WorldWideScience

Sample records for hot particle detection

  1. Hot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merwin, S.E.; Moeller, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensees are required to assess the dose to skin from a hot particle contamination event at a depth of skin of7mg/cm 2 over an area of 1 cm 2 and compare the value to the current dose limit for the skin. Although the resulting number is interesting from a comparative standpoint and can be used to predict local skin reactions, comparison of the number to existing limits based on uniform exposures is inappropriate. Most incidents that can be classified as overexposures based on this interpretation of dose actually have no effect on the health of the worker. As a result, resources are expended to reduce the likelihood that an overexposure event will occur when they could be directed toward eliminating the cause of the problem or enhancing existing programs such as contamination control. Furthermore, from a risk standpoint, this practice is not ALARA because some workers receive whole body doses in order to minimize the occurrence of hot particle skin contaminations. In this paper the authors suggest an alternative approach to controlling hot particle exposures

  2. 'Hot particle' intercomparison dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaurin, D.G.L.; Baum, J.W.; Charles, M.W.; Darley, D.P.J.; Durham, J.S.; Scannell, M.J.; Soares, C.G.

    1996-01-01

    Dosimetry measurements of four 'hot particles' were made at different density thickness values using five different methods. The hot particles had maximum dimensions of 650 μm and maximum beta energies of 0.97, 046, 0.36, and 0.32 MeV. Absorbers were used to obtain the dose at different depths for each dosimeter. Measurements were made using exoelectron dosimeters, an extrapolation chamber, NE Extremity Tape Dosimeters (tm), Eberline RO-2 and RO-2A survey meters, and two sets of GafChromic (tm) dye film with each set read out at a different institution. From these results the dose was calculated averaged over 1 cm 2 of tissue at 18, 70, 125, and 400 μm depth. Comparisons of tissue-dose averaged over 1 cm 2 for 18, 70, and 125 μm depth based on interpolated measured values, were within 30% for the GafChromic (tm) dye film, extrapolation chamber, NE Extremity Tape Dosimeters (tm), and Eberline RO-2 and 2A (tm) survey meters except for the hot particle with 0.46 MeV maximum beta energy. The results for this source showed differences of up to 60%. The extrapolation chamber and NE Extremity Tape dosimeters under-responded for measurements at 400 μm by about a factor of 2 compared with the GafChromic dye films for two hot particles with maximum beta energy of 0.32 and 0.36 MeV which each emitted two 100% 1 MeV photons per disintegration. Tissue doses determined using exoelectron dosimeters were a factor of 2 to 5 less than those determined using other dosimeters, possibly due to failures of the equipment. (author)

  3. Techniques employed for detection of hot particles in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillsbury, G D

    2007-01-01

    During the decommissioning of the Maine Yankee nuclear plant, several methods were developed and employed to survey for hot particles in the marine environment surrounding the site. The methods used and the sensitivities achieved in the search for environmentally dispersed particles during the various decommissioning activities performed are described in detail. Surveys were performed on dry soil, exposed marine sediment and submerged marine sediment. Survey techniques ranged from the use of the basic NaI detector coupled to a count rate meter to an intrinsic germanium detector deployed in a submarine housing coupled to a multi-channel analyser. The initial surveys consisted of collecting samples of marine sediment, spreading them out over a 1 m 2 surface in a thin layer, and scanning the deposited sediment by hand using a 5 cm by 5 cm NaI detector coupled to a standard count rate meter. This technique was later replaced by walkover scans with the 5 cm by 5 cm NaI detector moved in a serpentine pattern over the sediment surface. By coupling the detector to a 'smart meter', an alarm set point could be used to alert the surveyor to the presence of a particle within the instrument's field of view. A similar technique, with the detector mounted in a watertight housing secured to the end of a pole, was also employed to scan underwater locations. The most sensitive method developed for performing underwater surveys was the use of the intrinsic germanium detector placed in a submarine housing. Detailed descriptions of the methods employed and the results obtained are presented. This work demonstrates that there are several approaches to surveying for discrete particles in the marine environment and the relative merits of each are considered

  4. Particle detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.

    2000-01-01

    In this article G.Charpak presents the principles on which particle detection is based. Particle accelerators are becoming more and more powerful and require new detectors able to track the right particle in a huge flux of particles. The gigantic size of detectors in high energy physics is often due to the necessity of getting a long enough trajectory in a magnetic field in order to deduce from the curvature an accurate account of impulses in the reaction. (A.C.)

  5. Theory of hot particle stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Wong, H.V.; Tsang, K.T.

    1986-10-01

    The investigation of stabilization of hot particle drift reversed systems to low frequency modes has been extended to arbitrary hot beta, β/sub H/ for systems that have unfavorable field line curvature. We consider steep profile equilibria where the thickness of the pressure drop, Δ, is less than plasma radius, r/sub p/. The analysis describes layer modes which have mΔ/r/sub p/ 2/3. When robust stability conditions are fulfilled, the hot particles will have their axial bounce frequency less than their grad-B drift frequency. This allows for a low bounce frequency expansion to describe the axial dependence of the magnetic compressional response

  6. An ALARA-conscious hot particle control program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doolittle, W.W.; Bredvad, R.S.; Bevelacqua, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    In 1989 approximately twenty-five percent of the radiation dose received by the Point Beach Nuclear Plant (PBNP) Health Physics group was due to its hot particle control program. The Health Physics group initiated a review of the program with the objective of decreasing the dose expenditure for hot particle control while maintaining a high standard for hot particle detection and control. In this paper the methods and results of this evaluation are described. The components of the hot particle control program, rules of thumb, and radionuclide composition at PBNP are presented

  7. Application of the methods of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis for 'hot particles' detection in the human lungs formed as a result of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reva, Yu.P.; Portyanko, N.M.; Ivanov, A.S.; Chuchalin, A.G.

    1993-01-01

    The up-to-date approaches to 'hot particles' studying were applied in this investigation. A complex of morphological and physical-chemical methods make it possible to detect and identify the 'hot particles' in the autopsy material of the lungs from 2 males at the age 27 and 25, who participated in the liquidation of Chernobyl katastrophe consequences in 1986. The elemental and isotope content of these particles was the same as that of the 'hot particles' detected in the zone of the katstrophe. The results obtained make it possible to suppose that the 'hot particles' have been inhaled and existed for a long time in the human bodies. On the basis of these data we suppose that the 'hot particle' are the cause of respiratory and other systems disorders

  8. 'Hot' particles in the atmosphere (Vilnius, 1986)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lujanas, V.; Shpirkauskaite, N.

    1992-01-01

    After the Chernobyl accident in the atmosphere above Vilnius the alpha-and beta- 'hot' particles were discovered. The amount of particles and their size were measured by the alpha-radiography. After the exposition of nuclear plates the 'auroras' of the beta hot particles were of the size 0.37-22.2 μm. The change in time of the beta- 'hot' particles amount in the ground level air from the 25th of April to the 9th of May, 1986 was given. The amount of this particles deposited in the adult man respiratory tract was calculated. The energy of the discovered 8 'hot' alpha-particles ranged from 4.2 to 6.6 MeV. All the samples in which alpha- 'hot' particles found were taken in anticyclone conditions. (author). 1 tab., 1 ref

  9. Nuclear track radiography of 'hot' aerosol particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulyga, S.F.; Kievitskaja, A.I.; Kievets, M.K.; Lomonosova, E.M.; Zhuk, I.V.; Yaroshevich, O.I.; Perelygin, V.P.; Petrova, R.; Brandt, R.; Vater, P.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear track radiography was applied to identify aerosol 'hot' particles which contain elements of nuclear fuel and fallout after Chernobyl NPP accident. For the determination of the content of transuranium elements in radioactive aerosols the measurement of the α-activity of 'hot' particles by SSNTD was used in this work, as well as radiography of fission fragments formed as a result of the reactions (n,f) and (γ,f) in the irradiation of aerosol filters by thermal neutrons and high energy gamma quanta. The technique allowed the sizes and alpha-activity of 'hot' particles to be determined without extracting them from the filter, as well as the determination of the uranium content and its enrichment by 235 U, 239 Pu and 241 Pu isotopes. Sensitivity of determination of alpha activity by fission method is 5x10 -6 Bq per particle. The software for the system of image analysis was created. It ensured the identification of track clusters on an optical image of the SSNTD surface obtained through a video camera and the determination of size and activity of 'hot' particles

  10. Experimental approach to Chernobyl hot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tcherkezian, V.; Shkinev, V.; Khitrov, L.; Kolesov, G.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental approach to the investigation of Chernobyl hot particles and some results are presented in this study. Hot particles (HP) were picked out from soil samples collected during the 1986-1990 radiogeochemical expeditions in the contaminated zone (within 30 km of the Nuclear Power Plant). A number of hot particles were studied to estimate their contribution to the total activity, investigate their surface morphology and determine the size distribution. Hot particles contribution to the total activity in the 30 km zone was found to be not less than 65%. Investigation of HP element composition (by neutron activation analysis and EPMA) and radionuclide composition (direct alpha- and gamma-spectrometry, including determination of Pu and Am in Hp) revealed certain peculiarities of HP, collected in the vicinity of the damaged Nuclear Power Plant. Some particles were shown to contain uranium and fission products in proportion to one another, correlating with those in the partially burnt fuel, which proves their 'fuel' origin. Another part of the HP samples has revealed element fractionation as well as the presence of some terrestrial components. (Author)

  11. Nuclear track radiography of 'hot' aerosol particles

    CERN Document Server

    Boulyga, S F; Kievets, M K; Lomonosova, E M; Zhuk, I V; Yaroshevich, O I; Perelygin, V P; Petrova, R I; Brandt, R; Vater, P

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear track radiography was applied to identify aerosol 'hot' particles which contain elements of nuclear fuel and fallout after Chernobyl NPP accident. For the determination of the content of transuranium elements in radioactive aerosols the measurement of the alpha-activity of 'hot' particles by SSNTD was used in this work, as well as radiography of fission fragments formed as a result of the reactions (n,f) and (gamma,f) in the irradiation of aerosol filters by thermal neutrons and high energy gamma quanta. The technique allowed the sizes and alpha-activity of 'hot' particles to be determined without extracting them from the filter, as well as the determination of the uranium content and its enrichment by sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U, sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu and sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Pu isotopes. Sensitivity of determination of alpha activity by fission method is 5x10 sup - sup 6 Bq per particle. The software for the system of image analysis was created. It ensured the identification of track clusters on an optical imag...

  12. Automated contamination monitoring for hot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnstone, G.; Case, L.

    1987-01-01

    INS Corp., the largest nuclear laundry company in the United States, has recently developed two types of automated contamination monitoring systems: 1) the Automated Laundry Monitor (ALM), which provides quality assurance monitoring for protective clothing contamination and 2) a low-level automated monitoring system for Plastic Volume Reduction Service (PVRS). The presentation details the inaccuracies associated with hand-probe frisking which led to the development of the ALM. The ALM was designed for 100% quality assurance monitoring of garments to the most stringent customer requirements. A review of why the ALM is essential in verifying the absence of hot particles on garments is given. The final topic addresses the expansion of the ALM technology in support of the INS Plastic Volume Reduction Service by monitoring decontaminated plastics to free release levels. This presentation reviews the design and operation of both monitoring systems

  13. CR-39 α track detector and its application in observing of the hot particles in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Benchuan

    1992-01-01

    CR-39 α track detector is a new α remitting radionuclides plastic detector. It is audio-visual, convenient and economic in the detection of α particle track and the distribution of α emitting radionuclides in environmental samples. CR-39 α track detector is used to observe the hot particles in rock and the hot particles coming from the liquid effluents discharged by spent fuel reprocessing plant in UK in marine environment and got good results

  14. Single particle detecting telescope system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, I.; Tomiyama, T.; Iga, Y.; Komatsubara, T.; Kanada, M.; Yamashita, Y.; Wada, T.; Furukawa, S.

    1981-01-01

    We constructed the single particle detecting telescope system for detecting a fractionally charged particle. The telescope consists of position detecting counters, wall-less multi-cell chambers, single detecting circuits and microcomputer system as data I/0 processor. Especially, a frequency of double particle is compared the case of the single particle detecting with the case of an ordinary measurement

  15. The radiological significance of beta emitting hot particles released from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, W.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.; Martonen, T.B.

    1988-01-01

    In order to assess radiological hazards associated with inhalation of beta emitting hot particles detected in fall-out from the Chernobyl incident, radiation doses and lung cancer risk are calculated for a hot particle composed entirely of 103 Ru. Lung cancer risk estimates are based upon an initiation-promotion model of carcinogenesis. In the immediate vicinity of a hot particle, calculations indicate that doses may be extremely high, so that all cells are killed and no tumour will arise. At intermediate distances, however, the probability for lung cancer induction exhibits a distinct maximum. Risk enhancement factors, computed relative to a uniform radionuclide distribution of equal activity, are highest for intermediate activities and hot particles moving in the lung. While the risk from inhalation of 103 Ru hot particles might, indeed, exceed that from all other exposure pathways of the Chernobyl fall-out, it still lies within normal fluctuations of radon progeny induced lung cancer risk. (author)

  16. Approximate particle number projection in hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosov, D.S.; Vdovin, A.I.

    1995-01-01

    Heated finite systems like, e.g., hot atomic nuclei have to be described by the canonical partition function. But this is a quite difficult technical problem and, as a rule, the grand canonical partition function is used in the studies. As a result, some shortcomings of the theoretical description appear because of the thermal fluctuations of the number of particles. Moreover, in nuclei with pairing correlations the quantum number fluctuations are introduced by some approximate methods (e.g., by the standard BCS method). The exact particle number projection is very cumbersome and an approximate number projection method for T ≠ 0 basing on the formalism of thermo field dynamics is proposed. The idea of the Lipkin-Nogami method to perform any operator as a series in the number operator powers is used. The system of equations for the coefficients of this expansion is written and the solution of the system in the next approximation after the BCS one is obtained. The method which is of the 'projection after variation' type is applied to a degenerate single j-shell model. 14 refs., 1 tab

  17. Detection of Hot Halo Gets Theory Out of Hot Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    Scientists using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have detected an extensive halo of hot gas around a quiescent spiral galaxy. This discovery is evidence that galaxies like our Milky Way are still accumulating matter from the gradual inflow of intergalactic gas. "What we are likely witnessing here is the ongoing galaxy formation process," said Kristian Pedersen of the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and lead author of a report on the discovery. Chandra observations show that the hot halo extends more than 60,000 light years on either side of the disk of the galaxy known as NGC 5746. The detection of such a large halo alleviates a long-standing problem for the theory of galaxy formation. Spiral galaxies are thought to form from enormous clouds of intergalactic gas that collapse to form giant, spinning disks of stars and gas. Chandra X-ray Image of NGC 5746 Chandra X-ray Image of NGC 5746 One prediction of this theory is that large spiral galaxies should be immersed in halos of hot gas left over from the galaxy formation process. Hot gas has been detected around spiral galaxies in which vigorous star formation is ejecting matter from the galaxy, but until now hot halos due to infall of intergalactic matter have not been detected. "Our observations solve the mystery of the missing hot halos around spiral galaxies," said Pedersen. "The halos exist, but are so faint that an extremely sensitive telescope such as Chandra is needed to detect them." DSS Optical Image of NGC 5746 DSS Optical Image of NGC 5746 NGC 5746 is a massive spiral galaxy about a 100 million light years from Earth. Its disk of stars and gas is viewed almost edge-on. The galaxy shows no signs of unusual star formation, or energetic activity from its nuclear region, making it unlikely that the hot halo is produced by gas flowing out of the galaxy. "We targeted NGC 5746 because we thought its distance and orientation would give us the best chance to detect a hot halo caused by the infall of

  18. Hot particles in industrial waste and mining tailings

    CERN Document Server

    Selchau-Hansen, K; Freyer, K; Treutler, C; Enge, W

    1999-01-01

    Industrial waste was studied concerning its radioactive pollution. Using known properties of the solid state nuclear track detector CR-39 we found among a high concentration of more or less homogeneously distributed single alpha-tracks discrete spots of very high enrichments of alpha-particles created by so called hot particles. We will report about the alpha-activity, the concentration of hot particles and about their ability to be air borne.

  19. Spot Ignition of Natural Fuels by Hot Metal Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Urban, James Linwood

    2017-01-01

    The spot ignition of combustible material by hot metal particles is an important pathway by which wildland and urban spot fires and smolders are started. Upon impact with a fuel, such as dry grass, duff, or saw dust, these particles can initiate spot fires by direct flaming or smoldering which can transition to a flame. These particles can be produced by processes such as welding, powerline interactions, fragments from bullet impacts, abrasive cutting, and pyrotechnics. There is little publi...

  20. Atomic Particle Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1970-01-01

    This booklet tells how scientists observe the particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerges from an atomic nucleus. The equipment used falls into two general categories: counters which count each particle as it passes by, and track detectors, which make a photographic record of the particle's track.

  1. Do Chernobyl hot particles represent a public health hazard? (Biomedical and dosimetric aspects of hot particles)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Likhtarev, I; Repin, V; Bondarenko, O; Nechaev, S

    1994-12-31

    A model is developed to assess the risk of lung cancer from hot particle (HP) inhalation. It is based on linear dimensions of the lings parts, their histological structure, HP dose distribution radiobiological HP impact factors. The deposition probability of different aerosol size HP is estimated for various parts of human respiratory system. The epithelium on bronchial tree and the secretory cells in bronchial glands are identified as most sensitive to HP. A comparison of radiobiological effects of uniform and discrete radiation sources was carried out on culture of embryonic mouse fibroblasts. For doses up to 10{sup -3} Gy there is a good agreement between experimentally obtained HP-induced F and theoretical curves. As the dose increases the experimental value of F reaches a peak at 1 Gy which is not predicted theoretically. The coefficients of blast transformation induced by HP and by uniform radiation become equal at 3 Gy. Above 3 Gy the uniform radiation becomes 10 -10{sup 3} times more dangerous. It is concluded that local point-source irradiation by a HP is associated with 10 - 10{sup 3} times less risk of radiation-induced tumour than irradiation with the same activity idistributed diffusely. 27 figs., 13 tabs., 59 refs.

  2. Do Chernobyl hot particles represent a public health hazard? (Biomedical and dosimetric aspects of hot particles)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likhtarev, I.; Repin, V.; Bondarenko, O.; Nechaev, S.

    1993-01-01

    A model is developed to assess the risk of lung cancer from hot particle (HP) inhalation. It is based on linear dimensions of the lings parts, their histological structure, HP dose distribution radiobiological HP impact factors. The deposition probability of different aerosol size HP is estimated for various parts of human respiratory system. The epithelium on bronchial tree and the secretory cells in bronchial glands are identified as most sensitive to HP. A comparison of radiobiological effects of uniform and discrete radiation sources was carried out on culture of embryonic mouse fibroblasts. For doses up to 10 -3 Gy there is a good agreement between experimentally obtained HP-induced F and theoretical curves. As the dose increases the experimental value of F reaches a peak at 1 Gy which is not predicted theoretically. The coefficients of blast transformation induced by HP and by uniform radiation become equal at 3 Gy. Above 3 Gy the uniform radiation becomes 10 -10 3 times more dangerous. It is concluded that local point-source irradiation by a HP is associated with 10 - 10 3 times less risk of radiation-induced tumour than irradiation with the same activity idistributed diffusely. 27 figs., 13 tabs., 59 refs

  3. Nuclear track radiography of 'hot' aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulyga, S.F.; Kievitskaja, A.I.; Kievets, M.K.; Lomonosova, E.M.; Zhuk, I.V.; Yaroshevich, O.I.; Perelygin, V.P.; Petrova, R.; Brandt, R.; Vater, P

    1999-06-01

    Nuclear track radiography was applied to identify aerosol 'hot' particles which contain elements of nuclear fuel and fallout after Chernobyl NPP accident. For the determination of the content of transuranium elements in radioactive aerosols the measurement of the {alpha}-activity of 'hot' particles by SSNTD was used in this work, as well as radiography of fission fragments formed as a result of the reactions (n,f) and ({gamma},f) in the irradiation of aerosol filters by thermal neutrons and high energy gamma quanta. The technique allowed the sizes and alpha-activity of 'hot' particles to be determined without extracting them from the filter, as well as the determination of the uranium content and its enrichment by {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu isotopes. Sensitivity of determination of alpha activity by fission method is 5x10{sup -6} Bq per particle. The software for the system of image analysis was created. It ensured the identification of track clusters on an optical image of the SSNTD surface obtained through a video camera and the determination of size and activity of 'hot' particles00.

  4. Hot spots in nuclear and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelte, N.

    1981-01-01

    The aim of the present thesis was the study of the phenomenon of the pre-equilibrium process in nuclear and particle physics in the framework of the HS picture. From the comparison of the HS model with inclusive experiments of nuclear physics it could be concluded, that HS's can have an important portion of the pre-equilibrium spectrum. In reactions of hadrons and lighter nuclei with heavy target nuclei the dependence of the HS-induced spectrum from the target mass, the detector angle, the kinetic energy, and as far as data were available, from the kind of the emitted particle as function of the drift parameter, the maximal temperature, and the velocity could be indicated. For forward angles a qualitative to quantitative agreement with the studied data could by shown. For backward angles a quantitative agreement resulted which suggests the conclusion that this angular range is determined by the HS effect even about three orders of magnitude of the incident energy. (orig./HSI) [de

  5. Particle detection systems and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher L.; Makela, Mark F.

    2010-05-11

    Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons and neutrons. In one implementation, a particle detection system employs a plurality of drift cells, which can be for example sealed gas-filled drift tubes, arranged on sides of a volume to be scanned to track incoming and outgoing charged particles, such as cosmic ray-produced muons. The drift cells can include a neutron sensitive medium to enable concurrent counting of neutrons. The system can selectively detect devices or materials, such as iron, lead, gold, uranium, plutonium, and/or tungsten, occupying the volume from multiple scattering of the charged particles passing through the volume and can concurrently detect any unshielded neutron sources occupying the volume from neutrons emitted therefrom. If necessary, the drift cells can be used to also detect gamma rays. The system can be employed to inspect occupied vehicles at border crossings for nuclear threat objects.

  6. Calculating gamma dose factors for hot particle exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, P.

    1990-01-01

    For hot particle exposures to the skin, the beta component of radiation delivers the majority of the dose. However, in order to fully demonstrate regulatory compliance, licenses must ordinarily provide reasonable bases for assuming that both the gamma component of the skin dose and the whole body doses are negligible. While beta dose factors are commonly available in the literature, gamma dose factors are not. This paper describes in detail a method by which gamma skin dose factors may be calculated using the Specific Gamma-ray Constant, even if the particle is not located directly on the skin. Two common hot particle exposure geometries are considered: first, a single square centimeter of skin lying at density thickness of 7 mg/cm 2 and then at 1000 mg/cm 2 . A table provides example gamma dose factors for a number of isotopes encountered at power reactors

  7. Safety distance for preventing hot particle ignition of building insulation materials

    OpenAIRE

    Jiayun Song; Supan Wang; Haixiang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Trajectories of flying hot particles were predicted in this work, and the temperatures during the movement were also calculated. Once the particle temperature decreased to the critical temperature for a hot particle to ignite building insulation materials, which was predicted by hot-spot ignition theory, the distance particle traveled was determined as the minimum safety distance for preventing the ignition of building insulation materials by hot particles. The results showed that for sphere ...

  8. Detailed SEM-EPMA investigation of high specific radioactivity particles (hot particles)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burin, K.; Tsacheva, Ts.; Mandjoukov, I.; Mandjoukova, B.

    1993-01-01

    Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) spectra of a group of hot particles collected in Bulgaria after the Chernobyl accident have been obtained. A technique for hot particle localization is described. The object is irradiated for two days with a β source and the resulting autoradiographs show particles location precisely. High resolution x-ray spectrum of each particle has been obtained using EPMA. The distribution of chemical elements is visualized by colour dot maps representing the regions of interest of the spectrum. It is concluded that apart from reactor fuel the investigated hot particles come from either construction materials or materials used for the covering of the damaged reactor. 7 figs., 2 ref

  9. Mechanism of Corrosion of Activated Aluminum Particles by Hot Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razavi-Tousi, S.S.; Szpunar, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanism of corrosion in aluminum particles by hot water treatment for hydrogen generation is evaluated. The aluminum powder was activated by ball milling for different durations, which modified size and microstructure of the particles. Open circuit potential test was carried out to elucidate different stages of the reaction. Tafel test was used to explain the effect of ball milling and growth of hydroxide layer on corrosion of the particles. Surface, cross section and thickness of the grown hydroxide on the aluminum particles were studied in a scanning electron microscope. The corrosion potential of the aluminum powders depends on microstructure of the aluminum particles, growth of the hydroxide layer and a change in pH because of cathodic reactions. The hydrogen production test showed that a deformed microstructure and smaller particle size accelerates the corrosion rate of aluminum by hot water, the effect of the deformed microstructure being more significant at the beginning of the reaction. Effect of growth of the hydroxide layer on corrosion mechanism is discussed

  10. Gamma-spectrometric examination of hot particles emitted during the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balashazy, I.; Szabadine-Szende, G.; Loerinc, M.; Zombori, P.

    1987-05-01

    Ge(Li) gamma-spectrometric examination of hot particles prepared from air filtered dust of Budapest air after the Chernobyl accident is presented. The method of separating hot particles is described and their concentration in the air is determined. The radioactive isotope composition of hot particles is discussed and compared with that of dust samples. Finally, the inhalation probability and radiation burden of hot particles are evaluated. (author)

  11. Method to detect biological particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaever, I.

    1976-01-01

    A medical-diagnostic method to detect immunological as well as other specific reactions is described. According to the invention, first reactive particles (e.g. antibodies) are adsorbed on the surface of a solid, non-reactive substrate. The coated substrate is subjected to a solution which one assumes to contain the second biological particles (e.g. antigens) which are specific to the first and form complexes with these. A preferential radioactive labelling (e.g. with iodine 125) of the second biological particle is then directly or indirectly carried out. Clearage follows labelling in order to separate the second biological particles from the first ones. A specific splitting agent can selectively break the bond of both types of particle. The splitting agent solution is finally separated off and its content is investigated for the presence of labelling. (VJ) [de

  12. Acute skin lesions due to localized ''hot particle'' radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.; Carsten, A.L.; Kaurin, D.G.L.; Schaefer, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose of the studies was to determine incidence and severity of lesions resulting from localized deposition of dose to the skin from small ( 2 at 70μm depth) from isotopes having max beta particle energies from about 0.3-3 MeV. Incidence of erythema and scabs (indicating ulceration) were scored routinely for up to 71 days post-irradiation. Responses followed normal probability distributions, and thus, no true threshold could be defined. Ten and 50% incidence rates were deduced using probit analyses. Lowest dose producing 10% incidence was about 1 Gy for exposures to Yb-175 (0.5 MeV max energy) beta particles. Severity of lesions was estimated using diameters and persistence. From preliminary considerations of probability of induction, size, and persistence of acute lesions, a special limit for hot particle exposures in the range of 5-50 Gy may be reasonable, with an action level between about 1 Gy and the limit

  13. Effect of hot α-particles on ion cyclotron absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairns, R.A.; Kay, A.; Lashmore-Davies, C.N.

    1987-01-01

    Ion cyclotron heating involves mode conversion of the incident fast wave to a Bernstein mode, which is generally stongly damped and only propagates in a localized region of the plasma. The usual theoretical approach to this problem involves solution of fourth or higher order equations, but by treating the Bernstein mode as a driven response to the fast wave we obtain a simple second order equation. Comparison of its solutions with those of higher order equations shows that this approach gives good results. The same method can be used to consider the effect of a small population of hot α-particles on ion cyclotron heating, since it does away with the need for a small larmor radius expansion. The results indicate that a small concentration of α-particles can absorb a substantial fraction of the incident energy

  14. Hot-melt extrusion for enhanced delivery of drug particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Dave A; McConville, Jason T; Yang, Wei; Williams, Robert O; McGinity, James W

    2007-02-01

    With the recent advent of nanotechnology for pharmaceutical applications, drug particle engineering is the focus of increasing interest as a viable approach for overcoming solubility limitations of poorly water-soluble drugs. Although these particle engineering techniques have been proven successful for enhancing the dissolution properties of many poorly water-soluble drugs, there are limitations associated with them such as particle aggregation, morphological instability, and poor wettability. The aim of this study was to demonstrate a processing technique in which hot-melt extrusion (HME) is utilized to overcome these limitations. Micronized particles of amorphous itraconazole (ITZ) stabilized with PVP or HPMC were produced and subsequently melt extruded with poloxamer 407 and PEO 200 M to deaggregate and disperse the particles into the hydrophilic polymer matrix. Differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy were used to demonstrate that the HME process did not alter the properties of the micronized particles. Dissolution testing conducted at sink conditions revealed that the dissolution rate of the micronized particles was improved by HME due to particle deaggregation and enhanced wetting. Supersaturation dissolution testing demonstrated that the ITZ-HPMC micronized particle extrudates provided superior supersaturation of ITZ compared to the ITZ-PVP micronized particle extrudates. Supersaturation dissolution testing incorporating a pH change (from pH 1.2 to 6.8 at 2 h) revealed that neither micronized particle extrudate formulation significantly reduced the rate of ITZ precipitation from supersaturated solution once pH was increased. Moreover, the two extrudate formulations performed very similarly when only considering dissolution testing from just before pH adjustment through the duration of testing at neutral pH. From oral dosing of rats, it was determined that the two extrudate formulations performed similarly in

  15. Acoustic detection of melt particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costley, R.D. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Research Department at Sandia National Laboratories is investigating a type of Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). In this particular type of accident, core meltdown occurs while the pressure within the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is high. If one of the instrument tube penetrations in the lower head fails, melt particles stream through the cavity and into the containment vessel. This experiment, which simulates this type accident, was performed in the Surtsev Direct Heating Test Facility which is approximately a 1:10 linear scaling of a large dry containment volume. A 1:10 linear scale model of the reactor cavity was placed near the bottom of the Surtsey vessel so that the exit of the cavity was at the vertical centerline of the vessel. A pressure vessel used to create the simulated molten core debris was located at the scaled height of the RPV. In order to better understand how the melt leaves the cavity and streams into the containment an array of five acoustic sensors was placed directly in the path of the melt particles about 30 feet from the exit of the sealed cavity. Highly damped, broadband sensors were chosen to minimize ringing so that individual particle hits could be detected. The goal was to count the signals produced by the individual particle hits to get some idea of how the melt particles left the cavity. This document presents some of the results of the experiment. 9 figs

  16. Safety distance for preventing hot particle ignition of building insulation materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayun Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Trajectories of flying hot particles were predicted in this work, and the temperatures during the movement were also calculated. Once the particle temperature decreased to the critical temperature for a hot particle to ignite building insulation materials, which was predicted by hot-spot ignition theory, the distance particle traveled was determined as the minimum safety distance for preventing the ignition of building insulation materials by hot particles. The results showed that for sphere aluminum particles with the same initial velocities and diameters, the horizontal and vertical distances traveled by particles with higher initial temperatures were higher. Smaller particles traveled farther when other conditions were the same. The critical temperature for an aluminum particle to ignite rigid polyurethane foam increased rapidly with the decrease of particle diameter. The horizontal and vertical safety distances were closely related to the initial temperature, diameter and initial velocity of particles. These results could help update the safety provision of firework display.

  17. Detecting hot spots at hazardous-waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirschky, J.; Gilbert, R.O.

    1984-01-01

    Evaluating the need for remedial cleanup at a waste site involves both finding the average contaminant concentration and identifying highly contaminated areas, or hot spots. A nomographic procedure to determine the sample configuration needed to locate a hot spot is presented. The technique can be used to develop a waste-site sampling plant - to determine either the grid spacing required to detect a hot spot at a given level of confidence, or the probability of finding a hot spot of a certain size, given a particular grid spacing. The method and computer program (ELIPGRID) were developed for locating geologic deposits, but the basic procedure can also be used to detect hot spots at chemical- or nuclear-waste disposal sites. Nomographs based on the original program are presented for three sampling-grid configurations - square, rectangular and triangular

  18. Confocal (micro)-XRF for 3D analysis of elements distribution in hot environmental particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielewski, M.; Eriksson, M.; Himbert, J.; Simon, R.; Betti, M.; Hamilton, T.F.

    2007-01-01

    calculations. In figure 1 the distributions of Pu, Fe and Ti obtained for one of the studied hot particles are presented. The strongest signal was recorded for plutonium; the signals from iron and titanium are respectively 14 and 38 times less. It means that Pu is the most abundant of the observed elements. However, since the light elements are not detectable with the applied measurement conditions, it cannot be definitely stated if plutonium is the main element present in the sample. The isosurfaces are calculated at 20 % of maximum intensity for each element. Please note that the isosurfaces on the drawing are transparent. Changes in the spatial distribution of Pu, Fe, and Ti within the particle are shown in Fig. 2a, 2b, and 2c. Distinct elemental patterns are clearly visible at the higher concentration levels. The distributions of Cr, Cu, and Pb were also reconstructed but the results are not presented here. As it is shown in Fig. 1, the correlation between elements is good at low concentrations but the maxima of concentrations are not strongly correlated (see Fig. 2.). In general, the particle is inhomogeneous in terms of its elemental composition. Similar inhomogeneities were found for other particles with Pu identified as a major element in three of the six particles examined

  19. The radiation factor 'hot particles': origin, methods of investigation, characterization and risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonchev, Ts.; Vapirev, E.; Yanev, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The problem of hot particles (HP) is reviewed chronologically following published data. The term appeared in the 50-s when HP have been found in fallout as a result of nuclear explosions in the atmosphere. After the Chernobyl accident there is a growing interest in HP. In 1986 HP have been discovered in American nuclear power plants (NPP) and in 1992 some have been found at Kozloduy NPP in Bulgaria as well. Detection and collection methods and different approaches for HP investigation are discussed. The direct and indirect risks from HP are described. It is concluded that the problem deserves further investigation and the discovery of HP inside NPP is of special interest

  20. The radiation factor `hot particles`: origin, methods of investigation, characterization and risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonchev, Ts; Vapirev, E; Yanev, Y

    1994-12-31

    The problem of hot particles (HP) is reviewed chronologically following published data. The term appeared in the 50-s when HP have been found in fallout as a result of nuclear explosions in the atmosphere. After the Chernobyl accident there is a growing interest in HP. In 1986 HP have been discovered in American nuclear power plants (NPP) and in 1992 some have been found at Kozloduy NPP in Bulgaria as well. Detection and collection methods and different approaches for HP investigation are discussed. The direct and indirect risks from HP are described. It is concluded that the problem deserves further investigation and the discovery of HP inside NPP is of special interest.

  1. Estimation of the sizes of hot nuclear systems from particle-particle large angle kinematical correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Ville, J.L.; Bizard, G.; Durand, D.; Jin, G.M.; Rosato, E.

    1990-06-01

    Light fragment emission, when triggered by large transverse momentum protons shows specific kinematical correlations due to recoil effects of the excited emitting source. Such effects have been observed in azimuthal angular distributions of He-particles produced in collisions induced by 94 MeV/u 16 0 ions on Al, Ni and Au targets. A model calculation assuming a two-stage mechanism (formation and sequential decay of a hot source) gives a good description of these whole data. From this succesfull confrontation, it is possible to estimate the size of the emitting system

  2. α-particle radioactivity of hot particles from the Esk estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, E.I.

    1981-01-01

    Transuranium radionuclides (Pu, Am and Cm) present in effluents discharged into the north-east Irish Sea by British Nuclear Fuels Limited, Windscale, Cumbria, UK, are found in sediment and biota of the Esk estuary approximately 10 km to the south. The site of the present investigation was at Newbiggin and the materials examined were suspended particulate debris samples at the sea surface, bottom sediments and some forms of biota collected in September 1977. It is shown here that hot particles (defined as small volumes of material emitting α particles recorded in a dielectric detector as dense clusters of tracks from a common origin) found in the estuary are likely to be original effluent debris derived from the processing of Magnox uranium fuel elements and not formed in situ as a result of natural processes common to the estuary. (author)

  3. Hawking radiation of Dirac particles in the hot NUT-Kerr-Newman spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Hawking radiation of charged Dirac particles on the horizons of the hot NUT-Kerr-Newman spacetime is studied in this paper. To this end, we obtain the radial decoupled Dirac equation for the electron in the hot NUT-Kerr-Newman spacetime. Next we solve the Dirac equation near the horizons. Finally, by analytic continuation, the Hawking thermal spectrum formula of Dirac particles is obtained. The problem of the Hawking evaporation of Dirac particles in the hot NUT-Kerr-Newman background is thus solved. (orig.)

  4. A practical methodology of radiological protection for the reduction of hot particles in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez G, G.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this work, in general form, is to describe a practical method for reduction of hot particles generated as consequence of the operational activities of BWR nuclear reactors. This methodology provides a description of the localizations and/or probable activities of finding particles highly radioactive denominated hot particles. For this purpose it was developed a strategy based on the decontamination lineaments, as well as the manipulation, gathering, registration, contention, documentation, control and final disposition of the hot particles. In addition, some recommendations are reiterated and alternative, in order to gathering the hot particles in a dynamic way given to the activities of the personal occupationally exposed in highly radioactive areas. The structure of the methodology of hot particles is supported in the radiological controls based on the Code of Federal Regulation 10 CFR 20 as well as the applicable regulatory documents. It provides an idea based on administrative controls of radiological protection, in order to suggesting the responsibilities and necessary directing for the control of the hot particles required in nuclear plants of the BWR type. (author)

  5. Skin Dose Assessment by Hot Particles in Domestic Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Bo Yeol; Cho, Woon Kap; Lee, Jai Ki

    2009-01-01

    Since a contamination event by hot particles happened due to damaged nuclear fuel at a nuclear power plant (NPP) in the 1980's, skin exposure resulted from hot particles has gotten considerable attention from all the radiation workers in the nuclear industry. In particular, contamination incident caused by hot particles which happened at a NPP in Susquehanna proved that there existed hot particles with the radioactivity of 0.7 GBq, 0.78 GBq, and even 2.78 GBq at maximum. One of these particles was found on a worker's shoe and gave out a dose of 170 mSv. Although there has been no contamination event reported in domestic NPPs which are caused by hot particles, it is hard to conclude that there is no possibility of such contamination for radiation workers. The contaminated samples employed in this study were taken from local NPPs and supposes a case of a worker's skin contaminated by hot particles to evaluate the dose provided to the worker's skin

  6. Detecting hidden particles with MATHUSLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jared A.

    2018-03-01

    A hidden sector containing light long-lived particles provides a well-motivated place to find new physics. The recently proposed MATHUSLA experiment has the potential to be extremely sensitive to light particles originating from rare meson decays in the very long lifetime region. In this work, we illustrate this strength with the specific example of a light scalar mixed with the standard model-like Higgs boson, a model where MATHUSLA can further probe unexplored parameter space from exotic Higgs decays. Design augmentations should be considered in order to maximize the ability of MATHUSLA to discover very light hidden sector particles.

  7. [The interaction of soil micromycetes with "hot" particles in a model system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanova, N N; Lashko, T N; Redchits, T I; Vasilevskaia, A I; Borisiuk, L G; Siniavskaia, O I; Gavriliuk, V I; Muzalev, P N

    1991-01-01

    A model system which permits observing for a long time and fixing interaction of fungi with a radiation source has been created on the basis of an isolated "hot" particle, deficient mineral medium (saccharose content 60 mg/l) and suspension of fungal conidia. Five species (six strains) of micromycetes isolated from radionuclide-contaminated soils and fifteen "hot" particles have been tested. It has been found out for the first time that Cladosporium cladosporioides and Penicillium roseo-purpureum are able actively overgrow "hot" particles whose radioactivity did not exceed 3.1-1.0(-7) Ci by gamma-spectrum and to destroy them 50-150 days later. Certain changes in morphology of fungi-destructors of "hot" particles are revealed. A problem on ecological significance of the found phenomenon is discussed.

  8. Influence of complex particle emission on properties of giant dipole resonance of hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Wanxin; Jin Genming

    2003-01-01

    The possible reasons for the discrepancy between calculation results based on the statistical evaporation model and experimental data of giant dipole resonance of very hot nuclei are discussed. Both of simulations with the standard CASCADE code and the code coupling complex particle emission are carried out. It is shown that the complex particle emission affects the properties of giant dipole resonance of very hot nuclei

  9. Assessment of weathering and leaching rates of Thule hot particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, P. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark)); Outola, I. (STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland)); Nygren, U.; Ramebaeck, H. (FOI CBRN Defence and Security (Sweden)); Sidhu, R. (Institute of Energy Technology, Environmental Monitoring Section, Health and Safety Dept. (Norway))

    2010-03-15

    Within the current project a methodology for separating actinide particles originating from the Thule 1968 accident has been developed. Particles were completely isolated in water using visual and radiometric methods. The particles were attached electrostatic to a plastic support and could easily be moved to any container for leaching studies or other type of studies. Leaching and dissolution studies performed within the project indicate that some particles are relatively easily destroyed or leached while others are more refractory. The results shows that even though the oxide particles are hard to completely dissolve they release material even when exposed to weak solvents like water and salt solutions. Exposures to lung simulant fluids show relatively slow dissolution rates comparable to what is found using only water. Sequential extraction of particles shows that variation between particles is very large; some dissolve easily while some does not. Of radiological importance is the disruption of particles when exposed to dissolution. (author)

  10. Assessment of weathering and leaching rates of Thule hot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, P.; Outola, I.; Nygren, U.; Ramebaeck, H.; Sidhu, R.

    2010-03-01

    Within the current project a methodology for separating actinide particles originating from the Thule 1968 accident has been developed. Particles were completely isolated in water using visual and radiometric methods. The particles were attached electrostatic to a plastic support and could easily be moved to any container for leaching studies or other type of studies. Leaching and dissolution studies performed within the project indicate that some particles are relatively easily destroyed or leached while others are more refractory. The results shows that even though the oxide particles are hard to completely dissolve they release material even when exposed to weak solvents like water and salt solutions. Exposures to lung simulant fluids show relatively slow dissolution rates comparable to what is found using only water. Sequential extraction of particles shows that variation between particles is very large; some dissolve easily while some does not. Of radiological importance is the disruption of particles when exposed to dissolution. (author)

  11. Particle structure function and subbarrier fusion in hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Jing, K.X.; Phair, L.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1997-02-01

    The study of particle evaporation spectra can provide information about shape polarization phenomena induced by the nascent particle on the residual nucleus, and about optical modulations felt by the particle as it is preformed inside the nucleus. These aspects can be studied as a function temperature. Preliminary experimental evidence about these features has been obtained

  12. Particle detection from oriented nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wouters, J.; Moor, P. de; Schuurmans, P.; Severijns, N.; Vanderpoorten, W.; Vanneste, L.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is given of particle emission from nuclei that have been spin oriented by cryogenical means. Experiments and recent developments with detectors in the low temperature environment and their on-line application are reviewed. The most recent results are mentioned. Some phenomena to be unraveled in future studies are pointed out. (orig.)

  13. Auto-radiographical study of activity distribution of high-dispersity hot particles from NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonchev, Ts.; Andreev, Ts.; Todorov, N.; Andreev, P.; Kasabov, I.

    1995-01-01

    Autoradiograms of hot particles (HP) detected at Kozloduy NPP have been obtained with ordinary photographic film using direct contact. HP diameter and activity have been calculated by computer processing of the image.The distribution of HP weight and the precipitation time on surfaces has been estimated. Results on 37 HP found at the Kozloduy NPP units 1-4 and 9 HP found in special rooms containing waste are reported. The emitters are identified as 60 Co, 54 Mn and α emitters with specific activities 2.10 8 Bq/g, 2.10 7 Bq/g and 3.10 4 Bq/g respectively. 5 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Auto-radiographical study of activity distribution of high-dispersity hot particles from NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonchev, Ts [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Fizicheski Fakultet; Angelov, V [Civil Defence Administration, Sofia (Bulgaria); Andreev, Ts; Todorov, N [Kombinat Atomna Energetika, Kozloduj (Bulgaria); Andreev, P; Kasabov, I [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Fizicheski Fakultet

    1996-12-31

    Autoradiograms of hot particles (HP) detected at Kozloduy NPP have been obtained with ordinary photographic film using direct contact. HP diameter and activity have been calculated by computer processing of the image.The distribution of HP weight and the precipitation time on surfaces has been estimated. Results on 37 HP found at the Kozloduy NPP units 1-4 and 9 HP found in special rooms containing waste are reported. The emitters are identified as {sup 60} Co, {sup 54} Mn and {alpha} emitters with specific activities 2.10{sup 8} Bq/g, 2.10{sup 7} Bq/g and 3.10{sup 4} Bq/g respectively. 5 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. DETECTION OF WIDESPREAD HOT AMMONIA IN THE GALACTIC CENTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, E. A. C.; Morris, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    We present the detection of metastable inversion lines of ammonia (NH 3 ) from energy levels high above the ground state. We detect these lines in both emission and absorption toward 15 of 17 positions in the central 300 pc of the Galaxy. In total, we observe seven metastable transitions of NH 3 : (8, 8), (9, 9), (10, 10), (11, 11), (12, 12), (13, 13) and (15, 15), with energies (in Kelvins) ranging from 680 to 2200 K. We also mapped emission from NH 3 (8, 8) and (9, 9) in two clouds in the Sgr A complex (M-0.02–0.07 and M-0.13–0.08), and we find that the line emission is concentrated toward the dense centers of these molecular clouds. The rotational temperatures derived from the metastable lines toward M-0.02–0.07 and M-0.13–0.08 and an additional cloud (M0.25+0.01) range from 350 to 450 K. Similarly highly-excited lines of NH 3 have previously been observed toward Sgr B2, where gas with kinetic temperatures of ∼600 K had been inferred. Our observations show that the existence of a hot molecular gas component is not unique to Sgr B2, but rather appears common to many Galactic center molecular clouds. In M-0.02–0.07, we find that the hot NH 3 contributes ∼10% of the cloud's total NH 3 column density, and further, that the hot NH 3 in this cloud arises in gas which is extended or uniformly distributed on ∼>10 arcsec scales. We discuss the implications of these constraints upon the nature of this hot gas component. In addition to the detection of hot metastable NH 3 line emission, we also detect for the first time emission from nonmetastable inversion transitions of NH 3 in both M-0.02–0.07 and M-0.13–0.08

  16. Acoustic Particle Detection with the ANTARES Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Neff

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The (Antares Modules for Acoustic Detection Under the Sea AMADEUS system within the (Astronomy with a Neutrino Telescope and Abyss environmental RESsearch ANTARES neutrino telescope is designed to investigate detection techniques for acoustic signals produced by particle cascades. While passing through a liquid a cascade deposits energy and produces a measurable pressure pulse. This can be used for the detection of neutrinos with energies exceeding 1018 eV. The AMADEUS setup consists of 36 hydrophones grouped in six local clusters measuring about one cubic meter each. This article focuses on acoustic particle detection, the hardware of the AMADEUS detector and techniques used for acoustic signal processing.

  17. Acoustic Particle Detection with the ANTARES Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardt C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The (Antares Modules for Acoustic Detection Under the Sea AMADEUS system within the (Astronomy with a Neutrino Telescope and Abyss environmental RESsearch ANTARES neutrino telescope is designed to investigate detection techniques for acoustic signals produced by particle cascades. While passing through a liquid a cascade deposits energy and produces a measurable pressure pulse. This can be used for the detection of neutrinos with energies exceeding  eV. The AMADEUS setup consists of 36 hydrophones grouped in six local clusters measuring about one cubic meter each. This article focuses on acoustic particle detection, the hardware of the AMADEUS detector and techniques used for acoustic signal processing.

  18. Visualization study on hot particle-water interaction by using neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, K.; Hibiki, T.; Saito, Y.; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Sugimoto, Jun

    1999-01-01

    In relation to severe accident research of a nuclear reactor, an experiment was performed to simulate the premixing process in the vapor explosion by dropping hot stainless-steel particle into heavy water filled in a rectangular tank. The test rig consisted of a furnace and a rectangular tank (400 mm in height, 100 mm in width and 30 mm in depth) filled with heavy water kept at 4degC. The particle diameter used in the experiment were 6, 9 and 12 mm, and the initial temperature of the particle ranged from 600 to 1000degC. The behavior of gas dome generated by heated particle-subcooled water interaction was successfully visualized by high-frame-rate neutron radiography at the recording speed of 500 frames/s. Temporal and spatial variations of void fraction in the gas dome were measured by processing the images obtained. The void fraction measurement indicated the possibility that the ambient fluid was superheated by the hot particle-water contact and the vapor was generated in proportion to the particle size and temperature. Preliminary calculations of heat transfer from hot particle to water were conducted by using and empirical correlation for steady film boiling. Comparison between experimental and calculated results suggested that the transient heat transfer around the hot particle could not be explained only by steady film boiling but some other heat transfer mechanisms such as unsteady film boiling or hear transfer due to direct contact may be needed. (author)

  19. Alpha particles detection in nitrocellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero C, M.

    1976-01-01

    The method for the manufacturing of the detection films follows these steps: preparation of the mass which includes nitrocellulose in the form of cotton as raw material ethyl acetate, cellosolve acetate, isopropyl and butyl alcohols as solvents and dioctyl phtalate as plasticiser; dilution of the paste; pouring of the diluted mass; and drying of the detection films. The results obtained experimentally are: The determination of the development times of the different thicknesses of the manufactured films. Response linearity of the detectors, variation of the number of tracks according to the distance of the source to the detector. Sizes of the diameter of the tracks depending of the distance detector-alpha emmission source. As a conclusion we can say the the nitrocellulose detectors are specific for alpha radiation; the more effective thicknesses in uranium prospecting works were those of 60 microns, since for the laboratory works the thicknesses of 30 to 40 microns were the ideal; the development technique of the detection films is simple and cheap and can be realized even in another place than the laboratory; this way of the manufacturing of nitrocellulose detection film sensitive to alpha nuclear radiation is open to future research. (author)

  20. Assessment of radiation dose formation due to hot particles of Chernobyl origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demchuk, V.; Lutkovsky, V.; Bondarenko, O.

    1997-01-01

    The necessity to apply original data about the size and the activity distributions of hot particles has been arising at many post-Chernobyl research. Such researches include first of all (i) studying of migration processes at soil-water complexes, (ii) retrospective inhalation dose reconstruction for the population, and (iii) validation different scenarios of the Chernobyl accident deployment. Results of this research show that the fuel matrix in soil can be considered as constant with accuracy 20-30% for transuranic nuclides and major of long-living fission products. Temporal stability of hot particles at the natural environment gives a unique possibility to use the hot particle size distribution data and the soil contamination data for retrospective restoring of doses even 10 years later the Chernobyl accident. In present research the value of the integral of hot particle activity deposited into the lung was calculated using a standard inhalation model which takes into account the hot particle size distribution. This value normalised on the fallout density is equal to 0.55 Bq/(Bq.m -2 ) for areas nearby the Chernobyl NPP. (author)

  1. Particle production in hot and dense nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eklund, A.

    1992-08-01

    The charged particle production in heavy ion reactions at 200 A GeV has been studied for projectiles of 16 O and 32 S on targets of Al, Cu, Ag and Au. Up to 700 charged particles are measured in the pseudorapidity region -1.7 32 S+Au. The measured particle density is used to estimate the energy density attained in central collisions and gives a values of ≅2 GeV/fm 3 . This is close to the energy density predicted for the phase transition from hadronic matter to a quark-gluon plasma. To measure the large number of charged particle produced, finely granulated detector systems are employed. Streamer tube detectors with pad readout and large area, multi-step avalanche chambers with optical readout have been developed for the measurements. The widths of the pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles increase with decreasing centrality of the collision as well as with increasing mass of the target nucleus. This behaviour is assumed to be due to the target fragmentation. The Monte-Carlo model for nucleus-nucleus collisions, VENUS 3.11, which includes rescattering, is in reasonable agreement with the data. The yield of charged particles for central collisions of the heavy targets with 33 S is found to be proportional to the target mass, A, at target rapidity. At midrapidity it is approximately proportional to A 0.3 . At midrapidity the charged particle measurements are supplemented by measurements of the transverse energy. The dimensionless, normalized variances of the multiplicity and transverse energy distributions are, to a large extent, governed by the collision geometry. The change in the normalized variance when studying the charged particle distribution in a narrow angular region is explained as being of statistical nature. (au)

  2. Alpha-emitting 'hot particles' in the vicinity of BNFL Sellafield, Cumbria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittall, A.J.; Tossell, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    In a survey of environmental samples in the vicinity of BNFL Sellafield, two alpha-emitting radioactive particles were found in samples of grass. One particle appears to be of mineral origin, the other was not definitively identified, but may be a fragment of fuel cladding. Conservative estimates of the activities of these particles are very low. The abundance of radioactive particles in the terrestrial food chain appears to be low, with no evidence for any alpha-emitting hot particles in foodstuffs for consumption by humans. Results suggest that there is no significant dose to man through inhalation or ingestion pathways. (author)

  3. Hot particle dose calculations using the computer code VARSKIN Mod 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    The only calculational model recognised by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for hot particle dosimetry is VARSKIN Mod 1. Because the code was designed to calculate skin dose from distributed skin contamination and not hot particles, it is assumed that the particle has no thickness and, therefore, that no self-absorption occurs within the source material. For low energy beta particles such as those emitted from 60 Co, a significant amount of self-shielding occurs in hot particles and VARSKIN Mod 1 overestimates the skin dose. In addition, the presence of protective clothing, which will reduce the calculated skin dose for both high and low energy beta emitters, is not modelled in VARSKIN Mod 1. Finally, there is no provision in VARSKIN Mod 1 to calculate the gamma contribution to skin dose from radionuclides that emit both beta and gamma radiation. The computer code VARSKIN Mod 1 has been modified to model three-dimensional sources, insertion of layers of protective clothing between the source and skin, and gamma dose from appropriate radionuclides. The new code, VARSKIN Mod 2, is described and the sensitivity of the calculated dose to source geometry, diameter, thickness, density, and protective clothing thickness are discussed. Finally, doses calculated using VARSKIN Mod 2 are compared to doses measured from hot particles found in nuclear power plants. (author)

  4. A temperature dependent cyclic plasticity model for hot work tool steel including particle coarsening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilg, Andreas; Seifert, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    Hot work tools are subjected to complex thermal and mechanical loads during hot forming processes. Locally, the stresses can exceed the material's yield strength in highly loaded areas as e.g. in small radii in die cavities. To sustain the high loads, the hot forming tools are typically made of martensitic hot work steels. While temperatures for annealing of the tool steels usually lie in the range between 400 and 600 °C, the steels may experience even higher temperatures during hot forming, resulting in softening of the material due to coarsening of strengthening particles. In this paper, a temperature dependent cyclic plasticity model for the martensitic hot work tool steel 1.2367 (X38CrMoV5-3) is presented that includes softening due to particle coarsening and that can be applied in finite-element calculations to assess the effect of softening on the thermomechanical fatigue life of hot work tools. To this end, a kinetic model for the evolution of the mean size of secondary carbides based on Ostwald ripening is coupled with a cyclic plasticity model with kinematic hardening. Mechanism-based relations are developed to describe the dependency of the mechanical properties on carbide size and temperature. The material properties of the mechanical and kinetic model are determined on the basis of tempering hardness curves as well as monotonic and cyclic tests.

  5. Accounting for the self-absorption of betas in cobalt-60 hot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantz, M.W.; Steward, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports that the assumptions used dose calculations can be overly conservative for discrete hot particles (activated satellite chips and irradiated fuel fragments) due to self-absorption of betas within the particles. Using data from tests with a Co-60 hot particle, a model is developed to estimate the dose reduction factor afforded by self-absorption in a satellite chip with a known thickness. The model can be applied indirectly using ion chamber survey instrument readings (the thickness of the particle does not have to be measured). Tests with Co-60 particles found at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station verify that self-absorption is significant -- in one case, a dose reduction factor of 7 was measured in a satellite chip with a visible thickness

  6. Particle detection with superconducting tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jany, P.

    1990-08-01

    At the Institute of Experimental Nuclear Physics of the University of Karlsruhe (TH) and at the Institute for Nuclear Physics of the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe we started to produce superconducting tunnel junctions and to investigate them for their suitability as particle detectors. The required facilities for the production of tunnel junctions and the experimental equipments to carry out experiments with them were erected. Experiments are presented in which radiations of different kinds of particles could successfully be measured with the tunnel junctions produced. At first we succeeded in detectioning light pulses of a laser. In experiments with alpha-particles of an energy of 4,6 MeV the alpha-particles were detected with an energy resolution of 1,1%, and it was shown in specific experiments that the phonons originating from the deposition of energy by an alpha-particle in the substrate can be detected with superconducting tunnel junctions at the surface. On that occasion it turned out that the signals could be separated with respect to their point of origin (tunnel junction, contact leads, substrate). Finally X-rays with an energy of 6 keV were detected with an energy resolution of 8% in a test arrangement that makes use of the so-called trapping effect to read out a larger absorber volume. (orig.) [de

  7. Hot beta particles in the lung: Results from dogs exposed to fission product radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, F.F.; Griffith, W.C.; Hobbs, C.H. [and others

    1995-12-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident resulted in the release of uranium dioxide fuel and fission product radionuclides into the environment with the fallout of respirable, highly radioactive particles that have been termed {open_quotes}hot beta particles.{close_quotes} There is concern that these hot beta particles (containing an average of 150-20,000 Bq/particle), when inhaled and deposited in the lung, may present an extraordinary hazard for the induction of lung cancer. We reviewed data from a group of studies in dogs exposed to different quantities of beta-emitting radionuclides with varied physical half-lives to determine if those that inhaled hot beta particles were at unusual risk for lung cancer. This analysis indicates that the average dose to the lung is adequate to predict biologic effects of lung cancer for inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides in the range of 5-50 Gy to the lung and with particle activities in the range of 0.10-50 Bq/particle.

  8. When hot particles are not on the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabot, G.E.; Skrable, K.W.; French, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper a beta point source dose distribution function, cast in a form similar to that use in describing transmission of photons from point isotropic sources, is presented. The use of an apparent dose buildup factor and an effective value of the mass stopping power for beta distribution in the medium of interest allow the function to be applied in situations where the point source is in contact with the skin or separated from the skin by air or other energy absorbing materials. Example calculations are presented for a Co-60 particle on the skin (and compared to other methods) and for a Co-60 particle on protective clothing that is separated from the skin by an air gap

  9. Effects of radioactive hot particles on pig skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaurin, D.G.; Baum, J.W.; Schaefer, C.W. [and others

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of these studies was to determine the incidence and severity of lesions resulting from very localized deposition of dose to skin from small (< 0.5 mm) discrete radioactive particles as produced in the work environments of nuclear reactors. Hanford mini-pigs were exposed, both on a slightly off the skin, to localized replicate doses from 0.31 to 64 Gy (averaged over 1 cm{sup 2} at 70 {mu}m depth unless noted otherwise) using Sc-46, Yb-175, Tm-170, and fissioned UC{sub 2} isotopes having maximum beta-particle energies from about 0.3 to 3 MeV. Erythema and scabs (indicating ulceration) were scored for up to 71 days post-irradiation. The responses followed normal cumulative probability distributions, and therefore, no true threshold could be defined. Hence, 10 and 50% scab incidence rates were deduced using probit analyses. The lowest dose which produced 10% incidence was about 1 Gy for Yb-175 (0.5 MeV maximum energy) beta particle exposures, and about 3 to 9 Gy for other isotopes. The histopathology of lesions was determined at several doses. Single exposures to doses as large as 1,790 Gy were also given, and results were observed for up to 144 days post-exposure. Severity of detriment was estimated by analyzing the results in terms of lesion diameter, persistence, and infection. Over 1,100 sites were exposed. Only two exposed sites became infected after doses near 5000 Gy; the lesions healed quickly on treatment. 105 refs., 145 figs., 47 tabs.

  10. Effects of radioactive hot particles on pig skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaurin, D.G.; Baum, J.W.; Schaefer, C.W.

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of these studies was to determine the incidence and severity of lesions resulting from very localized deposition of dose to skin from small ( 2 at 70 μm depth unless noted otherwise) using Sc-46, Yb-175, Tm-170, and fissioned UC 2 isotopes having maximum beta-particle energies from about 0.3 to 3 MeV. Erythema and scabs (indicating ulceration) were scored for up to 71 days post-irradiation. The responses followed normal cumulative probability distributions, and therefore, no true threshold could be defined. Hence, 10 and 50% scab incidence rates were deduced using probit analyses. The lowest dose which produced 10% incidence was about 1 Gy for Yb-175 (0.5 MeV maximum energy) beta particle exposures, and about 3 to 9 Gy for other isotopes. The histopathology of lesions was determined at several doses. Single exposures to doses as large as 1,790 Gy were also given, and results were observed for up to 144 days post-exposure. Severity of detriment was estimated by analyzing the results in terms of lesion diameter, persistence, and infection. Over 1,100 sites were exposed. Only two exposed sites became infected after doses near 5000 Gy; the lesions healed quickly on treatment. 105 refs., 145 figs., 47 tabs

  11. Point kernel technique for calculating dose rates due to cobalt-60 hot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornhill, M.J.; McCarthy, J.T.; Morrissette, R.R.; Leach, B.N.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a computer code called BETA that has been developed by health physicists at the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station which accounts for the mass and size of hot particles of Cobalt-60, and therefore corrects the Loevinger-based dose calculation for self-absorption

  12. Handbook of particle detection and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Buvat, Irène

    2012-01-01

    The handbook centers on detection techniques in the field of particle physics, medical imaging and related subjects. It is structured into three parts. The first one is dealing with basic ideas of particle detectors, followed by applications of these devices in high energy physics and other fields. In the last part the large field of medical imaging using similar detection techniques is described. The different chapters of the book are written by world experts in their field. Clear instructions on the detection techniques and principles in terms of relevant operation parameters for scientists and graduate students are given.Detailed tables and diagrams will make this a very useful handbook for the application of these techniques in many different fields like physics, medicine, biology and other areas of natural science.

