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Sample records for hot laboratory processes

  1. Hot Laboratories and Remote Handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bart, G.; Blanc, J.Y.; Duwe, R.

    2003-01-01

    divided in two parts: - First, a mutual share of real examples about the 'life' in hot laboratories: waste management, decommissioning and release, safety; - Second, a presentation of tools or facilities dealing with PIE or defueling. Special radwaste management was presented by: - ISPRA, for heavy water; - IFE Kjeller, for old stored steel waste; - FZ Juelich presented an example of decommissioning and re-opening of hot laboratories; - IFE Kjeller presented a synthesis of two questionnaires sent to European Hot Laboratories on 'the fire preparedness measures in buildings with hot laboratories'; - The creep test device settled in K6 LECI Hot Cells in CEA at the Saclay site was also described; - ITU Karlsruhe/FZ Juelich presented experimental details and results from a study on a Vicker hardness test; - CEA/Valrho presented the two newest facilities of Atalante; Session 3 - Prospective Research on Materials for Future Applications comprised four presentations concerning the development of future gas cooled reactors and the materials research for nuclear fusion plants, namely: - E.H. Toscano (European Commission, ITU-Karlsruhe,Germany) who described a new facility to measure the fission product inventory; - V. Basini (CEA Cadarache, France) who presented results of HTR fuel development and innovative elaboration processes of fuel particles; - M. Roedig (FZJ, Juelich, Germany) reported on post irradiation experiments on plasma facing materials and miniaturized components for the next step fusion device ITER; - J. P. Coad (EFDA-JET, Abingdon, U.K.) who gave an overview on the tritium related technology programs at JET

  2. Laboratory evaluation of hot metal de siliconizing process in ladle; Avaliacao laboratorial do processo de dessiliciacao do gusa na panela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passos, Sergio R.M.; Furtado, Henrique S.; Bentes, Miguel A.G.; Almeida, Pedro S. de [Companhia Siderurgica Nacional, Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1996-12-31

    The attractiveness of hot metal de siliconizing in ladle, relative to the process in blast furnace runner, is the previous knowledge of silicon content of hot metal, without the constraints of slag removing by skimmer met in torpedo car, and the better efficiency in low range silicon content, making easier the process controllability. Meanwhile, the main question about this technology is the extent of the resulfurization of hot metal that may occur due to process be performed after the desulfurization. This work simulates de de siliconizing process in ladle by experiments in induction furnace to compare the efficiencies of various de siliconizing agents available at CSN iron and steel making plant, and to evaluate the resulfurization intensity able to occur during the process, as well as, unexpected increasing of refractory wear. (author) 4 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. The design of hot laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The need for specialized laboratories to handle radioactive substances of high activity has increased greatly due to the expansion of the nuclear power industry and the widespread use of radioisotopes in scientific research and technology. Such laboratories, which are called hot laboratories, are specially designed and equipped to handle radioactive materials of high activity, including plutonium and transplutonium elements. The handling of plutonium and transplutonium elements presents special radiation-protection and safety problems because of their high specific activity and high radiotoxicity. Therefore, the planning, design, construction and operation of hot laboratories must meet the stringent safety, containment, ventilation, shielding, criticality control and fire-protection requirements. The IAEA has published two manuals in its Safety Series, one on the safety aspects of design and equipment of hot laboratories (SS No.30) and the other on the safe handling of plutonium (SS No.39). The purpose of the symposium in Otaniemi was to collect information on recent developments in the safety features of hot laboratories and to review the present state of knowledge. A number of new developments have taken place as the result of growing sophistication in the philosophy of radiation protection as given in the ICRP recommendations (Report No.22) and in the Agency's basic safety standards (No.9). The topics discussed were safety features of planning and design, air cleaning, transfer and transport systems, criticality control, fire protection, radiological protection, waste management, administrative arrangements and operating experience

  4. Hot Laboratories and Remote Handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Opening talk of the workshop 'Hot Laboratories and Remote Handling' was given by Marin Ciocanescu with the communication 'Overview of R and D Program in Romanian Institute for Nuclear Research'. The works of the meeting were structured into three sections addressing the following items: Session 1. Hot cell facilities: Infrastructure, Refurbishment, Decommissioning; Session 2. Waste, transport, safety and remote handling issues; Session 3. Post-Irradiation examination techniques. In the frame of Section 1 the communication 'Overview of hot cell facilities in South Africa' by Wouter Klopper, Willie van Greunen et al, was presented. In the framework of the second session there were given the following four communications: 'The irradiated elements cell at PHENIX' by Laurent Breton et al., 'Development of remote equipment for DUPIC fuel fabrication at KAERI', by Jung Won Lee et al., 'Aspects of working with manipulators and small samples in an αβγ-box, by Robert Zubler et al., and 'The GIOCONDA experience of the Joint Research Centre Ispra: analysis of the experimental assemblies finalized to their safe recovery and dismantling', by Roberto Covini. Finally, in the framework of the third section the following five communications were presented: 'PIE of a CANDU fuel element irradiated for a load following test in the INR TRIGA reactor' by Marcel Parvan et al., 'Adaptation of the pole figure measurement to the irradiated items from zirconium alloys' by Yury Goncharenko et al., 'Fuel rod profilometry with a laser scan micrometer' by Daniel Kuster et al., 'Raman spectroscopy, a new facility at LECI laboratory to investigate neutron damage in irradiated materials' by Lionel Gosmain et al., and 'Analysis of complex nuclear materials with the PSI shielded analytical instruments' by Didier Gavillet. In addition, eleven more presentations were given as posters. Their titles were: 'Presentation of CETAMA activities (CEA analytic group)' by Alain Hanssens et al. 'Analysis of

  5. Design and management of hot-laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-09-01

    This document is a manual for the design and management of hot-laboratories. It is composed of three parts. The first part is devoted to the design of hot-laboratories. Items included here are; conceptual design; many regulations which must be considered at design stage; design of cave and its shielding; and the design of building, ventilation, and draining. Many examples of specific designs are presented by figures and photographs. The second part is concerned with the methods of operation management. Organizational structure, scheduling of operation, process management, and regulatory problems are discussed with some examples. Technological problems associated with the operation of a hot laboratory (e.g., manipulator, transfer machine, maintenance, and decontamination) are also discussed based on the authors' experiences. An example of the operation manual is presented for reference. The third part is devoted to the safety management and the training of personnel. The regulations by law are briefly explained. Most of this part is devoted to the problem of monitoring radio-activity. Monitoring of control areas, radio-active wastes, and personal dosage is discussed together with many other specific monitoring problems. As for training, the purpose and the present status are explained. (Aoki, K.)

  6. Radiological design of hot laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unruh, C.M.

    1976-04-01

    The fundamental design objectives for a laboratory where work with highly radioactive and highly toxic materials, such as plutonium and transplutonium nuclides, is performed are (1) to accomplish the purpose of the laboratory; (2) to protect the environment, (3) to provide safe working conditions; and (4) to keep radiation exposure to staff as low as practicable. The major planning and design features of a well engineered plutonium or transplutonium laboratory are given

  7. Radiological design of hot laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unruh, C.M.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental design objectives for a laboratory where work with highly radioactive and highly toxic materials, such as plutonium and transplutonium nuclides, is performed, are (1) to accomplish the purpose of the laboratory, (2) to protect the environment, (3) to provide safe working conditions, and (4) to keep radiation exposure to staff as low as practicable. The major planning and design features of well-engineered plutonium or transplutonium laboratory are given. (author)

  8. Development and efficiency assessment of process lubrication for hot forging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargin, S.; Artyukh, Viktor; Ignatovich, I.; Dikareva, Varvara

    2017-10-01

    The article considers innovative technologies in testing and production of process lubricants for hot bulk forging. There were developed new compositions of eco-friendly water-graphite process lubricants for hot extrusion and forging. New approaches to efficiency assessment of process lubricants are developed and described in the following article. Laboratory and field results are presented.

  9. Fuels Processing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Fuels Processing Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, provides researchers with the equipment they need to thoroughly explore the catalytic issues associated with...

  10. Physical processes in hot cosmic plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabian, A.G.; Giovannelli, F.

    1990-01-01

    The interpretation of many high energy astrophysical phenomena relies on a detailed knowledge of radiation and transport processes in hot plasmas. The understanding of these plasma properties is one of the aims of terrestrial plasma physics. While the microscopic properties of astrophysical plasmas can hardly be determined experimentally, laboratory plasmas are more easily accessible to experimental techniques, but transient phenomena and the interaction of the plasma with boundaries often make the interpretation of measurements cumbersome. This book contains the talks given at the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on astro- and plasma-physics in Vulcano, Sicily, May 29-June 2, 1989. The book focuses on three main areas: radiation transport processes in hot (astrophysical and laboratory) plasmas; magnetic fields; their generation, reconnection and their effects on plasma transport properties; relativistic and ultra-high density plasmas

  11. Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL)�is a scientific facility funded by DOE to create and implement innovative processes for environmental clean-up and...

  12. New facilities of the ECN hot cell laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duijves, K.A.; Konings, R.J.M.

    1996-04-01

    A description is given of two recent expansions of the ECN Hot Cell Laboratory in Petten; a production facility for molybdenum-99 and an actinide laboratory, a special facility to investigate unirradiated alpha- and beta-active samples. (orig.)

  13. Fire preparedness measures in buildings with hot laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberlaender, B.C.

    2003-01-01

    Important hot laboratory safety issues are the general design/construction of the building with respect to fire, fire prevention, fire protection, administrative controls, and risk assessment. Within the network of the European Working Group Hot Laboratories and Remote Handling items concerning 'fire preparedness measures in hot laboratories' were screened and studied. Two questionnaires were sent to European hot laboratories; the first in November 2002 on 'fire preparedness measures, fire detection and fire suppression/extinguishing in lead shielded cells, concrete shielded cells' and the second in June 2003 on 'Fire preparedness measures in buildings with hot laboratories'. The questionnaires were filled in by a total of ten hot laboratories in seven European countries. On request of participants the answers were evaluated and 'anonymised' for presentation and discussion at the plenary meeting. The answers showed that many European hot laboratories are implementing improvements to their fire protection programmes to comply with more stringent requirements of the national authorities. The recommendations ('International guidelines for the fire protection of Nuclear Power Plants') given by the insurance pools are followed up with national variations. An ISO standard (ISO 17873) is in progress giving criteria for the design and the operation of ventilation systems as well as fire hazard management in nuclear installations others than reactors

  14. Process innovation laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles

    2007-01-01

    to create a new methodology for developing and exploring process models and applications. The paper outlines the process innovation laboratory as a new approach to BPI. The process innovation laboratory is a comprehensive framework and a collaborative workspace for experimenting with process models....... The process innovation laboratory facilitates innovation by using an integrated action learning approach to process modelling in a controlled environment. The study is based on design science and the paper also discusses the implications to EIS research and practice......Most organizations today are required not only to operate effective business processes but also to allow for changing business conditions at an increasing rate. Today nearly every business relies on their enterprise information systems (EIS) for process integration and future generations of EIS...

  15. Refurbishment of an Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, K.; Henslee, S.P.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Coleman, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    An Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell (ALHC) Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) was in service for nearly thirty years. In order to comply with DOE regulations governing such facilities and meet ANL-W programmatic requirements, a major refurbishment effort was undertaken. All penetrations within the facility were sealed; the ventilation system was redesigned, upgraded and replaced; the manipulators were replaced; the hot cell windows were removed, refurbished, and reinstalled; all hot cell utilities were replaced; a lead-shielded glovebox housing an Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES) System was interfaced with the hot cells, and a new CO2 fire suppression system and other ALHC support equipment were installed

  16. Laboratory procedures used in the hot corrosion project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeys, T.R.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the Hot Corrosion Project in the LLNL Metals and Ceramics Division is to study the physical and chemical mechanisms of corrosion of nickel, iron, and some of their alloys when these metals are subjected to oxidizing or sulfidizing environments at temperatures between 850 and 950 0 C. To obtain meaningful data in this study, we must rigidly control many parameters. Parameters are discussed and the methods chosen to control them in this laboratory. Some of the mechanics and manipulative procedures that are specifically related to data access and repeatability are covered. The method of recording and processing the data from each experiment using an LS-11 minicomputer are described. The analytical procedures used to evaluate the specimens after the corrosion tests are enumerated and discussed

  17. Encapsulation of tritiated wastes in hot laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayet, L.; Bourdinaud, P.

    1982-06-01

    From 1962 to 1976, one of the laboratories called ''Cellule 4'', was equipped to produce large quantities of tritium. The decisions taken in June 1976 to redirect the activities of the Radioisotopes Department included the suspension of the tritium activities of ''Cellule 4'' at the Saclay Nuclear Research Center. From 1976 to 1981, many CEA departments contributed to the design and implementation of a packaging procedure for tritiated wastes resulting from the dismantling of ''Cellule 4''. A classification into three groups was adopted for this purpose. (1) Packaging in a welded stainless steel container. (2) Packaging in a reinforced concrete shell lined internally with a thick coat of epoxy resin charged with sand. (3) Packaging in a reinforced concrete shell lined internally with a thin coat of epoxy resin. The dismantling operations were carried out in three phases. (1) (2 1/2 months): the T activity remained unchanged during this period and waste selection was carried out. (2) (2 1/2 months): waste dismantling and packaging of groups (2) and (3) were carried out in this phase. Activity decayed rapidly. (3) (2 months): the work performed included the loosening and cutting of the general structures [fr

  18. Hot laboratory design on the basis of standardized components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadrot, J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes the principal effects on hot laboratory design brought about over the last 15 years by the use of standardized components developed jointly with the CEA and the industrial associates of AFINE. After a rapid survey of the various advantages of standardization, the author turns to the specific case of a laboratory producing mixed plutonium and uranium oxide fuels, giving a brief description of the glove-boxes and ancillary equipment. He then deals with the design of an isotope production laboratory. The basic component is the DR 200 standard cell, which permits the civil engineering work to be effected on modular principles. Use of a safety-flow pressure regulating valve makes possible pneumatic automation of the production-cell internals. A substantial gain in output is the result. In the next section the paper refers to a pilot facility for irradiated fuel studies, and describes the components used, which require taking into account the high activities and intense radiations encountered in studies of this type. The author then demonstrates the flexibility with which standardized components can be adapted to different uses, thus solving many distinct problems, an example of which is represented by a semi-hot box for handling up to 100g of americium-241. Finally, the paper offers a rapid summary of the effects of standardization at the various stages concerned, from initial design to the commissioning of a hot laboratory. (author)

  19. Upgrades of Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory hot cell facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daubert, R.L.; DesChane, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory operates the 327 Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PITL) and the 324 Shielded Materials Facility (SMF). These hot cell facilities provide diverse capabilities for the postirradiation examination and testing of irradiated reactor fuels and materials. The primary function of these facilities is to determine failure mechanisms and effects of irradiation on physical and mechanical properties of reactor components. The purpose of this paper is to review major equipment and facility upgrades that enhance customer satisfaction and broaden the engineering capabilities for more diversified programs. These facility and system upgrades are providing higher quality remote nondestructive and destructive examination services with increased productivity, operator comfort, and customer satisfaction

  20. Decontamination of an Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Henslee, S.P.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Coleman, R.M.

    1995-11-01

    An Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) had been in service for nearly thirty years. In order to comply with current DOE regulations governing such facilities and meet programmatic requirements, a major refurbishment effort was mandated. Due to the high levels of radiation and contamination within the cells, a decontamination effort was necessary to provide an environment that permitted workers to enter the cells to perform refurbishment activities without receiving high doses of radiation and to minimize the potential for the spread of contamination. State-of-the-art decontamination methods, as well as time-proven methods were utilized to minimize personnel exposure as well as maximize results

  1. Polymer Processing and Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to process and evaluate polymers for use in nonlinear optical, conductive and structural Air Force applications. Primary capabilities are extrusion of...

  2. Hot Chemistry Laboratory decommissioning activities at IPEN/CNEN-SP, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilo, Ruth L.; Lainetti, Paulo E.O.

    2009-01-01

    IPEN's fuel cycle activities were accomplished in laboratory and pilot plant scale and most facilities were built in the 70-80 years. Nevertheless, radical changes of the Brazilian nuclear policy in the beginning of 90's determined the interruption of several fuel cycle activities and facilities shutdown. Since then, IPEN has faced the problem of the pilot plants decommissioning considering that there was no experience/expertise in this field at all. In spite of this, some laboratory and pilot plant decommissioning activities have been performed in IPEN in the last years, even without previous experience and training support. One of the first decommissioning activities accomplished in IPEN involved the Hot Chemistry Laboratory. This facility was built in the beginning of the 80's with the proposal of supporting research and development in the nuclear chemistry area. It was decided to settle a new laboratory in the place where the Hot Chemistry Laboratory was installed, being necessary its total releasing from the radioactive contamination point of view. The previous work in the laboratory involved the manipulation of samples of irradiated nuclear fuel, besides plutonium-239 and uranium-233 standard solutions. There were 5 glove-boxes in the facility but only 3 were used with radioactive material. The glove-boxes contained several devices and materials, besides the radioactive compounds, such as: electric and electronic equipment, metallic and plastic pieces, chemical reagents, liquid and solid radioactive wastes, etc. The laboratory's decommissioning process was divided in 12 steps. This paper describes the procedures, problems faced and results related to the Hot Chemistry Laboratory decommissioning operations and its reintegration as a new laboratory of the Chemical and Environmental Technology Center (CQMA) - IPEN-CNEN/SP. (author)

  3. A university hot laboratory for teaching and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinonen, O.; Miettinen, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    In small countries which have limited material and capital resources there is more need for studying and teaching reactor chemistry in universities than there is in countries with special nuclear research and training centres. A new 150-m 2 laboratory of reactor chemistry was added to the premises of the Department of Radiochemistry, University of Helsinki, in October 1975. It contains a hot area with low-pressure air-conditioning, a sanitary room, a low-activity area, and an office area. The main instrument is a mass-spectrometer MI-1309 equipped with an ion counter which is particularly useful for plutonium analysis. The laboratory can handle samples up-to 10Ci gamma-acitivity - which equals one pellet of a fuel rod - in a sealed lead cell which has an interchangeable box for alpha-active work. Pretreated samples are submitted to chemical separations in glove-boxes. Samples for alpha and mass spectroscopy are also prepared in glove-boxes. Also the laboratory is provided with fume hoods suitable for building lead shields. Radiation protection and special features typical to the university environment are discussed. Methods for verfication of contamination and protection against internal and external contamination are applied. These include air monitoring, analysis of excreta, and whole-body counting. (author)

  4. Decommissioning program and future plan for research hot laboratory (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koya, Toshio; Nozawa, Yukio; Hanada, Yasushi; Ono, Katsuto; Kanazawa, Hiroyuki; Nihei, Yasuo; Owada, Isao

    2010-01-01

    The Research Hot Laboratory (RHL) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was constructed in 1961, as the first one in JAPAN, to perform the examinations of irradiated fuels and materials. RHL consists of 10 heavy concrete cells and 38 lead cells, which had been contributed to research and development program in or out of JAEA for the investigation of irradiation behavior for fuels and nuclear materials. However, RHL is the one of target as the rationalization program for decrepit facilities in former Tokai institute. Therefore the decommissioning works of RHL have been started on April 2003. The decommissioning work will be progressing, dismantling the lead cells and decontamination of concrete caves then release in the regulation of controlled area. The 18 lead cells (including semi-hot cell and junior-cell) had been dismantled. Removal of the applause from the cells, survey of the contamination revel in the lead cells and prediction of radio active waste have been finished as the preparing work for dismantling of the remained 20 lead cells. The future plan of decommissioning work has been prepared to incarnate the basic vision and dismantling procedure. (author)

  5. Surveillance and radiological protection in the Hot Cell laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, J.M.; Torre, J. De la; Garcia C, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The Hot Cells Laboratory (LCC) located in the National Institute of Nuclear Research are an installation that was designed for the management at distance of 10,000 Curies of Co-60 or other radioactive materials with different values in activity. The management of such materials in the installation, implies to analyze and to determine the doses that the POE will receive as well as the implementation of protection measures and appropriate radiological safety so that is completed the specified by the ALARA concept. In this work it is carried out an evaluation of the doses to receive for the POE when managing radionuclides with maximum activities that can be allowed in function of the current conditions of the cells and an evaluation of results is made with the program of surveillance and radiological protection implemented for the development of the works that carried out in the installation. (Author)

  6. Process and equipment development for hot isostatic pressing treatability study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, Ken; Wahlquist, Dennis; Malewitz, Tim

    2015-03-01

    Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA), LLC, has developed processes and equipment for a pilot-scale hot isostatic pressing (HIP) treatability study to stabilize and volume reduce radioactive calcine stored at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). In 2009, the U. S. Department of Energy signed a Record of Decision with the state of Idaho selecting HIP technology as the method to treat 5,800 yd^3 (4,400 m^3) of granular zirconia and alumina calcine produced between 1953 and 1992 as a waste byproduct of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Since the 1990s, a variety of radioactive and hazardous waste forms have been remotely treated using HIP within INL hot cells. To execute the remote process at INL, waste is loaded into a stainless-steel or aluminum can, which is evacuated, sealed, and placed into a HIP furnace. The HIP simultaneously heats and pressurizes the waste, reducing its volume and increasing its durability. Two 1 gal cans of calcine waste currently stored in a shielded cask were identified as candidate materials for a treatability study involving the HIP process. Equipment and materials for cask-handling and calcine transfer into INL hot cells, as well as remotely operated equipment for waste can opening, particle sizing, material blending, and HIP can loading have been designed and successfully tested. These results demonstrate BEA’s readiness for treatment of INL calcine.

  7. Current status and future prospects of JMTR Hot Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Osamu; Ooka, Norikazu; Hoshiya, Taiji

    1999-01-01

    A wide variety of post-irradiation examinations (PIEs) for research and development of nuclear fuels and materials to be utilized in nuclear field is available in three kinds of β - γ hot cells; concrete, lead and steel cells in the JMTR Hot Laboratory (JMTR HL) associated with the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). In addition to PIEs, re-capsuling including re-instrumentation on the irradiated specimen is currently conducted for the power ramping tests of the LWR fuels using the Boiling Water Capsule (BOCA) or for the re-irradiation tests in the different neutron fields (coupling irradiation test). The newly developed techniques by the JMTR HL have provided us with the key information about the irradiation effects on mechanical and physical properties of the specimen in various environments as fission and fusion reactors. These techniques are focused on several topics as follows; (1) miniaturized specimen test as an advanced mechanical test, (2) slow strain rate tensile test (SSRT) and crack propagation measurement in high temperature and pressure water for the study of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) of LWR core internals, (3) handling technique on materials containing tritium for the research and development of tritium breeders and neutron multiplier for fusion reactors, (4) jointing method using the conventional Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding for re-assembling of irradiation capsules and/or re-fabrication of specimen, and (5) Nondestructive examination using ultrasonic wave and infrared thermography for the quantitative evaluation of irradiation embrittlement of structural materials in fission and fusion reactors. As there are various PIE facilities around Oarai site, mutual exchange of PIE information, interchange of researchers and mutual utilization on PIE facilities are desired to raise the scientific and technical potential on PIE and to get the break-through of the study in the field of nuclear applications. (author)

  8. Design and management of hot-laboratories. [Manual]. Hottorabo no sekkei to kanri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-09-01

    This document is a manual for the design and management of hot-laboratories. It is composed of three parts. The first part is devoted to the design of hot-laboratories. Items included here are; conceptual design; many regulations which must be considered at design stage; design of cave and its shielding; and the design of building, ventilation, and draining. Many examples of specific designs are presented by figures and photographs. The second part is concerned with the methods of operation management. Organizational structure, scheduling of operation, process management, and regulatory problems are discussed with some examples. Technological problems associated with the operation of a hot laboratory (e.g., manipulator, transfer machine, maintenance, and decontamination) are also discussed based on the authors' experiences. An example of the operation manual is presented for reference. The third part is devoted to the safety management and the training of personnel. The regulations by law are briefly explained. Most of this part is devoted to the problem of monitoring radio-activity. Monitoring of control areas, radio-active wastes, and personal dosage is discussed together with many other specific monitoring problems. As for training, the purpose and the present status are explained.

  9. 16. Hot dense plasma atomic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Dappen; Totsuji, H.; Nishii, Y.

    2002-01-01

    This document gathers 13 articles whose common feature is to deal with atomic processes in hot plasmas. Density functional molecular dynamics method is applied to the hydrogen plasma in the domain of liquid metallic hydrogen. The effects of the density gradient are taken into account in both the electronic kinetic energy and the exchange energy and it is shown that they almost cancel with each other, extending the applicability of the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac approximation to the cases where the density gradient is not negligible. Another article reports about space and time resolved M-shell X-ray measurements of a laser-produced gas jet xenon plasma. Plasma parameters have been measured by ion acoustic and electron plasma waves Thomson scattering. Photo-ionization becomes a dominant atomic process when the density and the temperature of plasmas are relatively low and when the plasma is submitted to intense external radiation. It is shown that 2 plasmas which have a very different density but have the same ionization parameters, are found in a similar ionization state. Most radiation hydrodynamics codes use radiative opacity data from available libraries of atomic data. Several articles are focused on the determination of one group Rosseland and Planck mean analytical formulas for several single elements used in inertial fusion targets. In another paper the plasma density effect on population densities, effective ionization, recombination rate coefficients and on emission lines from carbon and Al ions in hot dense plasma, is studied. The last article is devoted to a new atomic model in plasmas that considers the occupation probability of the bound state and free state density in the presence of the plasma micro-field. (A.C.)

  10. Current status and future plan of JMTR Hot Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshiya, Taiji; Usui, Takashi; Saito, Jun-ichi; Shimizu, Michio; Nakakura, Yuichi; Mimura, Hideaki; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Ooka, Norikazu

    1999-01-01

    The newly developed techniques by the Hot Laboratory (JMTR HL) have provided for us the key information on behavior of specimens due to mechanical / physical / chemical / synergistic effects of radiation, stress and water for fission and fusion reactor environment. These techniques are focused on several topics as follows; (1) miniaturized specimen test for the development of fusion reactor materials, (2) slow strain rate tensile testing (SSRT) and crack propagation measuring tests for the study of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) of core internals of LWR, (3) handling technique on specimens including tritium for the research and development of tritium breeders and neutron multiplier as fusion blanket materials, (4) joining method using the Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding technique for re-assembling of capsule and re-fabrication of specimen and (5) nondestructive evaluation using ultrasonic wave and infrared thermography for the quantitative evaluation of irradiation brittleness of key components of fission and/or fusion reactor. The mutual exchange of PIE information, interchange of researchers and mutual utilization on PIE facilities are indispensable to raise PIE potentials and to get the break-through in the study of nuclear power. (author)

  11. Safety evaluation report of hot cell facilities for demonstration of advanced spent fuel conditioning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Gil Sung; Choung, W. M.; Ku, J. H.; Cho, I. J.; Kook, D. H.; Park, S. W.; Bek, S. Y.; Lee, E. P.

    2004-10-01

    The advanced spent fuel conditioning process(ACP) proposed to reduce the overall volume of the PWR spent fuel and improve safety and economy of the long-term storage of spent fuel. In the next phase(2004∼2006), the hot test will be carried out for verification of the ACP in a laboratory scale. For the hot test, the hot cell facilities of α- type and auxiliary facilities are required essentially for safe handling of high radioactive materials. As the hot cell facilities for demonstration of the ACP, a existing hot cell of β- type will be refurbished to minimize construction expenditures of hot cell facility. Up to now, the detail design of hot cell facilities and process were completed, and the safety analysis was performed to substantiate secure of conservative safety. The design data were submitted for licensing which was necessary for construction and operation of hot cell facilities. The safety investigation of KINS on hot cell facilities was completed, and the license for construction and operation of hot cell facilities was acquired already from MOST. In this report, the safety analysis report submitted to KINS was summarized. And also, the questionnaires issued from KINS and answers of KAERI in process of safety investigation were described in detail

  12. Hot topics: Signal processing in acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaumond, Charles F.

    2005-09-01

    Signal processing in acoustics is a multidisciplinary group of people that work in many areas of acoustics. We have chosen two areas that have shown exciting new applications of signal processing to acoustics or have shown exciting and important results from the use of signal processing. In this session, two hot topics are shown: the use of noiselike acoustic fields to determine sound propagation structure and the use of localization to determine animal behaviors. The first topic shows the application of correlation on geo-acoustic fields to determine the Greens function for propagation through the Earth. These results can then be further used to solve geo-acoustic inverse problems. The first topic also shows the application of correlation using oceanic noise fields to determine the Greens function through the ocean. These results also have utility for oceanic inverse problems. The second topic shows exciting results from the detection, localization, and tracking of marine mammals by two different groups. Results from detection and localization of bullfrogs are shown, too. Each of these studies contributed to the knowledge of animal behavior. [Work supported by ONR.

  13. The hot cell laboratories for material investigations of the Institute for Safety Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viehrig, H W

    1998-10-01

    Special facilities for handling and testing of irradiated specimens are necessary, to perform the investigation of activated material. The Institute for Safety Research has two hot cell laboratories: - the preparation laboratory and - the materials testing laboratory. This report is intended to give an overview of the available facilities and developed techniques in the laboratories. (orig.)

  14. TWRS tank waste pretreatment process development hot test siting report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howden, G.F.; Banning, D.L.; Dodd, D.A.; Smith, D.A.; Stevens, P.F.; Hansen, R.I.; Reynolds, B.A.

    1995-02-01

    This report is the sixth in a series that have assessed the hot testing requirements for TWRS pretreatment process development and identified the hot testing support requirements. This report, based on the previous work, identifies specific hot test work packages, matches those packages to specific hot cell facilities, and provides recommendations of specific facilities to be employed for the pretreatment hot test work. Also identified are serious limitations in the tank waste sample retrieval and handling infrastructure. Recommendations are provided for staged development of 500 mL, 3 L, 25 L and 4000 L sample recovery systems and specific actions to provide those capabilities

  15. Development of welding technique by remote control at the JMTR Hot Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Michio; Iwamatu, Sigemi; Takada, Humiki

    2000-03-01

    Several kinds of welding techniques have been systematically developed using the remote controlled procedures in the JMTR Hot Laboratory. These are as follows, (1) re-instrumentation's of FP gas pressure gauge and thermocouple to an irradiated fuel rod for the centerline temperature measurement, (2) welding of the un-irradiated/irradiated specimen and machining process to produce tensile test specimens, (3) fabrication of Co-60 radiation source from materials for reactivity adjustment in JMTR core, (4) re-capsuling of irradiated materials in the different types of irradiation facilities. These research and development of circumferential and sealed welding for capsuling and welding of irradiated specimen for re-irradiation were implemented under the remote-controlled conditions in the Hot Cell. These techniques will be very indispensable for supporting the irradiation experiments to be conducted in the JMTR. (author)

  16. Manual on Safety Aspects of the Design and Equipment of Hot Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    With the development of atomic energy application and research, hot laboratories are now being constructed in a number of countries. The present publication describes and discusses experience in several countries in designing equipment for these laboratories. The safe handling of highly radioactive substances is the main purpose of hot laboratory design and equipment. The manual aims at helping those persons, particularly in the developing countries, who plan to design and construct a new hot laboratory or modify an existing one. It does not deal in great detail with the engineering design of protective and handling equipment; these matters can be found in the comprehensive list of references. The manual itself covers only basic ideas and different approaches in the design of laboratory building, hot cells, shielded and glove boxes, fume cupboards, and handling and viewing equipment. Systems for transferring materials and main services are also discussed.

  17. Vaporizing Flow in Hot Fractures: Observations from Laboratory Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneafsey, T.; Pruess, K.

    1998-01-01

    Understanding water seepage in hot fractured rock is important in a number of fields including geothermal energy recovery and nuclear waste disposal. Heat-generating high-level nuclear waste packages which will be emplaced in the partially saturated fractured tuffs at the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, if it becomes a high-level nuclear waste repository, will cause significant impacts on moisture distribution and migration. Liquid water, which occupies anywhere from 30 to 100% of the porespace, will be vaporized as the temperature reaches the boiling temperature. Flowing primarily in fractures, the vapor will condense where it encounters cooler rock, generating mobile water. This water will flow under gravitational and capillary forces and may flow back to the vicinity of the emplaced waste where it may partially escape vaporization. Water flowing down (sub-) vertical fractures may migrate considerable distances through fractured rock that is at above-boiling temperatures; thus, flowing condensate may contact waste packages, and provide a pathway for the transport of water-soluble radionuclides downward to the saturated zone. Thermally-driven flow processes induced by repository heat may be as important or even more important for repository performance than natural infiltration. For a nominal thermal loading of 57 kW/acre, vaporization may generate an average equivalent percolation flux from condensate of 23.1 mm/yr over 1,000 years, and 5.2 mm/yr over 10,000 years. These numbers are comparable to or larger than current estimates of net infiltration at Yucca Mountain. This condensate, which is generated in the immediate vicinity (meters) of the waste packages, will likely have a larger impact on waste package and repository performance than a similar amount of water introduced at the land surface

  18. Development status of post irradiation examination techniques at the JMTR Hot Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmi, M.; Ohsawa, K.; Nakagawa, T.; Umino, A.; Shimizu, M.; Satoh, H.; Oyamada, R.

    1992-01-01

    Hot laboratory at Oarai Research Establishment was founded to examine the objects mainly irradiated at JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor) and has been operated since 1971. A wide variety of post-irradiation examinations (PIE) is available using the hot laboratory. Continuous efforts are made to develop new PIE techniques to accommodate the user's requirements. The following are main techniques recently developed in the hot laboratory; 1. Remote capsule assembly including remote weld of irradiated objects for reirradiation in JMTR. 2. Fracture toughness tests of reactor component materials. 3. Creep tests of heat resistance alloys in high temperature conditions. 4. Tests of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). 5. Examination techniques of miniaturized test specimens. This report describes an outline of the hot laboratory with main emphasis on the new PIE techniques. (author)

  19. Report on operation utilization and technical development of research reactors and hot laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    Activities of the Division of Research Reactor Operation in fiscal 1980 are described. The division is responsible for operation and maintenance of JRR-2, JRR-3, JRR-4 and Hot Laboratory. In the above connection, various other works are performed, including technical management of fuel and coolant, radiation control, irradiation technique, etc. In Hot Laboratory, postirradiation examinations of fuels and materials are made, and also development of examination methods. (author)

  20. Report on operation, utilization and technical development of research reactors and hot laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    Activities of the Division of Research Reactor Operation in fiscal 1978 are described. The division is responsible for operation and maintenance of JRR-2, JRR-3, JRR-4 and Hot Laboratory. In the above connection, various other works are performed, including technical management of fuel and coolant, radiation control, irradiation technique, etc. In Hot Laboratory, postirradiation examinations of fuels and materials are made, and also development of examination methods. (author)

  1. Report on operation, utilization and technical development of Research Reactors and Hot Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    Activities of the Division of Research Reactor Operation in fiscal 1981 are described. The division is responsible for operation and maintenance of JRR-2, JRR-3, JRR-4 and Hot Laboratory. In the above connection, various other works are performed, including technical management of fuel and coolant, radiation control, irradiation technique, etc. In Hot Laboratory, postirradiation examinations of fuels and materials are made, and also development of examination methods. (author)

  2. Radiation monitoring programme in a university hot laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillander, M.; Heinonen, O.J.

    1979-01-01

    The Department of Radiochemistry in the University of Helsinki is the only institute teaching radiochemistry at the university level in Finland. The research programme of the Deparment must therefore include the uses of radiation and radionuclides in many branches of science. The students must receive adequate instruction in radiation protection for safe work in laboratories. This also has the educational benefit that the radiochemists will subsequently be able to observe the necessary safety precautions when employing ionizing radiation professionally. The Department of Radiochemistry consists of the following laboratories: a radiotracer laboratory, a neutron/electron and a gamma irradiation laboratory, an environmental low activity level laboratory, a whole-body counting laboratory, a reactor chemistry laboratory and a waste-treatment facility. The radiation protection organization of the Department is presented. Various methods of monitoring, including advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the reactor chemistry laboratory where transuranic elements are utilized. These elements are highly radiotoxic and their monitoring in most cases requires destructive analysis. Different methods of determining external and internal doses are evaluated with regard to sensitivity and accuracy. Detection limits for radionuclides utilized in the laboratory are presented for different measurement systems, including non-destructive monitoring, spectrometry after chemical analysis, liquid scintillation counting and low-energy gamma spectrometry using a CsI-NaI scintillation detector. The guidelines laid down in the IAEA Safety Series Manuals are discussed in the light of practical experience. (author)

  3. Laboratory observation of hot bands of H+3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bawendi, M.G.; Rehfuss, B.D.; Oka, T.

    1990-01-01

    The (2ν 2 ,l=2 left-arrow ν 2 ), (2ν 2 ,l=0 left-arrow ν 2 ), and (ν 1 +ν 2 left-arrow ν 1 ) hot bands of H + 3 were observed. The vibrationally hot ions were produced in a liquid nitrogen cooled 6 kHz ac discharge using gas mixtures of H 2 and He. The spectra were detected in direct absorption using a newly extended tunable difference frequency spectrometer using both LiNbO 3 and LiIO 3 crystals as nonlinear optical elements. The range of this spectrometer is now ∼5300--∼1900 cm -1 . The positions of the rovibrational transitions compare extremely well with the theoretical predictions of Miller and Tennyson. A vibrational temperature study of the discharge indicates a significant population inversion between the ν 1 and ν 2 levels

  4. The Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing - LAMP - is a clean-room research facility run and operated by Pr. Gary Rubloff's group. Research activities focus...

  5. Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.

    2013-07-01

    Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the ARBI team validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. In addition to completing validation activities, this project looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. Based on these datasets, we conclude that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws. This has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

  6. Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backman, C. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Hoeschele, M. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the Building America research team ARBI validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. This project also looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. The team concluded that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws, which has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

  7. Alpha-Gamma Hot-Cell Facility at Argonne National Laboratory East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neimark, L.A.; Jackson, W.D.; Donahue, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    The Alpha-Gamma Hot-Cell Facility has been in operation at Argonne National Laboratory East (ANL-E) for 15 years. The facility was designed for plutonium research in support of ANL's LMFBR program. The facility consists of a kilocurie, nitrogen-atmosphere alpha-gamma hot cell and supporting laboratories. Modifications to the facility and its equipment have been made over the years as the workload and nature of the work changed. These modifications included inerting the entire hot cell, adding four work stations, modifying in-loading procedures and examination equipment to handle longer test articles, and changing to a new sodium-vapor lighting system. Future upgrading includes the addition of a decontamination and repair facility, use of radio-controlled transfer carts, refurbishment of the zinc bromide windows, and the installation of an Auger microprobe

  8. 25th-year jubilee edition of the Hot Laboratory's annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bart, G.

    1989-07-01

    The topics discussed in this report concern the history of PSI's Hot Laboratory, nuclear fuel development performed there during the last twenty years, post irradiation examination work, basic research for a final repository of radioactive wastes, and neutron embrittlement experiments. 44 figs., 1 tab., 82 refs

  9. KINETICS PROCESSES OF DEHYDRATION AND HEATING FISH DURING FRYING, DURING SEMI HOT AND HOT SMOKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Pokholchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Calculated methods of graphing of curves for kinetics of dehydration and fish heating during the processes of frying, semi hot smoking and hot smoking have been developed. The offered methods of calculating are based on the basic regularities of heat and mass exchanges of these processes. Based on the research of the regularities of dehydration on the kinetic curves, critical points were identified, that characterize the transition from the moisture removal with lower energy of its bond with material to the removal of one with higher energy bond, also the influence of the product shrinkage on the velocity of the moisture removal. These points are characteristic for the temperature curves as well. It’s suggested for the temperature curve to be replaced by broken line that consists of three straight lines that are crossing in points, corresponded with the critical moistures and critical temperatures. Significant amount of the experimental material of the research of the kinetics of dehydration and fish heating under different modes is shown by authors in the form of generalized dependencies. The method allows modeling the processes of heating and dehydrating of fish and choosing the most rational modes based on the calculated data. The proposed technique makes it possible to construct the curves of the kinetics of heating and dehydration kinetics in processes of roasting, semi hot and hot smoked fish, which allows to optimize a particular process, design more efficient in terms of consumption of raw materials and energy technology, as well as to create better machines or upgrade existing equipment into account the relationship of heat and mass transfer processes.

  10. Process considerations for hot pressing ceramic nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.; Brite, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    Spray calcined simulated ceramic nuclear waste powders were hot pressed in graphite, nickel-lined graphite and ZrO 2 -lined Al 2 O 3 dies. Densification, initial off-gas, waste element retention and pellet-die interactions were evaluated. Indicated process considerations and limitations are discussed. 15 figures

  11. Rockwell International Hot Laboratory decontamination and dismantlement interim progress report 1987-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    1997-01-01

    OAK A271 Rockwell International Hot Laboratory decontamination and dismantlement interim progress report 1987-1996. The Rockwell International Hot Laboratory (RIHL) is one of a number of former nuclear facilities undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The RIHL facility is in the later stages of dismantlement, with the final objective of returning the site location to its original natural state. This report documents the decontamination and dismantlement activities performed at the facility over the time period 1988 through 1996. At this time, the support buildings, all equipment associated with the facility, and the entire above-ground structure of the primary facility building (Building 020) have been removed. The basement portion of this building and the outside yard areas (primarily asphalt and soil) are scheduled for D and D activities beginning in 1997

  12. Processing hot-dip galvanized AHSS grades: a challenging task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichler, A.; Hebesberger, T.; Tragl, E.; Traint, S.; Faderl, J.; Angeli, G.; Koesters, K. [voestalpine Stahl GmbH, Linz (Austria)

    2005-07-01

    High-strength thin sheet steel grades have gained a considerable market share. At present a very strong demand has been observed for DP (dual-phase), CP (complex phase) and TRIP grades, which are often summarized as advanced high-strength steel grades (AHSS). The potential benefits of applying AHSS grades were impressively demonstrated in the ULSAC-AVC project, in which a remarkable reduction in mass and an increase in stiffness and crash safety were achieved by using a very high share of AHSS steel grades. The present contribution concentrates on hot-dip galvanized AHSS thin sheet grades. The hot-dip galvanizeability of such grades is critically discussed after an overview is provided of the metallurgy of AHSS grades, including microstructure, mechanical properties, phase transformations and required alloy design. Based on these fundamentals, the processing of AHSS grades in the hot-dip galvanizing line is discussed and the resulting properties presented. (orig.)

  13. Evaluation of advanced hot conditioning process for PHWRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandramohan, P.; Srinivasan, M.P.; Velmurugan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Hot-conditioning/hot functional test process is carried out to the PHT system of reactor before reactor going to critical/operational. The process is aimed in checking the component functionalities at high temperature and high pressure conditions, the process also checks/removes the suspended corrosion products in heat transport circuit. This process leads to formation of a passive or corrosion oxide film on the heat transport circuit surfaces which protects/mitigates the corrosion of the system circuits during the operation of plant. Major concerned alloy in the Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system of Indian PHWRs during the hot conditioning process and also during operation is the carbon steel due to its high corrosion. Hot-conditioning process mitigates the corrosion of carbon steel by the formation of iron oxide (Fe 3 O 4 ) as major oxide phase layer on the carbon steel surface with a typical thickness of 1.0 μm with particle size of 1μm after 336 h of process at 250 °C. But this passive oxide film thickness increase with time of operation of system with c.a. 10μm for 2.2 EFYP. The protectiveness of passive layer can be further enhanced by reducing the particle sizes in the passive film to nano meter range. The process can impact on the compactness of passive oxide layer with reduced pores in the oxide layer and properties of the nano nature oxide (transport properties) impacting the corrosion mitigation. The corrosion mitigation reduce the source term in the activated corrosion product generation. To achieve this a new process 'Advanced hot conditioning' was developed in water steam chemistry division, BARC for getting a passive oxide film with a lowered particle size in the passive film. The AHC process with 1g/L of PEG-8000 at 250 °C for 336 h showed a particle size <100 nm. The process was tested under the normal operating conditions as function of the time, the corrosion parameter like oxide film thickness, corrosion rate and metal ion

  14. Preliminary safety analysis report for the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OSCAR, DEBBY S.; WALKER, SHARON ANN; HUNTER, REGINA LEE; WALKER, CHERYL A.

    1999-01-01

    The Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) will be a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility used to characterize, treat, and repackage radioactive and mixed material and waste for reuse, recycling, or ultimate disposal. A significant upgrade to a previous facility, the Temporary Hot Cell, will be implemented to perform this mission. The following major features will be added: a permanent shield wall; eight floor silos; new roof portals in the hot-cell roof; an upgraded ventilation system; and upgraded hot-cell jib crane; and video cameras to record operations and facilitate remote-handled operations. No safety-class systems, structures, and components will be present in the AHCF. There will be five safety-significant SSCs: hot cell structure, permanent shield wall, shield plugs, ventilation system, and HEPA filters. The type and quantity of radionuclides that could be located in the AHCF are defined primarily by SNL/NM's legacy materials, which include radioactive, transuranic, and mixed waste. The risk to the public or the environment presented by the AHCF is minor due to the inventory limitations of the Hazard Category 3 classification. Potential doses at the exclusion boundary are well below the evaluation guidelines of 25 rem. Potential for worker exposure is limited by the passive design features incorporated in the AHCF and by SNL's radiation protection program. There is no potential for exposure of the public to chemical hazards above the Emergency Response Protection Guidelines Level 2

  15. Preliminary safety analysis report for the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OSCAR,DEBBY S.; WALKER,SHARON ANN; HUNTER,REGINA LEE; WALKER,CHERYL A.

    1999-12-01

    The Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) will be a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility used to characterize, treat, and repackage radioactive and mixed material and waste for reuse, recycling, or ultimate disposal. A significant upgrade to a previous facility, the Temporary Hot Cell, will be implemented to perform this mission. The following major features will be added: a permanent shield wall; eight floor silos; new roof portals in the hot-cell roof; an upgraded ventilation system; and upgraded hot-cell jib crane; and video cameras to record operations and facilitate remote-handled operations. No safety-class systems, structures, and components will be present in the AHCF. There will be five safety-significant SSCs: hot cell structure, permanent shield wall, shield plugs, ventilation system, and HEPA filters. The type and quantity of radionuclides that could be located in the AHCF are defined primarily by SNL/NM's legacy materials, which include radioactive, transuranic, and mixed waste. The risk to the public or the environment presented by the AHCF is minor due to the inventory limitations of the Hazard Category 3 classification. Potential doses at the exclusion boundary are well below the evaluation guidelines of 25 rem. Potential for worker exposure is limited by the passive design features incorporated in the AHCF and by SNL's radiation protection program. There is no potential for exposure of the public to chemical hazards above the Emergency Response Protection Guidelines Level 2.

  16. Annual report on operation, utilization and technical development of research reactors and hot laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This report describes the activities of the Department of Research Reactor Operation in fiscal year of 1989. It also presents some technical topics on the reactor operation and utilization in details. The Department is responsible for operation of the research reactors, JRR-2 and JRR-4, and the Hot Laboratory. The research reactor JRR-3 was reconstructed to enhance the performance for utilization. The first criticality was achieved on March 22, 1989, and it subsequently went into operation. In connection with the reactor operation, the various research and development activities in the area of fuel management, water chemistry, radiation monitoring and material irradiation have been made. In the Hot Laboratory, post-irradiation examinations of fuels and materials have been carried out along with the development of related techniques. (author)

  17. Hot Corrosion Test Facility at the NASA Lewis Special Projects Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Raymond C.; Cuy, Michael D.

    1994-01-01

    The Hot Corrosion Test Facility (HCTF) at the NASA Lewis Special Projects Laboratory (SPL) is a high-velocity, pressurized burner rig currently used to evaluate the environmental durability of advanced ceramic materials such as SiC and Si3N4. The HCTF uses laboratory service air which is preheated, mixed with jet fuel, and ignited to simulate the conditions of a gas turbine engine. Air, fuel, and water systems are computer-controlled to maintain test conditions which include maximum air flows of 250 kg/hr (550 lbm/hr), pressures of 100-600 kPa (1-6 atm), and gas temperatures exceeding 1500 C (2732 F). The HCTF provides a relatively inexpensive, yet sophisticated means for researchers to study the high-temperature oxidation of advanced materials, and the injection of a salt solution provides the added capability of conducting hot corrosion studies.

  18. Stochastic behavior of cooling processes in hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Oliveira, P.M.; Sa Martins, J.S.; Szanto de Toledo, A.

    1997-01-01

    The collapse of structure effects observed in hot nuclei is interpreted in terms of a dynamic lattice model which describes the process of nucleon (clusters) evaporation from a hot nucleus, predicting the final mass distribution. Results are compared with experimental data for the 10 B+ 9 Be and 10 B+ 10 B reactions, and indicate that the structures observed in the low-energy mass distributions in both simulation and experiment are a consequence of the competition between the residual interactions and the thermalization dissipative process. As a characteristic feature of complex evolving systems, this competition leads to long term memory during the dissipative path, the observables becoming thus insensitive to the actual microscopic interactions. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  19. Fire protection at hot laboratories: Prevention, surveillance and fire-fighting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappellier, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    After pointing out that fire in a hot laboratory can be an important factor contributing to a radioactivity accident, the author briefly recalls the items to be taken into account in a fire hazard analysis. He then describes various important aspects of prevention, detection and fire-fighting which - at the French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique - are governed by already defined rules or by guidelines which are sufficiently advanced to give a clear idea of the final conclusions to be drawn therefrom. From the point of view protection, the concept of fire sector has been evolved, at hot laboratories, becomes the fire and contamination sector, so as to ensure under all circumstances the containment of any radioactive materials dispersed in the premises on fire. Regarding fire detection, a study should be made on the constraints specific to the facility and liable to affect detector operation. These include ventilation, radiations, neutral or corrosive atmosphere, etc. As regards fire-fighting, two particular aspects are dealt with, namely the question of using water in case of fire and action to be taken concerning ventilation. A practical example - the protection of a ventilation system - is described. In conclusion the paper refers to the need for a thorough analysis specific to each hot laboratory, and to the importance of preparing an operational plan so as to avoid any dangerous improvisations in case of an accident. (author)

  20. Residence time modeling of hot melt extrusion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Elena; Podhaisky, Helmut; Ely, David; Thommes, Markus

    2013-11-01

    The hot melt extrusion process is a widespread technique to mix viscous melts. The residence time of material in the process frequently determines the product properties. An experimental setup and a corresponding mathematical model were developed to evaluate residence time and residence time distribution in twin screw extrusion processes. The extrusion process was modeled as the convolution of a mass transport process described by a Gaussian probability function, and a mixing process represented by an exponential function. The residence time of the extrusion process was determined by introducing a tracer at the extruder inlet and measuring the tracer concentration at the die. These concentrations were fitted to the residence time model, and an adequate correlation was found. Different parameters were derived to characterize the extrusion process including the dead time, the apparent mixing volume, and a transport related axial mixing. A 2(3) design of experiments was performed to evaluate the effect of powder feed rate, screw speed, and melt viscosity of the material on the residence time. All three parameters affect the residence time of material in the extruder. In conclusion, a residence time model was developed to interpret experimental data and to get insights into the hot melt extrusion process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Significance of fundamental processes of radiation chemistry in hot atom chemical processes: electron thermalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, M.

    1984-01-01

    The author briefly reviews the current understanding of the course of electron thermalization. An outline is given of the physical picture without going into mathematical details. The analogy of electron thermalization with hot atom processes is taken as guiding principle in this paper. Content: secondary electrons (generation, track structure, yields); thermalization (mechanism, time, spatial distribution); behaviour of hot electrons. (Auth.)

  2. Preliminary draft: environmental impact statement for Hot Engineering Test Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, J.W.; Baxter, B.J.; Carpenter, J.A.

    1978-08-01

    The project considered is the Hot Engineering Test Project (HETP), which is to be located in largely existing facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The project is a part of the National High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Fuel Recycle Program, which seeks to demonstrate the technological feasibility of the recycle processes. The HETP will attempt to confirm the operability of the processes (proven feasible in cold or nonradioactive, benchtop experimentation) under the more realistic radioactive condition. As such, the operation will involve the reprocessing and refabrication of spent HTGR fuel rods obtained from the Fort St. Vrain reactor. The reference fuel is highly enriched uranium. No significant radiological impacts are expected from routine operation of the facility to any biota or ecosystem. Concentrations of one or more radionuclides in Whiteoak Lake will increase as a result of the combination of HETP wastes with other ORNL wastes. Nonradiological effects from construction activities and routine operation should be insignificant on land and water use and on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. No significant socioeconomic impacts should occur from either construction or operation of the facility. Some conservative accident scenarios depict significant releases of radioactivity. Effects should be localized and would not be severe for all but the most unlikely of such incidents. No significant long-term commitment of resources is expected to be required for the project. Nor are any large quantities of scarce or critical resources likely to be irreversibly or irretrievably committed to the project. Principal alternatives considered were: relocation of the project site, postponement of the project schedule, project cancellation, and chemical process variations

  3. Hot deformation behavior of delta-processed superalloy 718

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y., E-mail: wangyanhit@yahoo.cn [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Shao, W.Z.; Zhen, L.; Zhang, B.Y. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} The peak stress for hot deformation can be described by the Z parameter. {yields} The grain size of DRX was inversely proportional to the Z parameter. {yields} The dissolution of {delta} phases was greatly accelerated under hot deformation. {yields}The {delta} phase stimulated nucleation can serve as the main DRX mechanism. - Abstract: Flow stress behavior and microstructures during hot compression of delta-processed superalloy 718 at temperatures from 950 to 1100 deg. C with strain rates of 10{sup -3} to 1 s{sup -1} were investigated by optical microscopy (OM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The relationship between the peak stress and the deformation conditions can be expressed by a hyperbolic-sine type equation. The activation energy for the delta-processed superalloy 718 is determined to be 467 kJ/mol. The change of the dominant deformation mechanisms leads to the decrease of stress exponent and the increase of activation energy with increasing temperature. The dynamically recrystallized grain size is inversely proportional to the Zener-Hollomon (Z) parameter. It is found that the dissolution rate of {delta} phases under hot deformation conditions is much faster than that under static conditions. Dislocation, vacancy and curvature play important roles in the dissolution of {delta} phases. The main nucleation mechanisms of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) for the delta-processed superalloy 718 include the bulging of original grain boundaries and the {delta} phase stimulated DRX nucleation, which is closely related to the dissolution behavior of {delta} phases under certain deformation conditions.

  4. Process waste assessment for the Radiography Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, N.M.

    1994-07-01

    This Process Waste Assessment was conducted to evaluate the Radiography Laboratory, located in Building 923. It documents the processes, identifies the hazardous chemical waste streams generated by these processes, recommends possible ways to minimize waste, and serves as a reference for future assessments of this facility. The Radiography Laboratory provides film radiography or radioscopy (electronic imaging) of weapon and nonweapon components. The Radiography Laboratory has six x-ray machines and one gamma ray source. It also has several other sealed beta- and gamma-ray isotope sources of low microcurie (μCi) activity. The photochemical processes generate most of the Radiography Laboratory's routinely generated hazardous waste, and most of that is generated by the DuPont film processor. Because the DuPont film processor generates the most photochemical waste, it was selected for an estimated material balance

  5. Experimental Validation for Hot Stamping Process by Using Taguchi Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawzi Zamri, Mohd; Lim, Syh Kai; Razlan Yusoff, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    Due to the demand for reduction in gas emissions, energy saving and producing safer vehicles has driven the development of Ultra High Strength Steel (UHSS) material. To strengthen UHSS material such as boron steel, it needed to undergo a process of hot stamping for heating at certain temperature and time. In this paper, Taguchi method is applied to determine the appropriate parameter of thickness, heating temperature and heating time to achieve optimum strength of boron steel. The experiment is conducted by using flat square shape of hot stamping tool with tensile dog bone as a blank product. Then, the value of tensile strength and hardness is measured as response. The results showed that the lower thickness, higher heating temperature and heating time give the higher strength and hardness for the final product. In conclusion, boron steel blank are able to achieve up to 1200 MPa tensile strength and 650 HV of hardness.

  6. Current activities in development of PIE techniques in JMTR hot laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Toshimitsu; Ohmi, Masao; Shimizu, Michio; Kaji, Yoshiyuki; Ueno, Fumiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    A wide variety of post-irradiation examinations (PIEs) for research and development of nuclear fuels and materials to be utilized in nuclear field has been carried out since 1971 in three kinds of β-γ hot cells; concrete, lead and steel cells in the JMTR Hot Laboratory (JMTR HL) associated with the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). In addition to PIEs, the re-capsuling work including re-instrumentation was also conducted for the power ramping tests of the irradiated LWR fuels using Boiling Water Capsule (BOCA). Recently, new PIE techniques are required for the advanced irradiation studies. In this paper, the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) growth test technique of irradiated in-core structural materials and the remote operation technique of the atomic force microscope (AFM) are described as JMTR HL's current activities in the development of new PIE techniques. (author)

  7. Hot laboratory in Saclay. Equipment and radio-metallurgy technique of the hot lab in Saclay. Description of hot cell for handling of plutonium salts. Installation of an hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazire, R.; Blin, J.; Cherel, G.; Duvaux, Y.; Cherel, G.; Mustelier, J.P.; Bussy, P.; Gondal, G.; Bloch, J.; Faugeras, P.; Raggenbass, A.; Raggenbass, P.; Fufresne, J.

    1959-01-01

    Describes the conception and installation of the hot laboratory in Saclay (CEA, France). The construction ended in 1958. The main aim of this laboratory is to examine fuel rods of EL2 and EL3 as well as nuclear fuel studies. It is placed in between both reactors. In a first part, the functioning and specifications of the hot lab are given. The different hot cells are described with details of the ventilation and filtration system as well as the waste material and effluents disposal. The different safety measures are explained: description of the radiation protection, decontamination room and personnel monitoring. The remote handling equipment is composed of cutting and welding machine controlled with manipulators. Periscopes are used for sight control of the operation. In a second part, it describes the equipment of the hot lab. The unit for an accurate measurement of the density of irradiated uranium is equipped with an high precision balance and a thermostat. The equipment used for the working of irradiated uranium is described and the time length of each operation is given. There is also an installation for metallographic studies which is equipped with a manipulation bench for polishing and cleaning surfaces and a metallographic microscope. X-ray examination of uranium pellets will also be made and results will be compared with those of metallography. The last part describes the hot cells used for the manipulation of plutonium salts. The plutonium comes from the reprocessing plant and arrived as a nitric solution. Thus these cells are used to study the preparation of plutonium fluorides from nitric solution. The successive operations needed are explained: filtration, decontamination and extraction with TBP, purification on ion exchangers and finally formation of the plutonium fluorides. Particular attention has been given to the description of the specifications of the different gloveboxes and remote handling equipment used in the different reaction steps and

  8. Defense Waste Processing Facility prototypic analytical laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Policke, T.A.; Bryant, M.F.; Spencer, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Technology (DWPT) Analytical Laboratory is a relatively new laboratory facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). It is a non-regulated, non-radioactive laboratory whose mission is to support research and development (R ampersand D) and waste treatment operations by providing analytical and experimental services in a way that is safe, efficient, and produces quality results in a timely manner so that R ampersand D personnel can provide quality technical data and operations personnel can efficiently operate waste treatment facilities. The modules are sample receiving, chromatography I, chromatography II, wet chemistry and carbon, sample preparation, and spectroscopy

  9. Enhancing the actinide sciences in Europe through hot laboratories networking and pooling: from ACTINET to TALISMAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourg, S.; Poinssot, C.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2004, Europe supports the strengthening of the European actinides sciences scientific community through the funding of dedicated networks: (i) from 2004 to 2008, the ACTINET6 network of excellence (6. Framework Programme) gathered major laboratories involved in nuclear research and a wide range of academic research organisations and universities with the specific aims of funding and implementing joint research projects to be performed within the network of pooled facilities; (ii) from 2009 to 2013, the ACTINET-I3 integrated infrastructure initiative (I3) supports the cost of access of any academics in the pooled EU hot laboratories. In this continuation, TALISMAN (Trans-national Access to Large Infrastructures for a Safe Management of Actinides) gathers now the main European hot laboratories in actinides sciences in order to promote their opening to academics and universities and strengthen the EU-skills in actinides sciences. Furthermore, a specific focus is set on the development of advanced cutting-edge experimental and spectroscopic capabilities, the combination of state-of-the art experimental with theoretical first-principle methods on a quantum mechanical level and to benefit from the synergy between the different scientific and technical communities. ACTINET-I3 and TALISMAN attach a great importance and promote the Education and Training of the young generation of actinides scientists in the Trans-national access but also by organizing Schools (general Summer Schools or Theoretical User Lab Schools) or by granting students to attend International Conference on actinide sciences. (authors)

  10. Experience feedback on the refurbishment of the LECA hot laboratory at Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandjean, Jean-Paul; Autran, Bernard; Blanc, Jean-Yves

    2007-01-01

    Full text: After ten years of renovation work, the LECA hot laboratory refurbishment project has finally been completed which means it is now time to draw a few conclusions. Refurbishment of LECA was needed to enable PIE in this laboratory up to 2015. Improvements were made according to the laboratory safety assessment in March 2001. More than 400,000 working hours were clocked up without any serious accidents. The overall radiological record remained below 0.4 man.Sv for this period despite a high contamination level in the venting system and hot cells. The total fissile mass was decreased by a factor of three, and contamination was also considerably reduced. The project was finalised two years later than expected, mainly due to difficulties with two contracts on civil engineering work to improve seismic resistance and on inserting stainless steel casing into some hot cells. Renovation work on existing structures was underestimated, as was the time required to re-commission the cells. The fact that the total number of external staff working inside the facility at the same time was limited also slowed work down. This delay affected the research programmes mainly over the last two years. On the whole, 85 % of all experimentation activities were nevertheless continued during refurbishment. New steps for refurbishment have already been planned so as to extend the LECA service life once again. A line of lead-shielded cells - not designed to withstand current earthquake standards - will be demolished before the end of 2008, and civil engineering operations have been programmed for 2013-2014 so the facility will be able to withstand a maximum design earthquake. (authors)

  11. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 325 Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1999-03-01

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs.'' This FEMP has been prepared for the RPL primarily because it has a ''major'' (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The RPL at PNNL houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and radioactive mixed waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities within the building include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed radioactive, low-level radioactive, and transuranic wastes generated by PNNL activities

  12. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 325 Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1999-04-02

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs.'' This FEMP has been prepared for the RPL primarily because it has a ''major'' (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The RPL at PNNL houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and radioactive mixed waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities within the building include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed radioactive, low-level radioactive, and transuranic wastes generated by PNNL activities.

  13. HOTLAB: European hot laboratories research and capacities and needs. Plenary meeting 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberlaender, B.C.; Jenssen, H.K. (ed.)

    2005-01-01

    The report presents proceedings from the 2004 annual HOTLAB plenary meeting at Halden and Kjeller, Norway. The goal of the yearly plenary meeting was to: Exchange experience on analytical methods, their implementation in hot cells, the methodologies used and their application in nuclear research. Share experience on common infrastructure exploitation matters such as remote handling techniques, safety features, QA-certification, waste handling, etc. Promote normalisation and co-operation, e.g. by looking at mutual complementarities. Prospect present and future demands from the nuclear industry and to draw strategic conclusions regarding further needs. The main themes of the five topical oral sessions of the Halden plenary meeting cover: Work package leaders report and specific papers, presentation of PIE facility databases, i.e. one worldwide (IAEA) and one inside the European communities. Reports from present and future needs and on nuclear transports. Refabrication and instrumentation: Available equipment, technical characteristics such as fabrication procedures, hot-cell compatibility, and practical experiences. Post irradiation examination: Updated and new remote techniques and methodologies, new materials such as inert matrix fuels, spallation sources and neutron absorber materials. Refurbishment and decommissioning: reports on refurbishment and decommissioning of PIE facilities. Waste and transport: Hot laboratory waste characteristics and handling, spent fuel research. Several posters are presented.

  14. HOTLAB: European hot laboratories research capacities and needs. Plenary meeting 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberlaender, B.C.; Jenssen, H.K.

    2005-01-01

    The report presents proceedings from the 2004 annual HOTLAB plenary meeting at Halden and Kjeller, Norway. The goal of the yearly plenary meeting was to: Exchange experience on analytical methods, their implementation in hot cells, the methodologies used and their application in nuclear research. Share experience on common infrastructure exploitation matters such as remote handling techniques, safety features, QA-certification, waste handling, etc. Promote normalisation and co-operation, e.g. by looking at mutual complementarities. Prospect present and future demands from the nuclear industry and to draw strategic conclusions regarding further needs. The main themes of the five topical oral sessions of the Halden plenary meeting cover: Work package leaders report and specific papers, presentation of PIE facility databases, i.e. one worldwide (IAEA) and one inside the European communities. Reports from present and future needs and on nuclear transports. Refabrication and instrumentation: Available equipment, technical characteristics such as fabrication procedures, hot-cell compatibility, and practical experiences. Post irradiation examination: Updated and new remote techniques and methodologies, new materials such as inert matrix fuels, spallation sources and neutron absorber materials. Refurbishment and decommissioning: reports on refurbishment and decommissioning of PIE facilities. Waste and transport: Hot laboratory waste characteristics and handling, spent fuel research. Several posters are presented

  15. Experience of Integrated Safeguards Approach for Large-scale Hot Cell Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaji, N.; Kawakami, Y.; Koizumi, A.; Otsuji, A.; Sasaki, K.

    2010-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been operating a large-scale hot cell laboratory, the Fuels Monitoring Facility (FMF), located near the experimental fast reactor Joyo at the Oarai Research and Development Center (JNC-2 site). The FMF conducts post irradiation examinations (PIE) of fuel assemblies irradiated in Joyo. The assemblies are disassembled and non-destructive examinations, such as X-ray computed tomography tests, are carried out. Some of the fuel pins are cut into specimens and destructive examinations, such as ceramography and X-ray micro analyses, are performed. Following PIE, the tested material, in the form of a pin or segments, is shipped back to a Joyo spent fuel pond. In some cases, after reassembly of the examined irradiated fuel pins is completed, the fuel assemblies are shipped back to Joyo for further irradiation. For the IAEA to apply the integrated safeguards approach (ISA) to the FMF, a new verification system on material shipping and receiving process between Joyo and the FMF has been established by the IAEA under technical collaboration among the Japan Safeguard Office (JSGO) of MEXT, the Nuclear Material Control Center (NMCC) and the JAEA. The main concept of receipt/shipment verification under the ISA for JNC-2 site is as follows: under the IS, the FMF is treated as a Joyo-associated facility in terms of its safeguards system because it deals with the same spent fuels. Verification of the material shipping and receiving process between Joyo and the FMF can only be applied to the declared transport routes and transport casks. The verification of the nuclear material contained in the cask is performed with the method of gross defect at the time of short notice random interim inspections (RIIs) by measuring the surface neutron dose rate of the cask, filled with water to reduce radiation. The JAEA performed a series of preliminary tests with the IAEA, the JSGO and the NMCC, and confirmed from the standpoint of the operator that this

  16. Annual report on operation and management of hot laboratories and facilities. From April 1, 2006 to March 31, 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-02-01

    This is an annual report in a fiscal year 2006 that describes activities of the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF), the Waste Safety Testing Facility (WASTEF), the Research Hot Laboratory (RHL) and the other research hot facilities in the Department of Hot laboratories and facilities. In RFEF, destructive examinations of BWR fuel rods and re-assembly were carried out as PIEs for a fuel assembly irradiated for 5 cycles in the Fukushima-2 Nuclear Power Station Unit-1. Mechanical property measurement of high burn-up fuel rods were performed as spent fuel integrity test for long term dry storage in order to formulate guidelines and technical criteria. In WASTEF, Slow Strain Rate Tests (SSRT) and Uni-axial Constant Load Tensile tests (UCLT) of in-core materials in pressurized high-temperature water condition, stress corrosion cracking tests for high-performance fuel cladding material and calorific value measurement of pulse irradiated fuel in NSRR were carried out. In RHL, equipment un-installations and decontamination were performed to lead cells according to the decommissioning plan. And modification of fuel storage room were started in order to utilize the facility for un-irradiated fuel storage after a fiscal year 2007. In addition, management of the other research hot facilities (No.1 Plutonium Laboratory, No.2 Research Laboratory, No.4 Research Laboratory, Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, Uranium Enrichment Laboratory, (Simulation Test for Environmental Radionuclide Migration (STEM), Clean Laboratory for Environmental Analysis and Research (CLEAR) and fuel storage) were carried out. (author)

  17. Certification of the PSI request for the renewal of the operation license for the Hot Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-03-01

    At the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), the Hot Laboratory was built in the years 1961 to 1963 in the former EIR in order to make scientific material analyses on highly radioactive material samples and to prepare diagnostic and therapeutically useful radioisotopes. The 1964 safety report with the request for the granting of the operational warrant was revised for the first time in 2004. Further safety reports and radiation protection plans were produced and accepted by the surveying authorities. The operational regulations were revised and approved on a yearly basis by the PSI direction. The regulations reflect the experience gained in 40 years of safe operation and take new regulations in nuclear energy legislation into account. In the years 2000-2002 the Hot Lab was refitted especially with respect to the fields of radiation and fire protection. Presently, the Hot Lab is used for applied material research on highly radioactive samples which mainly come from nuclear power plants, research reactors and the target stations of the PSI accelerator facilities. The investigations on highly radioactive samples and the handling of large quantities of radioisotopes include the possibility of incidents. The analysis of such incidents shows that the legal safety requirements are satisfied. The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) requirements concerning the protection of personnel, population and environment, as well as the protection against fire, are fulfilled. In the Hot Lab the principle of barriers for the containment of radioactive materials is applied. Open radioactive sources are manipulated in depressurized cells. The air extracted from the cells is filtered before being released to the environment. In the building, the total amount of radioactive materials is limited in order to reduce the exposition of the population in normal operation as well as in case of incidents, and to avoid criticality accidents. Possible weaknesses in this concept can be shown

  18. Simulation of Bimetallic Bush Hot Rolling Bonding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqin Tian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional model of bimetallic bush was established including the drive roller and the core roller. The model adopted the appropriate interface assumptions. Based on the bonding properties of bimetallic bush the hot rolling process was analyzed. The optimum reduction ratio of 28% is obtained by using the finite element simulation software MARC on the assumption of the bonding conditions. The stress-strain distribution of three dimensions was research assumptions to interface deformation of rolling. At the same time, based on the numerical simulation, the minimum reduction ratio 20% is obtained by using a double metal composite bush rolling new technology from the experiment research. The simulation error is not more than 8%.

  19. The Process of Thinking among Junior High School Students in Solving HOTS Question

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakry, Md Nor Bin Bakar

    2015-01-01

    Higher order thinking skills (HOTS) is one of the important aspect of teaching and learning mathematics. By using HOTS, student will be able to acquire a deep understand of mathematical concepts and can be applied in real life. Students ability to develop the capacity of the HOTS is closely related with thinking processes while solving mathematics…

  20. Contaminated Metal Components in Dismantling by Hot Cutting Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesari, Franco G.; Conforti, Gianmario; Rogante, Massimo; Giostri, Angelo

    2006-01-01

    During the preparatory dismantling activities of Caorso's Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), an experimental campaign using plasma and oxyacetylene metal cutting processes has been performed and applied to plates and tubes exposed to the coolant steam of the reactor. The plant (Boiling Water Reactor, 870 MWe) was designed and built in the 70's, and it was fully operating by 1981 to 1986 being shut down after 1987 Italy's poll that abrogated nuclear power based on U235 fission. The campaign concerns no activated materials, even if the analyses have been performed of by use contaminated components under the free release level, not yet taking into account radioactivity. In this paper, the parameters related to inhalable aerosol, solid and volatile residuals production have been, studied during hot processes which applies the same characteristics of the cutting in field for the dismantling programs of Caorso NPP. The technical parameters such as cutting time and cutting rate vs. pipe diameter/thickness/schedule or plate thickness for ferritic alloys and the emissions composition coming from the sectioning are also reported. The results underline the sort of trouble that can emerge in the cutting processes, in particular focusing on the effects comparison between the two cutting processes and the chemical composition of powders captured by filtering the gaseous emission. Some preliminary considerations on methodology to be used during the dismantling have been presented. (authors)

  1. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Cool and Hot Cognitive Processes: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Cobo, María José; Cabello, Rosario; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Although emotion and cognition were considered to be separate aspects of the psyche in the past, researchers today have demonstrated the existence of an interplay between the two processes. Emotional intelligence (EI), or the ability to perceive, use, understand, and regulate emotions, is a relatively young concept that attempts to connect both emotion and cognition. While EI has been demonstrated to be positively related to well-being, mental and physical health, and non-aggressive behaviors, little is known about its underlying cognitive processes. The aim of the present study was to systematically review available evidence about the relationship between EI and cognitive processes as measured through “cool” (i.e., not emotionally laden) and “hot” (i.e., emotionally laden) laboratory tasks. We searched Scopus and Medline to find relevant articles in Spanish and English, and divided the studies following two variables: cognitive processes (hot vs. cool) and EI instruments used (performance-based ability test, self-report ability test, and self-report mixed test). We identified 26 eligible studies. The results provide a fair amount of evidence that performance-based ability EI (but not self-report EI tests) is positively related with efficiency in hot cognitive tasks. EI, however, does not appear to be related with cool cognitive tasks: neither through self-reporting nor through performance-based ability instruments. These findings suggest that performance-based ability EI could improve individuals’ emotional information processing abilities. PMID:27303277

  2. Activity of safety review for the facilities using nuclear material (2). Safety review results and maintenance experiences for hot laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amagai, Tomio; Fujishima, Tadatsune; Mizukoshi, Yasutaka; Sakamoto, Naoki; Ohmori, Tsuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    In the site of O-arai Research and Development Center of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), five hot laboratories for post-irradiation examination and development of plutonium fuels are operated more than 30 years. A safety review method for preventive maintenance on these hot laboratories includes test facilities and devices are established in 2003. After that, the safety review of these facilities and devices are done and taken the necessary maintenance based on the results in each year. In 2008, 372 test facilities and devices in these hot laboratories were checked and reviewed by this method. As a results of the safety review, repair issues of 38 facilities of above 372 facilities were resolved. This report shows the review results and maintenance experiences based on the results. (author)

  3. Antinociceptive effects of voluntarily ingested buprenorphine in the hot-plate test in laboratory rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Sara Hestehave; Munro, Gordon; Brønnum Pedersen, Tina

    2017-01-01

    the animal to a thermal stimulus using a hot plate, significant antinociceptive effects of voluntarily ingested buprenorphine administered in Nutella® were demonstrated. This was evident at doses of 1.0 mg/kg 60 and 120 min post administration (Peffects were not as marked......Researchers performing experiments on animals should always strive towards the refinement of experiments, minimization of stress and provision of better animal welfare. An adequate analgesic strategy is important to improve post-operative recovery and welfare in laboratory rats and mice....... In addition, it is desirable to provide post-operative analgesia using methods that are minimally invasive and stressful. This study investigated the antinociceptive effects of orally administered buprenorphine ingested in Nutella® in comparison with subcutaneous buprenorphine administration. By exposing...

  4. Use of a CO2 pellet non-destructive cleaning system to decontaminate radiological waste and equipment in shielded hot cells at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bench, T.R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper details how the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory modified and utilized a commercially available, solid carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) pellet, non-destructive cleaning system to support the disposition and disposal of radioactive waste from shielded hot cells. Some waste materials and equipment accumulated in the shielded hot cells cannot be disposed directly because they are contaminated with transuranic materials (elements with atomic numbers greater than that of uranium) above waste disposal site regulatory limits. A commercially available CO 2 pellet non-destructive cleaning system was extensively modified for remote operation inside a shielded hot cell to remove the transuranic contaminants from the waste and equipment without generating any secondary waste in the process. The removed transuranic contaminants are simultaneously captured, consolidated, and retained for later disposal at a transuranic waste facility

  5. Hot-rolled Process of Multilayered Composite Metal Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU Wei

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available For multi-layer plate, it is a difficult problem to increase product yield rate and improve bonding interface quality. A high yield hot-rolled method of multilayered plate was proposed. The raw strips and plate were fixed by argon arc welding. The combined billet was put into a metal box and vacuum pumped, and then heated and rolled by multi passes at the temperature of 1000-1200℃. The 67 layered plate with the thickness of 2.5mm was successfully produced. The interfacial microstructures and diffusion behavior were investigated and analyzed by optical microscopy and scan electronic microscopy. The tensile and shear strength were tested,and the shear fractures were analyzed. The results show that the multilayered plate yield rate is more than 90% by two steps billet combination method and rolling process optimization. The good bonding interface quality is obtained, the shear strength of multilayered plate reaches 241 MPa. Nickel interlayer between 9Cr18 and 1Cr17 can not only prevent the diffusion of carbon, but also improve the microstructure characteristics.

  6. Materials and fabrication processes for operation in hot hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuffias, R.H.; Duffy, A.J.; Arrieta, V.M.; Abrams, W.M.; Benander, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    Operation in hot (2500 endash 3000 K) hydrogen severely limits the choice of structural materials. Rhenium is nonreactive with and has low permeability to hydrogen, and has sufficient strength up to 2800 K. Carbon, in the form of graphite or carbon composites, has excellent high temperature strength but reacts with hydrogen to form methane at a rapid rate above 2000 K. The carbides of zirconium, niobium, hafnium, and tantalum are nonreactive with and have low permeability to hydrogen, but they can be reliably fabricated only in the form of coatings. In order to demonstrate the Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) solar-thermal propulsion concept, rhenium and rhenium-coated graphite were chosen as the structural materials for the receiver-absorber-converter (RAC) component of the ISUS system. Several methods were investigated for fabricating the rhenium parts and coatings, with chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and Ultramet chosen as the most likely process and company for success. The CVD or rhenium and other refractory materials were thus applied to the ISUS program for fabrication of the RAC subsystem. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  7. Design of the Laboratory-Scale Plutonium Oxide Processing Unit in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meier, David E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tingey, Joel M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Amanda J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Delegard, Calvin H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Edwards, Matthew K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Orton, Robert D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rapko, Brian M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smart, John E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report describes a design for a laboratory-scale capability to produce plutonium oxide (PuO2) for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production, as well as for use as exercise and reference materials. This capability will be located in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The key unit operations are described, including PuO2 dissolution, purification of the Pu by ion exchange, precipitation, and re-conversion to PuO2 by calcination.

  8. Development of a new bench for puncturing of irradiated fuel rods in STAR hot laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitprez, B.; Silvestre, P.; Valenza, P.; Boulore, A.; David, T.

    2018-01-01

    A new device for puncturing of irradiated fuel rods in commercial power plants has been designed by Fuel Research Department of CEA Cadarache in order to provide experimental data of high precision on fuel pins with various designs. It will replace the current set-up that has been used since 1998 in hot cell 2 of STAR facility with more than 200 rod puncturing experiments. Based on this consistent experimental feedback, the heavy-duty technique of rod perforation by clad punching has been preserved for the new bench. The method of double expansion of rod gases is also retained since it allows upgrading the confidence interval of volumetric results obtained from rod puncturing. Furthermore, many evolutions have been introduced in the new design in order to improve its reliability, to make the maintenance easier by remote handling and to reduce experimental uncertainties. Tightness components have been studied with Sealing Laboratory Maestral at Pierrelatte so as to make them able to work under mixed pressure conditions (from vacuum at 10-5 mbar up to pressure at 50 bars) and to lengthen their lifetime under permanent gamma irradiation in hot cell. Bench ergonomics has been optimized to make its operating by remote handling easier and to secure the critical phases of a puncturing experiment. A high pressure gas line equipped with high precision pressure sensors out of cell can be connected to the bench in cell for calibration purposes. Uncertainty analyses using Monte Carlo calculations have been performed in order to optimize capacity of the different volumes of the apparatus according to volumetric characteristics of the rod to be punctured. At last this device is composed of independent modules which allow puncturing fuel pins out of different geometries (PWR, BWR, VVER). After leak tests of the device and remote handling simulation in a mock-up cell, several punctures of calibrated specimens have been performed in 2016. The bench will be implemented soon in hot

  9. Statistical analysis of process parameters to eliminate hot cracking of fiber laser welded aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Wang, Hui-Ping; Wang, Xiaojie; Cui, Haichao; Lu, Fenggui

    2015-03-01

    This paper investigates hot cracking rate in Al fiber laser welding under various process conditions and performs corresponding process optimization. First, effects of welding process parameters such as distance between welding center line and its closest trim edge, laser power and welding speed on hot cracking rate were investigated experimentally with response surface methodology (RSM). The hot cracking rate in the paper is defined as ratio of hot cracking length over the total weld seam length. Based on the experimental results following Box-Behnken design, a prediction model for the hot cracking rate was developed using a second order polynomial function considering only two factor interaction. The initial prediction result indicated that the established model could predict the hot cracking rate adequately within the range of welding parameters being used. The model was then used to optimize welding parameters to achieve cracking-free welds.

  10. Enhancing Students' HOTS in Laboratory Educational Activity by Using Concept Map as an Alternative Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, I. B. A.; Ibrahim, N. H.; Yahaya, N. A.; Surif, J.

    2017-01-01

    Educational transformation in the 21st century demands in-depth knowledge and understanding in order to promote the development of higher-order thinking skills (HOTS). However, the most commonly reported problem with respect to developing a knowledge of chemistry is poor mastery of basic concepts. Chemistry laboratory educational activities are…

  11. Business Process Innovation using the Process Innovation Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles

    for practical applications has not been identified. The aim of this paper is to establish a conceptual framework for business process innovation in the supply chain based on advanced enterprise systems. The main approach to business process innovation in this context is to create a new methodology for exploring...... process models and patterns of applications. The paper thus presents a new concept for business process innovation called the process innovation laboratory a.k.a. the ?-Lab. The ?-Lab is a comprehensive framework for BPI using advanced enterprise systems. The ?-Lab is a collaborative workspace...... for experimenting with process models and an explorative approach to study integrated modeling in a controlled environment. The ?-Lab facilitates innovation by using an integrated action learning approach to process modeling including contemporary technological, organizational and business perspectives....

  12. Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) cleanroom process model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Scott; Basili, Victor; Godfrey, Sally; Mcgarry, Frank; Pajerski, Rose; Waligora, Sharon

    1991-01-01

    The Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) cleanroom process model is described. The term 'cleanroom' originates in the integrated circuit (IC) production process, where IC's are assembled in dust free 'clean rooms' to prevent the destructive effects of dust. When applying the clean room methodology to the development of software systems, the primary focus is on software defect prevention rather than defect removal. The model is based on data and analysis from previous cleanroom efforts within the SEL and is tailored to serve as a guideline in applying the methodology to future production software efforts. The phases that are part of the process model life cycle from the delivery of requirements to the start of acceptance testing are described. For each defined phase, a set of specific activities is discussed, and the appropriate data flow is described. Pertinent managerial issues, key similarities and differences between the SEL's cleanroom process model and the standard development approach used on SEL projects, and significant lessons learned from prior cleanroom projects are presented. It is intended that the process model described here will be further tailored as additional SEL cleanroom projects are analyzed.

  13. Artificial intelligence in the materials processing laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1990-01-01

    Materials science and engineering provides a vast arena for applications of artificial intelligence. Advanced materials research is an area in which challenging requirements confront the researcher, from the drawing board through production and into service. Advanced techniques results in the development of new materials for specialized applications. Hand-in-hand with these new materials are also requirements for state-of-the-art inspection methods to determine the integrity or fitness for service of structures fabricated from these materials. Two problems of current interest to the Materials Processing Laboratory at UAH are an expert system to assist in eddy current inspection of graphite epoxy components for aerospace and an expert system to assist in the design of superalloys for high temperature applications. Each project requires a different approach to reach the defined goals. Results to date are described for the eddy current analysis, but only the original concepts and approaches considered are given for the expert system to design superalloys.

  14. Present status of mechanical testing technology at the Research Hot Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizaki, M.; Tobita, T.; Koya, T.; Kikuchi, T.

    1993-01-01

    Mechanical tests of irradiated metallic materials at the Research Hot Laboratory(RHL) have been carried out for 30 years to support material research in JAERI and to evaluate the irradiation integrity of pressure vessel steel in commercial power plant. Two tensile testing machines and one Charpy impact testing machine are available for the examinations. One of the tensile testing machines has 1000 kgf load capacity under the vacuum of ∼ 10 -7 torr at the temperature of 1300degC max.. The other one has 10 tonf load capacity, and is utilized for the multi-purpose tests such as tensile and compressive tests in air atmosphere at the temperature between -160 and 900degC. Examinations cover tensile test, bending test, J ic fracture toughness test, low cycle fatigue test and so on. Charpy impact testing machine with notched-bar specimen is instrumented with 30 kgf-m capacity in the temperature range of -140 - 240 degC. To support these mechanical tests in RHL, special jigs, devices and instruments have been developed. (author)

  15. Basic actinide chemistry and physics research in close cooperation with hot laboratories: ACTILAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, K; Konashi, K; Fujii, T; Uehara, A; Nagasaki, S; Ohtori, N; Tokunaga, Y; Kambe, S

    2010-01-01

    Basic research in actinide chemistry and physics is indispensable to maintain sustainable development of innovative nuclear technology. Actinides, especially minor actinides of americium and curium, need to be handled in special facilities with containment and radiation shields. To promote and facilitate actinide research, close cooperation with the facilities and sharing of technical and scientific information must be very important and effective. A three-year-program B asic actinide chemistry and physics research in close cooperation with hot laboratories , ACTILAB, was started to form the basis of sustainable development of innovative nuclear technology. In this program, research on actinide solid-state physics, solution chemistry and solid-liquid interface chemistry is made using four main facilities in Japan in close cooperation with each other, where basic experiments with transuranium elements can be made. The 17 O-NMR measurements were performed on (Pu 0.91 Am 0.09 )O 2 to study the electronic state and the chemical behaviour of Am and Cm ions in electrolyte solutions was studied by distribution experiments.

  16. Hot Cell Facility modifications at Sandia National Laboratories to support 99Mo production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernon, M.; Philbin, J.; Berry, D.

    1997-01-01

    In September, 1996, following the completion of an extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), a record of decision (ROD) was issued by DOE selecting Sandia as the facility to take on the 99 Mo production mission. 99 Mo is the precursor to 99m Tc which is used in 36,000 medical procedures per day in the US. to meet US 99 Mo medical demands, 20 kCi of 99 Mo must be delivered to the pharmaceutical companies each week. This could be accomplished by the processing of twenty-five targets (total fission product of 15 kCi/target) each week within the SNL Hot Cell Facility (HCF). To accomplish this new mission, significant modifications to the HCF will have to be undertaken. This paper presents a brief history of the HCF, and describes modifications necessary to achieve DOE directives

  17. Processing laboratory of radio sterilized biological tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguirre H, Paulina; Zarate S, Herman; Silva R, Samy; Hitschfeld, Mario

    2005-01-01

    The nuclear development applications have also reached those areas related to health. The risk of getting contagious illnesses through applying biological tissues has been one of the paramount worries to be solved since infectious illnesses might be provoked by virus, fungis or bacterias coming from donors or whether they have been introduced by means of intermediate stages before the use of these tissues. Therefore it has been concluded that the tissue allografts must be sterilized. The sterilization of medical products has been one of the main applications of the ionizing radiations and that it is why the International Organization of Atomic Energy began in the 70s promoting works related to the biological tissue sterilization and pharmaceutical products. The development of different tissue preservation methods has made possible the creation of tissue banks in different countries, to deal with long-term preservation. In our country, a project was launched in 1998, 'Establishment of a Tissue Bank in Latino america', this project was supported by the OIEA through the project INT/ 6/ 049, and was the starting of the actual Processing Laboratory of Radioesterilized Biological Tissues (LPTR), leaded by the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN). This first organization is part of a number of entities compounding the Tissue Bank in Chile, organizations such as the Transplantation Promotion Corporation hospitals and the LPTR. The working system is carried out by means of the interaction between the hospitals and the laboratory. The medical professionals perform the procuring of tissues in the hospitals, then send them to the LPTR where they are processed and sterilized with ionizing radiation. The cycle ends up with the tissues return released to the hospitals, where they are used, and then the result information is sent to the LPTR as a form of feedback. Up to now, human skin has been processed (64 donors), amniotic membranes (35 donors) and pig skin (175 portions

  18. In-process weld sampling during hot end welds of type W overpacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, G.A.

    1998-01-01

    Establish the criteria and process controls to be used in obtaining, testing, and evaluating in-process weld sample during the hot end welding of Type W Overpack capsules used to overpack CsCl capsules for storage at WESF

  19. Laboratory Simulations of Martian and Venusian Aeolian Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, Ronald

    1999-01-01

    With the flyby of the Neptune system by Voyager, the preliminary exploration of the Solar System was accomplished. Data have been returned for all major planets and satellites except the Pluto system. Results show that the surfaces of terrestrial planets and satellites have been subjected to a wide variety of geological processes. On solid- surface planetary objects having an atmosphere, aeolian processes are important in modifying their surfaces through the redistribution of fine-grained material by the wind. Bedrock may be eroded to produce particles and the particles transported by wind for deposition in other areas. This process operates on Earth today and is evident throughout the geological record. Aeolian processes also occur on Mars, Venus, and possibly Titan and Triton, both of which are outer planet satellites that have atmospheres. Mariner 9 and Viking results show abundant wind-related landforms on Mars, including dune fields and yardangs (wind-eroded hills). On Venus, measurements made by the Soviet Venera and Vega spacecraft and extrapolations from the Pioneer Venus atmospheric probes show that surface winds are capable of transporting particulate materials and suggest that aeolian processes may operate on that planet as well. Magellan radar images of Venus show abundant wind streaks in some areas, as well as dune fields and a zone of possible yardangs. The study of planetary aeolian processes must take into account diverse environments, from the cold, low-density atmosphere of Mars to the extremely hot, high- density Venusian atmosphere. Factors such as threshold wind speeds (minimum wind velocity needed to move particles), rates of erosion and deposition, trajectories of windblown particles, and aeolian flow fields over various landforms are all important aspects of the problem. In addition, study of aeolian terrains on Earth using data analogous to planetary data-collection systems is critical to the interpretation of spacecraft information and

  20. Conceptual design report of hot cell modification and process for fission Mo-99 production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Ho; Choung, W. M.; Lee, K. I.; Hwang, D. S.; Kim, Y. K.; Park, K. B.; Jung, Y. J.; Kim, D. S.; Park, Y. C.

    2001-05-01

    In this conceptual design report, the basic data and design guides for detail design of fission Mo-99 production process and hot cell modification are included.The basic data and design guides for detail design of fission Mo-99 production process contains following contents. -design capacity, the basic process, process flow diagram, process material balance, process data. The basic data and design guides for modification of existing hot cell contains following contents. - plot plan of hot cell facility, the plan for shield reinforcement of hot cell, the plan for management and storage of high level liquid wastes, the plan of ventilation system, the plan for modification of auxiliary facilities. And also, the results of preliminary safety analysis(normal operation and accidents) and criticality analysis are included in this conceptual design report

  1. Conceptual design report of hot cell modification and process for fission Mo-99 production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Ho; Choung, W. M.; Lee, K. I.; Hwang, D. S.; Kim, Y. K.; Park, K. B.; Jung, Y. J.; Kim, D. S.; Park, Y. C

    2001-05-01

    In this conceptual design report, the basic data and design guides for detail design of fission Mo-99 production process and hot cell modification are included.The basic data and design guides for detail design of fission Mo-99 production process contains following contents. -design capacity, the basic process, process flow diagram, process material balance, process data. The basic data and design guides for modification of existing hot cell contains following contents. - plot plan of hot cell facility, the plan for shield reinforcement of hot cell, the plan for management and storage of high level liquid wastes, the plan of ventilation system, the plan for modification of auxiliary facilities. And also, the results of preliminary safety analysis(normal operation and accidents) and criticality analysis are included in this conceptual design report.

  2. Pinellas Plant facts. [Products, processes, laboratory facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-09-01

    This plant was built in 1956 in response to a need for the manufacture of neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. The neutron generators consist of a miniaturized linear ion accelerator assembled with the pulsed electrical power supplies required for its operation. The ion accelerator, or neutron tube, requires ultra clean, high vacuum technology: hermetic seals between glass, ceramic, glass-ceramic, and metal materials: plus high voltage generation and measurement technology. The existence of these capabilities at the Pinellas Plant has led directly to the assignment of the lightning arrester connector, specialty capacitor, vacuum switch, and crystal resonator. Active and reserve batteries and the radioisotopically-powered thermoelectric generator draw on the materials measurement and controls technologies which are required to ensure neutron generator life. A product development and production capability in alumina ceramics, cermet (electrical) feedthroughs, and glass ceramics has become a specialty of the plant; the laboratories monitor the materials and processes used by the plant's commercial suppliers of ferroelectric ceramics. In addition to the manufacturing facility, a production development capability is maintained at the Pinellas Plant.

  3. Discussion of Carbon Emissions for Charging Hot Metal in EAF Steelmaking Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ling-zhi; Jiang, Tao; Li, Guang-hui; Guo, Yu-feng

    2017-07-01

    As the cost of hot metal is reduced for iron ore prices are falling in the international market, more and more electric arc furnace (EAF) steelmaking enterprises use partial hot metal instead of scrap as raw materials to reduce costs and the power consumption. In this paper, carbon emissions based on 1,000 kg molten steel by charging hot metal in EAF steelmaking is studied. Based on the analysis of material and energy balance calculation in EAF, the results show that 146.9, 142.2, 137.0, and 130.8 kg/t of carbon emissions are produced at a hot metal ratio of 0 %, 30 %, 50 %, and 70 %, while 143.4, 98.5, 65.81, and 31.5 kg/t of carbon emissions are produced at a hot metal ratio of 0 %, 30 %, 50 %, and 70 % by using gas waste heat utilization (coal gas production) for EAF steelmaking unit process. However, carbon emissions are increased by charging hot metal for the whole blast furnace-electric arc furnace (BF-EAF) steelmaking process. In the condition that the hot metal produced by BF is surplus, as carbon monoxide in gas increased by charging hot metal, the way of coal gas production can be used for waste heat utilization, which reduces carbon emissions in EAF steelmaking unit process.

  4. Dual temperature isotope exchange process using hot feed with liquid recycle from the humidifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulis, G.J.C.A.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to an improvement in the dual temperature substances at two temperatures. It provides hot feed process, which while keeping the water purity advantages offered by a recycle of liquid, reduces the energy requirements of the process saving in capital cost over previous hot feed process, at equal production rate, or conversely which offers a substantial increase in production rate at equal capital costs

  5. Shield wall evaluation of hot cell facility for advanced spent fuel conditioning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, I. J.; Kuk, D. H.; Ko, J. H.; Jung, W. M.; Yoo, G. S.; Lee, E. P.; Park, S. W.

    2002-01-01

    The future hot cell is located in the Irradiated Material Experiment Facility (IMEF) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). It is β-γ type hot cell that was constructed on the base floor in IMEF building for irradiated material testing. And this hot cell will be used for carrying out the Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process (ACP). The radiation shielding capability of hot cell should be sufficient to meet the radiation dose requirements in the related regulations. Because the radioactive sources of ACP are expected to be higher than radioactive sources of IMEF design criteria, the future hot cell in current status is unsatisfactory to hot test of ACP. So the shielding analysis of the future hot cell is performed to evaluate shielding ability of concrete shield wall. The shielding analysis included (a) identification of ACP source term; (b) photon source spectrum; (c) shielding analysis by QADS and MCNP-4C; and (d) enhancement of concrete shield wall. In this research, dose rates are obtained according to ACP source, geometry and hot cell shield wall thickness. And the evaluation and reinforcement thickness of the shield wall about future hot cell are concluded

  6. Non-destructive test for irradiated fuels using X-ray CT system in hot-laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Heemoon; Kim, Gil-Soo; Yoo, Boung-Ok; Tahk, Young-Wook; Cho, Moon-Sung; Ahn, Sang-Bok

    2015-01-01

    To inspect inside of irradiated fuel rod for PIE in hotcell, neutron beam and X-ray have been used. Many hot laboratories in the world have shown the results for NDT by 2-D film data. Currently, computed image processing technology instead of film has been developed and CT was applied to the X-ray and neutron beam system. In this trend, our facility needed to set up X-ray system for irradiated fuel inspection and installed in hotcell with consideration of radiation damage. In this study, X-ray system was tested to be operated with radioactive samples and was performed to inspect fuel rods and observe internal damage and dimensional change. 450kV X-ray CT system was installed in hotcell with modification and tested to check image resolution and radiation damage. The image data were analyzed by 3-D computer software. 8 fuel plates and VHTR rods were inspected and measured internal shape and dimension

  7. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, C.M.; Jain, J.; Owens, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the installation, testing, and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste (HLW) samples in a hot cell environment. The work was completed by the Analytical Process Development (APD) group in accordance with Task Order 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S Laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method

  8. Shielding calculation of a hot cell for the processing of fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, A.C.S. da; Pina, J.L.S. de; Silva, J.J.G. da.

    1986-12-01

    A dose rate estimation is made for an operator of a lead wall, fission products processing hot cell, in a distance of 50 cm from the emission source, at Brazilian Institute of Nuclear Engineering (IEN). (L.C.J.A.)

  9. Hot-crack test for aluminium alloys welds using TIG process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niel, A.; Deschaux-Beaume, F.; Bordreuil, C.; Fras, G.

    2010-06-01

    Hot cracking is a critical defect frequently observed during welding of aluminium alloys. In order to better understand the interaction between cracking phenomenon, process parameters, mechanical factors and microstructures resulting from solidification after welding, an original hot-cracking test during welding is developed. According to in-situ observations and post mortem analyses, hot cracking mechanisms are investigated, taking into account the interaction between microstructural parameters, depending on the thermal cycles, and mechanical parameters, depending on geometry and clamping conditions of the samples and on the thermal field on the sample. Finally, a process map indicating the limit between cracking and non-cracking zones according to welding parameters is presented.

  10. Data processing software for purex plant process control laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kansara, V.P.; Achuthan, P.V.; Sridhar, S.; Ramanujam, A.; Dhumwad, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    A software has been developed at the Fuel Reprocessing Division, Trombay to meet the data processing needs of the Control Laboratory of a reprocessing plant. During the normal plant operations contents of over one hundred process tanks have to be sampled and analysed for regular monitoring. In order to speed up the computation and the reporting of results as well as to obtain the process performance data over a period of time a software has been developed. The package has been sucessfully demonstrated and implemented at the Plutonium Plant, Trombay. This has been in continuous use since May 1987 with highly satisfactory performance. The software is a totally menu-driven package which can be used by the laboratory analysts with a few hours of training. The features include data validation involving source tank identification, the nature of the sample, the range of expected results, any duplication in sample numbering etc. Audio indication of deviations from the expected input or output values are given with an option to override in case of abnormal samples. The progress of analysis can be obtained for a given sample at any given time. Incorporated in the software is the help menu for quick reference of analytical protocol to be followed for a given tank/method. The computations for the determinations are carried out after obtaining input values on a screen-form. Th e results can be displayed on the monitor or obtained in the form of a hard copy i n any desired format. (author). 17 figs., 2 refs

  11. Application of processing maps in the optimization of the parameters of a hot working process. Part 1. Theoretical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Omar, A.; Prado, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The hot working processes constitute an important step in the manufacture of components for engineering applications. In the past, the mechanical processing have been used to impart a shape to the engineering materials. More recently, however, the hot working processes are used not only to achieve the required shape but also to impart desirable mechanical and microstructural characteristics by an adequate design of the thermomechanical process. The aim of the present paper is to summarize the general characteristics of the Dynamic Materials Model. In this model, the work piece material under hot working conditions is considered to be a dissipator of power. Also, the extreme principles of irreversible thermodynamics applied to large plastic flow are described to develop a continuum criterion capable to predict the metallurgical instabilities in a hot worked material. (Author) 22 refs

  12. Coercivities of hot-deformed magnets processed from amorphous and nanocrystalline precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Xin; Sepehri-Amin, H.; Ohkubo, T.; Hioki, K.; Hattori, A.; Hono, K.

    2017-01-01

    Hot-deformed magnets have been processed from amorphous and nanocrystalline precursors and their hard magnetic properties and microstructures have been investigated in order to explore the optimum process route. The hot-deformed magnets processed from an amorphous precursor exhibited the coercivity of 1.40 T that is higher than that processed from nanocrystalline powder, ∼1.28 T. The average grain size was larger in the magnets processed from amorphous precursor. Detailed microstructure analyses by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy revealed that the Nd + Pr concentrations in the intergranular phases were higher in the hot-deformed magnet processed from the amorphous precursor, which is considered to lead to the enhanced coercivity due to a stronger pinning force against magnetic domain wall motion.

  13. A method for manufacturing a tool part for an injection molding process, a hot embossing process, a nano-imprint process, or an extrusion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for manufacturing a tool part for an injection molding process, a hot embossing process, nano-imprint process or an extrusion process. First, there is provided a master structure (10) with a surface area comprising nanometre-sized protrusions (11...

  14. Avoiding Carbon Bed Hot Spots in Thermal Process Off-Gas Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soelberg, Nick; Enneking, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Mercury has had various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so is often present in radioactive and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. Test programs performed in recent years have shown that mercury in off-gas streams from processes that treat radioactive wastes can be controlled using fixed beds of activated sulfur-impregnated carbon, to levels low enough to comply with air emission regulations such as the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. Carbon bed hot spots or fires have occurred several times during these tests, and also during a remediation of tanks that contained mixed waste. Hot spots occur when localized areas in a carbon bed become heated to temperatures where oxidation occurs. This heating typically occurs due to heat of absorption of gas species onto the carbon, but it can also be caused through external means such as external heaters used to heat the carbon bed vessel. Hot spots, if not promptly mitigated, can grow into bed fires. Carbon bed hot spots and fires must be avoided in processes that treat radioactive and mixed waste. Hot spots are detected by (a) monitoring in-bed and bed outlet gas temperatures, and (b) more important, monitoring of bed outlet gas CO concentrations. Hot spots are mitigated by (a) designing for appropriate in-bed gas velocity, for avoiding gas flow maldistribution, and for sufficient but not excessive bed depth, (b) appropriate monitoring and control of gas and bed temperatures and compositions, and (c) prompt implementation of corrective actions if bed hot spots are detected. Corrective actions must be implemented quickly if bed hot spots are detected, using a graded approach and sequence starting with corrective actions that are simple, quick, cause the least impact to the process, and are easiest to recover from.

  15. Annual report on operation, utilization and technical development of Research Reactors and Hot Laboratory, from April 1, 1983 to March 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    Activities of the Department of Research Reactor Operation in fiscal year 1983 are described. The department is responsible for operation and maintenance of JRR-2, JRR-3, JRR-4 and Hot Laboratory. In the above connection, various other work has also been performed, such as technical management of fuel and coolant, radiation control, irradiation technique, etc. In Hot Laboratory, we have performed post-irradiation examinations of fuels and materials, and also development of examination procedures, too. (author)

  16. Simulation and analysis of hot forging process for industrial locking gear elevators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarefdoust, M.; Kadkhodayan, M.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper hot forging process for industrial locking gear elevators is simulated and analyzed. An increase in demand of industrial locking gear elevators with better quality and lower price caused the machining process to be replaced by hot forging process. Production of industrial locking gear elevators by means of hot forging process is affected by many parameters such as billet temperature, geometry of die and geometry of pre-formatted billet. In this study the influences of billet temperature on effective plastic strain, radius of die corners on internal stress of billet and thickness of flash on required force of press are investigated by means of computer simulation. Three-dimensional modeling of initial material and die are performed by Solid Edge, while simulation and analysis of forging are performed by Super Forge. Based on the computer simulation the required dies are designed and the workpieces are formed. Comparison of simulation results with experimental data demonstrates great compatibility.

  17. Frictional heating processes during laboratory earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, J.; Passelegue, F. X.; Deldicque, D.; Lahfid, A.; Girault, F.; Pinquier, Y.; Escartin, J.; Schubnel, A.

    2017-12-01

    Frictional heating during seismic slip plays a crucial role in the dynamic of earthquakes because it controls fault weakening. This study proposes (i) to image frictional heating combining an in-situ carbon thermometer and Raman microspectrometric mapping, (ii) to combine these observations with fault surface roughness and heat production, (iii) to estimate the mechanical energy dissipated during laboratory earthquakes. Laboratory earthquakes were performed in a triaxial oil loading press, at 45, 90 and 180 MPa of confining pressure by using saw-cut samples of Westerly granite. Initial topography of the fault surface was +/- 30 microns. We use a carbon layer as a local temperature tracer on the fault plane and a type K thermocouple to measure temperature approximately 6mm away from the fault surface. The thermocouple measures the bulk temperature of the fault plane while the in-situ carbon thermometer images the temperature production heterogeneity at the micro-scale. Raman microspectrometry on amorphous carbon patch allowed mapping the temperature heterogeneities on the fault surface after sliding overlaid over a few micrometers to the final fault roughness. The maximum temperature achieved during laboratory earthquakes remains high for all experiments but generally increases with the confining pressure. In addition, the melted surface of fault during seismic slip increases drastically with confining pressure. While melting is systematically observed, the strength drop increases with confining pressure. These results suggest that the dynamic friction coefficient is a function of the area of the fault melted during stick-slip. Using the thermocouple, we inverted the heat dissipated during each event. We show that for rough faults under low confining pressure, less than 20% of the total mechanical work is dissipated into heat. The ratio of frictional heating vs. total mechanical work decreases with cumulated slip (i.e. number of events), and decreases with

  18. Photochemical process of laboratory uranium wastes recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, O.N.; Barros, M.P. de.

    1984-01-01

    A method for uranium extraction in presence of various aquometallic ions, based on selective photo-reduction of uranium is studied. Some economical advantages in relation with others conventional processes are analysed. (M.J.C.) [pt

  19. Flow behavior of polymers during the roll-to-roll hot embossing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Yujun; Yi, Peiyun; Peng, Linfa; Lai, Xinmin; Lin, Zhongqin

    2015-01-01

    The roll-to-roll (R2R) hot embossing process is a recent advancement in the micro hot embossing process and is capable of continuously fabricating micro/nano-structures on polymers, with a high efficiency and a high throughput. However, the fast forming of the R2R hot embossing process limits the time for material flow and results in complicated flow behavior in the polymers. This study presents a fundamental investigation into the flow behavior of polymers and aims towards the comprehensive understanding of the R2R hot embossing process. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model based on the viscoelastic model of polymers is established and validated for the fabrication of micro-pyramids using the R2R hot embossing process. The deformation and recovery of micro-pyramids on poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) film are analyzed in the filling stage and the demolding stage, respectively. Firstly, in the analysis of the filling stage, the temperature distribution on the PVC film is discussed. A large temperature gradient is observed along the thickness direction of the PVC film and the temperature of the top surface is found to be higher than that of the bottom surface, due to the poor thermal conductivity of PVC. In addition, creep strains are demonstrated to depend highly on the temperature and are also observed to concentrate on the top layer of the PVC film because of high local temperature. In the demolding stage, the recovery of the embossed micro-pyramids is obvious. The cooling process is shown to be efficient for the reduction of recovery, especially when the mold temperature is high. In conclusion, this research advances the understanding of the flow behavior of polymers in the R2R hot embossing process and might help in the development of the highly accurate and highly efficient fabrication of microstructures on polymers. (paper)

  20. Laboratory simulations of lunar darkening processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, B.

    1993-01-01

    It was clear long before the Apollo missions that a darkening process occurs on the moon. However, its nature remains controversial and elusive. Current evidence implies that the darkening is associated with, and is probably caused by, submicroscopic metallic iron in the regolith. Questions discussed at the workshop include: (1) under what conditions will impact vitrification produce a dark glass; (2) what is the role of the submicroscopic metallic Fe (SMFe) in the lunar darkening process; (3) how is the SMFe produced; (4) is there a significant component of the regolith that has been deposited from a vapor, if so, what form is it in, and how can it be recognized, what are its effects on the chemistry of the regolith; (5) how do the processes of impact vitrification, vaporization, sputtering, and SMFe production vary as a function of distance from the sun and location in planetary magnetospheres; and (6) what other processes might affect optical properties. Ices have lower melting and boiling temperatures and sputtering yields several orders of magnitude larger than silicates. Hence, analogous processes will occur to an even greater extent on satellites of the outer planets, and these questions are relevant to those bodies as well.

  1. Controlling Laboratory Processes From A Personal Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, H.; Mackin, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    Computer program provides natural-language process control from IBM PC or compatible computer. Sets up process-control system that either runs without operator or run by workers who have limited programming skills. Includes three smaller programs. Two of them, written in FORTRAN 77, record data and control research processes. Third program, written in Pascal, generates FORTRAN subroutines used by other two programs to identify user commands with device-driving routines written by user. Also includes set of input data allowing user to define user commands to be executed by computer. Requires personal computer operating under MS-DOS with suitable hardware interfaces to all controlled devices. Also requires FORTRAN 77 compiler and device drivers written by user.

  2. Application of powder metallurgy and hot rolling processes for manufacturing aluminum/alumina composite strips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabihi, Majed, E-mail: m.zabihi@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Toroghinejad, Mohammad Reza, E-mail: toroghi@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shafyei, Ali, E-mail: shafyei@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-10

    In this study, aluminum matrix composites (AMC) with 2, 4, 6 and 10 wt% alumina were produced using powder metallurgy (PM), mechanical milling (MM) and vacuum hot pressing (VHP) techniques; then, this was followed by the hot-rolling process. During hot rolling, AMCs with 6 and 10 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were fractured whereas strip composites with 2 and 4 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were produced successfully. Microstructure and mechanical properties of the samples were investigated by optical and scanning electron microscopes and tensile and hardness tests, respectively. Microscopic evaluations of the hot-rolled composites showed a uniform distribution of alumina particles in the aluminum matrix. It was found that with increasing alumina content in the matrix, tensile strength (TS) and hardness increased and the percentage of elongation also decreased. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to investigate aluminum/alumina interfaces and fracture surfaces of the hot rolled specimens after tensile test. SEM observations demonstrated that the failure mode in the hot-rolled Al-2 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite strips is a typical ductile fracture, while the failure mode was shear ductile fracture with more flat surfaces in Al-4 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} strips.

  3. Annual report on operation, utilization and technical development of hot laboratories. From April 1, 1996 to March 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This report describes activities, in fiscal year 1996, of the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF), the Research Hot Laboratory (RHL) and the Waste Safety Testing Facility (WASTEF) which belong to the Department of Hot laboratories. In the RFEF, Post-Irradiation Examinations (PIEs) of PWR fuel assemblies irradiated in the Takahama Unit 3, a BWR fuel assembly irradiated in the Fukusima Daini Unit have been performed. Also, PIEs of assembly materials irradiated in the Fugen Reactor have been carried out. To support R and D works in JAERI, refabrication of segmented fuel rods have been done using irradiated LWR fuel rods for pulse irradiation in the NSRR and re-irradiation tests in the JMTR. PIEs have been performed on high burnup fuel rods and ROX fuel rods. For the RHL, PIEs have been performed on segment fuels irradiated in the NSRR, fuels and materials for HTTR, standard fuels for JRR-3M and materials for nuclear fusion reactor. In addition, a monitoring test of fuel elements in accordance with the surveillance program of the Magnox reactor of the Japan Atomic Power Corporation has been continued. In the WASTEF, leaching tests on TRU in simulated glass forms and a low flow rate tests on glass waste forms have been carried out. The examinations of alpha damage acceleration for the Synroc waste forms have also been performed. (author)

  4. An analysis of hot plate initial temperature effect on rectangular narrow gap quenching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M-Hadi Kusuma; Mulya Juarsa; Anhar Riza Antariksawan; Nandy Putra

    2012-01-01

    The understanding about thermal management in the event of a severe accident such as the melting nuclear reactor fuel and reactor core, became a priority to maintain the integrity of reactor pressure vessel. Thus the debris will not out from the reactor pressure vessel and resulting impact of more substantial to the environment. One way to maintain the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel was cooling of the excess heat generated due to the accident. To get understanding of this aspect, there search focused on the effect of the initial temperature of the hot plate in the rectangular narrow gap quenching process. The initial temperature effect on quenching process is related to cooling process (thermal management) when the occurrence of a nuclear accident due to loss of coolant accident or severe accident. In order to address the problem, it is crucial to conduct research to get a better understanding of thermal management regarding to nuclear cooling accident. The research focused on determining the rewetting temperature of hot plate cooling on 220°C, 400°C, and 600°C with 0.2 liters/sec cooling water flowrate. Experiments were carried out by injecting 85°C cooling water temperature into the narrow gap at flowrates of 0.2 liters/sec. Data of transient temperature measurements were recorded using a data acquisition system in order to know the rewetting temperature during the quenching process. This study aims to understand the effect of hot plate initial temperature on rewetting during rectangular narrow gap quenching process. The results obtained show that the rewetting point on cooling the hot plate 220°C, 400°C and 600°occurs at varying rewetting temperatures. At 220°C hot plate initial temperature, the rewetting temperature occurs on 220°C. At 400°C hot plate initial temperature, the rewetting temperature occurs on 379.51°C. At 600°C hot plate initial temperature, the rewetting temperature occurs on 426.63°C. Significant differences of hot plate

  5. The influences of fluorine and process variations on polysilicon film stress and MOSFET hot carrier effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Lynn E.; Macwilliams, Kenneth P.; Isaac, Mary

    1991-01-01

    The use of fluorinated gate oxides may provide an improvement in nMOSFET reliability by enhancing hot carrier resistance. In order to clarify the mechanisms by which polysilicon processing and fluorination influence the oxide behavior, a matrix of nMOSFET structures was prepared using various processing, doping, and implantation strategies. These structures were evaluated for crystalline morphology and chemical element distribution. Mechanical stress measurements were taken on the polysilicon films from room temperature to cryogenic temperature. These examinations showed that fluorination of a structure with randomly oriented polysilicon can reduce residual mechanical stress and improve hot carrier resistance at room temperature.

  6. Evaluating the effects of compaction of hot mix asphalt on selected laboratory tests

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kekana, SL

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available of the gyratory prepared samples for standard laboratory design mix and the field prepared samples, while the short-term aged (SA) sample shows similar rut rates to the field compacted samples. Early failure was evident after 2 000 wheel passes for the short.... The laboratory design mixed is represented by short-term aged mixed and design mix (fresh mix in the laboratory). The type of mix discussed in this study is summarised in Tables 1 and 2 and Figure 1. Detailed information about the mix is discussed in Denneman...

  7. Handbook of materials testing reactors and ancillary hot laboratories in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to make available to those interested in 'in-pile' irradiation experiments important data on Materials Testing Reactors in operation in the European Community. Only thermal reactors having a power output of more than 5 MW(th) are taken into consideration. In particular, detailed technical information is given on the experimental irradiation facilities of the reactors, their specialized irradiation devices (loops and instrumented capsules), and the associated hot cell facilities for post-irradiation examination of samples

  8. Investigation on field removed pipe sections in the PISC hot laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambini, M.; Crutzen, S.; Jehenson, P.; Bergh, R. Van den; Violin, F.

    1990-01-01

    Action No. 1 of PISC II: Real Contaminated Structures (RCS), seeks to collect results from specific investigations and limited round robin tests on real service induced defects in materials and structures of the primary circuit of Light Water Reactors. The hot cell facilities at JRC-Ispra are fully equipped for non destructive and destructive work on a collaborative basis. Cracked austenitic steel primary circuit pipes coming from the primary circuit of the Muhleberg reactor (Switzerland) have been inspected in order to demonstrate the validity of the facilities to examine these contaminated pieces. (author)

  9. Investigation on field removed pipe sections in the PISC hot laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambini, M.; Crutzen, S.; Jehenson, P.

    1990-01-01

    Action no. 1 of PISC III (Programme for the Inspection of Steel Components): Real Contaminated Structures (RCS), seeks to collect results from specific investigations and limited round robin tests on real service induced defects in materials and structures of the primary circuit of Light Water Reactors. The hot cell facilities at JRC-Ispra are fully equipped for non destructive and destructive work on a collaborative basis. Cracked austenitic steel pipes coming from the primary circuit of the Muehleberg reactor (Switzerland) have been inspected in order to demonstrate the validity of the facilities for the examination of these contaminated pieces

  10. Gear hot forging process robust design based on finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xuewen, Chen; Won, Jung Dong

    2008-01-01

    During the hot forging process, the shaping property and forging quality will fluctuate because of die wear, manufacturing tolerance, dimensional variation caused by temperature and the different friction conditions, etc. In order to control this variation in performance and to optimize the process parameters, a robust design method is proposed in this paper, based on the finite element method for the hot forging process. During the robust design process, the Taguchi method is the basic robust theory. The finite element analysis is incorporated in order to simulate the hot forging process. In addition, in order to calculate the objective function value, an orthogonal design method is selected to arrange experiments and collect sample points. The ANOVA method is employed to analyze the relationships of the design parameters and design objectives and to find the best parameters. Finally, a case study for the gear hot forging process is conducted. With the objective to reduce the forging force and its variation, the robust design mathematical model is established. The optimal design parameters obtained from this study indicate that the forging force has been reduced and its variation has been controlled

  11. Laboratory investigation of the performance properties of hot mix asphalt containing waste glass

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available CSIR is currently undertaking a study on potential utilization of crushed glass as a substitute material to natural aggregate in asphalt mixes. As part of the study, laboratory investigation is needed to determine the performance characteristics...