  13. Biosensing Using Magnetic Particle Detection Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ting Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic particles are widely used as signal labels in a variety of biological sensing applications, such as molecular detection and related strategies that rely on ligand-receptor binding. In this review, we explore the fundamental concepts involved in designing magnetic particles for biosensing applications and the techniques used to detect them. First, we briefly describe the magnetic properties that are important for bio-sensing applications and highlight the associated key parameters (such as the starting materials, size, functionalization methods, and bio-conjugation strategies. Subsequently, we focus on magnetic sensing applications that utilize several types of magnetic detection techniques: spintronic sensors, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR sensors, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs, sensors based on the atomic magnetometer (AM, and others. From the studies reported, we note that the size of the MPs is one of the most important factors in choosing a sensing technique.

  14. Handbook of particle detection and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grupen, Claus [Siegen Univ. (Germany). Fachbereich 7 - Physik; Buvat, Irene (eds.) [Paris 7 et 11 Univ., Orsay (France). IMNC-UMR 8165 CNRS

    2012-07-01

    The handbook centers on detection techniques in the field of particle physics, medical imaging and related subjects. It is structured into three parts. The first one is dealing with basic ideas of particle detectors, followed by applications of these devices in high energy physics and other fields. In the last part the large field of medical imaging using similar detection techniques is described. The different chapters of the book are written by world experts in their field. Clear instructions on the detection techniques and principles in terms of relevant operation parameters for scientists and graduate students are given. Detailed tables and diagrams will make this a very useful handbook for the application of these techniques in many different fields like physics, medicine, biology and other areas of natural science. (orig.)

  15. Solubility of hot fuel particles from Chernobyl--influencing parameters for individual radiation dose calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garger, Evgenii K; Meisenberg, Oliver; Odintsov, Oleksiy; Shynkarenko, Viktor; Tschiersch, Jochen

    2013-10-15

    Nuclear fuel particles of Chernobyl origin are carriers of increased radioactivity (hot particles) and are still present in the atmosphere of the Chernobyl exclusion zone. Workers in the zone may inhale these particles, which makes assessment necessary. The residence time in the lungs and the transfer in the blood of the inhaled radionuclides are crucial for inhalation dose assessment. Therefore, the dissolution of several kinds of nuclear fuel particles from air filters sampled in the Chernobyl exclusion zone was studied. For this purpose filter fragments with hot particles were submersed in simulated lung fluids (SLFs). The activities of the radionuclides (137)Cs, (90)Sr, (239+240)Pu and (241)Am were measured in the SLF and in the residuum of the fragments by radiometric methods after chemical treatment. Soluble fractions as well as dissolution rates of the nuclides were determined. The influence of the genesis of the hot particles, represented by the (137)Cs/(239+240)Pu ratio, on the availability of (137)Cs was demonstrated, whereas the dissolution of (90)Sr, (239+240)Pu and (241)Am proved to be independent of genesis. No difference in the dissolution of (137)Cs and (239+240)Pu was observed for the two applied types of SLF. Increased solubility was found for smaller hot particles. A two-component exponential model was used to describe the dissolution of the nuclides as a function of time. The results were applied for determining individual inhalation dose coefficients for the workers at the Chernobyl construction site. Greater dose coefficients for the respiratory tract and smaller coefficients for the other organs were calculated (compared to ICRP default values). The effective doses were in general lower for the considered radionuclides, for (241)Am even by one order of magnitude. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Research and systematization of 'hot' particles in the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site soils - methodology and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorlachev, I.D.; Knyazev, B.B.; Kvochkina, T.N.; Lukashenko, S.N.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Sources of soil activity in Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) could be both 'hot' particles dimensions from tens microns to units millimeters and sub-microns particles determining a matrix activity of soil samples. The fractionating of radionuclides and formation of 'hot' particles radionuclide composition arose from temperature changes and complicated nuclear-physical and thermodynamics processes occurring in a fire ball and cloud of nuclear explosion. Knowledge of 'hot' particles physical-chemical properties is needed for evaluation of radioactive products migration in the environment and danger level of the people external and internal exposure. Moreover, minute information about the structure and compound of 'radioactive' particles can be useful for specification of processes occurring in a fiery sphere when conducting explosions of different phylum and also for specification of radioactive fallout forming mechanism. The main polluted spots of SNTS could be divided into the four the species depending on nuclear explosion phylum. Species of radionuclide and their distribution for the different nuclear explosions are able to differ considerably. Therefore, several most typical areas for the each phylum test were selected and twenty soil samples were collected to reveal their radionuclide pollution peculiarities. Collected soil samples were separated into the five granulometric fractions: 1 mm - 2 mm, 0.5 mm - 1 mm. 0.28 mm-0.5 mm, 0.112 mm - 0.28 mm and 1 mm), 210 'hot' particles of second fraction (1>f>0.5 mm) and 154 'hot' particles of third fraction (0.5>f>0.28 mm) have been selection from the twelve SNTS soil samples by the compelled fission and visual identification methods. Main sources of soil samples and 'hot' particles activities are 239+240 Pu, 241 Am, 137 Cs and 152 Eu isotopes.In addition to the described works the special sampling of large 'hot' particles (dimension more than 2 mm) was carried out in areas of the ground and air tests

  17. Surface crack detection by magnetic particle inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebbels, K.

    1988-01-01

    For ferromagnetic materials magnetic particle inspection is without doubt the most sensitive method to detect surface cracks and the least sensitive method referring to disturbing boundary conditions. Up to now the technique is based on experiments, experience, on empirical facts and on a subjective evaluation. This contribution for the first time presents a concept which allows the objective, reproducible as well as reliable magnetic particle inspection: Modelling of testing based on Maxwell's equations by finite element calculation; objective setting of test-parameters and their surveillance, handling systems, illumination and sensors, image processing and fully automated evaluation. Economy and safety of magnetic particle inspection are strongly improved by this procedure. (orig./HP) [de

  18. Proton beam shaped by “particle lens” formed by laser-driven hot electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, S. H.; Shen, B. F.; Wang, W. P.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, L. G.; Huang, S.; Xu, Z. Z.; He, S. K.; Lu, F.; Zhang, F. Q.; Deng, Z. G.; Dong, K. G.; Wang, S. Y.; Zhou, K. N.; Xie, N.; Wang, X. D.; Liu, H. J.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhang, B. H.

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional tailoring of a proton beam is realized by a “particle lens” in our experiment. A large quantity of electrons, generated by an intense femtosecond laser irradiating a polymer target, produces an electric field strong enough to change the trajectory and distribution of energetic protons flying through the electron area. The experiment shows that a strip pattern of the proton beam appears when hot electrons initially converge inside the plastic plate. Then the shape of the proton beam changes to a “fountain-like” pattern when these hot electrons diffuse after propagating a distance.

  19. Picosecond optical shutter for particle detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, B.; Gee, C.M.; Shapiro, G.

    1975-04-01

    Characteristics of an optical shutter utilizing Kerr effect induced by picosecond laser pulses in carbon disulfide are studied experimentally. The shutter has a gate time of 4.5 to 5 ps full width at half-maximum and a transmission of approximately 15 percent at a wavelength 0.53 μm. Such an ultrafast shutter can be used as an optical signal gate in a sampling detection scheme that has picosecond time-resolution. The picosecond optical detection scheme is envisioned to have applications in experimental high-energy physics such as to time-resolve ultrashort Cherenkov or synchrotron radiation emitted by relativistic particles. Methods of synchronizing a laser-activated Kerr shutter with a particle accelerator or synchrotron are discussed

  20. The origin, composition and distribution of 'hot particles' derived from the nuclear industry and dispersed in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, E.I.; Clifton, R.J.

    1987-10-01

    Today, recent sediments of the Esk estuary, Cumbria, contain few hot particles derived from BNF compared with those deposited during peak releases of 1972-74. Overall the hot particles account for about 10% of the total alpha particle activity of the sediments. At some horizons, in buried sediments, concentrations of hot particles probably represent rapid transport on the sea surface under conditions of minimum erosion. Similar particles, usually less well defined, occur in accreting sediments but are corroded. Representative types of the most radioactive particles have been isolated and contain Pu, Am and Cm but only trace amounts of naturally occuring alpha emitters. Microprobe analysis of these particles often shows the presence of fairly pure uranium as the major element. On the basis of radioactivity and elemental composition many of these particles appear to be irradiated nuclear fuel debris. (author)

  1. Processes of conversion of a hot metal particle into aerogel through clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, B. M., E-mail: bmsmirnov@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    Processes are considered for conversion into a fractal structure of a hot metal micron-size particle that is located in a buffer gas or a gas flow and is heated by an external electric or electromagnetic source or by a plasma. The parameter of this heating is the particle temperature, which is the same in the entire particle volume because of its small size and high conductivity. Three processes determine the particle heat balance: particle radiation, evaporation of metal atoms from the particle surface, and heat transport to the surrounding gas due to its thermal conductivity. The particle heat balance is analyzed based on these processes, which are analogous to those for bulk metals with the small particle size, and its high temperature taken into account. Outside the particle, where the gas temperature is lower than on its surface, the formed metal vapor in a buffer gas flow is converted into clusters. Clusters grow as a result of coagulation until they become liquid, and then clusters form fractal aggregates if they are removed form the gas flow. Subsequently, associations of fractal aggregates join into a fractal structure. The rate of this process increases in medium electric fields, and the formed fractal structure has features of aerogels and fractal fibers. As a result of a chain of the above processes, a porous metal film may be manufactured for use as a filter or catalyst for gas flows.

  2. Meta-material for nuclear particle detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, V.; Salvato, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Cirillo, M.; Scherillo, A.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Vannozzi, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2017-02-01

    Superconducting strips coated with boron were engineered with a view to subnuclear particle detection. Combining the characteristics of boron as a generator of α-particles (as a consequence of neutron absorption) and the ability of superconducting strips to act as resistive switches, it is shown that fabricated Nb-boron and NbN-boron strips represent a promising basis for implementing neutron detection devices. In particular, the superconducting transition of boron-coated NbN strips generates voltage outputs of the order of a few volts thanks to the relatively higher normal state resitivity of NbN with respect to Nb. This result, combined with the relatively high transition temperature of NbN (of the order of 16 K for the bulk material), is an appealing prospect for future developments. The coated strips are meta-devices since their constituting material does not exist in nature and it is engineered to accomplish a specific task, i.e. generate an output voltage signal upon α-particle irradiation.

  3. Protective clothing and hot particle control: EPRI workshop gives the issues an airing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    A recent workshop organized by the Electric Power Research Institute on Protective Clothing Topics and Hot Particle Control brought together working-level engineers, industry experts and vendors. Ideas arising from the accident recovery efforts at Three Mile Island were exchanged. Among the topics discussed were the role of fabric colour in the retention of radionuclides, modesty garments, laundering of protective clothing and worker heat stress. (author)

  4. Hot plasma and energetic particles in the earth's outer magnetosphere: new understandings during the IMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.N.; Fritz, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper we review the major accomplishments made during the IMS period in clarifying magnetospheric particle variations in the region from roughly geostationary orbit altitudes into the deep magnetotail. We divide our review into three topic areas: (1) acceleration processes; (2) transport processes; and (3) loss processes. Many of the changes in hot plasmas and energetic particle populations are often found to be related intimately to geomagnetic storm and magnetospheric substorm effects and, therefore, substantial emphasis is given to these aspects of particle variations in this review. The IMS data, taken as a body, allow a reasonably unified view as one traces magnetospheric particles from their acceleration source through the plasma sheet and outer trapping regions and, finally, to their loss via ionospheric precipitation and ring current formation processes. It is this underlying, unifying theme which is pursued here. 52 references, 19 figures

  5. Characteristics of 'hot particles' from the Chernobyl radioactive fallout and some comments on the relevant radiological risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaracz, P.; Mirowski, S.; Piasecki, E.; Wilhelmi, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Paper reviews some radiative characteristics of 'hot particles' (HP) - a particulate fraction of the Chernobyl fallout. The work is based mostly on results of HP investigations of the Warsaw group. A classification of hot particles in their γ activity contents as well as some suggestions about possible mechanisms of their formation are provided. A comparison between activities of the Chernobyl hot particles and the ones from nuclear weapon tests of the early 60-ties is made. Some comments on health detriment caused by HPs are included. (author)

  6. New data on the self-absorption of betas in cobalt-60 hot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantz, M.W.; Steward, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    The authors demonstrated that standard dose calculation methods for hot particles could seriously overestimate the beta dose rate component to skin. The reason-self-absorption within an activated satellite particle that has a finite thickness can lead to dramatic reductions in beta output, as compared to that predicted by calculation models that assume the particle has zero thickness. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the self-absorption effect with a particle model and confirmed it with measurements on two high-activity Co-60 particles found at the Palo Verde Nuclear Power Station. The authors then described a method for using an Eberline RO-2 ion chamber survey instrument to estimate the beta dose rate reduction related to self-absorption within a particle. This method relied on the comparison of the uncorrected beta/gamma ratio [(open window-closed window) divided-by closed window] for a particle expected of exhibiting self-absorption to the ratio obtained for a particle of zero thickness

  7. Hot spot detection for breast cancer in Ki-67 stained slides: image dependent filtering approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, M. Khalid Khan; Downs-Kelly, Erinn; Gurcan, Metin N.

    2014-03-01

    We present a new method to detect hot spots from breast cancer slides stained for Ki67 expression. It is common practice to use centroid of a nucleus as a surrogate representation of a cell. This often requires the detection of individual nuclei. Once all the nuclei are detected, the hot spots are detected by clustering the centroids. For large size images, nuclei detection is computationally demanding. Instead of detecting the individual nuclei and treating hot spot detection as a clustering problem, we considered hot spot detection as an image filtering problem where positively stained pixels are used to detect hot spots in breast cancer images. The method first segments the Ki-67 positive pixels using the visually meaningful segmentation (VMS) method that we developed earlier. Then, it automatically generates an image dependent filter to generate a density map from the segmented image. The smoothness of the density image simplifies the detection of local maxima. The number of local maxima directly corresponds to the number of hot spots in the breast cancer image. The method was tested on 23 different regions of interest images extracted from 10 different breast cancer slides stained with Ki67. To determine the intra-reader variability, each image was annotated twice for hot spots by a boardcertified pathologist with a two-week interval in between her two readings. A computer-generated hot spot region was considered a true-positive if it agrees with either one of the two annotation sets provided by the pathologist. While the intra-reader variability was 57%, our proposed method can correctly detect hot spots with 81% precision.

  8. Deposition and detection of particles during integrated circuit manufacturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wali, F.; Knotter, D. Martin; Kelly, John J.; Kuper, F.G.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract—Deposition mechanism of silica particles on silicon wafers was investigated by depositing specially prepared mono-dispersed particles (mean diameter = 330 nm). To measure particles of the size below the detection limit of our particle measurement tools, silica particles with luminance core

  9. Ionizing particle detection based on phononic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, Arafa H., E-mail: arafa16@yahoo.com, E-mail: arafa.hussien@science.bsu.edu.eg; Mehaney, Ahmed; Eissa, Mostafa F. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef (Egypt)

    2015-08-14

    Most conventional radiation detectors are based on electronic or photon collections. In this work, we introduce a new and novel type of ionizing particle detector based on phonon collection. Helium ion radiation treats tumors with better precision. There are nine known isotopes of helium, but only helium-3 and helium-4 are stable. Helium-4 is formed in fusion reactor technology and in enormous quantities during Big Bang nucleo-synthesis. In this study, we introduce a technique for helium-4 ion detection (sensing) based on the innovative properties of the new composite materials known as phononic crystals (PnCs). PnCs can provide an easy and cheap technique for ion detection compared with conventional methods. PnC structures commonly consist of a periodic array of two or more materials with different elastic properties. The two materials are polymethyl-methacrylate and polyethylene polymers. The calculations showed that the energies lost to target phonons are maximized at 1 keV helium-4 ion energy. There is a correlation between the total phonon energies and the transmittance of PnC structures. The maximum transmission for phonons due to the passage of helium-4 ions was found in the case of making polyethylene as a first layer in the PnC structure. Therefore, the concept of ion detection based on PnC structure is achievable.

  10. Reassessment of data used in setting exposure limits for hot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.; Kaurin, D.G.

    1991-05-01

    A critical review and a reassessment of data reviewed in NCRP Report 106 on effects of ''hot particles'' on the skin of pigs, monkeys, and humans were made. Our analysis of the data of Forbes and Mikhail on effects from activated UC 2 particles, ranging in diameter from 144 μm to 328 μm, led to the formulation of a new model for prediction of both the threshold for acute ulceration and for ulcer diameter. A dose of 27 Gy at a depth of 1.33 mm in tissue in this model will result in an acute ulcer with a diameter determined by the radius over which this dose (at 1.33-mm depth) extends. Application of the model to the Forbes-Mikhail data yielded a ''threshold'' (5% probability) of 6 x 10 9 beta particles from a point source on skin of mixed fission product beta particles, or about 10 10 beta particles from Sr--Y-90, since few of the Sr-90 beta particles reach this depth. The data of Hopewell et al. for their 1 mm Sr-Y-90 exposures were also analyzed with the above model and yielded a predicted threshold of 2 x 10 10 Sr-Y-90 beta particles for a point source on skin. Dosimetry values were employed in this latter analysis that are 3.3 times higher than previously reported for this source. An alternate interpretation of the Forbes and Mikhail data, derived from linear plots of the data, is that the threshold depends strongly on particle size with the smaller particles yielding a much lower threshold and smaller minimum size ulcer. Additional animal exposures are planned to distinguish between the above explanations. 17 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Study of the magnetic compressional mode in a hot particle plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotler, D.P.; Berk, H.L.; Engquist, M.G.

    1985-09-01

    The integral equation for the magnetic compressional mode, accounting for geometrical effects along the field line and using the eikonal approximation across the field line, is solved numerically for the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. These results reproduce the analytic estimates when there is strong drift reversal. For typical EBT-S parameters, instability is observed for all pressure scale lengths just below those needed for drift reversal, i.e., vertical bar Rpar. delta(P/sub c/ + P/sub perpendicular h/)/2B 2 par. deltar vertical bar > 1 (where P is the particle pressure, c and h refer to cold and hot components, B is the midplane magnetic field, and R is the midplane radius of curvature). If larger core densities are present, a wave-particle resonance arises when the particle drifts are not reversed, causing instability up to much larger pressure scale lengths. Stability for all values of the ratio of hot electron density to core density is obtained with vertical bar Rpar. deltaP/sub c//B 2 par. deltar vertical bar > 1 + P/sub parallel h//P/sub perpendicular h/

  12. Source apportionment of aerosol particles at a European air pollution hot spot using particle number size distributions and chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoni, Cecilia; Pokorná, Petra; Hovorka, Jan; Masiol, Mauro; Topinka, Jan; Zhao, Yongjing; Křůmal, Kamil; Cliff, Steven; Mikuška, Pavel; Hopke, Philip K

    2018-03-01

    Ostrava in the Moravian-Silesian region (Czech Republic) is a European air pollution hot spot for airborne particulate matter (PM), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and ultrafine particles (UFPs). Air pollution source apportionment is essential for implementation of successful abatement strategies. UFPs or nanoparticles of diameter hot-spot including nanoparticles, Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was applied to highly time resolved particle number size distributions (NSD, 14 nm-10 μm) and PM 0.09-1.15 chemical composition. Diurnal patterns, meteorological variables, gaseous pollutants, organic markers, and associations between the NSD factors and chemical composition factors were used to identify the pollution sources. The PMF on the NSD reveals two factors in the ultrafine size range: industrial UFPs (28%, number mode diameter - NMD 45 nm), industrial/fresh road traffic nanoparticles (26%, NMD 26 nm); three factors in the accumulation size range: urban background (24%, NMD 93 nm), coal burning (14%, volume mode diameter - VMD 0.5 μm), regional pollution (3%, VMD 0.8 μm) and one factor in the coarse size range: industrial coarse particles/road dust (2%, VMD 5 μm). The PMF analysis of PM 0.09-1.15 revealed four factors: SIA/CC/BB (52%), road dust (18%), sinter/steel (16%), iron production (16%). The factors in the ultrafine size range resolved with NSD have a positive correlation with sinter/steel production and iron production factors resolved with chemical composition. Coal combustion factor resolved with NSD has moderate correlation with SIA/CC/BB factor. The organic markers homohopanes correlate with coal combustion and the levoglucosan correlates with urban background. The PMF applications to NSD and chemical composition datasets are complementary. PAHs in PM 1 were found to be associated with coal combustion factor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. CRISPR Spacer Arrays for Detection of Viral Signatures from Acidic Hot Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, J. C.; Bateson, M. M.; Suciu, D.; Young, M. J.

    2010-04-01

    Viruses are the most abundant life-like entities on the planet Earth. Using CRISPR spacer sequences, we have developed a microarray-based approach to detecting viral signatures in the acidic hot springs of Yellowstone.

  14. Remarkable morphological diversity of viruses and virus-like particles in hot terrestrial environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel, R; Bettstetter, M; Hedlund, B P; Häring, M; Kessler, A; Stetter, K O; Prangishvili, D

    2002-12-01

    Electron microscopic studies of the viruses in two hot springs (85 degrees C, pH 1.5-2.0, and 75-93 degrees C, pH 6.5) in Yellowstone National Park revealed particles with twelve different morphotypes. This diversity encompassed known viruses of hyperthermophilic archaea, filamentous Lipothrixviridae, rod-shaped Rudiviridae, and spindle-shaped Fuselloviridae, and novel morphotypes previously not observed in nature. Two virus types resembled head-and-tail bacteriophages from the families Siphoviridae and Podoviridae, and constituted the first observation of these viruses in a hydrothermal environment. Viral hosts in the acidic spring were members of the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Acidianus.

  15. Soft photons from off-shell particles in a hot plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, P.A.; Quack, E.

    1995-05-01

    Considering the propagation of off-shell particles in the framework of thermal field theory, we present the general formalism for the calculation of the production rate of soft photons and dileptons from a hot plasma. This approach is illustrated with an electrodynamic plasma. The photon production rate from strongly interacting quarks in the quark-gluon plasma, which might be formed in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions, is calculated in the previously unaccessible regime of photon energies of the order of the plasma temperature within an effective field theory incorporating dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. (orig.)

  16. Hot gas path component cooling system having a particle collection chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Carlos Miguel; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2018-02-20

    A cooling system for a hot gas path component includes a substrate having an outer surface and an inner surface. The inner surface defines at least one interior space. A passage is formed in the substrate between the outer surface and the inner surface. An access passage is formed in the substrate and extends from the outer surface to the inner space. The access passage is formed at a first acute angle to the passage and includes a particle collection chamber. The access passage is configured to channel a cooling fluid to the passage. Furthermore, the passage is configured to channel the cooling fluid therethrough to cool the substrate.

  17. Fission Detection Using the Associated Particle Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.P. Keegan; J.P. Hurley; J.R. Tinsley; R. Trainham; S.C. Wilde

    2008-01-01

    A beam of tagged 14 MeV neutrons from the deuterium-tritium (DT) reaction is used to induce fission in a target composed of depleted uranium. The generator yield is 10 7 neutrons/second radiated into a 4 x 4 in. NaI detectors are used for gamma-ray detection. The fission process is known to produce multiple gamma-rays and neutrons. Triple coincidences (α-γ-γ) are measured as a function of neutron flight time up to 90 ns after fission, where the α-particle arises from the DT reaction. A sudden increase in the triple coincidence rate at the location of the material is used to localize and detect fission in the interrogated target. Comparisons are made with experiment runs where lead, tungsten, and iron were used as target materials. The triple coincidence response profile from depleted uranium is noted to be different to those observed from the other target materials. The response from interrogation targets composed of fissile material is anticipated to be even more unique than that observed from depleted uranium

  18. Detection of dark matter particles with low temperature phonon sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadoulet, B.

    1988-03-01

    Taking as an example the development effort in Berkeley, the author discusses for nonspecialists (Astronomers and Particle Physicists) the promises of phonon sensing at low temperature for the detection of dark matter particles and the difficulties faced. 31 refs

  19. Probing the degrees of freedom in hot composite nuclei. Systematics of charged particle evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, M.; Downer, J.B.; Whitfield, J.P.; Brown, C.M.; Milosevich, Z.; Karol, P.J.; Vardaci, E.; Copi, C.; De Young, P.

    1995-01-01

    The study of evaporative particle emission offers a number of experimental observables whose measurement can provide insight into the behavior of highly excited composite nuclei. Simultaneous observations of multiple degrees of freedom in such hot systems allows stringent testing of theoretical models by insisting that the calculations reproduce the several measured characteristics with a single set of model input parameters. Such comparisons are presented for two data sets, one involving a relatively light (low Z) system and the other referring to a relatively heavy (high Z) system. In the latter case, reasonably good agreement has been found between statistical model calculations (with empirical barriers) and the experimental data, while for the former situation, the parameters required to reproduce the energy spectra lead to significant inconsistencies in predicted particle multiplicities and angular anisotropies. (authors). 12 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Dynamical aspects of particle emission in binary dissipative collisions -effects on hot-nuclei formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eudes, Ph.; Basrak, Z.; Sebille, F.

    1997-01-01

    Characteristics of charged-particle emission in heavy-ion reactions have been studied in the framework of the semiclassical Landau-Vlasov approach for the 40 Ar + 27 Al collisions at 65 MeV/u. The reaction mechanism is dominated by binary dissipative collisions. After an abundant prompt emission coming from the overlapping region between the target and the projectile, two excited nuclei, the quasi-target and the quasi-projectile, emerge from the collision. To shed some light on the role played by dynamical effects, light-charged particle observables, which are currently used as an experimental signature a of hot equilibrated nucleus, have been carefully investigated. (K.A.)

  1. Hot spots in energetic materials generated by infrared and ultrasound, detected by thermal imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Wei; You, Sizhu; Suslick, Kenneth S; Dlott, Dana D

    2014-02-01

    We have observed and characterized hot spot formation and hot-spot ignition of energetic materials (EM), where hot spots were created by ultrasonic or long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) exposure, and were detected by high-speed thermal microscopy. The microscope had 15-20 μm spatial resolution and 8.3 ms temporal resolution. LWIR was generated by a CO2 laser (tunable near 10.6 μm or 28.3 THz) and ultrasound by a 20 kHz acoustic horn. Both methods of energy input created spatially homogeneous energy fields, allowing hot spots to develop spontaneously due to the microstructure of the sample materials. We observed formation of hot spots which grew and caused the EM to ignite. The EM studied here consisted of composite solids with 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine crystals and polymer binders. EM simulants based on sucrose crystals in binders were also examined. The mechanisms of hot spot generation were different with LWIR and ultrasound. With LWIR, hot spots were most efficiently generated within the EM crystals at LWIR wavelengths having longer absorption depths of ∼25 μm, suggesting that hot spot generation mechanisms involved localized absorbing defects within the crystals, LWIR focusing in the crystals or LWIR interference in the crystals. With ultrasound, hot spots were primarily generated in regions of the polymer binder immediately adjacent to crystal surfaces, rather than inside the EM crystals.

  2. Entanglement of identical particles and the detection process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tichy, Malte C.; de Melo, Fernando; Kus, Marek

    2013-01-01

    We introduce detector-level entanglement, a unified entanglement concept for identical particles that takes into account the possible deletion of many-particle which-way information through the detection process. The concept implies a measure for the effective indistinguishability of the particles...... statistical behavior depends on their initial entanglement. Our results show that entanglement cannot be attributed to a state of identical particles alone, but that the detection process has to be incorporated in the analysis....

  3. Hot-stage microscopy for determination of API particles in a formulated tablet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simek, Michal; Grünwaldová, Veronika; Kratochvíl, Bohumil

    2014-01-01

    Although methods exist to readily determine the particle size distribution (PSD) of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) before its formulation into a final product, the primary challenge is to develop a method to determine the PSD of APIs in a finished tablet. To address the limitations of existing PSD methods, we used hot-stage microscopy to observe tablet disintegration during temperature change and, thus, reveal the API particles in a tablet. Both mechanical and liquid disintegration were evaluated after we had identified optimum milling time for mechanical disintegration and optimum volume of water for liquid disintegration. In each case, hot-stage micrographs, taken before and after the API melting point, were compared with image analysis software to obtain the PSDs. Then, the PSDs of the APIs from the disintegrated tablets were compared with the PSDs of raw APIs. Good agreement was obtained, thereby confirming the robustness of our methodology. The availability of such a method equips pharmaceutical scientists with an in vitro assessment method that will more reliably determine the PSD of active substances in finished tablets.

  4. Hot-Stage Microscopy for Determination of API Particles in a Formulated Tablet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Šimek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although methods exist to readily determine the particle size distribution (PSD of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API before its formulation into a final product, the primary challenge is to develop a method to determine the PSD of APIs in a finished tablet. To address the limitations of existing PSD methods, we used hot-stage microscopy to observe tablet disintegration during temperature change and, thus, reveal the API particles in a tablet. Both mechanical and liquid disintegration were evaluated after we had identified optimum milling time for mechanical disintegration and optimum volume of water for liquid disintegration. In each case, hot-stage micrographs, taken before and after the API melting point, were compared with image analysis software to obtain the PSDs. Then, the PSDs of the APIs from the disintegrated tablets were compared with the PSDs of raw APIs. Good agreement was obtained, thereby confirming the robustness of our methodology. The availability of such a method equips pharmaceutical scientists with an in vitro assessment method that will more reliably determine the PSD of active substances in finished tablets.

  5. Dissociation of 1P states in hot QCD Medium Using Quasi-Particle Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilima, Indrani; Agotiya, Vineet Kumar

    2018-03-01

    We extend the analysis of a very recent work [1] to study the dissociation phenomenon of 1P states of the charmonium and bottomonium spectra (χc and χb) in a hot QCD medium using Quasi-Particle Model. This study employed a medium modified heavy quark potential which has quite different form in the sense that it has a lomg range Coulombic tail in addition to the Yukawa term even above the deconfinement temperature. Then we study the flavor dependence of their binding energies and explore the nature of dissociation temperatures by employing the Quasi-Particle debye mass for pure gluonic and full QCD case. Interestingly, the dissociation temperatures obtained by employing EoS1 and EoS2 with the Γ criterion, is closer to the upper bound of the dissociation temperatures which are obtained by the dissolution of a given quarkonia state by the mean thermal energy of the quasi-partons in the hot QCD/QGP medium.

  6. Transistor-based particle detection systems and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ankit; Nair, Pradeep R.; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful

    2015-06-09

    Transistor-based particle detection systems and methods may be configured to detect charged and non-charged particles. Such systems may include a supporting structure contacting a gate of a transistor and separating the gate from a dielectric of the transistor, and the transistor may have a near pull-in bias and a sub-threshold region bias to facilitate particle detection. The transistor may be configured to change current flow through the transistor in response to a change in stiffness of the gate caused by securing of a particle to the gate, and the transistor-based particle detection system may configured to detect the non-charged particle at least from the change in current flow.

  7. THE DETECTION OF A HOT MOLECULAR CORE IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD WITH ALMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimonishi, Takashi; Onaka, Takashi; Kawamura, Akiko; Aikawa, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    We report the first detection of a hot molecular core outside our Galaxy based on radio observations with ALMA toward a high-mass young stellar object (YSO) in a nearby low metallicity galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Molecular emission lines of CO, C 17 O, HCO + , H 13 CO + , H 2 CO, NO, SiO, H 2 CS, 33 SO, 32 SO 2 , 34 SO 2 , and 33 SO 2 are detected from a compact region (∼0.1 pc) associated with a high-mass YSO, ST11. The temperature of molecular gas is estimated to be higher than 100 K based on rotation diagram analysis of SO 2 and 34 SO 2 lines. The compact source size, warm gas temperature, high density, and rich molecular lines around a high-mass protostar suggest that ST11 is associated with a hot molecular core. We find that the molecular abundances of the LMC hot core are significantly different from those of Galactic hot cores. The abundances of CH 3 OH, H 2 CO, and HNCO are remarkably lower compared to Galactic hot cores by at least 1–3 orders of magnitude. We suggest that these abundances are characterized by the deficiency of molecules whose formation requires the hydrogenation of CO on grain surfaces. In contrast, NO shows a high abundance in ST11 despite the notably low abundance of nitrogen in the LMC. A multitude of SO 2 and its isotopologue line detections in ST11 imply that SO 2 can be a key molecular tracer of hot core chemistry in metal-poor environments. Furthermore, we find molecular outflows around the hot core, which is the second detection of an extragalactic protostellar outflow. In this paper, we discuss the physical and chemical characteristics of a hot molecular core in the low metallicity environment.

  8. Effects of Hot Particles on the Skin: The Considerations of a EULEP/EURADOS Task Group (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles, M.W.; Burkhart, W.R.; Darley, P.J.; Hopewell, J.W.; Mill, A.J.

    2000-01-01

    The main findings are summarised of a recent joint EULEP/EURADOS working group (part of the Environmental Dosimetry Action of the EU 4th framework programme) which has reviewed the origins, physical and radiological characteristics, biological effects, and international dose limits for non respirable, radioactive 'hot particles' which present potential hazards to the skin. Account has been taken of previous deliberations of the ICRP, a recent draft report of the NCRP, recent statements from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and other recent research findings regarding the stochastic effects of hot particle exposures. The working group recommends further research to address several topics which fall into four main areas: dosimetry: deterministic effects: stochastic effects: and radiological protection philosophy. The first three topics have been considered in three other papers in these proceedings. This paper concentrates on issues related to radiological protection philosophy which arise from the disparity between recommendations regarding hot particle dose limits of the ICRP, the NCRP and NRC. (author)

  9. Impact of plasma-sprayed metal particles on hot and cold glass surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, A.; Lamontagne, M.; Moreau, C.; Chandra, S.

    2006-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed molten molybdenum and amorphous steel particles (38-55 μm diameter) were photographed during impact (velocity 120-200 m/s) and spreading on a smooth glass surface that was maintained at either room temperature or 400 deg. C. Droplets approaching the surface were identified by a photodetector and after a known delay, a 5-ns laser pulse was triggered to illuminate the spreading splat and photograph it with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. A rapid two-color pyrometer was used to collect thermal radiation from particles during flight and impact to follow the evolution of their temperature and size. Particles that impacted the surface at room temperature ruptured and splashed, leaving a small central solidified core on the substrate. On a surface held at 400 deg. C, there was no splashing and a circular, disk-like splat remained on the surface. Splats on a glass surface held at room temperature had a maximum spread diameter almost three times that on a hot surface. A simple analysis was done to estimate the area of the splat in contact with the non-heated glass surface during spreading. The analysis supports the hypothesis that only a portion of the splat is in good contact with the surface at room temperature, while the rest of the fluid is separated from the substrate by a gas barrier

  10. In-situ observations of Eyjafjallajökull ash particles by hot-air balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petäjä, T.; Laakso, L.; Grönholm, T.; Launiainen, S.; Evele-Peltoniemi, I.; Virkkula, A.; Leskinen, A.; Backman, J.; Manninen, H. E.; Sipilä, M.; Haapanala, S.; Hämeri, K.; Vanhala, E.; Tuomi, T.; Paatero, J.; Aurela, M.; Hakola, H.; Makkonen, U.; Hellén, H.; Hillamo, R.; Vira, J.; Prank, M.; Sofiev, M.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Laaksonen, A.; lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kulmala, M.; Viisanen, Y.; Kerminen, V.-M.

    2012-03-01

    The volcanic ash cloud from Eyjafjallajökull volcanic eruption seriously distracted aviation in Europe. Due to the flight ban, there were only few in-situ measurements of the properties and dispersion of the ash cloud. In this study we show in-situ observations onboard a hot air balloon conducted in Central Finland together with regional dispersion modelling with SILAM-model during the eruption. The modeled and measured mass concentrations were in a qualitative agreement but the exact elevation of the layer was slightly distorted. Some of this discrepancy can be attributed to the uncertainty in the initial emission height and strength. The observed maximum mass concentration varied between 12 and 18 μg m -3 assuming a density of 2 g m -3, whereas the gravimetric analysis of the integrated column showed a maximum of 45 μg m -3 during the first two descents through the ash plume. Ion chromatography data indicated that a large fraction of the mass was insoluble to water, which is in qualitative agreement with single particle X-ray analysis. A majority of the super-micron particles contained Si, Al, Fe, K, Na, Ca, Ti, S, Zn and Cr, which are indicative for basalt-type rock material. The number concentration profiles indicated that there was secondary production of particles possibly from volcano-emitted sulfur dioxide oxidized to sulfuric acid during the transport.

  11. Multifrequency eddy current examination for surface defects detection of hot steel products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroshima, Tatsuo; Sakamoto, Takahide; Takahashi, Akio; Miyata, Kenichi.

    1985-01-01

    Multifrequency eddy current testing method using probe coils has been studied for surface defects detection in hot steel products at high temperature over the magnetic Curie point. The conventional signal processing method is not available for suppression of an undesirable signal caused by lift-off variation or unevenness in inspected surfaces, because the undesirable signal pattern is similar to a defect signal pattern. In order to suppress the undesirable signal a new dual frequency signal processing method using three phase rotators has been developed, and was applied to several hot steel inspections. The results are as follows. 1. In the rotating eddy current machine for hot steel rods, the lift-off variation signal caused by a wobble of rods or the difference between rotating center and pass center of rods can be suppressed. A long seam or crack whose depth is more than 0.5mm can be detected. 2. In the hot inspection for continuously cast slabs, the signal caused by oscillation mark whose depth is under 1 mm can be suppressed. A fine transversal crack whose depth is 2 mm can be detected. 3. In the hot inspection for round billets, the lift-off variation signal caused by oval shape can be eliminated, and a crack which is deeper than 1.5 mm can be clearly detected. The detectability of defects can be improved by the analysis of dual frequency signal pattern. (author)

  12. Super-thermal particles in hot plasmas—Kinetic models, numerical solution strategies, and comparison to tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauber, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    The excitation of collective instabilities by super-thermal particles in hot plasmas and the related transport processes attract increasing interest due to their fundamental challenges for theoretical models and their practical importance for burning fusion plasmas. In fact, the physics of a self-heated thermonuclear plasma due to fusion-born 3.5 MeV α-particles is one of the most important outstanding fundamental research topics on the way to a fusion power plant with magnetic confinement. Within the last 10 years significant advances on both the theoretical and the experimental sides have been made leading to a more detailed and quantitative understanding of fast-particle-driven instabilities. On the theoretical side, the crucial step was to move from fluid models for the plasma background with a hybrid kinetic expression for the energetic particles to a fully kinetic model for all the plasma species, i.e. background ions, background electrons, and fast ions. This improvement allows one to describe consistently the resonant interaction between global plasma waves such as shear Alfvén and Alfvén–acoustic waves, and the particles via Landau damping, i.e. the dynamics parallel to the magnetic background field. Also, mode conversion mechanisms require the inclusion of background ion scales in a kinetic, non-perturbative way. This accurate treatment of the plasma background leads not only to changes in the linear mode properties such as frequency, growth/damping rate, and mode structure but also influences the non-linear dynamics. Due to major advances, innovations and installation of diagnostics in present day experiments, this comparison can be carried out in a more detailed and comprehensive way than a few years ago. For example, the measurement of damping rates via active external antennas, the imaging of 2D mode structures via electron–cyclotron-emission spectroscopy, and the direct detection of escaping fast ions allow to diagnose various kinetic features

  13. Skin dose from distributed radioactive sources and hot particles - Regulations and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, S.W.

    1991-01-01

    The issues concerning Beta Dosimetry, Hot Particle Dosimetry, and associated dose to skin have been highlighted since the 1979 TMI-2 accident report of the Presidential Commission. The conclusions drawn from the DOE/EML International Beta Dosimetry Symposium of 1983 are still valid. The questions of location(s) of the radiosensitive layer of human skin, the most valid method of skin dose measurement and interpretation of associated radiobiological data are still lingering. The need for improving beta calculation standards and procedures are more evident now than in 1983. This paper will discuss the newest ICRP and NCRP recommendations, as well as the regulations and guidelines from the NRC. I would expect that the draft recommendations published in this paper will be considerably changed by the time of the January, 1991 presentation of this paper

  14. Development of automatic flaw detection systems for magnetic particle examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, T.; Kimura, J.; Amako, T.

    1988-01-01

    Utilizing a video camera and an image processor, development was carried out on automatic flaw detection and discrimination techniques for the purpose of achieving automated magnetic particle examination. Following this, fluorescent wet magnetic particle examination systems for blade roots and rotor grooves of turbine rotors and the non-fluorescent dry magnetic particle examination system for butt welds, were developed. This paper describes these automatic magnetic particle examination (MT) systems and the functional test results

  15. Electro-optical detection of charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semertzidis, Y.K.; Castillo, V.; Kowalski, L.; Kraus, D.E.; Larsen, R.; Lazarus, D.M.; Magurno, B.; Nikas, D.; Ozben, C.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Tsang, T.

    2000-01-01

    We have made the first observation of a charged particle beam by means of its electro-optical effect on the polarization of laser light in a LiNbO 3 crystal. The modulation of the laser light during the passage of a pulsed electron beam was observed using a fast photodiode and a digital oscilloscope. The fastest rise time measured, 120 ps, was obtained in the single shot mode and was limited by the bandwidth of the oscilloscope and the associated electronics. This technology holds good for detectors of greatly improved spatial and temporal resolution for single relativistic charged particles as well as particle beams

  16. Electro-optical detection of charged particles

    CERN Document Server

    Semertzidis, Y K; Kowalski, L A; Kraus, D E; Larsen, R; Lazarus, D M; Magurno, B; Nikas, D; Ozben, C; Srinivasan-Rao, T; Tsang, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    We have made the first observation of a charged particle beam by means of its electro-optical effect on the polarization of laser light in a LiNbO sub 3 crystal. The modulation of the laser light during the passage of a pulsed electron beam was observed using a fast photodiode and a digital oscilloscope. The fastest rise time measured, 120 ps, was obtained in the single shot mode and was limited by the bandwidth of the oscilloscope and the associated electronics. This technology holds good for detectors of greatly improved spatial and temporal resolution for single relativistic charged particles as well as particle beams.

  17. Electro-optical detection of charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semertzidis, Y.K.; Castillo, V.; Kowalski, L.; Kraus, D.E.; Larsen, R.; Lazarus, D.M. E-mail: lazarus@sun2.bnl.gov; Magurno, B.; Nikas, D.; Ozben, C.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Tsang, T

    2000-10-01

    We have made the first observation of a charged particle beam by means of its electro-optical effect on the polarization of laser light in a LiNbO{sub 3} crystal. The modulation of the laser light during the passage of a pulsed electron beam was observed using a fast photodiode and a digital oscilloscope. The fastest rise time measured, 120 ps, was obtained in the single shot mode and was limited by the bandwidth of the oscilloscope and the associated electronics. This technology holds good for detectors of greatly improved spatial and temporal resolution for single relativistic charged particles as well as particle beams.

  18. The associated particle method explosives detection technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Li; Chen Yuan; Guo Haiping; Zheng Pu; Wang Xinhua; He Tie; Mu Yunfeng; Yang Xiaofei; Zhu Chuanxin

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces the basic principle of associated alpha particles technique for explosives' inspection and the measurement system. The characteristic prompt gamma-rays come from water, graphite, liquid nitrogen, ammonium nitrate, melamine and simulated samples induced by D-T neutron from generator were gained by single alpha particles detector and gamma-ray detector. The complex gamma-ray spectra were deconvolved. The element ratio between the experiment and chemics molecular formula is agreement in 10%. (authors)

  19. Natural radionuclides in the environment. A contribution for the localization and characterization of natural hot particles in solid samples; Natuerliche Radionuklide in der Umwelt. Ein Beitrag zur Lokalisierung und Charakterisierung natuerlicher Heisser Teilchen in festen Proben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehnke, A.

    2006-07-01

    In the present thesis appearance, spreading, origin, and mineralogical properties of natural hot particles are studied and the radioecological relevance of these particles judged. For this first relevent quaestions on radioactivity in the environment and on hot particles are theoretically treated. In the following detailedly the method of the autoradiography and solid-state track detectors is considered, which make possible to quote the precise position, the number and distribution of radioactive particles on the cutting area or surface of a sample. Basing on these methodical considerations by laboratory experiments determined track pattern formations of alpha emitters are documentated and interpreted. Starting from the knowledge obtained from this in the further part of the thesis a detection technique is developed, by means of which it is possible, to determine and mark the position of natural hot particles in sold samples. Thereafter follows a description of the electron-microscopical studies for the identification of the localized natural hot particles. Using the developed detection technique, as well as the electron-microscopical methods, a broad spectrum of samples - anthropogeneous depositions (industrial residues, industry products, by-products) and natural depositions (rocks, sediments, minerals) - is studied.

  20. Hot-Spot Fatigue and Impact Damage Detection on a Helicopter Tailboom

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    other 14 PZT disks were used as sensors. Among the 28 PZT disks, 16 PZT disks were placed in the two fatigue hot-spot areas to detect cracks initiated...more efficient and effective airframe maintenance, fatigue cracking and impact damage detection technologies were developed and demonstrated on a...SHM system in successfully monitoring fatigue cracks initiated from cyclical loading conditions; detecting, locating and quantifying ballistic

  1. Risk assessment of hot beta-particles from the Chernobyl fallout in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzunov, I.

    1993-01-01

    Research on hot particles (HP) was carried out in the Laboratory of Dosimetry and Radiation Protection. Field measurements with a Geiger-counter led to early discovery of HP on the ground in May 1986. Laboratory measurements of HP activity followed and their nuclide composition was determined. The carcinogenic risk of HP is discussed on the basis of a computer model assuming the radiation as initiator and all other factors as stimulators for cell proliferation (promoters). It is found that in the case of low radiation dose the probability for cancer is almost directly proportional to the number of cell divisions while at high radiation dose the slope is nearly vertical and reaches saturation point at about 5 cell divisions. An estimation of the number of inhaled HP was made by investigation of air filters. It is concluded that, besides iodine, inhaled HP are the most hazardous factor of the Chernobyl fallout. For some critical groups of the population, engaged in dusty outdoor operations, the carcinogenic risk was estimates as high as 0.1 - 1%. An average activity of 50 Bq per retained particle is proposed. It is stressed that Bulgarian population had not been informed adequately and no protection measures against HP intake had been taken. 3 figs., 12 refs

  2. Risk assessment of hot beta-particles from the Chernobyl fallout in Bulgaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzunov, I

    1994-12-31

    Research on hot particles (HP) was carried out in the Laboratory of Dosimetry and Radiation Protection. Field measurements with a Geiger-counter led to early discovery of HP on the ground in May 1986. Laboratory measurements of HP activity followed and their nuclide composition was determined. The carcinogenic risk of HP is discussed on the basis of a computer model assuming the radiation as initiator and all other factors as stimulators for cell proliferation (promoters). It is found that in the case of low radiation dose the probability for cancer is almost directly proportional to the number of cell divisions while at high radiation dose the slope is nearly vertical and reaches saturation point at about 5 cell divisions. An estimation of the number of inhaled HP was made by investigation of air filters. It is concluded that, besides iodine, inhaled HP are the most hazardous factor of the Chernobyl fallout. For some critical groups of the population, engaged in dusty outdoor operations, the carcinogenic risk was estimates as high as 0.1 - 1%. An average activity of 50 Bq per retained particle is proposed. It is stressed that Bulgarian population had not been informed adequately and no protection measures against HP intake had been taken. 3 figs., 12 refs.

  3. Electro-optical Detection of Charged Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarus, D.M.

    2001-01-01

    The electric field of charged particles can induce transient changes in the polarization of light that produce sub-picosecond modulation of a laser beam. This is a consequence of the electro-optical effect in which the presence of the electric field in an electro-optical medium produces a change in the index of refraction of the medium resulting in a phase retardation between polarization components parallel and perpendicular to the electric field. We have observed the electro-optical effect due to 10 picosecond electron beam bunches with rise times that were limited by the bandwidth of our data acquisition system. This technology is being applied to particle beam diagnostics and has the potential to produce charged particle detectors combining excellent spatial resolution with unprecedented temporal precision.

  4. Particle-in-cell studies of laser-driven hot spots and a statistical model for mesoscopic properties of Raman backscatter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albright, B.J.; Yin, L.; Bowers, K.J.; Kline, J.L.; Montgomery, D.S.; Fernandez, J.C.; Daughton, W.

    2006-01-01

    The authors use explicit particle-in-cell simulations to model stimulated scattering processes in media with both solitary and multiple laser hot spots. These simulations indicate coupling among hot spots, whereby scattered light, plasma waves, and hot electrons generated in one laser hot spot may propagate to neighboring hot spots, which can be destabilized to enhanced backscatter. A nonlinear statistical model of a stochastic beam exhibiting this coupled behavior is described here. Calibration of the model using particle-in-cell simulations is performed, and a threshold is derived for 'detonation' of the beam to high reflectivity. (authors)

  5. Studies at Dounreay on the repopulation of offshore sediments by hot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, Ron; Toole, Joe; Innes, Steve

    2007-01-01

    of these sediments over time is substantially reduced. There is little mixing of the more deeply buried sediments. Following a period of stormy weather over the winter of 2004-05, repopulation surveys were initiated in March 2005 to see if the effect of these storm events could be detected in the distribution of particles in the sediments. Little evidence for this was found, and was limited to the recovery of a single particle of high activity in the surface sediments of Repop 12 located over 2 km to the northeast of the effluent diffuser. The justification for continuation of the programme of repopulation surveys is questioned, particularly on health and safety grounds. The programme of surveys may eventually exhaust the mobile particle population such that repopulation rates decrease significantly although there is no evidence as to when this may occur. It is suggested that little further benefit will be obtained from the continued retrieval of additional and similar information

  6. Efficacy of brown sugar flotation and hot water methods for detecting Rhagoletis indifferens (Dipt., Tephritidae) larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brown sugar flotation and hot water methods are accepted procedures for detecting larval western cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis indifferens Curran, in sweet cherry [Prunus avium (L.) L.] and could be included in a systems approach for showing the absence of larvae in fruit. The methods require cr...

  7. CVD diamond sensors for charged particle detection

    CERN Document Server

    Krammer, Manfred; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bertuccio, G; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; D'Angelo, P; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Dencuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Hallewell, G D; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Kass, R; Koeth, T W; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; MacLynne, L; Manfredotti, C; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Moroni, L; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Perera, L P; Pirollo, S; Procario, M; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Rousseau, L; Rudge, A; Russ, J; Sala, S; Sampietro, M; Schnetzer, S; Sciortino, S; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Suter, B; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R; Trischuk, W; Tromson, D; Vittone, E; Walsh, A M; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; Wetstein, M; White, C; Zeuner, W; Zöller, M

    2001-01-01

    CVD diamond material was used to build position-sensitive detectors for single-charged particles to be employed in high-intensity physics experiments. To obtain position information, metal contacts shaped as strips or pixels are applied to the detector surface for one- or two- dimensional coordinate measurement. Strip detectors 2*4 cm/sup 2/ in size with a strip distance of 50 mu m were tested. Pixel detectors of various pixel sizes were bump bonded to electronics chips and investigated. A key issue for the use of these sensors in high intensity experiments is the radiation hardness. Several irradiation experiments were carried out with pions, protons and neutrons exceeding a fluence of 10/sup 15/ particles/cm/sup 2/. The paper presents an overview of the results obtained with strip and pixel detectors in high-energy test beams and summarises the irradiation studies. (8 refs).

  8. Detection of charged particles through a photodiode: design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angoli, A.; Quirino, L.L.; Hernandez, V.M.; Lopez del R, H.; Mireles, F.; Davila, J.I.; Rios, C.; Pinedo, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    This project develops and construct an charge particle detector mean a pin photodiode array, design and analysis using a silicon pin Fotodiodo that generally is used to detect visible light, its good efficiency, size compact and reduced cost specifically allows to its use in the radiation monitoring and alpha particle detection. Here, so much, appears the design of the system of detection like its characterization for alpha particles where one is reported as alpha energy resolution and detection efficiency. The equipment used in the development of work consists of alpha particle a triple source composed of Am-241, Pu-239 and Cm-244 with 5,55 KBq as total activity, Maestro 32 software made by ORTEC, a multi-channel card Triumph from ORTEC and one low activity electroplated uranium sample. (Author)

  9. Geometric effects in alpha particle detection from distributed air sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, L.R.; Leitao, R.M.S.; Marques, A.; Rivera, A.

    1994-08-01

    Geometric effects associated to detection of alpha particles from distributed air sources, as it happens in Radon and Thoron measurements, are revisited. The volume outside which no alpha particle may reach the entrance window of the detector is defined and determined analytically for rectangular and cylindrical symmetry geometries. (author). 3 figs

  10. Multiple Δt strategy for particle image velocimetry (PIV) error correction, applied to a hot propulsive jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, J; Lecuona, A; Nauri, S; Legrand, M; Rodríguez, P A

    2009-01-01

    PIV (particle image velocimetry) is a measurement technique with growing application to the study of complex flows with relevance to industry. This work is focused on the assessment of some significant PIV measurement errors. In particular, procedures are proposed for estimating, and sometimes correcting, errors coming from the sensor geometry and performance, namely peak-locking and contemporary CCD camera read-out errors. Although the procedures are of general application to PIV, they are applied to a particular real case, giving an example of the methodology steps and the improvement in results that can be obtained. This real case corresponds to an ensemble of hot high-speed coaxial jets, representative of the civil transport aircraft propulsion system using turbofan engines. Errors of ∼0.1 pixels displacements have been assessed. This means 10% of the measured magnitude at many points. These results allow the uncertainty interval associated with the measurement to be provided and, under some circumstances, the correction of some of the bias components of the errors. The detection of conditions where the peak-locking error has a period of 2 pixels instead of the classical 1 pixel has been made possible using these procedures. In addition to the increased worth of the measurement, the uncertainty assessment is of interest for the validation of CFD codes

  11. Multiple Δt strategy for particle image velocimetry (PIV) error correction, applied to a hot propulsive jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, J.; Lecuona, A.; Nauri, S.; Legrand, M.; Rodríguez, P. A.

    2009-07-01

    PIV (particle image velocimetry) is a measurement technique with growing application to the study of complex flows with relevance to industry. This work is focused on the assessment of some significant PIV measurement errors. In particular, procedures are proposed for estimating, and sometimes correcting, errors coming from the sensor geometry and performance, namely peak-locking and contemporary CCD camera read-out errors. Although the procedures are of general application to PIV, they are applied to a particular real case, giving an example of the methodology steps and the improvement in results that can be obtained. This real case corresponds to an ensemble of hot high-speed coaxial jets, representative of the civil transport aircraft propulsion system using turbofan engines. Errors of ~0.1 pixels displacements have been assessed. This means 10% of the measured magnitude at many points. These results allow the uncertainty interval associated with the measurement to be provided and, under some circumstances, the correction of some of the bias components of the errors. The detection of conditions where the peak-locking error has a period of 2 pixels instead of the classical 1 pixel has been made possible using these procedures. In addition to the increased worth of the measurement, the uncertainty assessment is of interest for the validation of CFD codes.

  12. New technique for alpha particles detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsy, A.A.; Khattab, F.M.

    1998-01-01

    Man possesses no biological sensors of ionizing radiation as a consequence he must depend entirely on instrumentation for the detection and measurement of radiation. The recent discovery of the solid state nuclear track detection ( SSNTD ) techniques and its advantages over other dosimeters made them a useful tool for radiation dosimetry. This work is devoted to review and illustrate the application of SSNTD technique in some branches of science and technology specially the newly produced TASTRAK obtained from Track Analysis System Limited, Bristol, UK. The detector is successfully irradiated, chemically etched and calibrated for the aim of the Alpha radiation dosimetry

  13. Development of an ICCD-scintillator system for measurement of spatial dose distributions around 'hot particles'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydarous, A. Sh; Darley, P. J.; Charles, M. W.

    2004-01-01

    An intensified charge coupled device (ICCD)-scintillator system has been investigated for potential use in measuring the spatially non-uniform dose distribution around 'hot particles'. This imaging system is capable of producing real-time measurements considerably quicker than other presently available radiation dosimetry techniques and exhibits good linearity and reproducibility and relatively high spatial resolution (∼17.5 μm). The time required for a dose evaluation is less than a hundredth that required for radiochromic dye film measurements. The non-uniformity of the system has been eliminated by applying pixel-to-pixel correction factors. The measurable dose rate range using a 110 μm thick scintillator extends from ∼2000 down to ∼6 Gy h -1 . The prototype ICCD-scintillator system has been used in evaluation of the skin dose from some high-activity nuclear fuel fragments. The results agree within a few percentage with radiochromic dye film measurements for 1 cm 2 averaging areas. (authors)

  14. Magnetic particle detection in unshielded environment using orthogonal fluxgate gradiometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elrefai, Ahmed L., E-mail: a.lotfyelrefai@gmail.com; Sasada, Ichiro [Applied Science for Electronics and Materials, Kyushu University, Kasuga (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    A new detection system for magnetic particles, which can operate in an unshielded environment, is developed using a fundamental mode orthogonal fluxgate gradiometer. The proposed detection system offers the advantages of cost, size, and weight reduction as compared to contamination detection systems using superconducting quantum interference device sensor. The detection system can be used to detect metallic contamination in foods or lithium ion battery production lines. The system has been investigated numerically to optimize various design parameters of the system. Experimental setup has been developed to evaluate some of the numerically predicted results. Steel balls were successfully detected down to the diameter of 50 μm.

  15. Health-related hot topic detection in online communities using text clustering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjie Lu

    Full Text Available Recently, health-related social media services, especially online health communities, have rapidly emerged. Patients with various health conditions participate in online health communities to share their experiences and exchange healthcare knowledge. Exploring hot topics in online health communities helps us better understand patients' needs and interest in health-related knowledge. However, the statistical topic analysis employed in previous studies is becoming impractical for processing the rapidly increasing amount of online data. Automatic topic detection based on document clustering is an alternative approach for extracting health-related hot topics in online communities. In addition to the keyword-based features used in traditional text clustering, we integrate medical domain-specific features to represent the messages posted in online health communities. Three disease discussion boards, including boards devoted to lung cancer, breast cancer and diabetes, from an online health community are used to test the effectiveness of topic detection. Experiment results demonstrate that health-related hot topics primarily include symptoms, examinations, drugs, procedures and complications. Further analysis reveals that there also exist some significant differences among the hot topics discussed on different types of disease discussion boards.

  16. Astrophysical dark matter: candidates from particle physics and detection possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freese, K.

    1989-01-01

    In this talk, I will discuss the arguments that 50% to 90% of the matter in galaxies, including our own, is made of an unknown type of dark matter. I will review the reason why cosmologists believe Ω = 1 and illustrate the contrast with the limits on the amount of baryonic matter from element abundances in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. Other arguments for nonbaryonic dark matter will also be discussed. Candidates for the dark matter from particle physics will be presented. I will focus on cold dark matter candidates known as WIMPs, weakly interacting massive (O(GeV)) particles. I will try to illustrate why these particles are interesting for astrophysics and outline ideas for cornering them. Detection possibilities for these particles include indirect detection, which takes advantage of the annihilation products of these particles in the galactic halo, the sun, or the earth. Direct detection via newly proposed cryogenic detectors must be sensitive to <∼ keV energy deposits. Annual modulation of the dark matter signal can be used as a signature for these halo particles. I hope to motivate the interest in these particles and discuss ideas for finding them

  17. An application of Brookhaven National Laboratory's hot particle methodology for determining the most effective beta particle energy in causing skin ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, C.

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of this project was to compare the effectiveness of hot particles with different energy betas in producing ulcers on skin. The sources were man-made hot particles similar in size and activity to those found in the commercial nuclear power industry. Four different particle types were used. These were thulium (Tm-170) with a 0.97 MeV maximum energy beta, ytterbium (Yb-175) with a maximum beta energy of 0.47 MeV, scandium (Sc-46) with a 0.36 MeV beta, which was used as a surrogate for cobalt-60 (0.31 MeV beta) and uranium (in the carbide form) with an average maximum beta energy of about 2.5 MeV. Since higher energy beta particles penetrate further in skin, they will affect a higher number and different populations of target cells. The experiments were designed as threshold studies such that the dose needed to produce ulcers ten percent of the time (ED 10%) for each particle type could be compared against each other

  18. Integrated fiber optic sensors for hot spot detection and temperature field reconstruction in satellites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapp, S; Baier, H

    2010-01-01

    Large satellites are often equipped with more than 1000 temperature sensors during the test campaign. Hundreds of them are still used for monitoring during launch and operation in space. This means an additional mass and especially high effort in assembly, integration and verification on a system level. So the use of fiber Bragg grating temperature sensors is investigated as they offer several advantages. They are lightweight, small in size and electromagnetically immune, which fits well in space applications. Their multiplexing capability offers the possibility to build extensive sensor networks including dozens of sensors of different types, such as strain sensors, accelerometers and temperature sensors. The latter allow the detection of hot spots and the reconstruction of temperature fields via proper algorithms, which is shown in this paper. A temperature sensor transducer was developed, which can be integrated into satellite sandwich panels with negligible mechanical influence. Mechanical and thermal vacuum tests were performed to verify the space compatibility of the developed sensor system. Proper reconstruction algorithms were developed to estimate the temperature field and detect thermal hot spots on the panel surface. A representative hardware demonstrator has been built and tested, which shows the capability of using an integrated fiber Bragg grating temperature sensor network for temperature field reconstruction and hot spot detection in satellite structures

  19. Acoustic Detection Of Loose Particles In Pressure Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Lloyd C.

    1995-01-01

    Particle-impact-noise-detector (PIND) apparatus used in conjunction with computer program analyzing output of apparatus to detect extraneous particles trapped in pressure sensors. PIND tester essentially shaker equipped with microphone measuring noise in pressure sensor or other object being shaken. Shaker applies controlled vibration. Output of microphone recorded and expressed in terms of voltage, yielding history of noise subsequently processed by computer program. Data taken at sampling rate sufficiently high to enable identification of all impacts of particles on sensor diaphragm and on inner surfaces of sensor cavities.