  12. Waste processing to support 99Mo production at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longley, S.; Carson, S.; McDonald, M.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the isotope production program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), procedures are being finalized for the production of 99 Mo from the irradiation of 235 U-coated stainless-steel targets at the Technical Area (TA) V reactor and hot-cell facilities. Methods have been identified and tested for the management of the nonproduct (waste) material as the final step in the production process. These methods were developed utilizing the waste material from a series of cold and hot tests, beginning with depleted uranium powder and culminating with a test involving an irradiated 235 U target with an initial fission product inventory of ∼18000 Ci at the end of the irradiation cycle. This paper describes the radioactive waste management from the isotope production

  13. Hot-crack test for aluminium alloys welds using TIG process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deschaux-beaume F.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Hot cracking is a critical defect frequently observed during welding of aluminium alloys. In order to better understand the interaction between cracking phenomenon, process parameters, mechanical factors and microstructures resulting from solidification after welding, an original hot-cracking test during welding is developed. According to in-situ observations and post mortem analyses, hot cracking mechanisms are investigated, taking into account the interaction between microstructural parameters, depending on the thermal cycles, and mechanical parameters, depending on geometry and clamping conditions of the samples and on the thermal field on the sample. Finally, a process map indicating the limit between cracking and non-cracking zones according to welding parameters is presented.

  14. Sandia Laboratories technical capabilities: materials and processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundergan, C.D.; Mead, P.L.

    1977-08-01

    Materials and process activities have emphasized the balance between research and development necessary to provide materials compatible with the extreme environments and performance requirements associated with nuclear ordnance. Specific technical areas which have continuing emphasis include metallurgy, composites, surface characterization and thin films, polymers, ceramics, and high-temperature characterization. Complete processing and fabrication facilities assure the capability for early evaluation and use of tailored materials. Efforts are focused on material applications involving structural and electronic materials, thermal and electrical insulation, radiation shields, and shock mitigation. Key elements in these efforts are functionability, reliability, and longevity. This interdisciplinary approach to scientific materials engineering results from the recognition that many disciplines are required to understand, characterize, and apply materials, and from the fact that material design is an essential element in meeting the objectives of quality, functionality, and life. In effect, the responsibility of a materials group extends beyond the development of a material into the understanding and description of its behavior in the extreme environments to which it will be subjected

  15. Seismic modifications to the Hot and Suspect Repair area Argone National Laboratory - West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, L.E.; Harris, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    The ANL-W WIPP Waste Facility Enhancement Project required substantial remodeling and upgrades to the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) building, including the Hot and Suspect Repair Area (HSRA). The HSRA is an enclosed single-storied area inside the HFEF. It is separated into several compartments, some of which are used for handling radioactive materials. The HSRA roof consists of 18 GA steel Robertson Q decking with 1.5 in. concrete topping, and is utilized for storage. Braced steel frames support the HSRA roof, except at the north side, where the steel beams are connected to the HFEF columns. The HSRA has hollow block masonry perimeter and interior walls. Seismic evaluations concluded that the HSRA did not have a competent seismic force resisting system. The structure was upgraded by decoupling it from the HFEF framing for N/S motions, modifying two existing braced frames, adding a new braced frame that can be removed temporarily during maintenance and strengthening the roof diaphragm by a unique modification consisting of special epoxy grout and steel plates installed over the existing concrete roof

  16. Seismic modifications to the hot suspect repair area Argonne National Laboratory, West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, L.E.; Harris, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    The ANL-W WIPP Waste Facility Enhancement Project required substantial remodeling and upgrades to the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) building, including the Hot and Suspect Repair Area (HSRA). The HSRA is an enclosed single-stoned area inside the HFEF. It is separated into several compartments, some of which are used for handling radioactive materials. The HSRA roof consists of 18 GA steel Robertson Q decking with 1.5 in. concrete topping, and is utilized for storage. Braced steel frames support the HSRA roof, except at the north side, where the steel beams arc connected to the HFEF columns. The HSRA has hollow block masonry perimeter and interior walls. Seismic evaluations concluded that the HSRA did not have a competent seismic force resisting system. The structure was upgraded by decoupling it from the HFEF framing for N/S motions, modifying two existing braced frames, adding a now braced frame that can be removed temporarily during maintenance and strengthening the roof diaphragm by a unique modification consisting of special epoxy grout and steel plates installed over the existing concrete roof

  17. Polycarbonate as an Elasto-Plastic Material Model for Simulation of the Microstructure Hot Imprint Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokas Šakalys

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The thermal imprint process of polymer micro-patterning is widely applied in areas such as manufacturing of optical parts, solar energy, bio-mechanical devices and chemical chips. Polycarbonate (PC, as an amorphous polymer, is often used in thermoforming processes because of its good replication characteristics. In order to obtain replicas of the best quality, the imprint parameters (e.g., pressure, temperature, time, etc. must be determined. Therefore finite element model of the hot imprint process of lamellar periodical microstructure into PC has been created using COMSOL Multiphysics. The mathematical model of the hot imprint process includes three steps: heating, imprinting and demolding. The material properties of amorphous PC strongly depend on the imprint temperature and loading pressure. Polycarbonate was modelled as an elasto-plastic material, since it was analyzed below the glass transition temperature. The hot imprint model was solved using the heat transfer and the solid stress-strain application modes with thermal contact problem between the mold and polycarbonate. It was used for the evaluation of temperature and stress distributions in the polycarbonate during the hot imprint process. The quality of the replica, by means of lands filling ratio, was determined as well.

  18. Closure behavior of spherical void in slab during hot rolling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Rong; Zhang, Jiongming; Wang, Bo

    2018-04-01

    The mechanical properties of steels are heavily deteriorated by voids. The influence of voids on the product quality should be eliminated through rolling processes. The study on the void closure during hot rolling processes is necessary. In present work, the closure behavior of voids at the center of a slab at 800 °C during hot rolling processes has been simulated with a 3D finite element model. The shape of the void and the plastic strain distribution of the slab are obtained by this model. The void decreases along the slab thickness direction and spreads along the rolling direction but hardly changes along the strip width direction. The relationship between closure behavior of voids and the plastic strain at the center of the slab is analyzed. The effects of rolling reduction, slab thickness and roller diameter on the closure behavior of voids are discussed. The larger reduction, thinner slab and larger roller diameter all improve the closure of voids during hot rolling processes. Experimental results of the closure behavior of a void in the slab during hot rolling process mostly agree with the simulation results..

  19. Towards the damage evaluation using Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model for hot forming processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Muhammad; Bambach, Markus

    2018-05-01

    In the production of semi-finished metal products, hot forming is used to eliminate the pores and voids from the casting process under compressive stresses and to modify the microstructure for further processing. In the case of caliber and flat rolling processes, tensile stresses occur at certain roll gap ratios which promote pore formation on nonmetallic inclusion. The formation of new pores contributes to ductile damage and reduces the load carrying capacity of the material. In the literature, the damage nucleation and growth during the hot forming process are not comprehensively described. The aim of this study is to understand the damage initiation and growth mechanism during hot forming processes. Hot tensile tests are performed at different temperatures and strain rates for 16MnCrS5 steel. To investigate the influence of geometrical variations on the damage mechanism, specimens with different stress triaxiality ratios are used. Finite element simulations using the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) damage model are performed to estimate the critical void fraction for the damage initiation and the evolution of the void volume fraction. The results showed that the GTN model underestimates the softening of the material due to the independence of the temperature and the strain rate.

  20. Study on the Hot Extrusion Process of Advanced Radiation Resistant Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byoungkwon; Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Kibaik; Kang, Suk Hoon; Chun, Youngbum; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Ferritic/martensitic steel has a better thermal conductivity and swelling resistance than austenitic stainless steel. Unfortunately, the available temperature range of ferritic/martensitic steel is limited at up to 650 .deg. C. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels have been developed as the most prospective core structural materials for next generation nuclear systems because of their excellent high strength and irradiation resistance. The material performances of this new alloy are attributed to the existence of uniformly distributed nano-oxide particles with a high density, which is extremely stable at high temperature in a ferritic/martensitic matrix. This microstructure can be very attractive in achieving superior mechanical properties at high temperatures, and thus, these favorable microstructures should be obtained through the controls of the fabrication process parameters during the mechanical alloying and hot consolidation procedures. In this study, a hot extrusion process for advanced radiation resistant ODS steel tube was investigated. ODS martensitic steel was designed to have high homogeneity, productivity, and reproducibility. Mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes were employed to fabricate the ODS steels. A microstructure observation and creep rupture test were examined to investigate the effects of the optimized fabrication conditions. Advanced radiation resistant ODS steel has been designed to have homogeneity, productivity, and reproducibility. For these characteristics, modified mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes were developed. Microstructure observation revealed that the ODS steel has uniformly distributed fine-grain nano-oxide particles. The fabrication process for the tubing is also being propelled in earnest.

  1. Study on the Hot Extrusion Process of Advanced Radiation Resistant Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byoungkwon; Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Kibaik; Kang, Suk Hoon; Chun, Youngbum; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steel has a better thermal conductivity and swelling resistance than austenitic stainless steel. Unfortunately, the available temperature range of ferritic/martensitic steel is limited at up to 650 .deg. C. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels have been developed as the most prospective core structural materials for next generation nuclear systems because of their excellent high strength and irradiation resistance. The material performances of this new alloy are attributed to the existence of uniformly distributed nano-oxide particles with a high density, which is extremely stable at high temperature in a ferritic/martensitic matrix. This microstructure can be very attractive in achieving superior mechanical properties at high temperatures, and thus, these favorable microstructures should be obtained through the controls of the fabrication process parameters during the mechanical alloying and hot consolidation procedures. In this study, a hot extrusion process for advanced radiation resistant ODS steel tube was investigated. ODS martensitic steel was designed to have high homogeneity, productivity, and reproducibility. Mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes were employed to fabricate the ODS steels. A microstructure observation and creep rupture test were examined to investigate the effects of the optimized fabrication conditions. Advanced radiation resistant ODS steel has been designed to have homogeneity, productivity, and reproducibility. For these characteristics, modified mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes were developed. Microstructure observation revealed that the ODS steel has uniformly distributed fine-grain nano-oxide particles. The fabrication process for the tubing is also being propelled in earnest

  2. Annual report on operation, utilization and technical development of hot laboratories. From April 1, 2001 to March 31, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-01-01

    This is an annual report in a fiscal year of 2001 that describes activities of the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF), the Waste Safety Testing Facility (WASTEF), and the Research Hot Laboratory (RHL) in the Department of Hot laboratories. In RFEF, PIEs including destructive and nondestructive tests were performed on a BWR fuel assembly and/or its fuel rod irradiated in the Fukushima-2 Nuclear Power Station Unit-1 and a fuel assembly with UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel pellets for Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute. In addition, 34 fuel assemblies irradiated in the nuclear ship ''Mutsu'' were conveyed from Mutsu Establishment, and re-assembly and PIEs for the assemblies were carried out. In WASTEF, tests for evaluating barrier performance in terms of disposal of waste, high temperature tests for evaluating stable on TRansUraniums (TRU) nitrides, leaching tests on Rock-like OXide (ROX) fuels were performed. The slow Strain Rate Tests (SSRT) apparatuses were installed for investigation of Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) on light water structural materials, and characterization tests for the apparatus were performed. In RHL, PIEs for light water reactor materials, fusion materials, and target materials of Proton Accelerator Facilities were carried out for laboratories in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. PIEs for zirconium alloys for ultra-high burn-up irradiated in the Kashiwazaki Nuclear Power Station Unit-5 were also performed. In order to investigate roots cause of pipe rupture in Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station Unit-1 of Chubu Electric Power Company, several examinations including SEM observation, EPMA, and Vickers hardness test were performed in those three facilities. The data from the examinations greatly contribute to clarify roots cause of the pipe rupture. (author)

  3. Annual report on operation, utilization and technical development of hot laboratories. From April 1, 2001 to March 31, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This is an annual report in a fiscal year of 2001 that describes activities of the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF), the Waste Safety Testing Facility (WASTEF), and the Research Hot Laboratory (RHL) in the Department of Hot laboratories. In RFEF, PIEs including destructive and nondestructive tests were performed on a BWR fuel assembly and/or its fuel rod irradiated in the Fukushima-2 Nuclear Power Station Unit-1 and a fuel assembly with UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel pellets for Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute. In addition, 34 fuel assemblies irradiated in the nuclear ship ''Mutsu'' were conveyed from Mutsu Establishment, and re-assembly and PIEs for the assemblies were carried out. In WASTEF, tests for evaluating barrier performance in terms of disposal of waste, high temperature tests for evaluating stable on TRansUraniums (TRU) nitrides, leaching tests on Rock-like OXide (ROX) fuels were performed. The slow Strain Rate Tests (SSRT) apparatuses were installed for investigation of Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) on light water structural materials, and characterization tests for the apparatus were performed. In RHL, PIEs for light water reactor materials, fusion materials, and target materials of Proton Accelerator Facilities were carried out for laboratories in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. PIEs for zirconium alloys for ultra-high burn-up irradiated in the Kashiwazaki Nuclear Power Station Unit-5 were also performed. In order to investigate roots cause of pipe rupture in Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station Unit-1 of Chubu Electric Power Company, several examinations including SEM observation, EPMA, and Vickers hardness test were performed in those three facilities. The data from the examinations greatly contribute to clarify roots cause of the pipe rupture. (author)

  4. The Simulation and Analysis of the Closed Die Hot Forging Process by A Computer Simulation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipakkumar Gohil

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research work is to study the variation of various parameters such as stress, strain, temperature, force, etc. during the closed die hot forging process. A computer simulation modeling approach has been adopted to transform the theoretical aspects in to a computer algorithm which would be used to simulate and analyze the closed die hot forging process. For the purpose of process study, the entire deformation process has been divided in to finite number of steps appropriately and then the output values have been computed at each deformation step. The results of simulation have been graphically represented and suitable corrective measures are also recommended, if the simulation results do not agree with the theoretical values. This computer simulation approach would significantly improve the productivity and reduce the energy consumption of the overall process for the components which are manufactured by the closed die forging process and contribute towards the efforts in reducing the global warming.

  5. Virtual and Remote Laboratories in Process of Control Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kalúz

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the progress in the development of virtual and remote laboratories at Department of Information Engineering and Process Control, FCFT STU in Bratislava. Article is the overview of technical solutions used for online education purposes. These comprise software technologies, most commonly used in virtual and remote laboratory design at our department, as MATLAB Web Server, Java, C/C++, and Adobe Flash. We have created virtual laboratories as online Web applications, which provide features of mathematical computing and simulations of technological plants. We also describe a technology of remote control laboratory with a real experimental device.

  6. Radioactive spent resins conditioning by the hot super-compaction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, Andreas; Centner, Baudouin; Lemmens, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Spent ion exchanger media are considered to be problematic waste that, in many cases, requires special approaches and precautions during its immobilization to meet the acceptance criteria for disposal. The waste acceptance criteria define, among others, the quality of waste forms for disposal, and therefore will sometimes define appropriate treatment options. The selection of treatment options for spent ion exchange materials must consider their physical and chemical characteristics. Basically, the main methods for the treatment of spent organic ion exchange materials, following to pretreatment methods are: - Direct immobilization, producing a stable end product by using Cement, Bitumen, Polymer or High Integrity Containers, - The destruction of the organic compounds by using Thermochemical processes or Oxidation to produce an inorganic intermediate product that may or may not be further conditioned for storage and/or disposal, - The complete removal of the resin inner structural water by a thermal process. After a thorough technical economical analysis, Tractebel Engineering selected the Resin Hot Compaction Process to be installed at Tihange Nuclear Power Plant. The Resin Hot Compaction Process is used to make dense homogenous organic blocks from a wide range of particulate waste. In this process spent resins are first dewatered and dried to remove the inner structural water content. The drying takes place in a drying vessel that holds the contents of two 200 L drums (Figure). In the oil heated drying and mixing unit, the resins are heated to the necessary process temperature for the hot pressing step and then placed into special metal drums, which are automatically lidded and immediately transferred to a high force compactor. After high force compaction the pellets are transferred to a measuring unit, where the dose rate, height and weight are automatically measured and recorded. A volume reduction factor of approximately up to four (depending on the type of

  7. Effects of Processing Parameters on the Forming Quality of C-Shaped Thermosetting Composite Laminates in Hot Diaphragm Forming Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, X. X.; Gu, Y. Z.; Sun, J.; Li, M.; Liu, W. P.; Zhang, Z. G.

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the effects of processing temperature and vacuum applying rate on the forming quality of C-shaped carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin matrix composite laminates during hot diaphragm forming process were investigated. C-shaped prepreg preforms were produced using a home-made hot diaphragm forming equipment. The thickness variations of the preforms and the manufacturing defects after diaphragm forming process, including fiber wrinkling and voids, were evaluated to understand the forming mechanism. Furthermore, both interlaminar slipping friction and compaction behavior of the prepreg stacks were experimentally analyzed for showing the importance of the processing parameters. In addition, autoclave processing was used to cure the C-shaped preforms to investigate the changes of the defects before and after cure process. The results show that the C-shaped prepreg preforms with good forming quality can be achieved through increasing processing temperature and reducing vacuum applying rate, which obviously promote prepreg interlaminar slipping process. The process temperature and forming rate in hot diaphragm forming process strongly influence prepreg interply frictional force, and the maximum interlaminar frictional force can be taken as a key parameter for processing parameter optimization. Autoclave process is effective in eliminating voids in the preforms and can alleviate fiber wrinkles to a certain extent.

  8. Process for removal of sulfur oxides from hot gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauerle, G. L.; Kohl, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    A process for the removal of sulfur oxides from two gas streams containing the same. One gas stream is introduced into a spray dryer zone and contacted with a finely dispersed spray of an aqueous medium containing an absorbent for sulfur oxides. The aqueous medium is introduced at a controlled rate so as to provide water to the gas in an amount to produce a cooled product gas having a temperature at least 7 0 C. above its adiabatic saturation temperature and from about 125-300% of the stoichiometric amount of absorbent required to react with the sulfur oxides to be removed from the gas stream. The effluent from the spray dryer zone comprises a gas stream of reduced sulfur oxide content and contains entrained dry particulate reaction products including unreacted absorbent. This gas stream is then introduced into a particulate removal zone from which is withdrawn a gas stream substantially free of particles and having a reduced sulfur oxide content. the dry particulate reaction products are collected and utilized as a source of absorbent for a second aqueous scrubbing medium containing unreacted absorbent for the sulfur oxides. An effluent gas stream is withdrawn from the aqueous scrubbing zone and comprises a water-saturated gas stream of reduced sulfur oxide content and substantially free of particles. The effluent gas streams from the particulate removal zone and the aqueous scrubbing zone are combined in such proportions that the combined gas stream has a temperature above its adiabatic saturation temperature

  9. High-Frequency Microwave Processing of Materials Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Conducts research on high-frequency microwave processing of materials using a highpower, continuous-wave (CW), 83-GHz, quasi-optical beam system for rapid,...

  10. Coercivity enhancement of HDDR-processed Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet with the rapid hot-press consolidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozawa, N. [Magnetic Materials Research Laboratory, NEOMAX Company, Hitachi Metals Ltd., Osaka 618-0013 (Japan); Sepehri-Amin, H. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Magnetic Materials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Ohkubo, T. [Magnetic Materials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Hono, K. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Magnetic Materials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Nishiuchi, T. [Magnetic Materials Research Laboratory, NEOMAX Company, Hitachi Metals Ltd., Osaka 618-0013 (Japan); Hirosawa, S., E-mail: Satoshi_Hirosawa@hitachi-metals.co.j [Magnetic Materials Research Laboratory, NEOMAX Company, Hitachi Metals Ltd., Osaka 618-0013 (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    High coercivity, fully dense anisotropic permanent magnets of submicron grain sizes were produced by rapid hot-press consolidation of hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination (HDDR) processed Nd-Fe-Co-B powders. In the hot-press process, the coercivity of the consolidated material showed a sharp minimum prior to full densification. Thereafter, it reached a value 25% higher than that of the initial powder. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that the variation in H{sub cJ} was caused by a redistribution of Nd along the grain boundaries during hot pressing and that the high coercivity was attributable to the formation of thin, continuous Nd-rich phase along the grain boundaries.

  11. Structure and hot-rolled reinforcement rods properties evolution in the process of long service life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikryukov, V.R.; Syomin, A.P.; Konovalov, S.V.; Ivanov, Yu.F.; Gromov, V.E.

    2006-01-01

    The physical nature of mechanical properties of hot-rolled reinforcement rods degradation during long-life operation is established by methods of transmission diffraction electron microscopy. It is shown that strength and plasticity properties decrease is due to cementite plates cutting and dissolution, microcracks formation process as a result of interstitial phase inclusions creation in the near-surface layer of material

  12. Structure and hot-rolled reinforcement rods properties evolution in the process of long service life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikryukov, V R [Siberian State Industrial University, Kirov str., 42. 654007, Novokuznetsk (Russian Federation); Syomin, A P [Siberian State Industrial University, Kirov str., 42. 654007, Novokuznetsk (Russian Federation); Konovalov, S V [Siberian State Industrial University, Kirov str., 42. 654007, Novokuznetsk (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Yu F [Siberian State Industrial University, Kirov str., 42. 654007, Novokuznetsk (Russian Federation); Gromov, V E [Siberian State Industrial University, Kirov str., 42. 654007, Novokuznetsk (Russian Federation)

    2006-08-25

    The physical nature of mechanical properties of hot-rolled reinforcement rods degradation during long-life operation is established by methods of transmission diffraction electron microscopy. It is shown that strength and plasticity properties decrease is due to cementite plates cutting and dissolution, microcracks formation process as a result of interstitial phase inclusions creation in the near-surface layer of material.

  13. Process Waste Assessment for the Plotting and Digitizing Support Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, N.M.

    1994-04-01

    This Process Waste Assessment was conducted to evaluate the Plotting and Digitizing Support Laboratory, located in Building 913, Room 157. It documents the processes, identifies the hazardous chemical waste streams generated by these processes, recommends possible ways to minimize waste, and serves as a reference for future assessments of this facility

  14. Establishment of effective maintenance method based on the superior inspection technique for the deteriorating hot laboratory exhaust stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizukoshi, Yasutaka; Yasu, Tetsunori

    2012-06-01

    The Materials Monitoring Facility is equipped with an exhaust stack to emit air from a controlled area (the hot laboratory) into the atmosphere. Cracks and exfoliation have been observed for the surface of the exhaust stack, which is made of reinforced concrete and was constructed on the seacoast about 25 years ago, so exposed to a salt-corrosive condition. In order to get details of the present condition of the exhaust stack, an inspection was carried out using an electromagnetic wave radar method and chloride content method. Cracks and exfoliation were observed for the whole stack surface, especially for high positions. Moreover, salt damage was observed for the outer surface of the exhaust stack, and it was estimated that the infiltration of the chloride content was about 17 mm. Based on this detailed inspection of the exhaust stack, maintenance and repair work were carried out. (author)

  15. Surveillance and radiological protection in the Hot Cell laboratory; Vigilancia y proteccion radiologica en el Laboratorio de Celdas Calientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, J.M.; Torre, J. De la; Garcia C, M.A. [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    The Hot Cells Laboratory (LCC) located in the National Institute of Nuclear Research are an installation that was designed for the management at distance of 10,000 Curies of Co-60 or other radioactive materials with different values in activity. The management of such materials in the installation, implies to analyze and to determine the doses that the POE will receive as well as the implementation of protection measures and appropriate radiological safety so that is completed the specified by the ALARA concept. In this work it is carried out an evaluation of the doses to receive for the POE when managing radionuclides with maximum activities that can be allowed in function of the current conditions of the cells and an evaluation of results is made with the program of surveillance and radiological protection implemented for the development of the works that carried out in the installation. (Author)

  16. Effect of hot-dip galvanizing processes on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 600-MPa hot-dip galvanized dual-phase steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Chun-fu; Zheng, Zhi-wang; Wang, Min-li; Xu, Quan; Zhang, Shen-gen

    2017-12-01

    A C-Mn dual-phase steel was soaked at 800°C for 90 s and then either rapidly cooled to 450°C and held for 30 s (process A) or rapidly cooled to 350°C and then reheated to 450°C (process B) to simulate the hot-dip galvanizing process. The influence of the hot-dip galvanizing process on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 600-MPa hot-dip galvanized dual-phase steel (DP600) was investigated using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and tensile tests. The results showed that, in the case of process A, the microstructure of DP600 was composed of ferrite, martensite, and a small amount of bainite. The granular bainite was formed in the hot-dip galvanizing stage, and martensite islands were formed in the final cooling stage after hot-dip galvanizing. By contrast, in the case of process B, the microstructure of the DP600 was composed of ferrite, martensite, bainite, and cementite. In addition, compared with the yield strength (YS) of the DP600 annealed by process A, that for the DP600 annealed by process B increased by approximately 50 MPa because of the tempering of the martensite formed during rapid cooling. The work-hardening coefficient ( n value) of the DP600 steel annealed by process B clearly decreased because the increase of the YS affected the computation result for the n value. However, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation ( A 80) of the DP600 annealed by process B exhibited less variation compared with those of the DP600 annealed by process A. Therefore, DP600 with excellent comprehensive mechanical properties (YS = 362 MPa, UTS = 638 MPa, A 80 = 24.3%, n = 0.17) was obtained via process A.

  17. Annual report on operation, utilization and technical development of research reactors and hot laboratory, from April 1, 1987 to March 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    Activities of the Department of Research Reactor Operation in fiscal year 1987 are described. The department is responsible for operation and maintenance of JRR-2, JRR-4, Research Reactor Development Division which performed upgraded JRR-3 and other R D, and Hot Laboratory. In the above connection various other work has also been performed, such as technical management of fuel and coolant, radiation control, irradiation technique, etc. In Hot Laboratory, we have performed post-irradiation examinations of fuels and materials, and also development of examination procedures, too. (author)

  18. Annual report on operation, utilization and technical development of research reactors and hot laboratory, from April 1, 1985 to March 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    Activities of the Department of Research Reactor Operation in fiscal year 1985 are described. The department is responsible for operation and maintenance of JRR-2, JRR-4, Research Reactor Development Division which performed upgraded JRR-3 and other R and D, and Hot Laboratory. In the above connection various other work has also been performed, such as technical management of fuel and coolant, radiation control, irradiation technique, etc. In Hot Laboratory, we have performed post-irradiation examinations of fuels and materials, and also development of examination procedures, too. (author)

  19. Analysis of the hot cell lay-out for the advanced spent fuel conditioning process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Song, T. G.; Hong, D. H.; Kim, Y. H.; Yoon, J. S

    2003-04-01

    Equipment used for ACP must operate in intense radiation fields enclosed in a hot cell and be remotely maintained. For the reliable remote maintenance operation, several design aspects should be considered. Even though the design results seem to be satisfactory, all the remote operation should be checked prior to the hot demonstration. The best way to check the remote operability is a real mock-up test, but the mock-up test is too expensive and time consuming, and need refabrication of the design to deal with the problem found in the test operation. The 3D graphic simulator gives an alternate solution for this. It can check the remote operability of the process without fabrication of the process equipment. In other words, using a graphic simulator, remote operation task can be simulated in a computer(virtual environment), not the real environment. In this report, for the analysis on the hat cell layout for the ACP process, the verification from the concept of the process to the detailed motion of the equipment and the remote operation devices using virtual prototyping is described. Also, the requirement of the process equipment in the sense of size and remote maintenance, and that of the transportation and handling for the process material are described. Finally, from these results, the hot cell layout alternatives and the bases for the selection of the optimum layout are implemented. The graphical simulator and the results from this analysis can be effectively used not only for optimizing the hot cell layout but also designing the ACP equipment and maintenance process.

  20. Experience of steam generator tube examination in the hot laboratory of EDF: analysis of recent events concerning the secondary side

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thebault, Y.; Bouvier, O. de; Boccanfuso, M.; Coquio, N.; Barbe, V.; Molinie, E.

    2011-01-01

    Until 2010, more than 60 steam generator (SG) tubes have been removed and analysed in the EDF hot laboratory of CEIDRE/Chinon. This article is particularly related to three recent events that lead to the extraction of several tubes dedicated to laboratory destructive examinations. The first event that constitutes a first occurrence on the EDF Park, concerns the detection of a circumferential crack on the external surface of a tube located at tube support plate elevation. After this observation, several tubes have been extracted from Bugey 3 and Fessenheim 2 nuclear power plants with steam generators equipped with 600 MA bundle. The other two events concern the consequences of chemical cleaning of the tube bundle steam generators. The examples chosen are from Cruas 4 et Chinon B2 units whose tubes were extracted following non destructive testing performed immediately after or at the completion of cycle following the chemical cleaning. In the case of Cruas 4, Eddy Current Testing (ET) were performed for requalification of steam Generators after chemical cleaning. They allowed the detection of an indication located at the bottom of tube for a large number of tubes; the ET signal was similar to that corresponding to 'deposit' corrosion. Moreover, inspections of Chinon-B2 SGs at the end of the operation cycle following the chemical cleaning, showed the presence of conductor deposits at the bottom of some tubes. The first part of this document presents the major results of laboratory examinations of the pulled tubes of Bugey 3 and Fessenheim 2 and their analysis. Hypothesis concerning damage mechanisms of the tubes are also proposed. The second part of the paper relates the results of the laboratory examinations of the pulled tubes of Cruas 4 and Chinon B 2 after chemical cleaning and their analysis. (authors)

  1. Characterization of the interfacial heat transfer coefficient for hot stamping processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Xi; Liu, Xiaochuan; Fang, Haomiao; Ji, Kang; El Fakir, Omer; Wang, LiLiang

    2016-08-01

    In hot stamping processes, the interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC) between the forming tools and hot blank is an essential parameter which determines the quenching rate of the process and hence the resulting material microstructure. The present work focuses on the characterization of the IHTC between an aluminium alloy 7075-T6 blank and two different die materials, cast iron (G3500) and H13 die steel, at various contact pressures. It was found that the IHTC between AA7075 and cast iron had values 78.6% higher than that obtained between AA7075 and H13 die steel. Die materials and contact pressures had pronounced effects on the IHTC, suggesting that the IHTC can be used to guide the selection of stamping tool materials and the precise control of processing parameters.

  2. Martensitic microstructural transformations from the hot stamping, quenching and partitioning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Heping; Jin Xuejun; Dong Han; Shi Jie

    2011-01-01

    Hot stamping, which combines forming and quenching in one process, produces high strength steels with limited ductility because the quenching is uncontrolled. A new processing technique has been proposed in which the hot stamping step is followed by a controlled quenching and partitioning process, producing a microstructure containing retained austenite and martensite. To investigate this microstructure, specimens were heated at a rate of 10 deg. C/s to the austenitizing temperature of 900 deg. C, held for 5 min to eliminate thermal gradients, and cooled at a rate of 50 deg. C/s to a quenching temperature of 300 deg. C, which is between the martensite start temperature and the martensite finish temperatures. The resulting microstructure was examined using optical microscope, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The material produced contains irregular, fragmented martensite plates, a result of the improved strength of the austenite phase and the constraints imposed by a high dislocation density. - Research Highlights: → A novel heat treatment of advanced high strength steels is proposed. → The processing technique is hot stamping plus quenching and partitioning process. → The material produced contains irregular, fragmented martensite plates. → The reason is strength of austenite phase and constraint of dislocation density.

  3. Manual on safety aspects of the design and equipment of hot laboratories. 1981 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This manual covers the general principles of planning and design of areas inside laboratories according to the varying potential radiation and contamination hazards; enclosures for radioactive material containment; viewing and lighting systems and various types of manipulators; transfer and transport of radioactive materials within the laboratories; air cleaning and ventilation systems, with particular reference to IAEA Safety Series No.17; techniques for controlling air pollution from the operation of nuclear facilities; various radioactive waste disposal systems; criticality control; fire protection; personnel monitoring, including changing-room monitoring and protective clothing; standardization and automation; and administrative controls. Although alpha, beta, gamma technologies have developed separately, equipment used in radioactive work is common to many operations. There is a step change in technology between work with uranium and plutonium and between work with plutonium and other transuranics; with plutonium one enters the field of alpha, beta, gamma technology. This manual reports the basic requirements and gives reference to more sophisticated techniques available. It is not concerned with work on a commercial scale. Other publications of interest in this context, for instance IAEA Safety Series No.39, are referenced for more detailed information.

  4. Generation and use of process maps for hot extrusion of seamless tubes for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaibhaw, Kumar; Jha, S.K.; Saibaba, N.; Jayaraj, R.N.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Hot extrusion is known as significant bulk deformation step in manufacturing of seamless tube production. Elevated temperature deformation carried out above the recrystallization temperature would enable imposition of large strains in single step. This deformation causes a significant change in the microstructure of the material and depends on extrusion process parameters such as temperature and strain rate (Ram speed). Basic microstructure developed at this deformation stage has significant bearing on the final properties of the material fabricated with subsequent cold working steps. Zirconium alloys and special nuclear grade austenitic stainless steels are two important groups of materials used as structural and core components in thermal and fast reactors world wide respectively. The properties of former alloy are very sensitive to the thermo mechanical fabrication steps initiated with hot extrusion due to their anisotropic deformation behaviour. However, nuclear grade austenitic stainless steels have many variants from their commercial grades in terms of micro and macro alloy chemistry. Factors such as these significantly affect the workability of the materials and require proper selection of extrusion parameters especially working temperature and extrusion speed plays a key role in the quality of the product. Modern developments in processing technology envisage the application of processing maps based on dynamic material model for selection of hot extrusion parameters. The present paper is aimed at bringing out significance of the map in selection of working domain with respect to the industrial process conditions for both groups of nuclear materials mentioned earlier. Developed process maps of certain alloys suggest use of extremely slow strain rate and low temperature extrusion which can not be achieved during bulk processing due to design of equipment and heat transfer constraints in industrial scale production. Attempts are made to highlight

  5. Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of High-Strength Steel Controlled by Hot Stamping Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Hang; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Junrui; Li, Guangyao; Cui, Junjia

    2018-03-01

    A novel design and manufacturing method, dubbed "precast," of the cooling system and tools for a hot forming process was proposed in this paper. The integrated structures of the punch and blank holder were determined by analyzing the bending and reverse-bending deformation of the forming parts. The desired crashworthiness performance of an automotive front bumper constructed with this process was obtained by a tailored phase transformation, which generated martensite-bainite in the middle and full martensite transformation in the corner areas. Varying cooling effects in the formed parts caused the highest temperature to be located in the bottom and the lowest on the end of the formed parts. Moreover, the microstructural distributions demonstrated that the bottom possessed a relatively lower content of martensite, while, conversely, the end possessed a higher content. This was precisely the most desired phase distributions for the hot formed parts. For the six-process cycle stamping, the temperatures reached a stable status after an initial rapid increase in the first three process cycles. The microstructural results verified the feasibility of the hot forming tools under multiprocess cycles.

  6. Criteria for prediction of plastic instabilities for hot working processes. (Part I: Theoretical review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Omar, A.; Prado, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Hot working processes often induce high levels of deformation at high strain rates, and impose very complex multiaxial modes of solicitation. These processes are essentially limited by apparition and development of plastic instabilities. These may be the direct cause of rapid crack propagation, which lead to a possible final rupture. The complexity of deformation modes and the simultaneous intervention of several parameters have led many researchers to develop various criteria, with different approaches, to predict the occurrence of defects and to optimize process control parameters. The aim of the present paper is to summarize the general characteristics of some instability criteria, widely used in the literature, for the prediction of plastic instabilities during hot working. It was considered appropriate to divide the work into two parts: part I presents the phenomenological criteria for the prediction of plastic instabilities, based on descriptive observation of microscopic phenomena of the deformation (strain hardening and strain rate sensitivity), and discusses the continuum criteria based on the principle of maximum rate of entropy production of irreversible thermodynamics applied to continuum mechanics of large plastic flow. Also, this part provides a bibliographical discussion among several authors with regard to the physical foundations of dynamic materials model. In part II, of the work, a comparative study has been carried out to characterize the flow instability during a hot working process of a medium carbon microalloyed using phenomenological and continuum criteria. (Author) 83 refs.

  7. Hot Deformation Behavior and Processing Maps of Diamond/Cu Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongdi; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Di; Zhu, Hanxing; Fan, Tongxiang

    2018-06-01

    The hot deformation behaviors of 50 vol pct uncoated and Cr-coated diamond/Cu composites were investigated using hot isothermal compression tests under the temperature and strain rate ranging from 1073 K to 1273 K (800 °C to 1000 °C) and from 0.001 to 5 s-1, respectively. Dynamic recrystallization was determined to be the primary restoration mechanism during deformation. The Cr3C2 coating enhanced the interfacial bonding and resulted in a larger flow stress for the Cr-coated diamond/Cu composites. Moreover, the enhanced interfacial affinity led to a higher activation energy for the Cr-coated diamond/Cu composites (238 kJ/mol) than for their uncoated counterparts (205 kJ/mol). The strain-rate-dependent constitutive equations of the diamond/Cu composites were derived based on the Arrhenius model, and a high correlation ( R = 0.99) was observed between the calculated flow stresses and experimental data. With the help of processing maps, hot extrusions were realized at 1123 K/0.01 s-1 and 1153 K/0.01 s-1 (850 °C/0.01 s-1 and 880 °C/0.01 s-1) for the uncoated and coated diamond/Cu composites, respectively. The combination of interface optimization and hot extrusion led to increases of the density and thermal conductivity, thereby providing a promising route for the fabrication of diamond/Cu composites.

  8. Experimental investigation on influence of porous material properties on drying process by a hot air jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Marco, P; Filippeschi, S

    2012-01-01

    The drying process of porous media is a subject of scientific interest, and different mathematical approaches can be found in the literature. A previous paper by the same authors showed that the celebrated Martin correlation for hot air jet heat and mass transfer yields different degrees of accuracy (from 15% to 65%, increasing at high values of input power) if tested on different fabrics, the remaining conditions being the same. In this paper the fabric drying has been experimentally investigated more in depth. A dedicated experimental apparatus for hot jet drying was assembled and operated, in which a hot jet impinges perpendicularly onto a wet fabric. A calibrated orifice was adopted to measure the jet flow rate, with an accuracy better than 3%. The drying power was determined by continuously weighing with a precision scale a moistened patch exposed to the drying jet. The effect of the time of the exposure and the initial amount of water has been evaluated for each sample. During the hot jet exposure, the temperature distribution over the wet patch has been observed by an infrared thermo-camera. A mathematical model of water transport inside and outside the fabric was developed, in order to evidence the governing transport resistances. The theoretical predictions have been compared with the experimental results, and showed the necessity to modify correlations and models accounting for fabric properties.

  9. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report: 238Pu fuel form processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Progress in the Savannah River 238 Pu Fuel Form Program is discussed. Goals of the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) program are to provide technical support for the transfer of the 238 Pu fuel form fabrication operations from Mound Laboratory to new facilities being built at the Savannah River Plant (SRP), to provide the technical basis for 238 Pu scrap recovery at SRP, and to assist in sustaining plant operations. During the period it was found that the density of hot-pressed 238 PuO 2 pellets decreased as the particle size of ball-milled powder decreased;the surface area of calcined 238 PuO 2 powder increased with increasing precipitation temperature and may be related to the variation in ball-milling response observed among different H Area B-Line batches; calcined PuO 2 produced by Pu(III) reverse-strike precipitation was directly fabricated into a pellet without ball milling, slugging, or sharding. The pellet had good appearance with acceptable density and dimensional stability, and heat transfer measurements and calculations showed that the use of hollow aluminum sleeves in the plutonium fuel fabrication (PuFF) storage vault reduced the temperature of shipping cans to 170 0 C and will reduce the temperature at the center of pure plutonium oxide (PPO) spheres to 580 0 C

  10. Study of emission process in hot, optically thin plasma: application to solar active regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenman-Clark, Lois.

    1983-06-01

    Analysis of soft X-ray got in hot and weak density plasmas, such as those in TOKAMAKS and in solar flares, needs a detailed knowledge of emission processes. In this work are presented spectroscopic diagnostics which can be deduced from such spectra analysis and results are applied to magnesium solar spectrum analysis. An important improvement is brought to collisional calculation corresponding to forbidden line populating. For this line, The relative importance of autoionizing states effect, called also resonance effect is studied [fr

  11. Decommissioning of the radio chemical hot laboratory of the european commission joint research centre of Ispra - 59207

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugolini, Daniele; Rossi, Francesco; Basile, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The construction of the Radio Chemical Hot Laboratory (RCHL) of the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of Ispra began in the early 1960's while the laboratory activities started in 1964. In 1976 an annex to the main building was built. At this time the RCHL main research activities were in environment and biochemistry by means of radioactive tracers; neutron activation analyses; extraction of actinides from radioactive liquid waste coming from the nuclear fuel reprocessing plants; and analyses of U, Pu, and Th in samples from the nuclear fuel cycle in order to determine the isotopic ratio and the burn-up. In 1978, a new area of laboratories named 'Stabularium' was built to study the metabolism of heavy metal on laboratory animals. Complementary to the laboratory three pneumatic transfer systems for irradiated sources connected the RCHL to two research reactors. The decommissioning activities of the 2650 m 2 facility started in January 2008 and they were completed at the end of 2010 with the release for unrestricted use of all the buildings of the facility. They consisted in five main tasks: pre-decommissioning, licensing, dismantling, waste management, and final survey. The main pre-decommissioning activities were the physical and radiological characterization of the facility. The principal licensing activity was the preparation of the de-licensing documentation to obtain the license termination from the safety authorities. Dismantling consisted in the removal of all the equipments and ancillary systems, of the pneumatic transfer system, and in the decontamination of the structures of the controlled zone. The waste management was limited to the transfer of the waste and of the clearable material to the centralized waste management facility. The final survey consisted in the final radiological characterization to quantify the concentration of any residual radioactivity remained after the completion of the dismantling activities for the release of the RCHL without any

  12. Real-time monitoring of the laser hot-wire welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Liu, Shuang; Ma, Junjie; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2014-04-01

    The laser hot-wire welding process was investigated in this work. The dynamics of the molten pool during welding was visualized by using a high-speed charge-coupled device (CCD) camera assisted by a green laser as an illumination source. It was found that the molten pool is formed by the irradiation of the laser beam on the filler wire. The effect of the hot-wire voltage on the stability of the welding process was monitored by using a spectrometer that captured the emission spectrum of the laser-induced plasma plume. The spectroscopic study showed that when the hot-wire voltage is above 9 V a great deal of spatters occur, resulting in the instability of the plasma plume and the welding process. The effect of spatters on the plasma plume was shown by the identified spectral lines of the element Mn I. The correlation between the Fe I electron temperature and the weld-bead shape was studied. It was noted that the electron temperature of the plasma plume can be used to real-time monitor the variation of the weld-bead features and the formation of the weld defects.

  13. Hot workability of γ + α2 titanium aluminide: Development of processing map and constitutive equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.; Narayana Murty, S.V.S.; Pant, Bhanu; Agarwala, Vijaya; Sinha, P.P.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Deformation studies of five TiAl alloys carried out through processing map. ► DRX domain and superplastic domain identified in power efficiency map. ► Safe working zone for alloys found at 1223–1423 K at strain rates (10 −2 –10 −3 s −1 ). ► Strain rate sensitivity, activation energy, Zener Hollomon parameter (Z) are obtained. ► Constitutive equations derived and verified. DRX grain size correlated with Z. - Abstract: Gamma titanium alumindes are intermetallics, which have very narrow working range. Hot isothermal working is the most suitable process for hot working of alloy. Accordingly, hot isothermal compression test is carried out on reaction synthesized and homogenized titanium aluminide alloys at different temperatures and strain rates using Gleeble thermomechanical simulator. Three alloys of Ti48Al2Cr2Nb0.1B (atom%) have been used in the study. Stress–strain data obtained from the test has been used to construct processing map, which indicates the safe and unsafe working zone. Strain rate sensitivity and Zener–Hollomon parameter has been calculated. Further, constitutive equations have been generated and verified. It is found that alloy has good workability in the temperature range of 1223–1423 K at strain rates of 0.01–0.001 s −1 . In this range of parameters, the alloys nearly follow the constitutive equations.

  14. Prediction of Proper Temperatures for the Hot Stamping Process Based on the Kinetics Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadian, P.; Parsa, M. H.; Mirzadeh, H.

    2015-02-01

    Nowadays, the application of kinetics models for predicting microstructures of steels subjected to thermo-mechanical treatments has increased to minimize direct experimentation, which is costly and time consuming. In the current work, the final microstructures of AISI 4140 steel sheets after the hot stamping process were predicted using the Kirkaldy and Li kinetics models combined with new thermodynamically based models in order for the determination of the appropriate process temperatures. In this way, the effect of deformation during hot stamping on the Ae3, Acm, and Ae1 temperatures was considered, and then the equilibrium volume fractions of phases at different temperatures were calculated. Moreover, the ferrite transformation rate equations of the Kirkaldy and Li models were modified by a term proposed by Åkerström to consider the influence of plastic deformation. Results showed that the modified Kirkaldy model is satisfactory for the determination of appropriate austenitization temperatures for the hot stamping process of AISI 4140 steel sheets because of agreeable microstructure predictions in comparison with the experimental observations.

  15. Effect of thermal and mechanical parameter’s damage numerical simulation cycling effects on defects in hot metal forming processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Amri, Abdelouahid; el yakhloufi Haddou, Mounir; Khamlichi, Abdellatif

    2017-10-01

    Damage mechanisms in hot metal forming processes are accelerated by mechanical stresses arising during Thermal and mechanical properties variations, because it consists of the materials with different thermal and mechanical loadings and swelling coefficients. In this work, 3D finite element models (FEM) are developed to simulate the effect of Temperature and the stresses on the model development, using a general purpose FE software ABAQUS. Explicit dynamic analysis with coupled Temperature displacement procedure is used for a model. The purpose of this research was to study the thermomechanical damage mechanics in hot forming processes. The important process variables and the main characteristics of various hot forming processes will also be discussed.

  16. Testing a Constrained MPC Controller in a Process Control Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricardez-Sandoval, Luis A.; Blankespoor, Wesley; Budman, Hector M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment performed by the fourth year chemical engineering students in the process control laboratory at the University of Waterloo. The objective of this experiment is to test the capabilities of a constrained Model Predictive Controller (MPC) to control the operation of a Double Pipe Heat Exchanger (DPHE) in real time.…

  17. Waste management study: Process development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the present Toxic Waste Control Operations at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, evaluates the technologies most applicable to the treatment of toxic and hazardous wastes and presents conceptual designs of processes for the installation of a new decontamination and waste treatment facility (DWTF) for future treatment of these wastes

  18. Environmental Assessment for the vacuum process laboratory (VPL) relocation at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluates the potential environmental impacts of relocating a vacuum process laboratory (VPL) from Building 321 to Building 2231 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The VPL provides the latest technology in the field of vacuum deposition of coatings onto various substrates for several weapons-related and energy-related programs at LLNL. Operations within the VPL at LLNL will not be expanded nor reduced by the relocation. No significant environmental impacts are expected as a result of the relocation of the VPL

  19. Improving the Quality of Hot Stamping Parts with Innovative Press Technology and Inline Process Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, R.; Palm, C.

    2017-09-01

    The increasing number of hot stamped parts in the automotive industry is challenging different process areas. This paper presents a method how to improve the production rates over the whole life cycle of a hot forming part. In the core element of a hot forming line, the hydraulic press, mainly two processing steps are performed. Forming and quenching of the sheet metal part. In addition to the forming operation, it is inevitable to optimize the quenching condition in the bottom dead centre in order to reach a fully martensitic structure and tight geometrical tolerances of the part. Deviations in the blank thickness, tool wear, polishing of classical tools impair the quenching condition and therefore the part quality over the time. A new press and tool design has been developed to counter this effect by providing homogenous contact pressure over the whole die. Especially with a multi cavity tool, the new method is advantageous. Test series have shown that the new tool and press concept can produce parts with a blank thickness of 1.0 mm within 8.0 s cycle time. The so called PCH flex principle makes it possible to produce such high output rates under reliable conditions.

  20. Accreditation of Medical Laboratories – System, Process, Benefits for Labs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zima Tomáš

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available One and key of the priorities in laboratory medicine is improvement of quality management system for patient safety. Quality in the health care is tightly connected to the level of excellence of the health care provided in relation to the current level of knowledge and technical development. Accreditation is an effective way to demonstrate competence of the laboratory, a tool to recognize laboratories world-wide, is linked to periodical audits, to stimulate the maintenance and improvement of the quality, which leads to high standard of services for clients (patients, health care providers, etc.. The strategic plans of IFCC and EFLM include focusing on accreditation of labs based on ISO standards and cooperation with European Accreditation and national accreditation bodies. IFCC and EFLM recognised that ISO 15189:2012 Medical laboratories – Requirements for quality and competence, encompasses all the assessment criteria specified in the policy of quality. The last version is oriented to process approach with detailed division and clearly defined requirements. The accreditation of labs improves facilitation of accurate and rapid diagnostics, efficiency of treatment and reduction of errors in the laboratory process. Accreditation is not about who the best is, but who has a system of standard procedures with aim to improve the quality and patient safety. Quality system is about people, with people and for people.

  1. Software process improvement in the NASA software engineering laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgarry, Frank; Pajerski, Rose; Page, Gerald; Waligora, Sharon; Basili, Victor; Zelkowitz, Marvin

    1994-01-01

    The Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) was established in 1976 for the purpose of studying and measuring software processes with the intent of identifying improvements that could be applied to the production of ground support software within the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The SEL has three member organizations: NASA/GSFC, the University of Maryland, and Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC). The concept of process improvement within the SEL focuses on the continual understanding of both process and product as well as goal-driven experimentation and analysis of process change within a production environment.

  2. Optimized manufacture of nuclear fuel cladding tubes by FEA of hot extrusion and cold pilgering processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillac, Alexis; Ly, Céline

    2018-05-01

    Within the forming route of Zirconium alloy cladding tubes, hot extrusion is used to deform the forged billets into tube hollows, which are then cold rolled to produce the final tubes with the suitable properties for in-reactor use. The hot extrusion goals are to give the appropriate geometry for cold pilgering, without creating surface defects and microstructural heterogeneities which are detrimental for subsequent rolling. In order to ensure a good quality of the tube hollows, hot extrusion parameters have to be carefully chosen. For this purpose, finite element models are used in addition to experimental tests. These models can take into account the thermo-mechanical coupling conditions obtained in the tube and the tools during extrusion, and provide a good prediction of the extrusion load and the thermo-mechanical history of the extruded product. This last result can be used to calculate the fragmentation of the microstructure in the die and the meta-dynamic recrystallization after extrusion. To further optimize the manufacturing route, a numerical model of the cold pilgering process is also applied, taking into account the complex geometry of the tools and the pseudo-steady state rolling sequence of this incremental forming process. The strain and stress history of the tube during rolling can then be used to assess the damage risk thanks to the use of ductile damage models. Once validated vs. experimental data, both numerical models were used to optimize the manufacturing route and the quality of zirconium cladding tubes. This goal was achieved by selecting hot extrusion parameters giving better recrystallized microstructure that improves the subsequent formability. Cold pilgering parameters were also optimized in order to reduce the potential ductile damage in the cold rolled tubes.

  3. Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leininger, T.F.; Robin, A.M.; Wolfenbarger, J.K.; Suggitt, R.M.

    1995-03-28

    A partial oxidation process is described for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, HCl, HF, H{sub 2}S, COS, N{sub 2}, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000 F. 1 figure.

  4. Guiding Principles for Sustainable Existing Buildings: Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, Jason E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-11-11

    In 2006, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) signed the Federal Leadership in High Performance and Sustainable Buildings Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), along with 21 other agencies. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is exceeding this requirement and, currently, about 25 percent of its buildings are High Performance and Sustainable Buildings. The pages that follow document the Guiding Principles conformance effort for the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at PNNL. The RPL effort is part of continued progress toward a building inventory that is 100 percent compliant with the Guiding Principles.

  5. Advanced Manufacturing Processes Laboratory Building 878 hazards assessment document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, C.; Thornton, W.; Swihart, A.; Gilman, T.

    1994-07-01

    The introduction of the hazards assessment process is to document the impact of the release of hazards at the Advanced Manufacturing Processes Laboratory (AMPL) that are significant enough to warrant consideration in Sandia National Laboratories' operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment is prepared in accordance with the Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requirement that facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment provides an analysis of the potential airborne release of chemicals associated with the operations and processes at the AMPL. This research and development laboratory develops advanced manufacturing technologies, practices, and unique equipment and provides the fabrication of prototype hardware to meet the needs of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM). The focus of the hazards assessment is the airborne release of materials because this requires the most rapid, coordinated emergency response on the part of the AMPL, SNL/NM, collocated facilities, and surrounding jurisdiction to protect workers, the public, and the environment

  6. Advanced Manufacturing Processes Laboratory Building 878 hazards assessment document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, C.; Thornton, W.; Swihart, A.; Gilman, T.

    1994-07-01

    The introduction of the hazards assessment process is to document the impact of the release of hazards at the Advanced Manufacturing Processes Laboratory (AMPL) that are significant enough to warrant consideration in Sandia National Laboratories` operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment is prepared in accordance with the Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requirement that facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment provides an analysis of the potential airborne release of chemicals associated with the operations and processes at the AMPL. This research and development laboratory develops advanced manufacturing technologies, practices, and unique equipment and provides the fabrication of prototype hardware to meet the needs of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM). The focus of the hazards assessment is the airborne release of materials because this requires the most rapid, coordinated emergency response on the part of the AMPL, SNL/NM, collocated facilities, and surrounding jurisdiction to protect workers, the public, and the environment.

  7. PIE technology on mechanical tests for HTTR core component and structural materials developed at Research Hot Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizaki, Minoru; Honda, Junichi; Usami, Kouji; Ouchi, Asao; Oeda, Etsuro; Matsumoto, Seiichiro

    2001-02-01

    The high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) with the target operation temperature of 950degC established the first criticality on November, 1998 based on a large amount of R and D results on fuel and materials. In such R and D works, the development of reactor materials are one of the key issues from the view point of reactor environments such as extremely high temperature, neutron irradiation and so on for the HTTR. The Research Hot Laboratory (RHL) had carried out much kind of post irradiation examinations (PIEs) on core component and pressure vessel materials for during more than a quarter century. And obtained data played an important role in development, characterization and licensing of those materials for the HTTR. This paper describes the PIE technology developed at RHL and typical results on mechanical tests such as elevated temperature tensile and creep rupture tests for Hasteloy-X, Incolloy 800H and so on, and Charpy impact, J IC fracture toughness, K Id fracture toughness and small punch tests for normalized and tempered 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel from historical view. In addition, an electrochemical test technique established for investigating the irradiation embrittlement mechanism on 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel is also mentioned. (author)

  8. Improved monitoring procedure for Iodine -131 in radiochemical process laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Pratap; Yadav, R.K.B.; Anilkumar, S.; Gopalakrishnan, R.K.; Chakraborty, S.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation Hazard Control Unit at Isotope wing provides radiological safety support and advises for safe processing and production of radiopharmaceuticals. Tellurium Oxide (TeO 2 ), irradiated in a nuclear reactor, is processed in a process laboratory for separating 131 I using dry distillation technique. The workplace environment is being assessed for airborne radioactivity using installed Static Air Samplers (SASs). SASs contains two filter media (glass fibre and charcoal impregnated paper) to collect airborne 131 I radioactivity and laboratory air sampled at 50 litres per minutes (lpm). Personal Air Sampler (PAS) consists of three types of filters viz. a glass fibre, charcoal impregnated paper and cartridges containing activated charcoal granules. Three combinations were studied at a sampling rate of 5 lpm

  9. Pyrochemical processing automation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennison, D.K.; Domning, E.E.; Seivers, R.

    1991-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing a fully automated system for pyrochemical processing of special nuclear materials (SNM). The system utilizes a glove box, an automated tilt-pour furnace (TPF), an IBM developed gantry robot, and specialized automation tooling. All material handling within the glove box (i.e., furnace loading, furnace unloading, product and slag separation, and product packaging) is performed automatically. The objectives of the effort are to increase process productivity, decrease operator radiation, reduce process wastes, and demonstrate system reliability and availability. This paper provides an overview of the automated system hardware, outlines the overall operations sequence, and discusses the current status

  10. Manual on laboratory testing for uranium ore processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Laboratory testing of uranium ores is an essential step in the economic evaluation of uranium occurrences and in the development of a project for the production of uranium concentrates. Although these tests represent only a small proportion of the total cost of a project, their proper planning, execution and interpretation are of crucial importance. The main purposes of this manual are to discuss the objectives of metallurgical laboratory ore testing, to show the specific role of these tests in the development of a project, and to provide practical instructions for performing the tests and for interpreting their results. Guidelines on the design of a metallurgical laboratory, on the equipment required to perform the tests and on laboratory safety are also given. This manual is part of a series of Technical Reports on uranium ore processing being prepared by the IAEA's Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management. A report on the Significance of Mineralogy in the Development of Flowsheets for Processing Uranium Ores (Technical Reports Series No. 196, 1980) and an instruction manual on Methods for the Estimation of Uranium Ore Reserves (No. 255, 1985) have already been published. 17 refs, 40 figs, 17 tabs

  11. Setting Mechanical Properties of High Strength Steels for Rapid Hot Forming Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löbbe, Christian; Hering, Oliver; Hiegemann, Lars; Tekkaya, A. Erman

    2016-01-01

    Hot stamping of sheet metal is an established method for the manufacturing of light weight products with tailored properties. However, the generally-applied continuous roller furnace manifests two crucial disadvantages: the overall process time is long and a local setting of mechanical properties is only feasible through special cooling techniques. Hot forming with rapid heating directly before shaping is a new approach, which not only reduces the thermal intervention in the zones of critical formability and requested properties, but also allows the processing of an advantageous microstructure characterized by less grain growth, additional fractions (e.g., retained austenite), and undissolved carbides. Since the austenitization and homogenization process is strongly dependent on the microstructure constitution, the general applicability for the process relevant parameters is unknown. Thus, different austenitization parameters are analyzed for the conventional high strength steels 22MnB5, Docol 1400M, and DP1000 in respect of the mechanical properties. In order to characterize the resulting microstructure, the light optical and scanning electron microscopy, micro and macro hardness measurements, and the X-ray diffraction are conducted subsequent to tensile tests. The investigation proves not only the feasibility to adjust the strength and ductility flexibly, unique microstructures are also observed and the governing mechanisms are clarified. PMID:28773354

  12. Novel process chain for hot metal gas forming of ferritic stainless steel 1.4509

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosel, André; Lambarri, Jon; Degenkolb, Lars; Reuther, Franz; Hinojo, José Luis; Rößiger, Jörg; Eurich, Egbert; Albert, André; Landgrebe, Dirk; Wenzel, Holger

    2018-05-01

    Exhaust gas components of automobiles are often produced in ferritic stainless steel 1.4509 due to the low thermal expansion coefficient and the low material price. Until now, components of the stainless steel with complex geometries have been produced in series by means of multi-stage hydroforming at room temperature with intermediate annealing operations. The application of a single-stage hot-forming process, also referred to as hot metal gas forming (HMGF), offers great potential to significantly reduce the production costs of such components. The article describes a novel process chain for the HMGF process. Therefore the tube is heated in two steps. After pre-heating of the semi-finished product outside the press, the tube is heated up to forming start temperature by means of a tool-integrated conductive heating before forming. For the tube of a demonstrator geometry, a simulation model for the conduction heating was set up. In addition to the tool development for this process, experimental results are also described for the production of the demonstrator geometry.

  13. Environmental assessment for the Processing and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed Processing and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETC) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). This facility is needed to integrate, consolidate, and enhance the materials science and materials process research and development (R ampersand D) currently in progress at SNL/NM. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI)

  14. Environmental assessment for the Processing and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed Processing and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETC) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). This facility is needed to integrate, consolidate, and enhance the materials science and materials process research and development (R&D) currently in progress at SNL/NM. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  15. Implementing a lessons learned process at Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fosshage, Erik D.; Drewien, Celeste A.; Eras, Kenneth; Hartwig, Ronald Craig; Post, Debra S.; Stoecker, Nora Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    The Lessons Learned Process Improvement Team was tasked to gain an understanding of the existing lessons learned environment within the major programs at Sandia National Laboratories, identify opportunities for improvement in that environment as compared to desired attributes, propose alternative implementations to address existing inefficiencies, perform qualitative evaluations of alternative implementations, and recommend one or more near-term activities for prototyping and/or implementation. This report documents the work and findings of the team.

  16. Waste treatment process by solidifying cementitious materials using hydrothermal hot-pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Kamakura, T.; Yamasaki, N.; Hashida, T.

    2001-01-01

    Solidification of low-level radioactive wastes containing Na 2 SO 4 with cement by hydrothermal hot-pressing (HHP) technique was examined. Relatively high mechanical strength, reduced leaching ratio of SO 3 , and higher resistance to the carbonation of the HHP product were attained in comparison with conventional concrete. The solidification by the HHP treatment may be proceeded by the rearrangement of particles and the bonding material formation among the particles by dissolution-deposition process. The possibility of developing the accelerated testing method for duration of cemented materials by hydrothermal method was discussed. (author)

  17. Rapid radiochemical procedures for a process support laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beals, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    An on-site mobile laboratory has been installed near a groundwater treatment facility, and rapid analytical procedures have been deployed for determining sample activity in the process support laboratory. The required analyses to support the remediation project include gross alpha/, gross nonvolatile beta, 90 Sr, 99 Tc, 137 Cs and total Ra (226 + 228). The present mission of the Savannah River Site (SRS), a US Department of Energy nuclear production facility, is one of nuclear waste stabilization and of environmental restoration and remediation. Because of previous practices of disposing low-level radioactive waste to seepage basins, some of the groundwater under the SRS has become contaminated with radioactive species. A water treatment facility has been installed to remediate the groundwater below the old F and H areas' seepage basins. Groundwater is pumped from the contaminated aquifer through a series of filtration, ion exchange, and reverse osmosis steps and when cleaned is reinjected back into the aquifer. Samples are pulled from various points in the treatment facility to ensure that the process is working as designed. In order to minimize turnaround time for these analyses, a process control station (i.e., a mobile on-site laboratory) has been installed at the F area water treatment unit, and rapid radioanalytical procedures have been deployed

  18. Rolling process simulation of a pair-crossed hot strip mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shaojie; Xu Jianzhong; Liu Xianghua; Wang Guodong

    2000-01-01

    Process simulation can help optimize the operating parameters aiming to improve the quality of rolled products. In this paper, software in Visual Basic language is developed to simulate the hot rolling process of a pair-crossed mill. The strip temperature is calculated by considering air cooling, water cooling, heat generation and conduction.The production parameters including rolling speeds, resistance to deformation, rolling forces, drive torques and powers are evaluated by mathematical models and their parameter identification support tools. The deformation of roll stack is calculated by influential function method. The roll temperature and expansion are calculated by finite differential method, and the roll wear is described by empirical formula. Based on these calculations as well as the effect of heredity is taken into account, the strip crown and flatness then can be obtained. The results show that the simulation software has friendly user interface, high accuracy and practicability. It can be served as a basis for the mill design and optimization of process parameters to acquire high quality of hot rolled strip. (author)

  19. Process data in safeguards at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehinger, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    The desire to improve timeliness and sensitivity of material control and accounting capabilities is the basis for evaluation and upgrade of regulatory requirements throughout the nuclear industry. Improvements invariably require better measurement capabilities and more frequent measurements. Operating plants typically include a broad range of measurements and equipment devoted to process control. How can these measurements be used to benefit safeguards? A part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has focused on the use of process data for safeguards. This report discusses recent safeguards demonstrations and current activities in a test facility at Oak Ridge

  20. Industrial versus Laboratory Clinker Processing Using Grinding Aids (Scale Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Jean Assaad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of grinding aid (GA effect on clinker processing in laboratory grinding mills is relatively simple. Yet, the results obtained cannot be directly transposed to industrial mills, given the fundamentally different operational modes and grinding parameters. This paper seeks to evaluate the scale effect by comparing the results obtained from a closed-circuit tube mill operating at 90 ton/hr to those determined using a 50-liter laboratory mill. Tests results have shown that the decrease in specific energy consumption (Ec due to glycol or amine-based GA can be evaluated under laboratory conditions. However, such tests underestimate the actual performance that could be achieved in real-scale mills; the Ec reduction due to GA is around twofold higher when grinding is performed in real-scale mill. Compared to industrial tests, the cement particle size distribution curves widened and shifted towards higher diameters when grinding was performed under laboratory conditions, particularly with GA additions. This led to remarkable changes in water demand, setting time, and 1- and 28-day compressive strengths.

  1. The use of electromagnetic field in designing the high quality Al alloys for hot forging process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonko Gulišija

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a way to obtain the better quality of EN AW 7075 aluminum high-strength alloy by application of electromagnetic field (EMF during the casting process. In this way, the uniform fine-grained microstructure, and hence the better mechanical properties of the alloy can be achieved. The microstructure and mechanical characterization for samples obtained with and without EMF were performed. The application of numerical simulation for hot forging process, using appropriate software, is efficient and highly useful tool for problem prediction in industrial production, reducing the time and costs in the process of development of new products. The input data of high strength Al-alloy EN AW-7075 is used for simulation because it enables the development of parts with complex dimensions and shape.

  2. Waste reduction efforts through the evaluation and procurement of a digital camera system for the Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, T. S.; Cohen, A. B.; Tsai, H.; Kettman, W. C.; Trychta, K.

    1999-01-01

    The Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility (AGHCF) at Argonne National Laboratory-East is a research facility where sample examinations involve traditional photography. The AGHCF documents samples with photographs (both Polaroid self-developing and negative film). Wastes generated include developing chemicals. The AGHCF evaluated, procured, and installed a digital camera system for the Leitz metallograph to significantly reduce labor, supplies, and wastes associated with traditional photography with a return on investment of less than two years

  3. The effects of polymers' visco-elastoplastic properties on the micro cavities filling step of hot embossing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gang; Barrière, Thierry

    2018-05-01

    The hot embossing process has been widely used in the manufacturing of polymer components, especially for the fabrication of micro or nano components. The significant advantage of the hot embossing process compared to the traditional injection moulding process is the excellent effective filling ratio for the high aspect ratio components and large surface structural components. The lack of material behavior modeling and numerical simulation limits the further development the hot embossing process, especially at the micro and nano scales. In this paper, a visco-elastoplastic behavior law has been proposed to describe the amorphous thermoplastic polymer mechanical properties in the hot embossing processing temperature range, which is lightly above their glass transition temperature. Uniaxial compression tests have been carried out in order to investigate the amorphous thermoplastic polymers properties. The material parameters in the visco-elastoplastic model have been identified according to the experimental results. A 3D numerical model has been created in the simulation software, which is based on the finite element method. The numerical simulation of the filling step of the hot embossing process has been effectuated by taking into account the viscous, elastic and plastic behaviors of thermoplastic polymers. The micro hot embossing process has been carried out using horizontal injection compression moulding equipment. A complete compression mould tool, equipped with the heating system, the cooling system, the ejection system and the vacuum system, has been designed and elaborated for this research work. The microfluidic devices based on the amorphous thermoplastic polymers have been successfully elaborated by hot embossing process. Proper agreement between the numerical simulation and the experimental elaboration has been obtained.

  4. Variation of microstructures and mechanical properties of hot heading process of super heat resisting alloy Inconel 718

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hong Seok; Ko, Dae Chul; Kim, Byung Min

    2007-01-01

    Metal forming is the process changing shapes and mechanical properties of the workpiece without initial material reduction through plastic deformation. Above all, because of hot working carried out above recrystallization temperature can be generated large deformation with one blow, it can produce with forging complicated parts or heat resisting super alloy such as Inconel 718 has the worst forgeability. In this paper, we established optimal variation of hot heading process of the Inconel 718 used in heat resisting component and evaluated mechanical properties hot worked product. Die material is SKD61 and initial temperature is 300 .deg. C. Initial billet temperature and punch velocity changed, relatively. Friction coefficient is 0.3 as lubricated condition of hot working. CAE is carried out using DEFORM software before marking the tryout part, and it is manufactured 150 ton screw press with optimal condition. It is know that forming load was decreased according to decreasing punch velocity

  5. Estimation of radiation exposure for hot cell workers during DUPIC fuel fabrication process in IMEF M6 cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Yong Bum; Baek, Sang Yeol; Park, Dae Kyu

    1997-06-01

    DUPIC(Direct Use of spent PWR fuel In CANDU) fuel cycle to utilize the PWR spent fuel in fabricating CANDU fuel, which is expected to reduce not only the total amount of high level radwastes but the energy sources is underway. IMEF M6 cell to be used as DUPIC fuel fabrication facility is refurbished and retrofitted. Radiation exposure for the hot cell worker by dispersion of the radioactive materials during the DUPIC process were estimated on the basis of the hot cell design information. According to the estimation results, DUPIC fuel fabrication process could be run without any severe impacts to the hot cell workers when the ventilation system to maintain the sufficient pressure difference between hotcell and working area and radiation monitoring system is supports the hot cell operation properly. (author). 4 tabs., 6 figs.

  6. Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High-Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yongqi; DeVries, Nicholas; Ruhter, David; Manoranjan, Sahu; Ye, Qing; Ye, Xinhuai; Zhang, Shihan; Chen, Scott; Li, Zhiwei; O' Brien, Kevin

    2014-03-31

    A novel Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High-Pressure Stripping (Hot-CAP) has been developed by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC in this three-year, bench-scale project. The Hot-CAP features a concentrated carbonate solution (e.g., K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) for CO{sub 2} absorption and a bicarbonate slurry (e.g., KHCO{sub 3}) for high-pressure CO{sub 2} stripping to overcome the energy use and other disadvantages associated with the benchmark monoethanolamine (MEA) process. The project was aimed at performing laboratory- and bench-scale experiments to prove its technical feasibility and generate process engineering and scale-up data, and conducting a techno-economic analysis (TEA) to demonstrate its energy use and cost competitiveness over MEA. To meet project goals and objectives, a combination of experimental, modeling, process simulation, and economic analysis studies were applied. Carefully designed and intensive experiments were conducted to measure thermodynamic and reaction engineering data relevant to four major unit operations in the Hot-CAP (i.e., CO{sub 2} absorption, CO{sub 2} stripping, bicarbonate crystallization, and sulfate reclamation). The rate promoters that could accelerate the CO{sub 2} absorption rate into the potassium carbonate/bicarbonate (PCB) solution to a level greater than that into the 5 M MEA solution were identified, and the superior performance of CO{sub 2} absorption into PCB was demonstrated in a bench-scale packed-bed column. Kinetic data on bicarbonate crystallization were developed and applied for crystallizer design and sizing. Parametric testing of high-pressure CO{sub 2} stripping with concentrated bicarbonate-dominant slurries at high temperatures ({>=}140{degrees}C) in a bench-scale stripping column demonstrated lower heat use than with MEA. The feasibility of a modified process for combining SO{sub 2} removal with CO{sub 2} capture was preliminarily

  7. Evolution of Oxide Inclusions in Si-Mn Killed Steels During Hot-Rolling Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen; Guo, Changbo; Zhang, Lifeng; Ling, Haitao; Li, Chao

    2017-10-01

    The evolution of oxide inclusions in Si-Mn killed steels refined by slags of different basicity during a four-pass industrial hot-rolling process was investigated using an automated microscopy system. High-basicity refining slag induced the formation of CaO- and Al2O3-containing inclusions, while refining slag with 0.8 basicity induced dominant inclusions of SiO2 and MnO-SiO2. CaO-SiO2-Al2O3 inclusions mainly formed endogenously during solidification and cooling of Ca-containing steels, where Ca originated from slag-steel reactions. However, the larger-sized higher-CaO inclusions originated from slag entrainment. Different inclusions presented different hot-rolling behaviors. The inclusion composition changed by deformation and new phase formation. The dominant oxide types were unchanged under refinement by low-basicity slag; however, they changed under refinement with high-basicity slag. The deformation index of inclusions decreased with increasing accumulated reduction (AR) of the steel. The difference in deformation index between different inclusion types was the largest in the first rolling stage and decreased in subsequent stages. SiO2-CaO and SiO2-MnO-CaO inclusions had larger deformation indices during hot rolling but smaller indices in the last two stages. High-basicity slag increased inclusion complexity; from the perspective of cold-drawing performance, low-basicity refining slag is better for the industrial production of tire-cord steels.

  8. Radioactive Mapping Contaminant of Alpha on The Air in Space of Repair of Hot Cell and Medium Radioactivity Laboratory in Radio metallurgy Installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusuf-Nampira; Endang-Sukesi; S-Wahyuningsih; R-Budi-Santoso

    2007-01-01

    Hot cell and space of acid laboratory medium activity in Radio metallurgy Installation are used for the examination preparation of fuel nuclear post irradiation. The sample examined is dangerous radioactive material representing which can disseminate passing air stream. The dangerous material spreading can be pursued by arranging air stream from laboratory space to examination space. To know the performance the air stream arrangement is hence conducted by radioactive mapping contaminant of alpha in laboratory / space of activity place, for example, medium activity laboratory and repair space. This mapping radioactivity contaminant is executed with the measurement level of the radioactivity from sample air taken at various height with the distance of 1 m, various distance and from potential source as contaminant spreading access. The mapping result indicate that a little spreading of radioactive material happened from acid cupboard locker to laboratory activity up to distance of 3 m from acid cupboard locker and spreading of radioactive contaminant from goods access door of the hot cell 104 to repair space reach the distance of 2 m from goods door access. Level of the radioactive contamination in the space was far under maximum limitation allowed (20 Bq / m 3 ). (author)

  9. The Results of HLW Processing Using Zirconium Salt of Dibutyl phosphoric Acid in Hot Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorov, Yu.S.; Zilberman, B.Ya.; Shmidt, O.V. [Khlopin Radium Institute, 2nd Murinsky Ave., 28, Saint-Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    Zirconium salt of dibutyl phosphoric acid (ZS HDBP), is an effective solvent for liquid HLW and ILW (high and intermediate level wastes) processing with radionuclide partitioning into different groups for further immobilization according to radiotoxicity. The rig trials in mixer-settles in hot cells were carried out using 30 L of real HLW containing transplutonium (TPE), rare earths (RE), Sr and Cs in 2 mol/L HNO{sub 3}, characterized by total specific activity 520 MBk/L. The recovery factor for TPE and RE was as high as 10{sup 4}, but only 10 for Sr. Purification factor of TPE and RE from Cs and Sr was 10{sup 4}, and that of Sr from TPE and Cs was 10{sup 3}. Almost all Cs was localized in the second cycle raffinate. So Zr salt of HDBP can be used in HLW processing with radionuclide partitioning with respect to the categories of radiotoxicity. (authors)

  10. Chemical process developments in reprocessing from 1965--1975 in the Institute for Hot Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgaertner, F.

    Work on the aqueous reprocessing of fuels is described. The following are discussed: LABEX (laboratory-scale extraction), MILLI facility (1 kg/day), problems of aqueous reprocessing, centrifugal extractor development, radiolytic products from Purex process, and TAMARA facility. Results of the MILLI operation are reviewed. Solutions to problems are discussed

  11. Westinghouse Modular Grinding Process - Enhancement of Volume Reduction for Hot Resin Supercompaction - 13491

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehrmann, Henning [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Dudenstr. 44, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Aign, Joerg [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global D and D and Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D-22419 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    In nuclear power plants (NPP) ion exchange (IX) resins are used in several systems for water treatment. Spent resins can contain a significant amount of contaminates which makes treatment for disposal of spent resins mandatory. Several treatment processes are available such as direct immobilization with technologies like cementation, bitumisation, polymer solidification or usage of a high integrity container (HIC). These technologies usually come with a significant increase in final waste volume. The Hot Resin Supercompaction (HRSC) is a thermal treatment process which reduces the resin waste volume significantly. For a mixture of powdered and bead resins the HRSC process has demonstrated a volume reduction of up to 75 % [1]. For bead resins only the HRSC process is challenging because the bead resins compaction properties are unfavorable. The bead resin material does not form a solid block after compaction and shows a high spring back effect. The volume reduction of bead resins is not as good as for the mixture described in [1]. The compaction properties of bead resin waste can be significantly improved by grinding the beads to powder. The grinding also eliminates the need for a powder additive.Westinghouse has developed a modular grinding process to grind the bead resin to powder. The developed process requires no circulation of resins and enables a selective adjustment of particle size and distribution to achieve optimal results in the HRSC or in any other following process. A special grinding tool setup is use to minimize maintenance and radiation exposure to personnel. (authors)

  12. Manufacturing and mechanical property test of the large-scale oxide dispersion strengthened martensitic mother tube by hot isostatic pressing and hot extrusion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Takeshi; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Masayuki

    2003-09-01

    Mass production capability of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel cladding (9Cr) is evaluated in the Phase II of the Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle System. The cost for manufacturing mother tube is a dominant factor in the total cost for manufacturing ODS ferritic cladding. In this study, the large-scale 9Cr-ODS martensitic mother tube was produced by overseas supplier with mass production equipments for commercialized ODS steels. The process of manufacturing the ODS mother tube consists of raw material powder production, mechanical alloying by high energy ball mill, hot isostatic pressing(HIP), and hot extrusion. Following results were obtained in this study. (1) Micro structure of the ODS steels is equivalent to that of domestic products, and fine oxides are uniformly distributed. The mechanical alloying by large capacity (1 ton) ball mill can be satisfactorily carried out. (2) A large scale mother tube (65 mm OD x 48 mm ID x 10,000 mm L), which can produce about 60 pieces of 3 m length ODS ferritic claddings by four times cold rolling, have been successfully manufactured through HIP and Hot Extrusion process. (3) Rough surface of the mother tubes produced in this study can be improved by selecting the reasonable hot extrusion condition. (4) Hardness and tensile strength of the manufactured ODS steels are lower than domestic products with same chemical composition. This is owing to the high aluminum content in the product, and those properties could be improved by decreasing the aluminum content in the raw material powder. (author)

  13. Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) is one of the largest hot cells dedicated to radioactive materials research at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The nation's...

  14. Process simulation and experimental validation of Hot Metal Gas Forming with new press hardening steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, A.; Reuther, F.; Neumann, S.; Albert, A.; Landgrebe, D.

    2017-09-01

    One field in the work of the Fraunhofer Institute for Machine Tools and Forming Technology IWU in Chemnitz is industry applied research in Hot Metal Gas Forming, combined with press hardening in one process step. In this paper the results of investigations on new press hardening steels from SSAB AB (Docol®1800 Bor and Docol®2000 Bor) are presented. Hot tensile tests recorded by the project partner (University of West Bohemia, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering) were used to create a material model for thermo-mechanical forming simulations. For this purpose the provided raw data were converted into flow curve approximations of the real stress-real strain-curves for both materials and afterwards integrated in a LS-DYNA simulation model of Hot Metal Gas Forming with all relevant boundary conditions and sub-stages. Preliminary experimental tests were carried out using a tool at room temperature to permit evaluation of the forming behaviour of Docol 1800 Bor and Docol 2000 Bor tubes as well as validation of the simulation model. Using this demonstrator geometry (outer diameter 57 mm, tube length 300 mm, wall thickness 1.5 mm), the intention was to perform a series of tests with different furnace temperatures (from 870 °C to 1035 °C), maximum internal pressures (up to 67 MPa) and pressure build-up rates (up to 40 MPa/s) to evaluate the formability of Docol 1800 Bor and Docol 2000 Bor. Selected demonstrator parts produced in that way were subsequently analysed by wall thickness and hardness measurements. The tests were carried out using the completely modernized Dunkes/AP&T HS3-1500 hydroforming press at the Fraunhofer IWU. In summary, creating a consistent simulation model with all relevant sub-stages was successfully established in LS-DYNA. The computation results show a high correlation with the experimental data regarding the thinning behaviour. The Hot Metal Gas Forming of the demonstrator geometry was successfully established as well. Different hardness values

  15. Study on Hot Deformation Behavior of 7085 Aluminum Alloy during Backward Extrusion Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Mei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Compression test was carried out and the true stress-strain curves were obtained from the hot compression of 7085 alloy. A numerical simulation on the deformation behavior of 7085 aluminum alloy during the backward extrusion was also performed by finite element method. The results show that dynamic recrystallization occurs in the hot compression of 7085 alloy and the peak stress reaches higher values as the strain rate increases and deformation temperature decreases. The backward extrusion processes include contact deformation, initial deformation, and steady deformation. Severe plastic deformation of shear and compression occurs when the metal flowed into the channel between fillet of punch and wall of die so that the grain size can be refined by backward extrusion. The deformation in the region of top of wall is too small to meet the mechanical properties of requirements and the metal usually needs to be trimmed. The experiments with the same parameters as simulation had been carried out and the experimental cup after extrusion has better quality.

  16. Polymorphic Transformation of Indomethacin during Hot Melt Extrusion Granulation: Process and Dissolution Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Nahar, Kajalajit; Dave, Rutesh; Bates, Simon; Morris, Kenneth

    2018-05-10

    To study and elucidate the effect of the intensity and duration of processing stresses on the possible solid-state changes during a hot melt extrusion granulation process. Blends of α-indomethacin and PEG 3350 (w/w 4:1) were granulated using various screw sizes/designs on the melt extruder under different temperature regimes. Differential Scanning Calorimetry and X-ray Powder Diffraction were employed for characterization. The dissolution behavior of the pure polymorphs and the resulting granules was determined using in-situ fiber optic UV testing system. An XRPD quantitation method using Excel full pattern fitting was developed to determine the concentration of each constituent (amorphous, α and γ indomethacin and PEG) in samples collected from each functioning zone and in granules. Analysis of in-process samples and granules revealed that higher temperature (≥130°C) and shear stress accelerated the process induced phase transitions from amorphous and/or the α form to γ indomethacin during heating stage. However, rapid cooling resulted in an increased percentage of the α form allowing isolation of the meta-stable form. By determining the conditions that either prevent or facilitate process induced transformations of IMC polymorphs during melt granulation, a design space was developed to control the polymorph present in the resulting granules. This represents the conditions necessary to balance the thermodynamic relationships between the polymorphs of the IMC system and the kinetics of the possible transformations as a function of the processing stresses.

  17. Processes of conversion of a hot metal particle into aerogel through clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, B. M., E-mail: bmsmirnov@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    Processes are considered for conversion into a fractal structure of a hot metal micron-size particle that is located in a buffer gas or a gas flow and is heated by an external electric or electromagnetic source or by a plasma. The parameter of this heating is the particle temperature, which is the same in the entire particle volume because of its small size and high conductivity. Three processes determine the particle heat balance: particle radiation, evaporation of metal atoms from the particle surface, and heat transport to the surrounding gas due to its thermal conductivity. The particle heat balance is analyzed based on these processes, which are analogous to those for bulk metals with the small particle size, and its high temperature taken into account. Outside the particle, where the gas temperature is lower than on its surface, the formed metal vapor in a buffer gas flow is converted into clusters. Clusters grow as a result of coagulation until they become liquid, and then clusters form fractal aggregates if they are removed form the gas flow. Subsequently, associations of fractal aggregates join into a fractal structure. The rate of this process increases in medium electric fields, and the formed fractal structure has features of aerogels and fractal fibers. As a result of a chain of the above processes, a porous metal film may be manufactured for use as a filter or catalyst for gas flows.

  18. The coupled process laboratory test of highly compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Zhenyao; Li Guoding; Li Shushen; Wang Chengzu

    2004-01-01

    Highly compacted bentonite blocks have been heated and hydrated in the laboratory in order to simulate the thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) coupled processes of buffer material in a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository. The experiment facility, which is composed of experiment barrel, heated system, high pressure water input system, temperature measure system, water content measure system and swelling stress system, is introduced in this paper. The steps of the THM coupled experiment are also given out in detail. There are total 10 highly compacted bentonite blocks used in this test. Experimental number 1-4 are the tests with the heater and the hydrated process, which temperature distribution vs. time and final moisture distribution are measured. Experimental number 5-8 are the tests with the heater and without the hydrated process, which temperature distribution vs. time and final moisture distribution are measured. Experimental number 9-10 are the tests with the heater and the hydrated process, which temperature distribution vs. time, final moisture distribution and the swelling stress distribution at some typical points vs. time are measured. The maximum test time is nearly 20 days and the minimum test time is only 8 hours. The results show that the temperature field is little affected by hydration process and stress condition, but moisture transport and stress distribution are a little affected by the thermal gradient. The results also show that the water head difference is the mainly driving force of hydration process and the swelling stress is mainly from hydration process. It will great help to understand better about heat and mass transfer in porous media and the THM coupled process in actual HLW disposal. (author)

  19. Research of the heat exchanging processes running in the heating and hot water supply loops of the coil heat exchangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ірина Геннадіївна Шитікова

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The fuel-energy complex research has made it possible to disclose a huge power-saving potential in the municipal heat-and-power engineering. Power-and-resource-saving units and systems are becoming extremely urgent because of the power engineering crisis expansion. The self-adjusting heat supply system from the individual heating points with the heat-accumulating units and coil heat exchangers for independent heating and water supply systems has been examined. Coil heat exchangers are used in municipal heating for heat transfer (e.g. geothermal waters for the independent mains of the heating and hot water supply systems. The heat engineering calculation of the heating and accumulating unit with the coil heat exchanger for independent heat supply systems from individual heater was performed and experimental data were received at the experimental industrial unit under the laboratory conditions. The peculiarities of the flows in the intertubular space, their influence on the heat exchange and temperatures of the first and intermediate mains have been shown. It is important to know the processes running inside the apparatus to be able to improve the technical characteristics of the three-loop coil heat exchanger. The task solution will make it possible to save the materials consumption for the three-loop coil heat exchangers in the future

  20. Information use differences in hot and cold risk processing: When does information about probability count in the Columbia Card Task?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz eMarkiewicz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This paper aims to provide insight into information processing differences between hot and cold risk taking decision tasks within a single domain. Decision theory defines risky situations using at least three parameters: outcome one (often a gain with its probability and outcome two (often a loss with a complementary probability. Although a rational agent should consider all of the parameters, decision maker could potentially narrow focus to only some of them, particularly when explicit Type 2 processes do not have the resources to override implicit Type 1 processes. Here we investigate differences in risky situation parameter(s influence on hot and cold decisions. Although previous studies show lower information use in hot as compared to cold processes, they do not provide decision weight changes and therefore do not explain whether this difference results from worse concentration on each parameter of a risky situation (probability, gain amount and loss amount or from ignoring some parameters. Methods: Two studies were conducted, with participants performing the Columbia Card Task (CCT in either its Cold or Hot version. In the first study, participants also performed the Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT to monitor their ability to override Type 1 processing cues (implicit processes with Type 2 explicit processes. Because hypothesis testing required comparison of the relative importance of risky situation decision weights (gain, loss, probability, we developed a novel way of measuring information use in the CCT by employing a conjoint analysis methodology. Results: Across the two studies, results indicated that in the CCT Cold condition decision makers concentrate on each information type (gain, loss, probability, but in the CCT Hot condition they concentrate mostly on a single parameter: probability of gain/loss. We also show that an individual’s CRT score correlates with information use propensity in cold but not hot tasks. Thus

  1. Information Use Differences in Hot and Cold Risk Processing: When Does Information About Probability Count in the Columbia Card Task?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiewicz, Łukasz; Kubińska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to provide insight into information processing differences between hot and cold risk taking decision tasks within a single domain. Decision theory defines risky situations using at least three parameters: outcome one (often a gain) with its probability and outcome two (often a loss) with a complementary probability. Although a rational agent should consider all of the parameters, s/he could potentially narrow their focus to only some of them, particularly when explicit Type 2 processes do not have the resources to override implicit Type 1 processes. Here we investigate differences in risky situation parameters' influence on hot and cold decisions. Although previous studies show lower information use in hot than in cold processes, they do not provide decision weight changes and therefore do not explain whether this difference results from worse concentration on each parameter of a risky situation (probability, gain amount, and loss amount) or from ignoring some parameters. Two studies were conducted, with participants performing the Columbia Card Task (CCT) in either its Cold or Hot version. In the first study, participants also performed the Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT) to monitor their ability to override Type 1 processing cues (implicit processes) with Type 2 explicit processes. Because hypothesis testing required comparison of the relative importance of risky situation decision weights (gain, loss, probability), we developed a novel way of measuring information use in the CCT by employing a conjoint analysis methodology. Across the two studies, results indicated that in the CCT Cold condition decision makers concentrate on each information type (gain, loss, probability), but in the CCT Hot condition they concentrate mostly on a single parameter: probability of gain/loss. We also show that an individual's CRT score correlates with information use propensity in cold but not hot tasks. Thus, the affective dimension of hot tasks inhibits correct

  2. Information Use Differences in Hot and Cold Risk Processing: When Does Information About Probability Count in the Columbia Card Task?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiewicz, Łukasz; Kubińska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This paper aims to provide insight into information processing differences between hot and cold risk taking decision tasks within a single domain. Decision theory defines risky situations using at least three parameters: outcome one (often a gain) with its probability and outcome two (often a loss) with a complementary probability. Although a rational agent should consider all of the parameters, s/he could potentially narrow their focus to only some of them, particularly when explicit Type 2 processes do not have the resources to override implicit Type 1 processes. Here we investigate differences in risky situation parameters' influence on hot and cold decisions. Although previous studies show lower information use in hot than in cold processes, they do not provide decision weight changes and therefore do not explain whether this difference results from worse concentration on each parameter of a risky situation (probability, gain amount, and loss amount) or from ignoring some parameters. Methods: Two studies were conducted, with participants performing the Columbia Card Task (CCT) in either its Cold or Hot version. In the first study, participants also performed the Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT) to monitor their ability to override Type 1 processing cues (implicit processes) with Type 2 explicit processes. Because hypothesis testing required comparison of the relative importance of risky situation decision weights (gain, loss, probability), we developed a novel way of measuring information use in the CCT by employing a conjoint analysis methodology. Results: Across the two studies, results indicated that in the CCT Cold condition decision makers concentrate on each information type (gain, loss, probability), but in the CCT Hot condition they concentrate mostly on a single parameter: probability of gain/loss. We also show that an individual's CRT score correlates with information use propensity in cold but not hot tasks. Thus, the affective dimension of

  3. Hot ethanol extraction: economic feasibility of a new and green process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carré Patrick

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A new extraction process using ethanol at a temperature above boiling point is assessed from an economic point of view. The study was based on an assessment of the main operating costs adjusted by Lang’s factor. Operating costs were assessed based on energy consumption calculated using a model of the process developed from experimental results, and for a hypothetical unit with a 160 000 t/year rapeseed crushing capacity. The processing cost was estimated at 47.4 € per ton of processed seed. Amortization represented 35% of this cost, energy 32% and manpower 10%. Uncertainty about investment is the main factor that could lead to significant error in this cost, but this uncertainty could be offset by an adjustment of the amortization duration, most of the equipment being durable. Profit generated by the process relies principally on a better valuation of the meal: higher value comes from higher protein content and quality on the market for GM-free high protein feedstuffs. Oil quality is also improved by a lower oleic acidity, low phospholipid content and pigment concentration. This gain was estimated at 2.5% of the crude oil value. Unlike the conventional hexane process, hot ethanol extraction produces molasses in small proportions. Molasses value was set at 70% of corn price. The process profitability appears sufficiently positive to justify further research to test the hypothesis underlying our model. The main uncertainty lies in the performance of the process in real conditions of counter-flow extraction and solvent regeneration.

  4. The Sodium Process Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Henslee, S.P.; McDermott, M.D.; Price, J.R.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Wells, P.B.

    1998-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) has approximately 680,000 liters of raw sodium stored in facilities on site. As mandated by the State of Idaho and the US Department of Energy (DOE), this sodium must be transformed into a stable condition for land disposal. To comply with this mandate, ANL-W designed and built the Sodium Process Facility (SPF) for the processing of this sodium into a dry, sodium carbonate powder. The major portion of the sodium stored at ANL-W is radioactively contaminated. The sodium will be processed in three separate and distinct campaigns: the 290,000 liters of Fermi-1 primary sodium, the 50,000 liters of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) secondary sodium, and the 330,000 liters of the EBR-II primary sodium. The Fermi-1 and the EBR-II secondary sodium contain only low-level of radiation, while the EBR-II primary sodium has radiation levels up to 0.5 mSv (50 mrem) per hour at 1 meter. The EBR-II primary sodium will be processed last, allowing the operating experience to be gained with the less radioactive sodium prior to reacting the most radioactive sodium. The sodium carbonate will be disposed of in 270 liter barrels, four to a pallet. These barrels are square in cross-section, allowing for maximum utilization of the space on a pallet, minimizing the required landfill space required for disposal

  5. The Sodium Process Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Henslee, S.P. McDermott, M.D.; Price, J.R.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Wells, P.B.

    1998-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) has approximately 680,000 liters of raw sodium stored in facilities on site. As mandated by the State of Idaho and the US Department of Energy (DOE), this sodium must be transformed into a stable condition for land disposal. To comply with this mandate, ANL-W designed and built the Sodium Process Facility (SPF) for the processing of this sodium into a dry, sodium carbonate powder. The major portion of the sodium stored at ANL-W is radioactively contaminated. The sodium will be processed in three separate and distinct campaigns: the 290,000 liters of Fermi-1 primary sodium, the 50,000 liters of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) secondary sodium, and the 330,000 liters of the EBR-II primary sodium. The Fermi-1 and the EBR-II secondary sodium contain only low-level of radiation, while the EBR-II primary sodium has radiation levels up to 0.5 mSv (50 mrem) per hour at 1 meter. The EBR-II primary sodium will be processed last, allowing the operating experience to be gained with the less radioactive sodium prior to reacting the most radioactive sodium. The sodium carbonate will be disposed of in 270 liter barrels, four to a pallet. These barrels are square in cross-section, allowing for maximum utilization of the space on a pallet, minimizing the required landfill space required for disposal.

  6. Hot forming and quenching pilot process development for low cost and low environmental impact manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Roger W.; Foster, Alistair; Herrmann Praturlon, Anja

    2017-09-01

    The Hot Forming and in-tool Quenching (HFQ®) process is a proven technique to enable complex shaped stampings to be manufactured from high strength aluminium. Its widespread uptake for high volume production will be maximised if it is able to wholly amortise the additional investment cost of this process compared to conventional deep drawing techniques. This paper discusses the use of three techniques to guide some of the development decisions taken during upscaling of the HFQ® process. Modelling of Process timing, Cost and Life-cycle impact were found to be effective tools to identify where development budget could be focused in order to be able to manufacture low cost panels of different sizes from many different alloys in a sustainable way. The results confirm that raw material cost, panel trimming, and artificial ageing were some of the highest contributing factors to final component cost. Additionally, heat treatment and lubricant removal stages played a significant role in the overall life-cycle assessment of the final products. These findings confirmed development priorities as novel furnace design, fast artificial ageing and low-cost alloy development.

  7. Hot Experiment on Fission Gas Release Behavior from Voloxidation Process using Spent Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Geun Il; Park, J. J.; Jung, I. H.; Shin, J. M.; Cho, K. H.; Yang, M. S.; Song, K. C.

    2007-08-01

    Quantitative analysis of the fission gas release characteristics during the voloxidation and OREOX processes of spent PWR fuel was carried out by spent PWR fuel in a hot-cell of the DFDF. The release characteristics of 85 Kr and 14 C fission gases during voloxidation process at 500 .deg. C is closely linked to the degree of conversion efficiency of UO 2 to U 3 O 8 powder, and it can be interpreted that the release from grain-boundary would be dominated during this step. Volatile fission gases of 14 C and 85 Kr were released to near completion during the OREOX process. Both the 14 C and 85 Kr have similar release characteristics under the voloxidation and OREOX process conditions. A higher burn-up spent fuel showed a higher release fraction than that of a low burn-up fuel during the voloxidation step at 500 .deg. C. It was also observed that the release fraction of semi-volatile Cs was about 16% during a reduction at 1,000 .deg. C of the oxidized powder, but over 90% during the voloxidation at 1,250 .deg. C

  8. Identification of a process window for tailored carburization of sheet metals in hot stamping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Alexander; Merklein, Marion

    2018-05-01

    Due to governmental regulations concerning the reduction of CO2 emissions and increasing safety standards, hot stamping of high strength boron manganese steel sheets has evolved into a state of the art process for manufacturing structural car body parts. The combined forming and in-die quenching process enables the formation of a fully martensitic microstructure. Therefore, press hardened steels offer high strength, but low ductility. In order to further improve passenger safety, a tailored configuration of mechanical properties is desired. Besides state of the art methods, like the application of locally different heat treatment temperatures or varying quenching rates, the adjustment of mechanical properties of sheet metals by a tailored carburization is a novel approach. For the carburization process, the specimens are first coated with graphite and subsequently heat treated. Within this contribution, different coating strategies as well as heat treatment temperatures and dwell times are investigated. For the determination of a process window, mechanical properties such as tensile strength and microhardness will be analyzed and correlated with the resulting microstructure.

  9. Integrated hot fuel gas cleaning for advanced gasification combined cycle process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieminen, M.; Kangasmaa, K.; Laatikainen, J.; Staahlberg, P.; Kurkela, E. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Gasification and Advanced Combustion

    1996-12-01

    The fate of halogens in pressurised fluidized-bed gasification and hot gas filtration is determined. Potential halogen removal sorbents, suitable for integrated hot gas cleaning, are screened and some selected sorbents are tested in bench scale. Finally, halogen removal results are verified using the PDU-scale pressurised fluidized-bed gasification and integrated hot gas cleaning facilities of VTT. The project is part of the JOULE II Extension programme of the European Union. (author)

  10. Data Processing and Programming Applied to an Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinidad, J. A.; Gasco, C.; Palacios, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    This report is the original research work presented for the attainment of the author master degree and its main objective has been the resolution -by means of friendly programming- of some of the observed problems in the environmental radioactivity laboratory belonging to the Department of Radiological Surveillance and Environmental Radioactivity from CIEMAT. The software has been developed in Visual Basic for applications in Excel files and it solves by macro orders three of the detected problems: a) calculation of characteristic limits for the measurements of the beta total and beta rest activity concentrations according to standards MARLAP, ISO and UNE and the comparison of the three results b) Pb-210 and Po-210 decontamination factor determination in the ultra-low level Am-241 analysis in air samples by alpha spectrometry and c) comparison of two analytical techniques for measuring Pb-210 in air ( direct-by gamma spectrometry- and indirect -by radiochemical separation and alpha spectrometry). The organization processes of the different excel files implied in the subroutines, calculations and required formulae are explained graphically for its comprehension. The advantage of using this kind of programmes is based on their versatility and the ease for obtaining data that lately are required by tables that can be modified as time goes by and the laboratory gets more data with the special applications for describing a method (Pb-210 decontamination factors for americium analysis in air) or comparing temporal series of Pb-210 data analysed by different methods (Pb-210 in air). (Author)

  11. Chemical hot gas purification for biomass gasification processes; Chemische Heissgasreinigung bei Biomassevergasungsprozessen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stemmler, Michael

    2010-07-01

    The German government decided to increase the percentage of renewable energy up to 20 % of all energy consumed in 2020. The development of biomass gasification technology is advanced compared to most of the other technologies for producing renewable energy. So the overall efficiency of biomass gasification processes (IGCC) already increased to values above 50 %. Therefore, the production of renewable energy attaches great importance to the thermochemical biomass conversion. The feedstock for biomass gasification covers biomasses such as wood, straw and further energy plants. The detrimental trace elements released during gasification of these biomasses, e.g. KCl, H{sub 2}S and HCl, cause corrosion and harm downstream devices. Therefore, gas cleaning poses an especial challenge. In order to improve the overall efficiency this thesis aims at the development of gas cleaning concepts for the allothermic, water blown gasification at 800 C and 1 bar (Guessing-Process) as well as for the autothermic, water and oxygen blown gasification at 950 C and 18 bar (Vaernamo-Process). Although several mechanisms for KCl- and H{sub 2}S-sorption are already well known, the achievable reduction of the contamination concentration is still unknown. Therefore, calculations on the produced syngas and the chemical hot gas cleaning were done with a thermodynamic process model using SimuSage. The syngas production was included in the calculations because the knowledge of the biomass syngas composition is very limited. The results of these calculations prove the dependence of syngas composition on H{sub 2}/C-ratio and ROC (Relative Oxygen Content). Following the achievable sorption limits were detected via experiments. The KCl containing syngases were analysed by molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS). Furthermore, an optimised H{sub 2}S-sorbent was developed because the examined sorbents exceeded the sorption limit of 1 ppmv. The calculated sorption limits were compared to the limits

  12. Hot granules medium pressure forming process of AA7075 conical parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guojiang; Zhao, Changcai; Peng, Yaxin; Li, Ying

    2015-05-01

    High strength aluminum alloy plate has a low elongation at room temperature, which leads to the forming of its components need a high temperature. Liquid or gas is used as the pressure-transfer medium in the existing flexible mould forming process, the heat resistance of the medium and pressurizing device makes the application of aluminum alloy plate thermoforming restricted. To solve this problem, the existing medium is replaced by the heat-resisting solid granules and the general pressure equipments are applied. Based on the pressure-transfer performance test of the solid granules medium, the feasibility that the assumption of the extended Drucker-Prager linear model can be used in the finite element analysis is proved. The constitutive equation, the yield function and the theoretical forming limit diagram(FLD) of AA7075 sheet are established. Through the finite element numerical simulation of hot granules medium pressure forming(HGMF) process, not only the influence laws of the process parameters, such as forming temperature, the blank-holder gap and the diameter of the slab, on sheet metal forming performance are discussed, but also the broken area of the forming process is analyzed and predicted, which are coincided with the technological test. The conical part whose half cone angle is 15° and relative height H/d 0 is 0.57, is formed in one process at 250°C. The HGMF process solves the problems of loading and seal in the existing flexible mould forming process and provides a novel technology for thermoforming of light alloy plate, such as magnesium alloy, aluminium alloy and titanium alloy.

  13. Conceptual Design for the Pilot-Scale Plutonium Oxide Processing Unit in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Meier, David E.; Tingey, Joel M.; Casella, Amanda J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jones, Susan A.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2014-08-05

    This report describes a conceptual design for a pilot-scale capability to produce plutonium oxide for use as exercise and reference materials, and for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production. This capability is referred to as the Pilot-scale Plutonium oxide Processing Unit (P3U), and it will be located in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The key unit operations are described, including plutonium dioxide (PuO2) dissolution, purification of the Pu by ion exchange, precipitation, and conversion to oxide by calcination.

  14. Plutonium scrap processing at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, A.E.; McKerley, B.J.; Christensen, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory currently has the newest plutonium handling facility in the nation. Los Alamos has been active in the processing of plutonium almost since the discovery of this man-made element in 1941. One of the functions of the new facility is the processing of plutonium scrap generated at LASL and other sites. The feed for the scrap processing program is extremely varied, and a wide variety of contaminants are often encountered. Depending upon the scrap matrix and contaminants present, the majority of material receives a nitric acid/hydrofluoric acid or nitric acid/calcium fluoride leach. The plutonium nitrate solutions are then loaded onto an anion exchange column charged with DOWEX 1 x 4, 50 to 100 mesh, nitrate form resin. The column is eluted with 0.48 M hydroxyl amine nitrate. The Pu(NO 3 ) 3 is then precipitated as plutonium III oxalate which is calcined at 450 to 500 0 C to yield a purified PuO 2 product

  15. Processing effects in production of composite prepreg by hot melt impregnation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, C.; Jayaraman, K.; Petty, C. A.

    1993-06-01

    The hot melt impregnation process for producing composite prepreg has been studied. The role of the exit die is highlighted by operating without impregnation bars. Experimental results show that when a fiber tow is pulled through a resin bath and then through a wedge shaped die, the total resin mass fraction and the extent of resin impregnation in the tow increase with the processing viscosity. The penetration of resin into a fiber bundle is greater when the resin viscosity is higher. This trend is unchanged over a range of tow speeds up to the breaking point. A theoretical model is developed to describe the effect of processing conditions and die geometry on the degree of impregnation. Calculations with this model indicate that for a given die geometry, the degree of impregnation increases from 58 percent to 90 percent as the ratio of the clearance between the tow and the die wall, to the total die gap is decreased from 0.15 to 0.05. Physical arguments related to the effective viscosity of the prepreg show that the clearance ratio is independent of the tow speed, but decreases as the ratio of the effective shear viscosity of the prepreg to the resin viscosity increases. This provides a connection between the experimental results obtained with varying resin viscosity and the computational results obtained with varying clearance values at the die inlet.

  16. Analysis of Filling and Stresses in the Hot Forging Process Depending on Flange Die Shapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun Hyoung; Kim, Cheol

    2010-01-01

    Hot closed-forging process and the die used for forming an automotive flange were analyzed from the viewpoints of heat transfer, grain-flow lines, and stresses to obtain a forged product without defects such as surface cracks, laps, cold shots, and partial filling. The forging process including up-set, pre-forging, final forging and pressing forces was investigated using finite element analysis. The influence of the preform die and the ratio of the heights of the upper die to lower die on the forging process and die were investigated and a die shape (10 .deg. for the preform die, and 1.5:1 ratio for the final die) suitable to achieve successful forging was determined on the basis of a parametric study. All parametric design requirements such as strength, full filling, and a load limit of 13,000 KN were satisfied for this newly developed flange die. New dies and flanges were fabricated and investigated. Defects such as partial filling and surface cracks were not observed

  17. The Effect of Process and Model Parameters in Temperature Prediction for Hot Stamping of Boron Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoyang Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Finite element models of the hot stamping and cold die quenching process for boron steel sheet were developed using either rigid or elastic tools. The effect of tool elasticity and process parameters on workpiece temperature was investigated. Heat transfer coefficient between blank and tools was modelled as a function of gap and contact pressure. Temperature distribution and thermal history in the blank were predicted, and thickness distribution of the blank was obtained. Tests were carried out and the test results are used for the validation of numerical predictions. The effect of holding load and the size of cooling ducts on temperature distribution during the forming and the cool die quenching process was also studied by using two models. The results show that higher accuracy predictions of blank thickness and temperature distribution during deformation were obtained using the elastic tool model. However, temperature results obtained using the rigid tool model were close to those using the elastic tool model for a range of holding load.

  18. Development of the Thyssen hot briquetting process and its industrial application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeffken, E.; Pflipsen, H.D.; Seidelmann, L.; Auth, R.

    1988-07-18

    At Thyssen Stahl AG the converter waste gases of the basic oxygen steelmaking plant Bruckhausen are dedusted according to a new method , the CO included in the waste gas being recovered and used as fuel gas. The dry dusts produced in this process are dumped despite their high iron content. Considerations aimed at recovering this residues have led to the development of a hot briquetting process for converter dusts. Preliminary tests were followedby the construction of a pilot plant with a briqueting capacity of 2 to 3 t/h. As a result of the successful trials, a large-size plant for a throughput rate of 12 t/h was commissioned at mid-1987, which allows to briquet all the dusts produced in the steel plant. About 30000 t briquettes, which are charged as cooling ore and scrap in the steel plant, have been produced so far. In view of the high iron content of 60 to 70% and of the elimination of dumping costs, the process can be operated economically. The recycling of the dust has contributed, moreover, to the relief of the dumping ground and to environmental protection.

  19. Thermal performance of small solar domestic hot water systems in theory, in the laboratory and in practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa

    1998-01-01

    for poor thermal performances of systems tested in practice are given. Based on theoretical calculations the negative impact on the thermal performance, due to a large number of different parameter variations are given. Recommendations for future developments of small solar domestic hot water systems...

  20. Effects of delayed laboratory processing on platelet serotonin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanner, Jennifer E; Frazier, Lorraine; Udtha, Malini

    2013-01-01

    Despite the availability of established guidelines for measuring platelet serotonin, these guidelines may be difficult to follow in a hospital setting where time to processing may vary from sample to sample. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the time to processing of human blood samples on the stability of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the determination of platelet serotonin levels in human plasma. Human blood samples collected from a convenience sample of eight healthy volunteers were analyzed to determine platelet serotonin levels from plasma collected in ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) tubes and stored at 4°C for 3 hr, 5 hr, 8 hr, and 12 hr. Refrigeration storage at 4°C for 3 hr, 5 hr, 8 hr, and 12 hr altered the platelet serotonin measurement when compared to immediate processing. The bias for the samples stored at 4°C for 3 hr was 102.3 (±217.39 ng/10(9) platelets), for 5 hr was 200.1 (±132.76 ng/10(9) platelets), for 8 hr was 146.9 (±221.41 ng/10(9) platelets), and for 12 hr was -67.6 (±349.60 ng/10(9) platelets). Results from this study show that accurate measurement of platelet serotonin levels is dependent on time to processing. Researchers should therefore follow a standardized laboratory guideline for obtaining immediate platelet serotonin levels after blood sample collection.

  1. Potential of Laboratory Execution Systems (LESs) to Simplify the Application of Business Process Management Systems (BPMSs) in Laboratory Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, Sebastian; Göde, Bernd; Gu, Xiangyu; Stoll, Norbert; Thurow, Kerstin

    2017-04-01

    Modern business process management (BPM) is increasingly interesting for laboratory automation. End-to-end workflow automation and improved top-level systems integration for information technology (IT) and automation systems are especially prominent objectives. With the ISO Standard Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) 2.X, a system-independent and interdisciplinary accepted graphical process control notation is provided, allowing process analysis, while also being executable. The transfer of BPM solutions to structured laboratory automation places novel demands, for example, concerning the real-time-critical process and systems integration. The article discusses the potential of laboratory execution systems (LESs) for an easier implementation of the business process management system (BPMS) in hierarchical laboratory automation. In particular, complex application scenarios, including long process chains based on, for example, several distributed automation islands and mobile laboratory robots for a material transport, are difficult to handle in BPMSs. The presented approach deals with the displacement of workflow control tasks into life science specialized LESs, the reduction of numerous different interfaces between BPMSs and subsystems, and the simplification of complex process modelings. Thus, the integration effort for complex laboratory workflows can be significantly reduced for strictly structured automation solutions. An example application, consisting of a mixture of manual and automated subprocesses, is demonstrated by the presented BPMS-LES approach.

  2. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockrem, L.L.; Owens, J.W.; Seidel, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the installation, testing and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste samples in a hot cell environment. The 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method

  3. Application of annular centrifugal contactors in the hot test of the improved total partitioning process for high level liquid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wuhua; Chen, Jing; Wang, Jianchen; Wang, Shuwei; Feng, Xiaogui; Wang, Xinghai; Li, Shaowei; Xu, Chao

    2014-08-15

    High level liquid waste (HLLW) produced from the reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel still contains moderate amounts of uranium, transuranium (TRU) actinides, (90)Sr, (137)Cs, etc., and thus constitutes a permanent hazard to the environment. The partitioning and transmutation (P&T) strategy has increasingly attracted interest for the safe treatment and disposal of HLLW, in which the partitioning of HLLW is one of the critical technical issues. An improved total partitioning process, including a TRPO (tri-alkylphosphine oxide) process for the removal of actinides, a CESE (crown ether strontium extraction) process for the removal of Sr, and a CECE (calixcrown ether cesium extraction) process for the removal of Cs, has been developed to treat Chinese HLLW. A 160-hour hot test of the improved total partitioning process was carried out using 72-stage 10-mm-dia annular centrifugal contactors (ACCs) and genuine HLLW. The hot test results showed that the average DFs of total α activity, Sr and Cs were 3.57 × 10(3), 2.25 × 10(4) and 1.68 × 10(4) after the hot test reached equilibrium, respectively. During the hot test, 72-stage 10-mm-dia ACCs worked stable, continuously with no stage failing or interruption of the operation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The sodium process facility at Argonne National Laboratory - West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Henslee, S.P.; McDermott, M.D.; Price, J.R.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Wells, P.B.

    1997-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W) has approximately 680,000 liters (180,000 gallons) of raw sodium stored in facilities on site. As mandated by the State of Idaho and the United States Department of Energy (DOE), this sodium must be transformed into a stable condition for land disposal. To comply with this mandate, ANL-W designed and built the Sodium Process Facility (SPF) for the processing of this sodium into a dry, sodium carbonate powder. The major portion of the sodium stored at ANL-W is radioactively contaminated. The SPF was designed to react elemental sodium to sodium carbonate through two-stages involving caustic process and carbonate process steps. The sodium is first reacted to sodium hydroxide in the caustic process step. The caustic process step involves the injection of sodium into a nickel reaction vessel filled with a 50 wt% solution of sodium hydroxide. Water is also injected, controlling the boiling point of the solution. In the carbonate process, the sodium hydroxide is reacted with carbon dioxide to form sodium carbonate. This dry powder, similar in consistency to baking soda, is a waste form acceptable for burial in the State of Idaho as a non-hazardous, radioactive waste. The caustic process was originally designed and built in the 1980s for reacting the 290,000 liters (77,000 gallons) of primary sodium from the Fermi-1 Reactor to sodium hydroxide. The hydroxide was slated to be used to neutralize acid products from the PUREX process at the Hanford site. However, changes in the DOE mission precluded the need for hydroxide and the caustic process was never operated. With the shutdown of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), the necessity for a facility to react sodium was identified. In order to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements, the sodium had to be converted into a waste form acceptable for disposal in a Sub-Title D low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. Sodium hydroxide is a RCRA

  5. Fabrication of SiCp/Al Alloy Composites by In-situ Vacuum Hot Press Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, S. W.; Hong, S. K.; Kim, Y. M.; Kang, C. S. [Chonnam National University, Kwangju (Korea); Chang, S. Y. [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-07-01

    SiCp/pure Al and SiCp/2024Al MMCs were fabricated by in-situ VHP process designed specially just in this study which is composed of the vacuum hot press at range from R.T. to 500 deg.C and the continuous extrusion without canning process at 520 deg.C. It was investigated the effect of SiC particle size, volume fraction and extrusion ratio on the tensile properties and micro structure in all composites. In case of the 10:1 extrusion ratio, but SiCp/pure Al and SiCp/2024Al composites were shown a sound appearance and a good micro structure without crack of SiCp as well as uniform distribution of SiCp. However, in case of the 16:1 extrusion ratio, the number of cracked SiC particles more than increased in a higher volume fraction composite and 2024Al matrix composite compared with pure Al matrix one. The tensile strength of the composites reinforced smaller SiCp was higher than that of the bigger SiCp reinforced in same volume fraction and extrusion ratio. (author) 14 refs., 14 figs.

  6. Description of the heating and expansion process of a water drop enclosed in a hot melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehlich, G.; Berg, E. von.

    1985-11-01

    In the present study a simple model for the description of the heating- and expansion-process of a water drop enclosed in hot melt is developed. The model is valid between the first contact of melt and water up to the beginning of evaporation. A possible superheating by retardation of ebullition is disregarded. The balance equations for energy, mass and momentum as well as the equation of state are integrated over the radial space coordinate in both media using appropriate profiles of temperature, pressure and velocity. Thereby a system of coupled ordinary differential equations is formed for the variables of the model which are now time dependent only. The equations are solved numerically by means of a FORTRAN-program. The influence of parameters (melt-temperature, heat-transfer-coefficient between melt and water as well as drop radius) are studied. It is shown that always very rapidly a vapor-layer forms around the water drop, while the inner part of the drop did not yet 'notice' anything of the heating process. An approximation formula for the time-transfer-coefficients between melt and water. Due to this approximation, the time up to incipience of evaporation grows proportional to the drop radius, which means that in the frame of the present model even small droplets won't evaporate as a whole instantaneously. (orig.) [de

  7. Laboratory Spacecraft Data Processing and Instrument Autonomy: AOSAT as Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightholder, Jack; Asphaug, Erik; Thangavelautham, Jekan

    2015-11-01

    Recent advances in small spacecraft allow for their use as orbiting microgravity laboratories (e.g. Asphaug and Thangavelautham LPSC 2014) that will produce substantial amounts of data. Power, bandwidth and processing constraints impose limitations on the number of operations which can be performed on this data as well as the data volume the spacecraft can downlink. We show that instrument autonomy and machine learning techniques can intelligently conduct data reduction and downlink queueing to meet data storage and downlink limitations. As small spacecraft laboratory capabilities increase, we must find techniques to increase instrument autonomy and spacecraft scientific decision making. The Asteroid Origins Satellite (AOSAT) CubeSat centrifuge will act as a testbed for further proving these techniques. Lightweight algorithms, such as connected components analysis, centroid tracking, K-means clustering, edge detection, convex hull analysis and intelligent cropping routines can be coupled with the tradition packet compression routines to reduce data transfer per image as well as provide a first order filtering of what data is most relevant to downlink. This intelligent queueing provides timelier downlink of scientifically relevant data while reducing the amount of irrelevant downlinked data. Resulting algorithms allow for scientists to throttle the amount of data downlinked based on initial experimental results. The data downlink pipeline, prioritized for scientific relevance based on incorporated scientific objectives, can continue from the spacecraft until the data is no longer fruitful. Coupled with data compression and cropping strategies at the data packet level, bandwidth reductions exceeding 40% can be achieved while still downlinking data deemed to be most relevant in a double blind study between scientist and algorithm. Applications of this technology allow for the incorporation of instrumentation which produces significant data volumes on small spacecraft

  8. Simulation of the planetary interior differentiation processes in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Yingwei

    2013-11-15

    A planetary interior is under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions and it has a layered structure. There are two important processes that led to that layered structure, (1) percolation of liquid metal in a solid silicate matrix by planet differentiation, and (2) inner core crystallization by subsequent planet cooling. We conduct high-pressure and high-temperature experiments to simulate both processes in the laboratory. Formation of percolative planetary core depends on the efficiency of melt percolation, which is controlled by the dihedral (wetting) angle. The percolation simulation includes heating the sample at high pressure to a target temperature at which iron-sulfur alloy is molten while the silicate remains solid, and then determining the true dihedral angle to evaluate the style of liquid migration in a crystalline matrix by 3D visualization. The 3D volume rendering is achieved by slicing the recovered sample with a focused ion beam (FIB) and taking SEM image of each slice with a FIB/SEM crossbeam instrument. The second set of experiments is designed to understand the inner core crystallization and element distribution between the liquid outer core and solid inner core by determining the melting temperature and element partitioning at high pressure. The melting experiments are conducted in the multi-anvil apparatus up to 27 GPa and extended to higher pressure in the diamond-anvil cell with laser-heating. We have developed techniques to recover small heated samples by precision FIB milling and obtain high-resolution images of the laser-heated spot that show melting texture at high pressure. By analyzing the chemical compositions of the coexisting liquid and solid phases, we precisely determine the liquidus curve, providing necessary data to understand the inner core crystallization process.