  20. Impurity 'hot' atoms 67Ga in a role a physical-chemical studies at an estimation of radiation damage in Zn cyclotron targets after bombardment with charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, I.E.; Lazarev, V.V.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the migration of impurity 'hot atoms' 67 Ga produced from various types of nuclear reaction on zinc targets is reported. The type of charged particles as well as their energy, beam current, total fluency was varied

  1. Use of the diamond to the detection of particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mer, C.; Tromson, D.; Brambilla, A.; Foulon, F.; Guizard, B.; Bergonzo

    2001-01-01

    Diamond synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a valuable material for the detection of particles: broad forbidden energy band, high mobility of electron-hole pairs, and a short life-time of charge carriers. Diamond layers have been used in alpha detectors or gamma dose ratemeters designed to be used in hostile environment. Diamond presents a high resistance to radiation and corrosion. The properties of diamond concerning the detection of particles are spoilt by the existence of crystal defects even in high quality natural or synthesized diamond. This article presents recent works that have been performed in CEA laboratories in order to optimize the use of CVD diamond in particle detectors. (A.C.)

  2. Indirect Charged Particle Detection: Concepts and a Classroom Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Nicholas B.; Horányi, Mihály; Collette, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    We describe the principles of macroscopic charged particle detection in the laboratory and their connections to concepts taught in the physics classroom. Electrostatic dust accelerator systems, capable of launching charged dust grains at hypervelocities (1-100 km/s), are a critical tool for space exploration. Dust grains in space typically have…

  3. The Detection of Hot Cores and Complex Organic Molecules in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewiło, Marta; Indebetouw, Remy; Charnley, Steven B.; Zahorecz, Sarolta; Oliveira, Joana M.; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Ward, Jacob L.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Wiseman, Jennifer; Fukui, Yasuo; Kawamura, Akiko; Meixner, Margaret; Onishi, Toshikazu; Schilke, Peter

    2018-02-01

    We report the first extragalactic detection of the complex organic molecules (COMs) dimethyl ether (CH3OCH3) and methyl formate (CH3OCHO) with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). These COMs, together with their parent species methanol (CH3OH), were detected toward two 1.3 mm continuum sources in the N 113 star-forming region in the low-metallicity Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Rotational temperatures ({T}{rot}∼ 130 K) and total column densities ({N}{rot}∼ {10}16 cm‑2) have been calculated for each source based on multiple transitions of CH3OH. We present the ALMA molecular emission maps for COMs and measured abundances for all detected species. The physical and chemical properties of two sources with COMs detection, and the association with H2O and OH maser emission, indicate that they are hot cores. The fractional abundances of COMs scaled by a factor of 2.5 to account for the lower metallicity in the LMC are comparable to those found at the lower end of the range in Galactic hot cores. Our results have important implications for studies of organic chemistry at higher redshift.

  4. Detection of neutrinos, antineutrinos, and neutrino-like particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischbach, Ephraim

    2018-04-24

    An apparatus for detecting the presence of a nuclear reactor by the detection of antineutrinos from the reactor can include a radioactive sample having a measurable nuclear activity level and a decay rate capable of changing in response to the presence of antineutrinos, and a detector associated with the radioactive sample. The detector is responsive to at least one of a particle or radiation formed by decay of the radioactive sample. A processor associated with the detector can correlate rate of decay of the radioactive sample to a flux of the antineutrinos to detect the reactor.

  5. Microstructural study and densification analysis of hot work tool steel matrix composites reinforced with TiB{sub 2} particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedrizzi, A., E-mail: anna.fedrizzi@ing.unitn.it [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Via Mesiano 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Pellizzari, M. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Via Mesiano 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Zadra, M. [K4Sint, Start-up of the University of Trento, Viale Dante 300, 38057 Pergine Valsugana (Italy); Marin, E. [Department of Chemistry, Physics and Environment, University of Udine, Via Cotonificio 108, 33100 Udine (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    Hot work tool steels are characterized by good toughness and high hot hardness but are less wear resistant than other tooling materials, such as high speed steel. Metal matrix composites show improved tribological behavior, but not much work has been done in the field of hot work tool steels. In this paper TiB{sub 2}-reinforced hot work tool steel matrix composites were produced by spark plasma sintering (SPS). Mechanical alloying (MA) was proposed as a suited process to improve the composite microstructure. Density measurements and microstructure confirmed that MA promotes sintering and produces a fine and homogeneous dispersion of reinforcing particles. X-ray diffraction patterns of the sintered composites highlighted the formation of equilibrium Fe{sub 2}B and TiC, as predicted by thermodynamic calculations using Thermo-Calc® software. Scanning electron microscopy as well as scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy highlighted the reaction of the steel matrix with TiB{sub 2} particles, showing the formation of a reaction layer at the TiB{sub 2}-steel interface. Phase investigations pointed out that TiB{sub 2} is not chemically stable in steel matrix because of the presence of carbon even during short time SPS. - Highlights: • TiB{sub 2} reinforced steel matrix composites were produced by spark plasma sintering. • TiB{sub 2} was successfully dispersed in the steel matrix by mechanical alloying. • Steel and TiB{sub 2} react during sintering forming equilibrium Fe{sub 2}B and TiC. • The new phases were investigated by means of AFM, Volta potential and XRD analyses.

  6. Detection of special nuclear materials with the associate particle technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carasco, Cédric; Deyglun, Clément; Pérot, Bertrand; Eléon, Cyrille; Normand, Stéphane; Sannié, Guillaume; Boudergui, Karim; Corre, Gwenolé; Konzdrasovs, Vladimir; Pras, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    In the frame of the French trans-governmental R and D program against chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosives (CBRN-E) threats, CEA is studying the detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) by neutron interrogation with fast neutrons produced by an associated particle sealed tube neutron generator. The deuterium-tritium fusion reaction produces an alpha particle and a 14 MeV neutron almost back to back, allowing tagging neutron emission both in time and direction with an alpha particle position-sensitive sensor embedded in the generator. Fission prompt neutrons and gamma rays induced by tagged neutrons which are tagged by an alpha particle are detected in coincidence with plastic scintillators. This paper presents numerical simulations performed with the MCNP-PoliMi Monte Carlo computer code and with post processing software developed with the ROOT data analysis package. False coincidences due to neutron and photon scattering between adjacent detectors (cross talk) are filtered out to increase the selectivity between nuclear and benign materials. Accidental coincidences, which are not correlated to an alpha particle, are also taken into account in the numerical model, as well as counting statistics, and the time-energy resolution of the data acquisition system. Such realistic calculations show that relevant quantities of SNM (few kg) can be distinguished from cargo and shielding materials in 10 min acquisitions. First laboratory tests of the system under development in CEA laboratories are also presented.

  7. Influence of hard particle addition and chemical interdiffusion on the properties of hot extruded tool steel compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, P.A.; Weber, S.; Inden, G.; Pyzalla, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    Low alloyed steel bars were co-extruded with pre-sintered tool steel powders with the addition of tungsten carbides (W 2 C/WC) as hard particles. During the hot extrusion process of these massive and powdery materials, an extrudate is formed consisting of a completely densified wear resistant coating layer and a bulk steel bar as the tough substrate core. This work combines experimental measurements (EPMA) and diffusion calculations (DICTRA TM ) to investigate the effect of hard particle addition and its dissolution, as well as the formation of M 6 C carbides on the properties of two different PM tool steel coatings hot extruded with a 1.2714 steel bar. A carburization effect resulting from the W 2 C hard particles is responsible for an increase of the 1.2344 steel matrix hardness. The mechanical properties of the interface region between coating matrix and substrate are influenced by chemical interdiffusion of carbon and other alloying elements occurring during heat treatment.

  8. Solvent-accessible surface area: How well can be applied to hot-spot detection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, João M; Ramos, Rui M; Pimenta, António C; Moreira, Irina S

    2014-03-01

    A detailed comprehension of protein-based interfaces is essential for the rational drug development. One of the key features of these interfaces is their solvent accessible surface area profile. With that in mind, we tested a group of 12 SASA-based features for their ability to correlate and differentiate hot- and null-spots. These were tested in three different data sets, explicit water MD, implicit water MD, and static PDB structure. We found no discernible improvement with the use of more comprehensive data sets obtained from molecular dynamics. The features tested were shown to be capable of discerning between hot- and null-spots, while presenting low correlations. Residue standardization such as rel SASAi or rel/res SASAi , improved the features as a tool to predict ΔΔGbinding values. A new method using support machine learning algorithms was developed: SBHD (Sasa-Based Hot-spot Detection). This method presents a precision, recall, and F1 score of 0.72, 0.81, and 0.76 for the training set and 0.91, 0.73, and 0.81 for an independent test set. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Near-infrared detection of ammonium minerals at Ivanhoe Hot Springs, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) data were collected over the fossil hot spring deposit at Ivanhoe, Nevada in order to determine the surface distribution of NH4-bearing minerals. Laboratory studies show that NH4-bearing minerals have characteristic absorption features in the near-infrared (NIR). Ammonium-bearing feldspars and alunites were observed at the surface of Ivanhoe using a hand-held radiometer. However, first look analysis of the AIS images showed that the line was about 500 m east of its intended mark, and the vegetation cover was sufficiently dense to inhibit preliminary attempts at making relative reflectance images for detection of ammonium minerals.

  10. SQUID sensor application for small metallic particle detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Hatsukade, Yoshimi; Ohtani, Takeyoshi; Suzuki, Shuichi

    2009-01-01

    High-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is an ultra-sensitive magnetic sensor. Since the performance of the SQUID is improved and stabilized, now it is ready for application. One strong candidate for application is a detection system of magnetic foreign matters in industrial products or beverages. There is a possibility that ultra-small metallic foreign matter has been accidentally mixed with industrial products such as lithium ion batteries. If this happens, the manufacturer of the product suffers a great loss recalling products. The outer dimension of metallic particles less than 100 μm cannot be detected by an X-ray imaging, which is commonly used for the inspection. Ionization of the material is also a big issue for beverages in the case of the X-ray imaging. Therefore a highly sensitive and safety detection system for small foreign matters is required. We developed detection systems based on high-Tc SQUID with a high-performance magnetic shield. We could successfully measure small iron particles of 100 μm on a belt conveyer and stainless steel balls of 300 μm in water. These detection levels were hard to be achieved by a conventional X-ray detection or other methods

  11. Hot isostatic-pressing diagrams for fine-particle beryllium powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoev, P.I.; Papirov, I.I.; Tikhinskij, G.F.; Vasil'ev, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    Charts of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) for 4 and 8 μm grain beryllium powders are plotted. Values of thickening rates are calculated and their dependences on HIP pressure and temperature are plotted. It is shown, that the relative density powder at growth of HIP pressure and temperature

  12. Detection of charged particles in thick hydrogenated amorphous silicon layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujieda, I.; Cho, G.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Qureshi, S.; Ward, W.; Street, R.A.

    1988-03-01

    We show our results in detecting particles of various linear energy transfer, including minimum ionizing electrons from a Sr-90 source with 5 to 12 micron thick n-i-p and p-i-n diodes. We measured W ( average energy to produce one electron-hole pair) using 17keV filtered xray pulses with a result W = 6.0 /+-/ 0.2eV. This is consistent with the expected value for a semiconductor with band gap of 1.7 to 1.9eV. With heavily ionizing particles such as 6 MeV alphas and 1 to 2 MeV protons, there was some loss of signal due to recombination in the particle track. The minimum ionizing electrons showed no sign of recombination. Applications to pixel and strip detectors for physics experiments and medical imaging will be discussed. 7 refs., 8 figs

  13. Discrimination capability of avalanche counters detecting different ionizing particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prete, G.; Viesti, G.; Padua Univ.

    1985-01-01

    The discrimination capability of avalanche counters to detect different ionizing particles has been studied using a 252 Cf source. Pulse height, pulse-height resolution and timing properties have been measured as a function of the reduced applied voltage for parallel-plate and parallel-grid avalanche counters. At the highest applied voltages, space charge effects shift the pulse-height signal of the avalanche counter away from being linearly proportional to the stopping power of the detected particles and cause the pulse-height resolution to deteriorate. To optimize the avalanche counter capability, without loss of time resolution, it appears better to operate the detector at voltages well below the breakdown threshold. Measurements with 32 S ions are also reported. (orig.)

  14. Experimental study of the form of "hot" steel particles on the ignition characteristics of liquid fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharevich, Arkadiy V.

    2015-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of laws governing the ignition of liquid propellants (kerosene, diesel fuel and petroleum residue) by the single spherical steel particle heated to high temperatures are presented. Is carried out the comparison of the ignition delay times of the investigated flammable substances by the particles in the sphere and disk forms. It is established that the particle shape does not exert a substantial influence on the ignition process characteristics.

  15. Thermal pulse detection of photons and charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riisager, K.; Hansen, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    During the last few years the technique of thermal detection has been developed so that high resolution spectroscopy of single particles is possible. This method seems to yield improvements in energy resolution of about a factor 100 and could thus be of decisive importance for neutrino experiments. The theoretical limits for the resolution and the experimental works performed to data are reviewed and the Goeteborg detector is briefly described. 18 refs

  16. Combined Data with Particle Swarm Optimization for Structural Damage Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Kang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a damage detection method based on combined data of static and modal tests using particle swarm optimization (PSO. To improve the performance of PSO, some immune properties such as selection, receptor editing, and vaccination are introduced into the basic PSO and an improved PSO algorithm is formed. Simulations on three benchmark functions show that the new algorithm performs better than PSO. The efficiency of the proposed damage detection method is tested on a clamped beam, and the results demonstrate that it is more efficient than PSO, differential evolution, and an adaptive real-parameter simulated annealing genetic algorithm.

  17. Simulation of << Hot >> particles formation during the accident at the Chernobyl NPP.; Modelirovanie obrazovaniya << goryachikh >> chastits vo vremya avarii na ChAEhS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashparov, V A; Ivanov, Yu A; Prister, B S; Zvarich, S I; Protsak, V P; Khomutinin, Yu V; Polyakov, V D; Gudkov, A N; Kurepin, A D; Pazukhin, Eh M [Yinstitut Syil` s` kogospodars` koyi Radyiologyiyi, Kyiv (Ukraine); [Moskovskij Inzhenerno-Fizicheskij Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    Dispersal composition of fuel << hot >> particles formed after oxidation of real Chernobyl nuclear fuel in the air for 3-21 hours at 673-1173 K was obtained. Mechanism of ruthenium particles formation during the accident (with dispersion of nuclear fuel) as a result of ruthenium oxidation, its sublimation, condensation and restoration on materials, presented by the elements of iron group was modelled. Dynamics of relative release of fission products, as well as of transuranium and transplutonium elements from real and modeled << hot >> particles at their high temperature incineration (1273-2273 K) in the inert media was measured.

  18. Exposure to Particle Matters and Hazardous Volatile Organic Compounds in Selected Hot Spring Hotels in Guangdong, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiusheng He

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In Guangdong province, many hot springs were exploited and developed into popular places for tourist. In addition, hotels have been set up near hot spring sites to attract people, including local citizens, to spend their spare time inside these so-called “spring hotels”. In our study, indoor air quality was investigated in four hot spring hotels in Guangdong province, China. Measured indoor pollutants included CO2, CO, PM10, PM2.5 and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs. As the result show, high concentrations of carbon dioxide might be attributed to poor ventilation; and the variations of indoor PM10, PM2.5 concentrations were related to occupants’ activities. Alpha-pinene and toluene were the most common VOC species in the hot spring hotels other than monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons like Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene and Xylenes (BTEX, which were at medium levels among the reported indoor pollutants. High cancer risk of benzene in the newly decorated rooms should be seriously taken into consideration in the future. Indoor to Outdoor air concentration ratios (I/O for CO2 and VOCs were higher than 1, indicating their strong indoor sources. Negative correlations were found between indoor CO2 and all the other compounds, and VOCs were shown to be significantly correlated (p < 0.01 to each other, including aromatic hydrocarbons and mono-terpenes. For indoor and outdoor air compounds, correlation coefficients among all compounds did not show a significant correlation, which indicated that these pollutants had different sources. Principal components analysis by SPSS showed that indoor materials, inhabitants’ activities and respiration, cleaning products and outdoor sources were the main sources of indoor detected pollutants in hot spring hotels.

  19. Heat and Mass Transfer at Hot Surface Ignition of Coal Particle

    OpenAIRE

    Glushkov Dmitrii O.; Kosintsev Andrey. G.; Shlegel Nikita E.; Vershinina Ksenia Yu.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental investigations of the characteristics of heat and mass transfer during the conductive heating of a coal particle. We have established the boundary conditions of combustion initiation, and the conditions of thermal decomposition and solid fuel particles decay, characterized by the temperature of a heat source, and the duration of the respective stages.

  20. Detection of alpha particles by means of zinc sulphide screens. Study of their characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaeta, R.; Manero, F.

    1959-01-01

    A method of SZn(Ag) screens preparation in order to detect alpha particles is described. The behaviour of the luminophore in a scintillometer is primarily studied and followed by experimental methods in the preparation of screens with the specific qualities required. A sedimentation technic of SZn(Ag) deposition has been employed, and followed by pressing in hot. The variation of impulse size with the massif thickness of luminophore has been studied, and found a maximum value for 6,5 mg/cm 2 in unpressed screens and 6 mg/cm 2 in the pressed ones. The plateau curves present flat areas till 450 volts. The background in source absence is below 0.5 impulse/minute. (Author) 19 refs

  1. Hot Spots Detection of Operating PV Arrays through IR Thermal Image Using Method Based on Curve Fitting of Gray Histogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall efficiency of PV arrays is affected by hot spots which should be detected and diagnosed by applying responsible monitoring techniques. The method using the IR thermal image to detect hot spots has been studied as a direct, noncontact, nondestructive technique. However, IR thermal images suffer from relatively high stochastic noise and non-uniformity clutter, so the conventional methods of image processing are not effective. The paper proposes a method to detect hotspots based on curve fitting of gray histogram. The result of MATLAB simulation proves the method proposed in the paper is effective to detect the hot spots suppressing the noise generated during the process of image acquisition.

  2. Particle and photon detection for a neutron radiative decay experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, T.R. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)], E-mail: thomas.gentile@nist.gov; Dewey, M.S.; Mumm, H.P.; Nico, J.S.; Thompson, A.K. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Chupp, T.E. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Cooper, R.L. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)], E-mail: cooperrl@umich.edu; Fisher, B.M.; Kremsky, I.; Wietfeldt, F.E. [Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Kiriluk, K.G.; Beise, E.J. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2007-08-21

    We present the particle and photon detection methods employed in a program to observe neutron radiative beta-decay. The experiment is located at the NG-6 beam line at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research. Electrons and protons are guided by a 4.6 T magnetic field and detected by a silicon surface barrier detector. Photons with energies between 15 and 750 keV are registered by a detector consisting of a bismuth germanate scintillator coupled to a large area avalanche photodiode. The photon detector operates at a temperature near 80 K in the bore of a superconducting magnet. We discuss CsI as an alternative scintillator, and avalanche photodiodes for direct detection of photons in the 0.1-10 keV range.

  3. Analysis of a Single Hot Particle by a Combination of Non-Destructive Analytical Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrnecek, E.; Aldave de las Heras, L.; Bielewski, M.; Carlos, R. [EC JRC Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Betti, M. [IAEA Environment Laboratories (Monaco)

    2013-07-15

    Radioactive substances are often released to the environment in the form of particles. The determination of their chemical composition is a key factor in the overall understanding of their environmental behaviour. The aim of this investigation was to identify the source of one single radioactive particle collected from the Irish Sea and to understand its fate in the environment and in human body fluids. As the particle was supposed to be analysed for its dissolution behaviour in humans after ingestion, it was necessary to gain as much information as possible beforehand on the chemical and isotopic composition by means of non-destructive analysis such as SEM, SIMS, {mu}-XRF and {mu}-XANES. In this paper, an overview of the different non-destructive methods applied for the analysis of this particle and the results obtained is given. Additionally, the dissolution behaviour in human digestive solutions is discussed. (author)

  4. A radioactive particle detection system for the Maralinga rehabilitation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, L.J.; Baylis, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    Following the cessation of British nuclear testing at Maralinga, several sites were left contaminated with plutonium in various forms over areas of many square kilometres. The contamination included 239 Pu and 241 Am together with other isotopes of plutonium, and was in the form of fine dust, discrete particles and contaminated fragments of metals, plastics and ceramics. Following a government decision to rehabilitate the area to a standard suitable for re-occupation by the traditional owners, the Maralinga Tjarutja, an expert committee, MARTAC, was convened to advise the Department of Primary Industries and Energy about suitable methods and standards for the cleanup. Criteria set by MARTAC required the removal of all discrete particles of contamination exceeding 100 kBq of 241 Am and imposed limits on the numbers of particles exceeding 20 kBq. A detection system was required which could detect any radioactive particles exceeding criteria and, following rehabilitation, verify that none remained. The most useful indicator of contamination was the 60 keV gamma-ray from 241 Am. The system was fitted to a four wheel drive utility vehicle, and was based on four thin-crystal, sodium iodide detectors of 12.5 cm diameter held 30 cm above ground level. Electronic components from off-the-shelf hand-held ratemeters were used to provide the high voltage supply, amplifier and single channel analyser in a ruggedised form of proven reliability. The combined use of thin crystal detectors and single channel analyser allowed a significant reduction in background count rates while maintaining the efficiency for detection of the 60 keV gamma-ray. To allow efficient and reliable coverage, the vehicle was fitted with a high-resolution speedometer to allow the proper speed to be maintained, and a mapping display, based on the GPS system, which showed the previous path of the vehicle and boundary of the area to be scanned. Whenever a radioactive particle was detected, its coordinates were

  5. Biomarker detection of global infectious diseases based on magnetic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carinelli, Soledad; Martí, Mercè; Alegret, Salvador; Pividori, María Isabel

    2015-09-25

    Infectious diseases affect the daily lives of millions of people all around the world, and are responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths, mostly in the developing world. Although most of these major infectious diseases are treatable, the early identification of individuals requiring treatment remains a major issue. The incidence of these diseases would be reduced if rapid diagnostic tests were widely available at the community and primary care level in low-resource settings. Strong research efforts are thus being focused on replacing standard clinical diagnostic methods, such as the invasive detection techniques (biopsy or endoscopy) or expensive diagnostic and monitoring methods, by affordable and sensitive tests based on novel biomarkers. The development of new methods that are needed includes solid-phase separation techniques. In this context, the integration of magnetic particles within bioassays and biosensing devices is very promising since they greatly improve the performance of a biological reaction. The diagnosis of clinical samples with magnetic particles can be easily achieved without pre-enrichment, purification or pretreatment steps often required for standard methods, simplifying the analytical procedures. The biomarkers can be specifically isolated and preconcentrated from complex biological matrixes by magnetic actuation, increasing specificity and the sensitivity of the assay. This review addresses these promising features of the magnetic particles for the detection of biomarkers in emerging technologies related with infectious diseases affecting global health, such as malaria, influenza, dengue, tuberculosis or HIV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. PARASITIC INTERFERENCE IN LONG BASELINE OPTICAL INTERFEROMETRY: REQUIREMENTS FOR HOT JUPITER-LIKE PLANET DETECTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matter, A.; Lopez, B.; Lagarde, S.; Danchi, W. C.; Robbe-Dubois, S.; Petrov, R. G.; Navarro, R.

    2009-01-01

    The observable quantities in optical interferometry, which are the modulus and the phase of the complex visibility, may be corrupted by parasitic fringes superimposed on the genuine fringe pattern. These fringes are due to an interference phenomenon occurring from stray light effects inside an interferometric instrument. We developed an analytical approach to better understand this phenomenon when stray light causes cross talk between beams. We deduced that the parasitic interference significantly affects the interferometric phase and thus the associated observables including the differential phase and the closure phase. The amount of parasitic flux coupled to the piston between beams appears to be very influential in this degradation. For instance, considering a point-like source and a piston ranging from λ/500 to λ/5 in the L band (λ = 3.5 μm), a parasitic flux of about 1% of the total flux produces a parasitic phase reaching at most one-third of the intrinsic phase. The piston, which can have different origins (instrumental stability, atmospheric perturbations, etc.), thus amplifies the effect of parasitic interference. According to the specifications of piston correction in space or at ground level (respectively λ/500 ∼ 2 nm and λ/30 ∼ 100 nm), the detection of hot Jupiter-like planets, one of the most challenging aims for current ground-based interferometers, limits parasitic radiation to about 5% of the incident intensity. This was evaluated by considering different types of hot Jupiter synthetic spectra. Otherwise, if no fringe tracking is used, the detection of a typical hot Jupiter-like system with a solar-like star would admit a maximum level of parasitic intensity of 0.01% for piston errors equal to λ/15. If the fringe tracking specifications are not precisely observed, it thus appears that the allowed level of parasitic intensity dramatically decreases and may prevent the detection. In parallel, the calibration of the parasitic phase by a

  7. Experimental determination of alpha particle threshold detection in cellulose nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoefell, T.M.J.

    1978-01-01

    LR 115, type II, Kodak-Pathe cellulose nitrate pellicles were irradiated perpendicularly with monoenergetic alpha bemas in the energy range 2,5-5,5 Mev. The alpha particle beams were produced by an intense Am 241 source using Argon as energy attenuating. After irradiations, samples were etched with NaOH solutions without agitation at 60 0 C, by different time periods varying from 15 minutes to 3,5 hours. Measurements of density and track diameter were done using optical microscopy. The sample compositions were done by CHN method of combustion gas analysis showing good agreement with the composition of cellulose trinitrate. From detection threshold and from obtained results, the development of latent tracks only occur for alpha particles with stopping power superior to 0,87 +- 0,06 MeV.cm -2 .mg -1 , was verified. (M.C.K.) [pt

  8. Determination of uranium isotopic composition and 236U content of soil samples and hot particles using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, S F; Becker, J S

    2001-07-01

    As a result of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) the environment was contaminated with spent nuclear fuel. The 236U isotope was used in this study to monitor the spent uranium from nuclear fallout in soil samples collected in the vicinity of the Chernobyl NPP. Nuclear track radiography was applied for the identification and extraction of hot radioactive particles from soil samples. A rapid and sensitive analytical procedure was developed for uranium isotopic ratio measurement in environmental samples based on double-focusing inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (DF-ICP-MS) with a MicroMist nebulizer and a direct injection high-efficiency nebulizer (DIHEN). The performance of the DF-ICP-MS with a quartz DIHEN and plasma shielded torch was studied. Overall detection efficiencies of 4 x 10(-4) and 10(-3) counts per atom were achieved for 238U in DF-ICP-QMS with the MicroMist nebulizer and DIHEN, respectively. The rate of formation of uranium hydride ions UH+/U+ was 1.2 x 10(-4) and 1.4 x 10(-4), respectively. The precision of short-term measurements of uranium isotopic ratios (n = 5) in 1 microg L(-1) NBS U-020 standard solution was 0.11% (238U/235U) and 1.4% (236U/238U) using a MicroMist nebulizer and 0.25% (235U/238U) and 1.9% (236U/P38U) using a DIHEN. The isotopic composition of all investigated Chernobyl soil samples differed from those of natural uranium; i.e. in these samples the 236U/238U ratio ranged from 10(-5) to 10(-3). Results obtained with ICP-MS, alpha- and gamma-spectrometry showed differences in the migration properties of spent uranium, plutonium, and americium. The isotopic ratio of uranium was also measured in hot particles extracted from soil samples.

  9. Determination of uranium isotopic composition and 236U content of soil samples and hot particles using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulyga, S.F.; Becker, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    As a result of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) the environment was contaminated with spent nuclear fuel. The 236 U isotope was used in this study to monitor the spent uranium from nuclear fallout in soil samples collected in the vicinity of the Chernobyl NPP. Nuclear track radiography was applied for the identification and extraction of hot radioactive particles from soil samples. A rapid and sensitive analytical procedure was developed for uranium isotopic ratio measurement in environmental samples based on double-focusing inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (DF-ICP-MS) with a MicroMist nebulizer and a direct injection high-efficiency nebulizer (DIHEN). The performance of the DF-ICP-MS with a quartz DIHEN and plasma shielded torch was studied. Overall detection efficiencies of 4 x 10 -4 and 10 -3 counts per atom were achieved for 238 U in DF-ICP-QMS with the MicroMist nebulizer and DIHEN, respectively. The rate of formation of uranium hydride ions UH + /U + was 1.2 x 10 -4 and 1.4 x 10 -4 , respectively. The precision of short-term measurements of uranium isotopic ratios (n = 5) in 1 μg L -1 NBS U-020 standard solution was 0.11% ( 238 U/ 235 U) and 1.4% ( 236 U/ 238 U) using a MicroMist nebulizer and 0.25% ( 235 U/ 238 U) and 1.9% ( 236 U/ 238 U) using a DIHEN. The isotopic composition of all investigated Chernobyl soil samples differed from those of natural uranium; i.e. in these samples the 236 U/ 238 U ratio ranged from 10 -5 to 10 -3 . Results obtained with ICP-MS, α- and γ-spectrometry showed differences in the migration properties of spent uranium, plutonium, and americium. The isotopic ratio of uranium was also measured in hot particles extracted from soil samples. (orig.)

  10. Detection of hot fallout on Taiwan in the period 1971-1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, P.S.; Chu, T.C.; Hsu, C.N.; Su, S.J.

    1977-01-01

    The observation of fallout during the period of 1971-1975 is presented. Relatively high activity from nuclear tests at Lop Nor off mainland China was detected twice in this period. The gamma-ray spectrum of the hot fallout after the 11th nuclear test is given. The high activity peaks in the figures included are indicated with corresponding dates and sequence number of the tests for easy identification and comparison. The calibration of thermoluminescent dosimeters for the low exposure rates is presented. The gross beta activities are much more likely to build up in milk and surface water samples. Their intensity and duration are more significant than other foodstuff samples, and the timing of their appearance is more predictable. (author)

  11. Can we really measure the internal energy of hot nuclei with a 4 π detection array?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vient, E.; Genouin-Duhamel, E.; Steckmeyer, J.C.

    2001-10-01

    The second generation of high quality detection arrays gave hope to nuclear physicists to finally obtain an experimental equation of state of nuclear matter. In spite of this progress, the measurement of the internal energy of a hot nucleus remains a very difficult task. This paper illustrates this difficulty by a methodological study of a classical technique of excitation energy measurement used in the Fermi energy range. The aim of this study is to verify the validity, the accuracy and the experimental limits of these measurements. It is shown that it is difficult to have a real experimental mastery of the source reconstruction and calorimetry at least for limited bombarding energies and violent collisions. (authors)

  12. Can we really measure the internal energy of hot nuclei with a 4 {pi} detection array?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vient, E.; Genouin-Duhamel, E.; Steckmeyer, J.C. [and others

    2001-10-01

    The second generation of high quality detection arrays gave hope to nuclear physicists to finally obtain an experimental equation of state of nuclear matter. In spite of this progress, the measurement of the internal energy of a hot nucleus remains a very difficult task. This paper illustrates this difficulty by a methodological study of a classical technique of excitation energy measurement used in the Fermi energy range. The aim of this study is to verify the validity, the accuracy and the experimental limits of these measurements. It is shown that it is difficult to have a real experimental mastery of the source reconstruction and calorimetry at least for limited bombarding energies and violent collisions. (authors)

  13. Composition and fate of mine- and smelter-derived particles in soils of humid subtropical and hot semi-arid areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ettler, Vojtěch, E-mail: ettler@natur.cuni.cz [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Albertov 6, 128 43 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Johan, Zdenek [BRGM, Avenue Claude Guillemin, 45082 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Kříbek, Bohdan; Veselovský, František [Czech Geological Survey, Geologická 6, 152 00 Praha 5 (Czech Republic); Mihaljevič, Martin [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Albertov 6, 128 43 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Vaněk, Aleš; Penížek, Vít [Department of Soil Science and Soil Protection, Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129, 165 21 Praha 6 (Czech Republic); Majer, Vladimír [Czech Geological Survey, Geologická 6, 152 00 Praha 5 (Czech Republic); Sracek, Ondra [Department of Geology, Faculty of Science, Palacký University in Olomouc, 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Mapani, Ben; Kamona, Fred [Department of Geology, Faculty of Science, University of Namibia, Private Bag 13301, Windhoek (Namibia); Nyambe, Imasiku [University of Zambia, School of Mines, P. O. Box 32 379, Lusaka (Zambia)

    2016-09-01

    We studied the heavy mineral fraction, separated from mining- and smelter-affected topsoils, from both a humid subtropical area (Mufulira, Zambian Copperbelt) and a hot semi-arid area (Tsumeb, Namibia). High concentrations of metal(loid)s were detected in the studied soils: up to 1450 mg As kg{sup −1}, 8980 mg Cu kg{sup −1}, 4640 mg Pb kg{sup −1}, 2620 mg Zn kg{sup −1}. A combination of X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) helped to identify the phases forming individual metal(loid)-bearing particles. Whereas spherical particles originate from the smelting and flue gas cleaning processes, angular particles have either geogenic origins or they are windblown from the mining operations and mine waste disposal sites. Sulphides from ores and mine tailings often exhibit weathering rims in contrast to smelter-derived high-temperature sulphides (chalcocite [Cu{sub 2}S], digenite [Cu{sub 9}S{sub 5}], covellite [CuS], non-stoichiometric quenched Cu–Fe–S phases). Soils from humid subtropical areas exhibit higher available concentrations of metal(loids), and higher frequencies of weathering features (especially for copper-bearing oxides such as delafossite [Cu{sup 1+} Fe{sup 3+} O{sub 2}]) are observed. In contrast, metal(loid)s are efficiently retained in semi-arid soils, where a high proportion of non-weathered smelter slag particles and low-solubility Ca–Cu–Pb arsenates occur. Our results indicate that compared to semi-arid areas (where inorganic contaminants were rather immobile in soils despite their high concentrations) a higher potential risk exists for agriculture in mine- and smelter-affected humid subtropical areas (where metal(loid) contaminants can be highly available for the uptake by crops). - Highlights: • Mining- and smelter-derived particles identified in subtropical and semi-arid soils • Sulphides, oxides, and metal-bearing arsenates most frequently encountered

  14. Do alien particles exist, and can they be detected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, M.

    2016-07-01

    We may call “alien particles” those particles belonging to the matter/field content of a d-dimensional brane other than the 3-brane (or stack of branes) sweeping the spacetime in which we live. They can appear in our spacetime at the regions of intersection between our and their brane. They can be identified (or not) as alien matter depending on their properties, on the physical laws governing their evolution in the “homeland” brane, and on the details of our detection techniques.

  15. Comparison Between Weisskopf and Thomas-Fermi Model for Particle Emission Widths from Hot Deformed Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surowiec, Aa.; Pomorski, K.; Schmitt, Ch.; Bartel, J.

    2002-01-01

    The emission widths Γ n and Γ p for emission of neutrons and protons are calculated within the Thomas-Fermi model, which we have recently developed, and are compared with those obtained in the usual Weisskopf approach for the case of zero angular momentum. Both methods yield quite similar results at small deformations, but rather important differences are observed for very deformed shapes, in particular for charged particles. A possible generalization of the model for emission of α-particles is also discussed. (author)

  16. PIXE analysis of U and Pu from hot particles: K-lines vs L-lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiménez-Ramos, M.C.; García López, J.; Eriksson, M.

    2012-01-01

    . (2007) [1] and Jiménez-Ramos et al. (2010) [2], radioactive particles from aircraft accidents in Palomares and Thule have been characterized. Using micro-Proton Induced X-ray Emission (μ-PIXE) and confocal X-ray fluorescence microprobe (μ-XRF), the L-lines of the main components in these particles, U......-lines present not overlapping between the main peaks in the spectra and the X-ray absorption in the sample is much lower than for L-lines....

  17. Hot spots effect on infrared spectral luminance emitted by carbon under plasma particles impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delchambre, E.; Reichle, R.; Mitteau, R.; Missirlian, M.; Gobin, R.

    2004-01-01

    During the last Tore Supra campaigns, an anomalous deformation in the near infrared spectrum of radiation has been observed on neutralizer underneath the Toroidal Pumped Limiter (TPL) on which we observed the growth of carbon layer. The consequence is the difficulty to asses the surface temperature of the components and the power loaded. Laboratory experiment has been performed, using an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ions source, to reproduce, characterize and explain this phenomenon. The luminance emitted by Carbon Fibre Composite (CFC) and pyrolytic graphite, have been observed under 95 keV of H+ bombardments. The amplitude of the deformation was found to depend on the type of material used and the power density of the incident power loaded. This paper presents the possible hot spots explanation. The experimental luminance deformation is reproduced and these results are validated using a thermal model of dust in radiate equilibrium. (authors)

  18. Study of fine particles (PM2.5) during the dry-hot time in the Toluca city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosendo G, V.; Aldape U, F.

    2007-01-01

    The first obtained results of the analysis of the fine fraction particulate material (PM 2.5 ) samples collected in the Toluca City are presented. The samples analyzed are part of a more extensive campaign that contemplates the low project the one which one carries out this work and that it integrates three climatic times (dry-hot, of rains and dry-cold time) with the purpose of investigating the events of contamination in one complete year. The obtained results correspond to the dry-hot time and its include mainly the database starting from which the temporal variation graphs were obtained, the correlations among elements and the enrichment factor, as well as a multiple correlation analysis. Additionally the gravimetry was measured. Its are not observed significant episodes, however, it was found an element of the traces order, little common in other atmospheric studies as it is arsenic. From the gravimetry it was deduced that the air quality standard of fine particle, it does not violate. (Author)

  19. Measurements of meteor smoke particles during the ECOMA-2006 campaign: 1. Particle detection by active photoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Markus; Strelnikova, Irina

    2009-03-01

    We present a new design of an in situ detector for the study of meteor smoke particles (MSPs) in the middle atmosphere. This detector combines a classical Faraday cup with a xenon-flashlamp for the active photoionization/photodetachment of MSPs and the subsequent detection of corresponding photoelectrons. This instrument was successfully launched in September 2006 from the Andøya Rocket Range in Northern Norway. A comparison of photocurrents measured during this rocket flight and measurements performed in the laboratory proves that observed signatures are truly due to photoelectrons. In addition, the observed altitude cut-off at 60 km (i.e., no signals were observed below this altitude) is fully understood in terms of the mean free path of the photoelectrons in the ambient atmosphere. This interpretation is also proven by a corresponding laboratory experiment. Consideration of all conceivable species which can be ionized by the photons of the xenon-flashlamp demonstrates that only MSPs can quantitatively explain the measured currents below an altitude of 90 km. Above this altitude, measured photocurrents are most likely due to photoionization of nitric oxide. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the active photoionization and subsequent detection of photoelectrons provides a promising new tool for the study of MSPs in the middle atmosphere. Importantly, this new technique does not rely on the a priori charge of the particles, neither is the accessible particle size range severely limited by aerodynamical effects. Based on the analysis described in this study, the geophysical interpretation of our measurements is presented in the companion paper by Strelnikova, I., et al. [2008. Measurements of meteor smoke particles during the ECOMA-2006 campaign: 2. results. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics, this issue, doi:10.1016/j.jastp.2008.07.011].

  20. Transit detections of extrasolar planets around main-sequence stars. I. Sky maps for hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, R.; Mislis, D.; Antoniadis, J.

    2009-12-01

    Context: The findings of more than 350 extrasolar planets, most of them nontransiting Hot Jupiters, have revealed correlations between the metallicity of the main-sequence (MS) host stars and planetary incidence. This connection can be used to calculate the planet formation probability around other stars, not yet known to have planetary companions. Numerous wide-field surveys have recently been initiated, aiming at the transit detection of extrasolar planets in front of their host stars. Depending on instrumental properties and the planetary distribution probability, the promising transit locations on the celestial plane will differ among these surveys. Aims: We want to locate the promising spots for transit surveys on the celestial plane and strive for absolute values of the expected number of transits in general. Our study will also clarify the impact of instrumental properties such as pixel size, field of view (FOV), and magnitude range on the detection probability. Methods: We used data of the Tycho catalog for ≈1 million objects to locate all the stars with 0^m~≲~m_V~≲~11.5m on the celestial plane. We took several empirical relations between the parameters listed in the Tycho catalog, such as distance to Earth, m_V, and (B-V), and those parameters needed to account for the probability of a star to host an observable, transiting exoplanet. The empirical relations between stellar metallicity and planet occurrence combined with geometrical considerations were used to yield transit probabilities for the MS stars in the Tycho catalog. Magnitude variations in the FOV were simulated to test whether this fluctuations would be detected by BEST, XO, SuperWASP and HATNet. Results: We present a sky map of the expected number of Hot Jupiter transit events on the basis of the Tycho catalog. Conditioned by the accumulation of stars towards the galactic plane, the zone of the highest number of transits follows the same trace, interrupted by spots of very low and high

  1. Detection of minimum-ionizing particles in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, S.N.; Fujieda, I.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Qureshi, S.; Ward, W.; Street, R.A.

    1987-09-01

    Based on previously-reported results of the successful detection of alpha particles and 1- and 2-MeV protons with hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si : H) diodes, detection of a single minimum-ionizing particle will require a total sensitive thickness of approximately 100 to 150 μm, either in the form of a single thick diode, or as a stack of several thinner diodes. Signal saturation at high dE/dx makes it necessary to simulate minimum ionization in order to evaluate present detectors. Two techniques, using pulsed infrared light, and pulsed x-rays, give single-pulse signals large enough for direct measurements. A third, using beta rays, requires multiple-transit signal averaging to produce signals measurable above noise. Signal amplitudes from the a-Si : H limit at 60% of the signal size from Si crystals extrapolated to the same thickness. This is consistent with an a-Si : H radiation ionization energy, W = 6 eV/electron-hole pair. Beta-ray signals are observed at the expected amplitude

  2. Evolution of particle clouds around ablating pellets in magnetically confined hot plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengyel, L.L.

    1991-08-01

    Cryogenic hydrogen isotope pellets are being currently used for introducing fuel particles into the palsma interior in magnetic confinement fusion experiments. The spatial and time evolution of the initially low-temperature high-density particle clouds forming around such pellets are considered here, with particular attention being given to such physical processes as heating of the cloud by the energy fluxes carried by incident plasma particles, gasdynamic expansion with j vectorxB vector - produced deceleration in the transverse direction, finite-rate ionization and recombination processes, and magnetic field convection and diffusion. While the dynamic processes associated with the ionization and radial confinement processes are characterized by the relatively short Alfven time scale (μs range), the subsequent phase of axial expansion is associated with a notably larger hadrodynamic time scale defined by the heat input and gasdynamic expansion rates (ms range). Data stemming from experimental measurements in toroidal confinement machines are compared with results of model calculations. Some similarities with space plasmas are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  3. DETECTING THE WARM-HOT INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM THROUGH X-RAY ABSORPTION LINES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Yangsen; Shull, J. Michael; Cash, Webster; Wang, Q. Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) at temperatures 10 5 -10 7 K is believed to contain 30%-50% of the baryons in the local universe. However, all current X-ray detections of the WHIM at redshifts z > 0 are of low statistical significance (∼ Ovii ∼10 15 cm -2 (corresponding to an equivalent width of 2.5 mÅ for a Doppler velocity of 50 km s –1 ) at ∼> 3σ significance level. The simulation results also suggest that it would take >60 Ms for Chandra and 140 Ms for XMM-Newton to measure the N Ovii at ≥4σ from a spectrum of a background QSO with flux of ∼0.2 mCrab (1 Crab = 2 × 10 –8 erg s –1 cm –2 at 0.5-2 keV). Future X-ray spectrographs need to be equipped with spectral resolution R ∼ 4000 and effective area A ≥ 100 cm 2 to accomplish the similar constraints with an exposure time of ∼2 Ms and would require ∼11 Ms to survey the 15 QSOs with flux ∼> 0.2 mCrab along which clear intergalactic O VI absorbers have been detected.

  4. Quantitative SERS Detection of Dopamine in Cerebrospinal Fluid by Dual-Recognition-Induced Hot Spot Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kun; Liu, Yu; Wang, Yuning; Zhang, Ren; Liu, Jiangang; Wei, Jia; Qian, Hufei; Qian, Kun; Chen, Ruoping; Liu, Baohong

    2018-05-09

    Reliable profiling of the extracellular dopamine (DA) concentration in the central nervous system is essential for a deep understanding of its biological and pathological functions. However, quantitative determination of this neurotransmitter remains a challenge because of the extremely low concentration of DA in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients. Herein, on the basis of the specific recognition of boronate toward diol and N-hydroxysuccinimide ester toward the amine group, a simple and highly sensitive strategy was presented for DA detection by using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy as a signal readout. This was realized by first immobilizing 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid di( N-hydroxysuccinimide ester) on gold thin film surfaces to capture DA, followed by introducing 3-mercaptophenylboronic acid (3-MPBA)-functionalized silver nanoparticles to generate numerous plasmonic "hot spots" with the nanoparticle-on-mirror geometry. Such a dual-recognition mechanism not only avoids complicated bioelement-based manipulations but also efficiently decreases the background signal. With the direct use of the recognition probe 3-MPBA as a Raman reporter, the "signal-on" SERS method was employed to quantify the concentration of DA from 1 pM to 1 μM with a detection limit of 0.3 pM. Moreover, our dual-recognition-directed SERS assay exhibited a high resistance to cerebral interference and was successfully applied to monitoring of DA in CSF samples of patients.

  5. A Review on Hot-IP Finding Methods and Its Application in Early DDoS Target Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Dau Hoang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available On the high-speed connections of the Internet or computer networks, the IP (Internet Protocol packet traffic passing through the network is extremely high, and that makes it difficult for network monitoring and attack detection applications. This paper reviews methods to find the high-occurrence-frequency elements in the data stream and applies the most efficient methods to find Hot-IPs that are high-frequency IP addresses of IP packets passing through the network. Fast finding of Hot-IPs in the IP packet stream can be effectively used in early detection of DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service attack targets and spreading sources of network worms. Research results show that the Count-Min method gives the best overall performance for Hot-IP detection thanks to its low computational complexity, low space requirement and fast processing speed. We also propose an early detection model of DDoS attack targets based on Hot-IP finding, which can be deployed on the target network routers.

  6. Improved method for detection of “hot spots” in microelectronic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov V. M.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available New method of liquid crystal thermography of “hot spots” in crystals of microelectronic products have been developed. The method is based on the use of local cholesteric phase image of “hot spot” in transparent smectic phase of cholesteric liquid crystal against a background of clearly visible topological elements on the surface of microelectronic device crystal. Examples of “hot spot” images in crystals of different types of integrated circuits are shown.

  7. CMOS-based avalanche photodiodes for direct particle detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapels, Christopher J.; Squillante, Michael R.; Lawrence, William G.; Augustine, Frank L.; Christian, James F.

    2007-01-01

    Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology are augmenting Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) as imaging devices and cameras in some demanding optical imaging applications. Radiation Monitoring Devices are investigating the APS concept for nuclear detection applications and has successfully migrated avalanche photodiode (APD) pixel fabrication to a CMOS environment, creating pixel detectors that can be operated with internal gain as proportional detectors. Amplification of the signal within the diode allows identification of events previously hidden within the readout noise of the electronics. Such devices can be used to read out a scintillation crystal, as in SPECT or PET, and as direct-conversion particle detectors. The charge produced by an ionizing particle in the epitaxial layer is collected by an electric field within the diode in each pixel. The monolithic integration of the readout circuitry with the pixel sensors represents an improved design compared to the current hybrid-detector technology that requires wire or bump bonding. In this work, we investigate designs for CMOS APD detector elements and compare these to typical values for large area devices. We characterize the achievable detector gain and the gain uniformity over the active area. The excess noise in two different pixel structures is compared. The CMOS APD performance is demonstrated by measuring the energy spectra of X-rays from 55 Fe

  8. Microwave kinetic inductance detectors for astronomy and particle detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Christian; Monfardini, Alessandro [Institut Neel, CNRS and Universite J. Fourier, Grenoble (France); Roesch, Markus; Schuster, Karl [IRAM, St. Martin d' Heres (France)

    2011-07-01

    A new type of superconducting detector, the Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector, has recently drawn the attention of the low-temperature detector community. Easy fabrication, high sensitivity, low time constants and most notably the intrinsic capability to frequency multiplexing open new possibilities to applications that need very large array sizes and/or high speed read-out. We develop detector arrays for applications in the domain of astronomy, particle detection, phonon imaging and Helium-physics based on Lumped Element KIDs (LEKIDs). In a LEKID a resonant circuit composed of a discrete inductance and capacitance is coupled to a transmission line. The constant current density in the inductive part makes it a very efficient detector for em-radiation and particles. In this contribution we discuss detector principle, design and measured characteristics. Then we focus on the application for a millimeter wavelength camera, successfully tested at the IRAM 30-meter telescope at Pico Veleta, Spain in October 2010. The current instrument contains two arrays at 100 mK with more than 100 pixels on one read-out-line each for observations at 1.3 and 2 mm. The performances are the best achieved as of today for groundbased KIDs with sensitivities already comparable with existing (horns-coupled bolometers) instruments.

  9. Polycrystalline CVD diamond device level modeling for particle detection applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozzi, A.; Passeri, D.; Kanxheri, K.; Servoli, L.; Lagomarsino, S.; Sciortino, S.

    2016-12-01

    Diamond is a promising material whose excellent physical properties foster its use for radiation detection applications, in particular in those hostile operating environments where the silicon-based detectors behavior is limited due to the high radiation fluence. Within this framework, the application of Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) simulation tools is highly envisaged for the study, the optimization and the predictive analysis of sensing devices. Since the novelty of using diamond in electronics, this material is not included in the library of commercial, state-of-the-art TCAD software tools. In this work, we propose the development, the application and the validation of numerical models to simulate the electrical behavior of polycrystalline (pc)CVD diamond conceived for diamond sensors for particle detection. The model focuses on the characterization of a physically-based pcCVD diamond bandgap taking into account deep-level defects acting as recombination centers and/or trap states. While a definite picture of the polycrystalline diamond band-gap is still debated, the effect of the main parameters (e.g. trap densities, capture cross-sections, etc.) can be deeply investigated thanks to the simulated approach. The charge collection efficiency due to β -particle irradiation of diamond materials provided by different vendors and with different electrode configurations has been selected as figure of merit for the model validation. The good agreement between measurements and simulation findings, keeping the traps density as the only one fitting parameter, assesses the suitability of the TCAD modeling approach as a predictive tool for the design and the optimization of diamond-based radiation detectors.

  10. Detection of alpha particles using DNA/Al Schottky junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ta' ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber, E-mail: hassankirkukly@gmail.com, E-mail: vengadeshp@um.edu.my [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre (LDMRC), 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Al-Muthana, Al-Muthana 66001 (Iraq); Periasamy, Vengadesh, E-mail: hassankirkukly@gmail.com, E-mail: vengadeshp@um.edu.my [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre (LDMRC), 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Amin, Yusoff Mohd [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-09-21

    Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA can be utilized in an organic-metallic rectifying structure to detect radiation, especially alpha particles. This has become much more important in recent years due to crucial environmental detection needs in both peace and war. In this work, we fabricated an aluminum (Al)/DNA/Al structure and generated current–voltage characteristics upon exposure to alpha radiation. Two models were utilized to investigate these current profiles; the standard conventional thermionic emission model and Cheung and Cheung's method. Using these models, the barrier height, Richardson constant, ideality factor and series resistance of the metal-DNA-metal structure were analyzed in real time. The barrier height, Φ value calculated using the conventional method for non-radiated structure was 0.7149 eV, increasing to 0.7367 eV after 4 min of radiation. Barrier height values were observed to increase after 20, 30 and 40 min of radiation, except for 6, 8, and 10 min, which registered a decrease of about 0.67 eV. This was in comparison using Cheung and Cheung's method, which registered 0.6983 eV and 0.7528 eV for the non-radiated and 2 min of radiation, respectively. The barrier height values, meanwhile, were observed to decrease after 4 (0.61 eV) to 40 min (0.6945 eV). The study shows that conventional thermionic emission model could be practically utilized for estimating the diode parameters including the effect of series resistance. These changes in the electronic properties of the Al/DNA/Al junctions could therefore be utilized in the manufacture of sensitive alpha particle sensors.

  11. Polycrystalline CVD diamond device level modeling for particle detection applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozzi, A.; Passeri, D.; Kanxheri, K.; Servoli, L.; Lagomarsino, S.; Sciortino, S.

    2016-01-01

    Diamond is a promising material whose excellent physical properties foster its use for radiation detection applications, in particular in those hostile operating environments where the silicon-based detectors behavior is limited due to the high radiation fluence. Within this framework, the application of Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) simulation tools is highly envisaged for the study, the optimization and the predictive analysis of sensing devices. Since the novelty of using diamond in electronics, this material is not included in the library of commercial, state-of-the-art TCAD software tools. In this work, we propose the development, the application and the validation of numerical models to simulate the electrical behavior of polycrystalline (pc)CVD diamond conceived for diamond sensors for particle detection. The model focuses on the characterization of a physically-based pcCVD diamond bandgap taking into account deep-level defects acting as recombination centers and/or trap states. While a definite picture of the polycrystalline diamond band-gap is still debated, the effect of the main parameters (e.g. trap densities, capture cross-sections, etc.) can be deeply investigated thanks to the simulated approach. The charge collection efficiency due to β -particle irradiation of diamond materials provided by different vendors and with different electrode configurations has been selected as figure of merit for the model validation. The good agreement between measurements and simulation findings, keeping the traps density as the only one fitting parameter, assesses the suitability of the TCAD modeling approach as a predictive tool for the design and the optimization of diamond-based radiation detectors.

  12. Generalized Boltzmann equations for on-shell particle production in a hot plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakovac, A.

    2002-01-01

    A novel refinement of the conventional treatment of Kadanoff-Baym equations is suggested. In addition to the Boltzmann equation, another differential equation is used for calculating the evolution of the nonequilibrium two-point function. Although it was usually interpreted as a constraint on the solution of the Boltzmann equation, we argue that its dynamics is relevant to the determination and resummation of the particle production cut contributions. The differential equation for this new contribution is illustrated in the example of the cubic scalar model. The analogue of the relaxation time approximation is suggested. It results in the shift of the threshold location and in a smearing out of the nonanalytic threshold behavior of the spectral function. The possible consequences for the dilepton production are discussed

  13. A Detection of the Same Hot Plasma in the Corona: During a CME and Later at Ulysses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, S. T.; Poletto, G.

    2004-01-01

    We show direct evidence for the same very hot plasma being detected remotely from SOHO in the corona and subsequently, at Ulysses in the solar wind. This is, to our knowledge, the first time that such an unambiguous identification has been made in the case of hot plasma. This detection complements studies correlating other plasma and field properties observed to the properties measured at the source in the corona. This observation takes advantage of a SOHO-Sun-Ulysses quadrature, during which the Sun-Ulysses included angle is $90^\\circ$ and it is possible to observe with Ulysses instruments the same plasma that has previously been remotely observed with SOHO instruments in the corona on the limb of the Sun. The identification builds on an existing base of separate SOHO and interplanetary detections of hot plasma. SOHO/UVCS has found evidence for very hot coronal plasma in current sheets in the aftermath of CMEs in the [Fe XVIII] $\\lambda$ \\AA\\ line, implying a temperature on the order of $6\\times 10(exp 6)$ K. This temperature is unusually high even for active regions, but is compatible with the high temperature predicted in current sheets. In the solar wind, ACE data from early 1998 to middle 2000 revealed high frozen-in Fe charge state in many cases to be present in interplanetary plasma.

  14. Terahertz imaging and spectroscopy based on hot electron bolometer (HEB) heterodyne detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerecht, Eyal; You, Lixing

    2008-02-01

    Imaging and spectroscopy at terahertz frequencies have great potential for healthcare, plasma diagnostics, and homeland security applications. Terahertz frequencies correspond to energy level transitions of important molecules in biology and astrophysics. Terahertz radiation (T-rays) can penetrate clothing and, to some extent, can also penetrate biological materials. Because of their shorter wavelengths, they offer higher spatial resolution than do microwaves or millimeter waves. We are developing hot electron bolometer (HEB) mixer receivers for heterodyne detection at terahertz frequencies. HEB detectors provide unprecedented sensitivity and spectral resolution at terahertz frequencies. We describe the development of a two-pixel focal plane array (FPA) based on HEB technology. Furthermore, we have demonstrated a fully automated, two-dimensional scanning, passive imaging system based on our HEB technology operating at 0.85 THz. Our high spectral resolution terahertz imager has a total system noise equivalent temperature difference (NEΔT) value of better than 0.5 K and a spatial resolution of a few millimeters. HEB technology is becoming the basis for advanced terahertz imaging and spectroscopic technologies for the study of biological and chemical agents over the entire terahertz spectrum.

  15. Detection of ligand binding hot spots on protein surfaces via fragment-based methods: application to DJ-1 and glucocerebrosidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landon, Melissa R.; Lieberman, Raquel L.; Hoang, Quyen Q.; Ju, Shulin; Caaveiro, Jose M.M.; Orwig, Susan D.; Kozakov, Dima; Brenke, Ryan; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Beglov, Dmitry; Vajda, Sandor; Petsko, Gregory A.; Ringe, Dagmar; (BU-M); (Brandeis); (GIT)

    2010-08-04

    The identification of hot spots, i.e., binding regions that contribute substantially to the free energy of ligand binding, is a critical step for structure-based drug design. Here we present the application of two fragment-based methods to the detection of hot spots for DJ-1 and glucocerebrosidase (GCase), targets for the development of therapeutics for Parkinson's and Gaucher's diseases, respectively. While the structures of these two proteins are known, binding information is lacking. In this study we employ the experimental multiple solvent crystal structures (MSCS) method and computational fragment mapping (FTMap) to identify regions suitable for the development of pharmacological chaperones for DJ-1 and GCase. Comparison of data derived via MSCS and FTMap also shows that FTMap, a computational method for the identification of fragment binding hot spots, is an accurate and robust alternative to the performance of expensive and difficult crystallographic experiments.

  16. Towards a generalized Landau theory of quasi-particles for hot dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leermakers, R.

    1985-01-01

    In this thesis it is tried to construct a Landau quasi-particle theory for relativistic systems, using field-theoretical methods. It includes a perturbative calculation of the pressure of a quark-gluon plasma. It reports the existence of a hitherto unnoticed plasmon contribution of the order g 3 due to transverse quasi-gluons. A new and Lorentz covariant formulation of the Landau theory is being developed, for a general relativistic system. A detailed calculation is presented of the observables of a quantum electrodynamical (QED) plasma, in lowest orders of perturbation theory. A transverse plasmon effect is discovered, both analytically and numerically. In addition, the analysis shows quasi-electrons and positrons to be stable excitations at any temperature. This is proven in all orders of perturbation theory. Along with a Landau theory for quark-gluon matter, a linearized kinetic equation is derived for the singlet quark distribution function, with a collision term for soft encounters between quasi-quarks. (Auth.)

  17. In-vitro analysis of the dissolution kinetics and systemic availability of plutonium ingested in the form of 'hot' particles from the Semipalatinsk NTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, M; León Vintró, L; Mitchell, P I; García-Tenorio, R; Jimenez-Ramos, M C; Burkitbayev, M; Priest, N D

    2009-05-01

    In-vitro leaching of radioactive 'hot' particles isolated from soils sampled at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site has been carried out in order to evaluate the fraction of plutonium activity released into simulated human stomach and small intestine fluids during digestion. Characterisation of the particles (10-100 Bq(239,240)Pu) and investigation of their dissolution kinetics in simulated fluids has been accomplished using a combination of high-resolution alpha-spectrometry, gamma-spectrometry and liquid scintillation counting. The results of these analyses indicate that plutonium transfer across the human gut following the ingestion of 'hot' particles can be up to two orders of magnitude lower than that expected for plutonium in a more soluble form, and show that for areas affected by local fallout, use of published ingestion dose coefficients, together with bulk radionuclide concentrations in soil, may lead to a considerable overestimation of systemic uptake via the ingestion pathway.

  18. In-vitro analysis of the dissolution kinetics and systemic availability of plutonium ingested in the form of 'hot' particles from the Semipalatinsk NTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, M. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Leon Vintro, L. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)], E-mail: luis.leon@ucd.ie; Mitchell, P.I. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Jimenez-Ramos, M.C. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sevilla, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Burkitbayev, M. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Priest, N.D. [School of Health and Social Sciences, Middlesex University, Queensway, Enfield EN3 4SA (United Kingdom)

    2009-05-15

    In-vitro leaching of radioactive 'hot' particles isolated from soils sampled at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site has been carried out in order to evaluate the fraction of plutonium activity released into simulated human stomach and small intestine fluids during digestion. Characterisation of the particles (10-100 Bq {sup 239,240}Pu) and investigation of their dissolution kinetics in simulated fluids has been accomplished using a combination of high-resolution alpha-spectrometry, gamma-spectrometry and liquid scintillation counting. The results of these analyses indicate that plutonium transfer across the human gut following the ingestion of 'hot' particles can be up to two orders of magnitude lower than that expected for plutonium in a more soluble form, and show that for areas affected by local fallout, use of published ingestion dose coefficients, together with bulk radionuclide concentrations in soil, may lead to a considerable overestimation of systemic uptake via the ingestion pathway.