  9. Hot cell renovation in the spent fuel conditioning process facility at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Seung Nam; Lee, Jong Kwang; Park, Byung Suk; Cho, Il Je; Kim, Ki Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The advanced spent fuel conditioning process facility (ACPF) of the irradiated materials examination facility (IMEF) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been renovated to implement a lab scale electrolytic reduction process for pyroprocessing. The interior and exterior structures of the ACPF hot cell have been modified under the current renovation project for the experimentation of the electrolytic reduction process using spent nuclear fuel. The most important aspect of this renovation was the installation of the argon compartment within the hot cell. For the design and system implementation of the argon compartment system, a full-scale mock-up test and a three-dimensional (3D) simulation test were conducted in advance. The remodeling and repairing of the process cell (M8a), the maintenance cell (M8b), the isolation room, and their utilities were also planned through this simulation to accommodate the designed argon compartment system. Based on the considered refurbishment workflow, previous equipment in the M8 cell, including vessels and pipes, were removed and disposed of successfully after a zoning smear survey and decontamination, and new equipment with advanced functions and specifications were installed in the hot cell. Finally, the operating area and isolation room were also refurbished to meet the requirements of the improved hot cell facility.

  10. The effect of side-chain substitution and hot processing on diketopyrrolopyrrole-based polymers for organic solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heintges, G.H.L.; Leenaers, P.J.; Janssen, R.A.J.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of cold and hot processing on the performance of polymer-fullerene solar cells are investigated for diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) based polymers that were specifically designed and synthesized to exhibit a strong temperature-dependent aggregation in solution. The polymers, consisting of

  11. Description of a plutonium incident in the Hot Laboratory on May 24, 1983, and the resulting consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausmann, W.; Francioni, W.; Ingold, F.; Ledergerber, G.

    1985-08-01

    At 16.15 on 24 May 1983 a rapid chemical reaction occured in an apparatus in which a routine waste sludge evaporation process was under way. The waste was produced during fuel fabrication. The resulting pressure wave ruptured a number of parts at the glove box in which the equipment was situated leading to an alpha contamination of that and neighboring laboratories. The alarm system activated by the fire alarm, the activity detectors and manualy by the operators functioned correctly. No one was physicaly injured and thanks to immediate protecture measures (e.g. gas masks) the amount of alpha-dust incorporated could be limited in degree and extent. Very time-consuming and costly cleaning and decontamination procedures were found to be necessary but these led to the encouraging result that the greater part of the contaminated equipment (particularly electrical and electronic apparatus) could be released for further unrestricted use in open labs. Detailed tests with the original waste solutions showed that at a certain ammonium nitrate content and at 235 C an exothermic chemical reaction can occur in the sludge. This temperature can only be reached due to a defective apparatus (e.g. a broken glass vessel) allowing the sludge to contact the heating element directly. The external expert agrees that this is the most likely cause of the incident. (author)

  12. Process controls for Bi2Te3-Sb2Te3 prepared by mechanical alloying and hot pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Go-Eun; Kim, Il-Ho; Choi, Soon-Mok; Lim, Young-Soo; Seo, Won-Seon; Park, Jae-Soung; Yang, Seung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    p-Type Bi 2 Te 3 -Sb 2 Te 3 solid solutions were prepared by mechanical alloying (MA) and hot pressing (HP) under different process conditions, after which the transport and the thermoelectric properties were evaluated. The relative densities of all hot-pressed specimens were over 98%, and the microstructure and crystal orientation were independent of the HP direction. All specimens exhibited p-type conduction, and the electrical resistivity was observed to increase slightly with increasing temperature, indicating a degenerate semiconductor behavior. The carrier concentration decreased with increasing HP temperature while the mobility increased. The maximum figure of merit obtained was 0.86 at 323 K for Bi 0.5 Sb 1.5 Te 3 hot-pressed at 648 K.

  13. Investigation on Hot Workability of Homogenized Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Alloy Based on Activation Energy and Processing Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaoyan; Su, Wusen; Xiao, Dan; Xu, Guofu

    2018-06-01

    Hot deformation behaviors of the homogenized Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy were studied by uniaxial compression tests carried out at 623-743 K and strain rates of 0.01-10 s-1. The constitutive equation was developed for the activation energy, and thus the activation energy map was constructed. During the hot deformation, the dominated softening mechanisms were the dynamic recovery and dynamic recrystallization, which were most likely to be driven with increasing temperature and decreasing activation energy. Based on the superposition of the activation energy map and the processing map, together with the microstructure characteristics, the optimized hot workability of the alloy was proposed at the domain (670-743 K and 0.01-0.16 s-1), where the peak efficiency was 0.39 and the activation energy range was 196-260 kJ mol-1.

  14. Application of heat treatment and hot extrusion processes to improve mechanical properties of the AZ91 alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Reguła

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to evaluate the effects of hot working (extrusion and hest treatment on room temperature mechanical properties of magnesium-based AZ91 alloy. The results were compared with as-cast condition. The examined material had been obtained by gravity casting to permanent moulds and subsequently subjected to heat treatment and/or processed by extrusion at 648 K. Microstructural and mechanical properties of properly prepared specimens were studied. Rm, Rp02 and A5 were determined from tensile tests. Brinell hardness tests were also conducted. The research has shown that hot working of AZ91 alloy provides high mechanical properties unattainable by cast material subjected to heat-treatment. The investigated alloy subjected to hot working and subsequently heat-treated has doubled its strength and considerably improved the elongation - compared with the as-cast material.

  15. IN10 data processing on the Rutherford Laboratory IBM 360

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, W.S.; Anderson, I.S.

    1978-09-01

    This report described modifications made to some of the IN10 spectrometer data analysis programs in use at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble in order that they may be used on the IBM 360 system at the Rutherford Laboratory. Fuller descriptions of the programs are contained in the original manual (Users' Guide to Processing IN10 Data by W S Howells, ILL Internal Report (1977). Programs discussed are: a) FAST. A program for fitting Lorentzians to raw data. This is a modification of the ILL programs FAST and HAST. b) SUPER. A convolution program for fitting quasielastic peaks to corrected data. This program is based on the ILL program SUPER. c) SAND. A convolution program for fitting an elastic and a Quasielastic peak to data. This is similar to the ILL version of SAND. d) SWIFT. A program similar to SUPER but faster. It is based on the ILL program CONTTY. Before using these programs users must consult the NBRU in order to obtain an account number and a user identifier. (U.K.)

  16. Plasma separation process: Magnet move to Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    This is the final report on the series of operations which culminated with the delivery of the Plasma Separation Process prototype magnet system (PMS) to Building K1432 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This procedure included real time monitoring of the cold mass support strut strain gauges and an in-cab rider to monitor the instrumentation and direct the driver. The primary technical consideration for these precautions was the possibility of low frequency resonant vibration of the cold mass when excited by symmetrical rough road conditions at specific speeds causing excess stress levels in the support struts and consequent strut failure. A secondary consideration was the possibility of high acceleration loads due to sudden stops, severe road conditions, of impacts. The procedure for moving and transportation to ORNL included requirements for real time continuous monitoring of the eight strut stain gauges and three external accelerometers. Because the strain gauges had not been used since the original magnet cooldown, it was planned to verify their integrity during magnet warmup. The measurements made from the strut strain gauges resulted in stress values that were physically impossible. It was concluded that further evaluation was necessary to verify the usefulness of these gauges and whether they might be faulty. This was accomplished during the removal of the magnet from the building. 6 figs., 1 tab

  17. Oil bioremediation processes in Brazilian marine environments : laboratory simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, E.S.; Triguis, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Bioremediation methods have been used in Brazil to remediate contaminated soils from refinery residues. In particular, bioremediation is a process that can reduce the amount of oil that reaches shorelines, by enhancing natural biodegradation. This presentation presents the results of a laboratory study in which seawater contaminated with light crude oil was bioremediated in a period of 28 days using NPK fertilizer. Whole oil gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses of the hydrocarbon fractions were used to determine the extent of oil biodegradation. It was determined that natural degradation occurred in the first 4 days, and mostly through the evaporation of light end n-alkanes. Biodegradation of n-alkanes was found to be most effective after 7 days, and no changes were observed in the relative abundance of steranes and triterpanes. It appears that the addition of NPK nutrient reduces the biodegradation potential of polyaromatic compounds. Seawater samples were also measured to determine the efficiency of bioremediation. The use of NPK fertilizer resulted in higher toxicity after 14 days probably due to the creation of metabolites as polyaromatic compounds biodegrade. Non toxic levels were found to be reestablished after 28 days of bioremediation. 16 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs

  18. Cold and semi-hot tests of 4-group partitioning process at NUCEF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Yasuji; Yamaguchi, Isoo; Fujiwara, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Mizoguchi, Kenichi [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kubota, Masumitsu [Research Organization for Information Science and Technology, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    The 4-Group Partitioning Process was tested in the Partitioning Test Facility installed in a hot cell at NUCEF (Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility) using simulated high-level liquid waste (HLLW) or the simulated HLLW added with a small amount of real HLLW and Tc. Behavior of each element was examined in a series of the following separation steps: pretreatment for HLLW to prepare the feed solution to extraction step, extraction with diisodecylphosphoric acid for the separation of transuranium elements, precipitation by denitration and adsorption step with active carbon for the separation of Tc and platinum group metals, and adsorption with inorganic ion exchangers for the separation of Sr and Cs. It was confined that each element behaved as expected. More than 99.99% of Am were extracted with DIDPA and 99.92% of Am were back-extracted with 4 M nitric acid. In the precipitation step by denitration, ratio of Tc precipitated was 96.2%. The present tests confined the expected performance of each equipment in the Partitioning Test Facility for the separation of elements and gave useful data for the comparison of element behavior with a result of a partitioning test using real HLLW. (author)

  19. Dynamic Recrystallization Behavior of AISI 422 Stainless Steel During Hot Deformation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadabadi, R. Mohammadi; Naderi, M.; Mohandesi, J. Aghazadeh; Cabrera, Jose Maria

    2018-02-01

    In this work, hot compression tests were performed to investigate the dynamic recrystallization (DRX) process of a martensitic stainless steel (AISI 422) at temperatures of 950, 1000, 1050, 1100 and 1150 °C and strain rates of 0.01, 0.1 and 1 s-1. The dependency of strain-hardening rate on flow stress was used to estimate the critical stress for the onset of DRX. Accordingly, the critical stress to peak stress ratio was calculated as 0.84. Moreover, the effect of true strain was examined by fitting stress values to an Arrhenius type constitutive equation, and then considering material constants as a function of strain by using a third-order polynomial equation. Finally, two constitutive models were used to investigate the competency of the strain-dependent constitutive equations to predict the flow stress curves of the studied steel. It was concluded that one model offers better precision on the flow stress values after the peak stress, while the other model gives more accurate results before the peak stress.

  20. Reduced activation ODS ferritic steel - recent development in high speed hot extrusion processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oksiuta, Zbigniew [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Bialystok Technical University (Poland); Lewandowska, Malgorzata; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology (Poland); Baluc, Nadine [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2010-05-15

    The paper presents the microstructure and mechanical properties of an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS), reduced activation, ferritic steel, namely the Fe-14Cr-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} alloy, which was fabricated by hot isostatic pressing followed by high speed hydrostatic extrusion (HSHE) and heat treatment HT at 1050 C. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations revealed significant differences in the grain size and dislocation density between the as-HIPped and as-HSHE materials. It was also found that the microstructure of the steel is stable after HT. The HSHE process improves significantly the tensile and Charpy impact properties of the as-HIPped steel. The ultimate tensile strength at room temperature increases from 950 up to 1350 MPa, while the upper shelf energy increases from 3.0 up to 6.0 J. However, the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) remains relatively high (about 75 C).These results indicate that HSHE is a promising method for achieving grain refinement and thus improving the mechanical properties of ODS ferritic steels. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  1. Microstructure and thermal conductivity of Mo-TiC cermets processed by hot isostatic pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Flem, Marion; Allemand, Alexandre; Urvoy, Stephane; Cedat, Denis; Rey, Colette

    2008-01-01

    In the scope of refractory material development for structural applications in the core of future nuclear reactors (gas fast reactors working between 500 o C and at least 800 o C in nominal conditions and up to 1650 o C in accidental scenarios), five Mo-TiC cermets, and single-phase TiC and Mo, were processed by hot isostatic pressing. Starting TiC volume contents were 0%, 12.5%, 25%, 37.5%, 50%, 75% and 100%. First, high dense specimens were characterized in terms of microstructure, composition and phase volume fractions. Cermets exhibited two phases in agreement with phase diagram previsions (Mo-TiC 1-2at.% and TiC-Mo 10-15at.% ), and a residual non-reacted TiC-rich phase (TiC-Mo 1at.% ). Second, heat capacity and thermal diffusivity were measured up to 1000 o C which allowed to evaluate the thermal conductivity of each cermet: this lays between TiC conductivity (12-18 W/m K) and Mo conductivity (95-125 W/m K), thermal properties continuously decreasing with starting TiC content. An analytical approach based on the volume fraction and properties of each constituent allowed to highlight the existence of thermal resistance at the interphases at low temperature

  2. Investigation of hot- iso-static press process for tungsten target samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yongli; Zhang Jinquan; Li Huaqing

    2006-01-01

    Zr and stainless steel (S.S.) were selected respectively as the cladding materials of W target. The e-beam weld was used to prepare the W-Zr and W-S.S. small samples for hot iso-static press (HIP) process. The technology parameters of HIP were investigated at 1200, 1300, 1400 degree C and 180 MPa, respectively. The micro-morphology of the interface, diffusion depths and composition as well as their micro-hardness were observed and determined. The bonding of W-Zr and W-S.S. is very well under the testing conditions. There is no any pore or micro-crack in the interface, and there is no grain growth of W below 1400 degree C either. The diffusion of Zr to W at the interface of W-Zr is preferred during HIP process, and the diffusion depths under testing conditions are 6-13 μm. The diffusion of W and Fe is considerable at the interface of W-S.S. Its depth is about 13 μm, and the diffusion of Cr and Ni is mall. The hardness at the interface of W-Zr and W-S.S. shows that a diffusion layer is present for both interface. A part of stainless steel cladding was melted after HIP contained the oxygen absorber Zr at 1300 degree C and 180 MPa. Therefore, 1200 degree C and 180 MPa is suitable for W-S.S. without Zr, but 1300 or 1400 degree C and 180 MPa is better for W-Zr. (authors)

  3. Application of solar energy to the supply of industrial process hot water. Aerotherm final report, 77-235. [Can washing in Campbell Soup plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-01-01

    The objectives of the Solar Industrial Process Hot Water Program are to design, test, and evaluate the application of solar energy to the generation and supply of industrial process hot water, and to provide an assessment of the economic and resource benefits to be gained. Other objectives are to stimulate and give impetus to the use of solar energy for supplying significant amounts of industrial process heat requirements. The plant selected for the design of a solar industrial process hot water system was the Campbell Soup facility in Sacramento, California. The total hot water demand for this plant varies between 500 and 800 gpm during regular production shifts, and hits a peak of over 1,000 gpm for approximately one hour during the cleanup shift. Most of the hot water is heated in the boiler room by a combination of waste heat recovery and low pressure (5 psi) steam-water heat exchangers. The hot water emerges from the boiler room at a temperature between 160/sup 0/F and 180/sup 0/F and is transported to the various process areas. Booster heaters in the process areas then use low pressure (5 psi) or medium pressure (20 psi) steam to raise the temperature of the water to the level required for each process. Hot water is used in several processes at the Campbell Soup plant, but the can washing process was selected to demonstrate the feasibility of a solar hot water system. A detailed design and economic analysis of the system is given. (WHK)

  4. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 3 of 6: MICROSTRUCTURAL ENGINEERING IN HOT-STRIP MILLS Part 2 of 2: Constitutive Behavior Modeling of Steels Under Hot-Rolling Conditions; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi-Wen Cheng; Patrick Purtscher

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the development of models for predicting (1) constitutive behaviors and (2) mechanical properties of hot-rolled steels as functions of chemical composition, microstructural features, and processing variables. The study includes the following eight steels: A36, DQSK, HSLA-V, HSLA-Nb, HSLA-50/Ti-Nb, and two interstitial-free (IF) grades. These developed models have been integrated into the Hot-Strip Mill Model (HSMM), which simulates the hot strip rolling mills and predicts the mechanical properties of hot-rolled products. The HSMM model has been developed by the University of British Columbia-Canada as a part of project on the microstructural engineering in hot-strip mills

  5. Mechanical shielded hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgy, H.R.; Abdel-Rassoul, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    A plan to erect a mechanical shielded hot cell in the process hall of the Radiochemical Laboratory at Inchas is described. The hot cell is designed for safe handling of spent fuel bundles, from the Inchas reactor, and for dismantling and cutting the fuel rods in preparation for subsequent treatment. The biological shielding allows for the safe handling of a total radioactivity level up to 10,000 MeV-Ci. The hot cell consists of an α-tight stainless-steel box, connected to a γ-shielded SAS, through an air-lock containing a movable carriage. The α-box is tightly connected with six dry-storage cavities for adequate storage of the spent fuel bundles. Both the α-box, with the dry-storage cavities, and the SAS are surrounded by 200-mm thick biological lead shielding. The α-box is equipped with two master-slave manipulators, a lead-glass window, a monorail crane and Padirac and Minirag systems. The SAS is equipped with a lead-glass window, tong manipulator, a shielded pit and a mechanism for the entry of the spent fuel bundle. The hot cell is served by adequate ventilation and monitoring systems. (author)

  6. Hot deformation behaviors and processing maps of B{sub 4}C/Al6061 neutron absorber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yu-Li [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University Of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Wang, Wen-Xian, E-mail: Wangwenxian@tyut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University Of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Zhou, Jun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University Of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University Erie, The Behrend College, Erie, PA 16563 (United States); Chen, Hong-Sheng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University Of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2017-02-15

    In this study, the hot deformation behaviors of 30 wt.% B{sub 4}C/Al6061 neutron absorber composites (NACs) have been investigated by conducting isothermal compression tests at temperatures ranging from 653 K to 803 K and strain rates from 0.01 to 10 s{sup −1}. It was found that, during hot compression, the B{sub 4}C/Al6061 NACs exhibited a steady flow characteristic which can be expressed by the Zener-Hollomon parameter as a hyperbolic-sine function of flow stress. High average activation energy (185.62 kJ/mol) of B{sub 4}C/Al6061 NACs is noted in current study owing to the high content of B{sub 4}C particle. The optimum hot working conditions for B{sub 4}C/Al6061 NACs are found to be 760–803 K/0.01–0.05 s{sup −1} based on processing map and microstructure evolution. Typical material instabilities are thought to be attributed to void formation, adiabatic shear bands (ASB), particle debonding, and matrix cracking. Finally, the effect of the plastic deformation zones (PDZs) on the microstructure evolution in this 30 wt.% B{sub 4}C/Al6061 composite is found to be very important. - Highlights: •The hot deformation behavior of the 30 wt.% B{sub 4}C/Al6061 NACs was first analyzed. •The 3D efficiency map and the instability map are developed. •The optimum hot working conditions were identified and validated by SEM and TEM. •The hot deformation schematic diagram of 30 wt.% B{sub 4}C/Al6061 NACs is developed.

  7. Laser materials processing applications at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargrove, R.S.; Dragon, E.P.; Hackel, R.P.; Kautz, D.D.; Warner, B.E.

    1993-01-01

    High power and high radiance laser technologies developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) such as copper-vapor lasers, solid-state slab lasers, dye lasers, harmonic wavelength conversion of these lasers, and fiber optic delivery systems show great promise for material processing tasks. Evaluation of models suggests significant potential for tenfold increases in welding, cutting, and drilling performance, as well as capability for applications in emerging technologies such as micromachining, surface treatment, and stereolithography. Copper and dye laser systems are currently being developed at LLNL for uranium enrichment production facilities. The goals of this program are to develop low-cost, reliable and maintainable industrial laser systems. Chains of copper lasers currently operate at more than 1.5 kW output and achieve mean time between failures of more than 1,000 hours. The beam quality of copper vapor lasers is approximately three times the diffraction limit. Dye lasers have near diffraction limited beam quality at greater than 1.0 kW. Diode laser pumped, Nd:YAG slab lasers are also being developed at LLNL. Current designs achieve powers of greater than 1.0 kW and projected beam quality is in the two to five times diffraction limited range. Results from cutting and drilling studies in titanium and stainless steel alloys show that cuts and holes with extremely fine features can be made with dye and copper-vapor lasers. High radiance beams produce low distortion and small heat-affected zones. The authors have accomplished very high aspect ratio holes in drilling tests (> 60: 1) and features with micron scale (5-50 μm) sizes. Other, traditionally more difficult, materials such as copper, aluminum and ceramics will soon be studied in detail

  8. Clinical Laboratory Data Management: A Distributed Data Processing Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Martin; Morgner, Raymond; Packer, Bernice

    1980-01-01

    Two turn-key systems, one for patient registration and the other for the clinical laboratory have been installed and linked together at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, forming the nucleus of an evolving distributed Hospital Information System.

  9. FABRICE process for the refrabrication of experimental pins in a hot cell, from pins pre-irradiated in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignesoult, N.; Atabek, R.; Ducas, S.

    1982-06-01

    The Fabrice ''hot cell refabrication'' process for small pins from very long irradiated fuel elements was developed at the CEA to allow parametric studies of the irradiation behavior of pins from nuclear power plants. Since this operation required complete assurance of the validity of the process, qualification of the fabrication was performed on test pins, refabricated in the hot cell, as well as irradiation qualification. The latter qualification was intended to demonstrate that, in identical experimental irradiation conditions, the refabricated Fabrice pins behaved in the same way as whole pins with the same initial characteristics. This qualification of the Fabrice process, dealing with more than twenty pins at different burnups, showed that fabrication did not alter: the inherent characteristics of the sampled fuel element and the irradiation behavior of the sampled fuel element [fr

  10. Hot deformation and processing maps of K310 cold work tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezatpour, H.R.; Sajjadi, S.A.; Haddad-Sabzevar, M.; Ebrahimi, G.R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The steady state stresses are related to strain rate and temperature. ► The study led to n DRX = 3.95 and Q DRX = 219.65 kJ/(mol K) and α = 1.2 × 10 −2 MPa −1 . ► The safe domain occurs in the region of 1000–1100 °C for a strain rate of 0.1 s −1 . - Abstract: Hot working response of cold work tool steel K310 was investigated by means of compression test at temperature range of 900–1100 °C. The equivalent strain rates used in these tests were 0.01, 0.1 and 1 s −1 , respectively in order to obtain the processing and stability maps of the studied material following the Dynamic Material Model. All the zones of flow instability were studied through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The microstructure of the samples after deformation was then analyzed by light microscopy and the differences were compared together. The steady state stress obtained from the flow curves was related to strain rate (ε . ) and temperature (T) by means of the well known Zener–Holloman equation. A least square analysis of the data led to n = 3.95 and Q DRX = 219.65 kJ/mol and α = 1.2 × 10 −2 MPa −1 . Also, hardness results showed that by increasing strain from peak to steady state strain, hardness was decreased.

  11. Chemical effect in nuclear decay processes. Applications in in situ studies in hot atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urch, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    In certain cases, secondary processes, such as X-ray or electron emission initiated by the primary event, do show effects which can be correlated with the chemical state of the emitting atom. The most well known is Moessbauer recoil-less γ-emission, but this talk will concentrate on other, more widespread processes that follow either γ-ray internal conversion (γIC) or electron capture (EC). The former leads to electron emission and the latter to X-ray and Auger electron emission. Such emissions have been extensively studied in non-radioactive situations. These studies have shown that changes in photo- or Auger-electron energy can be readily correlated with valency and that the energies, peak shapes and peak intensities of X-rays that are generated by valence-core transitions show chemically related perturbations. γIC has been applied to the determination of changes of 3p and 3d binding energies as a function of technetium valency. The results are comparable with those from conventional X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) it is the Kα and Kβ X-rays from chromium ( 51 Cr) that have been most extensively studied. Studies in non-radioactive systems for chromium and related first row transition elements seem to indicate that the Kβ/Kα intensity ratio increases with valency. This may be rationalized as due to a greater response by 3p than 2p electrons to a reduction in the number of 3d electrons: 3p becomes more contracted and so the 3p → 1s transition probability is enhanced leading to the relative increase in Kβ intensity. Once 'chemical effects' in γIC and EC:XES have been established for a range of recoil elements they may be used to determine the chemical state of a recoil atom in a solid state matrix without recourse to dissolution. Such a non-invasive procedure will yield invalunable data on the primary hot atom chemistry processes. (author)

  12. Cause of Damage. Hot cracking; Schadensursache Heissrissigkeit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wader, Therese [BENTELER Steel/Tube GmbH, Paderborn (Germany). Vorentwicklung Werkstoffe

    2016-10-15

    Under certain conditions, Nb-containing stainless steels are susceptible to hot cracking. Such conditions include low melting phases on the grain boundaries, a coarse-grained microstructure such as cast structures, microstructure orientations towards the main tensile direction and high processing temperatures. The case of damage was characterized using metallographic and microanalytical methods. In the laboratory, the critical temperature range for the formation of hot cracks could furthermore specifically be localized under mechanical stresses by means of a dilatometer aiming at clearly verifying the cause of the damage, namely ''hot cracks''.

  13. Intensive heat method for using non-segregate fine tailings for generating hot process water and stable solids that can support traffic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betzer-Zilevitch, M. [Ex-Tar Technologies Inc., AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This power point presentation described a method developed to extract energy from non-segregated fine tailings for generating hot process water. The method produced stable solids that were able to support traffic. Discharged non-segregated tailings passed through a zero liquid discharge direct contact steam generator (DCSG) and were then further treated and returned to the oil sands mine and bitumen extraction facility. A direct contact heat exchanger and condenser removed contaminates. Laboratory analyses confirmed that the DCSG condensate was toxic. Light organics were not destroyed. The method was then simulated in order to investigate the impact of pressure on performance. The study demonstrated that the method is both simple and robust. Non-segregated asphaltene-rich fine tailing streams can be used, and no changes to extraction, oil separation, or froth treatment equipment is needed. A cost benefit analysis was included. tabs., figs.

  14. Ionization processes in the Fe 27 region of hot iron plasma in the field of hard gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illarionov, A.F.

    1989-01-01

    A highly ionized hot plasma of an iron 26 56 Fe-type heavy element in the field of hard ionizing gamma-ray radiation is considered. The processes of ionization and recombination are discussed for a plasma consisting of the fully ionized Fe 27 and the hydrogen-like Fe 26 ions of iron in the case of large optical depth of the plasma with respect to the photoionization by gamma-ray quanta. The self-ionization process of a hot plasma with the temperature kT ≅ I (I being the ionization potential), due to the production of the own ionizing gamma-ray quanta, by the free-free (ff) and recombination (fb) radiation mechanisms, is investigated. It is noted that in the stationary situation the process of self-ionization of a hot plasma imposes the restriction upon the plasma temperature, kT<1.5 I. It is shown that the ionization of heavy-ion plasma by the impact of thermal electrons is dominating over the processes of ff- and fb-selfionization of plasma only by the large concentration of hydrogen-like iron at the periphery of the region of fully ionized iron Fe 27

  15. 238Pu fuel form processes. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-05-01

    Progress in the Savannah River 238 Pu fuel form program is summarized. Suspended solids observed in the technical-grade oxalic acid solution used in H-Area B-Line had no significant effect on particle size or morphology. A small but significant increase in product purity was noted with the use of reagent-grade oxalic acid. The density of hot-pressed LCHP pellets made from both problem and standardized feed decreased with longer milling times as was observed for multi-hundred watt (MHW) pellets. The LCHP pellets (greater than 90 percent theoretical density) generally cracked following final heat treatment. Cold-pressing studies indicate the anticipated pressure variation during cold pressing in the PuFF facility will have negligible effect on the density of MHW spheres. Construction of the plutonium experimental facility is 72 percent complete

  16. The influence of alloying elements on the hot-dip aluminizing process and on the subsequent high-temperature oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasbrenner, H.; Nold, E.; Voss, Z.

    1997-01-01

    For hot dip aluminizing HDA an Al melt was doped with one of the elements Mo, W or Nb with a nominal composition of about 1 wt%. In case of W, the nominal composition was achieved, not so for Mo and Nb. The influence of these elements on the coating formed and on the following oxidation process was investigated. Hot dip aluminizing was carried out at 800 C for 5 min under dry Ar atmosphere. The oxidation experiments were performed at 950 C for 24 h in air. Compared to the HDA processes with pure Al, the addition of the alloying elements lead to thinner intermetallic layers. A change in the oxidation behavior was observed as well concerning the suppression of internal oxidation and the formation of dense and close oxide scales. (orig.)

  17. [AT THE CROSSROADS: THE ROLE OF LABORATORY MEDICINE IN THE PATIENT CARE PROCESS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffen, Yuval; Zaidise, Itzhak

    2017-06-01

    In recent decades, the laboratory medicine profession has undergone significant changes due to both technological developments and economic constraints. Technological innovations support automation, provide faster and more accurate equipment, and allow increased efficiency through the use of commercial test kits. These changes, combined with budgetary constraints, have led to mergers and centralization of medical laboratories to optimize work and cut costs. While this centralization may be a business necessity, it leads to a disconnection between the laboratory and the clinical context. In addition, laboratory tests are treated as a commodity, which places emphasis on price only, rather than quality. In this article, we review the developments and changes that medical laboratories and the laboratory medicine profession have undergone in recent decades. We focus on technological and structural challenges affecting the functioning of medical laboratories and the relations between laboratory workers and medical teams. We then introduce vocational education changes required for the laboratory medicine profession. We propose defining the role of medical laboratory directors in terms of their basic training as medical doctors or doctors of science. We suggest that laboratory employees should become a reliable source of information regarding selection of appropriate test methods, processing data and presenting the results to the medical staff. Laboratory workers must deepen their clinical knowledge and become an integral part of the patient care process, along with medical and nursing staff. Special training programs for medical laboratory workers and directors must be developed in order to match the complex activities currently being conducted in laboratories.

  18. 21 CFR 111.315 - What are the requirements for laboratory control processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the requirements for laboratory control... MANUFACTURING, PACKAGING, LABELING, OR HOLDING OPERATIONS FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Production and Process Control System: Requirements for Laboratory Operations § 111.315 What are the requirements for laboratory control...

  19. Hot laboratory in Saclay. Equipment and radio-metallurgy technique of the hot lab in Saclay. Description of hot cell for handling of plutonium salts. Installation of an hot cell; Laboratoire a tres haute activite de Saclay. Equipement et techniques radiometallurgiques du laboratoire a haute activite de Saclay. Description de cellules pour manipulation de sels de plutonium. Amenagement d'une cellule du laboratoire de haute activite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazire, R; Blin, J; Cherel, G; Duvaux, Y; Cherel, G; Mustelier, J P; Bussy, P; Gondal, G; Bloch, J; Faugeras, P; Raggenbass, A; Raggenbass, P; Fufresne, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    Describes the conception and installation of the hot laboratory in Saclay (CEA, France). The construction ended in 1958. The main aim of this laboratory is to examine fuel rods of EL2 and EL3 as well as nuclear fuel studies. It is placed in between both reactors. In a first part, the functioning and specifications of the hot lab are given. The different hot cells are described with details of the ventilation and filtration system as well as the waste material and effluents disposal. The different safety measures are explained: description of the radiation protection, decontamination room and personnel monitoring. The remote handling equipment is composed of cutting and welding machine controlled with manipulators. Periscopes are used for sight control of the operation. In a second part, it describes the equipment of the hot lab. The unit for an accurate measurement of the density of irradiated uranium is equipped with an high precision balance and a thermostat. The equipment used for the working of irradiated uranium is described and the time length of each operation is given. There is also an installation for metallographic studies which is equipped with a manipulation bench for polishing and cleaning surfaces and a metallographic microscope. X-ray examination of uranium pellets will also be made and results will be compared with those of metallography. The last part describes the hot cells used for the manipulation of plutonium salts. The plutonium comes from the reprocessing plant and arrived as a nitric solution. Thus these cells are used to study the preparation of plutonium fluorides from nitric solution. The successive operations needed are explained: filtration, decontamination and extraction with TBP, purification on ion exchangers and finally formation of the plutonium fluorides. Particular attention has been given to the description of the specifications of the different gloveboxes and remote handling equipment used in the different reaction steps and

  20. Hot laboratory in Saclay. Equipment and radio-metallurgy technique of the hot lab in Saclay. Description of hot cell for handling of plutonium salts. Installation of an hot cell; Laboratoire a tres haute activite de Saclay. Equipement et techniques radiometallurgiques du laboratoire a haute activite de Saclay. Description de cellules pour manipulation de sels de plutonium. Amenagement d'une cellule du laboratoire de haute activite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazire, R.; Blin, J.; Cherel, G.; Duvaux, Y.; Cherel, G.; Mustelier, J.P.; Bussy, P.; Gondal, G.; Bloch, J.; Faugeras, P.; Raggenbass, A.; Raggenbass, P.; Fufresne, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    Describes the conception and installation of the hot laboratory in Saclay (CEA, France). The construction ended in 1958. The main aim of this laboratory is to examine fuel rods of EL2 and EL3 as well as nuclear fuel studies. It is placed in between both reactors. In a first part, the functioning and specifications of the hot lab are given. The different hot cells are described with details of the ventilation and filtration system as well as the waste material and effluents disposal. The different safety measures are explained: description of the radiation protection, decontamination room and personnel monitoring. The remote handling equipment is composed of cutting and welding machine controlled with manipulators. Periscopes are used for sight control of the operation. In a second part, it describes the equipment of the hot lab. The unit for an accurate measurement of the density of irradiated uranium is equipped with an high precision balance and a thermostat. The equipment used for the working of irradiated uranium is described and the time length of each operation is given. There is also an installation for metallographic studies which is equipped with a manipulation bench for polishing and cleaning surfaces and a metallographic microscope. X-ray examination of uranium pellets will also be made and results will be compared with those of metallography. The last part describes the hot cells used for the manipulation of plutonium salts. The plutonium comes from the reprocessing plant and arrived as a nitric solution. Thus these cells are used to study the preparation of plutonium fluorides from nitric solution. The successive operations needed are explained: filtration, decontamination and extraction with TBP, purification on ion exchangers and finally formation of the plutonium fluorides. Particular attention has been given to the description of the specifications of the different gloveboxes and remote handling equipment used in the different reaction steps and

  1. Characterization of Sludge from the Process of Steel Tubes Chemical Treatment for Hot Galvanizing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofilić, U.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Inadequate industrial waste management in Croatia is reflected in the non-sanitary waste disposal, low recycling levels, negligible share of waste processing technologies, insufficient control of its flows, etc.Generated industrial wastes are most frequently disposed of at producers’ own, mostly illegal landfills. There are many such landfills on the Croatian territory, and the disposed types of waste often include those that can be hazardous and represent a considerable source of environmental pollution.Past waste management in all industrial branches can be characterized in this way, which at the same time may result in the harmful impact on human health and the environment. It also represents economic loss due to low utilisation of material and energy potential of some industrial wastes. The metallurgical industry collects its production waste separately. Only a part of the generated waste is returned to the production process and some waste is occasionally used by other industries as secondary raw materials, but the largest part of it ends at producers' own landfills on site. Hazardous wastes (dust containing heavy metals, waste oils etc. are mostly disposed of in a controlled and lawful manner. Past handling of metallurgical waste was unacceptable both from the environmental and economic point of view. Therefore a systematic resolving of this important issue was initiated at the beginning of this decade. Sisak Steelworks galvanized steel pipes in the hot-dip galvanizing procedure by immersing in molten zinc. Between 1970 and 2000 Sisak Steelworks produced approximately 900 000 tonnes of galvanized pipes this way and generated around 70 000 m3 of neutralisation sludge, which was subsequently disposed of in the landfill on site. The paper presents the results of examination of physical-chemical properties of neutralisation sludge generated as waste material in the process of neutralisation of waste sulphate acid bath used in Sisak

  2. Additive Manufacturing of IN100 Superalloy Through Scanning Laser Epitaxy for Turbine Engine Hot-Section Component Repair: Process Development, Modeling, Microstructural Characterization, and Process Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Ranadip; Das, Suman

    2015-09-01

    This article describes additive manufacturing (AM) of IN100, a high gamma-prime nickel-based superalloy, through scanning laser epitaxy (SLE), aimed at the creation of thick deposits onto like-chemistry substrates for enabling repair of turbine engine hot-section components. SLE is a metal powder bed-based laser AM technology developed for nickel-base superalloys with equiaxed, directionally solidified, and single-crystal microstructural morphologies. Here, we combine process modeling, statistical design-of-experiments (DoE), and microstructural characterization to demonstrate fully metallurgically bonded, crack-free and dense deposits exceeding 1000 μm of SLE-processed IN100 powder onto IN100 cast substrates produced in a single pass. A combined thermal-fluid flow-solidification model of the SLE process compliments DoE-based process development. A customized quantitative metallography technique analyzes digital cross-sectional micrographs and extracts various microstructural parameters, enabling process model validation and process parameter optimization. Microindentation measurements show an increase in the hardness by 10 pct in the deposit region compared to the cast substrate due to microstructural refinement. The results illustrate one of the very few successes reported for the crack-free deposition of IN100, a notoriously "non-weldable" hot-section alloy, thus establishing the potential of SLE as an AM method suitable for hot-section component repair and for future new-make components in high gamma-prime containing crack-prone nickel-based superalloys.

  3. Physical and mathematical modeling of process of frozen ground thawing under hot tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemenkova, M. Y.; Shastunova, U.; Shabarov, A.; Kislitsyn, A.; Shuvaev, A.

    2018-05-01

    A description of a new non-stationary thermophysical model in the “hot tank-frozen ground” system is given, taking into account mass transfer of pore moisture. The results of calculated and experimental data are presented, and the position of the thawing front is shown to be in good agreement with the convective heat transfer due to moisture migration in the thawed ground.

  4. Facilitating Improvements in Laboratory Report Writing Skills with Less Grading: A Laboratory Report Peer-Review Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R. Brigati

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Incorporating peer-review steps in the laboratory report writing process provides benefits to students, but it also can create additional work for laboratory instructors. The laboratory report writing process described here allows the instructor to grade only one lab report for every two to four students, while giving the students the benefits of peer review and prompt feedback on their laboratory reports. Here we present the application of this process to a sophomore level genetics course and a freshman level cellular biology course, including information regarding class time spent on student preparation activities, instructor preparation, prerequisite student knowledge, suggested learning outcomes, procedure, materials, student instructions, faculty instructions, assessment tools, and sample data. T-tests comparing individual and group grading of the introductory cell biology lab reports yielded average scores that were not significantly different from each other (p = 0.13, n = 23 for individual grading, n = 6 for group grading. T-tests also demonstrated that average laboratory report grades of students using the peer-review process were not significantly different from those of students working alone (p = 0.98, n = 9 for individual grading, n = 6 for pair grading. While the grading process described here does not lead to statistically significant gains (or reductions in student learning, it allows student learning to be maintained while decreasing instructor workload. This reduction in workload could allow the instructor time to pursue other high-impact practices that have been shown to increase student learning. Finally, we suggest possible modifications to the procedure for application in a variety of settings.

  5. Facilitating improvements in laboratory report writing skills with less grading: a laboratory report peer-review process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigati, Jennifer R; Swann, Jerilyn M

    2015-05-01

    Incorporating peer-review steps in the laboratory report writing process provides benefits to students, but it also can create additional work for laboratory instructors. The laboratory report writing process described here allows the instructor to grade only one lab report for every two to four students, while giving the students the benefits of peer review and prompt feedback on their laboratory reports. Here we present the application of this process to a sophomore level genetics course and a freshman level cellular biology course, including information regarding class time spent on student preparation activities, instructor preparation, prerequisite student knowledge, suggested learning outcomes, procedure, materials, student instructions, faculty instructions, assessment tools, and sample data. T-tests comparing individual and group grading of the introductory cell biology lab reports yielded average scores that were not significantly different from each other (p = 0.13, n = 23 for individual grading, n = 6 for group grading). T-tests also demonstrated that average laboratory report grades of students using the peer-review process were not significantly different from those of students working alone (p = 0.98, n = 9 for individual grading, n = 6 for pair grading). While the grading process described here does not lead to statistically significant gains (or reductions) in student learning, it allows student learning to be maintained while decreasing instructor workload. This reduction in workload could allow the instructor time to pursue other high-impact practices that have been shown to increase student learning. Finally, we suggest possible modifications to the procedure for application in a variety of settings.

  6. Towards a Toolbox for a Process Innovation Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Jie; Møller, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Driven by the global competition, process Innovation has been a challenge to large enterprises for many years. The research in this paper discusses about the theory and methods of Business Process Innovation (BPI) in designing Intelligent Supply Chains (ISC) in inter-organizations. We first review...... the BPI concepts, compare it with Business Process Improvement (BPIm) and Business Process Reengineering (BPR), and then build an analytical framework to define business process innovation from four different perspectives: management science, knowledge management, information technology and quality...

  7. Towards a Toolbox for a Process Innovation Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Jie; Møller, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Driven by the global competition, process Innovation has been a challenge to large enterprises for many years. The research in this paper discusses about the theory and methods of Business Process Innovation (BPI) in designing Intelligent Supply Chains (ISC) in inter-organizations. We first review...... the BPI concepts, compare it with Business Process Improvement (BPIm) and Business Process Reengineering (BPR), and then build an analytical framework to define business process innovation from four different perspectives: management science, knowledge management, information technology and quality...

  8. [The balanced scorecard used as a management tool in a clinical laboratory: internal business processes indicators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas La Casta, Maria; Flores Pardo, Emilio; Uris Selles, Joaquín

    2009-01-01

    to propose a set of indicators as a management tool for a clinical laboratory, by using the balanced scorecard internal business processes perspective. indicators proposed are obtained from different sources; external proficiency testing of the Valencia Community Government, by means of internal surveys and laboratory information system registers. One year testing process proportion indicators results are showed. internal management indicators are proposed (process, appropriateness and proficiency testing). The process indicators results show gradual improvement since its establishment. after one years of using a conceptually solid Balanced Scorecard Internal business processes perspective indicators, the obtained results validate the usefulness as a laboratory management tool.

  9. High-coercivity ultrafine-grained anisotropic Nd–Fe–B magnets processed by hot deformation and the Nd–Cu grain boundary diffusion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepehri-Amin, H.; Ohkubo, T.; Nagashima, S.; Yano, M.; Shoji, T.; Kato, A.; Schrefl, T.; Hono, K.

    2013-01-01

    The grain boundary diffusion process using an Nd 70 Cu 30 eutectic alloy has been applied to hot-deformed anisotropic Nd–Fe–B magnets, resulting in a substantial enhancement of coercivity, from 1.5 T to 2.3 T, at the expense of remanence. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the areal fraction of an Nd-rich intergranular phase increased from 10% to 37%. The intergranular phase of the hot-deformed magnet initially contained ∼55 at.% ferromagnetic element, while it diminished to an undetectable level after the process. Microscale eutectic solidification of Nd/NdCu as well as a fine lamellae structure of Nd 70 (Co,Cu) 30 /Nd were observed in the intergranular phase. Micromagnetic simulations indicated that the reduction of the magnetization in the intergranular phases leads to the enhancement of coercivity in agreement with the experimental observation

  10. Software for biomedical engineering signal processing laboratory experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Willis J; Wilson, J

    2009-01-01

    In the early 1990's we developed a special computer program called UW DigiScope to provide a mechanism for anyone interested in biomedical digital signal processing to study the field without requiring any other instrument except a personal computer. There are many digital filtering and pattern recognition algorithms used in processing biomedical signals. In general, students have very limited opportunity to have hands-on access to the mechanisms of digital signal processing. In a typical course, the filters are designed non-interactively, which does not provide the student with significant understanding of the design constraints of such filters nor their actual performance characteristics. UW DigiScope 3.0 is the first major update since version 2.0 was released in 1994. This paper provides details on how the new version based on MATLAB! works with signals, including the filter design tool that is the programming interface between UW DigiScope and processing algorithms.

  11. Hot Deformation and Processing Window Optimization of a 70MnSiCrMo Carbide-Free Bainitic Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ying; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Hua

    2017-03-21

    The hot deformation behavior of a high carbon carbide-free bainitic steel was studied through isothermal compression tests that were performed on a Gleeble-1500D thermal mechanical simulator at temperatures of 1223-1423 K and strain rates of 0.01-5 s -1 . The flow behavior, constitutive equations, dynamic recrystallization (DRX) characteristics, and processing map were respectively analyzed in detail. It is found that the flow stress increases with increasing the strain rate and decreases with increasing the temperature, and the single-peak DRX can be easily observed at high temperatures and/or low strain rates. The internal relationship between the flow stress and processing parameters was built by the constitutive equations embracing a parameter of Z/A, where the activation energy for hot deformation is 351.539 kJ/mol and the stress exponent is 4.233. In addition, the DRX evolution and the critical conditions for starting DRX were discussed. Then the model of the DRX volume fraction was developed with satisfied predictability. Finally, the processing maps at different strains were constructed according to the dynamic material model. The safety domains and flow instability regions were identified. The best processing parameters of this steel are within the temperature range of 1323-1423 K and strain rate range of 0.06-1 s -1 .

  12. Hot Deformation and Processing Window Optimization of a 70MnSiCrMo Carbide-Free Bainitic Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Han

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The hot deformation behavior of a high carbon carbide-free bainitic steel was studied through isothermal compression tests that were performed on a Gleeble-1500D thermal mechanical simulator at temperatures of 1223–1423 K and strain rates of 0.01–5 s−1. The flow behavior, constitutive equations, dynamic recrystallization (DRX characteristics, and processing map were respectively analyzed in detail. It is found that the flow stress increases with increasing the strain rate and decreases with increasing the temperature, and the single-peak DRX can be easily observed at high temperatures and/or low strain rates. The internal relationship between the flow stress and processing parameters was built by the constitutive equations embracing a parameter of Z/A, where the activation energy for hot deformation is 351.539 kJ/mol and the stress exponent is 4.233. In addition, the DRX evolution and the critical conditions for starting DRX were discussed. Then the model of the DRX volume fraction was developed with satisfied predictability. Finally, the processing maps at different strains were constructed according to the dynamic material model. The safety domains and flow instability regions were identified. The best processing parameters of this steel are within the temperature range of 1323–1423 K and strain rate range of 0.06–1 s−1.

  13. Application of MMC model on simulation of shearing process of thick hot-rolled high strength steel plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Liang; Li, Shuhui [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacture for Thin-walled Structures, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Yang, Bing; Gao, Yongsheng [Automotive Steel Research Institute, R and D Center, BaoShan Iron and Steel Co.,Ltd, Shanghai 201900 (China)

    2013-12-16

    Shear operation is widely used as the first step in sheet metal forming to cut the sheet or plate into the required size. The shear of thick hot-rolled High Strength Steel (HSS) requires large shearing force and the sheared edge quality is relatively poor because of the large thickness and high strength compared with the traditional low carbon steel. Bad sheared edge quality will easily lead to edge cracking during the post-forming process. This study investigates the shearing process of thick hot-rolled HSS plate metal, which is generally exploited as the beam of heavy trucks. The Modified Mohr-Coulomb fracture criterion (MMC) is employed in numerical simulation to calculate the initiation and propagation of cracks during the process evolution. Tensile specimens are designed to obtain various stress states in tension. Equivalent fracture strains are measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC) equipment to constitute the fracture locus. Simulation of the tension test is carried out to check the fracture model. Then the MMC model is applied to the simulation of the shearing process, and the simulation results show that the MMC model predicts the ductile fracture successfully.

  14. Application of MMC model on simulation of shearing process of thick hot-rolled high strength steel plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Liang; Li, Shuhui; Yang, Bing; Gao, Yongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Shear operation is widely used as the first step in sheet metal forming to cut the sheet or plate into the required size. The shear of thick hot-rolled High Strength Steel (HSS) requires large shearing force and the sheared edge quality is relatively poor because of the large thickness and high strength compared with the traditional low carbon steel. Bad sheared edge quality will easily lead to edge cracking during the post-forming process. This study investigates the shearing process of thick hot-rolled HSS plate metal, which is generally exploited as the beam of heavy trucks. The Modified Mohr-Coulomb fracture criterion (MMC) is employed in numerical simulation to calculate the initiation and propagation of cracks during the process evolution. Tensile specimens are designed to obtain various stress states in tension. Equivalent fracture strains are measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC) equipment to constitute the fracture locus. Simulation of the tension test is carried out to check the fracture model. Then the MMC model is applied to the simulation of the shearing process, and the simulation results show that the MMC model predicts the ductile fracture successfully

  15. Signal and Image Processing Research at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, R S; Poyneer, L A; Kegelmeyer, L M; Carrano, C J; Chambers, D H; Candy, J V

    2009-06-29

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a large, multidisciplinary institution that conducts fundamental and applied research in the physical sciences. Research programs at the Laboratory run the gamut from theoretical investigations, to modeling and simulation, to validation through experiment. Over the years, the Laboratory has developed a substantial research component in the areas of signal and image processing to support these activities. This paper surveys some of the current research in signal and image processing at the Laboratory. Of necessity, the paper does not delve deeply into any one research area, but an extensive citation list is provided for further study of the topics presented.

  16. Hot Flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hot flashes Overview Hot flashes are sudden feelings of warmth, which are usually most intense over the face, neck and chest. Your skin might redden, as if you're blushing. Hot flashes can also cause sweating, and if you ...

  17. HOT 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Sara Stefansen

    2016-01-01

    HOT samler og formidler 21 literacykyndiges bud på, hvad der er hot, og hvad der bør være hot inden for literacy – og deres begrundelser for disse bud.......HOT samler og formidler 21 literacykyndiges bud på, hvad der er hot, og hvad der bør være hot inden for literacy – og deres begrundelser for disse bud....

  18. Effect of unit size on thermal fatigue behavior of hot work steel repaired by a biomimetic laser remelting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Dalong; Li, Zhongsheng; He, Qingbing; Chen, Dajun; Chen, Hanbin; Yang, Jiuzhou; Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Hong

    2018-01-01

    AISI H13 hot work steel with fatigue cracks was repaired by a biomimetic laser remelting (BLR) process in the form of lattice units with different sizes. Detailed microstructural studies and microhardness tests were carried out on the units. Studies revealed a mixed microstructure containing martensite, retained austenite and carbide particles with ultrafine grain size in units. BLR samples with defect-free units exhibited superior thermal fatigue resistance due to microstructure strengthening, and mechanisms of crack tip blunting and blocking. In addition, effects of unit size on thermal fatigue resistance of BLR samples were discussed.

  19. Coercivity enhancement of hot-deformed Nd-Fe-B magnets by the eutectic grain boundary diffusion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Lihua; Sepehri-Amin, H.; Ohkubo, T.; Yano, M.; Kato, A.; Shoji, T.; Hono, K.

    2016-01-01

    Nd-M (M = Al, Cu, Ga, Zn, Mn) alloys with compositions close to eutectic points were investigated as diffusion sources for the grain boundary diffusion process to hot-deformed Nd-Fe-B magnets. Coercivity enhancement was observed for most of the alloys. Among them, the sample processed with Nd 90 Al 10 exhibited the highest coercivity of 2.5 T at room temperature. However, the sample processed with Nd 70 Cu 30 exhibited the highest coercivity of 0.7 T at 200 ° C. Microstructural observations using scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) showed that nonferromagnetic Nd-rich intergranular phase envelops the Nd 2 Fe 14 B grains after the diffusion process. Abnormal grain growth and the dissolution of Al into the Nd 2 Fe 14 B grains were observed in the sample processed with Nd 90 Al 10 , which explains its inferior thermal stability of coercivity compared to the sample processed with Nd 70 Cu 30 . The coercivity enhancement and poor thermal stability of the coercivity of the Nd 90 Al 10 diffusion-processed sample are discussed based on microstructure studies by transmission electron microscopy. - Highlights: • Coercivity of hot-deformed Nd-Fe-B magnets is enhanced by the infiltration of various R-TM eutectic alloys. • The sample infiltrated with Nd 90 Al 10 shows the highest coercivity of 2.5 T at room temperature. • At 200 °C, Nd 70 Cu 30 diffusion-processed sample possesses the highest coercivity of 0.7 T.

  20. Coercivity enhancement of hot-deformed Nd-Fe-B magnets by the eutectic grain boundary diffusion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lihua [Elements Strategy Initiative Center for Magnetic Materials, National Institute of Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8577 (Japan); Sepehri-Amin, H.; Ohkubo, T. [Elements Strategy Initiative Center for Magnetic Materials, National Institute of Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Yano, M.; Kato, A.; Shoji, T. [Toyota Motor Corporation, Advanced Material Engineering Div., Susono 410-1193 (Japan); Hono, K., E-mail: kazuhiro.hono@nims.go.jp [Elements Strategy Initiative Center for Magnetic Materials, National Institute of Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8577 (Japan)

    2016-05-05

    Nd-M (M = Al, Cu, Ga, Zn, Mn) alloys with compositions close to eutectic points were investigated as diffusion sources for the grain boundary diffusion process to hot-deformed Nd-Fe-B magnets. Coercivity enhancement was observed for most of the alloys. Among them, the sample processed with Nd{sub 90}Al{sub 10} exhibited the highest coercivity of 2.5 T at room temperature. However, the sample processed with Nd{sub 70}Cu{sub 30} exhibited the highest coercivity of 0.7 T at 200 {sup °}C. Microstructural observations using scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) showed that nonferromagnetic Nd-rich intergranular phase envelops the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains after the diffusion process. Abnormal grain growth and the dissolution of Al into the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains were observed in the sample processed with Nd{sub 90}Al{sub 10}, which explains its inferior thermal stability of coercivity compared to the sample processed with Nd{sub 70}Cu{sub 30}. The coercivity enhancement and poor thermal stability of the coercivity of the Nd{sub 90}Al{sub 10} diffusion-processed sample are discussed based on microstructure studies by transmission electron microscopy. - Highlights: • Coercivity of hot-deformed Nd-Fe-B magnets is enhanced by the infiltration of various R-TM eutectic alloys. • The sample infiltrated with Nd{sub 90}Al{sub 10} shows the highest coercivity of 2.5 T at room temperature. • At 200 °C, Nd{sub 70}Cu{sub 30} diffusion-processed sample possesses the highest coercivity of 0.7 T.

  1. Reduction of adhesive stain defect in flexible printed circuit board on hot pressing process: A case study of electronic component factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakulkaew Srisang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is a reduction of an adhesive stain defect in flexible printed circuit board in hot pressing process, the electronic factory. The manufacturing have been processing by sheet type of products with ninety-six pieces of flexible printed circuit boards. Causes of the problem include the before and internal hot pressing process. In process beginning times, the most right row of products between the cooling plate and the hot pressing machine has temperature 71.2◦C that is higher than glass transition temperature (Tg 60◦C. Those products’ temperature lead to evaporate a polyimide adhesive before hot pressing process beginning. The internal hot pressing process include the preheat times and the pressure time. In the preheat time the problem is a gap between lower and upper plate, was under specification (Under 1 mm and leaded to adhesive polyimide stain. In the actuality this time requires temperature and low pressure that mean a gap within 1 – 2 mm (between lower and upper plate. In pressure times the hot pressing plate surface is not flat and products are pressed by insufficient force that it lead to generate an adhesive stain on flexible printed circuit boards. That force is measured by the pre-scale paper and a result, RGB color, is provided. And then color density (From standard color sample and RGB color (From pre-scale paper is found out the relation by Photoshop program and multiple regression theory using. The formula is applied to compare with defect so as to find out the suitable color density (Defects reducing. The solving solutions is provided including the gap reduced adjustment between cooling plate and hot pressing machine before hot pressing process, the plate adjustment within specification in the preheat time and the pressing plate polishing in the pressure time. Results of study and solving are provide defect reduction from 24.4 percentage to 7.2 percentage of total study product.

  2. Description of the EDF research and development laboratory's radiographic picture processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brillault, B.

    1985-01-01

    A digital radiographic picture processing system has been developed at the EDF Research and Development Laboratory to be supplied to EDF radiography experts. We describe it in pointing out the difficulties of radiograph digitization but also the numerous processing possibilities. The final goal of the Laboratory work is to extract the information from industrial radiographs by digital means. Our study is divided into three parts: digitization by a microdensitometer; display, processing and quantization of flaws; and, digital storing. 5 refs

  3. Characterization of hot deformation behavior and processing map of FGH4096–GH4133B dual alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yanhui; Ning, Yongquan, E-mail: ningke521@163.com; Nan, Yang; Liang, Houquan; Li, Yuzhi; Zhao, Zhanglong

    2015-06-05

    Highlights: • Hot deformation behavior of dual superalloys FGH4096–GH4133B was investigated. • Power dissipation maps built at different strains exhibit a continuous dynamic course. • Processing map approach was adopted to optimize hot forging process for dual superalloys. • Microstructure evolution at different deformation temperature and strain rate of dual superalloys was researched. - Abstract: The dual superalloys FGH4096–GH4133B were joined by the electron beam welding. Isothermal compression tests were carried out on electron beam weldments FGH4096–GH4133B alloys at the temperatures of 1020–1140 °C (the nominal γ′-transus temperature is about 1080 °C) and strain rates of 0.001–1.0 s{sup −1} with the height reduction of 50%. The results showed that the true stress–true strain curves are greatly affected by deformation temperature and strain rate. There is an intrinsic and necessary connection between the flow stress and thermal–dynamic behavior, which can be indicated by the true stress–true strain curves. The power dissipation maps at different strains exhibit that true strain has a great effect on processing maps. Processing maps under different strains were constructed for evaluation of the flow instability regime and optimization of processing parameters. When the true strain is 0.69, the optimum processing condition is around 1090−1130 °C/0.1−1.0 s{sup −1} with the peak efficiency of 0.58. The dynamic recrystallization mechanism and microstructure evolution in the welding seam of the studied dual-alloys have been discussed. High temperature and low strain rate are instrumental to dynamic recrystallization. The size of dynamically recrystallized grain decreased with the increase of strain rate and increased with the increase of deformation temperature. Based on the established combine processing map and microstructures, hot deformation process should be carried out under the condition of 1100−1120 °C/0.3−1.0 s

  4. Characterization of hot deformation behavior and processing map of FGH4096–GH4133B dual alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanhui; Ning, Yongquan; Nan, Yang; Liang, Houquan; Li, Yuzhi; Zhao, Zhanglong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Hot deformation behavior of dual superalloys FGH4096–GH4133B was investigated. • Power dissipation maps built at different strains exhibit a continuous dynamic course. • Processing map approach was adopted to optimize hot forging process for dual superalloys. • Microstructure evolution at different deformation temperature and strain rate of dual superalloys was researched. - Abstract: The dual superalloys FGH4096–GH4133B were joined by the electron beam welding. Isothermal compression tests were carried out on electron beam weldments FGH4096–GH4133B alloys at the temperatures of 1020–1140 °C (the nominal γ′-transus temperature is about 1080 °C) and strain rates of 0.001–1.0 s −1 with the height reduction of 50%. The results showed that the true stress–true strain curves are greatly affected by deformation temperature and strain rate. There is an intrinsic and necessary connection between the flow stress and thermal–dynamic behavior, which can be indicated by the true stress–true strain curves. The power dissipation maps at different strains exhibit that true strain has a great effect on processing maps. Processing maps under different strains were constructed for evaluation of the flow instability regime and optimization of processing parameters. When the true strain is 0.69, the optimum processing condition is around 1090−1130 °C/0.1−1.0 s −1 with the peak efficiency of 0.58. The dynamic recrystallization mechanism and microstructure evolution in the welding seam of the studied dual-alloys have been discussed. High temperature and low strain rate are instrumental to dynamic recrystallization. The size of dynamically recrystallized grain decreased with the increase of strain rate and increased with the increase of deformation temperature. Based on the established combine processing map and microstructures, hot deformation process should be carried out under the condition of 1100−1120 °C/0.3−1.0 s −1 with

  5. Detailed Modelling of Kinetic Biodegradation Processes in a Laboratory Mmicrocosm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, I.; Oswald, S.; Banwart, S.; Mayer, U.

    2003-04-01

    Biodegradation of organic contaminants in soil and groundwater usually takes places via different redox processes happening sequentially as well as simultaneously. We used numerical modelling of a long-term lab microcosm experiment to simulate the dynamic behaviour of fermentation and respiration in the aqueous phase in contact with the sandstone material, and to develop a conceptual model describing these processes. Aqueous speciation, surface complexation, mineral dissolution and precipitation were taken into account also. Fermentation can be the first step of the degradation process producing intermediate species, which are subsequently consumed by TEAPs. Microbial growth and substrate utilisation kinetics are coupled via a formulation that also includes aqueous speciation and other geochemical reactions including surface complexation, mineral dissolution and precipitation. Competitive exclusion between TEAPs is integral to the conceptual model of the simulation, and the results indicate that exclusion is not complete, but some overlap is found between TEAPs. The model was used to test approaches like the partial equilibrium approach that currently make use of hydrogen levels to diagnose prevalent TEAPs in groundwater. The observed pattern of hydrogen and acetate concentrations were reproduced well by the simulations, and the results show the relevance of kinetics, lag times and inhibition, and especially that intermediate products play a key role.

  6. Processing and properties of calcium phosphates bioceramics by hot isostatic pressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boilet Laurent

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Stoichiometric β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP, hydroxyapatite (HA and biphasic calcium phosphate (TCP/HA 60/40 %wt, BCP40 powders were synthesized by chemical precipitation of aqueous solutions of diammonium phosphate and calcium nitrate. After a calcination treatment and a milling step, powders were shaped by slip-casting. The sintering temperature effect on the density and the average grain size was investigated. By natural sintering, densities between 98 and 99.8% were obtained. Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP treatment was carried out after a pre-sintering of these materials. Transparent or translucent samples were obtained, indicating a relative density very close to the theoretical value (>99.9%. Mechanical properties (three-point bending strength, fracture toughness, Young's modulus and Vickers hardness were measured on hipped materials with similar grain size (∼0.7μm.

  7. Room temperature deformation mechanisms in ultrafine-grained materials processed by hot isostatic pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, W.Q.; Dirras, G.F.; Benyoucef, M.; Bacroix, B.

    2007-01-01

    Ultrafine-grained (uf-g) and microcrystalline-grained (mc-g) irons have been fabricated by hot isostatic pressing of nanopowders. The mechanical properties have been characterized by compressive tests at room temperature and the resulting microstructures and textures have been determined by combining electron back scatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. A transition of the deformation mode, from work hardening to work softening occurs for grain sizes below ∼1 μm, reflecting a transition of the deformation mode from homogeneous to localized deformation into shear bands (SBs). The homogeneous deformation is found to be lattice dislocation-based while the deformation within SBs involves lattice dislocations as well as boundary-related mechanisms, possibly grain boundary sliding accommodated by boundary opening

  8. Yb:Y2O3 transparent ceramics processed with hot isostatic pressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Peng; Luo, Dewei; Yin, Danlei; Tang, Dingyuan; Kong, Ling Bing

    2017-09-01

    Highly transparent 5 at.% Yb:Y2O3 ceramics were fabricated by using a combination method of vacuum sintering and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Co-precipitated Yb:Y2O3 powders, with 1 at.% ZrO2 as the sintering aid, were used as the starting material. The Yb:Y2O3 ceramics, vacuum sintered at 1700 °C for 2 h and HIPed at 1775 °C for 4 h, exhibited small grain size of 1.9 μm and highly dense microstructure. In-line optical transmittance of the ceramics reached 83.4% and 78.9% at 2000 and 600 nm, respectively. As the ceramic slab was pumped by a fiber-coupled laser diode at about 940 nm, a maximum output power of 0.77 W at 1076 nm was achieved, with a corresponding slope efficiency of 10.6%.

  9. Introduction of hot cell facility in research center Rez - Poster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrickova, A.; Srba, O.; Miklos, M.; Svoboda, P.

    2015-01-01

    This poster presents the hot cell facility which is being constructed as part of the SUSEN project at the Rez research center (Czech Republic). Within this project a new complex of 10 hot cells and one semi-hot cell will be built. There will be 8 gamma hot cells and 2 alpha hot cells. In each hot cell a hermetic, removable box made of stainless steel will home different type of devices. The hot cells and semi hot cell will be equipped with devices for processing samples (cutting, welding, drilling, machining) as well as equipment for testing (sample preparation area, stress testing machine, fatigue machine, electromechanical creep machine, high frequency resonance pulsator...) and equipment for studying material microstructure (nano-indenter with nano-scratch tester and scanning electron microscope). An autoclave with water loop, installed in a cell will allow mechanical testing in control environment of water, pressure and temperature. A scheme shows the equipment of each cell. This hot laboratory will be able to cover all the process to study radioactive materials: receiving the material, the preparation of the samples, mechanical testing and microstructure observation. Our hot cells will be close to the research nuclear reactor LVR-15 and new irradiation facility (high irradiation by cobalt source) is planned to be built within the SUSEN project

  10. Quality Control of Boar Sperm Processing : Implications from European AI Centres and Two Spermatology Reference Laboratories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riesenbeck, A; Schulze, M; Rüdiger, K; Henning, H; Waberski, D

    In recent years, increased automatization has resulted in a higher efficiency of boar semen processing in AI laboratories. Sophisticated laboratory management and efficient quality control programmes are needed for current tendencies in major pork-producing countries to reduce the sperm number per

  11. Interface analysis of A1 matrix composites produced by hot isostatic pressing, squeeze casting and semi-solid processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamsul, J.B.; Zainal Arifin Ahmad; Faaizulaswad, M.S.; Azmi, R.

    2000-01-01

    The interface analysis has been carried out an aluminium based composites system produced by hot isostatic pressing, squeeze casting and semi-solid processing. A range of different fabrication techniques has been used to produce different types of microstructure of Al 2124 (Al-Cu-Mg) reinforced with 5 weight % SiC particles. Blending followed by hot isostatic pressing is used to fabricate composite I. Composite II was 6061 (Al-Si-Mg) wrought aluminium alloy reinforced with fibres of alumina-silica (V f = 0.58) and fabricated by squeeze casting. Finally, A356 (AlSi7Mg0.3) alloy was reinforced with 20 Vol.% of SiC particles (13 μm) and namely as composite III. Composite III is fabricated by semi-solid processing. Interface analysis was done by optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Composite I exhibited good interface bonding and dislocation was also observed near the interface. Elements such as Al, Fe, Cr, Mn were found near the interface of composite II and intermetallic of iron rich inclusion and Mg 2 Si were observed near the interface of composite III. (Author)

  12. Status of microwave process development for RH-TRU [remote-handled transuranic] wastes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, T.L.; Youngblood, E.L.; Berry, J.B.; Mattus, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Handling and Packaging Plant is developing a microwave process to reduce and solidify remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) liquids and sludges presently stored in large tanks at ORNL. Testing has recently begun on an in-drum microwave process using nonradioactive RH-TRU surrogates. The microwave process development effort has focused on an in-drum process to dry the RH-TRU liquids and sludges in the final storage container and then melt the salt residues to form a solid monolith. A 1/3-scale proprietary microwave applicator was designed, fabricated, and tested to demonstrate the essential features of the microwave design and to provide input into the design of the full-scale applicator. The microwave fields are uniform in one dimension to reduce the formation of hot spots on the microwaved wasteform. The final wasteform meets the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, a federal repository for defense transuranic wastes near Carlsbad, New Mexico. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  13. Life Improvement of Pot Hardware in Continuous Hot Dipping Processes Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xingbo Liu

    2006-01-18

    The process of continuous galvanizing of rolled sheet steel includes immersion into a bath of molten zinc/aluminum alloy. The steel strip is dipped in the molten bath through a series of driving motors and rollers which control the speed and tension of the strip, with the ability to modify both the amount of coating applied to the steel as well as the thickness and width of the sheet being galvanized. There are three rolls used to guide the steel strip through the molten metal bath. The rolls that operate in the molten Zn/Al are subject to a severely corrosive environment and require frequent changing. The performance of this equipment, the metallic hardware submerged in the molten Zn/Al bath, is the focus of this research. The primary objective of this research is to extend the performance life of the metallic hardware components of molten Zn/Al pot hardware by an order of magnitude. Typical galvanizing operations experience downtimes on the order of every two weeks to change the metallic hardware submerged in the molten metal bath. This is an expensive process for industry which takes upwards of 3 days for a complete turn around to resume normal operation. Each roll bridle consists of a sink, stabilizer, and corrector roll with accompanying bearing components. The cost of the bridle rig with all components is as much as $25,000 dollars just for materials. These inefficiencies are of concern to the steel coating companies and serve as a potential market for many materials suppliers. This research effort served as a bridge between the market potential and industry need to provide an objective analytical and mechanistic approach to the problem of wear and corrosion of molten metal bath hardware in a continuous sheet galvanizing line. The approach of the investigators was to provide a means of testing and analysis that was both expeditious and cost effective. The consortium of researchers from West Virginia University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory developed

  14. Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yongqi

    2014-02-01

    This report summarizes the methodology and preliminary results of a techno-economic analysis on a hot carbonate absorption process (Hot-CAP) with crystallization-enabled high pressure stripping for post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture (PCC). This analysis was based on the Hot-CAP that is fully integrated with a sub-critical steam cycle, pulverized coal-fired power plant adopted in Case 10 of the DOE/NETL’s Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants. The techno-economic analysis addressed several important aspects of the Hot-CAP for PCC application, including process design and simulation, equipment sizing, technical risk and mitigation strategy, performance evaluation, and cost analysis. Results show that the net power produced in the subcritical power plant equipped with Hot-CAP is 611 MWe, greater than that with Econoamine (550 MWe). The total capital cost for the Hot-CAP, including CO{sub 2} compression, is $399 million, less than that for the Econoamine PCC ($493 million). O&M costs for the power plant with Hot-CAP is $175 million annually, less than that with Econoamine ($178 million). The 20-year levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for the power plant with Hot-CAP, including CO2 transportation and storage, is 119.4 mills/kWh, a 59% increase over that for the plant without CO2 capture. The LCOE increase caused by CO{sub 2} capture for the Hot-CAP is 31% lower than that for its Econoamine counterpart.

  15. Cyclic fatigue resistance of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals with hot isostatic press processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Taku; Sato, Toru; Yoshinari, Masao

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of surface roughness and cyclic loading on fatigue resistance in Y-TZP subjected to hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Fifty Y-TZP cylinders 3.0 mm in diameter were divided into Group A (polished by centerless method; TZP-CP) or Group B (blasted and acid-etched: TZP-SB150E). Twenty five cp-titanium cylinders (Ti-SB150E) were used as a control. Static and cyclic tests were carried out according to ISO 14801. The cyclic fatigue test was performed in distilled water at 37°C. Surface morphology and roughness as well as crystal phase on the surfaces were also evaluated. Fracture force under the static test was 1,765N (TZP-CP), 1,220N (TZP-SB150E), and 850 N (yield force, Ti-SB150E). Fracture values under the cyclic test decreased to approximately 70% of those under the static tests. These results indicate that HIPed Y-TZP with a 3.0-mm diameter has sufficient durability for application to dental implants.

  16. Dominant root locus in state estimator design for material flow processes: A case study of hot strip rolling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fišer, Jaromír; Zítek, Pavel; Skopec, Pavel; Knobloch, Jan; Vyhlídal, Tomáš

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of the paper is to achieve a constrained estimation of process state variables using the anisochronic state observer tuned by the dominant root locus technique. The anisochronic state observer is based on the state-space time delay model of the process. Moreover the process model is identified not only as delayed but also as non-linear. This model is developed to describe a material flow process. The root locus technique combined with the magnitude optimum method is utilized to investigate the estimation process. Resulting dominant roots location serves as a measure of estimation process performance. The higher the dominant (natural) frequency in the leftmost position of the complex plane the more enhanced performance with good robustness is achieved. Also the model based observer control methodology for material flow processes is provided by means of the separation principle. For demonstration purposes, the computer-based anisochronic state observer is applied to the strip temperatures estimation in the hot strip finishing mill composed of seven stands. This application was the original motivation to the presented research. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Discrete event simulation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analytical laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanahan, K.L.

    1992-02-01

    A discrete event simulation of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analytical laboratory has been constructed in the GPSS language. It was used to estimate laboratory analysis times at process analytical hold points and to study the effect of sample number on those times. Typical results are presented for three different simultaneous representing increasing levels of complexity, and for different sampling schemes. Example equipment utilization time plots are also included. SRS DWPF laboratory management and chemists found the simulations very useful for resource and schedule planning

  18. Studies of the AA2519 Alloy Hot Rolling Process and Cladding with EN AW-1050A Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Płonka B.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to determine the feasibility of plastic forming by hot rolling of the AA2519 aluminium alloy sheets and cladding these sheets with a layer of the EN AW-1050A alloy. Numerous hot-rolling tests were carried out on the slab ingots to define the parameters of the AA2519 alloy rolling process. It has been established that rolling of the AA2519 alloy should be carried out in the temperature range of 400-440°C. Depending on the required final thickness of the sheet metal, appropriate thickness of the EN AW-1050A alloy sheet, used as a cladding layer, was selected. As a next step, structure and mechanical properties of the resulting AA2519 alloy sheets clad with EN AW-1050A alloy was examined. The thickness of the coating layer was established at 0,3÷0,5mm. Studies covered alloy grain size and the core alloy-cladding material bond strength.

  19. Micromagnetic simulation for the magnetization reversal process of Nd-Fe-B hot-deformed nanocrystalline permanent magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Tsukahara

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We numerically demonstrated the magnetization reversal process inside a hot-deformed nanocrystalline permanent magnet. We performed large-scale micromagnetics simulation based on the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation with 0.1 billion calculation cells. The simulation model for the hot-deformed nanocrystalline permanent magnet consists of 2622 tabular grains that interact with each other by inter-grain exchange and dipole interactions. When the strength of the external field approached a coercive force, nucleation cores were created at the grain surface. The magnetization reversal was propagated by the inter-grain and dipole interactions. When the grains had overlapping regions parallel to the external field, the magnetization reversal propagated quickly between the grains due to the dipole interaction. In contrast, the motion of the magnetic domain wall was inhibited at interfaces between the grains perpendicular to the external field. Reversal magnetic domains had a pillar-shaped structure that is parallel to the external field. In the perpendicular direction, the reversal magnetic domain expanded gradually because of the inhibition of the domain wall motion.

  20. Interfacial layers evolution during annealing in Ti-Al multi-laminated composite processed using hot press and roll bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, A. H.; Eghbali, B.

    2016-09-01

    Ti-Al multi-laminated composites have great potential in high strength and low weight structures. In the present study, tri-layer Ti-Al composite was synthesized by hot press bonding under 40 MPa at 570 °C for 1 h and subsequent hot roll bonding at about 450 °C. This process was conducted in two accumulative passes to 30% and to 67% thickness reduction in initial and final passes, respectively. Then, the final annealing treatments were done at 550, 600, 650, 700 and 750 °C for 2, 4 and 6 h. Investigations on microstructural evolution and thickening of interfacial layers were performed by scanning electron microscopes, energy dispersive spectrometer, X-ray diffraction and micro-hardness tests. The results showed that the thickening of diffusion layers corresponds to amount of deformation. In addition to thickening of the diffusion layers, the thickness of aluminum layers decreased and after annealing treatment at 750 °C for 6 h the aluminum layers were consumed entirely, which occurred because of the enhanced interdiffusion of Ti and Al elements. Scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer showed that the sequence of interfacial layers as Ti3Al-TiAl-TiAl2-TiAl3 which are believed to be the result of thermodynamic and kinetic of phase formation. Micro-hardness results presented the variation profile in accordance with the sequence of intermetallic phases and their different structures.

  1. Energy flux of hot atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wotzak, G.P.; Kostin, M.D.

    1976-01-01

    The process in which hot atoms collide with thermal atoms of a gas, transfer kinetic energy to them, and produce additional hot atoms is investigated. A stochastic method is used to obtain numerical results for the spatial and time dependent energy flux of hot atoms in a gas. The results indicate that in hot atom systems a front followed by an intense energy flux of hot atoms may develop

  2. Rheology Guided Rational Selection of Processing Temperature To Prepare Copovidone-Nifedipine Amorphous Solid Dispersions via Hot Melt Extrusion (HME).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fengyuan; Su, Yongchao; Zhang, Jingtao; DiNunzio, James; Leone, Anthony; Huang, Chengbin; Brown, Chad D

    2016-10-03

    The production of amorphous solid dispersions via hot melt extrusion (HME) relies on elevated temperature and prolonged residence time, which can result in potential degradation and decomposition of thermally sensitive components. Herein, the rheological properties of a physical mixture of polymer and an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) were utilized to guide the selection of appropriate HME processing temperature. In the currently studied copovidone-nifedipine system, a critical temperature, which is substantially lower (∼13 °C) than the melting point of crystalline API, was captured during a temperature ramp examination and regarded as the critical point at which the API could molecularly dissolve into the polymer. Based on the identification of this critical point, various solid dispersions were prepared by HME processing below, at, and above the critical temperature (both below and above the melting temperature (T m ) of crystalline API). In addition, the resultant extrudates along with two control solid dispersions prepared by physical mixing and cryogenic milling were assessed by X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, hot stage microscopy, rheology, and solid-state NMR. Physicochemical properties of resultant solid dispersions indicated that the identified critical temperature is sufficient for the polymer-API system to reach a molecular-level mixing, manifested by the transparent and smooth appearance of extrudates, the absence of API crystalline diffraction and melting peaks, dramatically decreased rheological properties, and significantly improved polymer-API miscibility. Once the critical temperature has been achieved, further raising the processing temperature only results in limited improvement of API dispersion, reflected by slightly reduced storage modulus and complex viscosity and limited improvement in miscibility.

  3. Development and Implementation of a Quality Improvement Process for Echocardiographic Laboratory Accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Yvonne E; Lavie, Carl J; Ahmad, Homaa; Bernal, Jose A; Cash, Michael E; Dinshaw, Homeyar; Milani, Richard V; Shah, Sangeeta; Bienvenu, Lisa; White, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    We describe our process for quality improvement (QI) for a 3-year accreditation cycle in echocardiography by the Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC) for a large group practice. Echocardiographic laboratory accreditation by the IAC was introduced in 1996, which is not required but could impact reimbursement. To ensure high-quality patient care and community recognition as a facility committed to providing high-quality echocardiographic services, we applied for IAC accreditation in 2010. Currently, there is little published data regarding the IAC process to meet echocardiography standards. We describe our approach for developing a multicampus QI process for echocardiographic laboratory accreditation during the 3-year cycle of accreditation by the IAC. We developed a quarterly review assessing (1) the variability of the interpretations, (2) the quality of the examinations, (3) a correlation of echocardiographic studies with other imaging modalities, (4) the timely completion of reports, (5) procedure volume, (6) maintenance of Continuing Medical Education credits by faculty, and (7) meeting Appropriate Use Criteria. We developed and implemented a multicampus process for QI during the 3-year accreditation cycle by the IAC for Echocardiography. We documented both the process and the achievement of those metrics by the Echocardiography Laboratories at the Ochsner Medical Institutions. We found the QI process using IAC standards to be a continuous educational experience for our Echocardiography Laboratory physicians and staff. We offer our process as an example and guide for other echocardiography laboratories who wish to apply for such accreditation or reaccreditation. © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Report of the Committee of inquiry into a fire which occurred on 18 March 1987 in a radioisotope processing cell, Building 54 at the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    At about 1745 hours on Wednesday, 18 March 1987 a fire occurred in a small charcoal filter inside a processing cell (hot cell) in Building 54 at the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories (LHRL). This cell was being used to process irradiated uranium to separate the radioactive isotope molybdenum-99. Some radioactive contamination escaped from the hot cell into the operating area and three AAEC officers were found to have minor radioactive contamination on their skin/hair. The majority of the radioactive material released from the fire was trapped by the main filters outside the cell. The total amounts of radioactive noble gas and of radioiodine released to the environment during the week in which the fire occurred were within the normal range of discharge and were 53% and 2.1%, respectively, of the weekly limit authorised by the NSW Department of Health. On the evidence available to it, the Committee concludes that the fire was caused by spontaneous combustion in the charcoal filter used to trap radioactive gases released by the operations in the hot cell; the mechanism causing the fire cannot be clearly established at this stage; no member of AAEC staff, NSW emergency services personnel or the general public suffered, or will suffer, any adverse health effects from radioactivity as a result of the accident

  5. "Hot" Facilitation of "Cool" Processing: Emotional Distraction Can Enhance Priming of Visual Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjansson, Arni; Oladottir, Berglind; Most, Steven B.

    2013-01-01

    Emotional stimuli often capture attention and disrupt effortful cognitive processing. However, cognitive processes vary in the degree to which they require effort. We investigated the impact of emotional pictures on visual search and on automatic priming of search. Observers performed visual search after task-irrelevant neutral or emotionally…

  6. Phase-equilibria for design of coal-gasification processes: dew points of hot gases containing condensible tars. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prausnitz, J.M.

    1980-05-01

    This research is concerned with the fundamental physical chemistry and thermodynamics of condensation of tars (dew points) from the vapor phase at advanced temperatures and pressures. Fundamental quantitative understanding of dew points is important for rational design of heat exchangers to recover sensible heat from hot, tar-containing gases that are produced in coal gasification. This report includes essentially six contributions toward establishing the desired understanding: (1) Characterization of Coal Tars for Dew-Point Calculations; (2) Fugacity Coefficients for Dew-Point Calculations in Coal-Gasification Process Design; (3) Vapor Pressures of High-Molecular-Weight Hydrocarbons; (4) Estimation of Vapor Pressures of High-Boiling Fractions in Liquefied Fossil Fuels Containing Heteroatoms Nitrogen or Sulfur; and (5) Vapor Pressures of Heavy Liquid Hydrocarbons by a Group-Contribution Method.

  7. Microstructure and hot corrosion behavior of the Ni-based superalloy GH202 treated by laser shock processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Jiangdong [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Mechanical and Electrical Department, Nantong Shipping College, Nantong, Jiangsu 226010 (China); Zhang, Junsong [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Hua, Yinqun, E-mail: huayq@ujs.edu.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Chen, Ruifang [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Li, Zhibao [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Ye, Yunxia [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China)

    2017-03-15

    The effects of laser shock processing on microstructure, the residual stress, and hot corrosion behavior of the Ni-based superalloy GH202 were investigated. The microstructures of GH202 before and after laser shock processing (LSP) were characterized by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). A large number of crystal defects (twins, dislocation arrays, and high dense tangles) were generated on the surface of GH202 treated with LSP. The cross-sectional compressive residual stress and micro-hardness of specimens treated by LSP were improved significantly. The corrosion kinetics of GH202 with or without LSP treatment at 800 °C and 900 °C were investigated. Analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that the corrosion products mainly consist of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, NiO, CrS, Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}, and Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}. The surface and cross-section morphologies were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results confirmed that the crystal defects induced by LSP promotes the creation of diffusion paths for elements (Cr, Al, and Ti), allowing the formation of tiny homogeneous oxidation films in a very short time. Additionally, the spallation of oxidation film on the treated specimens was alleviated significantly. Overall, the hot corrosion resistance of Ni-based GH202 induced by LSP was improved in Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaCl molten salt from 800 °C to 900 °C. - Highlights: • Microstructure changes of GH202 before and after LSP were observed by EBSD and TEM. • The hardness and residual compressive stress after LSP were significantly increased. • The increased diffusion paths for elements helped to form oxidation films quickly. • Hot corrosion resistance of GH202 after LSP was significantly improved.

  8. Pharmaceutical process chemistry: evolution of a contemporary data-rich laboratory environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Stéphane; Thomson, Nicholas M

    2015-03-20

    Over the past 20 years, the industrial laboratory environment has gone through a major transformation in the industrial process chemistry setting. In order to discover and develop robust and efficient syntheses and processes for a pharmaceutical portfolio with growing synthetic complexity and increased regulatory expectations, the round-bottom flask and other conventional equipment familiar to a traditional organic chemistry laboratory are being replaced. The new process chemistry laboratory fosters multidisciplinary collaborations by providing a suite of tools capable of delivering deeper process understanding through mechanistic insights and detailed kinetics translating to greater predictability at scale. This transformation is essential to the field of organic synthesis in order to promote excellence in quality, safety, speed, and cost efficiency in synthesis.

  9. Effects of processing method and moisture history on laboratory fungal resistance of wood-HDPE composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig M. Clemons; Rebecca E. Ibach

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the effects of composite processing and moisture sorption on laboratory fungal resistance of wood-plastic composites. A 2-week water soaking or cyclic boiling-drying procedure was used to infuse moisture into composites made from high-density polyethylene filled with 50 percent wood flour and processed by extrusion, compression...

  10. Process design and control of a twin screw hot melt extrusion for continuous pharmaceutical tamper-resistant tablet production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronsky-Probst, J; Möltgen, C-V; Kessler, W; Kessler, R W

    2016-05-25

    Hot melt extrusion (HME) is a well-known process within the plastic and food industries that has been utilized for the past several decades and is increasingly accepted by the pharmaceutical industry for continuous manufacturing. For tamper-resistant formulations of e.g. opioids, HME is the most efficient production technique. The focus of this study is thus to evaluate the manufacturability of the HME process for tamper-resistant formulations. Parameters such as the specific mechanical energy (SME), as well as the melt pressure and its standard deviation, are important and will be discussed in this study. In the first step, the existing process data are analyzed by means of multivariate data analysis. Key critical process parameters such as feed rate, screw speed, and the concentration of the API in the polymers are identified, and critical quality parameters of the tablet are defined. In the second step, a relationship between the critical material, product and process quality attributes are established by means of Design of Experiments (DoEs). The resulting SME and the temperature at the die are essential data points needed to indirectly qualify the degradation of the API, which should be minimal. NIR-spectroscopy is used to monitor the material during the extrusion process. In contrast to most applications in which the probe is directly integrated into the die, the optical sensor is integrated into the cooling line of the strands. This saves costs in the probe design and maintenance and increases the robustness of the chemometric models. Finally, a process measurement system is installed to monitor and control all of the critical attributes in real-time by means of first principles, DoE models, soft sensor models, and spectroscopic information. Overall, the process is very robust as long as the screw speed is kept low. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Advances in chemical and physical properties of electric arc furnace carbon steel slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liapis, Ioannis; Papayianni, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    Slags are recognised as a highly efficient, cost effective tool in the metal processing industry, by minimising heat losses, reducing metal oxidation through contact with air, removing metal impurities and protecting refractories and graphite electrodes. When compared to natural aggregates for use in the construction industry, slags have higher specific weight that acts as an economic deterrent. A method of altering the specific weight of EAFC slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing, during steel production is presented in this article. The method has minimal interference with the production process of steel, even by limited additions of appropriate minerals at high temperatures. Five minerals are examined, namely perlite, ladle furnace slag, bauxite, diatomite and olivine. Measurements of specific weight are accompanied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence (XRF) analysis and scanning electron microscopy spectral images. It is also shown how altering the chemical composition is expected to affect the furnace refractory lining. Additionally, the process has been repeated for the most suitable mix in gas furnace and physical properties (FI, SI, LA, PSV, AAV, volume stability) examined. Alteration of the specific weight can result in tailoring slag properties for specific applications in the construction sector. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dry sample storage system for an analytical laboratory supporting plutonium processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treibs, H.A.; Hartenstein, S.D.; Griebenow, B.L.; Wade, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    The Special Isotope Separation (SIS) plant is designed to provide removal of undesirable isotopes in fuel grade plutonium by the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. The AVLIS process involves evaporation of plutonium metal, and passage of an intense beam of light from a laser through the plutonium vapor. The laser beam consists of several discrete wavelengths, tuned to the precise wavelength required to ionize the undesired isotopes. These ions are attracted to charged plates, leaving the bulk of the plutonium vapor enriched in the desired isotopes to be collected on a cold plate. Major portions of the process consist of pyrochemical processes, including direct reduction of the plutonium oxide feed material with calcium metal, and aqueous processes for purification of plutonium in residues. The analytical laboratory for the plant is called the Material and Process Control Laboratory (MPCL), and provides for the analysis of solid and liquid process samples

  13. Design of a hot pilot plant facility for demonstration of the pot calcination process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckham, J A

    1962-01-01

    A facility was designed for demonstration of the pot calcination process with wastes from processing aluminum alloy fuels, Darex or electrolytic processing of stainless-steel fuels, and Purex processes. This facility will also permit determination of procedures required for economical production of low-porosity, relatively nonleachable materials by addition of suitable reagents to the wastes fed to the calciner. The process consists of concentration by evaporation and thermal decomposition in situ in pots which also serve as the final disposal containers. This unit permits determination of pot loading and density, leachability, melting point, volatile material content, heat release, and thermal conductivity of the calcine. Also to be determined are transient calcine temperature distributions, fission product behavior during calcination, deentrainment obtained in the various parts of the system, decontamination achieved on all liquid and gaseous effluent streams, need for venting of stored pots, optimum means of remotely sealing the pots, and methods required for production of a minimum volume of noncondensable off-gas. This facility will employ nominal full-scale pots 8 and 12 in. in diameter and 8 ft long. A unique evaporator design was evolved to permit operation either with close-coupled continuous feed preparation or with bath feed preparation. Provisions were made to circumvent possible explosions due to organic material in feed solutions and other suspected hazards.

  14. Equipment, operation and some results from a hot test of the CTH actinide separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liljenzin, J.O.; Persson, G.

    1981-01-01

    The CTH actinide separation process has been tested by treating 16 l of 10 year old waste solution from PUREX reprocessing of metallic fuel. It was in general found to operate well and, in some respects, slightly better than design specifications. The extraction process removed more than 99.995% of initial alpha activity. After the sorption steps 5 Bq/l β-activity remained in solution. The modified reversed TALSPEAK process used to separate Am and Cm from the lanthanides gave an Am-Cm product with less than 0.7% of the lanthanides and vice versa. This result can probably be somewhat improved by continuous addition of lactic acid and closer pH control. (orig.)

  15. Investigation of interfacial heat transfer mechanism for 7075-T6 aluminum alloy in HFQ hot forming process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, Liang; Gao, Tianhan; Dai, Minghua; Hu, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The transient IHTC between 7075 alloy and die in HFQ process is investigated. • The accuracy of IHTC calculated by Beck and heat balance method is compared. • The relationship between IHTC and process parameter of 7075 alloy is studied. • The transient IHTC law is verified by U-type HFQ forming experiment. - Abstract: The IHTC (Interfacial-Heat-Transfer-Coefficient) between aluminum alloy and die during HFQ (Heat-Forming-Quenching) process is an important thermal parameter to reflect the heat transfer efficiency. In the present work, the instantaneous heat transfer law for high strength 7075-T6 alloy during HFQ process based on cylindrical-die model was investigated. The accuracy of IHTC calculated by Beck’s non-linear estimation method (Beck’s method) and heat balance method (HBM) were compared, and instantaneous IHTC of 7075-T6 alloy was acquired in experiment and analyzed in consideration of different contact pressure, surface roughness and lubricate conditions. Furthermore, the obtained IHTC was applied to the simulation process of typical U-type experimental model in order to validate the universality of heat transfer law. The result shows that the average IHTC goes near to 3300 W/m"2·K when pressure is above 80 MPa; Surface roughness can also affect the IHTC in HFQ process, but the effect mechanism is different from the boron steel in hot stamping process. The average IHTC decreases sharply when surface roughness increases in the range of 0.570–0.836 μm, the value is from 3453 W/m"2·K to 2001 W/m"2·K under 80 MPa. Furthermore, surface lubrication can promote heat transfer efficiency and increase IHTC value when contact pressure is relatively high.

  16. Microstructure and partitioning behavior characteristics in low carbon steels treated by hot-rolling direct quenching and dynamical partitioning processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yun-jie; Li, Xiao-lei; Yuan, Guo; Kang, Jian; Chen, Dong; Wang, Guo-dong

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a new process and composition design are proposed for “quenching and partitioning” or Q&P treatment. Three low carbon steels were treated by hot-rolling direct quenching and dynamical partitioning processes (DQ&P). The effects of proeutectoid ferrite and carbon concentration on microstructure evolution and mechanical properties were investigated. The present work obtained DQ&P prototype steels with good mechanical properties and established a new notion on compositions for Q&P processing. Microstructures were characterized by means of electro probe microanalyzer (EPMA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), especially the morphology and size of retained austenite. Mechanical properties were measured by uniaxial tensile tests. The results indicated that introducing proeutectoid ferrite can increase the volume fraction of retained austenite and thus improve mechanical properties. TEM observation showed that retained austenite included the film-like inter-lath austenite and blocky austenite located in martensite/ferrite interfaces or surrounded by ferrites. It was interesting that when the carbon concentration is as low as ~ 0.078%, the film-like inter-lath untransformed austenite cannot be stabilized to room temperature and almost all of them transformed into twin martensite. The blocky retained austenite strengthened the interfaces and transformed into twin martensite during the tensile deformation process. The PSEs of specimens all exceeded 20 GPa.%. - Highlights: •This study focused on a new process: Q&P process applying dynamical partitioning. •Ferrite can increase the volume fraction of retained austenite. •The film-like austenite and the blocky austenite were observed. •The low carbon steels treated by new process reached PSEs higher than 20 GPa.%.

  17. 21 CFR 212.60 - What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... maintenance. Each laboratory must have and follow written procedures to ensure that equipment is routinely... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What requirements apply to the laboratories where...) Laboratory Controls § 212.60 What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process...

  18. Development of the maintenance process by the servo manipulator for the parts of the equipment outside the MSM's workspace in a hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Song, D. K.; Park, B. S.; Yun, G. S.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the maintenance process by the servo manipulator for the parts of the equipment that cannot be reached by MSM in the hot cell was developed. To do this, the virtual mock up is implemented using virtual prototyping technology. And, Using this mock-up, the workspace of the manipulators in the hot cell and the operator's view through the wall-mounted lead glass are analyzed. And the path planning of the servo manipulator using the collision detection of the virtual mockup is established. Also, the maintenance process for the parts of the equipment that are located out area of the MSM's workspace by the servo manipulator is proposed and verified through the graphic simulation. The proposed remote maintenance process of the equipment can be effectively used in the real hot cell operation. Also, the implemented virtual mock-up of the hot cell can be effecively used in analyzing the various hot cell operation and in enhancing the reliability and safety of the spent fuel manaement

  19. Evolution of r-process elements in the hot supernova bubble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, G.J.; Wilson, J.R.; Woosley, S.E.

    1993-02-01

    We review some of the recent arguments as to why the r-process is thought to be associated with supernovae and how the high-temperature, high-entropy inner region of a core-collapse supernova is an ideal r-process site. We present preliminary extensions of our earlier work on the formation of the high-entropy ''bubble'' that describe more accurately its late-time evolution and the ejection of the neutrino-energized wind from the surface of the nascent neutron star. This site leads naturally to a distribution of temperature, density, neutron excess, and entropy for material ejected at different times in the wind as required by Solar abundances. We present simple analytic expressions which approximate these distributions. This site also predicts an amount of reprocess material ejected per event in agreement with simple galactic evolution arguments. However, it is not yet clear whether the entropy in this model is high enough (or the electron fraction is low enough) to produce an optimum fit to the Solar r-process abundance curve and additional mechanisms may be required to increase the entropy per baryon. We conclude with a discussion of nuclear measurements which would help to probe this r-process environment

  20. High pressure processing with hot sauce flavoring enhances sensory quality for raw oysters (Crassostrea virginica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluated the feasibility of flavoring raw oysters by placing them under pressure in the presence of selected flavorings. Hand-shucked raw oysters were processed at high pressure (600 MPa), in the presence or absence of (Sriracha®) flavoring, and evaluated by a trained sensory panel 3 an...

  1. Formability of fiber-reinforced thermoplastics in hot press forming process based on friction properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sachs, Ulrich; Haanappel, Sebastiaan; Rietman, Bert; ten Thije, R.H.W.; Akkerman, Remko

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an advanced solid state cladding process, based on Friction Stir Welding, is presented. The Friction Surface Cladding (FSC) technology enables the deposition of a solid-state coating using filler material on a substrate with good metallurgical bonding. A relatively soft AA1050 filler

  2. Hot Deformation Behavior of Hot-Extruded AA7175 Through Hot Torsion Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Yeon; Jung, Taek-Kyun; Son, Hyeon-Woo; Kim, Sang-Wook; Son, Kwang-Tae; Choi, Ho-Joon; Oh, Sang-Ho; Lee, Ji-Woon; Hyun, Soong-Keun

    2018-03-01

    The hot deformation behavior of hot-extruded AA7175 was investigated with flow curves and processing maps through hot torsion tests. The flow curves and the deformed microstructures revealed that dynamic recrystallization (DRX) occurred in the hot-extruded AA7175 during hot working. The failure strain was highest at medium temperature. This was mainly influenced by the dynamic precipitation of fine rod-shaped MgZn2. The processing map determined the optimal deformation condition for the alloy during hot working.

  3. Optimising Drug Solubilisation in Amorphous Polymer Dispersions: Rational Selection of Hot-melt Extrusion Processing Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu; Tian, Yiwei; Jones, David S; Andrews, Gavin P

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this article was to construct a T-ϕ phase diagram for a model drug (FD) and amorphous polymer (Eudragit® EPO) and to use this information to understand the impact of how temperature-composition coordinates influenced the final properties of the extrudate. Defining process boundaries and understanding drug solubility in polymeric carriers is of utmost importance and will help in the successful manufacture of new delivery platforms for BCS class II drugs. Physically mixed felodipine (FD)-Eudragit(®) EPO (EPO) binary mixtures with pre-determined weight fractions were analysed using DSC to measure the endset of melting and glass transition temperature. Extrudates of 10 wt% FD-EPO were processed using temperatures (110°C, 126°C, 140°C and 150°C) selected from the temperature-composition (T-ϕ) phase diagrams and processing screw speed of 20, 100 and 200rpm. Extrudates were characterised using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), optical, polarised light and Raman microscopy. To ensure formation of a binary amorphous drug dispersion (ADD) at a specific composition, HME processing temperatures should at least be equal to, or exceed, the corresponding temperature value on the liquid-solid curve in a F-H T-ϕ phase diagram. If extruded between the spinodal and liquid-solid curve, the lack of thermodynamic forces to attain complete drug amorphisation may be compensated for through the use of an increased screw speed. Constructing F-H T-ϕ phase diagrams are valuable not only in the understanding drug-polymer miscibility behaviour but also in rationalising the selection of important processing parameters for HME to ensure miscibility of drug and polymer.

  4. Pre-Brazed Casting and Hot Radial Pressing: A Reliable Process for the Manufacturing of CFC and W Monoblock Mockups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visca, E.; Libera, S.; Mancini, A.; Mazzone, G.; Pizzuto, A.; Testani, C.

    2006-01-01

    ENEA association is involved in the European International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) R-and-D activities and in particular for the manufacturing of high heat flux plasma-facing components (HHFC), such as the divertor targets, the baffles and the limiters: During the last years ENEA has manufactured actively cooled mock-ups by using different technologies, namely brazing, diffusion bonding and hot isostatic pressing (HIPping). A new manufacturing process has been set up and tested. It was successfully applied for the manufacturing of W armoured monoblock mockups. This technique is the HRP (Hot Radial Pressing) based on performing a radial diffusion bonding between the cooling tube and the armour tile by pressurizing only the internal tube and by keeping the joining zone in vacuum and at the required bonding temperature. The heating is obtained by a standard air furnace. The next step was to apply the HRP technique for the manufacturing of CFC armoured monoblock components. For this purpose some issues have to be solved like as the low CFC tensile strength, the pure copper interlayer between the heat sink and the armour necessary to mitigate the stress at the joint interface and the low wettability of the pure copper on the CFC matrix. This paper reports the research path followed to manufacture a medium scale vertical target CFC and W armoured mockup by HRP. An ad hoc rig able to maintain the CFC in a compressive constant condition was also designed and tested. The casting of a soft copper interlayer between the tube and the tile was performed by a new technique: the Pre-Brazed Casting (PBC, ENEA patent). Some mock-ups with three NB31 CFC tiles were successfully manufactured and tested to thermal fatigue using electron beam facilities. They all reached at least 1000 cycles at 20 MW/m 2 without suffering any damage. The manufactured medium scale vertical target mock-up is now under testing at the FE2000 (France) facility. (author)

  5. Wear Analysis of Die Inserts in the Hot Forging Process of a Forked Type Forging Using Reverse Scanning Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Dworzak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a wear analysis of die inserts used in the hot forging process of a forked forging (yoke, an element applied in steering systems of passenger vehicles. Studies involved the application of an original reverse scanning method intended for rapid and reliable wear analysis of forging tools (with complicated shape affording easy assessment without the need to dismount tools from the forging unit. The developed method involves analysis of progressive wear of forging tools based on measurements (scanning of forgings periodically collected from the process and constitutes a useful tool for measurement and testing. As the authors’ earlier works have demonstrated, the proposed new approach to analysis of tool wear with the application of reverse 3D scanning has proven successful in multiple instances in the case of axially symmetrical objects. The presented results of studies indicate that it is possible to utilize the expanded method to analyze the lifetime of forging tools, including tools with complex geometry. Application of the reverse scanning method allows for continuous and practical monitoring of the condition of forging tools over the course of the forging process and should have a positive impact on improving production output and reducing production costs.

  6. Terminal processes in the anaerobic degradation of an algal-bacterial mat in a high-sulfate hot spring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, D.M.; Olson, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    The algal-bacterial mat of a high-sulfate hot spring (Bath Lake) provided an environment in which to compare terminal processes involved in anaerobic decomposition. Sulfate reduction was found to dominate methane production, as indicated by comparison of initial electron flow through the two processes, rapid conversion of [2- 14 C]acetate to 14 CO 2 and not to 14 CH 4 , and the lack of rapid reduction of NaH 14 CO 3 to 14 CH 4 . Sulfate reduction was the dominant process at all depth intervals, but a marked decrease of sulfate reduction and sulfate-reducing bacteria was observed with depth. Concurrent methanogenesis was indicated by the presence of viable methanogenic bacteria and very low but detectable rates of methane production. A marked increase in methane production was observed after sulfate depletion despite high concentrations of sulfide (>1.25 mM), indicating that methanogenesis was not inhibited by sulfide in the natural environment. Although a sulfate minimum and sulfide maximum occurred in the region of maximal sulfate reduction, the absence of sulfate depletion in interstitial water suggests that methanogenesis is always severely limited in Bath Lake sediments. Low initial methanogenesis was not due to anaerobic methane oxidation

  7. Collection, transport and general processing of clinical specimens in Microbiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Romero, M Isabel; García-Lechuz Moya, Juan Manuel; González López, Juan José; Orta Mira, Nieves

    2018-02-06

    The interpretation and the accuracy of the microbiological results still depend to a great extent on the quality of the samples and their processing within the Microbiology laboratory. The type of specimen, the appropriate time to obtain the sample, the way of sampling, the storage and transport are critical points in the diagnostic process. The availability of new laboratory techniques for unusual pathogens, makes necessary the review and update of all the steps involved in the processing of the samples. Nowadays, the laboratory automation and the availability of rapid techniques allow the precision and turn-around time necessary to help the clinicians in the decision making. In order to be efficient, it is very important to obtain clinical information to use the best diagnostic tools. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  8. Implementation of a configurable laboratory information management system for use in cellular process development and manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russom, Diana; Ahmed, Amira; Gonzalez, Nancy; Alvarnas, Joseph; DiGiusto, David

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory requirements for the manufacturing of cell products for clinical investigation require a significant level of record-keeping, starting early in process development and continuing through to the execution and requisite follow-up of patients on clinical trials. Central to record-keeping is the management of documentation related to patients, raw materials, processes, assays and facilities. To support these requirements, we evaluated several laboratory information management systems (LIMS), including their cost, flexibility, regulatory compliance, ongoing programming requirements and ability to integrate with laboratory equipment. After selecting a system, we performed a pilot study to develop a user-configurable LIMS for our laboratory in support of our pre-clinical and clinical cell-production activities. We report here on the design and utilization of this system to manage accrual with a healthy blood-donor protocol, as well as manufacturing operations for the production of a master cell bank and several patient-specific stem cell products. The system was used successfully to manage blood donor eligibility, recruiting, appointments, billing and serology, and to provide annual accrual reports. Quality management reporting features of the system were used to capture, report and investigate process and equipment deviations that occurred during the production of a master cell bank and patient products. Overall the system has served to support the compliance requirements of process development and phase I/II clinical trial activities for our laboratory and can be easily modified to meet the needs of similar laboratories.

  9. Experimental tests of the production process of Mo-99 fission in the hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez M, V.; Lopez C, R.

    1991-12-01

    The production method of 99 Mo of fission obtains to this with a specific activity of several orders of great magnitude to the one obtained by other methods (as that of irradiation of a target constituted by an alloy or that of irradiation with neutrons of targets of molybdenum of natural isotopic composition or enriched with 98 Mo) and perhaps the most important it is that by this method hundred of Ci of 99 Mo can be obtained by production process. The development of the production process of 99 Mo of fission, is closely linked with the development of techniques for the handling of high radioactivities, particularly the handling of radioactive gases, also with the deposit and elimination of radioactive wastes and with the construction of safety targets for its irradiation in a nuclear reactor. (Author)

  10. Reduction of adhesive stain defect in flexible printed circuit board on hot pressing process: a case study of electronic component factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakulkaew Srisang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is a reduction of an adhesive stain defect in flexible printed circuit board in hot pressing process, the electronic factory. The manufacturing have been processing by sheet type of products with ninety-six pieces of flexible printed circuit boards. Causes of the problem include the before and internal hot pressing process. In process beginning times, the most right row of products between the cooling plate and the hot pressing machine has temperature 71.2◦C that is higher than glass transition temperature (Tg 60◦C. Those products’ temperature lead to evaporate a polyimide adhesive before hot pressing process beginning. The internal hot pressing process include the preheat times and the pressure time. In the preheat time the problem is a gap between lower and upper plate, was under specification(Under 1 mm and leaded to adhesive polyimide stain. In the actuality this time requires temperature and low pressure that mean a gap within 1 – 2 mm (between lower and upper plate. In pressure times the hot pressing plate surface is not flat and products are pressed by insufficient force that it lead to generate an adhesive stain on flexible printed circuit boards. That force is measured by the pre-scale paper and a result, RGB color, is provided. And then color density (From standard color sample and RGB color (From pre-scale paper is found out the relation by Photoshop program and multiple regression theory using. The formula is applied to compare with defect so as to find out the suitable color density (Defects reducing. The solving solutions is provided including the gap reduced adjustment between cooling plate and hot pressing machine before hot pressing process, the plate adjustment within specification in the preheat time and the pressing plate polishing in the pressure time. Results of study and solving are provide defect reduction from 24.4 percentage to 7.2 percentage of total study product.

  11. Theoretical study on the cooperative exciton dissociation process based on dimensional and hot charge-transfer state effects in an organic photocell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazaki, Tomomi; Nakajima, Takahito

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the exciton dissociation process at the donor–acceptor interface in organic photocells. In our previous study, we introduced a local temperature to handle the hot charge-transfer (CT) state and calculated the exciton dissociation probability based on the 1D organic semiconductor model [T. Shimazaki and T. Nakajima, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 17, 12538 (2015)]. Although the hot CT state plays an essential role in exciton dissociations, the probabilities calculated are not high enough to efficiently separate bound electron–hole pairs. This paper focuses on the dimensional (entropy) effect together with the hot CT state effect and shows that cooperative behavior between both effects can improve the exciton dissociation process. In addition, we discuss cooperative effects with site-disorders and external-electric-fields.

  12. Possible processes for origin of life and living matter in deuterium enriched hot mineral water

    OpenAIRE

    Ignatov, Ignat; Mosin, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper the isotopic composition of water and its temperature in the process of evolution of life is analysed. It was proposed an assumption, that under conditions of the primary O 2 free atmosphere, under influence of short-wave solar radiation, geothermal energy and powerful spark discharges, deuterium in form of HDO could be collected in hydrosphere, which physical-chemical properties differ from those of H 2O. There were obtained adapted to the maximal concentration D 2O cell...

  13. SLIPTA e-Tool improves laboratory audit process in Vietnam and Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuong T; McKinney, Barbara; Pierson, Antoine; Luong, Khue N; Hoang, Quynh T; Meharwal, Sandeep; Carvalho, Humberto M; Nguyen, Cuong Q; Nguyen, Kim T; Bond, Kyle B

    2014-01-01

    The Stepwise Laboratory Quality Improvement Process Towards Accreditation (SLIPTA) checklist is used worldwide to drive quality improvement in laboratories in developing countries and to assess the effectiveness of interventions such as the Strengthening Laboratory Management Toward Accreditation (SLMTA) programme. However, the paper-based format of the checklist makes administration cumbersome and limits timely analysis and communication of results. In early 2012, the SLMTA team in Vietnam developed an electronic SLIPTA checklist tool. The e-Tool was pilot tested in Vietnam in mid-2012 and revised. It was used during SLMTA implementation in Vietnam and Cambodia in 2012 and 2013 and further revised based on auditors' feedback about usability. The SLIPTA e-Tool enabled rapid turn-around of audit results, reduced workload and language barriers and facilitated analysis of national results. Benefits of the e-Tool will be magnified with in-country scale-up of laboratory quality improvement efforts and potential expansion to other countries.

  14. Development and Performance of a Highly Sensitive Model Formulation Based on Torasemide to Enhance Hot-Melt Extrusion Process Understanding and Process Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Rachel C; Kyeremateng, Samuel O; Asmus, Lutz; Degenhardt, Matthias; Rosenberg, Joerg; Wagner, Karl G

    2018-02-27

    The aim of this work was to investigate the use of torasemide as a highly sensitive indicator substance and to develop a formulation thereof for establishing quantitative relationships between hot-melt extrusion process conditions and critical quality attributes (CQAs). Using solid-state characterization techniques and a 10 mm lab-scale co-rotating twin-screw extruder, we studied torasemide in a Soluplus® (SOL)-polyethylene glycol 1500 (PEG 1500) matrix, and developed and characterized a formulation which was used as a process indicator to study thermal- and hydrolysis-induced degradation, as well as residual crystallinity. We found that torasemide first dissolved into the matrix and then degraded. Based on this mechanism, extrudates with measurable levels of degradation and residual crystallinity were produced, depending strongly on the main barrel and die temperature and residence time applied. In addition, we found that 10% w/w PEG 1500 as plasticizer resulted in the widest operating space with the widest range of measurable residual crystallinity and degradant levels. Torasemide as an indicator substance behaves like a challenging-to-process API, only with higher sensitivity and more pronounced effects, e.g., degradation and residual crystallinity. Application of a model formulation containing torasemide will enhance the understanding of the dynamic environment inside an extruder and elucidate the cumulative thermal and hydrolysis effects of the extrusion process. The use of such a formulation will also facilitate rational process development and scaling by establishing clear links between process conditions and CQAs.

  15. Comparison of structure, morphology, and leach characteristics of multi-phase ceramics produced via melt processing and hot isostatic pressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandeneau, Christopher S.; Hong, Tao; Brinkman, Kyle S.; Vance, Eric R.; Amoroso, Jake W.

    2018-04-01

    Melt processing of multi-phase ceramic waste forms offers potential advantages over traditional solid-state synthesis methods given both the prevalence of melters currently in use and the ability to reduce the possibility of airborne radionuclide contamination. In this work, multi-phase ceramics with a targeted hollandite composition of Ba1.0Cs0.3Cr1.0Al0.3Fe1.0Ti5.7O16 were fabricated by melt processing at 1675 °C and hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at 1250 and 1300 °C. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) confirmed hollandite as the major phase in all specimens. Zirconolite/pyrochlore peaks and weaker perovskite reflections were observed after melt processing, while HIP samples displayed prominent perovskite peaks and low-intensity zirconolite reflections. Melt processing produced specimens with large (>50 μm) well-defined hollandite grains, while HIP yielded samples with a more fine-grained morphology. Elemental analysis showed "islands" rich in Cs and Ti across the surface of the 1300 °C HIP sample, suggesting partial melting and partitioning of Cs into multiple phases. Photoemission data revealed multiple Cs 3d spin-orbit pairs for the HIP samples, with the lower binding energy doublets likely corresponding to Cs located in more leachable phases. Among all specimens examined, the melt-processed sample exhibited the lowest fractional release rates for Rb and Cs. However, the retention of Sr and Mo was greater in the HIP specimens.

  16. Understanding the nature of the manganese hot dip phosphatizing process of steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado M, G.; Fuentes A, J. C.; Salinas R, A.; Rodriguez V, F. J., E-mail: juan.fuentes@cinvestav.edu.mx [IPN, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Unidad Saltillo, Av. Industria Metalurgica No. 1062, Parque Industrial Ramos Arizpe, 25900 Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico)

    2013-07-01

    In this work, the phosphatizing process of steel is investigated using open circuit potential and Tafel curves as well as scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results reveal that a ph of 2.57 in the phosphatizing solution promotes the dissociation of phosphoric acid which assist the formation of the manganese tertiary salt (Mn{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}), which is deposited on the substrate. It was also observed that an increase in the temperature from 25 to 90 C and the presence of HNO{sub 3} as catalysts enhances the manganese phosphatizing kinetics. On the other hand, the generation of iron phosphates and oxides is predominant at a ph of 1 and 90 C. These observations are supported by species distribution and Pourbaix thermodynamic diagrams. (Author)

  17. Understanding the nature of the manganese hot dip phosphatizing process of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado M, G.; Fuentes A, J. C.; Salinas R, A.; Rodriguez V, F. J.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the phosphatizing process of steel is investigated using open circuit potential and Tafel curves as well as scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results reveal that a ph of 2.57 in the phosphatizing solution promotes the dissociation of phosphoric acid which assist the formation of the manganese tertiary salt (Mn 3 (PO 4 ) 2 ), which is deposited on the substrate. It was also observed that an increase in the temperature from 25 to 90 C and the presence of HNO 3 as catalysts enhances the manganese phosphatizing kinetics. On the other hand, the generation of iron phosphates and oxides is predominant at a ph of 1 and 90 C. These observations are supported by species distribution and Pourbaix thermodynamic diagrams. (Author)

  18. Effect of Temperature and Process on Quantity and Composition of Laboratory-generated Bitumen Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolliet, Christophe; Kriech, Anthony J; Juery, Catherine; Vaissiere, Mathieu; Brinton, Michael A; Osborn, Linda V

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the impact of temperature on emissions as related to various bitumen applications and processes used in commercial products. Bitumen emissions are very complex and can be influenced in quantity and composition by differences in crude source, refining processes, application temperature, and work practices. This study provided a controlled laboratory environment to study five bitumen test materials from three European refineries; three paving grade, one used for primarily roofing and some paving applications, and one oxidized industrial specialty bitumen. Emissions were generated at temperatures between 140°C and 230°C based on typical application temperatures of each product. Emissions were characterized by aerodynamic particle size, total organic matter (TOM), simulated distillation, 40 individual PACs, and fluorescence (FL-PACs) spectroscopy. Results showed that composition of bitumen emissions is influenced by temperature under studied experimental conditions. A distinction between the oxidized bitumen with flux oil (industrial specialty bitumen) and the remaining bitumens was observed. Under typical temperatures used for paving (150°C-170°C), the TOM and PAC concentrations in the emissions were low. However, bitumen with flux oil produced significantly higher emissions at 230°C, laden with high levels of PACs. Flux oil in this bitumen mixture enhanced release of higher boiling-ranged compounds during application conditions. At 200°C and below, concentrations of 4-6 ring PACs were ≤6.51 μg/m(3) for all test materials, even when flux oil was used. Trends learned about emission temperature-process relationships from this study can be used to guide industry decisions to reduce worker exposure during processing and application of hot bitumen.

  19. Structural and Optical Properties of Ultra-high Pure Hot Water Processed Ga2O3 Thin Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramani SHANMUGAN

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Thin film based gas sensor is an advanced application of thin film especially Ga2O3 (GO thin film gas sensor is useful for high temperature gas sensor. The effect of moisture or environment on thin film properties has more influence on gas sensing properties. Radio Frequency sputtered Ga2O3 thin film was synthesized and processed in ultra-high pure hot water at 95 °C for different time durations. The structural properties were verified by the Xray Diffraction technique and the observed spectra revealed the formation of hydroxyl compound of Gallium (Gallium Oxide Dueterate – GOD on the surface of the thin film and evidenced for structural defects as an effect of moisture. Decreased crystallite size and increased dislocation density was showed the crystal defects of prepared film. From the Ultra Violet – Visible spectra, decreased optical transmittance was noticed for various processing time. The formation of needle like GOD was confirmed using Field Emission Secondary Electron Microscope (FESEM images.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.2.7186

  20. Improvement of nuclear reactor component materials by application of hot isostatic processing (HIP). Survey report on Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.J.

    1975-12-01

    The report summarizes the results of an EPRI-sponsored state-of-the-art survey of hot isostatic processing (HIP). The purpose of the study was to identify potential nuclear plant applications of HIP with high pay-off through improvement in component quality and reliability. The survey shows that HIP will reduce cost and manufacturing time and improve quality and ease of nondestructive examination of all castings for which porosity is a problem. Nuclear valves are a prime example. Tubing, pipe, and sheet and bar present other possibilities of somewhat less immediate promise. This report includes a review of some of the EPRI motivations for undertaking this research; a brief explanation of HIP, the survey methodology exployed; the basic operations in the processes studied; a review of the historical applications of HIP to problem areas consistent with those addressed in the survey; the results of the survey and associated analyses of the problems; and the recommendations and justifications for the Phase II program

  1. A Feeding Strategy in Inner L-Shape Ring Hot Rolling Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Meng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to make the inner L-shape ring polling process with a closed die structure (ILRRCDS on the top and bottom of the driven roll stable, at first, this paper established the mathematical model for ILRRCDS. Then, the plastic penetration and biting-in conditions for ILRRCDS were deduced based on plain ring rolling theory. Moreover, a feeding strategy that can realize a constant growth of the ring’s outer radius was proposed and the reasonable value ranges of the feed rate of the mandrel were determined. The numerical simulation model for ILRRCDS is established based on ABAQUS software. Finally, the equivalent plastic strain (PEEQ and temperature distributions of rolled ring were obtained. The results indicated that the proposed feeding strategy can realize a stable ILRRCDS. At the end of ILRRCDS, the PEEQ at the inner radius surface of the ring is maximum, the PEEQ at the outer radius surface of the ring takes the second place, and the PEEQ at the middle part of ring is minimum. With the increase of rolling time, the higher temperature zone of the rolled ring gradually moves from the center part of the ring to the “inner corner zone” of the ring.