  19. X-ray emission of the hot gas and of accelerated particles in supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acero, F.

    2008-09-01

    The current observations seem to support the theory that the shock wave of supernova remnants accelerate electrons (representing about 1% of cosmic rays) of the interstellar medium up to energies of about 10 15 eV. However there is still no solid evidence that supernova remnants also accelerate protons (major component of cosmic rays). The X-ray observations of those supernova remnants with the satellite XMM-Newton can provide crucial information on the acceleration mechanisms and on this population of accelerated particles. This thesis presents the X-ray analysis of the supernova remnants RX J1713.7-3946 and SN 1006 for which it has been shown that they accelerate electrons efficiently. As a result, these objects are very good targets to compare the theoretical models of acceleration to the observation. For the first object, I constructed through new XMM-Newton observations, the first high-angular resolution mosaic of the entire supernova remnant. I then compared the X- and gamma-ray emission of this object in order to understand the nature of the gamma-ray emission. This spectral and morphological comparison allowed me to discuss the two possible origins of the gamma-ray radiation (issued by electrons or by protons). For SN 1006, I studied the density of the ambient medium in which the shock wave propagates. This density is a key parameter for the hydrodynamical evolution of the remnant and for studying a future gamma-ray emission. The study of X-ray emission of the gas heated by the shock wave allowed me to better estimate of the value of the density so far poorly constrained for this object. (author)

  20. Methodology and software to detect viral integration site hot-spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Modern gene therapy methods have limited control over where a therapeutic viral vector inserts into the host genome. Vector integration can activate local gene expression, which can cause cancer if the vector inserts near an oncogene. Viral integration hot-spots or 'common insertion sites' (CIS) are scrutinized to evaluate and predict patient safety. CIS are typically defined by a minimum density of insertions (such as 2-4 within a 30-100 kb region), which unfortunately depends on the total number of observed VIS. This is problematic for comparing hot-spot distributions across data sets and patients, where the VIS numbers may vary. Results We develop two new methods for defining hot-spots that are relatively independent of data set size. Both methods operate on distributions of VIS across consecutive 1 Mb 'bins' of the genome. The first method 'z-threshold' tallies the number of VIS per bin, converts these counts to z-scores, and applies a threshold to define high density bins. The second method 'BCP' applies a Bayesian change-point model to the z-scores to define hot-spots. The novel hot-spot methods are compared with a conventional CIS method using simulated data sets and data sets from five published human studies, including the X-linked ALD (adrenoleukodystrophy), CGD (chronic granulomatous disease) and SCID-X1 (X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency) trials. The BCP analysis of the human X-linked ALD data for two patients separately (774 and 1627 VIS) and combined (2401 VIS) resulted in 5-6 hot-spots covering 0.17-0.251% of the genome and containing 5.56-7.74% of the total VIS. In comparison, the CIS analysis resulted in 12-110 hot-spots covering 0.018-0.246% of the genome and containing 5.81-22.7% of the VIS, corresponding to a greater number of hot-spots as the data set size increased. Our hot-spot methods enable one to evaluate the extent of VIS clustering, and formally compare data sets in terms of hot-spot overlap. Finally, we show that the

  1. Determination of uranium isotopic composition and {sup 236}U content of soil samples and hot particles using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulyga, S.F. [Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Inst., Minsk (Belarus); Becker, J.S. [Central Department for Analytical Chemistry, Research Centre Juelich (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    As a result of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) the environment was contaminated with spent nuclear fuel. The {sup 236}U isotope was used in this study to monitor the spent uranium from nuclear fallout in soil samples collected in the vicinity of the Chernobyl NPP. Nuclear track radiography was applied for the identification and extraction of hot radioactive particles from soil samples. A rapid and sensitive analytical procedure was developed for uranium isotopic ratio measurement in environmental samples based on double-focusing inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (DF-ICP-MS) with a MicroMist nebulizer and a direct injection high-efficiency nebulizer (DIHEN). The performance of the DF-ICP-MS with a quartz DIHEN and plasma shielded torch was studied. Overall detection efficiencies of 4 x 10{sup -4} and 10{sup -3} counts per atom were achieved for {sup 238}U in DF-ICP-QMS with the MicroMist nebulizer and DIHEN, respectively. The rate of formation of uranium hydride ions UH{sup +}/U{sup +} was 1.2 x 10{sup -4} and 1.4 x 10{sup -4}, respectively. The precision of short-term measurements of uranium isotopic ratios (n = 5) in 1 {mu}g L{sup -1} NBS U-020 standard solution was 0.11% ({sup 238}U/{sup 235}U) and 1.4% ({sup 236}U/{sup 238}U) using a MicroMist nebulizer and 0.25% ({sup 235}U/{sup 238}U) and 1.9% ({sup 236}U/{sup 238}U) using a DIHEN. The isotopic composition of all investigated Chernobyl soil samples differed from those of natural uranium; i.e. in these samples the {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U ratio ranged from 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -3}. Results obtained with ICP-MS, {alpha}- and {gamma}-spectrometry showed differences in the migration properties of spent uranium, plutonium, and americium. The isotopic ratio of uranium was also measured in hot particles extracted from soil samples. (orig.)

  2. Technical Note: The single particle soot photometer fails to reliably detect PALAS soot nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gysel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The single particle soot photometer (SP2 uses laser-induced incandescence (LII for the measurement of atmospheric black carbon (BC particles. The BC mass concentration is obtained by combining quantitative detection of BC mass in single particles with a counting efficiency of 100% above its lower detection limit. It is commonly accepted that a particle must contain at least several tenths of a femtogram BC in order to be detected by the SP2.

    Here we show the result that most BC particles from a PALAS spark discharge soot generator remain undetected by the SP2, even if their BC mass, as independently determined with an aerosol particle mass analyser (APM, is clearly above the typical lower detection limit of the SP2. Comparison of counting efficiency and effective density data of PALAS soot with flame generated soot (combustion aerosol standard burner, CAST, fullerene soot and carbon black particles (Cabot Regal 400R reveals that particle morphology can affect the SP2's lower detection limit. PALAS soot particles are fractal-like agglomerates of very small primary particles with a low fractal dimension, resulting in a very low effective density. Such loosely packed particles behave like "the sum of individual primary particles" in the SP2's laser. Accordingly, most PALAS soot particles remain undetected as the SP2's laser intensity is insufficient to heat the primary particles to their vaporisation temperature because of their small size (Dpp ≈ 5–10 nm. Previous knowledge from pulsed laser-induced incandescence indicated that particle morphology might have an effect on the SP2's lower detection limit, however, an increase of the lower detection limit by a factor of ∼5–10, as reported here for PALAS soot, was not expected.

    In conclusion, the SP2's lower detection limit at a certain laser power depends primarily on the total BC mass per particle for compact particles with sufficiently high effective

  3. DETECTING THE WARM-HOT INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM THROUGH X-RAY ABSORPTION LINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Yangsen; Shull, J. Michael; Cash, Webster [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Wang, Q. Daniel, E-mail: yaoys@colorado.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2012-02-20

    The warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) at temperatures 10{sup 5}-10{sup 7} K is believed to contain 30%-50% of the baryons in the local universe. However, all current X-ray detections of the WHIM at redshifts z > 0 are of low statistical significance ({approx}< 3{sigma}) and/or controversial. In this work, we aim to establish the detection limits of current X-ray observatories and explore requirements for next-generation X-ray telescopes for studying the WHIM through X-ray absorption lines. We analyze all available grating observations of Mrk 421 and obtain spectra with signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) of {approx}90 and 190 per 50 mA spectral bin from Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, respectively. Although these spectra are two of the best ever collected with Chandra and XMM-Newton, we cannot confirm the two WHIM systems reported by Nicastro et al. in 2005. Our bootstrap simulations indicate that spectra with such high S/N cannot constrain the WHIM with O VII column densities N{sub Ovii}{approx}10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} (corresponding to an equivalent width of 2.5 mA for a Doppler velocity of 50 km s{sup -1}) at {approx}> 3{sigma} significance level. The simulation results also suggest that it would take >60 Ms for Chandra and 140 Ms for XMM-Newton to measure the N{sub Ovii} at {>=}4{sigma} from a spectrum of a background QSO with flux of {approx}0.2 mCrab (1 Crab = 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} at 0.5-2 keV). Future X-ray spectrographs need to be equipped with spectral resolution R {approx} 4000 and effective area A {>=} 100 cm{sup 2} to accomplish the similar constraints with an exposure time of {approx}2 Ms and would require {approx}11 Ms to survey the 15 QSOs with flux {approx}> 0.2 mCrab along which clear intergalactic O VI absorbers have been detected.

  4. Experimental studies of the acoustic detection of particle showers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulak, L.R.; Bowen, T.; Pifer, B.

    1977-01-01

    The scale and characteristics required of a detector that will measure ultrahigh-energy cosmic ray neutrino interactions have been studied in detail. Results obtained to date in observing acoustic signals from hadronic showers both at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Harvard University are reported. It is suggested that ultrasonic particle detection is possible, currently down to the level of 10 14 eV. This simple, inexpensive technique may be ideal for observing the secondaries produced in a massive (10 9 ton) neutrino detector. Three experimental tests were performed to determine if showers produce detectable sonic signals as recently predicted. One at the 200-MeV linac at BNL used heavily ionizing protons stopping in water (range = 30 cm) with total energy depositions between 10 19 and 20 21 eV and deposition times ranging from 3 μs to 200 μs. The diameter of the beam was fixed at 6 cm (a characteristic time of 30 μs). A similar test was done at the 160-MeV cyclotron at Harvard, where the energy deposition could be decreased to 10 15 eV. A third test was done with minimum ionizing protons from the 28-GeV fast extracted beam at BNL. As in the BNL linac test, the beam could not be tuned below energy depositions of 10 19 . Typically 3 x 10 11 protons traversed 30 cm of water during a deposition time of 2 μs with a beam diameter variable between 5 and 20 cm

  5. Hot spot detection and spatio-temporal dispersion of dengue fever in Hanoi, Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do Thi Thanh Toan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dengue fever (DF in Vietnam remains a serious emerging arboviral disease, which generates significant concerns among international health authorities. Incidence rates of DF have increased significantly during the last few years in many provinces and cities, especially Hanoi. The purpose of this study was to detect DF hot spots and identify the disease dynamics dispersion of DF over the period between 2004 and 2009 in Hanoi, Vietnam. Methods: Daily data on DF cases and population data for each postcode area of Hanoi between January 1998 and December 2009 were obtained from the Hanoi Center for Preventive Health and the General Statistic Office of Vietnam. Moran's I statistic was used to assess the spatial autocorrelation of reported DF. Spatial scan statistics and logistic regression were used to identify space–time clusters and dispersion of DF. Results: The study revealed a clear trend of geographic expansion of DF transmission in Hanoi through the study periods (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.02–1.34. The spatial scan statistics showed that 6/14 (42.9% districts in Hanoi had significant cluster patterns, which lasted 29 days and were limited to a radius of 1,000 m. The study also demonstrated that most DF cases occurred between June and November, during which the rainfall and temperatures are highest. Conclusions: There is evidence for the existence of statistically significant clusters of DF in Hanoi, and that the geographical distribution of DF has expanded over recent years. This finding provides a foundation for further investigation into the social and environmental factors responsible for changing disease patterns, and provides data to inform program planning for DF control.

  6. Hot spot detection and spatio-temporal dispersion of dengue fever in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toan, Do Thi Thanh; Hu, Wenbiao; Quang Thai, Pham; Hoat, Luu Ngoc; Wright, Pamela; Martens, Pim

    2013-01-24

    Dengue fever (DF) in Vietnam remains a serious emerging arboviral disease, which generates significant concerns among international health authorities. Incidence rates of DF have increased significantly during the last few years in many provinces and cities, especially Hanoi. The purpose of this study was to detect DF hot spots and identify the disease dynamics dispersion of DF over the period between 2004 and 2009 in Hanoi, Vietnam. Daily data on DF cases and population data for each postcode area of Hanoi between January 1998 and December 2009 were obtained from the Hanoi Center for Preventive Health and the General Statistic Office of Vietnam. Moran's I statistic was used to assess the spatial autocorrelation of reported DF. Spatial scan statistics and logistic regression were used to identify space-time clusters and dispersion of DF. The study revealed a clear trend of geographic expansion of DF transmission in Hanoi through the study periods (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.02-1.34). The spatial scan statistics showed that 6/14 (42.9%) districts in Hanoi had significant cluster patterns, which lasted 29 days and were limited to a radius of 1,000 m. The study also demonstrated that most DF cases occurred between June and November, during which the rainfall and temperatures are highest. There is evidence for the existence of statistically significant clusters of DF in Hanoi, and that the geographical distribution of DF has expanded over recent years. This finding provides a foundation for further investigation into the social and environmental factors responsible for changing disease patterns, and provides data to inform program planning for DF control.

  7. Development of detection method for individual environmental particles containing alpha radioactive nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esaka, Konomi; Yasuda, Kenichiro; Esaka, Fumitaka; Magara, Masaaki; Sakurai, Satoshi; Usuda, Shigekazu; Nakayama, Shinichi

    2006-01-01

    Artificial radioactive nuclides have been emitted from various sources and have fallen on the surface of the earth as fine particles. Although the characterization of the individual fallout particles is very important, their analysis is difficult. The purpose of this study is to develop a new detection method for individual objective particles containing radioactive nuclides in the environment. The soil or sediment sample was confined in a plastic film and the locations of objective particles were identified with alpha tracks created in a solid-state detectors (BARYOTRAK, Fukuvi Chemical, Ltd) stuck to the both sides of the plastic film. A piece of the film containing the objective particle was cut with a nitrogen laser for following individual particle analysis. This procedure allowed us to detect the objective particle from innumerable number of particles in the environment and characterize the individual particles. (author)

  8. [Research on the temperature field detection method of hot forging based on long-wavelength infrared spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Cun; Wei, Bin; Fu, Xian-Bin

    2014-02-01

    A temperature field detection method based on long-wavelength infrared spectrum for hot forging is proposed in the present paper. This method combines primary spectrum pyrometry and three-stage FP-cavity LCTF. By optimizing the solutions of three group nonlinear equations in the mathematical model of temperature detection, the errors are reduced, thus measuring results will be more objective and accurate. Then the system of three-stage FP-cavity LCTF was designed on the principle of crystal birefringence. The system realized rapid selection of any wavelength in a certain wavelength range. It makes the response of the temperature measuring system rapid and accurate. As a result, without the emissivity of hot forging, the method can acquire exact information of temperature field and effectively suppress the background light radiation around the hot forging and ambient light that impact the temperature detection accuracy. Finally, the results of MATLAB showed that the infrared spectroscopy through the three-stage FP-cavity LCTF could meet the requirements of design. And experiments verified the feasibility of temperature measuring method. Compared with traditional single-band thermal infrared imager, the accuracy of measuring result was improved.

  9. [Rapid detection of hot spot mutations of FGFR3 gene with PCR-high resolution melting assay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan; Wang, Han; Su, Hua; Gao, Jinsong; Zhao, Xiuli

    2017-08-10

    To identify the causative mutations in five individuals affected with dyschondroplasia and develop an efficient procedure for detecting hot spot mutations of the FGFR3 gene. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples with a standard phenol/chloroform method. PCR-Sanger sequencing was used to analyze the causative mutations in the five probands. PCR-high resolution melting (HRM) was developed to detect the identified mutations. A c.1138G>A mutation in exon 8 was found in 4 probands, while a c.1620C>G mutation was found in exon 11 of proband 5 whom had a mild phenotype. All patients were successfully distinguished from healthy controls with the PCR-HRM method. The results of HRM analysis were highly consistent with that of Sanger sequencing. The Gly380Arg and Asn540Lys are hot spot mutations of the FGFR3 gene among patients with ACH/HCH. PCR-HRM analysis is more efficient for detecting hot spot mutations of the FGFR3 gene.

  10. Exploring molecular complexity with ALMA (EMoCA): Detection of three new hot cores in Sagittarius B2(N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfand, M.; Belloche, A.; Menten, K. M.; Garrod, R. T.; Müller, H. S. P.

    2017-08-01

    Context. The Sagittarius B2 molecular cloud contains several sites forming high-mass stars. Sgr B2(N) is one of its main centers of activity. It hosts several compact and ultra-compact HII regions, as well as two known hot molecular cores (Sgr B2(N1) and Sgr B2(N2)) in the early stage of the high-mass star formation process, where complex organic molecules (COMs) are detected in the gas phase. Aims: Our goal is to use the high sensitivity of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to characterize the hot core population in Sgr B2(N) and thereby shed new light on the star formation process in this star-forming region. Methods: We use a complete 3 mm spectral line survey conducted with ALMA to search for faint hot cores in the Sgr B2(N) region. The chemical composition of the detected sources and the column densities are derived by modeling the whole spectra under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. Population diagrams are constructed to fit rotational temperatures. Integrated intensity maps are produced to derive the peak position and fit the size of each molecule's emission distribution. The kinematic structure of the hot cores is investigated by analyzing the line wing emission of typical outflow tracers. The H2 column densities are computed from ALMA and SMA continuum emission maps. Results: We report the discovery of three new hot cores in Sgr B2(N) that we call Sgr B2(N3), Sgr B2(N4), and Sgr B2(N5). The three sources are associated with class II methanol masers, well known tracers of high-mass star formation, and Sgr B2(N5), also with a UCHII region. Their H2 column densities are found to be between approximately 16 and 36 times lower than the one of the main hot core Sgr B2(N1). The spectra of these new hot cores have spectral line densities of 11 up to 31 emission lines per GHz above the 7σ level, assigned to 22-25 molecules plus 13-20 less abundant isotopologs. We derive rotational temperatures of approximately 140-180 K for

  11. An integrated micro-chip for rapid detection of magnetic particles

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.; Liang, Cai; Giouroudi, Ioanna; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes an integrated micro-chip for the manipulation and detection of magnetic particles (MPs). A conducting ring structure is used to manipulate MPs toward giant magnetoresistance(GMR) sensing elements for rapid detection

  12. Development of detection techniques for a single-particle of fissile material(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, S. C.; Kim, W. H.; Park, Y. J.; Song, B. C.; Jeon, Y. S.; Jee, K. Y.; Pyo, H. Y.; Kwack, E. H

    2001-06-01

    The Analytical methods and detection limit of signatures, and the particle discrimination techniques of unknown particles by microscope were investigated in this technical report. In connection with pre-treatment of swipe samples, sampling and treatment of particles, etching method, fission track observation and the preparation of sample for the neutron activation analysis were also described in this thchnical report.

  13. Development of detection techniques for a single-particle of fissile material(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, S. C.; Kim, W. H.; Park, Y. J.; Song, B. C.; Jeon, Y. S.; Jee, K. Y.; Pyo, H. Y.; Kwack, E. H.

    2001-06-01

    The Analytical methods and detection limit of signatures, and the particle discrimination techniques of unknown particles by microscope were investigated in this technical report. In connection with pre-treatment of swipe samples, sampling and treatment of particles, etching method, fission track observation and the preparation of sample for the neutron activation analysis were also described in this thchnical report

  14. Detecting particle dark matter signatures by cross-correlating γ-ray anisotropies with weak lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera, S.; Fornasa, M.; Fornengo, N.; Regis, M.

    2016-05-01

    The underlying nature of dark matter still represents one of the fundamental questions in contemporary cosmology. Although observations well agree with its description in terms of a new fundamental particle, neither direct nor indirect signatures of its particle nature have been detected so far, despite a strong experimental effort. Similarly, particle accelerators have hitherto failed at producing dark matter particles in collider physics experiments. Here, we illustrate how the cross-correlation between anisotropies in the diffuse γ-ray background and weak gravitational lensing effects represents a novel promising way in the quest of detecting particle dark matter signatures.

  15. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) detection or hot atom reaction product internal energy distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quick, C.R. Jr.; Moore, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is being utilized to investigate the rovibrational energy distributions produced by reactive and nonreactive collisions of translationally hot atoms with simple molecules. Translationally hot H atoms are produced by ArF laser photolysis of HBr. Using CARS we have monitored, in a state-specific and time-resolved manner, rotational excitation of HBr (v = 0), vibrational excitation of HBr and H 2 , rovibrational excitation of H 2 produced by the reaction H + HBr → H 2 + Br, and Br atom production by photolysis of HBr

  16. A Machine Learning Approach for Hot-Spot Detection at Protein-Protein Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melo, Rita; Fieldhouse, Robert; Melo, André; Correia, João D G; Cordeiro, Maria Natália D S; Gümüş, Zeynep H; Costa, Joaquim; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; de Sousa Moreira, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Understanding protein-protein interactions is a key challenge in biochemistry. In this work, we describe a more accurate methodology to predict Hot-Spots (HS) in protein-protein interfaces from their native complex structure compared to previous published Machine Learning (ML) techniques. Our model

  17. Hot-Volumes as Uniform and Reproducible SERS-Detection Enhancers in Weakly-Coupled Metallic Nanohelices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caridad, José M.; Winters, Sinéad; McCloskey, David; Duesberg, Georg S.; Donegan, John F.; Krstić, Vojislav

    2017-03-01

    Reproducible and enhanced optical detection of molecules in low concentrations demands simultaneously intense and homogeneous electric fields acting as robust signal amplifiers. To generate such sophisticated optical near-fields, different plasmonic nanostructures were investigated in recent years. These, however, exhibit either high enhancement factor (EF) or spatial homogeneity but not both. Small interparticle gaps or sharp nanostructures show enormous EFs but no near-field homogeneity. Meanwhile, approaches using rounded and separated monomers create uniform near-fields with moderate EFs. Here, guided by numerical simulations, we show how arrays of weakly-coupled Ag nanohelices achieve both homogeneous and strong near-field enhancements, reaching even the limit forreproducible detection of individual molecules. The unique near-field distribution of a single nanohelix consists of broad hot-spots, merging with those from neighbouring nanohelices in specific array configurations and generating a wide and uniform detection zone (“hot-volume”). We experimentally assessed these nanostructures via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, obtaining a corresponding EF of ~107 and a relative standard deviation <10%. These values demonstrate arrays of nanohelices as state-of-the-art substrates for reproducible optical detection as well as compelling nanostructures for related fields such as near-field imaging.

  18. A practical methodology of radiological protection for the reduction of hot particles in BWR type reactors; Una metodologia practica de proteccion radiologica para la reduccion de particulas calientes en reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez G, G [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Gerencia del Proyecto Nucleoelectrico Laguna Verde, Disciplina de Fisica Aplicada (Mexico)

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this work, in general form, is to describe a practical method for reduction of hot particles generated as consequence of the operational activities of BWR nuclear reactors. This methodology provides a description of the localizations and/or probable activities of finding particles highly radioactive denominated hot particles. For this purpose it was developed a strategy based on the decontamination lineaments, as well as the manipulation, gathering, registration, contention, documentation, control and final disposition of the hot particles. In addition, some recommendations are reiterated and alternative, in order to gathering the hot particles in a dynamic way given to the activities of the personal occupationally exposed in highly radioactive areas. The structure of the methodology of hot particles is supported in the radiological controls based on the Code of Federal Regulation 10 CFR 20 as well as the applicable regulatory documents. It provides an idea based on administrative controls of radiological protection, in order to suggesting the responsibilities and necessary directing for the control of the hot particles required in nuclear plants of the BWR type. (author)

  19. An approach to calculating metal particle detection in lubrication oil based on a micro inductive sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu; Zhang, Hongpeng

    2017-12-01

    A new microfluidic chip is presented to enhance the sensitivity of a micro inductive sensor, and an approach to coil inductance change calculation is introduced for metal particle detection in lubrication oil. Electromagnetic knowledge is used to establish a mathematical model of an inductive sensor for metal particle detection, and the analytic expression of coil inductance change is obtained by a magnetic vector potential. Experimental verification is carried out. The results show that copper particles 50-52 µm in diameter have been detected; the relative errors between the theoretical and experimental values are 7.68% and 10.02% at particle diameters of 108-110 µm and 50-52 µm, respectively. The approach presented here can provide a theoretical basis for an inductive sensor in metal particle detection in oil and other areas of application.

  20. A basic study on lesion detectability for hot spot imaging of positron emitters with dedicated PET and positron coincidence gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hong; Inoue, Tomio; Tian, Mei; Alyafei, Saleh; Oriuchi, Noboru; Khan, Nasim; Endo, Keigo; Li Sijin

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the correlations of detectability and the semi-quantification for hot spot imaging with positron emitters in positron emission tomography (PET) and with a positron coincidence detection system (PCD). Phantom study results for the measurement of the lesion-to-background (L/B) ratio ranged from 2.0 to 30.3, and detectability for hot spot lesion of PET and PCD were performed to correspond to clinical conditions. The detectability and semi-quantitative evaluation of hot spots from 4.4 mm to 36.9 mm in diameter were performed from the PET and PCD images. There were strong correlations between the L/B ratios derived from PET and PCD hot spot images and actual L/B ratios; but the L/B ratio derived from PET was higher than that from PCD with a significant difference of 10% to 54.8%. The detectability of hot spot imaging of PCD was lower than that of PET at 64.8% (PCD) versus 77.8% (PET). Even the actual L/B ratio was 8.0, hot spots more than 10.6 mm in diameter could be clearly identified with PCD imaging. The same identification could be achieved with PET imaging even when the actual L/B ratio was 4.0. This detailed investigation indicated that FDG PCD yielded results comparable to FDG PET on visual analysis and semi-quantitative analysis in detecting hot spots in phantoms, but semi-quantitative analysis of the L/B ratio with FDG PCD was inferior to that with FDG PET and the detectability of PCD in smaller hot spots was significantly poor. (author)

  1. Detection of hot gas in clusters of galaxies by observation of the microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gull, S.F.; Northover, K.J.E.

    1976-01-01

    It is stated that satellite observations have indicated that many rich clusters are powerful sources of x-rays. This has been interpreted as due to either thermal bremsstrahlung from very hot gas filling the clusters or as inverse Compton scattering of photons by relativistic electrons. Spectral evidence appears to favour a thermal origin for the radiation, implying the existence of large amounts of hot gas. This gas may be a major constituent of the Universe, and independent confirmation of its existence is very important. Observations are here reported of small diminutions in the cosmic microwave background radiation in the direction of several rich clusters of galaxies. This is considered to confirm the existence of large amounts of very hot gas in these clusters and to indicate that the x-radiation is thermal bremsstrahlung and not inverse Compton emission. The observations were made in 1975/1976 using the 25m. telescope at the SRC Appleton Laboratory at a frequency of 10.6 GH2, and details are given of the technique employed. (U.K.)

  2. A detection method of negative pionlike particles from a H2 gas discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uramoto, Joshin.

    1996-02-01

    The negative pionlike particles π - penetrate a metal (or insulator) plate if positive ions produced secondarily by H - ions, diffuse to the back of the plate. Thus, the π - particles are not detected by a usual beam collector of mass analyzer using a metal plate. In order to detect the π - particles, we must interrupt the diffusion of the positive ions to the back of the beam collector while the π - particles are confined inside the beam collector and changed into a multiplied electron current. (author)

  3. Aircraft Aerodynamic Parameter Detection Using Micro Hot-Film Flow Sensor Array and BP Neural Network Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiyi Que

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Air speed, angle of sideslip and angle of attack are fundamental aerodynamic parameters for controlling most aircraft. For small aircraft for which conventional detecting devices are too bulky and heavy to be utilized, a novel and practical methodology by which the aerodynamic parameters are inferred using a micro hot-film flow sensor array mounted on the surface of the wing is proposed. A back-propagation neural network is used to model the coupling relationship between readings of the sensor array and aerodynamic parameters. Two different sensor arrangements are tested in wind tunnel experiments and dependence of the system performance on the sensor arrangement is analyzed.

  4. Cryogenic detection of particles: Development effort in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadoulet, B.

    1987-05-01

    The development of cryogenic detectors of particles, with emphasis on large mass devices, has been reviewed. Most groups are still tooling up and exploring basic properties of sensors. The main discussion themes are summarized and some of the early experimental results are described

  5. Detection of charged particles in amorphous silicon layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Morel, J.; Kaplan, S.N.; Street, R.A.

    1986-02-01

    The successful development of radiation detectors made from amorphous silicon could offer the possibility for relatively easy construction of large area position-sensitive detectors. We have conducted a series of measurements with prototype detectors, on signals derived from alpha particles. The measurement results are compared with simple model calculations, and projections are made of potential applications in high-energy and nuclear physics

  6. Detection systems for high energy particle producing gaseous ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, L.; Duran, I.

    1985-01-01

    This report contains a review on the most used detectors based on the collection of the ionization produced by high energy particles: proportional counters, multiwire proportional chambers, Geiger-Muller counters and drift chambers. In six sections, the fundamental principles, the field configuration and useful gas mixtures, are discussed, most relevant devices are reported along 90 pages with 98 references. (Author) 98 refs

  7. Nano sized clay detected on chalk particle surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Lone; Hassenkam, Tue; Makovicky, Emil

    2012-01-01

    that in calcite saturated water, both the polar and the nonpolar functional groups adhere to the nano sized clay particles but not to calcite. This is fundamentally important information for the development of conceptual and chemical models to explain wettability alterations in chalk reservoirs...

  8. Detection systems for high energy particle producing gaseous ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez, L.

    1985-01-01

    This report contains a review on the most used detectors based on the collection of the ionization produced by high energy particles: proportional counters, multiwire proportional chambers, Geiger-Mueller counters and drift chambers. In six sections, the fundamental principles, the field configuration and useful gas mixtures are discussed, most relevant devices are reported. (author)

  9. Fault detection and isolation in GPS receiver autonomous integrity monitoring based on chaos particle swarm optimization-particle filter algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ershen; Jia, Chaoying; Tong, Gang; Qu, Pingping; Lan, Xiaoyu; Pang, Tao

    2018-03-01

    The receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) is one of the most important parts in an avionic navigation system. Two problems need to be addressed to improve this system, namely, the degeneracy phenomenon and lack of samples for the standard particle filter (PF). However, the number of samples cannot adequately express the real distribution of the probability density function (i.e., sample impoverishment). This study presents a GPS receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) method based on a chaos particle swarm optimization particle filter (CPSO-PF) algorithm with a log likelihood ratio. The chaos sequence generates a set of chaotic variables, which are mapped to the interval of optimization variables to improve particle quality. This chaos perturbation overcomes the potential for the search to become trapped in a local optimum in the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm. Test statistics are configured based on a likelihood ratio, and satellite fault detection is then conducted by checking the consistency between the state estimate of the main PF and those of the auxiliary PFs. Based on GPS data, the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively detect and isolate satellite faults under conditions of non-Gaussian measurement noise. Moreover, the performance of the proposed novel method is better than that of RAIM based on the PF or PSO-PF algorithm.

  10. The use of Nanotrap particles in the enhanced detection of Rift Valley fever virus nucleoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazly Shafagati

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV is a highly pathogenic arthropod-borne virus that has a detrimental effect on both livestock and human populations. While there are several diagnostic methodologies available for RVFV detection, many are not sensitive enough to diagnose early infections. Furthermore, detection may be hindered by high abundant proteins such as albumin. Previous findings have shown that Nanotrap particles can be used to significantly enhance detection of various small analytes of low abundance. We have expanded upon this repertoire to show that this simple and efficient sample preparation technology can drastically improve the detection of the RVFV nucleoprotein (NP, the most abundant and widely used viral protein for RVFV diagnostics.After screening multiple Nanotrap particle architectures, we found that one particle, NT45, was optimal for RVFV NP capture, as demonstrated by western blotting. NT45 significantly enhanced detection of the NP at levels undetectable without the technology. Importantly, we demonstrated that Nanotrap particles are capable of concentrating NP in a number of matrices, including infected cell lysates, viral supernatants, and animal sera. Specifically, NT45 enhanced detection of NP at various viral titers, multiplicity of infections, and time points. Our most dramatic results were observed in spiked serum samples, where high abundance serum proteins hindered detection of NP without Nanotrap particles. Nanotrap particles allowed for sample cleanup and subsequent detection of RVFV NP. Finally, we demonstrated that incubation of our samples with Nanotrap particles protects the NP from degradation over extended periods of time (up to 120 hours and at elevated temperatures (at 37ºC.This study demonstrates that Nanotrap particles are capable of drastically lowering the limit of detection for RVFV NP by capturing, concentrating, and preserving RVFV NP in clinically relevant matrices. These studies can be extended to

  11. Detection of charged particles in amorphous silicon layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, S.N.; Morel, J.R.; Mulera, T.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Schnurmacher, G.; Street, R.A.

    1985-10-01

    The successful development of radiation detectors made from amorphous silicon could offer the possibility for relatively easy construction of large area position-sensitive detectors. We have conducted a series of measurements with prototype detectors, on signals derived from alpha particles. The measurement results are compared with simple model calculations, and projections are made of potential applications in high-energy and nuclear physics. 4 refs., 7 figs

  12. The nature of (sub-)micrometre cometary dust particles detected with MIDAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannel, T.; Bentley, M. S.; Torkar, K.; Jeszenszky, H.; Romstedt, J.; Schmied, R.

    2015-10-01

    The MIDAS Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) onboard Rosetta collects dust particles and produces three-dimensional images with nano- to micrometre resolution. To date, several tens of particles have been detected, allowing determination of their properties at the smallest scale. The key features will be presented, including the particle size, their fragile character, and their morphology. These findings will be compared with the results of other Rosetta dust experiments.

  13. Structure-selective hot-spot Raman enhancement for direct identification and detection of trace penicilloic acid allergen in penicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liying; Jin, Yang; Mao, Hui; Zheng, Lei; Zhao, Jiawei; Peng, Yan; Du, Shuhu; Zhang, Zhongping

    2014-08-15

    Trace penicilloic acid allergen frequently leads to various fatal immune responses to many patients, but it is still a challenge to directly discriminate and detect its residue in penicillin by a chemosensing way. Here, we report that silver-coated gold nanoparticles (Au@Ag NPs) exhibit a structure-selective hot-spot Raman enhancement capability for direct identification and detection of trace penicilloic acid in penicillin. It has been demonstrated that penicilloic acid can very easily link Au@Ag NPs together by its two carboxyl groups, locating itself spontaneously at the interparticle of Au@Ag NPs to form strong Raman hot-spot. At the critical concentration inducing the nanoparticle aggregation, Raman-enhanced effect of penicilloic acid is ~60,000 folds higher than that of penicillin. In particular, the selective Raman enhancement to the two carboxyl groups makes the peak of carboxyl group at C6 of penicilloic acid appear as a new Raman signal due to the opening of β-lactam ring of penicillin. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticle sensor reaches a sensitive limit lower than the prescribed 1.0‰ penicilloic acid residue in penicillin. The novel strategy to examine allergen is more rapid, convenient and inexpensive than the conventional separation-based assay methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cantilever-based micro-particle filter with simultaneous single particle detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noeth, Nadine-Nicole; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Boisen, Anja

    2011-01-01

    Currently, separation of whole blood samples on lab-on-a-chip systems is achieved via filters followed by analysis of the filtered matter such as counting of blood cells. Here, a micro-chip based on cantilever technology is developed, which enables simultaneous filtration and counting of micro-particles...... from a liquid. A hole-array is integrated into a micro-cantilever, which is inserted into a microfluidic channel perpendicular to the flow. A metal pad at the apex of the cantilever enables an optical read-out of the deflection of the cantilever. When a micro-particle is too large to pass a hole...

  15. Scintillating optical fibres and the detection of very short lived particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    The application of scintillating fiber optics to the problem of heavy flavour particle detection in both fixed target and collider experiments is reviewed. Brief specifications for both fibres and read-out systems are given. (orig.)

  16. Design of a confocal microfluidic particle sorter using fluorescent photon burst detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, B.H.; Schots, A.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2004-01-01

    An instrumental system is described for detecting and sorting single fluorescent particles such as microspheres, bacteria, viruses, or even smaller macromolecules in a flowing liquid. The system consists of microfluidic chips (biochips), computer controlled high voltage power supplies, and a

  17. Study of a ;hot; particle with a matrix of U-bearing metallic Zr: Clue to supercriticality during the Chernobyl nuclear accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöml, P.; Burakov, B.

    2017-05-01

    This paper is dedicated to the 30th anniversary of the severe nuclear accident that occurred at the Chernobyl NPP on 26 April 1986. A detailed study on a Chernobyl "hot" particle collected from contaminated soil was performed. Optical and electron microscopy, as well as quantitative x-ray microbeam analysis methods were used to determine the properties of the sample. The results show that the particle (≈ 240 x 165 μm) consists of a metallic Zr matrix containing 2-3 wt. % U and bearing veins of an U,Nb admixture. The metallic Zr matrix contains two phases with different amounts of O with the atomic proportions (U,Zr,Nb)0.73O0.27 and (U,Zr,Nb)0.61O0.39. The results confirm the interaction between UO2 fuel and zircaloy cladding in the reactor core. To explain the process of formation of the particle, its properties are compared to laboratory experiments. Because of the metallic nature of the particle it is concluded that it must have formed during a very high temperature (> 2400∘C) process that lasted for only a very short time (few microseconds or less); otherwise the particle should have been oxidised. Such a rapid very high temperature process indicates that at least part of the reactor core could have been supercritical prior to an explosion as it was previously suggested in the literature.

  18. Particle Swarm Optimization approach to defect detection in armour ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesharaju, Manasa; Nagarajah, Romesh

    2017-03-01

    In this research, various extracted features were used in the development of an automated ultrasonic sensor based inspection system that enables defect classification in each ceramic component prior to despatch to the field. Classification is an important task and large number of irrelevant, redundant features commonly introduced to a dataset reduces the classifiers performance. Feature selection aims to reduce the dimensionality of the dataset while improving the performance of a classification system. In the context of a multi-criteria optimization problem (i.e. to minimize classification error rate and reduce number of features) such as one discussed in this research, the literature suggests that evolutionary algorithms offer good results. Besides, it is noted that Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) has not been explored especially in the field of classification of high frequency ultrasonic signals. Hence, a binary coded Particle Swarm Optimization (BPSO) technique is investigated in the implementation of feature subset selection and to optimize the classification error rate. In the proposed method, the population data is used as input to an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) based classification system to obtain the error rate, as ANN serves as an evaluator of PSO fitness function. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Magnetospheric particle detection efficiency of a conical telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, M.A.; Mitchell, J.W.; Wefel, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    A semianalytic program has been developed to map the pitch angles of magnetospheric particles onto a detector telescope acceptance cone. The telescope fractional efficiency is defined as the fraction of the pitch angle cone in common with the telescope cone multiplied by the fractional perpendicular component of the exposed detector area, and normalized by 2π. Calculations have been performed as a function of the satellite's location, orbital inclination and the zenith angle of the telescope axis, both in dipole and real geomagnetic field models. At the dipole equator, the peak efficiency occurs at 90 0 pitch angle. In the real geomagnetic field model, the average value of the pitch angle for maximum efficiency is ≅ 88 0 . The efficiency function depends strongly upon latitude and is independent of longitude in a dipole field, but depends on longitude in the real field model. In either field model, altitude, angle of tilt and orbital inclination have little effect upon efficiency. The efficiency function calculated at the dipole equator can be used at the minimum magnetic field equator with little error, but not for points away from the B min position. The results are applied to calculate the absolute flux of magnetospheric particles observed near the equator. (orig.)

  20. Acoustic particle detection - From early ideas to future benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahnhauer, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The history of acoustic neutrino detection technology is shortly reviewed from the first ideas 50 years ago to the detailed R and D programs of the last decade. The physics potential of ultra-high energy neutrino interaction studies is discussed for some examples. Ideas about the necessary detector size and suitable design are presented.

  1. Single particle detection: Phase control in submicron Hall sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Michele, Lorenzo; Shelly, Connor; Gallop, John; Kazakova, Olga

    2010-01-01

    We present a phase-sensitive ac-dc Hall magnetometry method which allows a clear and reliable separation of real and parasitic magnetic signals of a very small magnitude. High-sensitivity semiconductor-based Hall crosses are generally accepted as a preferential solution for non-invasive detection of superparamagnetic nanobeads used in molecular biology, nanomedicine, and nanochemistry. However, detection of such small beads is often hindered by inductive pick-up and other spurious signals. The present work demonstrates an unambiguous experimental route for detection of small magnetic moments and provides a simple theoretical background for it. The reliability of the method has been tested for a variety of InSb Hall sensors in the range 600 nm-5 μm. Complete characterization of empty devices, involving Hall coefficients and noise measurements, has been performed and detection of a single FePt bead with diameter of 140 nm and magnetic moment of μ≅10 8 μ B has been achieved with a 600 nm-wide sensor.

  2. Standoff alpha radiation detection for hot cell imaging and crime scene investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerst, Thomas; Sand, Johan; Ihantola, Sakari; Peräjärvi, Kari; Nicholl, Adrian; Hrnecek, Erich; Toivonen, Harri; Toivonen, Juha

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents the remote detection of alpha contamination in a nuclear facility. Alpha-active material in a shielded nuclear radiation containment chamber has been localized by optical means. Furthermore, sources of radiation danger have been identified in a staged crime scene setting. For this purpose, an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device camera was used to capture photons generated by alpha-induced air scintillation (radioluminescence). The detected radioluminescence was superimposed with a regular photograph to reveal the origin of the light and thereby the alpha radioactive material. The experimental results show that standoff detection of alpha contamination is a viable tool in radiation threat detection. Furthermore, the radioluminescence spectrum in the air is spectrally analyzed. Possibilities of camera-based alpha threat detection under various background lighting conditions are discussed.

  3. Minimum ionizing particle detection using amorphous silicon diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, J.; Hollingsworth, R.E.; Buitrago, R.H. (Glasstech Solar, Inc., Wheat Ridge, CO (USA)); Oakley, D.; Cumalat, J.P.; Nauenberg, U. (Colorado Univ., Boulder (USA). Dept. of Physics); McNeil, J.A. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden (USA). Dept. of Physics); Anderson, D.F. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Perez-Mendez, V. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon pin diodes have been used to detect minimum ionizing electrons with a pulse height signal-to-noise ratio exceeding 3. A distinct signal was seen for shaping times from 100 to 3000 ns. The devices used had a 54 {mu}m thick intrinsic layer and an active area of 0.1 cm{sup 2}. The maximum signal was 3200 electrons with a noise width of 950 electrons for a shaping time of 250 ns. (orig.).

  4. Single Molecule Raman Detection of Enkephalin on Silver Colloidal Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Holger; Abdali, Salim

    2004-01-01

    the Raman signal the enkephalin molecules have been attached to silver colloidal cluster structures. The experiments demonstrate that the SERS signal of the strongly enhanced ring breathing vibration of phenylalanine at 1000 cm-1 can be used as “intrinsic marker” for detecting a single enkephalin molecule...... and for monitoring its diffusion on the surface of the silver colloidal cluster without using a specific label molecule....

  5. Online platform for applying space–time scan statistics for prospectively detecting emerging hot spots of dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chou Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cases of dengue fever have increased in areas of Southeast Asia in recent years. Taiwan hit a record-high 42,856 cases in 2015, with the majority in southern Tainan and Kaohsiung Cities. Leveraging spatial statistics and geo-visualization techniques, we aim to design an online analytical tool for local public health workers to prospectively identify ongoing hot spots of dengue fever weekly at the village level. Methods A total of 57,516 confirmed cases of dengue fever in 2014 and 2015 were obtained from the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (TCDC. Incorporating demographic information as covariates with cumulative cases (365 days in a discrete Poisson model, we iteratively applied space–time scan statistics by SaTScan software to detect the currently active cluster of dengue fever (reported as relative risk in each village of Tainan and Kaohsiung every week. A village with a relative risk >1 and p value <0.05 was identified as a dengue-epidemic area. Assuming an ongoing transmission might continuously spread for two consecutive weeks, we estimated the sensitivity and specificity for detecting outbreaks by comparing the scan-based classification (dengue-epidemic vs. dengue-free village with the true cumulative case numbers from the TCDC’s surveillance statistics. Results Among the 1648 villages in Tainan and Kaohsiung, the overall sensitivity for detecting outbreaks increases as case numbers grow in a total of 92 weekly simulations. The specificity for detecting outbreaks behaves inversely, compared to the sensitivity. On average, the mean sensitivity and specificity of 2-week hot spot detection were 0.615 and 0.891 respectively (p value <0.001 for the covariate adjustment model, as the maximum spatial and temporal windows were specified as 50% of the total population at risk and 28 days. Dengue-epidemic villages were visualized and explored in an interactive map. Conclusions We designed an online analytical tool for

  6. Coupling effect between film boiling heat transfer and evaporation drag around a hot-particle in cold liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-Yan; YANG Yan-Hua; XU Ji-Jun

    2003-01-01

    Extremely rapid evaporation could occur when high-temperature particles contact withlow-temperature liquid. This kind of phenomenon is associated with the engineering safety and the problems inhigh-transient multi-phase fluid and heat transfer. The aim of our study was to design and build an observable ex-periment facility. The first series of experiments were performed by pouring one or six high-temperature particles intoa low saturated temperature liquid pool. The particle's falling-down speed was recorded by a high-speed camera, thuswe can find the special resistant feature of the moving high-temperature particles, which is induced by the high-speedevaporation surrounding the particles. The study has experimentally verified the theory of evaporation drag model.

  7. Spin-lock MR enhances the detection sensitivity of superparamagnetic iron oxide particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, R.P.M.; van der Tol, P.; Hectors, S.J.C.G.; Starmans, L.W.E.; Nicolaij, K.; Strijkers, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate spin-lock MR for detecting superparamagnetic iron oxides and compare the detection sensitivity of quantitative T1ρ with T2 imaging. Methods In vitro experiments were performed to investigate the influence of iron oxide particle size and composition on T1ρ. These comprise T1ρ and

  8. Spin-lock MR enhances the detection sensitivity of superparamagnetic iron oxide particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, Rik P. M.; van der Tol, Pieternel; Hectors, Stefanie J. C. G.; Starmans, Lucas W. E.; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate spin-lock MR for detecting superparamagnetic iron oxides and compare the detection sensitivity of quantitative T1ρ with T2 imaging. In vitro experiments were performed to investigate the influence of iron oxide particle size and composition on T1ρ . These comprise T1ρ and T2 measurements

  9. Virus Particle Detection by Convolutional Neural Network in Transmission Electron Microscopy Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Eisuke; Sato, Takaaki; Sano, Daisuke; Utagawa, Etsuko; Kato, Tsuyoshi

    2018-06-01

    A new computational method for the detection of virus particles in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images is presented. Our approach is to use a convolutional neural network that transforms a TEM image to a probabilistic map that indicates where virus particles exist in the image. Our proposed approach automatically and simultaneously learns both discriminative features and classifier for virus particle detection by machine learning, in contrast to existing methods that are based on handcrafted features that yield many false positives and require several postprocessing steps. The detection performance of the proposed method was assessed against a dataset of TEM images containing feline calicivirus particles and compared with several existing detection methods, and the state-of-the-art performance of the developed method for detecting virus was demonstrated. Since our method is based on supervised learning that requires both the input images and their corresponding annotations, it is basically used for detection of already-known viruses. However, the method is highly flexible, and the convolutional networks can adapt themselves to any virus particles by learning automatically from an annotated dataset.

  10. Particle detection and identification through Cerenkov effect in silica aerogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann, J.J.; Cantin, M.

    1978-01-01

    Cerenkov counters are largely used in high energy physics and in nuclear astrophysics to identify the charge of high energy particles and to measure their velocity. Good velocity resolution is obtained only near the Cerenkov threshold, which is directly dependent on the refractive index of the radiator. It is therefore very important to dispose of materials of various refractive indices. The silica aerogel allows to cover a range of indices between 1.015 and 1.2 which is intermediate between the indices given by gas and liquids. The samples most often built until now are hexagonal blocks of 1.06 refractive index and 0.24 g/cm 3 density. Blocks of one liter in volume have been assembled to form a mosaic of large dimension. For lower refractive indices, 1.015 for instance, the material becomes too brittle. So we have been led to use an aerogel sand made of aerogel grains of controlled granulometry. Radiators of both types blocks and sand are used in the franco-danish experiment to be launched aboard the NASA satellite HEAO-C in July 1979 [fr

  11. Charged Particle Tracking and Vertex Detection Group summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.; Meyer, D.

    1984-09-01

    Charged particle tracking is essential in order to investigate the new physics expected at the SSC. The Tracking Group studied radiation damage and rate limitations to tracking devices, vertex detectors, and central tracking. The Group concluded that silicon strips and large wire tracking chambers with small cells can probably survive at the design luminosity of 10 33 cm -2 sec -1 ; however, the presently designed electronics for silicon strip vertex detectors can withstand a luminosity of only 10 31 cm -2 sec -1 . Wire chambers at a radius of less than about 25 cm can withstand a luminosity of less than or equal to 10 32 cm -2 sec -1 only. Actual tracking and pattern recognition in central tracking chambers at a luminosity of 10 33 cm -2 sec -1 will be very difficult because of multiple interactions within the resolving time of the chambers; detailed simulations are needed in order to decide whether tracking is indeed possible at this luminosity. Scintillating glass fibers are an interesting possibility both for vertex detectors and for central trackers, but much research and development is still needed both on the fibers themselves and on the readout

  12. YBCO hot-electron bolometers dedicated to THz detection and imaging: Embedding issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurino, M; Tuerer, I; Martinez, A; Gensbittel, A; Degardin, A F; Kreisler, A J

    2010-01-01

    High-T c hot-electron bolometers (HEB) are an interesting alternative to other superconducting heterodyne mixers in the terahertz frequency range because of low-cost cooling investment, ultra-wide instantaneous bandwidth and low intrinsic noise level, even at 80 K. A technological process to fabricate stacked yttrium-based (YBCO) / praseodymium-based (PBCO) ultra-thin films (in the 15 to 40 nm thickness range) etched to form 0.5 μm x 0.5 μm constrictions, elaborated on (100) MgO substrates, has been previously described. Ageing effects were also considered, with the consequence of increased electrical resistance, significant degradation of the regular THz response and no HEB mixing action. Electron and UV lithography steps are revisited here to realize HEB mixers based on nano-bridges covered by a log-periodic planar gold antenna, dedicated to the 1 to 7 THz range. Several measures have been attempted to reduce the conversion losses, mainly by considering the embedding issues related to the YBCO nano-bridge impedance matching to the antenna and the design of optimized intermediate frequency circuitry. Antenna simulations were performed and validated through experiments on scaled models at GHz frequencies. Electromagnetic coupling to the incoming radiation was also studied, including crosstalk between neighbour antennas forming a linear imaging array.

  13. A Machine Learning Approach for Hot-Spot Detection at Protein-Protein Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Melo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding protein-protein interactions is a key challenge in biochemistry. In this work, we describe a more accurate methodology to predict Hot-Spots (HS in protein-protein interfaces from their native complex structure compared to previous published Machine Learning (ML techniques. Our model is trained on a large number of complexes and on a significantly larger number of different structural- and evolutionary sequence-based features. In particular, we added interface size, type of interaction between residues at the interface of the complex, number of different types of residues at the interface and the Position-Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM, for a total of 79 features. We used twenty-seven algorithms from a simple linear-based function to support-vector machine models with different cost functions. The best model was achieved by the use of the conditional inference random forest (c-forest algorithm with a dataset pre-processed by the normalization of features and with up-sampling of the minor class. The method has an overall accuracy of 0.80, an F1-score of 0.73, a sensitivity of 0.76 and a specificity of 0.82 for the independent test set.

  14. Resonant plasmonic terahertz detection in vertical graphene-base hot-electron transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryzhii, V. [Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Center for Photonics and Infrared Engineering, Bauman Moscow State Technical University and Institute of Ultra High Frequency Semiconductor Electronics of RAS, Moscow 111005 (Russian Federation); Otsuji, T. [Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Ryzhii, M. [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu 965-8580 (Japan); Mitin, V. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University at Buffalo, SUNY, Buffalo, New York 1460-1920 (United States); Shur, M. S. [Department of Electrical, Computer, and System Engineering and Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2015-11-28

    We analyze dynamic properties of vertical graphene-base hot-electron transistors (GB-HETs) and consider their operation as detectors of terahertz (THz) radiation using the developed device model. The GB-HET model accounts for the tunneling electron injection from the emitter, electron propagation across the barrier layers with the partial capture into the GB, and the self-consistent oscillations of the electric potential and the hole density in the GB (plasma oscillations), as well as the quantum capacitance and the electron transit-time effects. Using the proposed device model, we calculate the responsivity of GB-HETs operating as THz detectors as a function of the signal frequency, applied bias voltages, and the structural parameters. The inclusion of the plasmonic effect leads to the possibility of the GB-HET operation at the frequencies significantly exceeding those limited by the characteristic RC-time. It is found that the responsivity of GB-HETs with a sufficiently perfect GB exhibits sharp resonant maxima in the THz range of frequencies associated with the excitation of plasma oscillations. The positions of these maxima are controlled by the applied bias voltages. The GB-HETs can compete with and even surpass other plasmonic THz detectors.

  15. Deep UV emitting scintillators for alpha and beta particle detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30606 (United States); Jia, D.D.; Lewis, L.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Feofilov, S.P. [A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Meltzer, R.S., E-mail: rmeltzer@physast.uga.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30606 (United States)

    2011-03-21

    Several deep UV emitting scintillators, whose emission falls in the solar blind region of the spectrum (200-280 nm), are described and their scintillator properties are characterized. They include LaPO{sub 4}:Pr, YPO{sub 4}:Pr, YAlO{sub 3}:Pr, Pr(PO{sub 3}){sub 3}, YPO{sub 4}:Bi and ScPO{sub 4}. These materials would facilitate the detection of ionizing radiation in open areas, even during the daylight hours, and could be used to support large area surveys that monitor for the presence of ionization radiation due, for example, to system leaks or transfer contamination. These materials can be used in the form of powders, thin films or paints for radiation detection. They are characterized for both beta radiation using electron beams (2-35 keV) and {sup 137}Cs and alpha radiations using {sup 241}Am sources. Their absolute light yields are estimated and are compared to that of Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce. Their light yields decrease as a function of electron energy but at 10 keV they approach 8000 ph/MeV.

  16. On the efficiency of rocket-borne particle detection in the mesosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hedin

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Meteoric smoke particles have been proposed as a key player in the formation and evolution of mesospheric phenomena. Despite their apparent importance still very little is known about these particles. Important questions concern the smoke number density and size distribution as a function of altitude as well as the fraction of charged particles. Sounding rockets are used to measure smoke in situ, but aerodynamics has remained a major challenge. Basically, the small smoke particles tend to follow the gas flow around the payload rather than reaching the detector if aerodynamics is not considered carefully in the detector design. So far only indirect evidence for the existence of meteoric smoke has been available from measurements of heavy charge carriers. Quantitative ways are needed that relate these measured particle population to the atmospheric particle population. This requires in particular knowledge about the size-dependent, altitude-dependent and charge-dependent detection efficiency for a given instrument. In this paper, we investigate the aerodynamics for a typical electrostatic detector design. We first quantify the flow field of the background gas, then introduce particles in the flow field and determine their trajectories around the payload structure. We use two different models to trace particles in the flow field, a Continuous motion model and a Brownian motion model. Brownian motion is shown to be of basic importance for the smallest particles. Detection efficiencies are determined for three detector designs, including two with ventilation holes to allow airflow through the detector. Results from this investigation show that rocket-borne smoke detection with conventional detectors is largely limited to altitudes above 75 km. The flow through a ventilated detector has to be relatively large in order to significantly improve the detection efficiency.

  17. Ghost hunting—an assessment of ghost particle detection and removal methods for tomographic-PIV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsinga, G E; Tokgoz, S

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses and compares several methods, which aim to remove spurious peaks, i.e. ghost particles, from the volume intensity reconstruction in tomographic-PIV. The assessment is based on numerical simulations of time-resolved tomographic-PIV experiments in linear shear flows. Within the reconstructed volumes, intensity peaks are detected and tracked over time. These peaks are associated with particles (either ghosts or actual particles) and are characterized by their peak intensity, size and track length. Peak intensity and track length are found to be effective in discriminating between most ghosts and the actual particles, although not all ghosts can be detected using only a single threshold. The size of the reconstructed particles does not reveal an important difference between ghosts and actual particles. The joint distribution of peak intensity and track length however does, under certain conditions, allow a complete separation of ghosts and actual particles. The ghosts can have either a high intensity or a long track length, but not both combined, like all the actual particles. Removing the detected ghosts from the reconstructed volume and performing additional MART iterations can decrease the particle position error at low to moderate seeding densities, but increases the position error, velocity error and tracking errors at higher densities. The observed trends in the joint distribution of peak intensity and track length are confirmed by results from a real experiment in laminar Taylor–Couette flow. This diagnostic plot allows an estimate of the number of ghosts that are indistinguishable from the actual particles. (paper)

  18. A method for detecting the presence of organic fraction in nucleation mode sized particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vaattovaara

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available New particle formation and growth has a very important role in many climate processes. However, the overall knowlegde of the chemical composition of atmospheric nucleation mode (particle diameter, d<20 nm and the lower end of Aitken mode particles (d≤50 nm is still insufficient. In this work, we have applied the UFO-TDMA (ultrafine organic tandem differential mobility analyzer method to shed light on the presence of an organic fraction in the nucleation mode size class in different atmospheric environments. The basic principle of the organic fraction detection is based on our laboratory UFO-TDMA measurements with organic and inorganic compounds. Our laboratory measurements indicate that the usefulness of the UFO-TDMA in the field experiments would arise especially from the fact that atmospherically the most relevant inorganic compounds do not grow in subsaturated ethanol vapor, when particle size is 10 nm in diameter and saturation ratio is about 86% or below it. Furthermore, internally mixed particles composed of ammonium bisulfate and sulfuric acid with sulfuric acid mass fraction ≤33% show no growth at 85% saturation ratio. In contrast, 10 nm particles composed of various oxidized organic compounds of atmospheric relevance are able to grow in those conditions. These discoveries indicate that it is possible to detect the presence of organics in atmospheric nucleation mode sized particles using the UFO-TDMA method. In the future, the UFO-TDMA is expected to be an important aid to describe the composition of atmospheric newly-formed particles.

  19. Non-detection of a Helium Exosphere for the Hot Jupiter WASP-12b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreidberg, Laura; Oklopčić, Antonija

    2018-06-01

    An exosphere was recently detected around the exoplanet WASP-107b, a low-density, warm Neptune, based on an absorption feature from metastable helium (which has a vacuum wavelength of 10833 \\AA). Inspired by the WASP-107b detection, we reanalyzed archival HST observations of another evaporating exoplanet, WASP-12b, to search for signs of helium in its exosphere. We find no significant increase in transit depth at 10833 \\AA. We compare this result to theoretical predictions from a 1D model, and find that the expected helium feature amplitude is small, in agreement with the observed non-detection. We discuss possible explanations for why the helium feature is weaker for WASP-12b than WASP-107b, and conclude that the amplitude of the signal is highly sensitive to the stellar spectrum and the geometry of the evaporating gas cloud. These considerations should be taken into account in the design of future searches for helium exospheres.

  20. Assessing the environmental risk from hot particles in the vicinity of Dounreay-a case for inaction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D; Stone, D M; Smith, K; Morgan, G; Shimmield, T

    2007-01-01

    This study assesses the impact on species other than humans associated with radioactive particles present in the marine environment close to the UKAEA Dounreay site, through a review of marine survey data, to establish the distribution of species and the likelihood of encountering a particle, and considering retention, dissolution or absorption of the particle. Assumptions are made regarding particle density, distribution, size and bio-availability of the radioactive materials. From this, impacts are assessed against the likelihood of mortality or other significant harm to individuals and interpreted in terms of local populations. Results obtained indicate that no significant impact, at the population level, is likely to be observed. This does not preclude that some individuals will be affected. It does, however, suggest that any decision to remediate, if based predominantly on environmental considerations, should be cognisant of the damage caused by remediation itself and subsequent exploitation of the environment by humans

  1. 3D Silicon Coincidence Avalanche Detector (3D-SiCAD) for charged particle detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignetti, M. M.; Calmon, F.; Pittet, P.; Pares, G.; Cellier, R.; Quiquerez, L.; Chaves de Albuquerque, T.; Bechetoille, E.; Testa, E.; Lopez, J.-P.; Dauvergne, D.; Savoy-Navarro, A.

    2018-02-01

    Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) are p-n junctions operated in Geiger Mode by applying a reverse bias above the breakdown voltage. SPADs have the advantage of featuring single photon sensitivity with timing resolution in the picoseconds range. Nevertheless, their relatively high Dark Count Rate (DCR) is a major issue for charged particle detection, especially when it is much higher than the incoming particle rate. To tackle this issue, we have developed a 3D Silicon Coincidence Avalanche Detector (3D-SiCAD). This novel device implements two vertically aligned SPADs featuring on-chip electronics for the detection of coincident avalanche events occurring on both SPADs. Such a coincidence detection mode allows an efficient discrimination of events related to an incoming charged particle (producing a quasi-simultaneous activation of both SPADs) from dark counts occurring independently on each SPAD. A 3D-SiCAD detector prototype has been fabricated in CMOS technology adopting a 3D flip-chip integration technique, and the main results of its characterization are reported in this work. The particle detection efficiency and noise rejection capability for this novel device have been evaluated by means of a β- strontium-90 radioactive source. Moreover the impact of the main operating parameters (i.e. the hold-off time, the coincidence window duration, the SPAD excess bias voltage) over the particle detection efficiency has been studied. Measurements have been performed with different β- particles rates and show that a 3D-SiCAD device outperforms single SPAD detectors: the former is indeed capable to detect particle rates much lower than the individual DCR observed in a single SPAD-based detectors (i.e. 2 to 3 orders of magnitudes lower).