  2. Experiments to Further the Understanding of the Triple-Alpha Process in Hot Astrophysical Scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, N. R.; Greife, U.; Rehm, K. E.; Greene, J.; Henderson, D.; Jiang, C. L.; Kay, B. P.; Lee, H. Y.; Pardo, R.; Teh, K.; Deibel, C. M.; Notani, M.; Marley, S. T.; Tang, X. D.

    2009-01-01

    In astrophysics, the first excited 0 + state of 12 C at 7.654 MeV (Hoyle state) is the most important in the triple-α process for carbon nucleosynthesis. In explosive scenarios like supernovae, where temperatures of several 10 9 K are achieved, the interference of the Hoyle state with the second 0 + state located at 10.3 MeV in 12 C becomes significant. The recent NACRE compilation of astrophysical reaction rates assumes a 2 + resonance at 9.1 MeV for which no experimental evidence exists. Thus, it is critical to explore in more detail the 7-10 MeV excitation energy region, especially the minimum between the two 0 + resonances for carbon nucleosynthesis. The states in 12 C were populated through the β-decay of 12 B and 12 N produced at the ATLAS (Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System) in-flight facility. The decay of 12 C into three alphas is detected in a Frisch grid twin ionization chamber, acting as a low-threshold calorimeter. This minimizes the effects of β-summing and allowed us to investigate the minimum above the Hoyle state with much higher accuracy than previously possible. A detailed data analysis will include an R-matrix fit to determine an upper limit on the 2 + resonance width.

  3. Advances in chemical and physical properties of electric arc furnace carbon steel slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liapis, Ioannis; Papayianni, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Addition of 10% perlite decreases specific weight of the slag by approx. 7.5%. • Slag-crucible interaction and thin coating layer result in variations in XRF. • XRD shows high glass content and smaller crystalline sizes due to rapid cooling. • SEM shows higher homogeneity and lower crystallisation for SiO 2 /CaO-rich samples. • Physical properties (LA, PSV, AAV) of modified slag show limited deterioration. - Abstract: Slags are recognised as a highly efficient, cost effective tool in the metal processing industry, by minimising heat losses, reducing metal oxidation through contact with air, removing metal impurities and protecting refractories and graphite electrodes. When compared to natural aggregates for use in the construction industry, slags have higher specific weight that acts as an economic deterrent. A method of altering the specific weight of EAFC slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing, during steel production is presented in this article. The method has minimal interference with the production process of steel, even by limited additions of appropriate minerals at high temperatures. Five minerals are examined, namely perlite, ladle furnace slag, bauxite, diatomite and olivine. Measurements of specific weight are accompanied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence (XRF) analysis and scanning electron microscopy spectral images. It is also shown how altering the chemical composition is expected to affect the furnace refractory lining. Additionally, the process has been repeated for the most suitable mix in gas furnace and physical properties (FI, SI, LA, PSV, AAV, volume stability) examined. Alteration of the specific weight can result in tailoring slag properties for specific applications in the construction sector

  4. Advances in chemical and physical properties of electric arc furnace carbon steel slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liapis, Ioannis, E-mail: iliapis@sidenor.vionet.gr [AEIFOROS SA, 12th km Thessaloniki-Veroia Rd, PO Box 59, 57008 Ionia, Thessaloniki (Greece); Papayianni, Ioanna [Laboratory of Building Materials, Department of Civil Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • Addition of 10% perlite decreases specific weight of the slag by approx. 7.5%. • Slag-crucible interaction and thin coating layer result in variations in XRF. • XRD shows high glass content and smaller crystalline sizes due to rapid cooling. • SEM shows higher homogeneity and lower crystallisation for SiO{sub 2}/CaO-rich samples. • Physical properties (LA, PSV, AAV) of modified slag show limited deterioration. - Abstract: Slags are recognised as a highly efficient, cost effective tool in the metal processing industry, by minimising heat losses, reducing metal oxidation through contact with air, removing metal impurities and protecting refractories and graphite electrodes. When compared to natural aggregates for use in the construction industry, slags have higher specific weight that acts as an economic deterrent. A method of altering the specific weight of EAFC slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing, during steel production is presented in this article. The method has minimal interference with the production process of steel, even by limited additions of appropriate minerals at high temperatures. Five minerals are examined, namely perlite, ladle furnace slag, bauxite, diatomite and olivine. Measurements of specific weight are accompanied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence (XRF) analysis and scanning electron microscopy spectral images. It is also shown how altering the chemical composition is expected to affect the furnace refractory lining. Additionally, the process has been repeated for the most suitable mix in gas furnace and physical properties (FI, SI, LA, PSV, AAV, volume stability) examined. Alteration of the specific weight can result in tailoring slag properties for specific applications in the construction sector.

  5. What's to Be Done About Laboratory Quality? Process Indicators, Laboratory Stewardship, the Outcomes Problem, Risk Assessment, and Economic Value: Responding to Contemporary Global Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Frederick A; Badrick, Tony C; Sikaris, Kenneth A

    2018-02-17

    For 50 years, structure, process, and outcomes measures have assessed health care quality. For clinical laboratories, structural quality has generally been assessed by inspection. For assessing process, quality indicators (QIs), statistical monitors of steps in the clinical laboratory total testing, have proliferated across the globe. Connections between structural and process laboratory measures and patient outcomes, however, have rarely been demonstrated. To inform further development of clinical laboratory quality systems, we conducted a selective but worldwide review of publications on clinical laboratory quality assessment. Some QIs, like seven generic College of American Pathologists Q-Tracks monitors, have demonstrated significant process improvement; other measures have uncovered critical opportunities to improve test selection and result management. The College of Pathologists of Australasia Key Indicator Monitoring and Management System has deployed risk calculations, introduced from failure mode effects analysis, as surrogate measures for outcomes. Showing economic value from clinical laboratory testing quality is a challenge. Clinical laboratories should converge on fewer (7-14) rather than more (21-35) process monitors; monitors should cover all steps of the testing process under laboratory control and include especially high-risk specimen-quality QIs. Clinical laboratory stewardship, the combination of education interventions among clinician test orderers and report consumers with revision of test order formats and result reporting schemes, improves test ordering, but improving result reception is more difficult. Risk calculation reorders the importance of quality monitors by balancing three probabilities: defect frequency, weight of potential harm, and detection difficulty. The triple approach of (1) a more focused suite of generic consensus quality indicators, (2) more active clinical laboratory testing stewardship, and (3) integration of formal

  6. Decontamination of hot cells K-1, K-3, M-1, M-3, and A-1, M-Wing, Building 200: Project final report Argonne National Laboratory-East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheever, C.L.; Rose, R.W.

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to remove radioactively contaminated materials and equipment from the hot cells, to decontaminate the hot cells, and to dispose of the radioactive waste. The goal was to reduce stack releases of Rn-220 and to place the hot cells in an emptied, decontaminated condition with less than 10 microSv/h (1 mrem/h) general radiation background. The following actions were needed: organize and mobilize a decontamination team; prepare decontamination plans and procedures; perform safety analyses to ensure protection of the workers, public, and environment; remotely size-reduce, package, and remove radioactive materials and equipment for waste disposal; remotely decontaminate surfaces to reduce hot cell radiation background levels to allow personnel entries using supplied air and full protective suits; disassemble and package the remaining radioactive materials and equipment using hands-on techniques; decontaminate hot cell surfaces to remove loose radioactive contaminants and to attain a less than 10 microSv/h (1 mrem/h) general background level; document and dispose of the radioactive and mixed waste; and conduct a final radiological survey

  7. The Virtual Product-Process Design Laboratory for Structured Chemical Product Design and Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattei, Michele; Yunus, Nor Alafiza Binti; Kalakul, Sawitree

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present new methods for design of chemicals based formulated products and their implementation in the software, the Virtual Product-Process Design Laboratory. The new products are tailor-made blended liquid products and emulsion-based products. The new software...

  8. Analytical methods and laboratory facility for the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.J.; Dewberry, R.A.; Lethco, A.J.; Denard, C.D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the analytical methods, instruments, and laboratory that will support vitrification of defense waste. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is now being constructed at Savannah River Plant (SRP). Beginning in 1989, SRP high-level defense waste will be immobilized in borosilicate glass for disposal in a federal repository. The DWPF will contain an analytical laboratory for performing process control analyses. Additional analyses will be performed for process history and process diagnostics. The DWPF analytical facility will consist of a large shielded sampling cell, three shielded analytical cells, a laboratory for instrumental analysis and chemical separations, and a counting room. Special instrumentation is being designed for use in the analytical cells, including microwave drying/dissolution apparatus, and remote pipetting devices. The instrumentation laboratory will contain inductively coupled plasma, atomic absorption, Moessbauer spectrometers, a carbon analyzer, and ion chromatography equipment. Counting equipment will include intrinsic germanium detectors, scintillation counters, Phoswich alpha, beta, gamma detectors, and a low-energy photon detector

  9. Database of full-scale laboratory experiments on wave-driven sand transport processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Jebbe J.; Schretlen, Johanna Lidwina Maria; Ribberink, Jan S.; O'Donoghue, Tom

    2009-01-01

    A new database of laboratory experiments involving sand transport processes over horizontal, mobile sand beds under full-scale non-breaking wave and non-breaking wave-plus-current conditions is described. The database contains details of the flow and bed conditions, information on which quantities

  10. Gamification in Science Education: Gamifying Learning of Microscopic Processes in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Katja; Ariel, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and trouble-shooting microscopic processes involved in laboratory tests are often challenging for students in science education because of the inability to visualize the different steps and the various errors that may influence test outcome. The effectiveness of gamification or the use of game design elements and game-mechanics were…

  11. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Melton Valley Storage Tanks Waste Filtration Process Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, B.W.

    1998-01-01

    Cross-flow filtration is being evaluated as a pretreatment in the proposed treatment processes for aqueous high-level radioactive wastes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to separate insoluble solids from aqueous waste from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST)

  12. Ceramic containers for spent nuclear fuel. II. Reactions between TiO2 and the steel canning during hot isostatic processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, B.; Forberg, S.

    1984-01-01

    Rutile was selected for some practical studies of processing and properties of ceramic containers. Hot isostatic pressing at 1280 0 C has resulted in reaction zones between the TiO 2 powder and the steel canning. The phases ilmenite, pseudobrookite, rutile, and iron have been identified by x-ray diffraction and by microprobe analysis. The microstructures have been interpreted by classical metallographic methods, and some microstructures obtained by hot pressing and rapid cooling have also been examined for purposes of comparison. Some implications of the microstructures have been discussed in terms of microcracking and slow crack growth. 13 refs., 7 figs

  13. HOT 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette Romme

    Undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og hvad der burde være hot på læseområdet med 21 læsekyndige. Undersøgelsen er gennemført siden 2010. HOT-undersøgelsen er foretaget af Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning - Professionshøjskolerne i samarb. med Dansklærerforeningen......Undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og hvad der burde være hot på læseområdet med 21 læsekyndige. Undersøgelsen er gennemført siden 2010. HOT-undersøgelsen er foretaget af Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning - Professionshøjskolerne i samarb. med Dansklærerforeningen...

  14. Hot cell verification facility update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titzler, P.A.; Moffett, S.D.; Lerch, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The Hot Cell Verification Facility (HCVF) provides a prototypic hot cell mockup to check equipment for functional and remote operation, and provides actual hands-on training for operators. The facility arrangement is flexible and assists in solving potential problems in a nonradioactive environment. HCVF has been in operation for six years, and the facility is a part of the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory

  15. The performance of the remote analytical laboratory during the first fluorinel dissolution process campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, L.C.; Henscheid, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    The Remote Analytical Laboratory at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant was designed to provide analytical chemistry support to the irradiated fuel processing and associated waste processing operations. The facility was put into radioactive operation on July 7, 1986, and operated for more than a year during the first fluorinel fuel dissolution process campaign. The facility incorporated a number of innovative features and was equipped with state-of-the-art analytical instrumentation. The success of the facility is a direct function of how well the remote analytical equipment performed. The performance is discussed in this article

  16. HOT 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette

    Undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og hvad der burde være hot på læseområdet med 21 læsekyndige. Undersøgelsen er gennemført siden 2010. HOT-undersøgelsen er foretaget af Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning - Professionshøjskolerne i samarb. med Dansklærerforeningen...

  17. [Quality Management and Quality Specifications of Laboratory Tests in Clinical Studies--Challenges in Pre-Analytical Processes in Clinical Laboratories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Midori

    2015-01-01

    The cost, speed, and quality are the three important factors recently indicated by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) for the purpose of accelerating clinical studies. Based on this background, the importance of laboratory tests is increasing, especially in the evaluation of clinical study participants' entry and safety, and drug efficacy. To assure the quality of laboratory tests, providing high-quality laboratory tests is mandatory. For providing adequate quality assurance in laboratory tests, quality control in the three fields of pre-analytical, analytical, and post-analytical processes is extremely important. There are, however, no detailed written requirements concerning specimen collection, handling, preparation, storage, and shipping. Most laboratory tests for clinical studies are performed onsite in a local laboratory; however, a part of laboratory tests is done in offsite central laboratories after specimen shipping. As factors affecting laboratory tests, individual and inter-individual variations are well-known. Besides these factors, standardizing the factors of specimen collection, handling, preparation, storage, and shipping, may improve and maintain the high quality of clinical studies in general. Furthermore, the analytical method, units, and reference interval are also important factors. It is concluded that, to overcome the problems derived from pre-analytical processes, it is necessary to standardize specimen handling in a broad sense.

  18. Numerical simulation of hot-melt extrusion processes for amorphous solid dispersions using model-based melt viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochmann, Esther S; Steffens, Kristina E; Gryczke, Andreas; Wagner, Karl G

    2018-03-01

    Simulation of HME processes is a valuable tool for increased process understanding and ease of scale-up. However, the experimental determination of all required input parameters is tedious, namely the melt rheology of the amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) in question. Hence, a procedure to simplify the application of hot-melt extrusion (HME) simulation for forming amorphous solid dispersions (ASD) is presented. The commercial 1D simulation software Ludovic ® was used to conduct (i) simulations using a full experimental data set of all input variables including melt rheology and (ii) simulations using model-based melt viscosity data based on the ASDs glass transition and the physical properties of polymeric matrix only. Both types of HME computation were further compared to experimental HME results. Variation in physical properties (e.g. heat capacity, density) and several process characteristics of HME (residence time distribution, energy consumption) among the simulations and experiments were evaluated. The model-based melt viscosity was calculated by using the glass transition temperature (T g ) of the investigated blend and the melt viscosity of the polymeric matrix by means of a T g -viscosity correlation. The results of measured melt viscosity and model-based melt viscosity were similar with only few exceptions, leading to similar HME simulation outcomes. At the end, the experimental effort prior to HME simulation could be minimized and the procedure enables a good starting point for rational development of ASDs by means of HME. As model excipients, Vinylpyrrolidone-vinyl acetate copolymer (COP) in combination with various APIs (carbamazepine, dipyridamole, indomethacin, and ibuprofen) or polyethylene glycol (PEG 1500) as plasticizer were used to form the ASDs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. HOT 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette Romme

    En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager 21 læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet.......En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager 21 læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet....

  20. Precise turnaround time measurement of laboratory processes using radiofrequency identification technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Horst; Brümmer, Jens; Brinkmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    To implement Lean Six Sigma in our central laboratory we conducted a project to measure single pre-analytical steps influencing turnaround time (TAT) of emergency department (ED) serum samples. The traditional approach of extracting data from the Laboratory Information System (LIS) for a retrospective calculation of a mean TAT is not suitable. Therefore, we used radiofrequency identification (RFID) chips for real time tracking of individual samples at any pre-analytical step. 1,200 serum tubes were labelled with RFID chips and were provided to the emergency department. 3 RFID receivers were installed in the laboratory: at the outlet of the pneumatic tube system, at the centrifuge, and in the analyser area. In addition, time stamps of sample entry at the automated sample distributor and communication of results from the analyser were collected from LIS. 1,023 labelled serum tubes arrived at our laboratory. 899 RFID tags were used for TAT calculation. The following transfer times were determined (median 95th percentile in min:sec): pneumatic tube system --> centrifuge (01:25/04:48), centrifuge --> sample distributor (14:06/5:33), sample distributor --> analysis system zone (02:39/15:07), analysis system zone --> result communication (12:42/22:21). Total TAT was calculated at 33:19/57:40 min:sec. Manual processes around centrifugation were identified as a major part of TAT with 44%/60% (median/95th percentile). RFID is a robust, easy to use, and error-free technology and not susceptible to interferences in the laboratory environment. With this study design we were able to measure significant variations in a single manual sample transfer process. We showed that TAT is mainly influenced by manual steps around the centrifugation process and we concluded that centrifugation should be integrated in solutions for total laboratory automation.

  1. Thermalhydraulic assessment of the Pickering NGS 'B' feed and bleed system for the hot boiler chemical clean (Siemens Process)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorencez, Carlos M.

    2000-01-01

    The Hot Boiler Chemical Clean (HBCC) process from Siemens, to be used in PNGS, requires that the Heat Transport System (HTS) temperature be maintained in the range 160 to 170 o C for several days. To achieve these thermalhydraulic condition, the core decay power and the pump power of the main circulating pumps in a 3-3 configuration are employed to warm up the HTS from approximately 38 o C to 170 o C. At this point, high Bleed bias is applied to the signal of the HTS pressure controller to provide high Feed and Bleed flows, which are used to control the HTS temperature by means of the Bleed Cooler. To address any concern posed by these infrequently used HTS thermalhydraulic conditions, a detailed thermalhydraulic model of the Feed and Bleed System, that also includes the Gland Supply, Gland Return and Purification systems, was developed for the TUF code to determine the suitability of the Feed and Bleed System to conduct the HBCC. The model was then used to estimate the parameters such as Feed and Bleed flows, valve openings, pressure and temperature distributions throughout the Feed and Bleed System required for the application of HBCC. (author)

  2. Investigation of Wear Behavior of Aluminum Matrix Composite Reinforced by Al2O3 and Produced by Hot Pressing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil ARIK

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Al powder produced by gas atomization technique has 72.06 µm average particle size and 99 % purity was mixed with as a reinforcement Al2O3 has 99.52% purity and 45 submicron particle size in a high energy ball mill for two hours. In order to obtain disk samples with 30 mm diameter and 6 mm thick mixed powders, after the characterization of particle size and morphology, were compacted in a single action press. Compaction process were carried out from mixed powders by hot pressing at 200 MPa pressure and 550 °C temperature for two hours. Then microstructural analysis, hardness and density measurements of powder metal composite parts were performed. After, the characterization of samples abrasion wear tests were performed according to ASTM-G99-05 by using TRIBOMETER T10/20 ball-on-disk abrasive wearing device. After the abrasive wear test of aluminum and composite powder metal parts produced under the identical test parameters, test results were compared and effect of Al2O3 on the wear properties of composite materials was exhibited. The test results showed that the composite parts have 62 % extra harness and better abrasion wear performance according to aluminum powder metal parts produced and tested under the identical conditions

  3. Influence of silicon on hot-dip aluminizing process and subsequent oxidation for preparing hydrogen/tritium permeation barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Shilei; Li, Hualing; Wang, Shumao; Jiang, Lijun; Liu, Xiaopeng [Energy Materials and Technology Research Institute, General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2010-04-15

    The development of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) requires the production of a material capable of acting as a hydrogen/tritium permeation barrier on low activation steel. It is well known that thin alumina layer can reduce the hydrogen permeation rate by several orders of magnitude. A technology is introduced here to form a ductile Fe/Al intermetallic layer on the steel with an alumina over-layer. This technology, consisting of two main steps, hot-dip aluminizing (HDA) and subsequent oxidation behavior, seems to be a promising coating method to fulfill the required goals. According to the experiments that have been done in pure Al, the coatings were inhomogeneous and too thick. Additionally, a large number of cracks and porous band could be observed. In order to solve these problems, the element silicon was added to the aluminum melt with a nominal composition. The influence of silicon on the aluminizing and following oxidation process was investigated. With the addition of silicon into the aluminum melt, the coating became thinner and more homogeneous. The effort of the silicon on the oxidation behavior was observed as well concerning the suppression of porous band and cracks. (author)

  4. A Preliminary Shielding Study on the Integrated Operation Verification System in the Head-End Hot-Cell of the Pyro-processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jinhwam; Kim, Yewon; Park, Se-Hwan; Ahn, Seong-Kyu; Cho, Gyuseong [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Nuclear power accounts for more than 30 percent of power production in Korea. Its significance has annually been increased. Disposal spent fuel containing uranium, transuranic elements, and fission products is unavoidable byproduct of nuclear power production. it is recognized that finding appropriate sites for interim storage of disposal spent fuel is not easy because isolated sites should be required. Pyro-processing technology, Pyro-processing should be operated under high radiation environment in hot-cell structures. Because of this reason, all workers should be unauthorized to access inside the hot-cell areas under any circumstances except for acceptable dose verification and a normal operation should be remotely manipulated. For the reliable normal operation of pyroprocessing, it is noted that an evaluation of the space dose distribution in the hot-cell environments is necessary in advance in order to determine which technologies or instruments can be utilized on or near the process as the Integrated Operation Verification System (IOVS) is measured. Not like the electroreduction and electro-refining hot-cells, the head-end hot-cell equips Camera Radiation Detector (CRD) in which plutonium is securely measured and monitored for the safeguard of the pyro-processing. Results have been obtained using F2 surface tally in order to observe the magnitude of the gamma-ray and neutron flux which pass through the surface of the process cell. Furthermore, T-mesh tally has also been used to obtain the space dose distribution in the headend hot-cell. The hot-cell was divided into 7,668 cells in which each dimension was 1 x 1 x 1m for the T-mesh tally. To determine the position of the CRD and the surveillance camera, divergent approaches were required. Because the purpose of the CRD which contains a gamma-ray detector and a neutron detector is to identify the material composition as the process proceeds, the position in which detectable flux is exposed is required, whereas

  5. Assessment of the Idaho National Laboratory Hot Fuel Examination Facility Stack Monitoring Site for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2010-01-01

    This document reports on a series of tests to determine whether the location of the air sampling probe in the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) exhaust duct meets the applicable regulatory criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Federal regulations require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that is representative of the effluent stream. The tests conducted by PNNL during July 2010 on the HFEF system are described in this report. The sampling probe location is approximately 20 feet from the base of the stack. The stack base is in the second floor of the HFEF, and has a building ventilation stream (limited potential radioactive effluent) as well as a process stream (potential radioactive effluent, but HEPA-filtered) that feeds into it. The tests conducted on the duct indicate that the process stream is insufficiently mixed with the building ventilation stream. As a result, the air sampling probe location does not meet the criteria of the N13.1-1999 standard. The series of tests consists of various measurements taken over a grid of points in the duct cross section at the proposed sampling-probe location. The results of the test series on the HFEF exhaust duct as it relates to the criteria from ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 are desribed in this report. Based on these tests, the location of the air sampling probe does not meet the requirements of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard, and modifications must be made to either the HVAC system or the air sampling probe for compliance. The recommended approaches are discussed and vary from sampling probe modifications to modifying the junction of the two air exhaust streams.

  6. Nd-Fe-B-Cu hot deformation processing: a comparison of deformation modes, microstructural development and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrante, M.; Sinka, V.; Assis, O.B.G.; Oliveira, I. de; Freitas, E. de

    1996-01-01

    Due to its relative simplicity and low cost the hot deformation of Nd-Fe-B ingots is rapidly reaching the status of a valid alternative to sintering. Among the possible deformation modes, pressing, rolling and forging are perhaps the most successful. This paper describes the research programme undertaken so far, by discussing the relationship between deformation mode, microstructure and magnetic properties of magnets produced by hot deformation mode, microstructure and magnetic properties of magnets produced by hot deformation of a number of Nd-fe-B-Cu alloys. Microstructural observation showed that both pressed and forged samples are characterized by a heterogeneous microstructure and from magnetic measurements it was concluded that magnetic properties differ when taken in the center or in the periphery of the sample. On the other hand roller magnets were homogeneous both in terms of microstructure and magnetic properties, and interpretations of the mechanisms of texture development and of microstructural development of hot deformed magnets is put forward. (author)

  7. Metals Processing Laboratory Users (MPLUS) Facility Annual Report FY 2002 (October 1, 2001-September 30, 2002)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelini, P

    2004-04-27

    The Metals Processing Laboratory Users Facility (MPLUS) is a Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Industrial Technologies Program, user facility designated to assist researchers in key industries, universities, and federal laboratories in improving energy efficiency, improving environmental aspects, and increasing competitiveness. The goal of MPLUS is to provide access to the specialized technical expertise and equipment needed to solve metals processing issues that limit the development and implementation of emerging metals processing technologies. The scope of work can also extend to other types of materials. MPLUS has four primary user centers: (1) Processing--casting, powder metallurgy, deformation processing (including extrusion, forging, rolling), melting, thermomechanical processing, and high-density infrared processing; (2) Joining--welding, monitoring and control, solidification, brazing, and bonding; (3) Characterization--corrosion, mechanical properties, fracture mechanics, microstructure, nondestructive examination, computer-controlled dilatometry, and emissivity; and (4) Materials/Process Modeling--mathematical design and analyses, high-performance computing, process modeling, solidification/deformation, microstructure evolution, thermodynamic and kinetic, and materials databases A fully integrated approach provides researchers with unique opportunities to address technologically related issues to solve metals processing problems and probe new technologies. Access is also available to 16 additional Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) user facilities ranging from state-of-the-art materials characterization capabilities, and high-performance computing to manufacturing technologies. MPLUS can be accessed through a standardized user-submitted proposal and a user agreement. Nonproprietary (open) or proprietary proposals can be submitted. For open research and development, access to capabilities is provided free of charge

  8. Metals Processing Laboratory Users (MPLUS) Facility Annual Report: October 1, 2000 through September 30, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelini, P

    2004-04-27

    The Metals Processing Laboratory Users Facility (MPLUS) is a Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Industrial Technologies Program user facility designated to assist researchers in key industries, universities, and federal laboratories in improving energy efficiency, improving environmental aspects, and increasing competitiveness. The goal of MPLUS is to provide access to the specialized technical expertise and equipment needed to solve metals processing issues that limit the development and implementation of emerging metals processing technologies. The scope of work can also extend to other types of materials. MPLUS has four primary User Centers including: (1) Processing--casting, powder metallurgy, deformation processing including (extrusion, forging, rolling), melting, thermomechanical processing, high density infrared processing; (2) Joining--welding, monitoring and control, solidification, brazing, bonding; (3) Characterization--corrosion, mechanical properties, fracture mechanics, microstructure, nondestructive examination, computer-controlled dilatometry, and emissivity; (4) Materials/Process Modeling--mathematical design and analyses, high performance computing, process modeling, solidification/deformation, microstructure evolution, thermodynamic and kinetic, and materials data bases. A fully integrated approach provides researchers with unique opportunities to address technologically related issues to solve metals processing problems and probe new technologies. Access is also available to 16 additional Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) user facilities ranging from state of the art materials characterization capabilities, high performance computing, to manufacturing technologies. MPLUS can be accessed through a standardized User-submitted Proposal and a User Agreement. Nonproprietary (open) or proprietary proposals can be submitted. For open research and development, access to capabilities is provides free of charge while

  9. Line Heat-Source Guarded Hot Plate

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description:The 1-meter guarded hot-plate apparatus measures thermal conductivity of building insulation. This facility provides for absolute measurement of thermal...

  10. Hot cell renovation in the spent fuel conditioning process facility at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Nam Yu

    2015-10-01

    Results and conclusion: Based on the considered refurbishment workflow, previous equipment in the M8 cell, including vessels and pipes, were removed and disposed of successfully after a zoning smear survey and decontamination, and new equipment with advanced functions and specifications were installed in the hot cell. Finally, the operating area and isolation room were also refurbished to meet the requirements of the improved hot cell facility.

  11. Using Self-Reflection To Increase Science Process Skills in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veal, William R.; Taylor, Dawne; Rogers, Amy L.

    2009-03-01

    Self-reflection is a tool of instruction that has been used in the science classroom. Research has shown great promise in using video as a learning tool in the classroom. However, the integration of self-reflective practice using video in the general chemistry laboratory to help students develop process skills has not been done. Immediate video feedback and direct instruction were employed in a general chemistry laboratory course to improve students' mastery and understanding of basic and advanced process skills. Qualitative results and statistical analysis of quantitative data proved that self-reflection significantly helped students develop basic and advanced process skills, yet did not seem to influence the general understanding of the science content.

  12. Process in Developing Zebra fish Laboratory at Malaysian Nuclear Agency for Toxicology Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazliana Mohd Saaya; Mohd Noor Hidayat Adenan; Anee Suryani Sued

    2015-01-01

    Toxicology is a branch of the very important especially in determining the safety and effectiveness of herbal products to avoid any side effects to the user. Currently, toxicity tests conducted in the laboratory is testing the toxicity of shrimp, tests on cell cultures and experimental animal tests on the rats. One of the most recent exam easier and can reduce the use of experimental rats was testing on zebra fish fish. Fish zebra fish Danio rerio, suitable for the study of toxicity, teratogenicity, genetic, oncology and neurobiology. Zebra fish system of aquarium fish zebra fish system has been in Nuclear Malaysia since 2013 but has not yet fully operational due to several factors and is in the process of moving into a new laboratory which systematically and in accordance with the enabling environment for care. The development of a new fully equipped laboratory is expected to benefit all for use in research. (author)

  13. Mood and implicit alcohol expectancy processes: predicting alcohol consumption in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardell, Jeffrey D; Read, Jennifer P; Curtin, John J; Merrill, Jennifer E

    2012-01-01

    Implicit positive alcohol expectancy (PAE) processes are thought to respond phasically to external and internal stimuli-including mood states-and so they may exert powerful proximal influences over drinking behavior. Although social learning theory contends that mood states activate mood-congruent implicit PAEs, which in turn lead to alcohol use, there is a dearth of experimental research examining this mediation model relative to observable drinking. Moreover, an expectancy theory perspective might suggest that, rather than influencing PAEs directly, mood may moderate the association between PAEs and drinking. To test these models, this study examined the role of mood in the association between implicitly measured PAE processes (i.e., latency to endorse PAEs) and immediate alcohol consumption in the laboratory. Gender differences in these processes also were examined. College students (N = 146) were exposed to either a positive, negative, or neutral mood induction procedure, completed a computerized PAE reaction time (RT) task, and subsequently consumed alcohol ad libitum. The mood manipulation had no direct effects on drinking in the laboratory, making the mediation hypothesis irrelevant. Instead, gender and mood condition moderated the association between RT to endorse PAEs and drinking in the laboratory. For males, RT to tension reduction PAEs was a stronger predictor of volume of beer consumed and peak blood alcohol concentration in the context of general arousal (i.e., positive and negative mood) relative to neutral mood. RT to PAEs did not predict drinking in the laboratory for females. The results show that PAE processes are important determinants of immediate drinking behavior in men, suggesting that biased attention to mood-relevant PAEs-as indicated by longer RTs-predicts greater alcohol consumption in the appropriate mood context. The findings also highlight the need to consider gender differences in PAE processes. This study underscores the need for

  14. Transforming the Learning Environment of Undergraduate Physics Laboratories to Enhance Physics Inquiry Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory P. Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Concerns persist regarding the lack of promotion of students’ scientific inquiry processes in undergraduate physics laboratories. The consensus in the literature is that, especially in the early years of undergraduate physics programs, students’ laboratory work is characterized by recipe type, step-by-step instructions for activities where the aim is often confirmation of an already well-established physics principle or concept. In response to evidence reflecting these concerns at their university, the authors successfully secured funding for this study. A mixed-method design was employed. In the 2011/2012 academic year baseline data were collected. A quantitative survey, the Undergraduate Physics Laboratory Learning Environment Scale (UPLLES was developed, validated, and used to explore students’ perceptions of their physics laboratory environments. Analysis of data from the UPLLES and from interviews confirmed the concerns evident in the literature and in a previous evaluation of laboratories undertaken in 2002. To address these concerns the activities that students were to perform in the laboratory section of the course/s were re/designed to engage students in more inquiry oriented thinking and activity. In Fall 2012, the newly developed laboratory activities and tutorials, were implemented for the first time in PHYS124; a first year course. These changes were accompanied by structured training of teaching assistants and changes to the structure of the evaluation of students’ laboratory performance. At the end of that term the UPLLES was administered (n = 266 and interviews with students conducted (n = 16 to explore their perceptions of their laboratory environments. Statistically significant differences (p<.001 between the students in the PHYS 124 classes of 2011/2012 and 2012/2013 across all dimensions were found. Effect sizes of 0.82 to 1.3, between the views of students in the first semester physics classes of 2011/2012 and 2012

  15. Safety analysis of IFR fuel processing in the Argonne National Laboratory Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charak, I; Pedersen, D.R.; Forrester, R.J.; Phipps, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) includes on-site processing and recycling of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process is being demonstrated in the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) at ANL's Idaho site. This paper describes the safety analyses that were performed in support of the FCF program; the resulting safety analysis report was the vehicle used to secure authorization to operate the facility and carry out the program, which is now under way. This work also provided some insights into safety-related issues of a commercial IFR fuel processing facility. These are also discussed

  16. Optimization of the Hot Forging Processing Parameters for Powder Metallurgy Fe-Cu-C Connecting Rods Based on Finite Element Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengxian; Yi, Jianhong; Eckert, Jürgen

    2017-12-01

    Powder forged connecting rods have the problem of non-uniform density distributions because of their complex geometric shape. The densification behaviors of powder metallurgy (PM) connecting rod preforms during hot forging processes play a significant role in optimizing the connecting rod quality. The deformation behaviors of a connecting rod preform, a Fe-3Cu-0.5C (wt pct) alloy compacted and sintered by the powder metallurgy route (PM Fe-Cu-C), were investigated using the finite element method, while damage and friction behaviors of the material were considered in the complicated forging process. The calculated results agree well with the experimental results. The relationship between the processing parameters of hot forging and the relative density of the connecting rod was revealed. The results showed that the relative density of the hot forged connecting rod at the central shank changed significantly compared with the relative density at the big end and at the small end. Moreover, the relative density of the connecting rod was sensitive to the processing parameters such as the forging velocity and the initial density of the preform. The optimum forging processing parameters were determined and presented by using an orthogonal design method. This work suggests that the processing parameters can be optimized to prepare a connecting rod with uniform density distribution and can help to better meet the requirements of the connecting rod industry.

  17. Hot gas cleaning, a targeted project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romey, I. [University of Essen, Essen (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    Advanced hot gas cleaning systems will play a key role in future integrated combined cycle technologies. IGCC demonstration plants in operation or under construction are at present equipped with conventional wet gas scrubbing and cleaning systems. Feasibility studies for those IGCC plants have shown that the total efficiency of the processes can be improved using hot gas cleaning systems. However, this technology has not been developed and tested at a technical scale. Six well-known European industrial companies and research centres jointly worked together since January 1996 on a Targeted Project `Hot Gas Cleaning` to investigate and develop new hot gas cleaning systems for advanced clean coal power generation processes. In addition project work on chemical analysis and modelling was carried out in universities in England and Germany. The latest main findings were presented at the workshop. The main project aims are summarised as follows: to increase efficiency of advanced power generation processes; to obtain a reduction of alkalis and environmental emissions e.g. SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO{sub 2} and dust; and to develop the design basis for future industrial plants based on long-term operation of laboratory, pilot and demo-plants. To cover a range of possible process routes for future hot gas cleaning systems the following research programme is under investigation: removal of trace elements by different commercial and self developed sorbents; gas separation by membranes; separation of gas turbine relevant pollutants by hot filter dust and; H{sub 2}S removal and gas dedusting at high temperatures. 13 figs.

  18. Impact of virtual chemistry laboratory instruction on pre-service science teachers’ scientific process skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutlu Ayfer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the impact of virtual chemistry laboratory instruction on pre-service science teachers’ scientific process skills. For this purpose, eight laboratory activities related to chemical kinetic, chemical equilibrium, thermochemistry, acids-bases, and electrochemistry were developed. Those activities were performed in virtual laboratory environment by the pre-service teachers in the experimental group and in the real laboratory environment by c the preservice teachers in the control group during eight weeks. Scientific process skills test developed by Burns, Okey and Wise [3], and translated into Turkish by Ateş and Bahar [2] was used before and after the instructions for data collection. According to results, while there was no significant difference between pre-test mean scores (U=133.500, p>0.05, significant difference between post-test mean scores was found in favour of experimental group (U=76.000, p<0.05. In addition, while no significant difference between pre-test mean scores for each sub-dimension was found, significant difference between post-test mean scores for designing investigation and formulating hypothesis skills was found in favour of experimental group.

  19. Improving Histopathology Laboratory Productivity: Process Consultancy and A3 Problem Solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kutsal YÖRÜKOĞLU

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The ISO 17020 quality program has been run in our pathology laboratory for four years to establish an action plan for correction and prevention of identified errors. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the errors that we could not identify through ISO 17020 and/or solve by means of process consulting. Process consulting is carefully intervening in a group or team to help it to accomplish its goals. Material and Method: The A3 problem solving process was run under the leadership of a ‘workflow, IT and consultancy manager’. An action team was established consisting of technical staff. A root cause analysis was applied for target conditions, and the 6-S method was implemented for solution proposals. Applicable proposals were activated and the results were rated by six-sigma analysis. Non-applicable proposals were reported to the laboratory administrator. Results: A mislabelling error was the most complained issue triggering all pre-analytical errors. There were 21 non-value added steps grouped in 8 main targets on the fish bone graphic (transporting, recording, moving, individual, waiting, over-processing, over-transaction and errors. Unnecessary redundant requests, missing slides, archiving issues, redundant activities, and mislabelling errors were proposed to be solved by improving visibility and fixing spaghetti problems. Spatial re-organization, organizational marking, re-defining some operations, and labeling activities raised the six sigma score from 24% to 68% for all phases. Operational transactions such as implementation of a pathology laboratory system was suggested for long-term improvement. Conclusion: Laboratory management is a complex process. Quality control is an effective method to improve productivity. Systematic checking in a quality program may not always find and/or solve the problems. External observation may reveal crucial indicators about the system failures providing very simple solutions.

  20. Decreasing troponin turnaround time in the emergency department using the central laboratory: A process improvement study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelstler, Arlene M; Rowland, Ralph; Theoret, Jennifer; Takla, Robert B; Szpunar, Susan; Patel, Shraddha P; Lowry, Andrew M; Pena, Margarita E

    2015-03-01

    To implement collaborative process improvement measures to reduce emergency department (ED) troponin turnaround time (TAT) to less than 60min using central laboratory. This was an observational, retrospective data study. A multidisciplinary team from the ED and laboratory identified opportunities and developed a new workflow model. Process changes were implemented in ED patient triage, staffing, lab collection and processing. Data collected included TAT of door-to-order, order-to-collect, collect-to-received, received-to-result, door-to-result, ED length of stay, and hemolysis rate before (January-August, 2011) and after (September 2011-June 2013) process improvement. After process improvement and implementation of the new workflow model, decreased median TAT (in min) was seen in door-to-order (54 [IQR43] vs. 11 [IQR20]), order-to-collect (15 [IQR 23] vs. 10 [IQR12]), collect-to-received (6 [IQR8] vs. 5 [IQR5]), received-to-result (30 [IQR12] vs. 24 [IQR11]), and overall door-to-result (117 [IQR60] vs. 60 [IQR40]). A troponin TAT of <60min was realized beginning in May 2012 (59 [IQR39]). Hemolysis rates decreased (14.63±0.74 vs. 3.36±1.99, p<0.0001), as did ED length of stay (5.87±2.73h vs. 5.15±2.34h, p<0.0001). Conclusion Troponin TAT of <60min using a central laboratory was achieved with collaboration between the ED and the laboratory; additional findings include a decreased ED length of stay. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Improving Histopathology Laboratory Productivity: Process Consultancy and A3 Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yörükoğlu, Kutsal; Özer, Erdener; Alptekin, Birsen; Öcal, Cem

    2017-01-01

    The ISO 17020 quality program has been run in our pathology laboratory for four years to establish an action plan for correction and prevention of identified errors. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the errors that we could not identify through ISO 17020 and/or solve by means of process consulting. Process consulting is carefully intervening in a group or team to help it to accomplish its goals. The A3 problem solving process was run under the leadership of a 'workflow, IT and consultancy manager'. An action team was established consisting of technical staff. A root cause analysis was applied for target conditions, and the 6-S method was implemented for solution proposals. Applicable proposals were activated and the results were rated by six-sigma analysis. Non-applicable proposals were reported to the laboratory administrator. A mislabelling error was the most complained issue triggering all pre-analytical errors. There were 21 non-value added steps grouped in 8 main targets on the fish bone graphic (transporting, recording, moving, individual, waiting, over-processing, over-transaction and errors). Unnecessary redundant requests, missing slides, archiving issues, redundant activities, and mislabelling errors were proposed to be solved by improving visibility and fixing spaghetti problems. Spatial re-organization, organizational marking, re-defining some operations, and labeling activities raised the six sigma score from 24% to 68% for all phases. Operational transactions such as implementation of a pathology laboratory system was suggested for long-term improvement. Laboratory management is a complex process. Quality control is an effective method to improve productivity. Systematic checking in a quality program may not always find and/or solve the problems. External observation may reveal crucial indicators about the system failures providing very simple solutions.

  2. Temperature field in the hot-top during casting a new super-high strength Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy by low frequency electromagnetic process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubo ZUO

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The billets of a new super-high strength Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy in 200 mm diameter were produced by the processed of low frequency electromagnetic casting (LFEC and conventional direct chill(DCcasting, respectively. The effects of low frequency electromagnetic field on temperature field of the melt in the hot-top were investigated by temperature thermocouples into the casting during the processes. The results show that during LFEC process the temperature field in the melt applying the hot-top is very uniform, which is helpful to reduce the difference of thermal gradients between the surface and the center, and then to reduce the thermal stress and to eliminate casting crack.

  3. [Study of continuous quality improvement for clinical laboratory processes via the platform of Hospital Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenqi; Shen, Ying; Peng, Xiaoxia; Tian, Jian; Wang, Hui; Xu, Lili; Nie, Xiaolu; Ni, Xin

    2015-05-26

    The program of continuous quality improvement in clinical laboratory processes for complete blood count (CBC) was launched via the platform of Beijing Children's Hospital Group in order to improve the quality of pediatric clinical laboratories. Fifteen children's hospitals of Beijing Children's Hospital group were investigated using the method of Chinese adapted continuous quality improvement with PDCA (Plan-Do-Check-Action). The questionnaire survey and inter-laboratory comparison was conducted to find the existing problems, to analyze reasons, to set forth quality targets and to put them into practice. Then, targeted training was conducted to 15 children's hospitals and the second questionnaire survey, self examinations by the clinical laboratories was performed. At the same time, the Group's online internal quality control platform was established. Overall effects of the program were evaluated so that lay a foundation for the next stage of PDCA. Both quality of control system documents and CBC internal quality control scheme for all of clinical laboratories were improved through this program. In addition, standardization of performance verification was also improved, especially with the comparable verification rate of precision and internal laboratory results up to 100%. In terms of instrument calibration and mandatory diagnostic rates, only three out of the 15 hospitals (20%) failed to pass muster in 2014 from 46.67% (seven out of the 15 hospitals) in 2013. The abnormal data of intraday precision variance coefficients of the five CBC indicator parameters (WBC, RBC, Hb, Plt and Hct) of all the 15 laboratories accounted for 1.2% (2/165) in 2014, a marked decrease from 9.6% (14/145) in 2013. While the number of the hospitals using only one horizontal quality control object for daily quality control has dropped to three from five. The 15 hospitals organized a total of 263 times of training in 2014 from 101 times in 2013, up 160%. The quality improvement program for

  4. Comparison of Ti(C,N)-based cermets processed by hot-pressing sintering and conventional pressureless sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Qingzhong; Ai, Xing; Zhao, Jun; Qin, Weizhen; Wang, Yintao; Gong, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The HP sintered Ti(C,N)-based cermets exhibit high hardness with fine grain size. • The PLS sintered cermets possess high mechanical properties with low porosity. • The applied pressure can rearrange particles and contribute to grain refinement. • The heating rate can greatly affect the solid and liquid phase sintering of cermets. - Abstract: A suitable sintering method is important to obtain the Ti(C,N)-based cermets with superior properties. In this paper, Ti(C,N)-based cermets were fabricated by hot-pressing sintering (HP) and conventional pressureless sintering (PLS) technology, respectively, to investigate the influence of different sintering methods on the microstructure and mechanical properties of cermets materials. The microstructure, fracture morphology, indention cracks and phase composition were observed and detected using scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The transverse rupture strength (TRS), Vickers hardness (HV) and fracture toughness (K IC ) were also measured. The results reveal that all of the Ti(C,N)-based cermets exhibit core–rim microstructures with black cores, white cores and grey rims embedded into metal binder phases. The grain size of the samples fabricated by HP is much finer and the structure is more compact than those fabricated by PLS, while there exist pores in the HP sintered samples. The sintering process has no influence on the phase composition of cermets, but affects the phase content and crystallinity. The samples fabricated by PLS present higher transverse rupture strength, fracture toughness and density than samples fabricated by HP. However, the HP sintered samples possess a higher hardness

  5. Transaction processing in the common node of a distributed function laboratory computer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubblefield, F.W.; Dimmler, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    A computer network architecture consisting of a common node processor for managing peripherals and files and a number of private node processors for laboratory experiment control is briefly reviewed. Central to the problem of private node-common node communication is the concept of a transaction. The collection of procedures and the data structure associated with a transaction are described. The common node properties assigned to a transaction and procedures required for its complete processing are discussed. (U.S.)

  6. TiO{sub 2} Processed by pressurized hot solvents as a novel photocatalyst for photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reli, Martin, E-mail: martin.reli@vsb.cz [Institute of Environmental Technology, VŠB-TU Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15/2172, 708 33 Ostrava (Czech Republic); Kobielusz, Marcin [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University in Kraków, ul. Ingardena 3, 30-060 Kraków (Poland); Matějová, Lenka [Institute of Environmental Technology, VŠB-TU Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15/2172, 708 33 Ostrava (Czech Republic); Daniš, Stanislav [Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Ke Karlovu 5, 121 16 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Macyk, Wojciech [Centre ENET, VŠB-TU Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15/2172, 708 33 Ostrava (Czech Republic); Obalová, Lucie [Institute of Environmental Technology, VŠB-TU Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15/2172, 708 33 Ostrava (Czech Republic); Kuśtrowski, Piotr; Rokicińska, Anna [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University in Kraków, ul. Ingardena 3, 30-060 Kraków (Poland); Kočí, Kamila [Institute of Environmental Technology, VŠB-TU Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15/2172, 708 33 Ostrava (Czech Republic); Centre ENET, VŠB-TU Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15/2172, 708 33 Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Synthesis of anatase-brookite TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts has been described. • The materials photocatalyze carbon dioxide reduction to methane. • The photoactivity of the synthesized composites has been compared with the activity of anatase-rutile material (P25). • The influence of electronic structure on photocatalytic activity has been discussed. - Abstract: Anatase-brookite TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts were prepared by the sol-gel process controlled within reverse micelles and processing by pressurized hot solvents–water/methanol/water (TiO{sub 2}(M)) and water/ethanol/water (TiO{sub 2}(E)), as an unconventional alternative to common calcination. The main goal of this work was to prepare anatase-brookite mixtures by processing by two different alcohols (methanol and ethanol) and evaluate the influence of the alcohol on the photocatalytic activity. Prepared photocatalysts were characterized by organic elemental analysis, nitrogen physisorption, XRD, UV–vis, photoelectrochemical and spectroelectrochemical measurements and XPS. The prepared photocatalysts efficiency was tested on the photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide and compared with commercial TiO{sub 2} Evonik P25. Both prepared nanocomposites were more efficient towards methane production but Evonik P25 was the most efficient towards hydrogen generated through water splitting. The higher performance of anatase-brookite mixture towards methane production can be explained by (i) a higher photocatalytic activity of brookite than rutile; (ii) a large surface area of anatase-brookite composites enabling better carbon dioxide adsorption; (iii) the photoinduced electron transfer from the brookite conduction band to the anatase conduction band. On the other hand, a higher production of hydrogen in the presence of Evonik P25 is caused by a better charge separation in anatase-rutile than anatase-brookite phase compositions. TiO{sub 2}(M) appeared more active than TiO{sub 2}(E) in the

  7. Laboratory Investigation of Contact Freezing and the Aerosol to Ice Crystal Transformation Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, Raymond A. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)

    2014-10-28

    This project has been focused on the following objectives: 1. Investigations of the physical processes governing immersion versus contact nucleation, specifically surface-induced crystallization; 2. Development of a quadrupole particle trap with full thermodynamic control over the temperature range 0 to –40 °C and precisely controlled water vapor saturation ratios for continuous, single-particle measurement of the aerosol to ice crystal transformation process for realistic ice nuclei; 3. Understanding the role of ice nucleation in determining the microphysical properties of mixed-phase clouds, within a framework that allows bridging between laboratory and field measurements.

  8. SLIPTA e-Tool improves laboratory audit process in Vietnam and Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuong T. Nguyen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Stepwise Laboratory Quality Improvement Process Towards Accreditation (SLIPTA checklist is used worldwide to drive quality improvement in laboratories in developing countries and to assess the effectiveness of interventions such as the Strengthening Laboratory Management Toward Accreditation (SLMTA programme. However, the paperbased format of the checklist makes administration cumbersome and limits timely analysis and communication of results. Development of e-Tool: In early 2012, the SLMTA team in Vietnam developed an electronic SLIPTA checklist tool. The e-Tool was pilot tested in Vietnam in mid-2012 and revised. It was used during SLMTA implementation in Vietnam and Cambodia in 2012 and 2013 and further revised based on auditors’ feedback about usability. Outcomes: The SLIPTA e-Tool enabled rapid turn-around of audit results, reduced workload and language barriers and facilitated analysis of national results. Benefits of the e-Tool will be magnified with in-country scale-up of laboratory quality improvement efforts and potential expansion to other countries.

  9. HOT 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette Romme

    En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager en række læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet. Undersøgelsen er gentaget hvert år siden 2010.......En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager en række læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet. Undersøgelsen er gentaget hvert år siden 2010....

  10. HOT 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette Romme

    En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager en række læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet. Undersøgelsen er gentaget hvert år siden 2010.......En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager en række læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet. Undersøgelsen er gentaget hvert år siden 2010....

  11. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 3 of 6 Microstructure Engineering in Hot Strip Mills, Part 1 of 2: Integrated Mathematical Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.K. Brimacombe; I.V. Samarasekera; E.B. Hawbolt; T.R. Meadowcroft; M. Militzer; W.J. Pool; D.Q. Jin

    1999-07-31

    This report describes the work of developing an integrated model used to predict the thermal history, deformation, roll forces, microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of steel strip in a hot-strip mill. This achievement results from a joint research effort that is part of the American Iron and Steel Institute's (AIS) Advanced Process Control Program, a collaboration between the U.S. DOE and fifteen North American Steelmakers.

  12. Study on hot deformation behavior and microstructure evolution of cast-extruded AZ31B magnesium alloy and nanocomposite using processing map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.; Loganathan, C.; Narayanasamy, R.; Senthilkumar, V.; Nguyen, Q.B.; Gupta, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hot deformation behavior of AZ31B Mg alloy and nanocomposite were studied. ► Activation energy of AZ31B Mg alloy and nanocomposite were determined. ► Twining, shear bands and flow localization were observed. - Abstract: The hot deformation behavior and microstructural evolution of cast-extruded AZ31B magnesium alloy and nanocomposite have been studied using processing-maps. Compression tests were conducted in the temperature range of 250–400 °C and strain rate range of 0.01–1.0 s −1 . The three-dimensional (3D) processing maps developed in this work, describe the variations of the efficiency of power dissipation and flow instability domains in the strain rate (ε) and temperature (T) space. The deformation mechanisms namely dynamic recrystallization (DRX), dynamic recovery (DRY) and instability regions were identified using processing maps. The deformation mechanisms were also correlated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and optical microscopy (OM). The optimal region for hot working has been observed at a strain rate (ε) of 0.01 s −1 and the temperature (T) of 400 °C for both magnesium alloy and nanocomposite. Few instability regimes have been identified in this study at higher strain rate (ε) and temperature (T). The stability domains have been identified in the lower strain rate regimes

  13. EDS Coal Liquefaction Process Development. Phase V. Laboratory evaluation of the characteristics of EDS Illinois bottoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lao, T C; Levasseur, A A

    1984-02-01

    This interim report documents work carried out by Combustion Engineering, Inc. under a contract to Exxon Research and Engineering Company to develop a conceptual Hybrid Boiler design fueled by the vacuum distillation residue (vacuum bottoms) derived from Illinois No. 6 coal in the EDS Coal Liquefaction Process. This report was prepared by Combustion Engineering, Inc., and is the first of two reports on the predevelopment phase of the Hybrid Boiler program. This report covers the results of a laboratory investigation to assess the fuel and ash properties of EDS vacuum bottoms. The results of the laboratory testing reported here were used in conjunction with Combustion Engineering's design experience to predict fuel performance and to develop appropriate boiler design parameters. These boiler design parameters were used to prepare the engineering design study reported in EDS Interim Report FE-2893-113, the second of the two reports on the predevelopment phase of the Hybrid Boiler Program. 46 figures, 29 tables.

  14. Placement of the radiochemical processing plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory into a safe standby condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holladay, D.W.; Bopp, C.D.; Farmer, A.J.; Johnson, J.K.; Miller, C.H.; Powers, B.A.; Collins, E.D.

    1986-01-01

    Extensive upgrade, cleanup, and decontamination efforts are being conducted for appropriate areas in the Radiochemical Processing Plant (RPP) with the goal of achieving safe standby condition by the end of FY 1989. The ventilation system must maintain containment thus, it is being upgraded via demolition and replacement of marginally adequate ductwork, fans, and control systems. Areas that are being decontaminated and stripped of various services (e.g., piping, ductwork, and process tanks) include hot cells, makeup rooms, and pipe tunnels. Operating equipment that is being decontaminated includes glove boxes and hoods. Replacement of the ventilation system and removal of equipment from pipe tunnels, cells, and makeup rooms are accomplished by contact labor by workers using proper attire, safety rules, and shielding, Removal of contaminated ductwork and piping is conducted with containment enclosures that are strategically located at breakpoints, and methods of separation are chosen to conform with health physics requirements. The methods of cutting contaminated piping and ductwork include portable reciprocating saws, pipe cutters, burning, and plasma torch. Specially designed containment enclosures will be used to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination while maintaining adequate ventilation

  15. Placement of the radiochemical processing plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory into a safe standby condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holladay, D.W.; Bopp, C.D.; Farmer, A.J.; Johnson, J.K.; Miller, C.H.; Powers, B.A.; Collins, E.D.

    1986-01-01

    Extensive upgrade, cleanup, and decontamination efforts are being conducted for appropriate areas in the Radiochemical Processing Plant (RPP) with the goal of achieving ''safe standby'' condition by the end of FY 1989. The ventilation system must maintain containment; thus, it is being upgraded via demolition and replacement of marginally adequate ductwork, fans, and control systems. Areas that are being decontaminated and stripped of various services (e.g., piping, ductwork, and process tanks) include hot cells, makeup rooms, and pipe tunnels. Operating equipment that is being decontaminated includes glove boxes and hoods. Replacement of the ventilation system and removal of equipment from pipe tunnels, cells, and makeup rooms are accomplished by contact labor by workers using proper attire, safety rules, and shielding. Removal of contaminated ductwork and piping is conducted with containment enclosures that are strategically located at breakpoints, and methods of separation are chosen to conform with health physics requirements. The methods of cutting contaminated piping and ductwork include portable reciprocating saws, pipe cutters, burning, and plasma torch. Specially designed containment enclosures will be used to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination while maintaining adequate ventilation. 6 figs

  16. Estimating HAPs and radionuclide emissions from a laboratory complex at a nuclear processing site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, R.A.; Faugl, T.

    1993-01-01

    A unique methodology was developed for conducting an air emission inventory (AEI) at a DOE nuclear processing facility. This methodology involved the use of computer-assisted design (CAD) drawings to document emission points, computerized process drawings to document industrial processes leading to emissions, and a computerized data base of AEI forms to document emission estimates and related process data. A detailed air emissions inventory for operating years 1985--1991 was recently implemented for the entire site using this methodology. One industrial area at the DOE Site is comprised of laboratory facilities that provide direct support to the nuclear reactor and recovery operations, developmental studies to support reactor and separation operations, and developmental studies to support waste handling and storage. The majority of the functions are conducted in a single large building complex wherein bench scale and pilot scale experiments are carried out involving radionuclides, hazardous air pollutants (HAP), and other chemicals reportable under the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) and Superfund Amendments and Re-authorization Act (SARA) Title 111. The results of the inventory showed that HAP and radionuclide emissions from the laboratory complex were relatively minor

  17. Description of the Sandia National Laboratories science, technology & engineering metrics process.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Gretchen B.; Watkins, Randall D.; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Burns, Alan Richard; Oelschlaeger, Peter

    2010-04-01

    There has been a concerted effort since 2007 to establish a dashboard of metrics for the Science, Technology, and Engineering (ST&E) work at Sandia National Laboratories. These metrics are to provide a self assessment mechanism for the ST&E Strategic Management Unit (SMU) to complement external expert review and advice and various internal self assessment processes. The data and analysis will help ST&E Managers plan, implement, and track strategies and work in order to support the critical success factors of nurturing core science and enabling laboratory missions. The purpose of this SAND report is to provide a guide for those who want to understand the ST&E SMU metrics process. This report provides an overview of why the ST&E SMU wants a dashboard of metrics, some background on metrics for ST&E programs from existing literature and past Sandia metrics efforts, a summary of work completed to date, specifics on the portfolio of metrics that have been chosen and the implementation process that has been followed, and plans for the coming year to improve the ST&E SMU metrics process.

  18. Clandestine laboratory scene investigation and processing using portable GC/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matejczyk, Raymond J.