  2. Detection of tire tread particles using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prochazka, David; Bilík, Martin; Prochazková, Petra; Klus, Jakub; Pořízka, Pavel; Novotný, Jan; Novotný, Karel; Ticová, Barbora; Bradáč, Albert; Semela, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is a study of the potential of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for detection of tire tread particles. Tire tread particles may represent pollutants; simultaneously, it is potentially possible to exploit detection of tire tread particles for identification of optically imperceptible braking tracks at locations of road accidents. The paper describes the general composition of tire treads and selection of an element suitable for detection using the LIBS method. Subsequently, the applicable spectral line is selected considering interferences with lines of elements that might be present together with the detected particles, and optimization of measurement parameters such as incident laser energy, gate delay and gate width is performed. In order to eliminate the matrix effect, measurements were performed using 4 types of tires manufactured by 3 different producers. An adhesive tape was used as a sample carrier. The most suitable adhesive tape was selected from 5 commonly available tapes, on the basis of their respective LIBS spectra. Calibration standards, i.e. an adhesive tape with different area content of tire tread particles, were prepared for the selected tire. A calibration line was created on the basis of the aforementioned calibration standards. The linear section of this line was used for determination of the detection limit value applicable to the selected tire. Considering the insignificant influence of matrix of various types of tires, it is possible to make a simple recalculation of the detection limit value on the basis of zinc content in a specific tire. - Highlights: • LIBS experimental measurement parameters for tire tread particles were optimize. • Calibration curve was prepared. • Limit of detection was determined

  3. Detection of tire tread particles using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prochazka, David, E-mail: prochazka.d@fme.vutbr.cz [Brno University of Technology, Institute of Physical Engineering, Technická 2, 616 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Brno University of Technology, Central European Institute of Technology, Technická 3058/10, CZ-616 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Bilík, Martin [Brno University of Technology, Institute of Forensic Engineering, Údolní 244/53, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Prochazková, Petra [Masaryk University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Kamenice 735/5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Klus, Jakub; Pořízka, Pavel; Novotný, Jan [Brno University of Technology, Central European Institute of Technology, Technická 3058/10, CZ-616 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Novotný, Karel [Masaryk University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Kamenice 735/5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Brno University of Technology, Central European Institute of Technology, Technická 3058/10, CZ-616 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Ticová, Barbora [Masaryk University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Kamenice 735/5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Bradáč, Albert; Semela, Marek [Brno University of Technology, Institute of Forensic Engineering, Údolní 244/53, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); and others

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this paper is a study of the potential of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for detection of tire tread particles. Tire tread particles may represent pollutants; simultaneously, it is potentially possible to exploit detection of tire tread particles for identification of optically imperceptible braking tracks at locations of road accidents. The paper describes the general composition of tire treads and selection of an element suitable for detection using the LIBS method. Subsequently, the applicable spectral line is selected considering interferences with lines of elements that might be present together with the detected particles, and optimization of measurement parameters such as incident laser energy, gate delay and gate width is performed. In order to eliminate the matrix effect, measurements were performed using 4 types of tires manufactured by 3 different producers. An adhesive tape was used as a sample carrier. The most suitable adhesive tape was selected from 5 commonly available tapes, on the basis of their respective LIBS spectra. Calibration standards, i.e. an adhesive tape with different area content of tire tread particles, were prepared for the selected tire. A calibration line was created on the basis of the aforementioned calibration standards. The linear section of this line was used for determination of the detection limit value applicable to the selected tire. Considering the insignificant influence of matrix of various types of tires, it is possible to make a simple recalculation of the detection limit value on the basis of zinc content in a specific tire. - Highlights: • LIBS experimental measurement parameters for tire tread particles were optimize. • Calibration curve was prepared. • Limit of detection was determined.

  4. Distributed Sensor Particles for Remote Fluorescence Detection of Trace Analytes: UXO/CW; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SINGH, ANUP K.; GUPTA, ALOK; MULCHANDANI, ASHOK; CHEN, WILFRED; BHATIA, RIMPLE B.; SCHOENIGER, JOSEPH S.; ASHLEY, CAROL S.; BRINKER, C. JEFFREY; HANCE, BRADLEY G.; SCHMITT, RANDAL L.; JOHNSON, MARK S.; HARGIS JR. PHILIP J.; SIMONSON, ROBERT J.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the development of sensor particles for remote detection of trace chemical analytes over broad areas, e.g residual trinitrotoluene from buried landmines or other unexploded ordnance (UXO). We also describe the potential of the sensor particle approach for the detection of chemical warfare (CW) agents. The primary goal of this work has been the development of sensor particles that incorporate sample preconcentration, analyte molecular recognition, chemical signal amplification, and fluorescence signal transduction within a ''grain of sand''. Two approaches for particle-based chemical-to-fluorescence signal transduction are described: (1) enzyme-amplified immunoassays using biocompatible inorganic encapsulants, and (2) oxidative quenching of a unique fluorescent polymer by TNT

  5. Detecting chaos in particle accelerators through the frequency map analysis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaphilippou, Yannis

    2014-06-01

    The motion of beams in particle accelerators is dominated by a plethora of non-linear effects, which can enhance chaotic motion and limit their performance. The application of advanced non-linear dynamics methods for detecting and correcting these effects and thereby increasing the region of beam stability plays an essential role during the accelerator design phase but also their operation. After describing the nature of non-linear effects and their impact on performance parameters of different particle accelerator categories, the theory of non-linear particle motion is outlined. The recent developments on the methods employed for the analysis of chaotic beam motion are detailed. In particular, the ability of the frequency map analysis method to detect chaotic motion and guide the correction of non-linear effects is demonstrated in particle tracking simulations but also experimental data.

  6. Evaluation of Three Hydration Strategies in Detection Dogs Working in a Hot Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia M. Otto

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity in hot environments can increase the risk of heat stress or heat stroke in dogs. Heat tolerance is influenced by acclimatization to the environment, physical fitness, and hydration state. Three common strategies to promote hydration in working dogs are free access to water (W, oral electrolyte solutions (OESs, and administration of subcutaneous fluids (SQs. None of these methods have been compared for safety or efficacy in a working environment. In a cross-over design, seven vehicle-screening canines were randomly assigned to each of the three hydration strategies during working shifts at the Sarita, TX checkpoint. Physical, behavioral, and biochemical parameters were collected before, during, and after a work shift (mean 5.7 ± 0.8 h. Dogs were given 10 mL/kg oral W, 10 mL/kg chicken flavored OES, or 15 mL/kg of SQs initially followed by controlled access to W or OES. The dogs drank 15.61 ± 4.47 mL/kg/h of W and OES when in the OES group, compared to 7.04 ± 3.42 and 5.56 ± 4.40 mL of W, for the W and SQ groups, respectively. The median environmental temperature was 84.8°F (29.3°C. The median humidity was 70%. Based on mixed effects linear modeling, dogs in the OES and SQ groups had significantly higher total CO2, and lower packed cell volume and total plasma protein at the end of the day. Creatinine increased a small but significant amount in the SQ group and decreased in the OES group. Searching behaviors were independent of hydration strategy but highly related to the dog specific factors of sex, breed, and activity level. Under conditions of controlled activity in moderate heat and humidity, dogs accustomed to the work and the environment were more likely to increase fluid consumption and hydration when provided a flavored OES. Potential benefits of OES and SQ were indirect and no adverse effects were documented for any of the hydration strategies tested.

  7. Exploiting evanescent-wave amplification for subwavelength low-contrast particle detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S.; Pereira, S. F.; Urbach, H. P.; Wei, Xukang; El Gawhary, O.

    2017-07-01

    The classical problem of subwavelength particle detection on a flat surface is especially challenging when the refractive index of the particle is close to that of the substrate. We demonstrate a method to improve the detection ability several times for such a situation, by enhancing the "forbidden" evanescent waves in the substrate using the principle of super-resolution with evanescent waves amplification. The working mechanism of the system and experimental validation from a design with a thin single dielectric layer is presented. The resulting system is a simple but complete example of evanescent-wave generation, amplification, and the consequent modulation of the far field. This principle can have far reaching impact in the field of particle detection in several applications ranging from contamination control to interferometric scattering microscopy for biological samples.

  8. Apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, R.G.

    1987-03-23

    Apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom. Differential phase measurements on scattered light from particles are possible using the two-frequency Zeeman effect laser which emits two frequencies of radiation 250 kHz apart. Excellent discrimination and reproducibility for various pure pollen and bacterial samples in suspension have been observed with a single polarization element. Additionally, a 250 kHz beat frequency was recorded from an individual particle traversing the focused output from the laser in a flow cytometer. 13 figs.

  9. Note: Electrostatic detection of stainless steel dust particles for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landy, P. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Skinner, C. H.; Schneider, H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Dust accumulation inside next-step fusion devices poses a significant safety concern and dust diagnostics will be needed to assure safe operations. An electrostatic dust detection device has been successfully demonstrated in the National Spherical Torus Experiment, Tore Supra, and the Large Helical Device, and the detector's response to carbon particles was previously characterized in laboratory experiments. This paper presents laboratory results showing that detection of stainless steel particles at levels as low as several μg/cm{sup 2} is also possible.

  10. Portable instrument for selectively detecting alpha-particles derived from radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapuis, A.M.; DaJlevic, D.

    1975-01-01

    A portable instrument of the pocket type designed primarily for monitoring atmospheric contamination in uranium mines by selectively detecting the α-particles emitted simultaneously by the daughter products of radon, namely radium A and radium C' is described. The instrument comprises in combination a tube containing a suction fan for drawing external air through a filter which retains the α-emitting aerosols, a detector in which the α-particles corresponding to the respective energies of the α-emissions of radium A and of radium C' are detected separately, and two collimators placed between the filter and the detector

  11. Mobility and height detection of particle labels in an optical evanescent wave biosensor with single-label resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Ommering, Kim; Koets, Marjo; Schleipen, Jean J H B; Prins, Menno W J [Philips Research Laboratories, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Somers, Philip A; Van IJzendoorn, Leo J, E-mail: menno.prins@philips.co [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2010-04-21

    Particle labels are used in biosensors to detect the presence and concentration of analyte molecules. In this paper we demonstrate an optical technique to measure the mobility and height of bound particle labels on a biosensor surface with single-label resolution. The technique is based on the detection of the particle-induced light scattering in an optical evanescent field. We show that the thermal particle motion in the optical evanescent field leads to intensity fluctuations that can accurately be detected. The technique is demonstrated using 290 bp (99 nm) DNA as an analyte and using polystyrene particles and magnetic particles with diameters between 500 and 1000 nm as labels. The particle intensity histograms show that quantitative height measurements are obtained for particles with uniform optical properties, and the intensity versus position plots reflect the analyte-antibody orientation and the analyte flexibility. The novel optical detection technique will lead to biosensors with very high sensitivity and specificity.

  12. Detection of H2O and Evidence for TiO VO in an Ultra Hot Exoplanet Atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Thomas M.; Sing, David K.; Wakeford, Hannah R.; Nikolov, Nikolay; Ballester, Gilda E.; Drummond, Benjamin; Kataria, Tiffany; Gibson, Neale P.; Amundsen, David S.; Spake, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    We present a primary transit observation for the ultra-hot (Teq approx. 2400 K) gas giant expolanet WASP-121b, made using the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 in spectroscopic mode across the 1.12-1.64 micron wavelength range. The 1.4 microns water absorption band is detected at high confidence (5.4(sigma)) in the planetary atmosphere. We also reanalyze ground-based photometric light curves taken in the B, r', and z' filters. Significantly deeper transits are measured in these optical bandpasses relative to the near-infrared wavelengths. We conclude that scattering by high-altitude haze alone is unlikely to account for this difference and instead interpret it as evidence for titanium oxide and vanadium oxide absorption. Enhanced opacity is also inferred across the 1.12-1.3 micron wavelength range, possibly due to iron hydride absorption. If confirmed, WASP-121b will be the first exoplanet with titanium oxide, vanadium oxide, and iron hydride detected in transmission. The latter are important species in M/L dwarfs and their presence is likely to have a significant effect on the overall physics and chemistry of the atmosphere, including the production of a strong thermal inversion.

  13. Hot spot detection system for vanes or blades of a combustion turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twerdochlib, M.

    1999-02-02

    This invention includes a detection system that can determine if a turbine component, such as a turbine vane or blade, has exceeded a critical temperature, such as a melting point, along any point along the entire surface of the vane or blade. This system can be employed in a conventional combustion turbine having a compressor, a combustor and a turbine section. Included within this system is a chemical coating disposed along the entire interior surface of a vane or blade and a closed loop cooling system that circulates a coolant through the interior of the vane or blade. If the temperature of the vane or blade exceeds a critical temperature, the chemical coating will be expelled from the vane or blade into the coolant. Since while traversing the closed loop cooling system the coolant passes through a detector, the presence of the chemical coating in the coolant will be sensed by the system. If the chemical coating is detected, this indicates that the vane or blade has exceeded a critical temperature. 5 figs.

  14. Detection of gas-permeable fuel particles for highl 7490 temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiele, B.A.; Stinton, D.P.; Costanzo, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    Fuel for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR) consists of uranium oxide-carbide and thoria microspheres coated with layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. The pyrolytic carbon coatings must be gas-tight to perform properly during irradiation. Therefore, particles must be carefully characterized to determine the number of defective particles (ie bare kernels, and cracked or permeable coatings). Although techniques are available to determine the number of bare kernels or cracked coatings, no reliable technique has been available to measure coating permeability. This work describes a technique recently developed to determine whether coatings for a batch of particles are gas-tight or permeable. Although most of this study was performed on Biso-coated particles, the technique applies equally well to Triso-coated particles. About 150 randomly selected Biso-particle batches were studied in this work. These batches were first subjected to an 18-hr chlorination at 15000C, and the volatile thorium tetrachloride released through cracked or very permeable coatings was measured versus chlorination time. Chlorinated batches were also radiographed to detect any thorium that had migrated from the kernel into the coatings. From this work a technique was developed to determine coating permeability. This consists of an 18-hr chlorination of multiple samples without measurement of the heavy metal released. Each batch is then radiographed and the heavy metal diffusion within each particle is examined so it can be determined if a particle batch is permeable, slightly permeable, or gas-tight. (author)

  15. Detecting charging state of ultra-fine particles: instrumental development and ambient measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Laakso

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of ion-induced nucleation in the lower atmosphere has been discussed for a long time. In this article we describe a new instrumental setup – Ion-DMPS – which can be used to detect contribution of ion-induced nucleation on atmospheric new particle formation events. The device measures positively and negatively charged particles with and without a bipolar charger. The ratio between "charger off" to "charger on" describes the charging state of aerosol particle population with respect to equilibrium. Values above one represent more charges than in an equilibrium (overcharged state, and values below unity stand for undercharged situation, when there is less charges in the particles than in the equilibrium. We performed several laboratory experiments to test the operation of the instrument. After the laboratory tests, we used the device to observe particle size distributions during atmospheric new particle formation in a boreal forest. We found that some of the events were clearly dominated by neutral nucleation but in some cases also ion-induced nucleation contributed to the new particle formation. We also found that negative and positive ions (charged particles behaved in a different manner, days with negative overcharging were more frequent than days with positive overcharging.

  16. A Novel On-Chip Impedance Sensor for the Detection of Particle Contamination in Hydraulic Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongpeng Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel impedance sensor based on a microfluidic chip is presented. The sensor consists of two single-layer coils and a straight micro-channel, and can detect, not only ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic particles in oil as an inductive sensor, but also, water droplets and air bubbles in oil as a capacitive sensor. The experiments are carried out at different excitation frequencies, number of coil turns and particle sizes. For the inductance detection, the inductance signals are found to increase with the excitation frequency and the noise is constant; both the inductance signals and the noise increase with the number of coil turns, but because the noise increases at a faster rate than the signal, the signal-to-noise ratio decreases with the number of coil turns. We demonstrate the successful detection of 40 μm iron particles and 110 μm copper particles using the coil with 20 turns at the excitation frequency of 2 MHz. For the capacitance detection, capacitance signals decrease with the excitation frequency and the noise is constant; the capacitance signals decrease with the number of coil turns, while the noise increases, thus, the signal-to-noise ratio decreases with the number of coil turns. We can detect 100 μm water droplets and 180 μm bubbles successfully using the coil with 20 turns at the excitation frequency of 0.3 MHz.

  17. Ensemble Monte Carlo particle investigation of hot electron induced source-drain burnout characteristics of GaAs field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moglestue, C.; Buot, F. A.; Anderson, W. T.

    1995-08-01

    The lattice heating rate has been calculated for GaAs field-effect transistors of different source-drain channel design by means of the ensemble Monte Carlo particle model. Transport of carriers in the substrate and the presence of free surface charges are also included in our simulation. The actual heat generation was obtained by accounting for the energy exchanged with the lattice of the semiconductor during phonon scattering. It was found that the maximum heating rate takes place below the surface near the drain end of the gate. The results correlate well with a previous hydrodynamic energy transport estimate of the electronic energy density, but shifted slightly more towards the drain. These results further emphasize the adverse effects of hot electrons on the Ohmic contacts.

  18. Development of Duplex Stainless Steels by Field-Assisted Hot Pressing: Influence of the Particle Size and Morphology of the Powders on the Final Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Junceda, A.; Rincón, M.; Torralba, J. M.

    2018-01-01

    The feasibility of processing duplex stainless steels with promising properties using a powder metallurgical route, including the consolidation by field-assisted hot pressing, is assessed in this investigation. The influence of the particle size and morphology of the raw austenitic and ferritic powders on the final microstructure and properties is also evaluated for an austenitic content of 60 wt pct. In addition, the properties of a new microconstituent generated between the initial constituents are analyzed. The maximum sintered density (98.9 pct) and the best mechanical behavior, in terms of elastic modulus, nanohardness, yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and ductility, are reached by the duplex stainless steel processed with austenitic and ferritic gas atomized stainless steel powders.

  19. Detection alpha particles and Cf-252 fission fragments with track solid detectors and with surface barrier detectors: efficiency determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khouri, M.T.F.C.; Koskinas, M.F.; Andrade, C. de; Vilela, E.C.; Hinostroza, H.; Kaschiny, J.R.A.; Costa, M.S. da; Rizzo, P.; Santos, W.M.S.

    1990-01-01

    The technique of particle detection by solid track detectors, types of developing and analysis of results are presented. Efficiency measurements of alpha particle detection with Makrofol e and surface barrier detector are made. Detection of Cf-252 fission fragments is shown. (L.C.)

  20. Detection of alpha particles and Cf-252 fission fragments with solid track detectors and surface barrier detector. Efficiency calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khouri, M.T.F.C.; Koskinas, M.F.; Andrade, C. de; Vilela, E.C.; Hinostroza, H.; Kaschiny, J.E.A.; Costa, M.S. da; Rizzo, P.; Santos, W.M.S.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for particle detection by using track solid detector and also types of revealing and result analysis are presented concerned to Cf-252 fission fragments detection. Measurements of alpha particles detection efficiency using Makrofol E and surface barrier detector are performed. (L.C.J.A.)

  1. Comparison of brown sugar, hot water, and salt methods for detecting western cherry fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) larvae in sweet cherry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown sugar or hot water methods have been developed to detect larvae of tephritid fruit flies in post-harvest fruit in order to maintain quarantine security. It would be useful to determine if variations of these methods can yield better results and if less expensive alternatives exist. This stud...

  2. Heavy particle detection characteristics of an MWPC operating at low (1 <= p <= 30 mbar) gas pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, G.; Presser, G.; Staehler, J.

    1981-01-01

    Pulse heights, timing properties and detection efficiencies of an MWPC were measured with 5.5 MeV alpha particles for different counting gases at low pressures. The pulse heights show a striking nonmonotonic dependence on the gas pressure that can be explained by a simple model of the amplification process at high reduced electric fields. The consequences of the observed pressure dependence of pulse heights for the detection of heavy ions with low pressure MWPCs are discussed. (orig.)

  3. The use of silicon devices (diodes, RAMs, etc.) for alpha particle detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agosteo, S.; Foglio Para, A.

    1993-01-01

    Silicon electronic devices (diodes, random access memories (RAMs), etc.) can be employed in alpha particle detection and spectroscopy with a good energy resolution. The detection mechanisms are first discussed; the performances of these devices operating in the pulse and in the current mode are then described starting from the pioneering works of the last decade. Some peculiar applications of RAMs are finally reported. (author). 7 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  4. An Adaptive Cultural Algorithm with Improved Quantum-behaved Particle Swarm Optimization for Sonar Image Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingmei; Hao, Wenqian; Li, Qiming

    2017-12-18

    This paper proposes an adaptive cultural algorithm with improved quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (ACA-IQPSO) to detect the underwater sonar image. In the population space, to improve searching ability of particles, iterative times and the fitness value of particles are regarded as factors to adaptively adjust the contraction-expansion coefficient of the quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization algorithm (QPSO). The improved quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization algorithm (IQPSO) can make particles adjust their behaviours according to their quality. In the belief space, a new update strategy is adopted to update cultural individuals according to the idea of the update strategy in shuffled frog leaping algorithm (SFLA). Moreover, to enhance the utilization of information in the population space and belief space, accept function and influence function are redesigned in the new communication protocol. The experimental results show that ACA-IQPSO can obtain good clustering centres according to the grey distribution information of underwater sonar images, and accurately complete underwater objects detection. Compared with other algorithms, the proposed ACA-IQPSO has good effectiveness, excellent adaptability, a powerful searching ability and high convergence efficiency. Meanwhile, the experimental results of the benchmark functions can further demonstrate that the proposed ACA-IQPSO has better searching ability, convergence efficiency and stability.

  5. Microfluidic CODES: a scalable multiplexed electronic sensor for orthogonal detection of particles in microfluidic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruxiu; Wang, Ningquan; Kamili, Farhan; Sarioglu, A Fatih

    2016-04-21

    Numerous biophysical and biochemical assays rely on spatial manipulation of particles/cells as they are processed on lab-on-a-chip devices. Analysis of spatially distributed particles on these devices typically requires microscopy negating the cost and size advantages of microfluidic assays. In this paper, we introduce a scalable electronic sensor technology, called microfluidic CODES, that utilizes resistive pulse sensing to orthogonally detect particles in multiple microfluidic channels from a single electrical output. Combining the techniques from telecommunications and microfluidics, we route three coplanar electrodes on a glass substrate to create multiple Coulter counters producing distinct orthogonal digital codes when they detect particles. We specifically design a digital code set using the mathematical principles of Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) telecommunication networks and can decode signals from different microfluidic channels with >90% accuracy through computation even if these signals overlap. As a proof of principle, we use this technology to detect human ovarian cancer cells in four different microfluidic channels fabricated using soft lithography. Microfluidic CODES offers a simple, all-electronic interface that is well suited to create integrated, low-cost lab-on-a-chip devices for cell- or particle-based assays in resource-limited settings.

  6. White-light Detection for Nanoparticle Sizing with the TSI Ultrafine Condensation Particle Counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, William D.; McMurry, Peter H.; Weber, Rodney J.; Quant, Frederick R.

    2000-01-01

    Several of the most common methods for measuring nanoparticle size distributions employ the ultrafine condensation particle counter (UCPC) for detection purposes. Among these methods, the pulse height analysis (PHA) technique, in which the optical response of the UCPC detector is related to initial particle diameter in the 3-10 nm range, prevails in applications where fast sampling is required or for which concentrations of nanoparticles are frequently very low. With the PHA technique, white light is required for particle illumination in order to obtain a monotonic relationship between initial particle diameter and optical response (pulse height). However, the popular, commercially available TSI Model 3025A UCPC employs a laser for particle detection. Here, we report on a novel white-light detection system developed for the 3025A UCPC that involves minimal alteration to the instrument and preserves normal counting operation. Performance is illustrated with pulse height spectra produced by differential mobility analyzer (DMA) - generated calibration aerosols in the 3-50 nm range

  7. Process and devices of detection of hard electromagnetic or particle radiations using a superconducting element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drukier, A.K.; Valette, Claude; Waysand, Georges.

    1975-01-01

    The invention relates to processes and systems for the detection of hard electromagnetic or particle radiations and the sensors fitted to these systems. 'Hard radiations' means those whose energy is greater than a variable threshold, depending on the applications, but always more than 5 keV. The use of these sensors and the associated systems can therefore be envisaged in radiography and also in emission gammagraphy in the biological, anatomic and medical fields. In these processes, in order to detect a photon or a radiation particle, use is made of the transition phenomenon of a homogeneous grain of superconducting material of the first kind, from the metastable superconducting state to the normal state, under the effect of a photoelectron ejected by the impact of the photon or of the particle on the grain of superconducting material [fr

  8. Study of a charge-coupled device for high-energy-particle detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhuiya, A.H.

    1983-05-01

    This presentation is based on measurements made to evaluate the application of charge-coupled devices as detectors of high-energy particles. The experiment was performed with a Fairchild Linear 256-Cell CCD111 array (size 8μm x 17 μm/cell), utilizing a light source instead of a particle beam. It was observed that the minimum detectable signal was limited to approx. 488 electrons at -50 0 C, where the readout and exposure times were about 260 ms and 400 ms respectively. The transfer inefficiency of the CCD111 was determined to be approx. 10 -4 . It has been concluded that at a lower temperature (approx. -100 0 C) or with faster readout (approx. 10 ms), the CCD111 would be able to detect the total deposited energy of minimum-ionizing charged particles

  9. Detection of /sup 4/He in stratospheric particles gives evidence of extraterrestrial origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajan, R S [Carnegie Institution of Washington, D.C. (USA). Dept. of Terrestrial Magnetism; Brownlee, D E; Tomandl, D; Hodge, P W; Farrar, H; Britten, R A

    1977-05-12

    The detection of large concentrations of /sup 4/He in some ..mu..m size stratospheric particles collected during the past 2 years is here reported. The final /sup 4/He concentrations ranged from 0.002 to 0.25 cc/gm. Such high concentrations confirm that the particles were extraterrestrial and that some of them were exposed to solar wind for at least 10 to 100 years; also, since solar wind ions are implanted only to depths of approximately 500 A, the measurements also indicate that the particles existed as small particles in space and were not produced in the atmosphere by fragmentation of larger meteoroids. The possibility that the observed He could have been the product of decaying U appears remote. Since micrometeorites probably have cometary origin, they are potentially a valuable source of primitive Solar System matter.

  10. Detection of methanogenic archaea in seawater particles and the digestive tract of a marine fish species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Maarel, MJEC; Sprenger, W; Haanstra, R; Forney, LJ

    1999-01-01

    A methanogen-specific nested PCR approach was used to detect methanogenic archaea in seawater particles of the North Sea and the feces and the digestive tract of flounder (Platichthys flesus), a fish found in the North Sea. A number of 16S rDNA sequences with 97.6-99.5% similarity to

  11. Alpha-particle detection based on the BJT detector and simple, IC-based readout electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovati, L; Bonaiuti, M [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Modena (Italy); Bettarini, S [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa and INFN Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Bosisio, L [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trieste and INFN Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Dalla Betta, G-F; Tyzhnevyi, V [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienza dell' Informazione, Universita di Trento e INFN Trento, Trento (Italy); Verzellesi, G [Dipartimento di Scienze e Metodi dell' Ingegneria, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia and INFN Trento, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Zorzi, N, E-mail: giovanni.verzellesi@unimore.i [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Trento (Italy)

    2009-11-15

    In this paper we propose a portable instrument for alpha-particle detection based on a previously-developed BJT detector and a simple, IC-based readout electronics. Experimental tests of the BJT detector and readout electronics are reported. Numerical simulations are adopted to predict the performance enhancement achievable with optimized BJT detectors.

  12. Alpha-particle detection based on the BJT detector and simple, IC-based readout electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovati, L; Bonaiuti, M; Bettarini, S; Bosisio, L; Dalla Betta, G-F; Tyzhnevyi, V; Verzellesi, G; Zorzi, N

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we propose a portable instrument for alpha-particle detection based on a previously-developed BJT detector and a simple, IC-based readout electronics. Experimental tests of the BJT detector and readout electronics are reported. Numerical simulations are adopted to predict the performance enhancement achievable with optimized BJT detectors.

  13. Detecting molecules and cells labeled with magnetic particles using an atomic magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dindi; Ruangchaithaweesuk, Songtham; Yao Li; Xu Shoujun

    2012-01-01

    The detection of magnetically labeled molecules and cells involves three essential parameters: sensitivity, spatial resolution, and molecular specificity. We report on the use of atomic magnetometry and its derivative techniques to achieve high performance in terms of all these parameters. With a sensitivity of 80 fT/√Hz for dc magnetic fields, we show that 7,000 streptavidin-conjugated magnetic microparticles magnetized by a permanent magnet produce a magnetic field of 650 pT; this result predicts that a single such particle can be detected during one second of signal averaging. Spatial information is obtained using a scanning magnetic imaging scheme. The spatial resolution is 20 μm with a detection distance of more than 1 cm; this distance is much longer than that in previous reports. The molecular specificity is achieved using force-induced remnant magnetization spectroscopy, which currently uses an atomic magnetometer for detection. As an example, we perform measurement of magnetically labeled human CD4+ T cells, whose count in the blood is the diagnostic criterion for human immunodeficiency virus infection. Magnetic particles that are specifically bound to the cells are resolved from nonspecifically bound particles and quantitatively correlate with the number of cells. The magnetic particles have an overall size of 2.8 μm, with a magnetic core in nanometer regime. The combination of our techniques is predicted to be useful in molecular and cellular imaging.

  14. Sensitive Detection of Small Particles in Fluids Using Optical Fiber Tip with Dielectrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsin Tai

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This work presents using a tapered fiber tip coated with thin metallic film to detect small particles in water with high sensitivity. When an AC voltage applied to the Ti/Al coated fiber tip and indium tin oxide (ITO substrate, a gradient electric field at the fiber tip induced attractive/repulsive force to suspended small particles due to the frequency-dependent dielectrophoresis (DEP effect. Such DEP force greatly enhanced the concentration of the small particles near the tip. The increase of the local concentration also increased the scattering of surface plasmon wave near the fiber tip. Combined both DEP effect and scattering optical near-field, we show the detection limit of the concentration for 1.36 μm polystyrene beads can be down to 1 particle/mL. The detection limit of the Escherichia coli (E. coli bacteria was 20 CFU/mL. The fiber tip sensor takes advantages of ultrasmall volume, label-free and simple detection system.

  15. Detecting molecules and cells labeled with magnetic particles using an atomic magnetometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Dindi; Ruangchaithaweesuk, Songtham; Yao Li; Xu Shoujun, E-mail: sxu7@uh.edu [University of Houston, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2012-09-15

    The detection of magnetically labeled molecules and cells involves three essential parameters: sensitivity, spatial resolution, and molecular specificity. We report on the use of atomic magnetometry and its derivative techniques to achieve high performance in terms of all these parameters. With a sensitivity of 80 fT/{radical}Hz for dc magnetic fields, we show that 7,000 streptavidin-conjugated magnetic microparticles magnetized by a permanent magnet produce a magnetic field of 650 pT; this result predicts that a single such particle can be detected during one second of signal averaging. Spatial information is obtained using a scanning magnetic imaging scheme. The spatial resolution is 20 {mu}m with a detection distance of more than 1 cm; this distance is much longer than that in previous reports. The molecular specificity is achieved using force-induced remnant magnetization spectroscopy, which currently uses an atomic magnetometer for detection. As an example, we perform measurement of magnetically labeled human CD4+ T cells, whose count in the blood is the diagnostic criterion for human immunodeficiency virus infection. Magnetic particles that are specifically bound to the cells are resolved from nonspecifically bound particles and quantitatively correlate with the number of cells. The magnetic particles have an overall size of 2.8 {mu}m, with a magnetic core in nanometer regime. The combination of our techniques is predicted to be useful in molecular and cellular imaging.

  16. Detection of fine magnetic particles coated on a thread using an HTS-SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawagishi, K.; Itozaki, H.; Kondo, T.; Komori, K.; Koetitz, R.

    2004-01-01

    Polymer-coated magnetic particles, which contain superparamagnetic ferrite nanoparticles, were attached to a nylon thread of 0.35 mm in diameter and were detected by an HTS-SQUID. The length of the sample attached into the thread was within 3 mm and its interval was 30 mm. The particles were magnetized by a coil applied dc field or by a magnet of 1.4 T. The thread ran 2 mm under the SQUID with 20-100 mm/s of the rate. Signals of magnetic beads were detected and the peak-to-peak amplitude of the signals was directly proportional to the applied field and the weight of the magnetic particles. Obtained peak-to-peak amplitude for 20 ng of magnetite particles was 350 pT at 0.25 mT of applied dc field with noise of 18 pT, and estimated detection limit was 10 ng. S/N ratio was improved by the remanence measurement using the magnet and 5.8 ng of detection limit was obtained. This measurement has been proved to be promising for the continuous analysis of ultra dilute DNA solution

  17. Hot Flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hot flashes Overview Hot flashes are sudden feelings of warmth, which are usually most intense over the face, neck and chest. Your skin might redden, as if you're blushing. Hot flashes can also cause sweating, and if you ...

  18. HOT 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Sara Stefansen

    2016-01-01

    HOT samler og formidler 21 literacykyndiges bud på, hvad der er hot, og hvad der bør være hot inden for literacy – og deres begrundelser for disse bud.......HOT samler og formidler 21 literacykyndiges bud på, hvad der er hot, og hvad der bør være hot inden for literacy – og deres begrundelser for disse bud....

  19. Dual-Channel Particle Filter Based Track-Before-Detect for Monopulse Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Cai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A particle filter based track-before-detect (PF-TBD algorithm is proposed for the monopulse high pulse repetition frequency (PRF pulse Doppler radar. The actual measurement model is adopted, in which the range is highly ambiguous and the sum and difference channels exist in parallel. A quantization method is used to approximate the point spread function to reduce the computation load. The detection decisions of the PF-TBD are fed to a binary integrator to further improve the detection performance. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can detect and track the low SNR target efficiently. The detection performance is improved significantly for both the single frame and the multiframe detection compared with the classical detector. A performance comparison with the PF-TBD using sum channel only is also supplied.

  20. Evaluation of Particle Counter Technology for Detection of Fuel Contamination Detection Utilizing Fuel System Supply Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-19

    product used as a diesel product for ground use (1). Free water contamination (droplets) may appear as fine droplets or slugs of water in the fuel...methods and test procedures for the calibration and use of automatic particle counters. The transition of this technology to the fuel industry is...UNCLASSIFIED 6 UNCLASSIFIED Receipt Vehicle Fuel Tank Fuel Injector Aviation Fuel DEF (AUST) 5695B 18/16/13 Parker 18

  1. 'Hot particles' in the cold light of day: principles for a stakeholder and public engagement architecture relating to historic liabilities in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wylie, Rick

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses issues in stakeholder relations, focusing on the challenges of liabilities management associated with small fragments of irradiated nuclear fuel hereafter termed particles (and sometimes termed 'hot particles' in the public domain, from which this paper gets its title), produced over a number of decades from now ceased operations at Dounreay. It describes key problems confronting the nuclear industry in developing a stakeholder-relations strategy. Drawing upon examples of the stakeholder activity at Dounreay, and using an ecological metaphor, an innovative architecture for stakeholder engagement relating to nuclear issues is outlined. This is based upon the view that the solution of the stakeholder issue must reflect the complexity and connectivity of influences and interests within the stakeholder environment. It is argued that the lay public should be visualised as the stakeholder if an effective stakeholder-relations strategy is to be achieved. The importance of creating trust in a context of scientific uncertainty is highlighted. This will, it is argued, become an increasingly salient issue in the thrust for openness and transparency, two key drivers of nuclear industry public and stakeholder relations, which could make the limits of scientific knowledge and control more widely appreciated, and bring to the fore the role of lay conceptions of perceived risk

  2. 'Hot particles' in the cold light of day: principles for a stakeholder and public engagement architecture relating to historic liabilities in the marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Rick

    2007-09-01

    This paper discusses issues in stakeholder relations, focusing on the challenges of liabilities management associated with small fragments of irradiated nuclear fuel hereafter termed particles (and sometimes termed 'hot particles' in the public domain, from which this paper gets its title), produced over a number of decades from now ceased operations at Dounreay. It describes key problems confronting the nuclear industry in developing a stakeholder-relations strategy. Drawing upon examples of the stakeholder activity at Dounreay, and using an ecological metaphor, an innovative architecture for stakeholder engagement relating to nuclear issues is outlined. This is based upon the view that the solution of the stakeholder issue must reflect the complexity and connectivity of influences and interests within the stakeholder environment. It is argued that the lay public should be visualised as the stakeholder if an effective stakeholder-relations strategy is to be achieved. The importance of creating trust in a context of scientific uncertainty is highlighted. This will, it is argued, become an increasingly salient issue in the thrust for openness and transparency, two key drivers of nuclear industry public and stakeholder relations, which could make the limits of scientific knowledge and control more widely appreciated, and bring to the fore the role of lay conceptions of perceived risk.

  3. Particle and power balances of hot-filament discharge plasmas in a multi-dipole device in the presence of a positively biased electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, M.H.; Hershkowitz, N.; Intrator, T.

    1989-01-01

    The plasma potential is typically assumed to float above an anode potential by a few times of an electron temperature (T /e). The difference between the plasma potential and the anode potential can be estimated by considering the particle production and loss. However, it has been reported experimentally that the plasma potential of a steady state plasma can be more negative than the anode potential with a potential dip (-- T /e) in front of the anode. This paper describes particle and power balances to estimate the bulk plasma potential of a hot-filament discharge plasma produced in a multi-dipole plasma device. The bulk plasma potential dependence on positive DC bias applied to an anode is analyzed, and the predicted characteristics of the plasma potential dependence are compared to the experiment. A steady state potential dip in front of an anode is experimentally observed using emissive probes with the zero emission inflection point method, and the conditions for the potential dip formation are derived

  4. The formation and deexcitation of hot nuclei in 40Ar + 197Au collisions at 44 and 77 MeV/A. Neutrons emission light charged particles and complex fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, A.

    1990-05-01

    This work is a contribution to the study of the formation and decay of hot nuclei produced in heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies. By studying the system Ar + Au and Ar + Th at 44 MeV/u and 77 MeV/u we first show how to classify events in two groups: peripheral and very dissipative collisions, measuring the number of evaporated neutrons, which depend directly on the violence of the collision. Associated with these neutrons, different deexcitation channels were observed (heavy residues, fission fragments, light charged particles, intermediate mass fragments). The ratio between peripheral and very dissipative collisions was found independent of the system and the same as the one observed at lower incident energy. The most probable neutron multiplicity for very dissipative collisions is not very different at 44 MeV/u and 77 MeV/u. A measurement of the angular distribution of fission fragments and heavy residues was performed. Detected products are essentially associated with large neutron multiplicity and have a cross section close to the one for the very dissipative collisions. The total mass of the fission fragments is close to the mass of the target, while the mass of the heavy residue is much smaller. The backward evaporated light charged particles are also produced in very dissipative collisions. The characteristics of their energy spectra as well as their multiplicities are very similar at 44 MeV/u 77 MeV/u. From the number of evaporated light charged particles, the estimation of the quasi-target excitation energy was done and found to be close to 600 MeV at 44 MeV/u and 77 MeV/u [fr

  5. Determination of alpha particle detection efficiency of an imaging plate (IP) detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, N.M; Iida, Takao; Yamazawa, Hiromi; Moriizumi, Jun

    2006-01-01

    In order to determine the detection efficiency of the imaging plate (IP) detector, the true radioactivity of the alpha particles, which sampled in the collection media, should be known. The true radioactivity could be accurately predicted with the help of the reference alpha spectrometer measurement. The detection efficiency calculated for the IP was estimated with the theoretical curve and the experimental data. It is assumed that the air sample contained the decay products of both 222 Rn and 220 Rn series, the most significant sources of alpha particles. The present study estimated the detection efficiency of the IP as 39.3% with an uncertainty of 2.9 that is well enough to confirm the future use of the IP as a radiation detector. Experimental materials and methods are described. (S.Y.)

  6. Detection of Carious Lesions and Restorations Using Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Naebi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose. In terms of the detection of tooth diagnosis, no intelligent detection has been done up till now. Dentists just look at images and then they can detect the diagnosis position in tooth based on their experiences. Using new technologies, scientists will implement detection and repair of tooth diagnosis intelligently. In this paper, we have introduced one intelligent method for detection using particle swarm optimization (PSO and our mathematical formulation. This method was applied to 2D special images. Using developing of our method, we can detect tooth diagnosis for all of 2D and 3D images. Materials and Methods. In recent years, it is possible to implement intelligent processing of images by high efficiency optimization algorithms in many applications especially for detection of dental caries and restoration without human intervention. In the present work, we explain PSO algorithm with our detection formula for detection of dental caries and restoration. Also image processing helped us to implement our method. And to do so, pictures taken by digital radiography systems of tooth are used. Results and Conclusion. We implement some mathematics formula for fitness of PSO. Our results show that this method can detect dental caries and restoration in digital radiography pictures with the good convergence. In fact, the error rate of this method was 8%, so that it can be implemented for detection of dental caries and restoration. Using some parameters, it is possible that the error rate can be even reduced below 0.5%.

  7. Detection of glass particles on bone lesions using SEM-EDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoriol, Romain; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Chantalat, Elodie; Roumiguié, Mathieu; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette; Payré, Bruno; Telmon, Norbert; Savall, Frédéric

    2017-09-01

    The problem of identifying the wounding agent in forensic cases is recurrent. Moreover, when several tools are involved, distinguishing the origin of lesions can be difficult. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS) equipment is increasingly available to the scientific and medical community, and some studies have reported its use in forensic anthropology. However, at our knowledge, no study has reported the use of SEM-EDS in forensic cases involving glass tools, whether in case reports or experiments. We performed an experimental study on human rib fragments, on which we manually created wounds using fragments of window and mirror glass. SEM-EDS was executed on samples without any further preparation on low vacuum mode, then on the same samples after defleshing them completely by boiling them. Window and mirror glass particles were detected on experimental wounds. Both had silica in their spectra, and the opaque side of the mirror contained titanium, allowing for their identification. Boiling and defleshing the bone samples involved a loss of information in terms of the number of wounds detected as positive for glass particles and in the number of glass particles detected, for both window and mirror glass. We suggest the analysis of wounds with suspected glass particles using low vacuum mode and with no defleshment by boiling.

  8. The application of thick hydrogenated amorphous silicon layers to charged particle and x-ray detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Cho, G.; Fujieda, I.; Kaplan, S.N.; Qureshi, S.; Street, R.A.

    1989-04-01

    We outline the characteristics of thick hydrogenated amorphous silicon layers which are optimized for the detection of charged particles, x-rays and γ-rays. Signal amplitude as a function of the linear energy transfer of various particles are given. Noise sources generated by the detector material and by the thin film electronics - a-Si:H or polysilicon proposed for pixel position sensitive detectors readout are described, and their relative amplitudes are calculated. Temperature and neutron radiation effects on leakage currents and the corresponding noise changes are presented. 17 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Detection of a human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle antigenically related to HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garry, R. F.; Fermin, C. D.; Hart, D. J.; Alexander, S. S.; Donehower, L. A.; Luo-Zhang, H.

    1990-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes. The loss of salivary and lacrimal gland function is accompanied by lymphocytic infiltration. Because similar symptoms and glandular pathology are observed in certain persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a search was initiated for a possible retroviral etiology in this syndrome. A human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle that is antigenically related to HIV was detected in lymphoblastoid cells exposed to homogenates of salivary tissue from patients with Sjogren's syndrome. Comparison of this retroviral particle to HIV indicates that they are distinguishable by several ultrastructural, physical, and enzymatic criteria.

  10. Detection of fission fragments and alpha particles using the solid trace detector CR-39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    The technique of detecting charged particles using the solid track detector CR-39 is employed to establish some characteristics of fission fragments and alpha particles emitted from a Cf-252 source. Results are presented and discussed on the following aspects i) distribution of the track diameters; ii) variations on the track diameters to the chemical attack; iii) variations of the chemical attack velocity with respect to concentration and temperature. iv) activation energy of the developping process; v) induction time; vi) critical angle and efficiency on track developping. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  11. Detection of biological particles in ambient air using Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McJimpsey, E L; Steele, P T; Coffee, K R; Fergenson, D P; Riot, V J; Woods, B W; Gard, E E; Frank, M; Tobias, H J; Lebrilla, C

    2006-01-01

    The Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system is an instrument used for the real time detection and identification of biological aerosols. Particles are drawn from the atmosphere directly into vacuum and tracked as they scatter light from several continuous wave lasers. After tracking, the fluorescence of individual particles is excited by a pulsed 266nm or 355nm laser. Molecules from those particles with appropriate fluorescence properties are subsequently desorbed and ionized using a pulsed 266nm laser. Resulting ions are analyzed in a dual polarity mass spectrometer. During two field deployments at the San Francisco International Airport, millions of ambient particles were analyzed and a small but significant fraction were found to have fluorescent properties similar to Bacillus spores and vegetative cells. Further separation of non-biological background particles from potential biological particles was accomplished using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. This has been shown to enable some level of species differentiation in specific cases, but the creation and observation of higher mass ions is needed to enable a higher level of specificity across more species. A soft ionization technique, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is being investigated for this purpose. MALDI is particularly well suited for mass analysis of biomolecules since it allows for the generation of molecular ions from large mass compounds that would fragment under normal irradiation. Some of the initial results from a modified BAMS system utilizing this technique are described

  12. Single-particle measurements of bouncing particles and in situ collection efficiency from an airborne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with light-scattering detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jin; Brock, Charles A.; Murphy, Daniel M.; Sueper, Donna T.; Welti, André; Middlebrook, Ann M.

    2017-10-01

    A light-scattering module was coupled to an airborne, compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (LS-AMS) to investigate collection efficiency (CE) while obtaining nonrefractory aerosol chemical composition measurements during the Southeast Nexus (SENEX) campaign. In this instrument, particles scatter light from an internal laser beam and trigger saving individual particle mass spectra. Nearly all of the single-particle data with mass spectra that were triggered by scattered light signals were from particles larger than ˜ 280 nm in vacuum aerodynamic diameter. Over 33 000 particles are characterized as either prompt (27 %), delayed (15 %), or null (58 %), according to the time and intensity of their total mass spectral signals. The particle mass from single-particle spectra is proportional to that derived from the light-scattering diameter (dva-LS) but not to that from the particle time-of-flight (PToF) diameter (dva-MS) from the time of the maximum mass spectral signal. The total mass spectral signal from delayed particles was about 80 % of that from prompt ones for the same dva-LS. Both field and laboratory data indicate that the relative intensities of various ions in the prompt spectra show more fragmentation compared to the delayed spectra. The particles with a delayed mass spectral signal likely bounced off the vaporizer and vaporized later on another surface within the confines of the ionization source. Because delayed particles are detected by the mass spectrometer later than expected from their dva-LS size, they can affect the interpretation of particle size (PToF) mass distributions, especially at larger sizes. The CE, measured by the average number or mass fractions of particles optically detected that had measurable mass spectra, varied significantly (0.2-0.9) in different air masses. The measured CE agreed well with a previous parameterization when CE > 0.5 for acidic particles but was sometimes lower than the minimum parameterized CE of 0.5.

  13. Efficient alpha particle detection by CR-39 applying 50 Hz-HV electrochemical etching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, M.; Soltani, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Alpha particles can be detected by CR-39 by applying either chemical etching (CE), electrochemical etching (ECE), or combined pre-etching and ECE usually through a multi-step HF-HV ECE process at temperatures much higher than room temperature. By applying pre-etching, characteristics responses of fast-neutron-induced recoil tracks in CR-39 by HF-HV ECE versus KOH normality (N) have shown two high-sensitivity peaks around 5–6 and 15–16 N and a large-diameter peak with a minimum sensitivity around 10–11 N at 25°C. On the other hand, 50 Hz-HV ECE method recently advanced in our laboratory detects alpha particles with high efficiency and broad registration energy range with small ECE tracks in polycarbonate (PC) detectors. By taking advantage of the CR-39 sensitivity to alpha particles, efficacy of 50 Hz-HV ECE method and CR-39 exotic responses under different KOH normalities, detection characteristics of 0.8 MeV alpha particle tracks were studied in 500 μm CR-39 for different fluences, ECE duration and KOH normality. Alpha registration efficiency increased as ECE duration increased to 90 ± 2% after 6–8 h beyond which plateaus are reached. Alpha track density versus fluence is linear up to 10 6  tracks cm −2 . The efficiency and mean track diameter versus alpha fluence up to 10 6  alphas cm −2 decrease as the fluence increases. Background track density and minimum detection limit are linear functions of ECE duration and increase as normality increases. The CR-39 processed for the first time in this study by 50 Hz-HV ECE method proved to provide a simple, efficient and practical alpha detection method at room temperature. - Highlights: • Alpha particles of 0.8 MeV were detected in CR-39 by 50 Hz-HV ECE method. • Efficiency/track diameter was studied vs fluence and time for 3 KOH normality. • Background track density and minimum detection limit vs duration were studied. • A new simple, efficient and low-cost alpha detection method

  14. Near-infrared Thermal Emission Detections of a Number of Hot Jupiters and the Systematics of Ground-based Near-infrared Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Bryce; Albert, Loic; Jayawardhana, Ray; Cushing, Michael; Moutou, Claire; Lafreniere, David; Johnson, John Asher; Bonomo, Aldo S.; Deleuil, Magali; Fortney, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    We present detections of the near-infrared thermal emission of three hot Jupiters and one brown dwarf using the Wide-field Infrared Camera (WIRCam) on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). These include Ks-band secondary eclipse detections of the hot Jupiters WASP-3b and Qatar-1b and the brown dwarf KELT-1b. We also report Y-band, K CONT-band, and two new and one reanalyzed Ks-band detections of the thermal emission of the hot Jupiter WASP-12b. We present a new reduction pipeline for CFHT/WIRCam data, which is optimized for high precision photometry. We also describe novel techniques for constraining systematic errors in ground-based near-infrared photometry, so as to return reliable secondary eclipse depths and uncertainties. We discuss the noise properties of our ground-based photometry for wavelengths spanning the near-infrared (the YJHK bands), for faint and bright stars, and for the same object on several occasions. For the hot Jupiters WASP-3b and WASP-12b we demonstrate the repeatability of our eclipse depth measurements in the Ks band; we therefore place stringent limits on the systematics of ground-based, near-infrared photometry, and also rule out violent weather changes in the deep, high pressure atmospheres of these two hot Jupiters at the epochs of our observations. Based on observations obtained with WIRCam, a joint project of Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), Taiwan, Korea, Canada, France, at the CFHT, which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institute National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii.

  15. Detection of lead nanoparticles in game meat by single particle ICP-MS following use of lead-containing bullets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollander, Barbro; Widemo, Fredrik; Ågren, Erik

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated whether game meat may contain nanoparticles of lead from ammunition. Lead nanoparticles in the range 40 to 750 nm were detected by ICP-MS in single particle mode in game shot with lead-containing bullets. The median diameter of the detected nanoparticles was around 60 nm....... The particle mass concentration ranged from 290 to 340 ng/g meat and the particle number concentrations from 27 to 50 million particles/g meat. The size limit of detection strongly depended on the level of dissolved lead and was in the range of 40 to 80 nm. In game meat sampled more than 10 cm away from...... the wound channel, no lead particles with a diameter larger than 40 nm were detected. In addition to dissolved lead in meat that originated from particulates, the presence of lead nano particles in game meat represents a hitherto unattended source of lead with a largely unknown toxicological impact...

  16. Electron microscopy characterization of mechanically alloyed and hot consolidates Cu-Cr3C2 particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López, M.

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Mechanically alloyed copper-ceramic composites have been obtained with the purpose of studying their use as copper-based material for electrical equipment. For high-temperature applications, dispersion-strengthened copper alloys are attractive due to their excellent combination of thermal and electrical conductivity, mechanical strength retention and microstructural stability. In this work, powder mixtures of pure copper with 2 vol % Cr3C2, milled during 4, 6, 10, 12 and 15 h in a high-energy planetary balls mill under argon atmosphere, were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing, applying a pressure of 100 MPa at 1073 K for two hours, to obtain materials with a fine microstructure. The Cu-Cr3C2 alloys were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, electron microprobe (EPMA and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Mechanical properties and electrical conductivity were also studied. The average tensile strength and electrical conductivity were found to be 500 MPa and 50 % IACS, respectively. The Cr3C2 ceramics show good stability during hot consolidation. Contributing to a further strengthening of the alloy during the hot consolidation, uniformly-distributed Fe-carbide particles of nanometric size precipitated in the copper matrix. Fe-Cr oxycarbides formed in the interphase between Cr3C2 particles and the copper matrix cause the low ductility of Cu-Cr3C2 alloys. Said particles are attributed to impurities/contamination generated from the milling process.

    Se obtuvieron aleaciones compuestas de Cu-Cr3C2, aleadas mecánicamente, para estudiar futuras aplicaciones en componentes eléctricos. A altas temperaturas, las aleaciones de base cobre reforzadas por dispersión, son atractivas por su excelente conductividad térmica y eléctrica, propiedades mecánicas y estabilidad microstructural. En este estudio

  17. Pulse pile-up in nuclear particle detection systems with rapidly varying counting rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datlowe, D.W.

    1977-01-01

    Pulse pile-up in nuclear particle detection systems is the distortion of the measured pulse height distribution which occurs when there is a significant probability that more than one particle will arrive within the detector resolving time. This paper treats the problem in cases where the probability of pile-up varies on a time scale comparable to the rise time of the detector system electronics. These variations introduce structure into the pulse height distributions which cannot occur for a time-independent pile-up probability. Three classes of problems which exemplify these effects are as follows: 1) Pile-up rejection circuits. 2) Cascaded nuclear decays, in which the lifetime for emission of a second X-ray is comparable to the detector rise time. 3) Bursts of particles where the intensity is modulated on a time scale comparable to the detector rise time. These problems are solved computationally by an extension of a numerical technique previously developed. (Auth.)

  18. Detection of a westward hotspot offset in the atmosphere of hot gas giant CoRoT-2b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Lisa; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Schwartz, Joel C.; Rauscher, Emily; Zhang, Michael; Knutson, Heather A.; Line, Michael; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian; Deming, Drake; Sundararajan, Sudarsan; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Zhao, Ming

    2018-03-01

    Short-period planets exhibit day-night temperature contrasts of hundreds to thousands of kelvin. They also exhibit eastward hotspot offsets whereby the hottest region on the planet is east of the substellar point1; this has been widely interpreted as advection of heat due to eastward winds2. We present thermal phase observations of the hot Jupiter CoRoT-2b obtained with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope. These measurements show the most robust detection to date of a westward hotspot offset of 23 ± 4°, in contrast with the nine other planets with equivalent measurements3-10. The peculiar infrared flux map of CoRoT-2b may result from westward winds due to non-synchronous rotation11 or magnetic effects12,13, or partial cloud coverage, that obscure the emergent flux from the planet's eastern hemisphere14-17. Non-synchronous rotation and magnetic effects may also explain the planet's anomalously large radius12,18. On the other hand, partial cloud coverage could explain the featureless dayside emission spectrum of the planet19,20. If CoRoT-2b is not tidally locked, then it means that our understanding of star-planet tidal interaction is incomplete. If the westward offset is due to magnetic effects, our result represents an opportunity to study an exoplanet's magnetic field. If it has eastern clouds, then it means that a greater understanding of large-scale circulation on tidally locked planets is required.

  19. EVIDENCE FOR THE DIRECT DETECTION OF THE THERMAL SPECTRUM OF THE NON-TRANSITING HOT GAS GIANT HD 88133 b

    KAUST Repository

    Piskorz, Danielle

    2016-11-23

    We target the thermal emission spectrum of the non-transiting gas giant HD 88133 b with high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy, by treating the planet and its host star as a spectroscopic binary. For sufficiently deep summed flux observations of the star and planet across multiple epochs, it is possible to resolve the signal of the hot gas giant\\'s atmosphere compared to the brighter stellar spectrum, at a level consistent with the aggregate shot noise of the full data set. To do this, we first perform a principal component analysis to remove the contribution of the Earth\\'s atmosphere to the observed spectra. Then, we use a cross-correlation analysis to tease out the spectra of the host star and HD 88133 b to determine its orbit and identify key sources of atmospheric opacity. In total, six epochs of Keck NIRSPEC L-band observations and three epochs of Keck NIRSPEC K-band observations of the HD 88133 system were obtained. Based on an analysis of the maximum likelihood curves calculated from the multi-epoch cross-correlation of the full data set with two atmospheric models, we report the direct detection of the emission spectrum of the non-transiting exoplanet HD 88133 b and measure a radial projection of the Keplerian orbital velocity of 40 +/- 15 km s(-1), a true mass of 1.02(-0.28)(+0.61) M-J, a nearly face-on orbital inclination of 15(-5)(+60), and an atmosphere opacity structure at high dispersion dominated by water vapor. This, combined with 11 years of radial velocity measurements of the system, provides the most up-to-date ephemeris for HD 88133.

  20. Tonneau: a multidetector array for charged particle and light fragment 4π detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peghaire, A.; Zwieglinski, B.; Rosato, E.; Jin, G.M.; Kasagi, J.; Doubre, H.; Peter, J.; Guilbault, F.; Lebrun, C.; Cassagnou, Y.; Legrain, R.

    1989-01-01

    The central part of the light-particle detection unit for the GANIL multidetector is a spherical (80 cm radius) shell of 2 mm thick NE 102A plastic scintillator. It spans the range of polar angles from θ = 30 0 - 150 0 and the azimuthal range φ = 0 0 - 360 0 , and it is segmented into 72 individual Δθ = 60 0 and Δφ = 10 0 wide detection modules. Each module is viewed by a photomultiplier at each end which provide information on the particle impact position, atomic number Z and velocity. The performance of the modules was studied with an α-source and during several experiments with heavy ion beams from 25 up to 85 MeV/amu

  1. Advances in associated-particle sealed-tube neutron probe diagnostics for substance detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.; Frey, M.

    1995-01-01

    The development and investigation of a small associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG) shows potential to allow the associated-particle diagnostic method to be moved out of the laboratory into field applications. The APSTNG interrogates the inspected object with 14-MeV neutrons generated from the deuterium-tritium reaction and detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron inside a cone encompassing the region of interest. Gamma-ray spectra of resulting neutron reactions identify many nuclides. Flight-times determined from detection times of the gamma-rays and alpha-particles can yield a separate coarse tomographic image of each identified nuclide, from a single orientation. Chemical substances are identified by comparing relative spectral line intensities with ratios of elements in reference compounds. The high-energy neutrons and gamma-rays penetrate large objects and dense materials. Generally no collimators or radiation shielding are needed. Proof-of-concept laboratory experiments have been successfully performed for simulated nuclear, chemical warfare, and conventional munitions. Most recently, inspection applications have been investigated for radioactive waste characterization, presence of cocaine in propane tanks, and uranium and plutonium smuggling. Based on lessons learned with the present APSTNG system, an advanced APSTNG tube (along with improved high voltage supply and control units) is being designed and fabricated that will be transportable and rugged, yield a substantial neutron output increase, and provide sufficiently improved lifetime to allow operation at more than an order of magnitude increase in neutron flux

  2. Associated-particle sealed-tube neutron probe: Detection of explosives, contraband, and nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.

    1996-01-01

    Continued research and development of the APSTNG shows the potential for practical field use of this technology for detection of explosives, contraband, and nuclear materials. The APSTNG (associated-particle sealed-tube generator) inspects the item to be examined using penetrating 14-MeV neutrons generated by the deuterium-tritium reaction inside a compact accelerator tube. An alpha detector built into the sealed tube detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron emitted in a cone encompassing the volume to be inspected. Penetrating high-energy gamma-rays from the resulting neutron reactions identify specific nuclides inside the volume. Flight-times determined from the detection times of gamma-rays and alpha-particles separate the prompt and delayed gamma-ray spectra and allow a coarse 3-D image to be obtained of nuclides identified in the prompt spectrum. The generator and detectors can be on the same side of the inspected object, on opposite sides, or with intermediate orientations. Thus, spaces behind walls and other confined regions can be inspected. Signals from container walls can be discriminated against using the flight-time technique. No collimators or shielding are required, the neutron generator is relatively small, and commercial-grade electronics are employed. The use of 14-MeV neutrons yields a much higher cross-section for detecting nitrogen than that for systems based on thermal-neutron reactions alone, and the broad range of elements with significant 14-MeV neutron cross-sections extends explosives detection to other elements including low-nitrogen compounds, and allows detection of many other substances. Proof-of-concept experiments have been successfully performed for conventional explosives, chemical warfare agents, cocaine, and fissionable materials

  3. Near surface illumination method to detect particle size information by optical calibration free remission measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Sabrina; Foschum, Florian; Kienle, Alwin

    2017-07-01

    A calibration free method to detect particle size information is presented. A possible application for such measurements is the investigation of raw milk since there not only the fat and protein content varies but also the fat droplet size. The newly developed method is sensitive to the scattering phase function, which makes it applicable to many other applications, too. By simulating the light propagation by use of Monte Carlo simulations, a calibration free device can be developed from this principle.

  4. Back-tracking of primary particle trajectories for muons detected at the Earth surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutenko, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    Investigations of cosmic rays on the surface of the Earth allow to derive information of applied character on the conditions of the interplanetary magnetic field and of the geomagnetic field. For this purpose, it is necessary to collate trajectories of particles detected in the ground-based detector to trajectories of primary cosmic rays in the heliosphere. This problem is solved by means of various back-tracking methods. In this work, one of such methods is presented.

  5. Back-tracking of primary particle trajectories for muons detected at the Earth surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shutenko, V V

    2017-01-01

    Investigations of cosmic rays on the surface of the Earth allow to derive information of applied character on the conditions of the interplanetary magnetic field and of the geomagnetic field. For this purpose, it is necessary to collate trajectories of particles detected in the ground-based detector to trajectories of primary cosmic rays in the heliosphere. This problem is solved by means of various back-tracking methods. In this work, one of such methods is presented. (paper)

  6. Optical Detection and Sizing of Single Nano-Particles Using Continuous Wetting Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennequin, Yves; McLeod, Euan; Mudanyali, Onur; Migliozzi, Daniel; Ozcan, Aydogan; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    The physical interaction between nano-scale objects and liquid interfaces can create unique optical properties, enhancing the signatures of the objects with sub-wavelength features. Here we show that the evaporation on a wetting substrate of a polymer solution containing sub-micrometer or nano-scale particles creates liquid micro-lenses that arise from the local deformations of the continuous wetting film. These micro-lenses have properties similar to axicon lenses that are known to create beams with a long depth of focus. This enhanced depth of focus allows detection of single nanoparticles using a low magnification microscope objective lens, achieving a relatively wide field-of-view, while also lifting the constraints on precise focusing onto the object plane. Hence, by creating these liquid axicon lenses through spatial deformations of a continuous thin wetting film, we transfer the challenge of imaging individual nano-particles to detecting the light focused by these lenses. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate the detection and sizing of single nano-particles (100 and 200 nm), CpGV granuloviruses as well as Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria over a wide field of view of e.g., 5.10×3.75 mm2 using a ×5 objective lens with a numerical aperture of 0.15. In addition to conventional lens-based microscopy, this continuous wetting film based approach is also applicable to lensfree computational on-chip imaging, which can be used to detect single nano-particles over a large field-of-view of e.g., >20-30 mm2. These results could be especially useful for high-throughput field-analysis of nano-scale objects using compact and cost-effective microscope designs. PMID:23889001

  7. A detection system for charged-particle decay studies with a continuous-implantation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, L.J. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Xu, X.X., E-mail: xuxinxing@ciae.ac.cn [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Lin, C.J., E-mail: cjlin@ciae.ac.cn [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Wang, J.S. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Fang, D.Q. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Li, Z.H. [School of Physic and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, Y.T. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Li, J. [School of Physic and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yang, L.; Ma, N.R. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Wang, K. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zang, H.L. [School of Physic and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, H.W.; Li, C.; Shi, C.Z.; Nie, M.W.; Li, X.F.; Li, H. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Ma, J.B.; Ma, P. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); and others

    2015-12-21

    A new detection system with high detection efficiency and low detection threshold has been developed for charged-particle decay studies, including β-delayed proton, α decay or direct proton emission from proton-rich nuclei. The performance was evaluated by using the β-delayed proton emitter {sup 24}Si produced by projectile fragmentation at the First Radioactive Ion Beam Line in Lanzhou. Under a continuous-beam mode, the isotopes of interest were implanted into two double-sided silicon strip detectors, where the subsequent decays were measured and correlated to the preceding implantations by using position and time information. The system allows us to measure protons with energies down to about 200 keV without obvious β background in the proton spectrum. Further application of the detection system can be extended to the measurements of β-delayed proton decay and the direct proton emission of more exotic proton-rich nuclei.

  8. An integrated micro-chip for rapid detection of magnetic particles

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.

    2012-03-09

    This paper proposes an integrated micro-chip for the manipulation and detection of magnetic particles (MPs). A conducting ring structure is used to manipulate MPs toward giant magnetoresistance(GMR) sensing elements for rapid detection. The GMRsensor is fabricated in a horseshoe shape in order to detect the majority of MPs that are trapped around the conducting structure. The GMR sensing elements are connected in a Wheatstone bridge circuit topology for optimum noise suppression. Full fabrication details of the micro-chip, characterization of the GMRsensors, and experimental results with MPs are presented in this paper. Experimental results showed that the micro-chip can detect MPs from low concentration samples after they were guided toward the GMRsensors by applying current to the conducting ring structure.

  9. Conditional-sampling spectrograph detection system for fluorescence measurements of individual airborne biological particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachman, Paul; Pinnick, R. G.; Hill, Steven C.; Chen, Gang; Chang, Richard K.; Mayo, Michael W.; Fernandez, Gilbert L.

    1996-03-01

    We report the design and operation of a prototype conditional-sampling spectrograph detection system that can record the fluorescence spectra of individual, micrometer-sized aerosols as they traverse an intense 488-nm intracavity laser beam. The instrument's image-intensified CCD detector is gated by elastic scattering or by undispersed fluorescence from particles that enter the spectrograph's field of view. It records spectra only from particles with preselected scattering-fluorescence levels (a fiber-optic-photomultiplier subsystem provides the gating signal). This conditional-sampling procedure reduces data-handling rates and increases the signal-to-noise ratio by restricting the system's exposures to brief periods when aerosols traverse the beam. We demonstrate these advantages by reliably capturing spectra from individual fluorescent microspheres dispersed in an airstream. The conditional-sampling procedure also permits some discrimination among different types of particles, so that spectra may be recorded from the few interesting particles present in a cloud of background aerosol. We demonstrate such discrimination by measuring spectra from selected fluorescent microspheres in a mixture of two types of microspheres, and from bacterial spores in a mixture of spores and nonfluorescent kaolin particles.

  10. Frequency Mixing Magnetic Detection Scanner for Imaging Magnetic Particles in Planar Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyobong; Lim, Eul-Gyoon; Jeong, Jae-Chan; Chang, Jiho; Shin, Sung-Woong; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2016-06-09

    The setup of a planar Frequency Mixing Magnetic Detection (p-FMMD) scanner for performing Magnetic Particles Imaging (MPI) of flat samples is presented. It consists of two magnetic measurement heads on both sides of the sample mounted on the legs of a u-shaped support. The sample is locally exposed to a magnetic excitation field consisting of two distinct frequencies, a stronger component at about 77 kHz and a weaker field at 61 Hz. The nonlinear magnetization characteristics of superparamagnetic particles give rise to the generation of intermodulation products. A selected sum-frequency component of the high and low frequency magnetic field incident on the magnetically nonlinear particles is recorded by a demodulation electronics. In contrast to a conventional MPI scanner, p-FMMD does not require the application of a strong magnetic field to the whole sample because mixing of the two frequencies occurs locally. Thus, the lateral dimensions of the sample are just limited by the scanning range and the supports. However, the sample height determines the spatial resolution. In the current setup it is limited to 2 mm. As examples, we present two 20 mm × 25 mm p-FMMD images acquired from samples with 1 µm diameter maghemite particles in silanol matrix and with 50 nm magnetite particles in aminosilane matrix. The results show that the novel MPI scanner can be applied for analysis of thin biological samples and for medical diagnostic purposes.

  11. Feature selection and classifier parameters estimation for EEG signals peak detection using particle swarm optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Asrul; Shapiai, Mohd Ibrahim; Tumari, Mohd Zaidi Mohd; Mohamad, Mohd Saberi; Mubin, Marizan

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal peak detection is widely used in clinical applications. The peak point can be detected using several approaches, including time, frequency, time-frequency, and nonlinear domains depending on various peak features from several models. However, there is no study that provides the importance of every peak feature in contributing to a good and generalized model. In this study, feature selection and classifier parameters estimation based on particle swarm optimization (PSO) are proposed as a framework for peak detection on EEG signals in time domain analysis. Two versions of PSO are used in the study: (1) standard PSO and (2) random asynchronous particle swarm optimization (RA-PSO). The proposed framework tries to find the best combination of all the available features that offers good peak detection and a high classification rate from the results in the conducted experiments. The evaluation results indicate that the accuracy of the peak detection can be improved up to 99.90% and 98.59% for training and testing, respectively, as compared to the framework without feature selection adaptation. Additionally, the proposed framework based on RA-PSO offers a better and reliable classification rate as compared to standard PSO as it produces low variance model.

  12. An Experiment and Detection Scheme for Cavity-Based Light Cold Dark Matter Particle Searches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masroor H. S. Bukhari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A resonance detection scheme and some useful ideas for cavity-based searches of light cold dark matter particles (such as axions are presented, as an effort to aid in the on-going endeavors in this direction as well as for future experiments, especially in possibly developing a table-top experiment. The scheme is based on our idea of a resonant detector, incorporating an integrated tunnel diode (TD and GaAs HEMT/HFET (High-Electron Mobility Transistor/Heterogeneous FET transistor amplifier, weakly coupled to a cavity in a strong transverse magnetic field. The TD-amplifier combination is suggested as a sensitive and simple technique to facilitate resonance detection within the cavity while maintaining excellent noise performance, whereas our proposed Halbach magnet array could serve as a low-noise and permanent solution replacing the conventional electromagnets scheme. We present some preliminary test results which demonstrate resonance detection from simulated test signals in a small optimal axion mass range with superior signal-to-noise ratios (SNR. Our suggested design also contains an overview of a simpler on-resonance dc signal read-out scheme replacing the complicated heterodyne read-out. We believe that all these factors and our propositions could possibly improve or at least simplify the resonance detection and read-out in cavity-based DM particle detection searches (and other spectroscopy applications and reduce the complications (and associated costs, in addition to reducing the electromagnetic interference and background.

  13. Passive Optimization Design Based on Particle Swarm Optimization in Rural Buildings of the Hot Summer and Warm Winter Zone of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilei Lu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of green building is an important way to solve the environmental problems of China’s construction industry. Energy conservation and energy utilization are important for the green building evaluation criteria (GBEC. The objective of this study is to evaluate the quantitative relationship between building shape parameter, envelope parameters, shading system, courtyard and the energy consumption (EC as well as the impact on indoor thermal comfort of rural residential buildings in the hot summer and warm winter zone (HWWZ. Taking Quanzhou (Fujian Province of China as an example, based on the field investigation, EnergyPlus is used to build the building performance model. In addition, the classical particle swarm optimization algorithm in GenOpt software is used to optimize the various factors affecting the EC. Single-objective optimization has provided guidance to the multi-dimensional optimization and regression analysis is used to find the effects of a single input variable on an output variable. Results shows that the energy saving rate of an optimized rural residence is about 26–30% corresponding to the existing rural residence. Moreover, the payback period is about 20 years. A simple case study is used to demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed optimization analysis. The optimization can be used to guide the design of new rural construction in the area and the energy saving transformation of the existing rural houses, which can help to achieve the purpose of energy saving and comfort.

  14. Rapid and Simple Detection of Hot Spot Point Mutations of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor, BRAF, and NRAS in Cancers Using the Loop-Hybrid Mobility Shift Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukuma, Shoichi; Yoshihara, Mitsuyo; Kasai, Fumio; Kato, Akinori; Yoshida, Akira; Akaike, Makoto; Kobayashi, Osamu; Nakayama, Haruhiko; Sakuma, Yuji; Yoshida, Tsutomu; Kameda, Yoichi; Tsuchiya, Eiju; Miyagi, Yohei

    2006-01-01

    A simple and rapid method to detect the epidermal growth factor receptor hot spot mutation L858R in lung adenocarcinoma was developed based on principles similar to the universal heteroduplex generator technology. A single-stranded oligonucleotide with an internal deletion was used to generate heteroduplexes (loop-hybrids) bearing a loop in the complementary strand derived from the polymerase chain reaction product of the normal or mutant allele. By placing deletion in the oligonucleotide adjacent to the mutational site, difference in electrophoretic mobility between loop-hybrids with normal and mutated DNA was distinguishable in a native polyacrylamide gel. The method was also modified to detect in-frame deletion mutations of epidermal growth factor receptor in lung adenocarcinomas. In addition, the method was adapted to detect hot spot mutations in the B-type Raf kinase (BRAF) at V600 and in a Ras-oncogene (NRAS) at Q61, the mutations commonly found in thyroid carcinomas. Our mutation detection system, designated the loop-hybrid mobility shift assay was sensitive enough to detect mutant DNA comprising 7.5% of the total DNA. As a simple and straightforward mutation detection technique, loop-hybrid mobility shift assay may be useful for the molecular diagnosis of certain types of clinical cancers. Other applications are also discussed. PMID:16931592

  15. Detection of spatial hot spots and variation for the neon flying squid Ommastrephes bartramii resources in the northwest Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yongjiu; Chen, Xinjun; Liu, Yan

    2017-07-01

    With the increasing effects of global climate change and fishing activities, the spatial distribution of the neon flying squid ( Ommastrephes bartramii) is changing in the traditional fishing ground of 150°-160°E and 38°-45°N in the northwest Pacific Ocean. This research aims to identify the spatial hot and cold spots (i.e. spatial clusters) of O. bartramii to reveal its spatial structure using commercial fishery data from 2007 to 2010 collected by Chinese mainland squid-jigging fleets. A relatively strongly-clustered distribution for O. bartramii was observed using an exploratory spatial data analysis (ESDA) method. The results show two hot spots and one cold spot in 2007 while only one hot and one cold spots were identified each year from 2008 to 2010. The hot and cold spots in 2007 occupied 8.2% and 5.6% of the study area, respectively; these percentages for hot and cold spot areas were 5.8% and 3.1% in 2008, 10.2% and 2.9% in 2009, and 16.4% and 11.9% in 2010, respectively. Nearly half (>45%) of the squid from 2007 to 2009 reported by Chinese fleets were caught in hot spot areas while this percentage reached its peak at 68.8% in 2010, indicating that the hot spot areas are central fishing grounds. A further change analysis shows the area centered at 156°E/43.5°N was persistent as a hot spot over the whole period from 2007 to 2010. Furthermore, the hot spots were mainly identified in areas with sea surface temperature (SST) in the range of 15-20°C around warm Kuroshio Currents as well as with the chlorophyll- a (chl- a) concentration above 0.3 mg/m3. The outcome of this research improves our understanding of spatiotemporal hotspots and its variation for O. bartramii and is useful for sustainable exploitation, assessment, and management of this squid.

  16. Detection of triglyceride using an iridium nano-particle catalyst based amperometric biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Yin; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Chou, Tse-Chuan

    2008-12-01

    The detection and quantification of triglyceride (TG) using an iridium nano-particle modified carbon based biosensor was successfully carried out in this study. The detection procedures were based on the electrochemical detection of enzymatically produced NADH. TG was hydrolyzed by lipase and the glycerol produced was catalytically oxidized by NAD-dependent glycerol dehydrogenase producing NADH in a solution containing NAD(+). Glyceryl tributyrate, a short chain triglyceride, was chosen as the substrate for the evaluation of this TG biosensor in bovine serum and human serum. A linear response to glyceryl tributyrate in the concentration range of 0 to 10 mM and a sensitivity of 7.5 nA mM(-1) in bovine serum and 7.0 nA mM(-1) in human serum were observed experimentally. The potential interference of species such as uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) was assessed. The incorporation of a selected surfactant and an increase in the incubation temperature appeared to enhance the performance of this biosensor. The conditions for the determination of TG levels in bovine serum using this biosensor were optimized, with sunflower seed oil being used as an analyte to simulate the detection of TG in blood. The experimental results demonstrated that this iridium nano-particle modified working electrode based biosensor provided a relatively simple means for the accurate determination of TG in serum.

  17. Detection and Analysis of Particles with Failed SiC in AGR-1 Fuel Compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunn, John D.; Baldwin, Charles A.; Gerczak, Tyler J.; Montgomery, Fred C.; Morris, Robert N.; Silva, Chinthaka M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Harp, Jason M.; Ploger, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    As the primary barrier to release of radioactive isotopes emitted from the fuel kernel, retention performance of the SiC layer in tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particles is critical to the overall safety of reactors that utilize this fuel design. Most isotopes are well-retained by intact SiC coatings, so pathways through this layer due to cracking, structural defects, or chemical attack can significantly contribute to radioisotope release. In the US TRISO fuel development effort, release of "1"3"4Cs and "1"3"7Cs are used to detect SiC failure during fuel compact irradiation and safety testing because the amount of cesium released by a compact containing one particle with failed SiC is typically ten or more times higher than that released by compacts without failed SiC. Compacts with particles that released cesium during the AGR-1 irradiation test or post-irradiation safety testing at 1600– 1800°C were identified, and individual particles with abnormally low cesium retention were sorted out with the ORNL Irradiated Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA). X-ray tomography was used for three-dimensional imaging of the internal coating structure to locate low-density pathways through the SiC layer and guide subsequent materialography by optical and scanning electron microscopy. All three cesium-releasing particles recovered from as-irradiated compacts showed a region where the inner pyrocarbon (IPyC) had cracked due to radiation-induced dimensional changes in the shrinking buffer and the exposed SiC had experienced concentrated attack by palladium; SiC failures observed in particles subjected to safety testing were related to either fabrication defects or showed extensive Pd corrosion through the SiC where it had been exposed by similar IPyC cracking. (author)

  18. ESA uncovers Geminga's `hot spot'

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    16 July 2004 Astronomers using ESA’s X-ray observatory XMM-Newton have detected a small, bright ‘hot spot’ on the surface of the neutron star called Geminga, 500 light-years away. The hot spot is the size of a football field and is caused by the same mechanism producing Geminga’s X-ray tails. This discovery identifies the missing link between the X-ray and gamma-ray emission from Geminga. hi-res Size hi-res: 1284 kb Credits: ESA, P. Caraveo (IASF, Milan) Geminga's hot spot This figure shows the effects of charged particles accelerated in the magnetosphere of Geminga. Panel (a) shows an image taken with the EPIC instrument on board the XMM-Newton observatory. The bright tails, made of particles kicked out by Geminga’s strong magnetic field, trail the neutron star as it moves about in space. Panel (b) shows how electrically charged particles interact with Geminga’s magnetic field. For example, if electrons (blue) are kicked out by the star, positrons (in red) hit the star’s magnetic poles like in an ‘own goal’. Panel (c) illustrates the size of Geminga’s magnetic field (blue) compared to that of the star itself at the centre (purple). The magnetic field is tilted with respect to Geminga’s rotation axis (red). Panel (d) shows the magnetic poles of Geminga, where charged particles hit the surface of the star, creating a two-million degrees hot spot, a region much hotter than the surroundings. As the star spins on its rotation axis, the hot spot comes into view and then disappears, causing the periodic colour change seen by XMM-Newton. An animated version of the entire sequence can be found at: Click here for animated GIF [low resolution, animated GIF, 5536 KB] Click here for AVI [high resolution, AVI with DIVX compression, 19128 KB] hi-res Size hi-res: 371 kb Credits: ESA, P. Caraveo (IASF, Milan) Geminga's hot spot, panel (a) Panel (a) shows an image taken with the EPIC instrument on board the XMM-Newton observatory. The bright tails, made of

  19. Detection and analysis of particles with failed SiC in AGR-1 fuel compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunn, John D., E-mail: hunnjd@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States); Baldwin, Charles A.; Gerczak, Tyler J.; Montgomery, Fred C.; Morris, Robert N.; Silva, Chinthaka M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States); Demkowicz, Paul A.; Harp, Jason M.; Ploger, Scott A. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Cesium release was used to detect SiC failure in HTGR fuel. • Tristructural-isotropic particles with SiC failure were isolated by gamma screening. • SiC failure was studied by X-ray tomography and SEM. • SiC degradation was observed after irradiation and subsequent safety testing. - Abstract: As the primary barrier to release of radioactive isotopes emitted from the fuel kernel, retention performance of the SiC layer in tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particles is critical to the overall safety of reactors that utilize this fuel design. Most isotopes are well-retained by intact SiC coatings, so pathways through this layer due to cracking, structural defects, or chemical attack can significantly contribute to radioisotope release. In the US TRISO fuel development effort, release of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs are used to detect SiC failure during fuel compact irradiation and safety testing because the amount of cesium released by a compact containing one particle with failed SiC is typically ten or more times higher than that released by compacts without failed SiC. Compacts with particles that released cesium during irradiation testing or post-irradiation safety testing at 1600–1800 °C were identified, and individual particles with abnormally low cesium retention were sorted out with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Irradiated Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA). X-ray tomography was used for three-dimensional imaging of the internal coating structure to locate low-density pathways through the SiC layer and guide subsequent materialography by optical and scanning electron microscopy. All three cesium-releasing particles recovered from as-irradiated compacts showed a region where the inner pyrocarbon (IPyC) had cracked due to radiation-induced dimensional changes in the shrinking buffer and the exposed SiC had experienced concentrated attack by palladium; SiC failures observed in particles subjected to safety testing were

  20. Attacks and Intrusion Detection in Cloud Computing Using Neural Networks and Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Shokuh Saljoughi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, cloud computing has become popular among users in organizations and companies. Security and efficiency are the two major issues facing cloud service providers and their customers. Since cloud computing is a virtual pool of resources provided in an open environment (Internet, cloud-based services entail security risks. Detection of intrusions and attacks through unauthorized users is one of the biggest challenges for both cloud service providers and cloud users. In the present study, artificial intelligence techniques, e.g. MLP Neural Network sand particle swarm optimization algorithm, were used to detect intrusion and attacks. The methods were tested for NSL-KDD, KDD-CUP datasets. The results showed improved accuracy in detecting attacks and intrusions by unauthorized users.

  1. Detection of preferential particle orientation in the atmosphere: Development of an alternative polarization lidar system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geier, Manfred; Arienti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Increasing interest in polarimetric characterization of atmospheric aerosols has led to the development of complete sample-measuring (Mueller) polarimeters that are capable of measuring the entire backscattering phase matrix of a probed volume. These Mueller polarimeters consist of several moving parts, which limit measurement rates and complicate data analysis. In this paper, we present the concept of a less complex polarization lidar setup for detection of preferential orientation of atmospheric particulates. On the basis of theoretical considerations of data inversion stability and propagation of measurement uncertainties, an optimum optical configuration is established for two modes of operation (with either a linear or a circular polarized incident laser beam). The conceptualized setup falls in the category of incomplete sample-measuring polarimeters and uses four detection channels for simultaneous measurement of the backscattered light. The expected performance characteristics are discussed through an example of a typical aerosol with a small fraction of particles oriented in a preferred direction. The theoretical analysis suggests that achievable accuracies in backscatter cross-sections and depolarization ratios are similar to those with conventional two-channel configurations, while in addition preferential orientation can be detected with the proposed four-channel system for a wide range of conditions. - Highlights: • A theoretical study of a new four-channel lidar concept is offered. • Preferential particle orientation detection could be realized with minor device modifications. • The proposed configuration is optimized to balance inversion uncertainties. • Circular polarized beam is demonstrated to provide the best noise performance. • Operation with ultra-short pulses is proposed to quantify particle number density

  2. Photoluminescence detection of alpha particle using DAM-ADC nuclear detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdalla, Ayman M., E-mail: aymanabdalla62@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, College of Science and Arts, Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED), Najran University, P.O. Box: 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Harraz, Farid A., E-mail: fharraz68@yahoo.com [Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED), Najran University, P.O. Box: 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Nanostructured Materials and Nanotechnology Division, Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute (CMRDI), P.O. Box: 87 Helwan, Cairo 11421 (Egypt); Ali, Atif M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Al-Sayari, S.A. [Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED), Najran University, P.O. Box: 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); College of Science and Arts-Sharoura, Najran University (Saudi Arabia); Al-Hajry, A. [Department of Physics, College of Science and Arts, Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED), Najran University, P.O. Box: 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-09-11

    The photoluminescence (PL) and UV–vis spectral analysis of DAM-ADC (diallyl maleate: DAM, polyallyl diglycol carbonate: ADC) nuclear detector are demonstrated for the first time. The DAM-ADC surfaces were exposed to thin {sup 241}Am disk source that emits alpha particles with activity 333 kBq. It is found that the track density of the irradiated samples remarkably influences the PL characteristics of the DAM-ADC detector. The spectral peak heights and the integrated intensities under the peaks exhibit linear correlations with correlation coefficient R{sup 2}=0.9636 and 0.9806, respectively for different alpha particle fluences ranging from 8.16–40.82×10{sup 7} particles/cm{sup 2}. Additionally, a correlation coefficient R{sup 2}=0.9734 was achieved for the UV–vis spectral analysis. The linear fitting functions, along with the corresponding fitting parameters were evaluated in each case. Both the PL and the UV–vis data of the irradiated DAM-ADC samples showed considerable spectral differences, and hence they would be used to offer sensitive approaches for alpha particle detection.

  3. Design of a versatile detector for the detection of charged particles, neutrons and gamma rays. Neutron interaction with the matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez P, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    The Fostron detector detects charged particles, neutrons and gamma rays with a reasonable discrimination power. Because the typical detectors for neutrons present a great uncertainty in the detection, this work was focused mainly to the neutron detection in presence of gamma radiation. Also there are mentioned the advantages and disadvantages of the Fostron detector

  4. Comparative solubilisation of potassium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate and sodium carbonate in hot dimethylformamide: application of cylindrical particle surface-controlled dissolution theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forryan, Claire L; Compton, Richard G; Klymenko, Oleksiy V; Brennan, Colin M; Taylor, Catherine L; Lennon, Martin

    2006-02-07

    A surface-controlled dissolution of cylindrical solid particles model is applied to potassium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate and sodium carbonate in dimethylformamide at elevated temperatures. Previously published data for the dissolution of potassium carbonate is interpreted assuming a cylindrical rather than a spherical shape of the particles, the former representing a closer approximation to the true shape of the particles as revealed by scanning electron microscopy. The dissolution kinetics of sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate in dimethylformamide at 100 degrees C were investigated via monitoring of the deprotonation of 2-cyanophenol with dissolved solid to form the 2-cyanophenolate anion that was detected with UV-visible spectroscopy. From fitting of experimental results to theory, the dissolution rate constant, k, for the dissolutions of potassium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate and sodium carbonate in dimethylformamide at 100 degrees C were found to have the values of (1.0 +/- 0.1) x 10(-7) mol cm(-2) s(-1), (5.5 +/- 0.3) x 10(-9) mol cm(-2) s(-1) and (9.7 +/- 0.8) x 10(-9) mol cm(-2) s(-1), respectively.

  5. Energetic particles detected by the Electron Reflectometer instrument on the Mars Global Surveyor, 1999-2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delory, Gregory T.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Brain, David

    2012-01-01

    events at Mars associated with solar flares and coronal mass ejections, which includes the identification of interplanetary shocks. MGS observations of energetic particles at varying geometries between the Earth and Mars that include shocks produced by halo, limb, and backsided events provide a unique......We report the observation of galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles by the Electron Reflectometer instrument aboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft from May of 1999 to the mission conclusion in November 2006. Originally designed to detect low-energy electrons, the Electron...... recorded high energy galactic cosmic rays with similar to 45% efficiency. Comparisons of this data to galactic cosmic ray proton fluxes obtained from the Advanced Composition Explorer yield agreement to within 10% and reveal the expected solar cycle modulation as well as shorter timescale variations. Solar...

  6. Detection of charged particles with a methylammonium lead tribromide perovskite single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qiang [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Wei, Haotong; Wei, Wei [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Chuirazzi, William; DeSantis, Dylan [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Huang, Jinsong, E-mail: jhuang2@unl.edu [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Cao, Lei, E-mail: cao.152@osu.edu [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2017-03-11

    Methylammonium lead tribromide (MAPbBr{sub 3}) perovskite crystals have attracted significant attention due to their attractive performance in various optoelectronic applications such as solar cells, light-emitting devices, photodetectors, and recently in X-ray detectors. In this study, we demonstrate a possible use of perovskite-based devices for detection of charged particles (which can be applied in basic scientific research, health physics, and environmental analysis) and investigate the mechanism of fundamental charge transport inside perovskite crystals. It was found that inexpensive MAPbBr{sub 3} single crystals could be used for measuring the energy spectrum of charged particles through direct collection of the produced charge. After fitting the plot of the centroid peak position versus voltage with the Hecht equation for single-polarity charge transport, the obtained hole mobility-lifetime product was in the range of (0.4–1.6)×10{sup −3} cm{sup 2}/V.

  7. Detection of Soot Using a Resistivity Sensor Device Employing Thermophoretic Particle Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doina Lutic

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Results are reported for thermophoretic deposition of soot particles on resistivity sensors as a monitoring technique for diesel exhaust particles with the potential of improved detection limit and sensitivity. Soot with similar characteristics as from diesel exhausts was generated by a propane flame and diluted in stages. The soot in a gas flow at 240–270C∘ was collected on an interdigitated electrode structure held at a considerably lower temperature, 105–125C∘. The time delay for reaching measurable resistance values, the subsequent rate, and magnitude of resistance decrease were a function of the distance between the fingers in the electrodes and the degree of dilution of the soot containing flow. Soot deposition and subsequent removal by heating the sensor support was also performed in a real diesel exhaust. Good similarities between the behavior in our laboratory system and the real diesel exhaust were noticed.

  8. Detection of charged particles with a methylammonium lead tribromide perovskite single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Qiang; Wei, Haotong; Wei, Wei; Chuirazzi, William; DeSantis, Dylan; Huang, Jinsong; Cao, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Methylammonium lead tribromide (MAPbBr_3) perovskite crystals have attracted significant attention due to their attractive performance in various optoelectronic applications such as solar cells, light-emitting devices, photodetectors, and recently in X-ray detectors. In this study, we demonstrate a possible use of perovskite-based devices for detection of charged particles (which can be applied in basic scientific research, health physics, and environmental analysis) and investigate the mechanism of fundamental charge transport inside perovskite crystals. It was found that inexpensive MAPbBr_3 single crystals could be used for measuring the energy spectrum of charged particles through direct collection of the produced charge. After fitting the plot of the centroid peak position versus voltage with the Hecht equation for single-polarity charge transport, the obtained hole mobility-lifetime product was in the range of (0.4–1.6)×10"−"3 cm"2/V.

  9. Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushizima, Daniela Mayumi; Geddes, C.G.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Bethel, E. Wes; Jacobsen, J.; Prabhat; Ruebel, O.; Weber, G.; Hamann, B.

    2010-01-01

    scientific data mining is increasingly considered. In plasma simulations, Bagherjeiran et al. presented a comprehensive report on applying graph-based techniques for orbit classification. They used the KAM classifier to label points and components in single and multiple orbits. Love et al. conducted an image space analysis of coherent structures in plasma simulations. They used a number of segmentation and region-growing techniques to isolate regions of interest in orbit plots. Both approaches analyzed particle accelerator data, targeting the system dynamics in terms of particle orbits. However, they did not address particle dynamics as a function of time or inspected the behavior of bunches of particles. Ruebel et al. addressed the visual analysis of massive laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) simulation data using interactive procedures to query the data. Sophisticated visualization tools were provided to inspect the data manually. Ruebel et al. have integrated these tools to the visualization and analysis system VisIt, in addition to utilizing efficient data management based on HDF5, H5Part, and the index/query tool FastBit. In Ruebel et al. proposed automatic beam path analysis using a suite of methods to classify particles in simulation data and to analyze their temporal evolution. To enable researchers to accurately define particle beams, the method computes a set of measures based on the path of particles relative to the distance of the particles to a beam. To achieve good performance, this framework uses an analysis pipeline designed to quickly reduce the amount of data that needs to be considered in the actual path distance computation. As part of this process, region-growing methods are utilized to detect particle bunches at single time steps. Efficient data reduction is essential to enable automated analysis of large data sets as described in the next section, where data reduction methods are steered to the particular requirements of our clustering analysis

  10. Hybrid Bacterial Foraging and Particle Swarm Optimization for detecting Bundle Branch Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kora, Padmavathi; Kalva, Sri Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal cardiac beat identification is a key process in the detection of heart diseases. Our present study describes a procedure for the detection of left and right bundle branch block (LBBB and RBBB) Electrocardiogram (ECG) patterns. The electrical impulses that control the cardiac beat face difficulty in moving inside the heart. This problem is termed as bundle branch block (BBB). BBB makes it harder for the heart to pump blood effectively through the heart circulatory system. ECG feature extraction is a key process in detecting heart ailments. Our present study comes up with a hybrid method combining two heuristic optimization methods: Bacterial Forging Optimization (BFO) and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) for the feature selection of ECG signals. One of the major controlling forces of BFO algorithm is the chemotactic movement of a bacterium that models a test solution. The chemotaxis process of the BFO depends on random search directions which may lead to a delay in achieving the global optimum solution. The hybrid technique: Bacterial Forging-Particle Swarm Optimization (BFPSO) incorporates the concepts from BFO and PSO and it creates individuals in a new generation. This BFPSO method performs local search through the chemotactic movement of BFO and the global search over the entire search domain is accomplished by a PSO operator. The BFPSO feature values are given as the input for the Levenberg-Marquardt Neural Network classifier.

  11. Detection of neural activity in the brains of Japanese honeybee workers during the formation of a "hot defensive bee ball".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Ugajin

    Full Text Available Anti-predator behaviors are essential to survival for most animals. The neural bases of such behaviors, however, remain largely unknown. Although honeybees commonly use their stingers to counterattack predators, the Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana japonica uses a different strategy to fight against the giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia japonica. Instead of stinging the hornet, Japanese honeybees form a "hot defensive bee ball" by surrounding the hornet en masse, killing it with heat. The European honeybee (A. mellifera ligustica, on the other hand, does not exhibit this behavior, and their colonies are often destroyed by a hornet attack. In the present study, we attempted to analyze the neural basis of this behavior by mapping the active brain regions of Japanese honeybee workers during the formation of a hot defensive bee ball. First, we identified an A. cerana homolog (Acks = Apis cerana kakusei of kakusei, an immediate early gene that we previously identified from A. mellifera, and showed that Acks has characteristics similar to kakusei and can be used to visualize active brain regions in A. cerana. Using Acks as a neural activity marker, we demonstrated that neural activity in the mushroom bodies, especially in Class II Kenyon cells, one subtype of mushroom body intrinsic neurons, and a restricted area between the dorsal lobes and the optic lobes was increased in the brains of Japanese honeybee workers involved in the formation of a hot defensive bee ball. In addition, workers exposed to 46°C heat also exhibited Acks expression patterns similar to those observed in the brains of workers involved in the formation of a hot defensive bee ball, suggesting that the neural activity observed in the brains of workers involved in the hot defensive bee ball mainly reflects thermal stimuli processing.

  12. Detection of charged particles through a photodiode: design and analysis; Deteccion de particulas cargadas mediante un fotodiodo: diseno y analisis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angoli, A.; Quirino, L.L.; Hernandez, V.M.; Lopez del R, H.; Mireles, F.; Davila, J.I.; Rios, C.; Pinedo, J.L. [UAEN, UAZ, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)]. e-mail: toono4@hotmail.com

    2006-07-01

    This project develops and construct an charge particle detector mean a pin photodiode array, design and analysis using a silicon pin Fotodiodo that generally is used to detect visible light, its good efficiency, size compact and reduced cost specifically allows to its use in the radiation monitoring and alpha particle detection. Here, so much, appears the design of the system of detection like its characterization for alpha particles where one is reported as alpha energy resolution and detection efficiency. The equipment used in the development of work consists of alpha particle a triple source composed of Am-241, Pu-239 and Cm-244 with 5,55 KBq as total activity, Maestro 32 software made by ORTEC, a multi-channel card Triumph from ORTEC and one low activity electroplated uranium sample. (Author)

  13. Mobility and height detection of particle labels in an optical evanescent wave biosensor with single-label resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ommering, K.; Somers, P.A.; Koets, M.; Schleipen, J.J.H.B.; IJzendoorn, van L.J.; Prins, M.W.J.

    2010-01-01

    Particle labels are used in biosensors to detect the presence and concentration of analyte molecules. In this paper we demonstrate an optical technique to measure the mobility and height of bound particle labels on a biosensor surface with single-label resolution. The technique is based on the

  14. Detection of lead nanoparticles in game meat by single particle ICP-MS following use of lead-containing bullets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollander, Barbro; Widemo, Fredrik; Ågren, Erik; Larsen, Erik H; Loeschner, Katrin

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated whether game meat may contain nanoparticles of lead from ammunition. Lead nanoparticles in the range 40 to 750 nm were detected by ICP-MS in single particle mode in game shot with lead-containing bullets. The median diameter of the detected nanoparticles was around 60 nm. The particle mass concentration ranged from 290 to 340 ng/g meat and the particle number concentrations from 27 to 50 million particles/g meat. The size limit of detection strongly depended on the level of dissolved lead and was in the range of 40 to 80 nm. In game meat sampled more than 10 cm away from the wound channel, no lead particles with a diameter larger than 40 nm were detected. In addition to dissolved lead in meat that originated from particulates, the presence of lead nano particles in game meat represents a hitherto unattended source of lead with a largely unknown toxicological impact to humans. Graphical Abstract Detection of lead nanoparticles in game meat by single particle ICP-MS following use of leadcontaining bullets.

  15. Detection of halogenated flame retardants in polyurethane foam by particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maley, Adam M.; Falk, Kyle A.; Hoover, Luke; Earlywine, Elly B.; Seymour, Michael D.; DeYoung, Paul A.; Blum, Arlene; Stapleton, Heather M.; Peaslee, Graham F.

    2015-01-01

    A novel application of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been developed to detect the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardant chemicals in polyurethane foams. Traditional Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC–MS) methods for the detection and identification of halogenated flame retardants in foams require extensive sample preparation and data acquisition time. The elemental analysis of the halogens in polyurethane foam performed by PIXE offers the opportunity to identify the presence of halogenated flame retardants in a fraction of the time and sample preparation cost. Through comparative GC–MS and PIXE analysis of 215 foam samples, excellent agreement between the two methods was obtained. These results suggest that PIXE could be an ideal rapid screening method for the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardants in polyurethane foams

  16. Accelerated Detection of Viral Particles by Combining AC Electric Field Effects and Micro-Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Robert Tomkins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A detection method that combines electric field-assisted virus capture on antibody-decorated surfaces with the “fingerprinting” capabilities of micro-Raman spectroscopy is demonstrated for the case of M13 virus in water. The proof-of-principle surface mapping of model bioparticles (protein coated polystyrene spheres captured by an AC electric field between planar microelectrodes is presented with a methodology for analyzing the resulting spectra by comparing relative peak intensities. The same principle is applied to dielectrophoretically captured M13 phage particles whose presence is indirectly confirmed with micro-Raman spectroscopy using NeutrAvidin-Cy3 as a labeling molecule. It is concluded that the combination of electrokinetically driven virus sampling and micro-Raman based signal transduction provides a promising approach for time-efficient and in situ detection of viruses.

  17. Accelerated detection of viral particles by combining AC electric field effects and micro-Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkins, Matthew Robert; Liao, David Shiqi; Docoslis, Aristides

    2015-01-08

    A detection method that combines electric field-assisted virus capture on antibody-decorated surfaces with the "fingerprinting" capabilities of micro-Raman spectroscopy is demonstrated for the case of M13 virus in water. The proof-of-principle surface mapping of model bioparticles (protein coated polystyrene spheres) captured by an AC electric field between planar microelectrodes is presented with a methodology for analyzing the resulting spectra by comparing relative peak intensities. The same principle is applied to dielectrophoretically captured M13 phage particles whose presence is indirectly confirmed with micro-Raman spectroscopy using NeutrAvidin-Cy3 as a labeling molecule. It is concluded that the combination of electrokinetically driven virus sampling and micro-Raman based signal transduction provides a promising approach for time-efficient and in situ detection of viruses.

  18. Very low level α-particle detection by means of pulse shape discrimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, M.

    1993-01-01

    A charge comparison pulse shape discriminator has been shown to be capable of low level alpha particle detection in a NE213 scintillator by discriminating against a high rate of gamma background. The clearly observed alpha peaks were due to 212 Po in 232 Th chain and 214 Po in 238 U chain with rates of 13.5/h and 15.6/h, and energies of 8.95 and 7.83 MeV respectively. For the 8.95 MeV alpha, the gamma background rate was reduced by a factor of 2.1 x 10 4 to a level of 22.5/h. The measurements were made in a low muon flux environment underground (1230 m deep). The detection limit for the alphas could be lowered to as low as 0.1-1 event per day deep underground by use of high purity PSD scintillators. (orig.)

  19. Detection of halogenated flame retardants in polyurethane foam by particle induced X-ray emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maley, Adam M.; Falk, Kyle A.; Hoover, Luke; Earlywine, Elly B.; Seymour, Michael D. [Department of Chemistry, Hope College, 35 E. 12th Street, Holland, MI 49423 (United States); DeYoung, Paul A. [Department of Physics, Hope College, 27 Graves Place, Holland, MI 49423 (United States); Blum, Arlene [Green Science Policy Institute, Box 5455, Berkeley, CA 94705 (United States); Stapleton, Heather M. [Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, LSRC Box 90328, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Peaslee, Graham F., E-mail: peaslee@hope.edu [Department of Chemistry, Hope College, 35 E. 12th Street, Holland, MI 49423 (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A novel application of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been developed to detect the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardant chemicals in polyurethane foams. Traditional Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC–MS) methods for the detection and identification of halogenated flame retardants in foams require extensive sample preparation and data acquisition time. The elemental analysis of the halogens in polyurethane foam performed by PIXE offers the opportunity to identify the presence of halogenated flame retardants in a fraction of the time and sample preparation cost. Through comparative GC–MS and PIXE analysis of 215 foam samples, excellent agreement between the two methods was obtained. These results suggest that PIXE could be an ideal rapid screening method for the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardants in polyurethane foams.

  20. Detection of low-energy antinuclei in space using an active-target particle detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poeschl, Thomas; Greenwald, Daniel; Konorov, Igor; Paul, Stephan [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Losekamm, Martin [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Institute of Astronautics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Measuring antimatter in space excellently probes various astrophysical processes. The abundances and energy spectra of antiparticles reveal a lot about the creation and propagation of cosmic-ray particles in the universe. Abnormalities in their spectra can reveal exotic sources or inaccuracies in our understanding of the involved processes. The measurement of antiprotons and the search for antideuterons and antihelium are optimal at low kinetic energies since background from high-energy cosmic-ray collisions is low. For this reason, we are developing an active-target particle detector capable of detecting ions and anti-ions in the energy range of 30-100 MeV per nucleon. The detector consists of 900 scintillating fibers coupled to silicon photomultipliers and is designed to operate on nanosatellites. The primary application of the detector will be the Antiproton Flux in Space (AFIS) mission, whose goal is the measurement of geomagnetically trapped antiprotons inside Earth's inner radiation belt. In this talk, we explain our particle identification technique and present results from first in-beam measurements with a prototype.

  1. Amorphous semiconductors for particle detection: Physical and technical limits and possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equer, B.; Karar, A.

    1989-01-01

    Amorphous silicon is used, at an industrial level, in at least three different fields of application: photovoltaic cells, flat TV screens and line scanners for image processing. In the last two cases, thin film transistors (TFT) are produced with the same technology. Particle detection with amorphous silicon has been demonstrated, but present performances are limited to ionizing particles. In this paper, we discuss the physical basis of amorphous semiconductors and the possible future development that can be expected on the basis of the existing technology. It is concluded that substitution of amorphous for crystalline silicon brings no clear advantage, if possible at all. Positive assets are to be found in using specific properties of thin layers: large area structures like arrays of photodiodes with associated readout are in the state of the art; vertical structures alternating layers of differently doped materials and/or of different semiconductors can be produced by the same technique. The development of large area pixel detectors is technically feasible but requires a very large effort. A joint development effort with industries involved in X-ray detection and 2D photodetectors might be the most appropriate solution. (orig.)

  2. Particle detection through the quantum counter concept in YAG:Er{sup 3+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghesani, A. F. [CNISM Unit, Dip. di Fisica e Astronomia and INFN, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Braggio, C., E-mail: Caterina.Braggio@unipd.it; Carugno, G.; Chiossi, F.; Guarise, M. [Dip. di Fisica e Astronomia and INFN, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Di Lieto, A.; Tonelli, M. [Dip. di Fisica and INFN, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo, 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ruoso, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell' Università 2, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy)

    2015-11-09

    We report on a scheme for particle detection based on the infrared quantum counter concept. Its operation consists of a two-step excitation process of a four level system, which can be realized in rare earth-doped crystals when a cw pump laser is tuned to the transition from the second to the fourth level. The incident particle raises the atoms of the active material into a low lying, metastable energy state, triggering the absorption of the pump laser to a higher level. Following a rapid non-radiative decay to a fluorescent level, an optical signal is observed with a conventional detector. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of such a scheme, we have investigated the emission from the fluorescent level {sup 4}S{sub 3∕2} (540 nm band) in an Er{sup 3+}-doped YAG crystal pumped by a tunable titanium sapphire laser when it is irradiated with 60 keV electrons delivered by an electron gun. We have obtained a clear signature that this excitation increases the {sup 4}I{sub 13∕2} metastable level population that can efficiently be exploited to generate a detectable optical signal.

  3. High-field quench behavior and dependence of hot spot temperature on quench detection voltage threshold in a Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Tengming; Ye, Liyang; Turrioni, Daniele; Li, Pei

    2015-01-01

    Small insert solenoids have been built using a multifilamentary Ag/Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O x round wire insulated with a mullite sleeve (∼100 μm in thickness) and characterized in background fields to explore the quench behaviors and limits of Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O x superconducting magnets, with an emphasis on assessing the impact of slow normal zone propagation on quench detection. Using heaters of various lengths to initiate a small normal zone, a coil was quenched safely more than 70 times without degradation, with the maximum coil temperature reaching 280 K. Coils withstood a resistive voltage of tens of mV for seconds without quenching, showing the high stability of these coils and suggesting that the quench detection voltage should be greater than 50 mV in order not to falsely trigger protection. The hot spot temperature for the resistive voltage of the normal zone to reach 100 mV increased from ∼40–∼80 K while increasing the operating wire current density J o from 89 A mm −2 to 354 A mm −2 , whereas for the voltage to reach 1 V, it increased from ∼60–∼140 K. This shows the increasing negative impact of slow normal zone propagation on quench detection with increasing J o and the need to limit the quench detection voltage to <1 V. These measurements, coupled with an analytical quench model, were used to assess the impact of the maximum allowable detection voltage and temperature upon quench detection on the quench protection, assuming a limit of the hot spot temperature to <300 K. (paper)

  4. Modeling and Detection of Ice Particle Accretion in Aircraft Engine Compression Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Ryan D.; Simon, Donald L.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2012-01-01

    The accretion of ice particles in the core of commercial aircraft engines has been an ongoing aviation safety challenge. While no accidents have resulted from this phenomenon to date, numerous engine power loss events ranging from uneventful recoveries to forced landings have been recorded. As a first step to enabling mitigation strategies during ice accretion, a detection scheme must be developed that is capable of being implemented on board modern engines. In this paper, a simple detection scheme is developed and tested using a realistic engine simulation with approximate ice accretion models based on data from a compressor design tool. These accretion models are implemented as modified Low Pressure Compressor maps and have the capability to shift engine performance based on a specified level of ice blockage. Based on results from this model, it is possible to detect the accretion of ice in the engine core by observing shifts in the typical sensed engine outputs. Results are presented in which, for a 0.1 percent false positive rate, a true positive detection rate of 98 percent is achieved.

  5. HOT 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette Romme

    Undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og hvad der burde være hot på læseområdet med 21 læsekyndige. Undersøgelsen er gennemført siden 2010. HOT-undersøgelsen er foretaget af Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning - Professionshøjskolerne i samarb. med Dansklærerforeningen......Undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og hvad der burde være hot på læseområdet med 21 læsekyndige. Undersøgelsen er gennemført siden 2010. HOT-undersøgelsen er foretaget af Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning - Professionshøjskolerne i samarb. med Dansklærerforeningen...

  6. HOT 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette

    Undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og hvad der burde være hot på læseområdet med 21 læsekyndige. Undersøgelsen er gennemført siden 2010. HOT-undersøgelsen er foretaget af Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning - Professionshøjskolerne i samarb. med Dansklærerforeningen...

  7. Beta particle detection efficiency of the radiation sensor made from a mixture of polyaniline and titanium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, M.; Miyata, H.; Katsumata, M.; Matsuda, K.; Ueno, T.; Ito, D.; Suzuki, T.

    2016-01-01

    We developed a new real-time radiation sensor using an organic semiconductor and measured its β-particle detection sensitivity. This sensor is fabricated by simply combining a p-type semiconductor, polyaniline (Pani), with an n-type semiconductor, TiO_2, and processing the compound. Since Pani and TiO_2 are both inexpensive materials, the sensor can be fabricated at a lower cost than inorganic semiconductor sensors. The signal of each fabricated sensor was measured by a charge sensitive ADC for the irradiation of β-particles. The response signal data of the ADC for each irradiation was measured to calculate the detection efficiency of the detector. The maximum detection efficiency measured as β-particle sensitivity of the sensor was 1%. This β-particle sensitivity is higher than that reported of Pani sensors in the past.

  8. HOT 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette Romme

    En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager 21 læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet.......En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager 21 læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet....

  9. Luminescence as a new detection method for non-relativistic highly ionizing particles in water/ice neutrino telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollmann, Anna [Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Cosmic ray detectors use air as a radiator for luminescence. In water and ice detectors Cherenkov light is the dominant light producing mechanism when the particle velocity exceeds the Cherenkov threshold, approximately three quarters of the speed of light. Luminescence is produced by highly ionizing particles passing through matter due to the excitation of the surrounding atoms. The observables of luminescence, such as the wavelength spectrum and decay times, are highly dependent on the properties of the medium. Therefore, the results of measurements, in which luminescence was produced by particles passing through water or ice, vary by two orders of magnitude in intensity. It is shown that, even for the most conservative intensity value, luminescence can be used as a detection method for highly ionizing particles with velocities below the Cherenkov threshold. These could be magnetic monopoles or other massive and highly penetrating exotic particles. In the most optimistic case, luminescence contributes even to the light output of standard model particles.

  10. Conception and modelling of photo-detection pixels. PIN photodiodes conceived in amorphous silicon for particles detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negru, R.

    2008-06-01

    The research done has revealed that the a-Si:H is a material ideally suited for the detection of particles, while being resistant to radiation. It also has a low manufacturing cost, is compatible with existing technology and can be deposited over large areas. Thus, despite the low local mobility of charges (30 cm 2 /V/s), a-Si:H is a material of particular interest for manufacturing high-energy particle detection pixels. As a consequence of this, we have studied the feasibility of an experimental pixel stacked structure based on a-Si:H as a basic sensor element for an electromagnetic calorimeter. The structure of such a pixel consists of different components. First, a silicon PIN diode in a-Si:H is fabricated, followed by a bias resistor and a decoupling capacitor. Before such a structure is made and in order to optimize its design, it is essential to have an efficient behavioural model of the various components. Thus, our primary goal was to develop a two-dimensional physical model of the PIN diode using the SILVACO finite element calculation software. This a-Si:H PIN diode two-dimensional physical model allowed us to study the problem of crosstalk between pixels in a matrix structure of detectors. In particular, we concentrated on the leakage current and the current generated in the volume between neighbouring pixels. The successful implementation of this model in SPICE ensures its usefulness in other professional simulators and especially its integration into a complete electronic structure (PIN diode, bias resistor, decoupling capacity and low noise amplifier). Thanks to these modelling tools, we were able to simulate PIN diode structures in a-Si:H with different thicknesses and different dimensions. These simulations have allowed us to predict that the thicker structures are relevant to the design of the pixel detectors for high energy physics. Applications in astronomy, medical imaging and the analysis of the failure of silicon integrated circuits, can also

  11. Phone camera detection of glucose blood level based on magnetic particles entrapped inside bubble wrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinkova, Pavla; Pohanka, Miroslav

    2016-12-18

    Glucose is an important diagnostic biochemical marker of diabetes but also for organophosphates, carbamates, acetaminophens or salicylates poisoning. Hence, innovation of accurate and fast detection assay is still one of priorities in biomedical research. Glucose sensor based on magnetic particles (MPs) with immobilized enzymes glucose oxidase (GOx) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was developed and the GOx catalyzed reaction was visualized by a smart-phone-integrated camera. Exponential decay concentration curve with correlation coefficient 0.997 and with limit of detection 0.4 mmol/l was achieved. Interfering and matrix substances were measured due to possibility of assay influencing and no effect of the tested substances was observed. Spiked plasma samples were also measured and no influence of plasma matrix on the assay was proved. The presented assay showed complying results with reference method (standard spectrophotometry based on enzymes glucose oxidase and peroxidase inside plastic cuvettes) with linear dependence and correlation coefficient 0.999 in concentration range between 0 and 4 mmol/l. On the grounds of measured results, method was considered as highly specific, accurate and fast assay for detection of glucose.

  12. Ultra-small particles of iron oxide as peroxidase for immunohistochemical detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yihang; Song Mengjie; Zhang Xiaoqing; Zhang Yu; Wang Chunyu; Gu Ning; Xin Zhuang; Li Suyi

    2011-01-01

    Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) modified ultra-small particles of iron oxide (USPIO) were synthesized through a two-step process. The first step: oleic acid (OA) capped Fe 3 O 4 (OA-USPIO) were synthesized by a novel oxidation coprecipitation method in H 2 O/DMSO mixing system, where DMSO acts as an oxidant simultaneously. The second step: OA was replaced by DMSA to obtain water-soluble nanoparticles. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by TEM, FTIR, TGA, VSM, DLS, EDS and UV-vis. Hydrodynamic sizes and Peroxidase-like catalytic activity of the nanoparticles were investigated. The hydrodynamic sizes of the nanoparticles (around 24.4 nm) were well suited to developing stable nanoprobes for bio-detection. The kinetic studies were performed to quantitatively evaluate the catalytic ability of the peroxidase-like nanoparticles. The calculated kinetic parameters indicated that the DMSA-USPIO possesses high catalytic activity. Based on the high activity, immunohistochemical experiments were established: using low-cost nanoparticles as the enzyme instead of expensive HRP, Nimotuzumab was conjugated onto the surface of the nanoparticles to construct a kind of ultra-small nanoprobe which was employed to detect epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) over-expressed on the membrane of esophageal cancer cell. The proper sizes of the probes and the result of membranous immunohistochemical staining suggest that the probes can be served as a useful diagnostic reagent for bio-detection.

  13. Detection of pyridaben residue levels in hot pepper fruit and leaves by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: effect of household processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Woo; Abd El-Aty, A M; Rahman, Md Musfiqur; Choi, Jeong-Heui; Choi, Ok-Ja; Rhee, Gyu-Seek; Chang, Moon-Ik; Kim, Heejung; Abid, Morad D N; Shin, Sung Chul; Shim, Jae-Han

    2015-07-01

    Following quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe (QuEChERS) and LC/MS/MS analysis, pyridaben residual levels were determined in unprocessed and processed hot pepper fruit and leaves. The linearities were satisfactory with determination coefficients (R(2)) in excess of 0.995 in processed and unprocessed pepper fruit and leaves. Recoveries at various concentrations were 79.9-105.1% with relative standard deviations ≤15%. The limits of quantitation of 0.003-0.012 mg/kg were very low compared with the maximum residue limits (2-5 mg/kg) set by the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, Republic of Korea. The effects of various household processes, including washing, blanching, frying and drying under different conditions (water volume, blanching time and temperature) on residual concentrations were evaluated. Both washing and blanching (in combination with high water volume and time factor) significantly reduced residue levels in hot pepper fruit and leaves compared with other processes. In sum, the developed method was satisfactory and could be used to accurately detect residues in unprocessed and processed pepper fruit and leaves. It is recommended that pepper fruit/leaves be blanched after washing before being consumed to protect consumers from the negative health effects of detected pesticide residues. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Detection of carbon dioxide in the gases evolved during the hot extraction determination of hydrogen in uranium ingots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jursik, M.L.; Pope, J.D.

    1977-08-01

    The hot extraction method was used at the National Lead Company of Ohio to determine hydrogen in uranium metal at the 2 ppM level. The volume of gas evolved from the heated sample was assumed to be hydrogen. When a liquid nitrogen trap was placed into the system the hydrogen values were reduced 5 to 10%. The gas retained by the nitrogen trap was identified by mass spectrometry as predominantly carbon dioxide. Low hydrogen values were observed only when the nitrogen trap was used in the analysis of high-carbon (300 to 600 ppM) uranium from NLO production ingots. However, hydrogen values for low-carbon (30 to 50 ppM) uranium were unaffected by the nitrogen trap. The formation of carbon dioxide appears to be associated with the carbon content of the uranium metal. Comparisons of hydrogen values obtained with the hot extraction method and with an inert fusion--thermal conductivity method are also presented. 3 tables, 4 figures

  15. Online Particle Detection by Neural Networks Based on Topologic Calorimetry Information

    CERN Document Server

    Ciodaro, T; The ATLAS collaboration; Damazio, D; de Seixas, JM

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the last results from the Ringer algorithm, which is based on artificial neural networks for the electron identification at the online filtering system of the ATLAS particle detector, in the context of the LHC experiment at CERN. The algorithm performs topological feature extraction over the ATLAS calorimetry information (energy measurements). Later, the extracted information is presented to a neural network classifier. Studies showed that the Ringer algorithm achieves high detection efficiency, while keeping the false alarm rate low. Optimizations, guided by detailed analysis, reduced the algorithm execution time in 59%. Also, the payload necessary to store the Ringer algorithm information represents less than 6.2 percent of the total filtering system amount

  16. Acoustic detection of particles, the RAP experiment: present status and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassan, M; Buonomo, B; Coccia, E; Blair, D; D'Antonio, S; Monache, G Delle; Gioacchino, D Di; Fafone, V; Ligi, C; Marini, A; Mazzitelli, G; Modestino, G; Pizzella, G; Quintieri, L; Roccella, S; Rocchi, A; Ronga, F; Tripodi, P; Valente, P

    2006-01-01

    Cosmic ray events with rate and energy much higher than expected were detected by the ultracryogenic gravitational antenna Nautilus located at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, when it was operating in superconducting state. Mechanisms related to the superconductivity state of the material could be involved in such a way to enhance the conversion efficiency of the particle energy into vibrational energy of the detector. The RAP experiment has the aim to study the mechanical response of a small metallic resonant bar to short pulses of high energy electron beam, investigating the response of the bar both in normal and in superconducting state. The results obtained for an Al5056 bar down to a temperature of 4 K are reported and the preliminary results for a niobium bar at temperature below and above the superconducting-normal transition are also discussed

  17. RAPS: an innovative active pixel for particle detection integrated in CMOS technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passeri, Daniele; Placidi, Pisana; Verducci, Leonardo; Ciampolini, Paolo; Matrella, Guido; Marras, Alessandro; Bilei, G.M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we discuss some design, implementation and test issues, with respect to the development of the RAPS01 chip in the framework of the Radiation Active Pixel Sensors (RAPS) INFN project. The project aimed at verifying feasibility of smart, high-resolution pixel arrays with a fully standard, submicron CMOS technology for particle detection purposes. Layout optimization of the pixel, including sensitive element and local read and amplification circuits has been carried out. Different basic pixel schemes and read-out options have been proposed and devised. Chip fabrication has been completed and test phase is now under way: to this purpose a suitable test environment has been devised and test strategies have been planned

  18. A new frozen-spin target for 4π particle detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradtke, Ch.; Dutz, H.; Peschel, H.; Goertz, S.; Harmsen, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Horikawa, N.; Iwata, T.; Kageya, T.; Matsuda, T.; Meier, A.; Meyer, W.; Radtke, E.; Reicherz, G.; Rohlof, Ch.; Thomas, A.; Wakai, A.

    1999-01-01

    A new frozen-spin target has been developed, that allows the detection of emitted particles in an angular acceptance of almost 4π in the laboratory frame. The central part of this new target represents a 3 He/ 4 He dilution refrigerator that is installed horizontally along the beam axis. The refrigerator includes an internal superconducting holding coil to maintain the nucleon polarization in the frozen-spin mode longitudinally to the beam. The design of the dilution refrigerator and the use of an internal holding coil enabled for the first time the measurement of a spin-dependent total cross section in combination with a polarized solid state target. This new frozen-spin target was used successfully to measure the helicity asymmetry of the total photoabsorption cross-section at the Mainz accelerator facility MAMI. This experiment has been performed in order to verify for the first time the GDH sum rule

  19. A new frozen-spin target for 4 pi particle detection

    CERN Document Server

    Bradtke, C; Peschel, H; Görtz, S; Harmsen, J; Hasegawa, S; Horikawa, N; Iwata, T; Kageya, T; Matsuda, T; Meier, A; Meyer, Werner T; Radtke, E; Reicherz, G; Rohlof, C; Thomas, A; Wakai, A

    1999-01-01

    A new frozen-spin target has been developed, that allows the detection of emitted particles in an angular acceptance of almost 4 pi in the laboratory frame. The central part of this new target represents a sup 3 He/ sup 4 He dilution refrigerator that is installed horizontally along the beam axis. The refrigerator includes an internal superconducting holding coil to maintain the nucleon polarization in the frozen-spin mode longitudinally to the beam. The design of the dilution refrigerator and the use of an internal holding coil enabled for the first time the measurement of a spin-dependent total cross section in combination with a polarized solid state target. This new frozen-spin target was used successfully to measure the helicity asymmetry of the total photoabsorption cross-section at the Mainz accelerator facility MAMI. This experiment has been performed in order to verify for the first time the GDH sum rule.

  20. Porous silicon platform for optical detection of functionalized magnetic particles biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Pil Ju; Ishikawa, Ryousuke; Sohn, Honglae; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2013-04-01

    The physical properties of porous materials are being exploited for a wide range of applications including optical biosensors, waveguides, gas sensors, micro capacitors, and solar cells. Here, we review the fast, easy and inexpensive electrochemical anodization based fabrication porous silicon (PSi) for optical biosensing using functionalized magnetic particles. Combining magnetically labeled biomolecules with PSi offers a rapid and one-step immunoassay and real-time detection by magnetic manipulation of superparamagnetic beads (SPBs) functionalized with target molecules onto corresponding probe molecules immobilized inside nano-pores of PSi. We first give an introduction to electrochemical and chemical etching procedures used to fabricate a wide range of PSi structures. Next, we describe the basic properties of PSi and underlying optical scattering mechanisms that govern their unique optical properties. Finally, we give examples of our experiments that demonstrate the potential of combining PSi and magnetic beads for real-time point of care diagnostics.

  1. Detecting Interplanetary Dust Particles with Radars to Study the Dynamics at the Edge of the Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janches, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's mesosphere is the region of the atmosphere between approximately 60-120 km altitude, where the transition from hydrodynamic flow to molecular diffusion occurs. It is highly dynamic region where turbulence by wave braking is produced and energy is deposited from sources from both, below and above this altitude range. Because aircraft and nearly all balloons reach altitudes below approximately 50 km and orbital spacecrafts are well above approximately 400 km, the mesosphere has only been accessed through the use of sounding rockets or remote sensing techniques, and as a result, it is the most poorly understood part of the atmosphere. In addition, millions of Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) enter the atmosphere. Within the mesosphere most of these IDPs melt or vaporize as a result of collisions with the air particles producing meteors that can be detected with radars. This provides a mean to study the dynamics of this region. In this lecture the basic principles of the utilization of meteor radars to study the dynamics of the mesosphere will be presented. A system overview of these systems will be provided as well as discuss the advantages/disadvantages of these systems, provide details of the data processing methodology and give a brief overview of the current status of the field as well as the vision for the next decade.

  2. DEPFET detectors for direct detection of MeV dark matter particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baehr, A.; Ninkovic, J.; Treis, J. [Max-Planck-Gesellschaft Halbleiterlabor, Munich (Germany); Kluck, H.; Schieck, J. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik, Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria); Atominstitut, Technische Universitaet Wien, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-12-15

    The existence of dark matter is undisputed, while the nature of it is still unknown. Explaining dark matter with the existence of a new unobserved particle is among the most promising possible solutions. Recently dark matter candidates in the MeV mass region received more and more interest. In comparison to the mass region between a few GeV to several TeV, this region is experimentally largely unexplored. We discuss the application of a RNDR DEPFET semiconductor detector for direct searches for dark matter in the MeV mass region. We present the working principle of the RNDR DEPFET devices and review the performance obtained by previously performed prototype measurements. The future potential of the technology as dark matter detector is discussed and the sensitivity for MeV dark matter detection with RNDR DEPFET sensors is presented. Under the assumption of six background events in the region of interest and an exposure of 1 kg year a sensitivity of about anti σ{sub e} = 10{sup -41} cm{sup 2} for dark matter particles with a mass of 10 MeV can be reached. (orig.)

  3. Detecting kinematic boundary surfaces in phase space: particle mass measurements in SUSY-like events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Dipsikha; Gainer, James S.; Kilic, Can; Kim, Doojin; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Yang, Yuan-Pao

    2017-06-01

    We critically examine the classic endpoint method for particle mass determination, focusing on difficult corners of parameter space, where some of the measurements are not independent, while others are adversely affected by the experimental resolution. In such scenarios, mass differences can be measured relatively well, but the overall mass scale remains poorly constrained. Using the example of the standard SUSY decay chain \\tilde{q}\\to {\\tilde{χ}}_2^0\\to \\tilde{ℓ}\\to {\\tilde{χ}}_1^0 , we demonstrate that sensitivity to the remaining mass scale parameter can be recovered by measuring the two-dimensional kinematical boundary in the relevant three-dimensional phase space of invariant masses squared. We develop an algorithm for detecting this boundary, which uses the geometric properties of the Voronoi tessellation of the data, and in particular, the relative standard deviation (RSD) of the volumes of the neighbors for each Voronoi cell in the tessellation. We propose a new observable, \\overline{Σ} , which is the average RSD per unit area, calculated over the hypothesized boundary. We show that the location of the \\overline{Σ} maximum correlates very well with the true values of the new particle masses. Our approach represents the natural extension of the one-dimensional kinematic endpoint method to the relevant three dimensions of invariant mass phase space.

  4. 'Zero-time' detectors using microchannel plates for charged particle detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, J.

    1977-01-01

    The mass identification of the reaction products detected in heavy ion nuclear reactions is generally obtained by the time-of-flight method. This method requires a device giving first the 'start' signal (zero time at the passage of the particle) and then the stop 'signal'. The interest lying in 'zero-time' detectors using a secondary electron emission has been considerably increased with using microchannel electron multipliers. Nevertheless such a device was shown to induce either fluctuations in the distance of flight or the use of detectors of different type in the 'start' and 'stop' channels respectively. In both cases, it remains an ambiguity as the access to time resolution, in the channel including the electron multiplier, is not direct and the effect of the different parameters on this resolution are masked. To palliate this drawback and study the qualities of microchannel plate multipliers in time measurement field, some devices mechanically and electronically symmetric have been developed. The resolution measurement in time of flight is obtained for electrons generated by the same particle and emitted from either side of a thin film. The distances of flight of the electrons on each side of the film are same, and so are the accelerating potentials. The microchannel electron multipliers and the processing electronic units are the same in each channel [fr

  5. New generation of monolithic active pixel sensors for charged particle detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deptuch, G.

    2002-09-01

    Vertex detectors are of great importance in particle physics experiments, as the knowledge of the event flavour is becoming an issue for the physics programme at Future Linear Colliders. Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) based on a novel detector structure have been proposed. Their fabrication is compatible with a standard CMOS process. The sensor is inseparable from the readout electronics, since both of them are integrated on the same, low-resistivity silicon wafer. The basic pixel configuration comprises only three MOS transistors and a diode collecting the charge through thermal diffusion. The charge is generated in the thin non-depleted epitaxial layer underneath the readout electronics. This approach provides, at low cost, a high resolution and thin device with the whole area sensitive to radiation. Device simulations using the ISE-TCAD package have been carried out to study the charge collection mechanism. In order to demonstrate the viability of the technique, four prototype chips have been fabricated using different submicrometer CMOS processes. The pixel gain has been calibrated using a 55 Fe source and the Poisson sequence method. The prototypes have been exposed to high-energy particle beams at CERN. The tests proved excellent detection performances expressed in a single-track spatial resolution of 1.5 μm and detection efficiency close to 100%, resulting from a SNR ratio of more than 30. Irradiation tests showed immunity of MAPS to a level of a few times 10 12 n/cm 2 and a few hundred kRad of ionising radiation. The ideas for future work, including on-pixel signal amplification, double sampling operation and current mode pixel design are present as well. (author)

  6. Space weathering on near-Earth objects investigated by neutral-particle detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plainaki, C.; Milillo, A.; Orsini, S.; Mura, A.; de Angelis, E.; di Lellis, A. M.; Dotto, E.; Livi, S.; Mangano, V.; Palumbo, M. E.

    2009-04-01

    The ion-sputtering (IS) process is active in many planetary environments in the solar system where plasma precipitates directly on the surface (for instance, Mercury, Moon and Europa). In particular, solar wind sputtering is one of the most important agents for the surface erosion of a near-Earth object (NEO), acting together with other surface release processes, such as photon stimulated desorption (PSD), thermal desorption (TD) and micrometeoroid impact vaporization (MIV). The energy distribution of the IS-released neutrals peaks at a few eVs and extends up to hundreds of eVs. Since all other release processes produce particles of lower energies, the presence of neutral atoms in the energy range above 10 eV and below a few keVs (sputtered high-energy atoms (SHEA)) identifies the IS process. SHEA easily escape from the NEO, due to NEO's extremely weak gravity. Detection and analysis of SHEA will give important information on surface-loss processes as well as on surface elemental composition. The investigation of the active release processes, as a function of the external conditions and the NEO surface properties, is crucial for obtaining a clear view of the body's present loss rate as well as for getting clues on its evolution, which depends significantly on space weather. In this work, an attempt to analyze processes that take place on the surface of these small airless bodies, as a result of their exposure to the space environment, has been realized. For this reason, a new space weathering model (space weathering on NEO-SPAWN) is presented. Moreover, an instrument concept of a neutral-particle analyzer specifically designed for the measurement of neutral density and the detection of SHEA from a NEO is proposed.

  7. Getting the astrophysics and particle physics of dark matter out of next-generation direct detection experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, Annika H. G.

    2010-01-01

    The next decade will bring massive new data sets from experiments of the direct detection of weakly interacting massive particle dark matter. Mapping the data sets to the particle-physics properties of dark matter is complicated not only by the considerable uncertainties in the dark-matter model, but by its poorly constrained local distribution function (the 'astrophysics' of dark matter). I propose a shift in how to think about direct-detection data analysis. I show that by treating the astrophysical and particle-physics uncertainties of dark matter on equal footing, and by incorporating a combination of data sets into the analysis, one may recover both the particle physics and astrophysics of dark matter. Not only does such an approach yield more accurate estimates of dark-matter properties, but it may illuminate how dark matter coevolves with galaxies.

  8. Hot spots, cluster detection and spatial outlier analysis of teen birth rates in the U.S., 2003–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Diba; Rossen, Lauren M.; Hamilton, Brady E.; He, Yulei; Wei, Rong; Dienes, Erin

    2017-01-01

    Teen birth rates have evidenced a significant decline in the United States over the past few decades. Most of the states in the US have mirrored this national decline, though some reports have illustrated substantial variation in the magnitude of these decreases across the U.S. Importantly, geographic variation at the county level has largely not been explored. We used National Vital Statistics Births data and Hierarchical Bayesian space-time interaction models to produce smoothed estimates of teen birth rates at the county level from 2003–2012. Results indicate that teen birth rates show evidence of clustering, where hot and cold spots occur, and identify spatial outliers. Findings from this analysis may help inform efforts targeting the prevention efforts by illustrating how geographic patterns of teen birth rates have changed over the past decade and where clusters of high or low teen birth rates are evident. PMID:28552189

  9. Hot spots, cluster detection and spatial outlier analysis of teen birth rates in the U.S., 2003-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Diba; Rossen, Lauren M; Hamilton, Brady E; He, Yulei; Wei, Rong; Dienes, Erin

    2017-06-01

    Teen birth rates have evidenced a significant decline in the United States over the past few decades. Most of the states in the US have mirrored this national decline, though some reports have illustrated substantial variation in the magnitude of these decreases across the U.S. Importantly, geographic variation at the county level has largely not been explored. We used National Vital Statistics Births data and Hierarchical Bayesian space-time interaction models to produce smoothed estimates of teen birth rates at the county level from 2003-2012. Results indicate that teen birth rates show evidence of clustering, where hot and cold spots occur, and identify spatial outliers. Findings from this analysis may help inform efforts targeting the prevention efforts by illustrating how geographic patterns of teen birth rates have changed over the past decade and where clusters of high or low teen birth rates are evident. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Study and characterization of an integrated circuit-deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon sensor for the detection of particles and radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despeisse, M.

    2006-03-01

    Next generation experiments at the European laboratory of particle physics (CERN) require particle detector alternatives to actual silicon detectors. This thesis presents a novel detector technology, which is based on the deposition of a hydrogenated amorphous silicon sensor on top of an integrated circuit. Performance and limitations of this technology have been assessed for the first time in this thesis in the context of particle detectors. Specific integrated circuits have been designed and the detector segmentation, the interface sensor-chip and the sensor leakage current have been studied in details. The signal induced by the track of an ionizing particle in the sensor has been characterized and results on the signal speed, amplitude and on the sensor resistance to radiation are presented. The results are promising regarding the use of this novel technology for radiation detection, though limitations have been shown for particle physics application. (author)

  11. Improved security detection strategy in quantum secure direct communication protocol based on four-particle Green-Horne-Zeilinger state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian; Nie, Jin-Rui; Li, Rui-Fan [Beijing Univ. of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing (China). School of Computer; Jing, Bo [Beijing Univ. of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing (China). School of Computer; Beijing Institute of Applied Meteorology, Beijing (China). Dept. of Computer Science

    2012-06-15

    To enhance the efficiency of eavesdropping detection in the quantum secure direct communication protocol, an improved quantum secure direct communication protocol based on a four-particle Green-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state is presented. In the protocol, the four-particle GHZ state is used to detect eavesdroppers, and quantum dense coding is used to encode the message. In the security analysis, the method of entropy theory is introduced, and two detection strategies are compared quantitatively by using the constraint between the information that the eavesdroppers can obtain and the interference that has been introduced. If the eavesdropper wants to obtain all the information, the detection rate of the quantum secure direct communication using an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) pair block will be 50% and the detection rate of the presented protocol will be 87%. At last, the security of the proposed protocol is discussed. The analysis results indicate that the protocol proposed is more secure than the others. (orig.)

  12. Strain detection in crystalline heterostructures using bidimensional blocking patterns of channelled particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo-Cubero, A.; David-Bosne, E.; Wahl, U.; Miranda, P.; da Silva, M. R.; Correia, J. G.; Lorenz, K.

    2018-03-01

    Strain is a critical parameter affecting the growth and the performance of many semiconductor systems but, at the same time, the accurate determination of strain profiles in heterostructures can be challenging, especially at the nanoscale. Ion channelling/blocking is a powerful technique for the detection of the strain state of thin films, normally carried out through angular scans with conventional particle detectors. Here we report the novel application of position sensitive detectors for the evaluation of the strain in a series of AlInN/GaN heterostructures with different compositions and thicknesses. The tetragonal strain is varied from compressive to tensile and analysed through bidimensional blocking patterns. The results demonstrate that strain can be correctly quantified when compared to Monte Carlo channelling simulations, which are essential because of the presence of ion steering effects at the interface between the layer and the substrate. Despite this physical limitation caused by ion steering, our results show that full bidimensional patterns can be applied to detect fingerprints and enhance the accuracy for most critical cases, in which the angular shift associated to the lattice distortion is below the critical angle for channelling.

  13. Preparation of a thin polysulfone phosphor sheet for the detection of alpha particles using adhesive process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, B. K.; Woo, Z. H.; Kim, G. H.; Chang, U. S.; Oh, W. Z.; Lee, K. W.; Han, M. J.

    2005-01-01

    According to atomic energy law and connection regs, the surface contamination of nuclear facilities should be monitored routinely. Surface contamination is divided into removable and fixed contamination. Fixed contamination is measured by a direct method with a survey meter. And removable contamination is measured by an indirect method using smear paper and a low background proportional counter. Also, in the decommissioning process of a nuclear research facilities, such as Korean Research Reactor 1 and 2 and Uranium Conversion Plant, a significant amount of nuclear wastes is produced. The wastes contaminated must be surveyed for the disposal and reuse in the future. In the previous study the medium, scintillatorembedded polymer membrane for detecting the alpharay, was prepared by impregnating organic scintillators in a membrane structure. The plastic scintillator consists of polysulfone(PSF) as a matrix with PPO as an organic scintillator and POPOP as a wave shifting agent dissolved in the matrix. But, an organic plastic scintillator was inadequate to detect the alpha particle in the alpha-beta mixing field because its light output is smaller than beta ray one. So, a thin phosphor sheet was prepared, which consisted of a very uniform deposit of silver activated zinc sulfide (ZnS(Ag)) phosphor applied to on side of clear polysulfone plastic sheet

  14. Ultrafast detection in particle physics and positron emission tomography using SiPMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenec, R.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Pestotnik, R.

    2017-12-01

    Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) photodetectors perform well in many particle and medical physics applications, especially where good efficiency, insensitivity to magnetic field and precise timing are required. In Cherenkov time-of-flight positron emission tomography the requirements for photodetector performance are especially high. On average only a couple of photons are available for detection and the best possible timing resolution is needed. Using SiPMs as photodetectors enables good detection efficiency, but the large sensitive area devices needed have somewhat limited time resolution for single photons. We have observed an additional degradation of the timing at very low light intensities due to delayed events in distribution of signals resulting from multiple fired micro cells. In this work we present the timing properties of AdvanSiD ASD-NUV3S-P-40 SiPM at single photon level picosecond laser illumination and a simple modification of the time-walk correction algorithm, that resulted in reduced degradation of timing resolution due to the delayed events.

  15. Identification of Dark Matter particles with LHC and direct detection data

    CERN Document Server

    Bertone, Gianfranco; Fornasa, Mattia; de Austri, Roberto Ruiz; Trotta, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Dark matter (DM) is currently searched for with a variety of detection strategies. Accelerator searches are particularly promising, but even if Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are found at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), it will be difficult to prove that they constitute the bulk of the DM in the Universe. We show that a significantly better reconstruction of the DM properties can be obtained with a combined analysis of LHC and direct detection (DD) data, by making a simple Ansatz on the WIMP local density, i.e. by assuming that the local density scales with the cosmological relic abundance. We demonstrate this method in an explicit example in the context of a 24-parameter supersymmetric model, with a neutralino LSP in the stau co-annihilation region. Our results show that future ton-scale DD experiments will allow to break degeneracies in the SUSY parameter space and achieve a significantly better reconstruction of the neutralino composition and its relic density than with LHC data alone.

  16. A magnetic particles-based chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay for rapid detection of ovalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiao-Li; Ren, Hong-Lin; Li, Yan-Song; Hu, Pan; Zhou, Yu; Liu, Zeng-Shan; Yan, Dong-Ming; Hui, Qi; Liu, Dong; Lin, Chao; Liu, Nan-Nan; Liu, Yan-Yan; Lu, Shi-Ying

    2014-08-15

    Egg allergy is an important public health and safety concern, so quantification and administration of food or vaccines containing ovalbumin (OVA) are urgently needed. This study aimed to establish a rapid and sensitive magnetic particles-chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (MPs-CLEIA) for the determination of OVA. The proposed method was developed on the basis of a double antibodies sandwich immunoreaction and luminol-H2O2 chemiluminescence system. The MPs served as both the solid phase and separator, the anti-OVA MPs-coated polyclonal antibodies (pAbs) were used as capturing antibody, and the horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb) was taken as detecting antibody. The parameters of the method were evaluated and optimized. The established MPs-CLEIA method had a linear range from 0.31 to 100ng/ml with a detection limit of 0.24ng/ml. The assays showed low reactivities and less than 5% of intraassay and interassay coefficients of variation (CVs), and the average recoveries were between 92 and 97%. Furthermore, the developed method was applied in real samples analysis successfully, and the correlation coefficient with the commercially available OVA kit was 0.9976. Moreover, it was more rapid and sensitive compared with the other methods for testing OVA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Detectability of weakly interacting massive particles in the Sagittarius dwarf tidal stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freese, Katherine; Gondolo, Paolo; Newberg, Heidi Jo

    2005-01-01

    Tidal streams of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy (Sgr) may be showering dark matter onto the solar system and contributing ∼(0.3-23)% of the local density of our galactic halo. If the Sagittarius galaxy contains dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), the extra contribution from the stream gives rise to a steplike feature in the energy recoil spectrum in direct dark matter detection. For our best estimate of stream velocity (300 km/s) and direction (the plane containing the Sgr dwarf and its debris), the count rate is maximum on June 28 and minimum on December 27 (for most recoil energies), and the location of the step oscillates yearly with a phase opposite to that of the count rate. In the CDMS experiment, for 60 GeV WIMPs, the location of the step oscillates between 35 and 42 keV, and for the most favorable stream density, the stream should be detectable at the 11σ level in four years of data with 10 keV energy bins. Planned large detectors like XENON, CryoArray, and the directional detector DRIFT may also be able to identify the Sgr stream

  18. The fabrication of magnetic particle-based chemiluminescence immunoassay for human epididymis protein-4 detection in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Fu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic particles have a significant influence on the immunoassay detection and cancer therapy. Herein, the chemiluminescence immunoassay combined with the magnetic particles (MPCLIA was presented for the clinical determination and analysis of human epididymis protein 4 (HE4 in the human serum. Under the optimized experiment conditions, the secure MPCLIA method can detect HE4 in the broader range of 0–1000 pmol/L, with a lower detection limit of 1.35 pmol/L. The satisfactory recovery rate of the method in the serum ranged from 83.62% to 105.10%, which was well within the requirement of clinical analysis. Moreover, the results showed the good correlation with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, with the correlation coefficient of 0.9589. This proposed method has been successfully applied to the clinical determination of HE4 in the human serum. Keywords: Chemiluminescence immunoassay, Magnetic particles, Human epididymis protein 4

  19. Problems and experience of detecting particles on the beaches in the vicinity of the Dounreay nuclear site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adsley, Ian; Davies, Mike; McCulloch, George; Gerrard, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: There are several instances where radioactive material has been released from nuclear sites and is now found in particulate form in the environment. Contamination in this form was identified on the beaches close to the Dounreay Nuclear site in the 1990's and since that time NUKEM Limited has provided a measurement service to the UKAEA to find and recover these particles. There are specific difficulties associated with detecting particles - as distinct from distributed activity - and this paper discusses some of the theoretical and practical problems that are encountered in monitoring for such particles. The viability and performance of several types and configurations of radiation detectors will be described, along with methods by which particles might be detected, given their response to buried particles. Practical solutions to these measurement problems are described. Three generations of vehicle mounted sensing systems are discussed - each including improvements to specific measurement problems. The reliability and failure mechanisms of the monitoring systems used will be discussed, together with remedial actions employed. Alongside the radiation technology has been the use of GPS and GIS technologies to provide area mapping at high spatial resolution. The other practical aspects of performing surveys are also discussed, including understanding health-and-safety requirements; constraints imposed by weather, tides and tidal speed; the logistics of making vehicles. The results of all the particle finds to date will be presented and compared to the anticipated detection limits, derived from computer modeling and experimental studies. (authors)

  20. Detection and characterisation of aluminium-containing nanoparticles in Chinese noodles by single particle ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeschner, Katrin; Correia, Manuel; López Chaves, Carlos; Rokkjær, Inge; Sloth, Jens J

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated Chinese noodles for the presence of aluminium-containing nanoparticles by using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in single particle mode (spICP-MS) after enzymatic digestion by α-amylase. The aluminium concentrations in the noodle samples, determined by conventional ICP-MS without or with the use of hydrofluoric acid for digestion, were 5.4 ± 1.9 µg/g and 10.1 ± 2.2 µg/g (N = 21), respectively. Aluminium-containing nanoparticles were detected by spICP-MS in all 21 samples. Depending on the assumed particle composition, Al 2 O 3 or Al 2 O 3 ∙2SiO 2 ∙2H 2 O, the median particle diameters were either below or above 100 nm, respectively. The minimum detectable particle diameter by spICP-MS was between 54 and 83 nm. The mass recovery of aluminium in the form of particles was between 5% and 18%. The presented work reports for the first time the detection of Al-containing particles in food by spICP-MS.

  1. Practical Considerations for Detection and Characterization of Sub-Micron Particles in Protein Solutions by Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruia, Flaviu; Parupudi, Arun; Polozova, Alla

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA) is an emerging analytical technique developed for detection, sizing, and counting of sub-micron particles in liquid media. Its feasibility for use in biopharmaceutical development was evaluated with particle standards and recombinant protein solutions. Measurements of aqueous suspensions of NIST-traceable polystyrene particle standards showed accurate particle concentration detection between 2 × 10(7) and 5 × 10(9) particles/mL. Sizing was accurate for particle standards up to 200 nm. Smaller than nominal value sizes were detected by NTA for the 300-900 nm particles. Measurements of protein solutions showed that NTA performance is solution-specific. Reduced sensitivity, especially in opalescent solutions, was observed. Measurements in such solutions may require sample dilution; however, common sample manipulations, such as dilution and filtration, may result in particle formation. Dilution and filtration case studies are presented to further illustrate such behavior. To benchmark general performance, NTA was compared against asymmetric flow field flow fractionation coupled with multi-angle light scattering (aF4-MALS) and dynamic light scattering, which are other techniques for sub-micron particles. Data shows that all three methods have limitations and may not work equally well under certain conditions. Nevertheless, the ability of NTA to directly detect and count sub-micron particles is a feature not matched by aF4-MALS or dynamic light scattering. Thorough characterization of particulate matter present in protein therapeutics is limited by the lack of analytical methods for particles in the sub-micron size range. Emerging techniques are being developed to bridge this analytical gap. In this study, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis is evaluated as a potential tool for biologics development. Our results indicate that method performance is molecule-specific and may not work as well under all solution conditions, especially when

  2. Segmentation and abnormality detection of cervical cancer cells using fast elm with particle swarm optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukumar P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer arises when the anomalous cells on the cervix mature unmanageable obviously in the renovation sector. The most probably used methods to detect abnormal cervical cells are the routine and there is no difference between the abnormal and normal nuclei. So that the abnormal nuclei found are brown in color while normal nuclei are blue in color. The spread or cells are examined and the image denoising is performed based on the Iterative Decision Based Algorithm. Image Segmentation is the method of paneling a digital image into compound sections. The major utilize of segmentation is to abridge or modify the demonstration of an image. The images are segmented by applying anisotropic diffusion on the Denoised image. Image can be enhanced using dark stretching to increase the quality of the image. It separates the cells into all nuclei region and abnormal nuclei region. The abnormal nuclei regions are further classified into touching and non-touching regions and touching regions undergoes feature selection process. The existing Support Vector Machines (SVM is classified few nuclei regions but the time to taken for execution is high. The abnormality detected from the image is calculated as 45% from the total abnormal nuclei. Thus the proposed method of Fast Particle Swarm Optimization with Extreme Learning Machines (Fast PSO-ELM to classify all nuclei regions further into touching region and separated region. The iterative method for to training the ELM and make it more efficient than the SVM method. In experimental result, the proposed method of Fast PSO-ELM may shows the accuracy as above 90% and execution time is calculated based on the abnormality (ratio of abnormal nuclei regions to all nuclei regions image. Therefore, Fast PSO-ELM helps to detect the cervical cancer cells with maximum accuracy.

  3. HOT 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette Romme

    En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager en række læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet. Undersøgelsen er gentaget hvert år siden 2010.......En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager en række læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet. Undersøgelsen er gentaget hvert år siden 2010....

  4. HOT 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette Romme

    En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager en række læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet. Undersøgelsen er gentaget hvert år siden 2010.......En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager en række læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet. Undersøgelsen er gentaget hvert år siden 2010....

  5. Effects of Hot-Spot Geometry on Backscattering and Down-Scattering Neutron Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Z. L.; Mannion, O. M.; Forrest, C. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Anderson, K. S.; Radha, P. B.

    2017-10-01

    The measured neutron spectrum produced by a fusion experiment plays a key role in inferring observable quantities. One important observable is the areal density of an implosion, which is inferred by measuring the scattering of neutrons. This project seeks to use particle-transport simulations to model the effects of hot-spot geometry on backscattering and down-scattering neutron spectra along different lines of sight. Implosions similar to those conducted at the Laboratory of Laser Energetics are modeled by neutron transport through a DT plasma and a DT ice shell using the particle transport codes MCNP and IRIS. Effects of hot-spot geometry are obtained by ``detecting'' scattered neutrons along different lines of sight. This process is repeated for various hot-spot geometries representing known shape distortions between the hot spot and the shell. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  6. A new method for alpha-particle detection in a classroom experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, A.; Pintye, Z.; Molnar, J.

    2005-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The World Year of Physics (WYP 2005) was a worldwide celebration of Physics and its importance in our everyday lives. In harmony with its aims, that is to raise the worldwide awareness of Physics and Physical Science, we introduced a novel lab work involving a new imaging and data evaluation method for alpha-particle detection, which can be easily implemented in a classroom environment. The target group of the experiments is mainly secondary school students (age between 16-18 years). Our aim is to motivate students to develop a better understanding of Physics, allowing them to experience for themselves something of its fascination. In order to increase their attractiveness, the experiments include using a CMOS video image sensor with a video output. The covering glass window of the sensor must be carefully removed in order to make it sensitive for alpha rays. The sensor is connected to a computer where the images are recorded as a short video clip. The recorded video is played back by frames. The resulted frames are then merged together into one image. On this image the student can count the number of spots, where each spot corresponds to a hit of an alpha particle. The experiment can also be visible on a TV screen even by a whole class, however the authors suggest implementing the following experiments as a practical work individually or in small groups. As students are familiar with modern information technology, we think that they will be highly motivated to make these experiments on their own. Acknowledgements. The development of the above experimental setup was funded by ATOMKI and it was presented to the interactive science centre 'Magic corner', Debrecen, Hungary at Christmas, 2005. (author)

  7. Is it possible to tell the difference between fermionic and bosonic hot dark matter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannestad, S.; Tu, H. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Ringwald, A.; Wong, Y.Y.Y. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    We study the difference between thermally produced fermionic and bosonic hot dark matter in detail. In the linear regime of structure formation, their distinct free-streaming behaviours can lead to pronounced differences in the matter power spectrum. While not detectable with current cosmological data, such differences will be clearly observable with upcoming large scale weak lensing surveys for particles as light as m{sub HDM} {proportional_to} 0.2 eV. In the nonlinear regime, bosonic hot dark matter is not subject to the same phase space constraints that severely limit the amount of fermionic hot dark matter infall into cold dark matter halos. Consequently, the overdensities in fermionic and bosonic hot dark matter of equal particle mass can differ by more than a factor of five in the central part of a halo. However, this unique manifestation of quantum statistics may prove very difficult to detect unless the mass of the hot dark matter particle and its decoupling temperature fall within a very narrow window, 1hot dark matter infall may have some observable consequences for the nonlinear power spectrum and hence the weak lensing convergence power spectrum at l {proportional_to} 10{sup 3} {yields} 10{sup 4} at the percent level. (orig.)

  8. Improving the API dissolution rate during pharmaceutical hot-melt extrusion I: Effect of the API particle size, and the co-rotating, twin-screw extruder screw configuration on the API dissolution rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Gogos, Costas G; Ioannidis, Nicolas

    2015-01-15

    The dissolution rate of the active pharmaceutical ingredients in pharmaceutical hot-melt extrusion is the most critical elementary step during the extrusion of amorphous solid solutions - total dissolution has to be achieved within the short residence time in the extruder. Dissolution and dissolution rates are affected by process, material and equipment variables. In this work, we examine the effect of one of the material variables and one of the equipment variables, namely, the API particle size and extruder screw configuration on the API dissolution rate, in a co-rotating, twin-screw extruder. By rapidly removing the extruder screws from the barrel after achieving a steady state, we collected samples along the length of the extruder screws that were characterized by polarized optical microscopy (POM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to determine the amount of undissolved API. Analyses of samples indicate that reduction of particle size of the API and appropriate selection of screw design can markedly improve the dissolution rate of the API during extrusion. In addition, angle of repose measurements and light microscopy images show that the reduction of particle size of the API can improve the flowability of the physical mixture feed and the adhesiveness between its components, respectively, through dry coating of the polymer particles by the API particles. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Properties and decay modes of hot nuclei produced in the reaction: 36Ar on 58Ni and detected with INDRA device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nalpas, L.

    1997-01-01

    Hot nuclei are formed in heavy ion collisions covering the Fermi energy domain. According to the excitation energy deposited into these nuclei, several de-excitation processes can be observed, in particular the emission of complex fragments (Z ≥ 3) which remains poorly understood. The GANIL facility offers the possibility to cover the excitation function for the Ar on Ni reaction over a broad energy range from 32 to 95 MeV/u where the hot nuclei evolve from classical 'evaporation' to complete 'vaporization' into light particles (neutrons, isotopes of H, He). The study of reaction mechanisms shows that from peripheral to central collisions the total cross section is dominated by binary dissipative collisions. Both partners coming from well-characterized events with the INDRA detector are reconstructed using the 'Minimum Spanning Tree' method. Thus excitation energy up to 20 MeV/A are reached in the most violent collisions at the highest bombarding energy. The deposited energy is not shared in the mass ratio between the quasi-projectile and the quasi-target, the quasi-projectile being hotter. For total excitation energies ranging roughly from 2 to 8 MeV/A, the proportion of 'multifragmentation' events increases to reach a plateau at about 10 MeV/A due to the rising probability to have complete 'vaporization' of the system above 8 MeV/A. The steady increase of the temperature extracted from the double isotopic He-Li ratios with excitation energy for the quasi-projectile suggests a progressive evolution of the de-excitation processes as predicted by statistical models. No signal of first order liquid-gas phase transition is seen in our data. (author)

  10. Fluorescent gel particles in the nanometer range for detection of metabolites in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, K.; Sun, H.; Poulsen, A.K.

    2006-01-01

    micelles in oil microemulsions. Typical sizes of the particles are tens of nanometers. Characterization methods for such particles based on size exclusion chromatography, photon correlation spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy have been developed. The stability...

  11. LIGHT MICROSCOPY DETECTION OF NANOSCALE PARTICLE INTERNALIZATION BY HUMAN LUNG CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    RATIONALE. Ultrafine particulate matter (PM) is reported to be more strongly correlated with adverse health effects relative to larger particle size fractions. These epidemiological findings are supported by toxicological studies suggesting that particle size is inversely associa...

  12. Preparation and characterization of gadolinium-loaded PLGA particles surface modified with RGDS for the detection of thrombus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Yu Zhang,1 Jun Zhou,1 Dajing Guo,1 Meng Ao,2 Yuanyi Zheng,2 Zhigang Wang21Department of Radiology, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China; 2Institute of Ultrasound Imaging, Department of Ultrasound, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Thrombotic disease is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The development of magnetic resonance molecular imaging provides potential promise for early disease diagnosis. In this study, we explore the preparation and characterization of gadolinium (Gd-loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA particles surface modified with the Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS peptide for the detection of thrombus. PLGA was employed as the carrier-delivery system, and a double emulsion solvent-evaporation method (water in oil in water was used to prepare PLGA particles encapsulating the magnetic resonance contrast agent Gd diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA. To synthesize the Gd-PLGA/chitosan (CS-RGDS particles, carbodiimide-mediated amide bond formation was used to graft the RGDS peptide to CS to form a CS-RGDS film that coated the surface of the PLGA particles. Blank PLGA, Gd-PLGA, and Gd-PLGA/CS particles were fabricated using the same water in oil in water method. Our results indicated that the RGDS peptide successfully coated the surface of the Gd-PLGA/CS-RGDS particles. The particles had a regular shape, smooth surface, relatively uniform size, and did not aggregate. The high electron density of the Gd-loaded particles and a translucent film around the particles coated with the CS and CS-RGDS films could be observed by transmission electron microscopy. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the Gd-PLGA/CS-RGDS particles could target thrombi and could be imaged using a clinical magnetic resonance scanner. Compared with the Gd-DTPA solution, the longitudinal relaxation time of

  13. Reusable nanosilver-coated magnetic particles for ultrasensitive SERS-based detection of malachite green in water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dan; Yang, Rong; Wang, Chongwen; Xiao, Rui; Long, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A novel nanosilver-deposited silica-coated Fe3O4 magnetic particle (Fe3O4@SiO2@Ag) with uniform size, good SERS activity and magnetic responsiveness was synthesized using amination polymer. The Fe3O4@SiO2@Ag magnetic particles have been successfully applied for ultrasensitive SERS detection of malachite green (MG) in water samples. The mechanism is that MG can be adsorbed on the silver surface of nanosilver-coated magnetic particles via one nitrogen atom, and the Raman signal intensity of MG is significantly enhanced by the nanosilver layer formed on the magnetic particles. The developed sensing system exhibited a sensitive response to MG in the range of 10 fM to 100 μM with a low limit of detection (LOD) 2 fM under optimal conditions. The LOD was several orders of magnitude lower than those of other methods. This SERS-based sensor showed good reproducibility and stability for MG detection. The silver-coated magnetic particles could easily be regenerated as SERS substrates only using low pH solution for multiple sensing events. The recovery of MG added to several water samples at different concentrations ranged from 90% to 110%. The proposed method facilitates the ultrasensitive analysis of dyes to satisfy the high demand for ensuring the safety of water sources. PMID:26964502

  14. Detecting cm-scale hot spot over 24-km-long single-mode fiber by using differential pulse pair BOTDA based on double-peak spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diakaridia, Sanogo; Pan, Yue; Xu, Pengbai; Zhou, Dengwang; Wang, Benzhang; Teng, Lei; Lu, Zhiwei; Ba, Dexin; Dong, Yongkang

    2017-07-24

    In distributed Brillouin optical fiber sensor when the length of the perturbation to be detected is much smaller than the spatial resolution that is defined by the pulse width, the measured Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) experiences two or multiple peaks. In this work, we propose and demonstrate a technique using differential pulse pair Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (DPP-BOTDA) based on double-peak BGS to enhance small-scale events detection capability, where two types of single mode fiber (main fiber and secondary fiber) with 116 MHz Brillouin frequency shift (BFS) difference have been used. We have realized detection of a 5-cm hot spot at the far end of 24-km single mode fiber by employing a 50-cm spatial resolution DPP-BOTDA with only 1GS/s sampling rate (corresponding to 10 cm/point). The BFS at the far end of 24-km sensing fiber has been measured with 0.54 MHz standard deviation which corresponds to a 0.5°C temperature accuracy. This technique is simple and cost effective because it is implemented using the similar experimental setup of the standard BOTDA, however, it should be noted that the consecutive small-scale events have to be separated by a minimum length corresponding to the spatial resolution defined by the pulse width difference.

  15. Applications of Beta Particle Detection for Synthesis and Usage of Radiotracers Developed for Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooraghi, Alex Abreu

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a noninvasive molecular imaging tool that requires the use of a radioactive compound or radiotracer which targets a molecular pathway of interest. We have developed and employed three beta particle radiation detection systems to advance PET. Specifically, the goals of these systems are to: 1. Automate dispensing of solutions containing a positron emitting isotope. 2. Monitor radioactivity on-chip during synthesis of a positron emitting radiotracer. 3. Assay cellular uptake on-chip of a positron emitting radiotracer. Automated protocols for measuring and dispensing solutions containing radioisotopes are essential not only for providing an optimum environment for radiation workers, but also to ensure a quantitatively accurate workflow. For the first project, we describe the development and performance of a system for automated radioactivity distribution of beta particle emitting radioisotopes such as fluorine-18 (F-18). Key to the system is a radiation detector in-line with a peristaltic pump. The system demonstrates volume accuracy within 5 % for volumes of 20 muL or greater. When considering volumes of 20 muL or greater, delivered radioactivity is in agreement with the requested radioactivity as measured with the dose calibrator. The integration of the detector and pump leads to a flexible system that can accurately dispense solutions containing F-18 in radioactivity concentrations directly produced from a cyclotron (~ 0.1-1 mCi/muL), to low activity concentrations intended for preclinical mouse scans (~ 1-10 muCi/muL), and anywhere in between. Electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) is an attractive microfluidic platform for batch synthesis of PET radiotracers. Visualization of radioisotopes on-chip is critical for synthesis optimization and technological development. For the second project, we describe the development and performance of a Cerenkov/real-time imaging system for PET radiotracer synthesis on EWOD. We also investigate

  16. Detecting kinematic boundary surfaces in phase space and particle mass measurements in SUSY-like events

    CERN Document Server

    Debnath, Dipsikha; Kilic, Can; Kim, Doojin; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Yang, Yuan-Pao

    2017-06-19

    We critically examine the classic endpoint method for particle mass determination, focusing on difficult corners of parameter space, where some of the measurements are not independent, while others are adversely affected by the experimental resolution. In such scenarios, mass differences can be measured relatively well, but the overall mass scale remains poorly constrained. Using the example of the standard SUSY decay chain $\\tilde q\\to \\tilde\\chi^0_2\\to \\tilde \\ell \\to \\tilde \\chi^0_1$, we demonstrate that sensitivity to the remaining mass scale parameter can be recovered by measuring the two-dimensional kinematical boundary in the relevant three-dimensional phase space of invariant masses squared. We develop an algorithm for detecting this boundary, which uses the geometric properties of the Voronoi tessellation of the data, and in particular, the relative standard deviation (RSD) of the volumes of the neighbors for each Voronoi cell in the tessellation. We propose a new observable, $\\bar\\Sigma$, which is ...

  17. Acquiring Structural Information on Virus Particles with Charge Detection Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keifer, David Z.; Motwani, Tina; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Jarrold, Martin F.

    2016-06-01

    Charge detection mass spectrometry (CDMS) is a single-molecule technique particularly well-suited to measuring the mass and charge distributions of heterogeneous, MDa-sized ions. In this work, CDMS has been used to analyze the assembly products of two coat protein variants of bacteriophage P22. The assembly products show broad mass distributions extending from 5 to 15 MDa for A285Y and 5 to 25 MDa for A285T coat protein variants. Because the charge of large ions generated by electrospray ionization depends on their size, the charge can be used to distinguish hollow shells from more compact structures. A285T was found to form T = 4 and T = 7 procapsids, and A285Y makes a small number of T = 3 and T = 4 procapsids. Owing to the decreased stability of the A285Y and A285T particles, chemical cross-linking was required to stabilize them for electrospray CDMS. Graphical Abstract[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Automated Sperm Head Detection Using Intersecting Cortical Model Optimised by Particle Swarm Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Weng Chun; Mat Isa, Nor Ashidi

    2016-01-01

    In human sperm motility analysis, sperm segmentation plays an important role to determine the location of multiple sperms. To ensure an improved segmentation result, the Laplacian of Gaussian filter is implemented as a kernel in a pre-processing step before applying the image segmentation process to automatically segment and detect human spermatozoa. This study proposes an intersecting cortical model (ICM), which was derived from several visual cortex models, to segment the sperm head region. However, the proposed method suffered from parameter selection; thus, the ICM network is optimised using particle swarm optimization where feature mutual information is introduced as the new fitness function. The final results showed that the proposed method is more accurate and robust than four state-of-the-art segmentation methods. The proposed method resulted in rates of 98.14%, 98.82%, 86.46% and 99.81% in accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and precision, respectively, after testing with 1200 sperms. The proposed algorithm is expected to be implemented in analysing sperm motility because of the robustness and capability of this algorithm.

  19. Automaton for spectra measurement of charged particles detected in nuclear photoemulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauehr, R.; Krzhemenek, Ya.; Piskorzh, Sh.; Svoboda, Z.; Shkaba, V.

    1978-01-01

    The electronic equipment is described for measuring the spectra of charged particles detected in nuclear photoemulsions. With regard to function, the electronic equipment may be classified as follows: unit for analog processing of signals, logic for track recognition and device for controlling and recording measurement results. The analog processing unit incorporates eight identical channels, each of which consists of a flexible light pipe, a photomultiplier, an amplifier, an amplitude analyzer, and a marker. Eight memory shift registers forming a data field are used for determining the presence of a track in an emulsion area being analyzed. The following track recognition criteria are used: (a) trace image in a logical form forms a continuous path in the register field; (b) the length of the continuous image should constitute at least five channels; and (c) tracks longer than five channels are recorded only once. The scanning plates of 700 mm long takes three hours. Accuracy of determination of the longitudinal coordinate is 25 μm

  20. Particle Filter with Integrated Voice Activity Detection for Acoustic Source Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders M. Johansson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In noisy and reverberant environments, the problem of acoustic source localisation and tracking (ASLT using an array of microphones presents a number of challenging difficulties. One of the main issues when considering real-world situations involving human speakers is the temporally discontinuous nature of speech signals: the presence of silence gaps in the speech can easily misguide the tracking algorithm, even in practical environments with low to moderate noise and reverberation levels. A natural extension of currently available sound source tracking algorithms is the integration of a voice activity detection (VAD scheme. We describe a new ASLT algorithm based on a particle filtering (PF approach, where VAD measurements are fused within the statistical framework of the PF implementation. Tracking accuracy results for the proposed method is presented on the basis of synthetic audio samples generated with the image method, whereas performance results obtained with a real-time implementation of the algorithm, and using real audio data recorded in a reverberant room, are published elsewhere. Compared to a previously proposed PF algorithm, the experimental results demonstrate the improved robustness of the method described in this work when tracking sources emitting real-world speech signals, which typically involve significant silence gaps between utterances.

  1. Controlled trapping and detection of magnetic particles by a magnetic microactuator and a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Giouroudi, Ioanna; Gooneratne, Chinthaka Pasan; Kokkinis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and testing of an integrated micro-chip for the controlled trapping and detection of magnetic particles (MPs). A unique magnetic micro-actuator consisting of square-shaped conductors is used to manipulate the MPs

  2. Suppression of sawtooth oscillations due to hot electrons and hot ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.Z.; Berk, H.L.

    1989-01-01

    The theory of m = 1 kink mode stabilization is discussed in the presence of either magnetically trapped hot electrons or hot ions. For instability hot ion requires particles peaked inside the q = 1 surface, while hot electrons require that its pressure profile be increasing at the q = 1 surface. Experimentally observed sawtooth stabilization usually occurs with off-axis heating with ECRH and near axis heating with ICRH. Such heating may produce the magnetically trapped hot particle pressure profiles that are consistent with theory. 17 refs., 2 figs

  3. Defect Detection of Adhesive Layer of Thermal Insulation Materials Based on Improved Particle Swarm Optimization of ECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yintang; Jia, Yao; Zhang, Yuyan; Luo, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Hongrui

    2017-10-25

    This paper studies the defect detection problem of adhesive layer of thermal insulation materials. A novel detection method based on an improved particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm of Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT) is presented. Firstly, a least squares support vector machine is applied for data processing of measured capacitance values. Then, the improved PSO algorithm is proposed and applied for image reconstruction. Finally, some experiments are provided to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method in defect detection for adhesive layer of thermal insulation materials. The performance comparisons demonstrate that the proposed method has higher precision by comparing with traditional ECT algorithms.

  4. Hot Gas Halos in Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulchaey, John

    Most galaxy formation models predict that massive low-redshift disk galaxies are embedded in extended hot halos of externally accreted gas. Such gas appears necessary to maintain ongoing star formation in isolated spirals like the Milky Way. To explain the large population of red galaxies in rich groups and clusters, most galaxy evolution models assume that these hot gas halos are stripped completely when a galaxy enters a denser environment. This simple model has been remarkably successful at reproducing many observed properties of galaxies. Although theoretical arguments suggest hot gas halos are an important component in galaxies, we know very little about this gas from an observational standpoint. In fact, previous observations have failed to detect soft X-ray emission from such halos in disk galaxies. Furthermore, the assumption that hot gas halos are stripped completely when a galaxy enters a group or cluster has not been verified. We propose to combine proprietary and archival XMM-Newton observations of galaxies in the field, groups and clusters to study how hot gas halos are impacted by environment. Our proposed program has three components: 1) The deepest search to date for a hot gas halo in a quiescent spiral galaxy. A detection will confirm a basic tenet of disk galaxy formation models, whereas a non-detection will seriously challenge these models and impose new constraints on the growth mode and feedback history of disk galaxies. 2) A detailed study of the hot gas halos properties of field early-type galaxies. As environmental processes such as stripping are not expected to be important in the field, a study of hot gas halos in this environment will allow us to better understand how feedback and other internal processes impact hot gas halos. 3) A study of hot gas halos in the outskirts of groups and clusters. By comparing observations with our suite of simulations we can begin to understand what role the stripping of hot gas halos plays in galaxy

  5. The fabrication of magnetic particle-based chemiluminescence immunoassay for human epididymis protein-4 detection in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaoling; Liu, Yangyang; Qiu, Ruiyun; Foda, Mohamed F; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Tao; Li, Jinshan

    2018-03-01

    The magnetic particles have a significant influence on the immunoassay detection and cancer therapy. Herein, the chemiluminescence immunoassay combined with the magnetic particles (MPCLIA) was presented for the clinical determination and analysis of human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) in the human serum. Under the optimized experiment conditions, the secure MPCLIA method can detect HE4 in the broader range of 0-1000 pmol/L, with a lower detection limit of 1.35 pmol/L. The satisfactory recovery rate of the method in the serum ranged from 83.62% to 105.10%, which was well within the requirement of clinical analysis. Moreover, the results showed the good correlation with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), with the correlation coefficient of 0.9589. This proposed method has been successfully applied to the clinical determination of HE4 in the human serum.

  6. EDF experience with open-quotes hot spotclose quotes management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guio, J.M. de

    1995-01-01

    During the past few years, open-quotes hot spotsclose quotes due to the presence of particles of metal activated during their migration through the reactor core, have been detected at several French pressurized water reactor (PWR) units. These open-quotes hot spots,close quotes which generate very high dose rates (from about 10 Gy/h to 200 G/h) are a significant factor in increase occupational exposures during outrates. Of particular concern are the difficult cases which prolong outage duration and increase the volume of radiological waste. Confronted with this situation, Electricite de France (EDF) has set up a national research group, as part of its ALARA program, to establish procedures and techniques to avoid, detect, and eliminate of hot spots. In particular, specific processes have been developed to eliminate these hot spots which are most costly in terms of occupational exposure due to the need for reactor maintenance. This paper sets out the general approach adopted at EDF so far to cope with the problem of hot spots, illustrated by experience at Blayais 3 and 4

  7. Charge-coupled devices for particle detection with high spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farley, F.J.; Damerell, C.J.S.; Gillman, A.R.; Wickens, F.J.

    1980-10-01

    The results of a study of the possible application of a thin microelectronic device (the charge-coupled device) to high energy physics as particle detectors with good spatial resolution which can distinguish between tracks emerging from the primary vertex and those from secondary vertices due to the decay of short lived particles with higher flavours, are reported. Performance characteristics indicating the spatial resolution, particle discrimination, time resolution, readout time and lifetime of such detectors have been obtained. (U.K.)

  8. Amperometric detection of morphine based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) immobilized molecularly imprinted polymer particles prepared by precipitation polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, K.-C.; Yeh, W.-M.; Tung, T.-S.; Liao, J.-Y.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular imprinting is a novel technique used for chiral separation, artificial antibodies, sensors, and assays. Typically, molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) are monoliths with irregular shapes. However, microspherical shapes with more uniform size can be obtained by the method of precipitation polymerization, which offers a higher active surface area by manipulating its compositions. In this study, MIP particles for the target molecule, morphine, were synthesized using a precipitation polymerization method that is more facile than the previous one that produced a thermally polymerized bulk. The conducting polymer, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), was utilized to immobilize the MIP particles onto the indium tin oxide (ITO) glass as a MIP/PEDOT-modified electrode. The sensitivity for the MIP/PEDOT-modified electrode with MIP particles was 41.63 μA/cm 2 mM, which is more sensitive than that with non-MIP particles or that of a single PEDOT film with no incorporated particles in detecting morphine ranging from 0.1 to 2 mM. The detection limit was 0.3 mM (S/N = 3). In addition, we presented that the modified electrode can discriminate codeine that plays an interfering species

  9. Particle detection and classification using commercial off the shelf CMOS image sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, Martín [Instituto Balseiro, Av. Bustillo 9500, Bariloche, 8400 (Argentina); Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (CNEA), Centro Atómico Bariloche, Av. Bustillo 9500, Bariloche 8400 (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Centro Atómico Bariloche, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Lipovetzky, Jose, E-mail: lipo@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Instituto Balseiro, Av. Bustillo 9500, Bariloche, 8400 (Argentina); Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (CNEA), Centro Atómico Bariloche, Av. Bustillo 9500, Bariloche 8400 (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Centro Atómico Bariloche, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Sofo Haro, Miguel; Sidelnik, Iván; Blostein, Juan Jerónimo; Alcalde Bessia, Fabricio; Berisso, Mariano Gómez [Instituto Balseiro, Av. Bustillo 9500, Bariloche, 8400 (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Centro Atómico Bariloche, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    2016-08-11

    In this paper we analyse the response of two different Commercial Off The shelf CMOS image sensors as particle detectors. Sensors were irradiated using X-ray photons, gamma photons, beta particles and alpha particles from diverse sources. The amount of charge produced by different particles, and the size of the spot registered on the sensor are compared, and analysed by an algorithm to classify them. For a known incident energy spectrum, the employed sensors provide a dose resolution lower than microGray, showing their potentials in radioprotection, area monitoring, or medical applications.

  10. SERENDIPITOUS DETECTION OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE HOT BORN-AGAIN CENTRAL STAR OF THE PLANETARY NEBULA K 1-16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montez, Rodolfo Jr. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Kastner, Joel H., E-mail: rodolfo.montez.jr@gmail.com, E-mail: jhk@cis.rit.edu [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2013-03-20

    We report the serendipitous detection of point-like X-ray emission from the hot, PG1159-type central star of the planetary nebula (CSPN) K 1-16 by the XMM-Newton and Chandra X-Ray Observatories. The CSPN lies superimposed on a galaxy cluster that includes an X-ray-bright quasar, but we have successfully isolated the CSPN X-ray emission from the strong diffuse background contributed by the quasar and intracluster gas. We have modeled the XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray data, taking advantage of the contrasting detection efficiencies of the two observatories to better constrain the low-energy spectral response of Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer. We find that the CSPN X-ray spectrum is well characterized by the combination of a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmosphere with T{sub *} {approx} 135 kK and a carbon-rich, optically thin thermal plasma with T{sub X} {approx} 1 MK. These results for X-ray emission from the K 1-16 CSPN, combined with those obtained for other PG1159-type objects, lend support to the 'born-again' scenario for Wolf-Rayet and PG1159 CSPNe, wherein a late helium shell flash dredges up carbon-rich intershell material and ejects this material into the circumstellar environment.

  11. DETECTION OF H{sub 2}O AND EVIDENCE FOR TiO/VO IN AN ULTRA-HOT EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Thomas M.; Sing, David K.; Nikolov, Nikolay; Drummond, Benjamin; Kataria, Tiffany; Spake, Jessica [School of Physics, University of Exeter, EX4 4QL Exeter (United Kingdom); Wakeford, Hannah R. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ballester, Gilda E. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Gibson, Neale P. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Amundsen, David S., E-mail: tevans@astro.ex.ac.uk [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10025 (United States)

    2016-05-01

    We present a primary transit observation for the ultra-hot ( T {sub eq} ∼ 2400 K) gas giant expolanet WASP-121b, made using the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 in spectroscopic mode across the 1.12–1.64 μ m wavelength range. The 1.4 μ m water absorption band is detected at high confidence (5.4 σ ) in the planetary atmosphere. We also reanalyze ground-based photometric light curves taken in the B , r ′, and z ′ filters. Significantly deeper transits are measured in these optical bandpasses relative to the near-infrared wavelengths. We conclude that scattering by high-altitude haze alone is unlikely to account for this difference and instead interpret it as evidence for titanium oxide and vanadium oxide absorption. Enhanced opacity is also inferred across the 1.12–1.3 μ m wavelength range, possibly due to iron hydride absorption. If confirmed, WASP-121b will be the first exoplanet with titanium oxide, vanadium oxide, and iron hydride detected in transmission. The latter are important species in M/L dwarfs and their presence is likely to have a significant effect on the overall physics and chemistry of the atmosphere, including the production of a strong thermal inversion.

  12. Hot prominence detected in the core of a coronal mass ejection. II. Analysis of the C III line detected by SOHO/UVCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jejčič, S.; Susino, R.; Heinzel, P.; Dzifčáková, E.; Bemporad, A.; Anzer, U.

    2017-11-01

    Context. We study the physics of erupting prominences in the core of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and present a continuation of a previous analysis. Aims: We determine the kinetic temperature and microturbulent velocity of an erupting prominence embedded in the core of a CME that occurred on August 2, 2000 using the Ultraviolet Coronagraph and Spectrometer observations (UVCS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) simultaneously in the hydrogen Lα and C III lines. We develop the non-LTE (departures from the local thermodynamic equilibrium - LTE) spectral diagnostics based on Lα and Lβ measured integrated intensities to derive other physical quantities of the hot erupting prominence. Based on this, we synthesize the C III line intensity to compare it with observations. Methods: Our method is based on non-LTE modeling of eruptive prominences. We used a general non-LTE radiative-transfer code only for optically thin prominence points because optically thick points do not allow the direct determination of the kinetic temperature and microturbulence from the line profiles. The input parameters of the code were the kinetic temperature and microturbulent velocity derived from the Lα and C III line widths, as well as the integrated intensity of the Lα and Lβ lines. The code runs in three loops to compute the radial flow velocity, electron density, and effective thickness as the best fit to the Lα and Lβ integrated intensities within the accuracy defined by the absolute radiometric calibration of UVCS data. Results: We analyzed 39 observational points along the whole erupting prominence because for these points we found a solution for the kinetic temperature and microturbulent velocity. For these points we ran the non-LTE code to determine best-fit models. All models with τ0(Lα) ≤ 0.3 and τ0(C III) ≤ 0.3 were analyzed further, for which we computed the integrated intensity of the C III line using a two-level atom. The best agreement between

  13. Multifragmentation of hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamain, B.

    1990-10-01

    It is difficult to deposit a large amount (∼ 1 Gev) of excitation energy into a nucleus. And if one wants to deposit large excitation energy values, the best way consists of shooting a given target nucleus with several nucleons, which can be achieved by using intermediate energy (10-100 MeV/nucleon) heavy ions. Such very excited objects were named hot nuclei. The study of hot nuclei has been undertaken only for 7 years because intermediate energy heavy ion facilities were not available before. The game is then to determine the decay properties of such nuclei, their limits of existence. Their study is connected with general properties of nuclear matter: namely its equation of state. Of special interest, is the onset of a new decay mechanism: multifragmentation, which is the non-sequential disassembly of a hot nucleus into several light nuclei (often called intermediate-mass fragments or IMF) or particles. This paper, shows how this mechanism can reflect fundamental properties of nuclear matter, but also how its experimental signature is difficult to establish. Multifragmentation has also been studied by using very energetic projectiles (protons and heavy ions) in the relativistic or ultra-relativistic region. The multifragmentation question of hot nuclei is far from being solved. One knows that IMF production increases when the excitation energy brought into a system is strongly increased, but very little is known about the mechanisms involved and a clear onset for multifragmentation is not established

  14. Field Demonstration of Light Obscuration Particle Counting Technologies to Detect Fuel Contaminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden to Washington Headquarters Service, Directorate for...and automatic particle counters for monitoring contamination is frequently used in the hydraulics / hydraulic fluid industry. In 1999 ISO adopted ISO...11171 2 UNCLASSIFIED Hydraulic fluid power — Calibration of automatic particle counters for liquids (7), replacing ISO 4402, as an international

  15. In-situ detection of micron-sized dust particles in near-Earth space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, E.; Zook, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    In situ detectors for micron sized dust particles based on the measurement of impact ionization have been flown on several space missions (Pioneer 8/9, HEOS-2 and Helios 1/2). Previous measurements of small dust particles in near-Earth space are reviewed. An instrument is proposed for the measurement of micron sized meteoroids and space debris such as solid rocket exhaust particles from on board an Earth orbiting satellite. The instrument will measure the mass, speed, flight direction and electrical charge of individually impacting debris and meteoritic particles. It is a multicoincidence detector of 1000 sq cm sensitive area and measures particle masses in the range from 10 to the -14th power g to 10 to the -8th power g at an impact speed of 10 km/s. The instrument is lightweight (5 kg), consumes little power (4 watts), and requires a data sampling rate of about 100 bits per second.

  16. SU-F-J-197: A Novel Intra-Beam Range Detection and Adaptation Strategy for Particle Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, M; Jiang, S; Shao, Y; Lu, W [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In-vivo range detection/verification is crucial in particle therapy for effective and safe delivery. The state-of-art techniques are not sufficient for in-vivo on-line range verification due to conflicts among patient dose, signal statistics and imaging time. We propose a novel intra-beam range detection and adaptation strategy for particle therapy. Methods: This strategy uses the planned mid-range spots as probing beams without adding extra radiation to patients. Such choice of probing beams ensures the Bragg peaks to remain inside the tumor even with significant range variation from the plan. It offers sufficient signal statistics for in-beam positron emission tomography (PET) due to high positron activity of therapeutic dose. The probing beam signal can be acquired and reconstructed using in-beam PET that allows for delineation of the Bragg peaks and detection of range shift with ease of detection enabled by single-layered spots. If the detected range shift is within a pre-defined tolerance, the remaining spots will be delivered as the original plan. Otherwise, a fast re-optimization using range-shifted beamlets and accounting for the probing beam dose is applied to consider the tradeoffs posed by the online anatomy. Simulated planning and delivery studies were used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed techniques. Results: Simulations with online range variations due to shifts of various foreign objects into the beam path showed successful delineation of the Bragg peaks as a result of delivering probing beams. Without on-line delivery adaptation, dose distribution was significantly distorted. In contrast, delivery adaptation incorporating detected range shift recovered well the planned dose. Conclusion: The proposed intra-beam range detection and adaptation utilizing the planned mid-range spots as probing beams, which illuminate the beam range with strong and accurate PET signals, is a safe, practical, yet effective approach to address range

  17. Size distribution of alkyl amines in continental particulate matter and their online detection in the gas and particle phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. C. VandenBoer

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available An ion chromatographic method is described for the quantification of the simple alkyl amines: methylamine (MA, dimethylamine (DMA, trimethylamine (TMA, ethylamine (EA, diethylamine (DEA and triethylamine (TEA, in the ambient atmosphere. Limits of detection (3σ are in the tens of pmol range for all of these amines, and good resolution is achieved for all compounds except for TMA and DEA. The technique was applied to the analysis of time-integrated samples collected using a micro-orifice uniform deposition impactor (MOUDI with ten stages for size resolution of particles with aerodynamic diameters between 56 nm and 18 μm. In eight samples from urban and rural continental airmasses, the mass loading of amines consistently maximized on the stage corresponding to particles with aerodynamic diameters between 320 and 560 nm. The molar ratio of amines to ammonium (R3NH+/NH4+ in fine aerosol ranged between 0.005 and 0.2, and maximized for the smallest particle sizes. The size-dependence of the R3NH+/NH4+ ratio indicates differences in the relative importance of the processes leading to the incorporation of amines and ammonia into secondary particles. The technique was also used to make simultaneous hourly online measurements of amines in the gas phase and in fine particulate matter using an Ambient Ion Monitor Ion Chromatograph (AIM-IC. During a ten day campaign in downtown Toronto, DMA, TMA + DEA, and TEA were observed to range from below detection limit to 2.7 ppt in the gas phase. In the particle phase, MAH+ and TMAH+ + DEAH+ were observed to range from below detection limit up to 15 ng m−3. The presence of detectable levels of amines in the particle phase corresponded to periods with higher relative humidity and higher mass loadings of nitrate. While the hourly measurements made using the AIM-IC provide data that can

  18. Application of CTOF method to detect secondly charged particle from 2 GeV electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Sanami, Toshiya; Ban, Syuichi; Lee, Hee-Seok; Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2002-01-01

    To design a shield and evaluate leakage radiation at high energy electron accelerators, the energy and angular data of secondary particle from the reaction of electrons with structural materials are required. Secondly neutron spectrum from structural materials has been measured by using electron accelerator in PAL (Pohang Accelerator Laboratory). In the neutron measurement, the electronics with Multi-hit TDC (MHTDC) was adopted to measure Time of Flight of every particles (TOFs) emitted from the reactions by each single electron bunch. The measurements are extended to secondly charged particles. For the charged particles measurement, the pulse height data for every particles are indispensable to distinguish charged particles by Δ E-E method. A new system which can measure pulse height for every particle is required instead of the MHTDC system. For this requirement, the method which can take output current from detectors was developed by using digital storage oscilloscope system is named ''Current Time of Flight method'' (CTOF). The CTOF method is able to measure pulse height and TOF for every particles produced by single electron bunch. Electrons are accelerated to 2.04 GeV and the repetition rate is 10 Hz. These electrons bombard thin disk samples of Cu 1mm, Al 4 mm and W 0.5 mm. Secondly charged particles, proton and deuteron, are produced in the samples by photonuclear reaction. Two dimensional of Δ E-E spectrum for each the samples measured by CTOF shows separation between proton and deuteron perfectly. Thus, proton and deuteron spectrum are obtained from this data. (M. Suetake)

  19. HOT 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Sara Stefansen

    HOT er en kvalitativ undersøgelse, der hvert år diskuterer og undersøger en lille udvalgt skare af danskkyndige fagpersoners bud på, hvad de er optagede af på literacyområdet her og nu – altså hvilke emner, de vil vurdere som aktuelle at forholde sig til i deres nuværende praksis.......HOT er en kvalitativ undersøgelse, der hvert år diskuterer og undersøger en lille udvalgt skare af danskkyndige fagpersoners bud på, hvad de er optagede af på literacyområdet her og nu – altså hvilke emner, de vil vurdere som aktuelle at forholde sig til i deres nuværende praksis....

  20. Challenges in the detection of long lived particles with ATLAS: the Hidden valley scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Ventura, D

    2009-01-01

    A number of extensions of the Standard Model result in particles that are neutral, weakly-coupled and have macroscopic decay lengths that can be comparable with LHC detector dimensions[1, 2, 3]. These long lived particles occur in many models; in the Hidden Valley (HV) Scenario a new sector is weakly coupled to the Standard Model and results in neutral long lived HV particles ($pi_{v}$) that decay to heavy quark pairs and tau pairs. These particles can be produced in Higgs boson decays, SUSY processes or $Z^prime$ decays. \\ We present the results of a first study of the ATLAS Detector performance for the Higgs decay $h^0 ightarrowpi_vpi_v$, where the $pi_v$ is neutral and has a displaced decay mainly to bottom quarks. The initial goal of our study is to obtain benchmark triggers for processes with such non-standard signatures in the ATLAS apparatus.

  1. Detection of {alpha} particles with the aid of a fluorescence counter; Detection des particules {alpha} a l'aide d'un compteur a fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koechlin, Y

    1951-07-01

    The operation principle of the fluorescence counter, used as {alpha} particles detector, is analyzed in the first part. Detection can be done in two ways: by counting the pulses due to each {alpha} particle, or by integrating all pulses and measuring the average current obtained. In the second part, three series of measurements are presented: 1 - two fluorescent substances (zinc sulfate and anthracene) are placed in front of the photocathode of three types of photomultipliers (RCA 931A, EMI 4588, and EMI 5311). These substances are bombarded with the {alpha} radiations of a Po source and then irradiated by the {beta} and {gamma} radiations of a Ra source in order to study the light emission of these thin film substances when submitted to the three types of radiations. The results show that thanks to the amplitude of the emitted light pulses, the fluorescence counter, when submitted to the three types of radiations, allows to distinguish between the {alpha} radiations of the polonium and the {beta} and {gamma} radiations of the radium source. The output current of a 931A, when measured with a galvanometer, allows to detect Po sources with an intensity of about 10{sup -6} curie. This is observed when its photocathode receives the light from a ZnS-Ag coating bombarded by the {alpha} particles of Po. The quantum efficiency of the counter is close to 100% for the {alpha} particles of Po. This efficiency is evaluated by comparison with the efficiency of a thin wall Geiger-Mueller counter. Moreover, when a thin crystal of anthracene is used as detector, the energy of the incident particles can be measured with a 2% preciseness. (J.S.)

  2. Particle identification with Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) detector with high detection threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, S.; Maulik, A.; Raha, Sibaji; Saha, Swapan K.; Syam, D.

    2014-10-01

    In the present work we describe the results of studies, using accelerator data, to determine the accuracy with which particles can be identified and their energies determined with a commercially available polymer (PET) used as a Nuclear Track Detector (NTD). The achieved charge resolution was ± 1 . The initial energy of stopping particle in PET was determined with an accuracy of 10 % for ion energies above the Bragg peak.

  3. Particle identification with Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) detector with high detection threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, S. [Centre for Astroparticle Physics and Space Science, Bose Institute, Kolkata 700 091 (India); Maulik, A., E-mail: atanu.maulik@gmail.com [Centre for Astroparticle Physics and Space Science, Bose Institute, Kolkata 700 091 (India); Raha, Sibaji; Saha, Swapan K. [Centre for Astroparticle Physics and Space Science, Bose Institute, Kolkata 700 091 (India); Department of Physics, Bose Institute, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Syam, D. [Department of Physics, Barasat Government College, Kolkata 700 124 (India)

    2014-10-01

    In the present work we describe the results of studies, using accelerator data, to determine the accuracy with which particles can be identified and their energies determined with a commercially available polymer (PET) used as a Nuclear Track Detector (NTD). The achieved charge resolution was ±1. The initial energy of stopping particle in PET was determined with an accuracy of 10% for ion energies above the Bragg peak.

  4. Particle Filter Based Tracking in a Detection Sparse Discrete Event Simulation Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Borovies, Drew A

    2007-01-01

    .... In actuality, even extremely uncertain or incomplete detections and counter-detections of opposing entities can provide enough data for entities to make reasonably intelligent decisions on the virtual battlefield...

  5. Rare particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, W.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) to search for hypothetical particles and known particles of rare processes is discussed. The hypothetical particles considered include fractionally charged particles, anomalously heavy isotopes, and superheavy elements. The known particles produced in rare processes discussed include doubly-charged negative ions, counting neutrino-produced atoms in detectors for solar neutrino detection, and the spontaneous emission of 14 C from 223 Ra. 35 references

  6. Detection of alpha particles by means of zinc sulphide screens. Study of their characteristics; Deteccion de particulas alfa por medio de pantallas de sulfuro de cinc: estudio de sus caracteristicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaeta, R; Manero, F

    1959-07-01

    A method of SZn(Ag) screens preparation in order to detect alpha particles is described. The behaviour of the luminophore in a scintillometer is primarily studied and followed by experimental methods in the preparation of screens with the specific qualities required. A sedimentation technic of SZn(Ag) deposition has been employed, and followed by pressing in hot. The variation of impulse size with the massif thickness of luminophore has been studied, and found a maximum value for 6,5 mg/cm{sup 2} in unpressed screens and 6 mg/cm{sup 2} in the pressed ones. The plateau curves present flat areas till 450 volts. The background in source absence is below 0.5 impulse/minute. (Author) 19 refs.

  7. Hot and Dry Cleaning of Biomass-Gasified Gas Using Activated Carbons with Simultaneous Removal of Tar, Particles, and Sulfur Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinya Sakanishi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a gas-cleaning process for the simultaneous removal of sulfur compounds, tar, and particles from biomass-gasified gas using Fe-supported activated carbon and a water-gas shift reaction. On a laboratory scale, the simultaneous removal of H2S and COS was performed under a mixture of gases (H2/CO/CO2/CH4/C2H4/N2/H2S/COS/steam. The reactions such as COS + H2 → H2S + CO and COS + H2O → H2S + CO2 and the water-gas shift reaction were promoted on the Fe-supported activated carbon. The adsorption capacity with steam was higher than that without steam. On a bench scale, the removal of impurities from a gas derived from biomass gasification was investigated using two activated filters packed with Fe-supported activated carbon. H2S and COS, three- and four-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, and particles were removed and a water-gas shift reaction was promoted through the first filter at 320–350 °C. The concentrations of H2S and COS decreased to less than 0.1 ppmv. Particles and the one- and two-ring PAHs, except for benzene, were then removed through the second filter at 60–170 °C. The concentration of tar and particles decreased from 2428 to 102 mg Nm−3 and from 2244 to 181 mg Nm−3, respectively.

  8. Comparison of molecular imprinted particles prepared using precipitation polymerization in water and chloroform for fluorescent detection of nitroaromatics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stringer, R. Cody, E-mail: rcsm84@mail.mizzou.edu [Department of Biological Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Gangopadhyay, Shubhra, E-mail: gangopadhyays@missouri.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Grant, Sheila A., E-mail: grantsa@missouri.edu [Department of Biological Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2011-10-10

    Highlights: {yields} Imprinted polymers prepared using precipitation polymerization. {yields} Comparison of chloroform and water as polymerization solvent. {yields} Imprinted polymer doped with quantum dots for fluorescent sensor. {yields} Fluorescent imprinted polymer used to detect nitroaromatic explosives. {yields} Chloroform is ideal solvent for molecular imprinting of nitroaromatics. - Abstract: A comparative study was conducted to study the effects that two different polymerization solvents would have on the properties of imprinted polymer microparticles prepared using precipitation polymerization. Microparticles prepared in chloroform, which previous results indicated was the optimal solvent for molecular imprinting of nitroaromatic explosive compounds, were compared to water, which was hypothesized to decrease water swelling of the polymer and allow enhanced rebinding of aqueous template. The microparticles were characterized and were integrated into a fluorescence sensing mechanism for detection of nitroaromatic explosive compounds. The performance of the sensing mechanisms was compared to illustrate which polymerization solvent produced optimal imprinted polymer microparticles for detection of nitroaromatic molecules. Results indicated that the structures of microparticles synthesized in chloroform versus water varied greatly. Sensor performance studies showed that the microparticles prepared in chloroform had greater imprinting efficiency and higher template rebinding than those prepared in water. For detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, the chloroform-based fluorescent microparticles achieved a lower limit of detection of 0.1 {mu}M, as compared to 100 {mu}M for the water-based fluorescent microparticles. Detection limits for 2,4-dinitrotoluene, as well as time response studies, also demonstrated that the chloroform-based particles are more effective for detection of nitroaromatic compounds than water-based particles. These results illustrate that the

  9. Comparison of molecular imprinted particles prepared using precipitation polymerization in water and chloroform for fluorescent detection of nitroaromatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stringer, R. Cody; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra; Grant, Sheila A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Imprinted polymers prepared using precipitation polymerization. → Comparison of chloroform and water as polymerization solvent. → Imprinted polymer doped with quantum dots for fluorescent sensor. → Fluorescent imprinted polymer used to detect nitroaromatic explosives. → Chloroform is ideal solvent for molecular imprinting of nitroaromatics. - Abstract: A comparative study was conducted to study the effects that two different polymerization solvents would have on the properties of imprinted polymer microparticles prepared using precipitation polymerization. Microparticles prepared in chloroform, which previous results indicated was the optimal solvent for molecular imprinting of nitroaromatic explosive compounds, were compared to water, which was hypothesized to decrease water swelling of the polymer and allow enhanced rebinding of aqueous template. The microparticles were characterized and were integrated into a fluorescence sensing mechanism for detection of nitroaromatic explosive compounds. The performance of the sensing mechanisms was compared to illustrate which polymerization solvent produced optimal imprinted polymer microparticles for detection of nitroaromatic molecules. Results indicated that the structures of microparticles synthesized in chloroform versus water varied greatly. Sensor performance studies showed that the microparticles prepared in chloroform had greater imprinting efficiency and higher template rebinding than those prepared in water. For detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, the chloroform-based fluorescent microparticles achieved a lower limit of detection of 0.1 μM, as compared to 100 μM for the water-based fluorescent microparticles. Detection limits for 2,4-dinitrotoluene, as well as time response studies, also demonstrated that the chloroform-based particles are more effective for detection of nitroaromatic compounds than water-based particles. These results illustrate that the enhanced chemical properties of

  10. Recommendations, requirements, and radioactive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    Hot particles consisting of activated metal debris and fuel fragments have received increased attention in the last five years. This increased attention resulted from the increased use of more sensitive whole body friskers at nuclear power plants, the relatively high local skin doses associated with the particles, and skin dose limits that were established before hot particles, and skin dose limits that were established before hot particles became a problem and before radiobiological effects data for the particles became available. The skin dose distribution and biological effects associated with hot particles differ from those associated with more uniform skin contamination and differences exist in the scientific community as to which effects should be protected against by a limit on exposures from particles. The NRC staff recognized the need for provisions in the Federal regulations specific to hot particle exposures and requested guidance from the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). NCRP Report No. 106 was provided to the NRC early in 1990. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is also developing recommendations for limits on exposures from hot particles. The NRC is supporting research on hot particle effects and will likely develop a rule for hot particle exposures

  11. Fluorescent detection of single tracks of alpha particles using lithium fluoride crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilski, P.; Marczewska, B.

    2017-01-01

    Lithium fluoride single crystals were successfully used for fluorescent imaging of single tracks of alpha particles. This was realized with a standard wide-field fluorescent microscope equipped with a 100× objective. Alpha particles create F_2 and F_3"+ color centers in LiF crystals. The subsequent illumination with the blue light (wavelength around 445 nm), excites these centers and produces fluorescence with a broad band peaked at 670 nm. The observed tracks of alpha particles have diameter of about 500 nm. Focusing of the microscope at different depths in a LiF crystal, enables imaging changes of shape and position of tracks, allowing for visualization of their paths. These encouraging results are the first step towards practical application of LiF as fluorescent nuclear track detectors.

  12. Intrinsic efficiency of LR-115 in alpha particles detection: simulations and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aharmim, B.; Sabir, A.; Marah, H.

    2002-01-01

    A numerical simulation is developed to characterize the response of the cellulose nitrate detector ''LR-115 type II'' to alpha particles of different incidence angles and energies. It permits to know whether an alpha particle at a given energy and direction is able to produce a visible etched track or not. For this purpose, a V t -variable track etch rate model is used. We have considered that the track etch rate is a function of the ionization rate and the defect created by delta rays along the alpha particle trajectory. Validation of the model is presented in the form of comparisons between theoretically computed values of the sensitive energy range and the track diameters and experimentally determined ones

  13. Detecting unstable periodic orbits of nonlinear mappings by a novel quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization non-Lyapunov way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Fei; Gao Hongrui; Li Zhuoqiu; Tong Hengqing; Lee, Ju-Jang

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that set of unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) can be thought of as the skeleton for the dynamics. However, detecting UPOs of nonlinear map is one of the most challenging problems of nonlinear science in both numerical computations and experimental measures. In this paper, a new method is proposed to detect the UPOs in a non-Lyapunov way. Firstly three special techniques are added to quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO), a novel mbest particle, contracting the searching space self-adaptively and boundaries restriction (NCB), then the new method NCB-QPSO is proposed. It can maintain an effective search mechanism with fine equilibrium between exploitation and exploration. Secondly, the problems of detecting the UPOs are converted into a non-negative functions' minimization through a proper translation in a non-Lyapunov way. Thirdly the simulations to 6 benchmark optimization problems and different high order UPOs of 5 classic nonlinear maps are done by the proposed method. And the results show that NCB-QPSO is a successful method in detecting the UPOs, and it has the advantages of fast convergence, high precision and robustness.

  14. An Improved Opposition-Based Learning Particle Swarm Optimization for the Detection of SNP-SNP Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Junliang; Sun, Yan; Li, Shengjun; Liu, Jin-Xing; Zheng, Chun-Hou; Zhang, Junying

    2015-01-01

    SNP-SNP interactions have been receiving increasing attention in understanding the mechanism underlying susceptibility to complex diseases. Though many works have been done for the detection of SNP-SNP interactions, the algorithmic development is still ongoing. In this study, an improved opposition-based learning particle swarm optimization (IOBLPSO) is proposed for the detection of SNP-SNP interactions. Highlights of IOBLPSO are the introduction of three strategies, namely, opposition-based learning, dynamic inertia weight, and a postprocedure. Opposition-based learning not only enhances the global explorative ability, but also avoids premature convergence. Dynamic inertia weight allows particles to cover a wider search space when the considered SNP is likely to be a random one and converges on promising regions of the search space while capturing a highly suspected SNP. The postprocedure is used to carry out a deep search in highly suspected SNP sets. Experiments of IOBLPSO are performed on both simulation data sets and a real data set of age-related macular degeneration, results of which demonstrate that IOBLPSO is promising in detecting SNP-SNP interactions. IOBLPSO might be an alternative to existing methods for detecting SNP-SNP interactions. PMID:26236727

  15. Test of the photon detection system for the LHCb RICH Upgrade in a charged particle beam

    CERN Document Server

    Baszczyk, M.K.

    2017-01-16

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded to make more efficient use of the available luminosity at the LHC in Run III and extend its potential for discovery. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors are key components of the LHCb detector for particle identification. In this paper we describe the setup and the results of tests in a charged particle beam, carried out to assess prototypes of the upgraded opto-electronic chain from the Multi-Anode PMT photosensor to the readout and data acquisition system.

  16. Detection of light charged particles from plasma focus by CR-39

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antanasijevic, R.; Vukovic, J.; Popovic, S.; Popovic, M. (Belgrade Univ. (Yugoslavia). Inst. za Fiziku); Puric, J.; Cuk, M. (Faculty of Physical Science, Belgrade (Yugoslavia))

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of a deuteron (D{sup +}) beam, emitted from a plasma focus has been carried out, using a CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector. The CR-39 was pretreated using different processes to destroy the existing background before exposing it to the particles produced in the plasma focus. From measurements of the diameters of the tracks, the estimated energy of the D{sup +} ions is about 0.5 MeV. The total number of emitted D{sup +} ions was 10 particles/pulse. Some preliminary results on imaging etched CR-39 with an Atomic Force Microscope (NanoScope AFM) are also presented. (author).

  17. Detection of light charged particles from plasma focus by CR-39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antanasijevic, R.; Vukovic, J.; Popovic, S.; Popovic, M.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of a deuteron (D + ) beam, emitted from a plasma focus has been carried out, using a CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector. The CR-39 was pretreated using different processes to destroy the existing background before exposing it to the particles produced in the plasma focus. From measurements of the diameters of the tracks, the estimated energy of the D + ions is about 0.5 MeV. The total number of emitted D + ions was 10 particles/pulse. Some preliminary results on imaging etched CR-39 with an Atomic Force Microscope (NanoScope AFM) are also presented. (author)

  18. Procedure for short-lived particle detection in the OPERA experiment and its application to charm decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agafonova, N.; Malgin, A.; Matveev, V.; Ryazhskaya, O.; Shakiryanova, I. [INR-Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Aleksandrov, A.; Buontempo, S.; Consiglio, L.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Shchedrina, T.; Tioukov, V. [INFN Sezione di Napoli, Naples (Italy); Anokhina, A.; Dzhatdoev, T.; Podgrudkov, D.; Roganova, T.; Shoziyoev, G. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, SINP MSU-Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Aoki, S.; Hara, T.; Ozaki, K.; Takahashi, S. [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan); Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Ereditato, A.; Kawada, J.; Kreslo, I.; Pistillo, C.; Strauss, T.; Tufanli, S.; Vuilleumier, J.L. [University of Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics (LHEP), Bern (Switzerland); Bender, D.; Guler, M.; Kamiscioglu, C.; Kamiscioglu, M. [METU-Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey); Bertolin, A.; Dusini, S.; Kose, U.; Stanco, L. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Padua (Italy); Bozza, C.; Grella, G.; Stellacci, S.M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Salerno and ' ' Gruppo Collegato' ' INFN, Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Brugnera, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Medinaceli, E.; Roda, M.; Sirignano, C. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Padua (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia dell' Universita di Padova, Padua (Italy); Buonaura, A.; De Lellis, G.; Galati, G.; Hosseini, B.; Lauria, A.; Montesi, M.C.; Strolin, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita Federico II di Napoli, Naples (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Naples (Italy); Buettner, B.; Ebert, J.; Goellnitz, C.; Hagner, C.; Hollnagel, A.; Lenkeit, J.; Wonsak, B. [Hamburg University, Hamburg (Germany); Chernyavsky, M.; Okateva, N.; Polukhina, N.; Starkov, N.; Vladimirov, M. [LPI-Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chukanov, A.; Dmitrievski, S.; Gornushkin, Y.; Olshevsky, A.; Sheshukov, A.; Zemskova, S. [JINR-Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); D' Ambrosio, N.; Di Marco, N.; Pupilli, F.; Schembri, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, L' Aquila (Italy); De Serio, M.; Muciaccia, M.T.; Simone, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Bari, Bari (Italy); INFN Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Amo Sanchez, P. del; Duchesneau, D.; Pessard, H.; Zghiche, A. [LAPP, Universite de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Di Ferdinando, D.; Mandrioli, G.; Patrizii, L.; Sirri, G.; Tenti, M. [INFN Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Dracos, M.; Jollet, C.; Meregaglia, A. [IPHC, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3, Strasbourg (France); Fini, R.A.; Pastore, A. [INFN Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Fukuda, T.; Ishida, H.; Matsuo, T.; Ogawa, S.; Shibuya, H. [Toho University, Funabashi (Japan); Giacomelli, G. [INFN Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia dell' Universita di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Goldberg, J. [Technion, Department of Physics, Haifa (Israel); Gustavino, C.; Monacelli, P. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Ishiguro, K.; Kitagawa, N.; Komatsu, M.; Morishima, K.; Naganawa, N.; Naka, T.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Niwa, K.; Omura, T.; Rokujo, H.; Sato, O.; Shiraishi, T. [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Jakovcic, K.; Klicek, B.; Ljubicic, A.; Malenica, M.; Stipcevic, M. [IRB-Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Kim, J.H.; Park, I.G.; Yoon, C.S. [Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.H. [Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kodama, K. [Aichi University of Education, Kariya, Aichi-Ken (Japan); Longhin, A.; Paoloni, A.; Spinetti, M.; Votano, L. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Loverre, P.; Rosa, G. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Rome (Italy); Mauri, N.; Pasqualini, L.; Pozzato, M.; Sioli, M. [INFN Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia dell' Universita di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Mikado, S. [Nihon University, Narashino, Chiba (Japan); Park, B.D. [Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Changwon Hospital, SKKU, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Terranova, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Vilain, P.; Wilquet, G. [IIHE, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-08-15

    TheOPERAexperiment, designed to perform the first observation of ν{sub μ} → ν{sub τ} oscillations in appearance mode through the detection of the τ leptons produced in ν{sub τ} charged current interactions, has collected data from 2008 to 2012. In the present paper, the procedure developed to detect τ particle decays, occurring over distances of the order of 1mm from the neutrino interaction point, is described in detail and applied to the search for charmed hadrons, showing similar decay topologies as the τ lepton. In the analysed sample, 50 charm decay candidate events are observed while 54 ± 4 are expected, proving that the detector performance and the analysis chain applied to neutrino events are well reproduced by the OPERA simulation and thus validating the methods for ν{sub τ} appearance detection. (orig.)

  19. Highly porous nanocomposites based on TiO2-noble metal particles for sensitive detection of water pollutants by SERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baia, M; Melinte, G; Iancu, V; Baia, L; Barbu-Tudoran, L; Diamandescu, L; Cosoveanu, V; Danciu, V

    2011-01-01

    Highly porous nanocomposites based on TiO2 aerogel and silver colloidal particles were prepared by different methods in order to study their capacity to detect pollutant species adsorbed on metallic nanoparticles surface from aqueous solution. The efficiency of the obtained composites to detect contaminants from water by means of SERS was evaluated using acrylamide and crystal violet as test molecules. It was found that the detection limits depend both on pollutant and composite type, and were determined to be in the range of 10 -1 -10 -4 M for acrylamide and around 10 -5 M for the dye molecule. These results prove the potential of the prepared porous composites for further use in the development of new SERS-based sensors devices.

  20. Highly porous nanocomposites based on TiO2-noble metal particles for sensitive detection of water pollutants by SERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baia, M; Melinte, G; Iancu, V; Baia, L [Faculty of Physics, Babes-Bolyai University, 400084, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Barbu-Tudoran, L [Faculty of Biology and Geology, Babes-Bolyai University, 400015, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Diamandescu, L [National Institute of Materials Physics, PO Box MG-7, 77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Cosoveanu, V; Danciu, V, E-mail: lucian.baia@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, 400028, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2011-07-06

    Highly porous nanocomposites based on TiO2 aerogel and silver colloidal particles were prepared by different methods in order to study their capacity to detect pollutant species adsorbed on metallic nanoparticles surface from aqueous solution. The efficiency of the obtained composites to detect contaminants from water by means of SERS was evaluated using acrylamide and crystal violet as test molecules. It was found that the detection limits depend both on pollutant and composite type, and were determined to be in the range of 10{sup -1}-10{sup -4} M for acrylamide and around 10{sup -5} M for the dye molecule. These results prove the potential of the prepared porous composites for further use in the development of new SERS-based sensors devices.

  1. Detection of the ternary alpha particles from 252Cr spontaneous source with timepix pixeleted detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadov, G.S.; Telezhnikov, S.A.; Ahmadov, F.I.; Garibov, A.A.; Ahmadov, G.S.; Ahmadov, F.I.; Granja, C.; Pospisil, S.

    2013-01-01

    A third charged particle is emitted besides the two main fission fragments in ternary fission. Because of the ternary fission is a unique tool to explore the dynamics and structure of atomic nuclei by probing the fissioning system near the scission point and observing fissioning reaction and decay mechanisms main tool to study nuclear fission processes

  2. Overview of lunar detection of ultra-high energy particles and new plans for the SKA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    James, Clancy W.; Alvarez-Muñiz, Jaime; Bray, Justin D.; Buitink, Stijn; Dagkesamanskii, Rustam D.; Ekers, Ronald D.; Falcke, Heino; Gayley, Ken; Huege, Tim; Mevius, Maaijke; Mutel, Rob; Scholten, Olaf; Spencer, Ralph; ter Veen, Sander; Winchen, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    The lunar technique is a method for maximising the collection area for ultra-high-energy (UHE) cosmic ray and neutrino searches. The method uses either ground-based radio telescopes or lunar orbiters to search for Askaryan emission from particles cascading near the lunar surface. While experiments

  3. Sensitivity for detection of decay of dark matter particle using ICAL at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    India-based neutrino observatory; iron calorimeter; kolar event; dark matter particle; lifetime. PACS No. ... certain DM energy density in a limited volume of the ICAL cavern. The ICAL ..... of light. This time difference will generally be a positive quantity. ... (a) The lower limit in the lifetime of DMP vs. its mass for μ+μ− decay.

  4. Production and detection of axion-like particles at the VUV-FEL. Letter of intent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koetz, U.; Ringwald, A.; Tschentscher, T.

    2006-06-01

    Recently, the PVLAS collaboration has reported evidence for an anomalously large rotation of the polarization of light generated in vacuum in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. This may be explained through the production of a new light spin-zero particle coupled to two photons. In this Letter of Intent, we propose to test this hypothesis by setting up a photon regeneration experiment which exploits the photon beam of the Vacuum-UltraViolet Free-Electron Laser VUV-FEL, sent along the transverse magnetic field of a linear arrangement of dipole magnets of size B L ∼ 30 Tm. The high photon energies available at the VUV-FEL increase substantially the expected photon regeneration rate in the mass range implied by the PVLAS anomaly, in comparison to the rate expected at visible lasers of similar power. We find that the particle interpretation of the PVLAS result can be tested within a short running period. The pseudoscalar vs. scalar nature can be determined by varying the direction of the magnetic field with respect to the laser polarization. The mass of the particle can be measured by running at different photon energies. The proposed experiment offers a window of opportunity for a firm establishment or exclusion of the particle interpretation of the PVLAS anomaly before other experiments can compete. (Orig.)

  5. RapidNano: towards 20nm Particle Detection on EUV Mask Blanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donck, J.C.J. van der; Bussink, P.G.W.; Fritz, E.C.; Walle, P. van der

    2016-01-01

    Cleanliness is a prerequisite for obtaining economically feasible yield levels in the semiconductor industry. For the next generation of lithographic equipment, EUV lithography, the size of yield-loss inducing particles for the masks will be smaller than 20 nm. Consequently, equipment for handling

  6. Carbon Particles in Airway Macrophage as a Surrogate Marker in the Early Detection of Lung Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NK Kalappanavar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been shown that inhalation of carbonaceous particulate matter may impair lung function in children. Objective: Using the carbon content of airway macrophages as a marker of individual exposure to particulate matter derived from fossil fuel, we sought direct evidence for this association. Methods: 300 children from puffed rice industrial areas and 300 children from population living in green zone were selected randomly. Airway macrophages were obtained from healthy children through sputum induction, and the grading of ultrafine carbon particles in airway macrophages was measured. Pulmonary function was also measured by spirometry. Results: Pulmonary function tests showed that in industrial area 42.6% and 20.3% of children had moderate obstructive airway disease and restrictive airway disease, respectively. In the green zone area, 7% of children had obstructive airway disease and 6% had restrictive airway disease. Evaluation of airway macrophages for ultrafine carbon particles revealed that in industrial area there were ultrafine carbon particles of grade 2 in 23% of subjects and grade 3 in 8.33% of individuals with obstructive airway disease. In the green zone area, the rates were 1.67% and 0.7%, respectively. Conclusion: The study provides a first evidence of the strong association between air pollution and development of airway diseases. Carbon particles in the sputum can be used as a marker for air pollution.

  7. Implementation of particle analysers in the detection and description of biofilm formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kadlec, Robert; Plocková, Jana; Růžička, F.; Holá, V.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 10, supl3 (2004), s. 102 ISSN 1198-743X. [14th ECCMID. European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases /14./. Praha, 01.05.2004-04.05.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4031919 Keywords : bacterial biofilm * particle size distribution * microparticle s Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.361, year: 2004

  8. Detection and localisation of very high energy particles in underwater acoustic; Detection et localisation de particules de tres hautes energies en acoustique sous-marine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juennard, N

    2007-12-15

    The theme of this thesis is included in the Antares international project whose object is to build a neutrino telescope located in a deep water environment in the Mediterranean sea. In deep water sea, a neutrino can interact with a water molecule. The collision generates a luminous flash and an acoustic wave. The goal of this work is to study this acoustic sound wave and develop a system able to detect the corresponding wave front and to estimate the initial direction of the particle. We first focus on the acoustic sound wave. Two different models are studied, and works made recently have led to a mathematical expression of both signal and wave front. Then, several detection methods are studied, from the most classical to the more recent ones. The experimental comparison in semi-real situation leads to the choice of a detection method: the Extended stochastic matched filter. Position and direction of the neutrino are now estimated with a Gauss-Newton inspired algorithm. This estimator is based on a wave front propagation model and on the time detection information given by the telescope hydro-phones. Performances of the system are then estimated. An antenna structure is then proposed and a global simulation finalizes this thesis. In this simulation, detection and estimation are based on the results found in the previous sections. Underwater sea noise is real and the results of the simulation valid our works. (author)

  9. Electronic properties of single crystal CVD diamond and its suitability for particle detection in hadron physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomorski, Michal

    2008-08-07

    This work presents the study on the suitability of single-crystal CVD diamond for particle-detection systems in present and future hadron physics experiments. Different characterization methods of the electrical and the structural properties were applied to gain a deeper understanding of the crystal quality and the charge transport properties of this novel semiconductor material. First measurements regarding the radiation tolerance of diamond were performed with sensors heavily irradiated with protons and neutrons. Finally, detector prototypes were fabricated and successfully tested in various experiments as time detectors for minimum ionizing particles as well as for spectroscopy of heavy ions at the energy ranges available at the SIS and the UNILAC facilities of GSI. (orig.)

  10. Electronic properties of single crystal CVD diamond and its suitability for particle detection in hadron physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomorski, Michal

    2008-01-01

    This work presents the study on the suitability of single-crystal CVD diamond for particle-detection systems in present and future hadron physics experiments. Different characterization methods of the electrical and the structural properties were applied to gain a deeper understanding of the crystal quality and the charge transport properties of this novel semiconductor material. First measurements regarding the radiation tolerance of diamond were performed with sensors heavily irradiated with protons and neutrons. Finally, detector prototypes were fabricated and successfully tested in various experiments as time detectors for minimum ionizing particles as well as for spectroscopy of heavy ions at the energy ranges available at the SIS and the UNILAC facilities of GSI. (orig.)

  11. MIPAS detection of cloud and aerosol particle occurrence in the UTLS with comparison to HIRDLS and CALIOP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sembhi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Satellite infrared emission instruments require efficient systems that can separate and flag observations which are affected by clouds and aerosols. This paper investigates the identification of cloud and aerosols from infrared, limb sounding spectra that were recorded by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS, a high spectral resolution Fourier transform spectrometer on the European Space Agency's (ESA ENVISAT (Now inoperative since April 2012 due to loss of contact. Specifically, the performance of an existing cloud and aerosol particle detection method is simulated with a radiative transfer model in order to establish, for the first time, confident detection limits for particle presence in the atmosphere from MIPAS data. The newly established thresholds improve confidence in the ability to detect particle injection events, plume transport in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS and better characterise cloud distributions utilising MIPAS spectra. The method also provides a fast front-end detection system for the MIPClouds processor; a processor designed for the retrieval of macro- and microphysical cloud properties from the MIPAS data.

    It is shown that across much of the stratosphere, the threshold for the standard cloud index in band A is 5.0 although threshold values of over 6.0 occur in restricted regimes. Polar regions show a surprising degree of uncertainty at altitudes above 20 km, potentially due to changing stratospheric trace gas concentrations in polar vortex conditions and poor signal-to-noise due to cold atmospheric temperatures. The optimised thresholds of this study can be used for much of the time, but time/composition-dependent thresholds are recommended for MIPAS data for the strongly perturbed polar stratosphere. In the UT, a threshold of 5.0 applies at 12 km and above but decreases rapidly at lower altitudes. The new thresholds are shown to allow much more sensitive

  12. SUSY long-lived massive particles. Detection and physics at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosiano, S.; Mele, B.; Nisati, A.; Petrarca, S.; Polesello, G.; Rimoldi, A.; Salvini, G.

    2001-01-01

    It was drawn a possible scenario for the observation of massive long-lived charged particles at the LHC detector ATLAS. The required flexibility of the detector triggers and of the identification and reconstruction systems are discussed. As an example, it was focused on the measurement of the mass and lifetime of long-lived charged sleptons predicted in the framework of supersymmetric models with gauge-mediated supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking. In this case the next-to-lightest SUSY particle can be the light scalar partner of the tau lepton (τ 1 ), possibly decaying slowly into a gravitino. A wide region of the SUSY parameters space was explored. The accessible range and precision on the measurement of the SUSY breaking scale parameter of √ F achievable with a counting method are assessed [it

  13. Detection of {alpha} particles using semiconductors. Application to the control of plutonium extraction; Detection des particules {alpha} par semiconducteurs application au controle de l'extraction du plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanguy, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-03-01

    A study is made of a particles produced by thick sources, using either diffused junction or surface barrier semiconductor detectors for controlling continuously the plutonium extraction process. For this, a presenting apparatus is described in which the solutions to be analyzed flow in contact with the detector protected by a thin mica membrane. A method is described which gives a precise recording of the spectra and which thus allows the separation of two or more {alpha} emitters present in the same solution. This method has been applied to the measurement of {sup 239}Pu in the the presence of {sup 241}Am with an accuracy of {+-}5 per cent. In the second part of the report is considered the detection of plutonium in solutions of {beta} - {gamma} emitting fission products. Pile-up is reduced by using a fast amplification chain associated to totally depleted thin detectors. Under these conditions a few mg of {sup 239}Pu can be detected in solutions of fission products having an activity of 100 curies/liter. A method is given for discriminating {alpha} and {beta} particles, it is based on the difference in the collection times for the charges liberated by these particles in the detector. (author) [French] On etudie la detection de particules {alpha} issues de sources epaisses par detecteurs semiconducteurs a jonction diffusee ou a barriere de surface pour le controle continu du procede d'extraction du plutonium. A cet effet on decrit un appareil presentateur dans lequel les solutions a analyser circulent au contact du detecteur protege par une membrane mince de mica. On decrit une methode qui permet par le trace precis des spectres de separer deux ou plusieurs emetteurs {alpha} presents dans une meme solution. Cette methode a ete appliquee a la mesure du {sup 239}Pu en presence de {sup 241}Am avec une precision de {+-} 5 pour cent. Dans la deuxieme partie on traite de la detection du plutonium dans des solutions de produits de fission emetteurs {beta} and {gamma}. On

  14. Hot chocolate effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, F.S.

    1982-01-01

    The ''hot chocolate effect'' was investigated quantitatively, using water. If a tall glass cylinder is filled nearly completely with water and tapped on the bottom with a softened mallet one can detect the lowest longitudinal mode of the water column, for which the height of the water column is one-quarter wavelength. If the cylinder is rapidly filled with hot tap water containing dissolved air the pitch of that mode may descend by nearly three octaves during the first few seconds as the air comes out of solution and forms bubbles. Then the pitch gradually rises as the bubbles float to the top. A simple theoretical expression for the pitch ratio is derived and compared with experiment. The agreement is good to within the 10% accuracy of the experiments

  15. The hot chocolate effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Frank S.

    1982-05-01

    The ''hot chocolate effect'' was investigated quantitatively, using water. If a tall glass cylinder is filled nearly completely with water and tapped on the bottom with a softened mallet one can detect the lowest longitudinal mode of the water column, for which the height of the water column is one-quarter wavelength. If the cylinder is rapidly filled with hot tap water containing dissolved air the pitch of that mode may descend by nearly three octaves during the first few seconds as the air comes out of solution and forms bubbles. Then the pitch gradually rises as the bubbles float to the top. A simple theoretical expression for the pitch ratio is derived and compared with experiment. The agreement is good to within the 10% accuracy of the experiments.

  16. Detection of Bioaerosols Using Single Particle Thermal Emission Spectroscopy (First-year Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    radiance is focused into 190-mm Horiba spectrometer where the radiance is dispersed onto an ultrafast, time-gated, liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooled 32...techniques were examined, i.e., methods that rely on acoustic levitation , radiative pressure, and suspension of small particles using the photophoretic...field of view HeNe helium-neon LN2 liquid nitrogen MCT mercury cadmium telluride NA numeric aperture Nd:YAG neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum

  17. Distributed drift chamber design for rare particle detection in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Bellwied, R; Bernardo, V; Caines, H; Christie, W; Costa, S; Crawford, H J; Cronqvist, M; Debbe, R; Dinnwiddie, R; Engelage, J; Flores, I; Fuzesy, R Z; Greiner, L; Hallman, T; Hoffmann, G; Huang, H Z; Jensen, P; Judd, E G; Kainz, K; Kaplan, M; Kelly, S; Lindstrom, P J; Llope, W J; Lo Curto, G; Longacre, R; Milosevich, Z; Mitchell, J T; Mitchell, J W; Mogavero, E; Mutchler, G S; Paganis, S; Platner, E; Potenza, R; Rotondo, F; Russ, D; Sakrejda, I; Saulys, A; Schambach, J; Sheen, J; Smirnoff, N; Stokely, C L; Tang, J; Trattner, A L; Trentalange, S; Visser, G; Whitfield, J P; Witharm, F; Witharm, R; Wright, M

    2002-01-01

    This report describes a multi plane drift chamber that was designed and constructed to function as a topological detector for the BNL AGS E896 rare particle experiment. The chamber was optimized for good spatial resolution, two track separation, and a high uniform efficiency while operating in a 1.6 T magnetic field and subjected to long term exposure from a 11.6 GeV/nucleon beam of 10 sup 6 Au ions per second.

  18. Liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy detection of laser ablation produced particles: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quarles, C. Derrick; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Choi, Inhee; Ruiz, Javier; Mao, Xianglei; Marcus, R. Kenneth; Russo, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    The use of a liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) microplasma source as an alternative to conventional inductively coupled plasma (ICP) detection of laser ablation (LA) produced particles using a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm is demonstrated. This configuration utilizes a 180° geometry, which is different from the 40° geometry that was used to ionize ablated particles followed by mass spectrometric detection. The use of a hollow counter electrode (nickel, 0.3 cm o.d., 0.1 cm i.d.) was implemented to introduce ablated particles directly into the APGD plasma with helium as a carrier gas. The LS-APGD source was optimized using ablated copper as the test sample (helium carrier gas flow rate (0.30 L min −1 He), discharge current (60 mA), laser power (44 mJ), and solution electrode sheath gas (0.2 L min −1 He) and solution flow rates (10 μL min −1 5% HNO 3 )). Standard brass samples having known Zn/Cu percentages were ablated and analyzed using the LS-APGD source. As a comparison, the established technique of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to analyze the same set of brass standards under similar ablation conditions to the LS-AGPD measurements, yielding comparable results. The Zn/Cu ratio results for the LS-APGD and LIBS measurements showed good similarity to previous measurements using ICP-MS detection. The performance of the LS-APGD–OES microplasma, comparable to well established methods, with lower capital and operational overhead expenses, suggests a great deal of promise as an analytical excitation source. - Highlights: ► Particles formed by laser ablation are readily introduced to the LS-APGD microplasma. ► The low power microplasma has sufficient energy to vaporize laser produced particles. ► Qualitative analysis of brass alloys is performed using a simple OES ratio method. ► The qualitative performance of the LS-APGD microplasma is on-par with LIBS analysis.

  19. Nano-particle enhanced impedimetric biosensor for detection of foodborne pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, G; Om, A S; Mun, J H

    2007-01-01

    Recent outbreaks of foodborne illness have been increased the need for rapid and sensitive methods for detection of these pathogens. Conventional methods for pathogens detection and identification involve prolonged multiple enrichment steps. Even though some immunological rapid assays are available, these assays still need enrichment steps result in delayed detection. Biosensors have shown great potential for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens. They are capable of direct monitoring the antigen-antibody reactions in real time. Among the biosensors, impedimetric biosensors have been widely adapted as an analysis tool for the study of various biological binding reactions because of their high sensitivity and reagentless operation. In this study a nanoparticle-enhanced impedimetric biosensor for Salmonella enteritidis detection was developed which detected impedance changes caused by the attachment of the cells to the anti-Salmonella antibodies immobilized on interdigitated gold electrodes. Successive immobilization of neutravidin followed by anti-Salmonella antibodies was performed to the sensing area to create a biological detection surface. To enhance the impedance responses generated by antigen-antibody reactions, anti-Salmonella antibody conjugated nanoparticles were introduced on the sensing area. Using a portable impedance analyzer, the impedance across the interdigital electrodes was measured after the series of antigen-antibody bindings. Bacteria cells present in solution attached to capture antibodies and became tethered to the sensor surface. Attached bacteria cells changed the dielectric constant of the media between the electrodes thereby causing a change in measured impedance. Optimum input frequency was determined by analyzing frequency characteristics of the biosensor over ranges of applied frequencies from 10 Hz to 400 Hz. At 100 Hz of input frequency, the biosensor was most sensitive to the changes of the bacteria concentration and this frequency

  20. Exploring the Cosmic Frontier, Task A - Direct Detection of Dark Matter, Task B - Experimental Particle Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, John A.J.; Gold, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the work of Task A and B for the period 2013-2016. For Task A the work is for direct detection of dark matter with the single-phase liquid argon experiment Mini-CLEAN. For Task B the work is for the search for new physics in the analysis of fluorescence events with the Auger experiment and for the search for the indirect detection of dark matter with the HAWC experiment.

  1. Exploring the Cosmic Frontier, Task A - Direct Detection of Dark Matter, Task B - Experimental Particle Astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, John A.J. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gold, Michael S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-08-11

    This report summarizes the work of Task A and B for the period 2013-2016. For Task A the work is for direct detection of dark matter with the single-phase liquid argon experiment Mini-CLEAN. For Task B the work is for the search for new physics in the analysis of fluorescence events with the Auger experiment and for the search for the indirect detection of dark matter with the HAWC experiment.

  2. Towards hot electron mediated charge exchange in hyperthermal energy ion-surface interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ray, M. P.; Lake, R. E.; Thomsen, Lasse Bjørchmar

    2010-01-01

    shows that the primary energy loss mechanism is the atomic displacement of Au atoms in the thin film of the metal–oxide–semiconductor device. We propose that neutral particle detection of the scattered flux from a biased device could be a route to hot electron mediated charge exchange.......We have made Na + and He + ions incident on the surface of solid state tunnel junctions and measured the energy loss due to atomic displacement and electronic excitations. Each tunnel junction consists of an ultrathin film metal–oxide–semiconductor device which can be biased to create a band of hot...

  3. A pulse stacking method of particle counting applied to position sensitive detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basilier, E.

    1976-03-01

    A position sensitive particle counting system is described. A cyclic readout imaging device serves as an intermediate information buffer. Pulses are allowed to stack in the imager at very high counting rates. Imager noise is completely discriminated to provide very wide dynamic range. The system has been applied to a detector using cascaded microchannel plates. Pulse height spread produced by the plates causes some loss of information. The loss is comparable to the input loss of the plates. The improvement in maximum counting rate is several hundred times over previous systems that do not permit pulse stacking. (Auth.)

  4. AstroBox2 – Detector for low-energy β-delayed particle detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saastamoinen, A., E-mail: ajsaasta@comp.tamu.edu [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Pollacco, E. [IRFU, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Roeder, B.T.; Spiridon, A.; Daq, M. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Trache, L.; Pascovici, G. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest-Magurele RO-077125 (Romania); De Oliveira, R. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Rodrigues, M.R.D. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05314-970, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tribble, R.E. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Efficient suppression of β-background is essential for studies of low-energy β-delayed charged particle decays of astrophysical interest. A promising method for such studies has been a micro pattern gas amplifier detector where the sample is implanted into the gas volume and the decays that follow are observed with high gain and signal to noise ratio. An upgraded version of the original AstroBox detector has been built and commissioned at Texas A&M University. Here a description of the new AstroBox2 detector is given, selected results from the commissioning tests are presented, and future perspectives discussed.

  5. A surface barrier detector for simultaneous detection of α and β particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, Fumio

    1981-01-01

    Semiconductor detectors are indispensable as the solid detectors with high energy resolution. Ge detectors are used for gamma-ray spectroscopy and its applied fields, while Si detectors are used as the detectors for charged particles such as α and β rays and low energy X-ray. In this paper, it is reported that the Si detector developed in the author's laboratory is suitable to monitor very weak radioactivity. The Si detector is a rectifier, but in order to capture radiation, it has large area and increased thickness, and a window is provided for incident charged particles. The Si detectors are classified into three types according to the manufacturing methods, namely surface barrier type, PN joint type and Li drift type. The Si detector introduced here is of surface barrier type, but it is characterized by the use of P-type Si with superhigh purity. The method of manufacturing this detector, its specifications and characteristics are described. Because of the surface barrier type, it can be produced simply in short time, and the yield of products is good. The stability is good, and the sensitivity is high, accordingly very weak radioactivity can be measured. As the examples of measurements, the results of uranium ore and fertilizer on the market are compared. Also the utilization as surface contamination meters is explained. (Kako, I.)

  6. Silicone-oil-based subvisible particles: their detection, interactions, and regulation in prefilled container closure systems for biopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felsovalyi, Flora; Janvier, Sébastien; Jouffray, Sébastien; Soukiassian, Hervé; Mangiagalli, Paolo

    2012-12-01

    Recent increased regulatory scrutiny concerning subvisible particulates (SbVPs) in parenteral formulations of biologics has led to the publication of numerous articles about the sources, characteristics, implications, and approaches to monitoring and detecting SbVPs. Despite varying opinions on the level of associated risks and method of regulation, nearly all industry scientists and regulators agree on the need for monitoring and reporting visible and subvisible particles. As prefillable drug delivery systems have become a prominent packaging option, silicone oil, a common primary packaging lubricant, may play a role in the appearance of particles. The goal of this article is to complement the current SbVP knowledge base with new insights into the evolution of silicone-oil-related particulates and their interactions with components in prefillable systems. We propose a "toolbox" for improved silicone-oil-related particulate detection and enumeration, and discuss the benefits and limitations of approaches for lowering and controlling silicone oil release in parenterals. Finally, we present surface cross-linking of silicone as the recommended solution for achieving significant SbVP reduction without negatively affecting functional performance. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Genetic Particle Swarm Optimization–Based Feature Selection for Very-High-Resolution Remotely Sensed Imagery Object Change Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Chen, Yunhao; Jiang, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    In the field of multiple features Object-Based Change Detection (OBCD) for very-high-resolution remotely sensed images, image objects have abundant features and feature selection affects the precision and efficiency of OBCD. Through object-based image analysis, this paper proposes a Genetic Particle Swarm Optimization (GPSO)-based feature selection algorithm to solve the optimization problem of feature selection in multiple features OBCD. We select the Ratio of Mean to Variance (RMV) as the fitness function of GPSO, and apply the proposed algorithm to the object-based hybrid multivariate alternative detection model. Two experiment cases on Worldview-2/3 images confirm that GPSO can significantly improve the speed of convergence, and effectively avoid the problem of premature convergence, relative to other feature selection algorithms. According to the accuracy evaluation of OBCD, GPSO is superior at overall accuracy (84.17% and 83.59%) and Kappa coefficient (0.6771 and 0.6314) than other algorithms. Moreover, the sensitivity analysis results show that the proposed algorithm is not easily influenced by the initial parameters, but the number of features to be selected and the size of the particle swarm would affect the algorithm. The comparison experiment results reveal that RMV is more suitable than other functions as the fitness function of GPSO-based feature selection algorithm. PMID:27483285

  8. Genetic Particle Swarm Optimization-Based Feature Selection for Very-High-Resolution Remotely Sensed Imagery Object Change Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Chen, Yunhao; Jiang, Weiguo

    2016-07-30

    In the field of multiple features Object-Based Change Detection (OBCD) for very-high-resolution remotely sensed images, image objects have abundant features and feature selection affects the precision and efficiency of OBCD. Through object-based image analysis, this paper proposes a Genetic Particle Swarm Optimization (GPSO)-based feature selection algorithm to solve the optimization problem of feature selection in multiple features OBCD. We select the Ratio of Mean to Variance (RMV) as the fitness function of GPSO, and apply the proposed algorithm to the object-based hybrid multivariate alternative detection model. Two experiment cases on Worldview-2/3 images confirm that GPSO can significantly improve the speed of convergence, and effectively avoid the problem of premature convergence, relative to other feature selection algorithms. According to the accuracy evaluation of OBCD, GPSO is superior at overall accuracy (84.17% and 83.59%) and Kappa coefficient (0.6771 and 0.6314) than other algorithms. Moreover, the sensitivity analysis results show that the proposed algorithm is not easily influenced by the initial parameters, but the number of features to be selected and the size of the particle swarm would affect the algorithm. The comparison experiment results reveal that RMV is more suitable than other functions as the fitness function of GPSO-based feature selection algorithm.

  9. Cationic polyelectrolyte functionalized magnetic particles assisted highly sensitive pathogens detection in combination with polymerase chain reaction and capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Lin, Yuexin; Wang, Yu; Jia, Li

    2015-06-01

    Pathogenic bacteria cause significant morbidity and mortality to humans. There is a pressing need to establish a simple and reliable method to detect them. Herein, we show that magnetic particles (MPs) can be functionalized by poly(diallyl dimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA), and the particles (PDDA-MPs) can be utilized as adsorbents for capture of pathogenic bacteria from aqueous solution based on electrostatic interaction. The as-prepared PDDA-MPs were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, zeta potential, vibrating sample magnetometry, X-ray diffraction spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The adsorption equilibrium time can be achieved in 3min. According to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, the maximum adsorption capacities for E. coli O157:H7 (Gram-negative bacteria) and L. monocytogenes (Gram-positive bacteria) were calculated to be 1.8×10(9) and 3.1×10(9)cfumg(-1), respectively. The bacteria in spiked mineral water (1000mL) can be completely captured when applying 50mg of PDDA-MPs and an adsorption time of 5min. In addition, PDDA-MPs-based magnetic separation method in combination with polymerase chain reaction and capillary electrophoresis allows for rapid detection of 10(1)cfumL(-1) bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Nano-metric Dust Particles as a Hardly Detectable Component of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sis of the TNO color index–orbital inclinations. We also .... In our view, during these two processes, their complementarities lead to a certain balance due to the .... dust will form a multi-mineral complex of the hardly detectable dust matter of the.

  11. The multi-stage proportional chamber in the detection of Cherenkov rings for particle recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauli, F.

    1979-01-01

    The multi-stage proportional chamber enables very high gains of 10 6 or more to be reached in gaseous mixtures offering a very good quantum efficiency in the far ultra-violet range. This makes it an ideal instrument for detecting and locating the photons emitted by Cerenkov effect in appropriate radiators [fr

  12. Controlled trapping and detection of magnetic particles by a magnetic microactuator and a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Giouroudi, Ioanna

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents the design and testing of an integrated micro-chip for the controlled trapping and detection of magnetic particles (MPs). A unique magnetic micro-actuator consisting of square-shaped conductors is used to manipulate the MPs towards a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensing element which rapidly detects the majority of MPs trapped around the square-shaped conductors. The ability to precisely transport a small number of MPs in a controlled manner over long distances by magnetic forces enables the rapid concentration of a majority of MPs to the sensing zone for detection. This is especially important in low concentration samples. The conductors are designed in such a manner so as to increase the capture efficiency as well as the precision and speed of transportation. By switching current to different conductors, MPs can be manipulated and immobilized on the innermost conductor where the GMR sensor is located. This technique rapidly guides the MPs towards the sensing zone. Secondly, for optimum measurement capability with high spatial resolution the GMR sensor is fabricated directly underneath and all along the innermost conductor to detect the stray fields originating from the MPs. Finally, a microfluidic channel is fabricated on top of this micro-chip. Experiments inside the microchannel were carried out and the MPs were successfully trapped at the sensing area. © (2014) Trans Tech Publications.

  13. Detection of circulating trophoblast particles in maternal blood using density gradient centrifugation in preeclampsia and in normotensive pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuessel, Lorenz; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine; Zeillinger, Robert; Pateisky, Petra; Ott, Johannes; Zeisler, Harald; Birdir, Cahit

    2016-08-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a frequent pregnancy-related disease and a major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Despite that, exact mechanisms of its pathophysiology remain largely unknown. In pregnancies complicated by PE, changes in the regulation of apoptosis seem to result in increased apoptotic shedding of trophoblast particles (TPs) into maternal circulation. Since the number of TP in peripheral blood is low, their detection necessitates pre-analytical enrichment. In this prospective multicenter pilot study we aimed to analyze TP in peripheral blood of 29 women with PE and of 13 unaffected controls using the OncoQuick®plus system for cell enrichment. Using immunocytochemistry, slides were evaluated microscopically for TP. Statistical analyses were performed using Welch's t-test or Fisher's exact test. TP were detected in 10 (34.5%) women with PE and in two (15.4%) of unaffected controls. More than one TP were only found in PE. Comparing the mean counts of TP between groups, we detected significantly more TP in PE (p = 0.046). The OncoQuick®plus system can be applied to detect TP in both women with PE and in normotensive pregnancies. Longitudinal studies investigating the role of TP as a screening method for patients at risk for PE are warranted.

  14. A Vision Controlled Robot to Detect and Collect Fallen Hot Cobalt60 Capsules inside Wet Storage Pool of Cobalt60 Irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solyman, A.E.M.

    2015-01-01

    In a typical irradiator that use radioactive cobalt-60 capsules source is one of the peaceful uses of atomic energy, it originated strategy in terms of its importance in the sterilization of medical products and food processing from bacteria and fungi before being exported. However, there are several well-known problems related to the fall of the cobalt-60 capsules inside the wet storage pool as a result of manufacturing defects, defects welds or a problem occurs in the vertical movement of the radioactive source rack. Therefore it is necessary to study this problem and solve it in a scientific way so as to keep the human as much as possible from radiation exposure, according to the principles of radiation protection and safety issued by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The present work considers the possibility to use a vision based control arm robot to collect fallen hot cobalt-60 capsules inside wet storage pool. A 5-DOF arm robot is designed and vision algorithms are established to pick the fallen capsule on the bottom surface of the storage pool, read the information printed on its edge (cap) and move it to a safe storage place. Two object detection approaches are studied; RGB-based filter and background subtraction technique. Vision algorithms and camera calibration are done using MATLAB/SIMULINK program. Robot arm forward and inverse kinematics are developed and programmed using an embedded micro controller system. Experiments show the validity of the proposed system and prove its success. The collecting process will be done without interference of operators, so radiation safety will be increased. The results showed camera calibration equations accuracy. And also the presence of vibrations in the hands of the movement of the robot and thus were seized motor rotation speed to 10 degrees per second to avoid these vibrations.This scientific application keeps the operators as much as possible from radiation exposure so it leads to increase radiation

  15. Low temperatures - hot topic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1988-09-15

    Neutrino mass measurements, next-generation double beta experiments, solar neutrino detection, searches for magnetic monopoles and the challenge of discovering what most of the Universe is made of (dark matter), not to mention axions (cosmic and solar), supersymmetric neutral particles and cosmic neutrinos. All this physics could use cryogenic techniques. Thus the second European Workshop on Low Temperature Devices for the Detection of Low Energy Neutrinos and Dark Matter, held at LAPP (Annecy) in May, covered an active and promising field.

  16. Low temperatures - hot topic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Neutrino mass measurements, next-generation double beta experiments, solar neutrino detection, searches for magnetic monopoles and the challenge of discovering what most of the Universe is made of (dark matter), not to mention axions (cosmic and solar), supersymmetric neutral particles and cosmic neutrinos. All this physics could use cryogenic techniques. Thus the second European Workshop on Low Temperature Devices for the Detection of Low Energy Neutrinos and Dark Matter, held at LAPP (Annecy) in May, covered an active and promising field

  17. Radiative detection of spin 3/2 particles in e+e- interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimenko, K.G.; Tikhonin, F.F.

    1983-01-01

    Cross-section for the process e + e - → γgsub(3/2)gtidlesub(3/2) has been calculated all the spin projections being taken into account. Photon energy dependence differs greatly from that of process e + e - →γωω tidle. In the case of eXistence of spin 3/2 neutral fermions such processes give a good possibility for their signal detection

  18. Review of Literature on Probability of Detection for Magnetic Particle Nondestructive Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    a precipitation hardened martensitic stainless steel . The inspections were based on MIL-STD-1949A [51], now superseded but current at the time...inspector population involved in the tests, it is not possible to draw any further conclusions.  MPT of flat 17-4PH stainless steel plates. A brief...inspection method used to detect surface-breaking cracks in high-strength steel components. A survey of the available literature on the reliability

  19. Study of a high surface gas triode for detecting atomic or nuclear particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lansiart, A.

    1967-06-01

    A triode filled with xenon at atmospheric pressure can be used as an X-ray detector since it produces an appreciable amount of light per quantum absorbed. Various methods are described for studying and reducing the deadtime after the passage of a spark. This detector can be used in medicine for the detection of tumours and also for the rapid recording of diffraction diagrams. (author) [fr

  20. Hot Jupiters around M dwarfs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murgas F.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The WFCAM Transit Survey (WTS is a near-infrared transit survey running on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT. We conduct Monte Carlo transit injection and detection simulations for short period (<10 day Jupiter-sized planets to characterize the sensitivity of the survey. We investigate the recovery rate as a function of period and magnitude in 2 hypothetical star-planet cases: M0–2 + hot Jupiter, M2–4 + hot Jupiter. We find that the WTS lightcurves are very sensitive to the presence of Jupiter-sized short-period transiting planets around M dwarfs. The non-detection of a hot-Jupiter around an M dwarf by the WFCAM Transit Survey allows us to place a firm upper limit of 1.9 per cent (at 95 per cent confidence on the planet occurrence rate.