    1997-02-01

    This presentation describes the use of portable gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for on-scene investigation and processing of clandestine laboratories. Clandestine laboratory investigations present special problems to forensic investigators. These crime scenes contain many chemical hazards that must be detected, identified and collected as evidence. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry performed on-scene with a rugged, portable unit is capable of analyzing a variety of matrices for drugs and chemicals used in the manufacture of illicit drugs, such as methamphetamine. Technologies used to detect various materials at a scene have particular applications but do not address the wide range of samples, chemicals, matrices and mixtures that exist in clan labs. Typical analyses performed by GC/MS are for the purpose of positively establishing the identity of starting materials, chemicals and end-product collected from clandestine laboratories. Concerns for the public and investigator safety and the environment are also important factors for rapid on-scene data generation. Here is described the implementation of a portable multiple-inlet GC/MS system designed for rapid deployment to a scene to perform forensic investigations of clandestine drug manufacturing laboratories. GC/MS has long been held as the 'gold standard' in performing forensic chemical analyses. With the capability of GC/MS to separate and produce a 'chemical fingerprint' of compounds, it is utilized as an essential technique for detecting and positively identifying chemical evidence. Rapid and conclusive on-scene analysis of evidence will assist the forensic investigators in collecting only pertinent evidence thereby reducing the amount of evidence to be transported, reducing chain of custody concerns, reducing costs and hazards, maintaining sample integrity and speeding the completion of the investigative process.

  19. Evaluation of Surface Runoff Generation Processes Using a Rainfall Simulator: A Small Scale Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danáčová, Michaela; Valent, Peter; Výleta, Roman

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, rainfall simulators are being used by many researchers in field or laboratory experiments. The main objective of most of these experiments is to better understand the underlying runoff generation processes, and to use the results in the process of calibration and validation of hydrological models. Many research groups have assembled their own rainfall simulators, which comply with their understanding of rainfall processes, and the requirements of their experiments. Most often, the existing rainfall simulators differ mainly in the size of the irrigated area, and the way they generate rain drops. They can be characterized by the accuracy, with which they produce a rainfall of a given intensity, the size of the irrigated area, and the rain drop generating mechanism. Rainfall simulation experiments can provide valuable information about the genesis of surface runoff, infiltration of water into soil and rainfall erodibility. Apart from the impact of physical properties of soil, its moisture and compaction on the generation of surface runoff and the amount of eroded particles, some studies also investigate the impact of vegetation cover of the whole area of interest. In this study, the rainfall simulator was used to simulate the impact of the slope gradient of the irrigated area on the amount of generated runoff and sediment yield. In order to eliminate the impact of external factors and to improve the reproducibility of the initial conditions, the experiments were conducted in laboratory conditions. The laboratory experiments were carried out using a commercial rainfall simulator, which was connected to an external peristaltic pump. The pump maintained a constant and adjustable inflow of water, which enabled to overcome the maximum volume of simulated precipitation of 2.3 l, given by the construction of the rainfall simulator, while maintaining constant characteristics of the simulated precipitation. In this study a 12-minute rainfall with a constant intensity

  20. Storage stability of cashew apple juice preserved by hot fill and aseptic processes Estabilidade do suco de caju preservado pelo método ''hot fill'' e processo asséptico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecília Oliveira Costa

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Cashew (Anacardium occidentale L. apples from Pacajus, Ceará State, Brazil, were processed into high pulp content juice. The juice was packed either by hot fill or an aseptic process and evaluated for physical, physical-chemical, and sensorial changes during a 12-month storage period at room temperature. The results indicated that pH, soluble solids, total acidity, total sugar content and color did not change significantly during storage nor were affected by the type of filling. The sensorial analysis showed that juice acceptance remained high throughout the storage period regardless of the filling system. Differences in juice viscosity persisted between both processes.Pedúnculos de caju (Anacardium occidentale L. de Pacajus, Estado do Ceará, Brasil, foram processados na forma de suco com alto teor de polpa. O suco foi acondicionado através do processo hot fill ou asséptico e verificada as alterações físicas, físico-químicas e sensoriais durante armazenagem por doze meses à temperatura ambiente. Os resultados indicaram que pH, sólidos solúveis, acidez total, conteúdo de açúcar e cor não mudaram de modo significativo durante a armazenagem nem foram afetadas pelo modo de acondicionamento. Análise sensorial mostrou que a aceitação do suco foi mantida alta durante o período de armazenagem a despeito do sistema de enchimento. Diferenças na viscosidade dos sucos persistiram entre ambos processos.

  1. An application of Brookhaven National Laboratory's hot particle methodology for determining the most effective beta particle energy in causing skin ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, C.

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of this project was to compare the effectiveness of hot particles with different energy betas in producing ulcers on skin. The sources were man-made hot particles similar in size and activity to those found in the commercial nuclear power industry. Four different particle types were used. These were thulium (Tm-170) with a 0.97 MeV maximum energy beta, ytterbium (Yb-175) with a maximum beta energy of 0.47 MeV, scandium (Sc-46) with a 0.36 MeV beta, which was used as a surrogate for cobalt-60 (0.31 MeV beta) and uranium (in the carbide form) with an average maximum beta energy of about 2.5 MeV. Since higher energy beta particles penetrate further in skin, they will affect a higher number and different populations of target cells. The experiments were designed as threshold studies such that the dose needed to produce ulcers ten percent of the time (ED 10%) for each particle type could be compared against each other

  2. Thorium base fuels reprocessing at the L.P.R. (Radiochemical Processes Laboratory) experimental plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almagro, J.C.; Dupetit, G.A.; Deandreis, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The availability of the LPR (Radiochemical Processes Laboratory) plant offers the possibility to demonstrate and create the necessary technological basis for thorium fuels reprocessing. To this purpose, the solvents extraction technique is used, employing TBP (at 30%) as solvent. The process is named THOREX, a one-cycle acid, which permits an adequate separation of Th 232 and U 233 components and fission products. For thorium oxide elements dissolution, the 'chopp-leach' process (installed at LPR) is used, employing a NO 3 H 13N, 0.05M FH and 0.1M Al (NO 3 ) 3 , as solvent. To adapt the pilot plant to the flow-sheet requirements proposed, minor modifications must be carried out in the interconnection of the existing decanting mixers. The input of the plant has been calculated by Origin Code modified for irradiations in reactors of the HWR type. (Author)

  3. An Evaluation of a Human Development Laboratory. A Study of the Outcome and Process of a Laboratory Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-08-01

    Lewis, W. A. Sensitivity training mutual emotional masturbation ? Personnel and Guidance Journal, 1970, 48, 525. L’Herisson, L., and Krumm, K. J. Changes...for the purpose of practicing their newly learned skills. The groups were formed by the participants’ selecting members of the laboratory with whom...34how" it is said) are con- ji 83 gruent. After this input, the participants returned to their respective small groups to continue practicing the skills

  4. Special study for the manual transfer of process samples from CPP [Chemical Processing Plant] 601 to RAL [Remote Analytical Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marts, D.J.

    1987-05-01

    A study of alternate methods to manually transport radioactive samples from their glove boxes to the Remote Analytical Laboratory (RAL) was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The study was performed to mitigate the effects of a potential loss of sampling capabilities that could take place if a malfunction in the Pneumatic Transfer System (PTS) occurred. Samples are required to be taken from the cell glove boxes and analyzed at the RAL regardless of the operational status of the PTS. This paper documents the conclusions of the study and how a decision was reached that determined the best handling scenarios for manually transporting 15 mL vials of liquid process samples from the K, W, U, WG, or WH cell glove boxes in the Chemical Processing Plant (CPP) 601 to the RAL. This study of methods to manually remove the samples from the glove boxes, package them for safe shipment, transport them by the safest route, receive them at the RAL, and safely unload them was conducted by EG and G Idaho, Inc., for Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company as part of the Glove Box Sampling and Transfer System Project for the Fuel Processing Facilities Upgrade, Task 10, Subtask 2. The study focused on the safest and most reliable scenarios that could be implemented using existing equipment. Hardware modifications and new hardware proposals were identified, and their impact on the handling scenario has been evaluated. A conclusion was reached that by utilizing the existing facility hardware, these samples can be safely transported manually from the sample stations in CPP 601 to the RAL, and that additional hardware could facilitate the transportation process even further

  5. Modelling and experimental investigation of waste tyre pyrolysis process in a laboratory reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudniak Leszek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of waste tyre pyrolysis process is developed in this work. Tyre material decomposition based on a simplified reaction mechanism leads to main product lumps: noncondensable (gas, condensable (pyrolytic oil and solid (char. The model takes into account kinetics of heat and mass transfer in the grain of the shredded rubber material as well as surrounding gas phase. The main reaction routes were modelled as the pseudo-first order reactions with a rate constant calculated from the Arrhenius type equation using literature values of activation energy determined for main tyre constituents based on TG/DTG measurements and tuned pre-exponential parameter values obtained by fitting theoretical predictions to the experimental results obtained in our laboratory reactor. The model was implemented within the CFD software (ANSYS Fluent. The results of numerical simulation of the pyrolysis process revealed non-uniformity of sample’s porosity and temperature. The simulation predictions were in satisfactory agreement with the experimentally measured mass loss of the tyre sample during pyrolysis process investigated in a laboratory reactor.

  6. Nano-SiC region formation in (100) Si-on-insulator substrate: Optimization of hot-C+-ion implantation process to improve photoluminescence intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Tomohisa; Omata, Yuhsuke; Kanazawa, Rikito; Iguchi, Yusuke; Nakada, Shinji; Aoki, Takashi; Sasaki, Tomokazu

    2018-04-01

    We experimentally studied the optimization of the hot-C+-ion implantation process for forming nano-SiC (silicon carbide) regions in a (100) Si-on-insulator substrate at various hot-C+-ion implantation temperatures and C+ ion doses to improve photoluminescence (PL) intensity for future Si-based photonic devices. We successfully optimized the process by hot-C+-ion implantation at a temperature of about 700 °C and a C+ ion dose of approximately 4 × 1016 cm-2 to realize a high intensity of PL emitted from an approximately 1.5-nm-thick C atom segregation layer near the surface-oxide/Si interface. Moreover, atom probe tomography showed that implanted C atoms cluster in the Si layer and near the oxide/Si interface; thus, the C content locally condenses even in the C atom segregation layer, which leads to SiC formation. Corrector-spherical aberration transmission electron microscopy also showed that both 4H-SiC and 3C-SiC nanoareas near both the surface-oxide/Si and buried-oxide/Si interfaces partially grow into the oxide layer, and the observed PL photons are mainly emitted from the surface SiC nano areas.

  7. A model for construction of efficiency and stability maps of hot working processes in polycrystalline metallic materials using the Garofalo's equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieiro, I.; Fernandez, A.; Martinez, A.; Casi, M.

    1998-01-01

    Has been developed a fast and easy method for to evaluate the efficiency of the process and some or possible stabilities situations in the hot working process for the polycrystalline metallic materials (p.m.m.), by the obtained dates in the Garofalo's equation resolution for the steady state creep and for wide ranges of the work variables, stress, strain rate and temperature. These method use the fitting parameters obtained for the equation mentioned and of their physical meaning. Has been developed the numerical treatment from our previously developed software for the analysis of creep and we can obtained the efficiency energetic maps for the creep and the more generally advises areas for the hot working. Further more has been obtained maps for parameters of great physical significance; f.e. the effective activation energy for different areas of the materials hot working, and in addition has been developed a method for obtained the values of {n P L} for the different ranges of power-law application, when has been obtained the value of { n G } in the Garofalo's equation. (Author) 13 refs

  8. Characterization of solid wastes from two different hot-dip galvanizing processes; Caracterizacion de residuos solidos procedentes de dos procesos distintos de galvanizado en caliente por inmersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delvasto, P.; Casal-Ramos, J. a.; Gonzalez-Jordan, O.; Duran-Rodriguez, N. C.; Dominguez, J. R.; Moncada, P.

    2012-11-01

    Zinc dust and zinc ash from hot-dip galvanizing industries located in Venezuela were characterized using atomic spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-Ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Dust was formed during the high-pressure drying process of the galvanized pieces, in a plant that uses a steel kettle to hold the molten zinc. Ash identified as A came from the same plant as the dust, while ash identified as B came from a hot-dip galvanizing plant which use a ceramic lined galvanizing furnace. Dust contained 98 wt % Zn, in metallic form. Both ash samples contained: Zn and ZnO, while Zn{sub 5}(OH){sub 8}Cl{sub 2}×H{sub 2}O and ZnCl{sub 2} were only found in ash B. Globally, ash “A” and ash “B” contain 71 and 75 wt % Zn, respectively. (Author)

  9. Validation of mathematical model for CZ process using small-scale laboratory crystal growth furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergfelds, Kristaps; Sabanskis, Andrejs; Virbulis, Janis

    2018-05-01

    The present material is focused on the modelling of small-scale laboratory NaCl-RbCl crystal growth furnace. First steps towards fully transient simulations are taken in the form of stationary simulations that deal with the optimization of material properties to match the model to experimental conditions. For this purpose, simulation software primarily used for the modelling of industrial-scale silicon crystal growth process was successfully applied. Finally, transient simulations of the crystal growth are presented, giving a sufficient agreement to experimental results.

  10. The laboratory test rig with miniature jet engine to research aviation fuels combustion process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawron Bartosz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents laboratory test rig with a miniature turbojet engine (MiniJETRig – Miniature Jet Engine Test Rig, that was built in the Air Force Institute of Technology. The test rig has been developed for research and development works aimed at modelling and investigating processes and phenomena occurring in full scale jet engines. In the article construction of a test rig is described, with a brief discussion on the functionality of each of its main components. Additionally examples of measurement results obtained during the realization of the initial tests have been included, presenting the capabilities of the test rig.

  11. Certification of the PSI request for the renewal of the operation license for the Hot Laboratory; Gutachten zum Gesuch des Paul Scherrer Instituts um Erneuerung der Betriebsbewilligung für das Hotlabor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-03-15

    At the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), the Hot Laboratory was built in the years 1961 to 1963 in the former EIR in order to make scientific material analyses on highly radioactive material samples and to prepare diagnostic and therapeutically useful radioisotopes. The 1964 safety report with the request for the granting of the operational warrant was revised for the first time in 2004. Further safety reports and radiation protection plans were produced and accepted by the surveying authorities. The operational regulations were revised and approved on a yearly basis by the PSI direction. The regulations reflect the experience gained in 40 years of safe operation and take new regulations in nuclear energy legislation into account. In the years 2000-2002 the Hot Lab was refitted especially with respect to the fields of radiation and fire protection. Presently, the Hot Lab is used for applied material research on highly radioactive samples which mainly come from nuclear power plants, research reactors and the target stations of the PSI accelerator facilities. The investigations on highly radioactive samples and the handling of large quantities of radioisotopes include the possibility of incidents. The analysis of such incidents shows that the legal safety requirements are satisfied. The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) requirements concerning the protection of personnel, population and environment, as well as the protection against fire, are fulfilled. In the Hot Lab the principle of barriers for the containment of radioactive materials is applied. Open radioactive sources are manipulated in depressurized cells. The air extracted from the cells is filtered before being released to the environment. In the building, the total amount of radioactive materials is limited in order to reduce the exposition of the population in normal operation as well as in case of incidents, and to avoid criticality accidents. Possible weaknesses in this concept can be shown

  12. Waste Processing Cost Recovery at Los Alamos National Laboratory-Analysis and Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, St. R.

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is implementing full cost recovery for waste processing in fiscal year 2009 (FY2009), after a transition year in FY2008. Waste processing cost recovery has been implemented in various forms across the nuclear weapons complex and in corporate America. The fundamental reasoning of sending accurate price signals to waste generators is economically sound, and leads to waste minimization and reduced waste expense over time. However, Los Alamos faces significant implementation challenges because of its status as a government-owned, contractor-operated national scientific institution with a diverse suite of experimental and environmental cleanup activities, and the fact that this represents a fundamental change in how waste processing is viewed by the institution. This paper describes the issues involved during the transition to cost recovery and the ultimate selection of the business model. Of the six alternative cost recovery models evaluated, the business model chosen to be implemented in FY2009 is Recharge Plus Generators Pay Distributed Direct. Under this model, all generators who produce waste must pay a distributed direct share associated with their specific waste type to use a waste processing capability. This cost share is calculated using the distributed direct method on the fixed cost only, i.e., the fixed cost share is based on each program's forecast proportion of the total Los Alamos volume forecast of each waste type. (Fixed activities are those required to establish the waste processing capability, i.e., to make the process ready, permitted, certified, and prepared to handle the first unit of waste. Therefore, the fixed cost ends at the point just before waste begins to be processed. The activities to actually process the waste are considered variable.) The volume of waste actually sent for processing is charged a unit cost based solely on the variable cost of disposing of that waste. The total cost recovered each year is the

  13. Use of soft hydrothermal processing to improve and recycle bedding for laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, T; Li, Z; Kibushi, T; Yamasaki, N; Kasai, N

    2008-10-01

    Cage bedding for laboratory rodents can influence animal wellbeing and thus the experimental data. In addition, a large amount of used bedding containing excrement is discharged as medical waste from life science institutes and breeding companies. We developed a ground-breaking system to improve fresh bedding and recycle used bedding by applying a soft hydrothermal process with high-temperature and high-pressure dry steam. The system removes both harmful organic components and aromatic hydrocarbons that can affect animals' metabolism. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the chemical and physical properties of the improved fresh bedding and the recycled used bedding treated by the system. The results showed that 68-99% of the predominant aromatic hydrocarbons were removed from fresh bedding treated at 0.35 MPa and 140 degrees C for 120 min ('improved bedding'). In addition, 59.4-99.0% of predominant harmful organic compounds derived from excrement were removed from used bedding treated at 0.45 MPa and 150 degrees C for 60 min ('recycled bedding'). The soft hydrothermal treatment increased the number of acidic functional groups on the bedding surface and gave it the high adsorptive efficiency of ammonia gas. Harmful substances such as microorganisms, heavy metals and pesticides decreased below the detection limit. The results clearly showed that the improved and recycled bedding is safer for laboratory rodents and has the potential to ameliorate conditions in primary and secondary enclosures (e.g. cages and animal rooms) used for maintaining laboratory animals. This process may be one of the most advanced techniques in providing an alternative to softwood and other bedding, economizing through the recycling of used bedding and reducing bedding waste from animal facilities.

  14. Emission characteristics of PBDEs during flame-retardant plastics extruding process: field investigation and laboratorial simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chao; Li, Ying; Li, Jinhui; Chen, Yuan; Li, Huafen

    2017-10-01

    Though mechanical recycling of WEEE plastics is supposed to be a promising method, PBDEs release and the resulting contamination during its processing remain unclear yet. The distribution of PBDEs pollution in production lines was investigated from two flame-retardant plastic modification plants in Southern China. This was followed by laboratory simulation experiments to characterize the emission processes. PBDEs concentrations ranged from 37 to 31,305 ng/L in cooling water and from 40,043 to 216,653 ng/g dry wt in solid samples taken during the field investigation. In the laboratory simulation, concentrations ranged from 146 to 433 ng/L in cooling water and from 411,436 to 747,516 ng/Nm 3 in flue gas. All samples were dominated by BDE-209 among the congeners. Temperatures and impurities in plastic substrate can significantly affect PBDEs release. Special attention should be paid to the risks of water directly discharge from the cooling system, especially for the biological sludge and sediments, as well as flue gas emissions to the environment.

  15. Technology roadmap for development of SiC sensors at plasma processes laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Amorim Fraga

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Recognizing the need to consolidate the research and development (R&D activities in microelectronics fields in a strategic manner, the Plasma Processes Laboratory of the Technological Institute of Aeronautics (LPP-ITA has established a technology roadmap to serve as a guide for activities related to development of sensors based on silicon carbide (SiC thin films. These sensors have also potential interest to the aerospace field due to their ability to operate in harsh environment such as high temperatures and intense radiation. In the present paper, this roadmap is described and presented in four main sections: i introduction, ii what we have already done in the past, iii what we are doing in this moment, and iv our targets up to 2015. The critical technological issues were evaluated for different categories: SiC deposition techniques, SiC processing techniques for sensors fabrication and sensors characterization. This roadmap also presents a shared vision of how R&D activities in microelectronics should develop over the next five years in our laboratory.

  16. Incinerator development program for processing transuranic waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedahl, T.G.

    1982-01-01

    In the fall of 1981, two short-term tests were conducted on a controlled air and a rotary kiln incinerator to assess their potential for processing transuranic (TRU) contaminated waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The primary purpose of the test program was a proof-of-principle verification that the incinerators could achieve near-complete combustion of the combustible portion of the waste, while mixed with high percentages of noncombustible and metal waste materials. Other important test objectives were to obtain system design information including off-gas and end-product characteristics and incinerator operating parameters. Approximately 7200 kg of simulated (non-TRU) waste from the INEL were processed during the two tests

  17. Remedial investigation of the High-Explosives (HE) Process Area, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crow, N.B.; Lamarre, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents the results of a Remedial Investigation (RI) to define the extent of high explosives (HE) compounds and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in the soil, rocks, and ground water of the HE Process Area of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300 Facility. The report evaluates potential public health environmental risks associated with these compounds. Hydrogeologic information available before February 15, 1990, is included; however, chemical analyses and water-level data are reported through March 1990. This report is intended to assist the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB)--Central Valley Region and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in evaluating the extent of environmental contamination of the LLNL HE Process Area and ultimately in designing remedial actions. 90 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Launching a Laboratory Testing Process Quality Improvement Toolkit: From the Shared Networks of Colorado Ambulatory Practices and Partners (SNOCAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, Douglas; Hamer, Mika; James, Kathy; Tutt, Brandon; West, David

    2015-01-01

    Family medicine and internal medicine physicians order diagnostic laboratory tests for nearly one-third of patient encounters in an average week, yet among medical errors in primary care, an estimated 15% to 54% are attributed to laboratory testing processes. From a practice improvement perspective, we (1) describe the need for laboratory testing process quality improvements from the perspective of primary care practices, and (2) describe the approaches and resources needed to implement laboratory testing process quality improvements in practice. We applied practice observations, process mapping, and interviews with primary care practices in the Shared Networks of Colorado Ambulatory Practices and Partners (SNOCAP)-affiliated practice-based research networks that field-tested in 2013 a laboratory testing process improvement toolkit. From the data collected in each of the 22 participating practices, common testing quality issues included, but were not limited to, 3 main testing process steps: laboratory test preparation, test tracking, and patient notification. Three overarching qualitative themes emerged: practices readily acknowledge multiple laboratory testing process problems; practices know that they need help addressing the issues; and practices face challenges with finding patient-centered solutions compatible with practice priorities and available resources. While practices were able to get started with guidance and a toolkit to improve laboratory testing processes, most did not seem able to achieve their quality improvement aims unassisted. Providing specific guidance tools with practice facilitation or other rapid-cycle quality improvement support may be an effective approach to improve common laboratory testing issues in primary care. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  19. Detection of pyridaben residue levels in hot pepper fruit and leaves by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: effect of household processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Woo; Abd El-Aty, A M; Rahman, Md Musfiqur; Choi, Jeong-Heui; Choi, Ok-Ja; Rhee, Gyu-Seek; Chang, Moon-Ik; Kim, Heejung; Abid, Morad D N; Shin, Sung Chul; Shim, Jae-Han

    2015-07-01

    Following quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe (QuEChERS) and LC/MS/MS analysis, pyridaben residual levels were determined in unprocessed and processed hot pepper fruit and leaves. The linearities were satisfactory with determination coefficients (R(2)) in excess of 0.995 in processed and unprocessed pepper fruit and leaves. Recoveries at various concentrations were 79.9-105.1% with relative standard deviations ≤15%. The limits of quantitation of 0.003-0.012 mg/kg were very low compared with the maximum residue limits (2-5 mg/kg) set by the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, Republic of Korea. The effects of various household processes, including washing, blanching, frying and drying under different conditions (water volume, blanching time and temperature) on residual concentrations were evaluated. Both washing and blanching (in combination with high water volume and time factor) significantly reduced residue levels in hot pepper fruit and leaves compared with other processes. In sum, the developed method was satisfactory and could be used to accurately detect residues in unprocessed and processed pepper fruit and leaves. It is recommended that pepper fruit/leaves be blanched after washing before being consumed to protect consumers from the negative health effects of detected pesticide residues. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Microstructure development and mechanical properties of quenching and partitioning (Q and P) steel and an incorporation of hot-dipping galvanization during Q and P process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jing; Yu, Hao, E-mail: yhzhmr@126.com

    2013-12-01

    The “quenching and partitioning” (Q and P) process has recently been substantiated to be a unique technological route for the production of high strength steels with significant amounts of retained austenite, and thus to provide better combination of strength and ductility. In this work, intercritically annealed specimens followed by Q and P treatment have been applied to low-carbon steel with chemical composition typical for conventional TRIP-assisted steels. Microstructure of the steel treated by the Q and P process was characterized by means of optical microscope, SEM, TEM and XRD. The study suggests that microstructure is mainly composed of ferrite, lath martensite, martensite–austenite islands, retained austenite and a small amount of bainite formed during partitioning. The fraction of bainite formed during partitioning is proportional to quenching temperature. The mechanical property of specimen treated by the Q and P process exhibits an improved combination of strength and ductility than that of the Q and T process. Two schemes of hot-dipping galvanization processes were designed. The results indicate that both hot-dip galvanizing schemes present a limited reduction in tensile strength and a slight enhancement of ductility. The scheme of galvanizing and partitioning after the quenching progress shows a better combination of strength and ductility.

  1. Laboratory Exercise: Study of Digestive and Regulatory Processes through the Exploration of Fasted and Postprandial Blood Glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Mari K.; Maurer, Luke W.

    2013-01-01

    Digestive physiology laboratory exercises often explore the regulation of enzyme action rather than systems physiology. This laboratory exercise provides a systems approach to digestive and regulatory processes through the exploration of postprandial blood glucose levels. In the present exercise, students enrolled in an undergraduate animal…

  2. Electrical processes for the treatment of medium active liquid wastes: a laboratory-scale evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, A.D.; Bowen, W.R.; Bridger, N.J.; Harrison, K.T.

    1983-10-01

    A wide range of electrochemical separation processes has been evaluated through literature and experimental studies for potential application to the treatment of medium-active liquid wastes. Of the ten processes considered, electro-osmosis and electrochemical ion-exchange show the most promise for immediate further development to a larger scale, while the faradaic deposition of PuO 2 , Tc, RuO 2 require further laboratory study before judgement can be passed on these. Electro-osmosis has an exceptionally high solids retention (99.99%) and is capable of dewatering suspensions to 35% - suitable for direct incorporation in concrete. Electrochemical ion-exchange has the attractions of a conventional ion-exchange process but with the added features of enhanced kinetics and pH operating range, as well as elution into demineralized water merely by polarity reversal. All electrical processes have the advantage of the added process variable of externally applied potential, which can enable remote, automatic control. (author)

  3. Electrical processes for the treatment of medium-active liquid wastes: a laboratory-scale evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, A.D.; Bowen, W.R.; Bridger, N.J.; Harrison, K.T.

    1984-01-01

    A wide range of electrochemical separation processes have been evaluated through the literature and experimental studies for potential application to the treatment of medium-active liquid wastes. Of the 10 processes considered, electro-osmosis and electrochemical ion-exchange show the most promise for immediate further development to a larger scale, while the faradic deposition of PuO 2 , Tc, RuO 2 require further laboratory study before judgment can be passed on these. Electro-osmosis has an exceptionally high solids retention (99.99%) and is capable of dewatering suspensions to 35% - suitable for direct incorporation in concrete. Electrochemical ion-exchange has the attractions of a conventional ion-exchange process but with the added features of enhanced kinetics and pH operating range, as well as elution into demineralized water merely by polarity reversal. All electrical processes have the advantage of the added process variable of externally applied potential, which can enable remote, automatic control

  4. Determination of the heating temperature of potholes surface on road pavement in the process of repairs using hot asphalt concrete mixes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giyasov Botir Iminzhonovich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the process of roads construction the necessary transport and operational characteristics should be achieved, which depend on the quality of the applied, material and technologies. Under the loads of transport means and the influence of weather conditions on the road pavement deformations and destructions occur, which lead to worsening of transport and operational characteristics, decrease of operational life of the road and they are often the reason of road accidents. According to the data of the Strategic Research Center of "Rosgosstrah" more than 20 % of road accidents in Russia occur due to bad quality of road pavement. One of the main directions in traffic security control and prolongation of operational life for road pavement of non-rigid type is road works, as a result of which defects of pavement are eliminated and in case of timely repairs of high quality the operational life of the road increases for several years. The most widely used material for non-rigid pavement repairs is hot road concrete mixes and in case of adherence to specifications they provide high quality of works. The authors investigate the problems of hot asphalt concrete mixes for repairs of road surfaces of non-rigid type. The results of the study hot asphalt concrete mix’s temperature regimes are offered in case of repair works considering the temperature delivered to the work site and the ambient temperature depending on the type of mix and class of bitumen.

  5. The production of grain oriented lanthanum titanate (La2Ti2O7) ceramics by uniaxial hot-forging process for improved fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceylan, Ali

    2008-01-01

    The layered-structural ceramics, such as lanthanum titanate (La 2 Ti 2 O 7 ), have been known for their good electrical and optical properties at high frequencies and temperatures. However, few studies have been conducted on the mechanical properties of these ceramics. The interest in ceramic hot-forging (HF) has been greatly increased recently due to the enhancement in fracture toughness via bridging effect of oriented grains. In this study, grain oriented lanthanum titanate was produced by the hot-forging process. The characterizations of the samples were achieved by density measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Vickers indentation and three-point bending test. According to X-ray diffraction patterns, the orientation factor (f) was found to be 0.73 for certain hot-forging conditions resulting an improved fracture toughness. The improved fracture toughness of La 2 Ti 2 O 7 (3.2 MPa m 1/2 ) reached to the value of monolithic alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) between 3 and 4 MPa m 1/2

  6. Water detritiation processing of JET purified waste water using the TRENTA facility at Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michling, R., E-mail: robert.michling@kit.edu; Bekris, N.; Cristescu, I.; Lohr, N.; Plusczyk, C.; Welte, S.; Wendel, J.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Operation of a water detritiation facility under optimized conditions for high detritiation performances. • Improvement of operational procedures to process tritiated waste water. • Handling and reduction of tritiated waste water to achieve enriched low volume tritiated water for sufficient storage. • Demonstration of the efficient availability of the TRENTA WDS facility for technical scale operation. -- Abstract: A Water Detritiation System (WDS) is required for any Fusion machine in order to process tritiated waste water, which is accumulated in various subsystems during operation and maintenance. Regarding the European procurement packages for the ITER tritium fuel cycle, the WDS test facility TRENTA applying the Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE) process was developed, installed and is currently in operation at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK). Besides the on-going R and D work for the design of ITER WDS, the current status of the TRENTA facility provides the option to utilize the WDS for processing tritiated water. Therefore, in the framework of the EFDA JET Fusion Technology Work Programme 2011, the TLK was able to offer the capability on a representative scale to process tritiated water, which was produced during normal operation at JET. The task should demonstrate the availability of the CECE process to handle and detritiate the water in terms of tritium enrichment and volume reduction. The operational program comprised the processing of purified tritiated water from JET, with a total volume of 180 l and an activity of 74 GBq. The paper will give an introduction to the TRENTA WDS facility and an overview of the operational procedure regarding tritiated water reduction. Data concerning required operation time, decontamination and enrichment performances and different operating procedures will be presented as well. Finally, a preliminary study on a technical implementation of processing the entire stock of JET

  7. Simulation Based Low-Cost Composite Process Development at the US Air Force Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Brian P.; Lee, C. William; Curliss, David B.

    2003-01-01

    Low-cost composite research in the US Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Organic Matrix Composites Branch has focused on the theme of affordable performance. Practically, this means that we use a very broad view when considering the affordability of composites. Factors such as material costs, labor costs, recurring and nonrecurring manufacturing costs are balanced against performance to arrive at the relative affordability vs. performance measure of merit. The research efforts discussed here are two projects focused on affordable processing of composites. The first topic is the use of a neural network scheme to model cure reaction kinetics, then utilize the kinetics coupled with simple heat transport models to predict, in real-time, future exotherms and control them. The neural network scheme is demonstrated to be very robust and a much more efficient method that mechanistic cure modeling approach. This enables very practical low-cost processing of thick composite parts. The second project is liquid composite molding (LCM) process simulation. LCM processing of large 3D integrated composite parts has been demonstrated to be a very cost effective way to produce large integrated aerospace components specific examples of LCM processes are resin transfer molding (RTM), vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM), and other similar approaches. LCM process simulation is a critical part of developing an LCM process approach. Flow simulation enables the development of the most robust approach to introducing resin into complex preforms. Furthermore, LCM simulation can be used in conjunction with flow front sensors to control the LCM process in real-time to account for preform or resin variability.

  8. Water detritiation processing of JET purified waste water using the TRENTA facility at Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michling, R.; Bekris, N.; Cristescu, I.; Lohr, N.; Plusczyk, C.; Welte, S.; Wendel, J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Operation of a water detritiation facility under optimized conditions for high detritiation performances. • Improvement of operational procedures to process tritiated waste water. • Handling and reduction of tritiated waste water to achieve enriched low volume tritiated water for sufficient storage. • Demonstration of the efficient availability of the TRENTA WDS facility for technical scale operation. -- Abstract: A Water Detritiation System (WDS) is required for any Fusion machine in order to process tritiated waste water, which is accumulated in various subsystems during operation and maintenance. Regarding the European procurement packages for the ITER tritium fuel cycle, the WDS test facility TRENTA applying the Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE) process was developed, installed and is currently in operation at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK). Besides the on-going R and D work for the design of ITER WDS, the current status of the TRENTA facility provides the option to utilize the WDS for processing tritiated water. Therefore, in the framework of the EFDA JET Fusion Technology Work Programme 2011, the TLK was able to offer the capability on a representative scale to process tritiated water, which was produced during normal operation at JET. The task should demonstrate the availability of the CECE process to handle and detritiate the water in terms of tritium enrichment and volume reduction. The operational program comprised the processing of purified tritiated water from JET, with a total volume of 180 l and an activity of 74 GBq. The paper will give an introduction to the TRENTA WDS facility and an overview of the operational procedure regarding tritiated water reduction. Data concerning required operation time, decontamination and enrichment performances and different operating procedures will be presented as well. Finally, a preliminary study on a technical implementation of processing the entire stock of JET

  9. Recycling of Zn-containing Fe-bearing steelmaking waste by the reducing smelting process in pig iron. I. Laboratory tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendera Ján

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Results of the laboratory test treatment of the zinc containing steelwork dusts in a hot liquid pig iron are described. These results show that it is necessary to use an external reductant. The zinc content of the dust emission is ca. 20 %. The charge of the steel-works dusts diminished the Si and Mn content of pig iron.

  10. Results of work in the hot cells of Laboratory Testing Materials Irradiated Areva of Carina project for the expansion of the database of mechanical characteristics of fractures in materials of RPV German irradiated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelmes, J.; Schabel, H.; Hein, H.; Kein, E.; Eiselt, C.

    2013-01-01

    In the frame of the already completed research projects CARINA and its predecessor CARISMA a data base was created for pre-irradiated original RPV steels of German PWRs which allowed to examine the consequences if the Master Curve (T 0 ) approach instead of the RT N OT concept is applied to the RPV safety assessment. Furthermore in CARINA different irradiation conditions with respect to the accumulated neutron fluences and specific impact parameters were investigated. Besides a brief introduction of the CARINA project and an overview of the main results an overview on the requirements of the hot laboratory work in terms of specimen manufacturing and material testing is given and examples for realization are shown. (Author)

  11. Stellar Laboratories: New GeV and Ge VI Oscillator Strengths and their Validation in the Hot White Dwarf RE0503-289

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Biemont, E.; Quinet, P.; Kruk, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    State-of-the-art spectral analysis of hot stars by means of non-LTE model-atmosphere techniques has arrived at a high level of sophistication. The analysis of high-resolution and high-S/N spectra, however, is strongly restricted by the lack of reliable atomic data for highly ionized species from intermediate-mass metals to trans-iron elements. Especially data for the latter has only been sparsely calculated. Many of their lines are identified in spectra of extremely hot, hydrogen-deficient post-AGB stars. A reliable determination of their abundances establishes crucial constraints for AGB nucleosynthesis simulations and, thus, for stellar evolutionary theory. Aims. In a previous analysis of the UV spectrum of RE 0503-289, spectral lines of highly ionized Ga, Ge, As, Se, Kr, Mo, Sn, Te, I, and Xe were identified. Individual abundance determinations are hampered by the lack of reliable oscillator strengths. Most of these identified lines stem from Ge V. In addition, we identified Ge VI lines for the first time. We calculated Ge V and Ge VI oscillator strengths in order to reproduce the observed spectrum. Methods. We newly calculated Ge V and Ge VI oscillator strengths to consider their radiative and collisional bound-bound transitions in detail in our non-LTE stellar-atmosphere models for the analysis of the Ge IV-VI spectrum exhibited in high-resolution and high-S/N FUV (FUSE) and UV (ORFEUS/BEFS, IUE) observations of RE 0503-289. Results. In the UV spectrum of RE 0503-289, we identify four Ge IV, 37 Ge V, and seven Ge VI lines. Most of these lines are identified for the first time in any star. We can reproduce almost all Ge IV, GeV, and Ge VI lines in the observed spectrum of RE 0503-289 (T(sub eff) = 70 kK, log g = 7.5) at log Ge = -3.8 +/- 0.3 (mass fraction, about 650 times solar). The Ge IV/V/VI ionization equilibrium, that is a very sensitive T(sub eff) indicator, is reproduced well. Conclusions. Reliable measurements and calculations of atomic data are a

  12. Microstructural and mechanical characteristics of W–2Ti and W–1TiC processed by hot isostatic pressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz, A., E-mail: angel.munoz@uc3m.es [Departamento de Física, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. de la Universidad, 30, E28911 Leganés (Spain); Savoini, B. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. de la Universidad, 30, E28911 Leganés (Spain); Tejado, E. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, E.T.S. I. de Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, E28040 Madrid (Spain); Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas (C.S.I.C), Av. Gregorio del Amo, 8, E2840 Madrid (Spain); Monge, M.A. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. de la Universidad, 30, E28911 Leganés (Spain); Pastor, J.Y. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, E.T.S. I. de Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, E28040 Madrid (Spain); Pareja, R. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. de la Universidad, 30, E28911 Leganés (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    W–2Ti and W–1TiC alloys were produced by mechanical alloying and consolidation by hot isostatic pressing. The composition and microstructural characteristics of these alloys were studied by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersion spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical behavior of the consolidated alloys was characterized by microhardness measurements and three point bending tests. The mechanical characteristics of the W–2Ti alloy appear to be related to solution hardening. In W–1TiC, the residual porosity should be responsible for the poor behavior observed in comparison with W–2Ti.

  13. Microstructural and mechanical characteristics of W–2Ti and W–1TiC processed by hot isostatic pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muñoz, A.; Savoini, B.; Tejado, E.; Monge, M.A.; Pastor, J.Y.; Pareja, R.

    2014-01-01

    W–2Ti and W–1TiC alloys were produced by mechanical alloying and consolidation by hot isostatic pressing. The composition and microstructural characteristics of these alloys were studied by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersion spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical behavior of the consolidated alloys was characterized by microhardness measurements and three point bending tests. The mechanical characteristics of the W–2Ti alloy appear to be related to solution hardening. In W–1TiC, the residual porosity should be responsible for the poor behavior observed in comparison with W–2Ti

  14. LABORATORY PROCESS CONTROLLER USING NATURAL LANGUAGE COMMANDS FROM A PERSONAL COMPUTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, H.

    1994-01-01

    The complex environment of the typical research laboratory requires flexible process control. This program provides natural language process control from an IBM PC or compatible machine. Sometimes process control schedules require changes frequently, even several times per day. These changes may include adding, deleting, and rearranging steps in a process. This program sets up a process control system that can either run without an operator, or be run by workers with limited programming skills. The software system includes three programs. Two of the programs, written in FORTRAN77, record data and control research processes. The third program, written in Pascal, generates the FORTRAN subroutines used by the other two programs to identify the user commands with the user-written device drivers. The software system also includes an input data set which allows the user to define the user commands which are to be executed by the computer. To set the system up the operator writes device driver routines for all of the controlled devices. Once set up, this system requires only an input file containing natural language command lines which tell the system what to do and when to do it. The operator can make up custom commands for operating and taking data from external research equipment at any time of the day or night without the operator in attendance. This process control system requires a personal computer operating under MS-DOS with suitable hardware interfaces to all controlled devices. The program requires a FORTRAN77 compiler and user-written device drivers. This program was developed in 1989 and has a memory requirement of about 62 Kbytes.

  15. Practical utilization of modeling and simulation in laboratory process waste assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyttle, T.W.; Smith, D.M.; Weinrach, J.B.; Burns, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), facility waste streams tend to be small but highly diverse. Initial characterization of such waste streams is difficult in part due to a lack of tools to assist the waste generators in completing such assessments. A methodology has been developed at LANL to allow process knowledgeable field personnel to develop baseline waste generation assessments and to evaluate potential waste minimization technology. This process waste assessment (PWA) system is an application constructed within the process modeling system. The Process Modeling System (PMS) is an object-oriented, mass balance-based, discrete-event simulation using the common LISP object system (CLOS). Analytical capabilities supported within the PWA system include: complete mass balance specifications, historical characterization of selected waste streams and generation of facility profiles for materials consumption, resource utilization and worker exposure. Anticipated development activities include provisions for a best available technologies (BAT) database and integration with the LANL facilities management Geographic Information System (GIS). The environments used to develop these assessment tools will be discussed in addition to a review of initial implementation results

  16. Laboratory Tests on Post-Filtration Precipitation in the WTP Pretreatment Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Crum, Jarrod V.

    2009-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, 'Undemonstrated Leaching Processes,' of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes et al. 2006). The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. A simplified flow diagram of the PEP system is shown in Figure 1.1. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP; and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF).

  17. Effects of process parameters on solid self-microemulsifying particles in a laboratory scale fluid bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Tusharmouli; Plakogiannis, Fotios M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to select the critical process parameters of the fluid bed processes impacting the quality attribute of a solid self-microemulsifying (SME) system of albendazole (ABZ). A fractional factorial design (2(4-1)) with four parameters (spray rate, inlet air temperature, inlet air flow, and atomization air pressure) was created by MINITAB software. Batches were manufactured in a laboratory top-spray fluid bed at 625-g scale. Loss on drying (LOD) samples were taken throughout each batch to build the entire moisture profiles. All dried granulation were sieved using mesh 20 and analyzed for particle size distribution (PSD), morphology, density, and flow. It was found that as spray rate increased, sauter-mean diameter (D(s)) also increased. The effect of inlet air temperature on the peak moisture which is directly related to the mean particle size was found to be significant. There were two-way interactions between studied process parameters. The main effects of inlet air flow rate and atomization air pressure could not be found as the data were inconclusive. The partial least square (PLS) regression model was found significant (P SME manufacturing process.

  18. Application of processing maps in the optimization of the parameters of a hot working process. Part 2. Processing maps of a microalloyed medium carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Omar, A.; Cabrera, J.M.; Prado, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Part 1 of this work presents a revision of the general characteristics of the so called dynamic materials model on which processing maps are developed. In this part following the methodology described in part 1, processing maps of a microalloyed medium carbon steel are developed over a temperature range varying from 900 to 1.150 degree centigree at different true strain rates ranging from 10''-4 to 10s''-1. The analysis of these maps revealed a domain of dynamic recrystallization centred at about 1.1.50 degree centigree and strain rate 10 s''-1 and a domain of dynamic recovery centred at 900 degree centigree and 0,1 s''-1. (Author) 20 refs

  19. Automated Radioanalytical Chemistry: Applications For The Laboratory And Industrial Process Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, Matthew J.; Farawila, Anne F.; Grate, Jay W.

    2009-01-01

    The identification and quantification of targeted α- and β-emitting radionuclides via destructive analysis in complex radioactive liquid matrices is highly challenging. Analyses are typically accomplished at on- or off-site laboratories through laborious sample preparation steps and extensive chemical separations followed by analysis using a variety of detection methodologies (e.g., liquid scintillation, alpha energy spectroscopy, mass spectrometry). Analytical results may take days or weeks to report. When an industrial-scale plant requires periodic or continuous monitoring of radionuclides as an indication of the composition of its feed stream, diversion of safeguarded nuclides, or of plant operational conditions (for example), radiochemical measurements should be rapid, but not at the expense of precision and accuracy. Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed and characterized a host of automated radioanalytical systems designed to perform reproducible and rapid radioanalytical processes. Platforms have been assembled for (1) automation and acceleration of sample analysis in the laboratory and (2) automated monitors for monitoring industrial scale nuclear processes on-line with near-real time results. These methods have been applied to the analysis of environmental-level actinides and fission products to high-level nuclear process fluids. Systems have been designed to integrate a number of discrete sample handling steps, including sample pretreatment (e.g., digestion and valence state adjustment) and chemical separations. The systems have either utilized on-line analyte detection or have collected the purified analyte fractions for off-line measurement applications. One PNNL system of particular note is a fully automated prototype on-line radioanalytical system designed for the Waste Treatment Plant at Hanford, WA, USA. This system demonstrated nearly continuous destructive analysis of the soft β-emitting radionuclide 99Tc in nuclear

  20. Synthesis and decay process of superheavy nuclei with Z=119-122 via hot-fusion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghahramany, N.; Ansari, A. [Shiraz University, Department of Physics and Biruni Observatory, College of Science, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    In this research article attempts have been made to calculate the superheavy-nuclei synthesis characteristics including, the potential energy parameters, fusion probability, fusion and evaporation residue (ER) cross sections as well as, decay properties of compound nucleus and the residue nuclei formation probability for elements with Z=119-122 by using the hot-fusion reactions. It is concluded that, although a selection of double magic projectiles such as {sup 48}Ca with high binding energy, simplifies the calculations significantly due to spherical symmetric shape of the projectile, resulting in high evaporation residue cross section, unfortunately, nuclei with Z > 98 do not exist in quantities sufficient for constructing targets for the hot-fusion reactions. Therefore, practically our selection is fusion reactions with titanium projectile because the mass production of target nuclei for experimental purposes is more feasible. Based upon our findings, it is necessary, for new superheavy-nuclei production with Z > 119, to use neutron-rich projectiles and target nuclei. Finally, the maximal evaporation residue cross sections for the synthesis of superheavy elements with Z=119-122 have been calculated and compared with the previously founded ones in the literature. (orig.)

  1. Cost analysis and cost justification of automated data processing in the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlake, G E

    1983-03-01

    Prospective cost analysis of alternative data processing systems can be facilitated by proper selection of the costs to be analyzed and realistic appraisal of the effect on staffing. When comparing projects with dissimilar cash flows, techniques such as analysis of net present value can be helpful in identifying financial benefits. Confidence and accuracy in prospective analyses will increase as more retrospective studies are published. Several accounts now in the literature describe long-term experience with turnkey laboratory information systems. Acknowledging the difficulty in longitudinal studies, they all report favorable effects on labor costs and recovery of lost charges. Enthusiasm is also expressed for the many intangible benefits of the systems. Several trends suggest that cost justification and cost effectiveness will be more easily demonstrated in the future. These are the rapidly decreasing cost of hardware (with corresponding reduction in service costs) and the entry into the market of additional systems designed for medium to small hospitals. The effect of broadening the sales base may be lower software prices. Finally, operational and executive data management and reporting are destined to become the premier extensions of the LIS for cost justification. Aptly applied, these facilities can promote understanding of costs, control of costs, and greater efficiency in providing laboratory services.

  2. Microstructure and textural characterization of hot extruded Zr-2.5Nb alloy PHWR pressure tube fabricated by various ingot processing route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaibhaw, Kumar; Jha, S.K.; Saibaba, N.; Neogy, S.; Mani Krishna, K.V.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G.K.

    2011-01-01

    Zr-2.5 Nb alloys finds its applications as a pressure tube component in pressure tube type thermal reactors such as PHWRs and RBMK due to properties attributed such as low neutron absorption cross section, high temperature strength and corrosion resistance etc. Manufacturing of this life time components involves series of thermo-mechanical processes of hot working and cold working with intermediate annealing. The life time of Pressure tube are limited due to their diametral creep properties which is governed by metallurgical characteristics such as texture, microstructure dislocation density etc. The primary breakdown of cast structure in Vacuum Arc Melted ingot can be effected by either hot extrusion or forging in single or multiple stages before final hot extrusion step into the blank for manufacturing of seamless pressure tube. Elevated temperature deformation carried out in hot working above the recrystallization temperature would enable impositions of large strains in single step. This deformation causes a significant change in the microstructure of the material and depends on process parameters such as extrusion ratio, temperature and strain rate. Basic microstructure developed at this deformation stage has significant bearing on the final properties of the material fabricated with subsequent cold working steps. The major texture in α+β Zr-2.5 Nb alloy is established during final extrusion to blank which does not change significantly during subsequent cold pilgering. However, microstructure is modified significantly in subsequent cold working which can be effected by cold pilgering or cold drawing in single or multiple steps. Present paper brings out the various ingot processing routes using forging and or extrusion followed for fabrication of pressure tubes. The development of texture and microstructures has been discussed at the blank stage from these processing routes and also with respect to varying extrusion variable such as extrusion ratio

  3. Contact pressure distribution during the polishing process of ceramic tiles: A laboratory investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sani, A S A; Hamedon, Z; Azhari, A; Sousa, F J P

    2016-01-01

    During the polishing process of porcelain tiles the difference in scratching speed between innermost and peripheral abrasives leads to pressure gradients linearly distributed along the radial direction of the abrasive tool. The aim of this paper is to investigate such pressure gradient in laboratory scale. For this purpose polishing tests were performed on ceramic tiles according to the industrial practices using a custom-made CNC tribometer. Gradual wear on both abrasives and machined surface of the floor tile were measured. The experimental results suggested that the pressure gradient tends to cause an inclination of the abraded surfaces, which becomes stable after a given polishing period. In addition to the wear depth of the machined surface, the highest value of gloss and finest surface finish were observed at the lowest point of the worn out surface of the ceramic floor tile corresponding to the point of highest pressure and lowest scratching speed. (paper)

  4. The AMES Laboratory chemical disposal site removal action: Source removal, processing, and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirley, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    The Ames Laboratory has historically supported the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) and its predecessor agencies by providing research into the purification and manufacturing of high purity uranium, thorium, and yttrium metals. Much of this work was accomplished in the late 1950s and early 1960s prior to the legislation of strict rules and regulations covering the disposal of radioactive and chemical wastes. As a result, approximately 800 cubic meters of low-level radioactive wastes, chemical wastes, and contaminated debris were disposed in nine near surface cells located in a 0.75 hectare plot of land owned by Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa. Under a national contract with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), OHM Remediation Services Corp (OHM) was tasked with providing turnkey environmental services to remove, process, package, transport, and coordinate the disposal of the waste materials and contaminated environmental media

  5. Development of laboratory and process sensors to monitor particle size distribution of industrial slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendse, H.P.

    1992-10-01

    In this paper we present a novel measurement technique for monitoring particle size distributions of industrial colloidal slurries based on ultrasonic spectroscopy and mathematical deconvolution. An on-line sensor prototype has been developed and tested extensively in laboratory and production settings using mineral pigment slurries. Evaluation to date shows that the sensor is capable of providing particle size distributions, without any assumptions regarding their functional form, over diameters ranging from 0.1 to 100 micrometers in slurries with particle concentrations of 10 to 50 volume percents. The newly developed on-line sensor allows one to obtain particle size distributions of commonly encountered inorganic pigment slurries under industrial processing conditions without dilution.

  6. The Ames Laboratory Chemical Disposal Site removal action: Source removal, processing, and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirley, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Ames Laboratory has historically supported the US Department of Energy (USDOE) and its predecessor agencies by providing research into the purification and manufacturing of high purity uranium, thorium, and yttrium metals. Much of this work was accomplished in the late 1950s and early 1960s prior to the legislation of strict rules and regulations covering the disposal of radioactive and chemical wastes. As a result, approximately 800 cubic meters of low-level radioactive wastes, mixed wastes, and contaminated debris were disposed in nine near surface cells located in a 0.75 hectare plot of land owned by Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa. Under a national contract with the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), OHM Remediation Services Corp. (OHM) was tasked with providing turnkey environmental services to remove, process, package, transport, and coordinate the disposal of the waste materials and contaminated environmental media

  7. Laboratory modelling of the transfer processes between the ocean and atmosphere in the boundary layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergeev Daniil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The processes of momentum and heat transfer between ocean and atmosphere in the boundary layer were investigated within laboratory modeling for a wide range of wind speed and surface wave including hurricane conditions. Experiments were carried out on the Wind-Wave Flume of the Large Thermostratified Tank of IAP RAS. A special net located under the surface at different depths allows to vary parameters of surface waves independently on wind parameters. Theory of self-similarity of air flow parameters in the flume was used to calculate values aerodynamic and heat transfer coefficients from the measured velocity and temperature profiles by Pito and hotfilm gauges respectively. Simultaneous measurements of surface elevation with system wire allow to obtain spectra and integral parameters of waves. It was demonstrated that in contrast to the drag coefficient, heat transfer coefficient is virtually independent of wind speed and wave parameters to the moment of the beginning of spray generation and then increases rapidly.

  8. Integration of laboratory bioassays into the risk-based corrective action process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, D.; Messina, F.; Clark, J.

    1995-01-01

    Recent data generated by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) and others indicate that residual hydrocarbon may be bound/sequestered in soil such that it is unavailable for microbial degradation, and thus possibly not bioavailable to human/ecological receptors. A reduction in bioavailability would directly equate to reduced exposure and, therefore, potentially less-conservative risk-based cleanup soil goals. Laboratory bioassays which measure bioavailability/toxicity can be cost-effectively integrated into the risk-based corrective action process. However, in order to maximize the cost-effective application of bioassays several site-specific parameters should be addressed up front. This paper discusses (1) the evaluation of parameters impacting the application of bioassays to soils contaminated with metals and/or petroleum hydrocarbons and (2) the cost-effective integration of bioassays into a tiered ASTM type framework for risk-based corrective action

  9. V-SIPAL - A VIRTUAL LABORATORY FOR SATELLITE IMAGE PROCESSING AND ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Buddhiraju

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a virtual laboratory for the Satellite Image Processing and Analysis (v-SIPAL being developed at the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay is described. v-SIPAL comprises a set of experiments that are normally carried out by students learning digital processing and analysis of satellite images using commercial software. Currently, the experiments that are available on the server include Image Viewer, Image Contrast Enhancement, Image Smoothing, Edge Enhancement, Principal Component Transform, Texture Analysis by Co-occurrence Matrix method, Image Indices, Color Coordinate Transforms, Fourier Analysis, Mathematical Morphology, Unsupervised Image Classification, Supervised Image Classification and Accuracy Assessment. The virtual laboratory includes a theory module for each option of every experiment, a description of the procedure to perform each experiment, the menu to choose and perform the experiment, a module on interpretation of results when performed with a given image and pre-specified options, bibliography, links to useful internet resources and user-feedback. The user can upload his/her own images for performing the experiments and can also reuse outputs of one experiment in another experiment where applicable. Some of the other experiments currently under development include georeferencing of images, data fusion, feature evaluation by divergence andJ-M distance, image compression, wavelet image analysis and change detection. Additions to the theory module include self-assessment quizzes, audio-video clips on selected concepts, and a discussion of elements of visual image interpretation. V-SIPAL is at the satge of internal evaluation within IIT Bombay and will soon be open to selected educational institutions in India for evaluation.

  10. Composting clam processing wastes in a laboratory- and pilot-scale in-vessel system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhenhu; Lane, Robert; Wen, Zhiyou

    2009-01-01

    Waste materials from the clam processing industry (offal, shells) have several special characteristics such as a high salinity level, a high nitrogen content, and a low C/N ratio. The traditional disposal of clam waste through landfilling is facing the challenges of limited land available, increasing tipping fees, and strict environmental and regulatory scrutiny. The aim of this work is to investigate the performance of in-vessel composting as an alternative for landfill application of these materials. Experiments were performed in both laboratory-scale (5L) and pilot-scale (120L) reactors, with woodchips as the bulking agent. In the laboratory-scale composting test, the clam waste and woodchips were mixed in ratios from 1:0.5 to 1:3 (w/w, wet weight). The high ratios resulted in a better temperature performance, a higher electrical conductivity, and a higher ash content than the low-ratio composting. The C/N ratio of the composts was in the range of 9:1-18:1. In the pilot-scale composting test, a 1:1 ratio of clam waste to woodchips was used. The temperature profile during the composting process met the US Environmental Protection Agency sanitary requirement. The final cured compost had a C/N ratio of 14.6, with an ash content of 167.0+/-14.1g/kg dry matter. In addition to the major nutrients (carbon, nitrogen, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, sulfur, and sodium), the compost also contained trace amounts of zinc, manganese, copper, and boron, indicating that the material can be used as a good resource for plant nutrients.

  11. HOT 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Sara Stefansen

    HOT er en kvalitativ undersøgelse, der hvert år diskuterer og undersøger en lille udvalgt skare af danskkyndige fagpersoners bud på, hvad de er optagede af på literacyområdet her og nu – altså hvilke emner, de vil vurdere som aktuelle at forholde sig til i deres nuværende praksis.......HOT er en kvalitativ undersøgelse, der hvert år diskuterer og undersøger en lille udvalgt skare af danskkyndige fagpersoners bud på, hvad de er optagede af på literacyområdet her og nu – altså hvilke emner, de vil vurdere som aktuelle at forholde sig til i deres nuværende praksis....

  12. Food and Drug Administration process validation activities to support 99Mo production at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, M.J.; Bourcier, S.C.; Talley, D.G.

    1997-01-01

    Prior to 1989 99 Mo was produced in the US by a single supplier, Cintichem Inc., Tuxedo, NY. Because of problems associated with operating its facility, in 1989 Cintichem elected to decommission the facility rather than incur the costs for repair. The demise of the 99 Mo capability at Cintichem left the US totally reliant upon a single foreign source, Nordion International, located in Ottawa Canada. In 1992 the DOE purchased the Cintichem 99 Mo Production Process and Drug Master File (DMF). In 1994 the DOE funded Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to produce 99 Mo. Although Cintichem produced 99 Mo and 99m Tc generators for many years, there was no requirement for process validation which is now required by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In addition to the validation requirement, the requirements for current Good manufacturing Practices were codified into law. The purpose of this paper is to describe the process validation being conducted at SNL for the qualification of SNL as a supplier of 99 Mo to US pharmaceutical companies

  13. [Internal audit in medical laboratory: what means of control for an effective audit process?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Hejl, Carine; Chianéa, Denis; Dedome, Emmanuel; Sanmartin, Nancy; Bugier, Sarah; Linard, Cyril; Foissaud, Vincent; Vest, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    To prepare the French Accreditation Committee (COFRAC) visit for initial certification of our medical laboratory, our direction evaluated its quality management system (QMS) and all its technical activities. This evaluation was performed owing an internal audit. This audit was outsourced. Auditors had an expertise in audit, a whole knowledge of biological standards and were independent. Several nonconformities were identified at that time, including a lack of control of several steps of the internal audit process. Hence, necessary corrective actions were taken in order to meet the requirements of standards, in particular, the formalization of all stages, from the audit program, to the implementation, review and follow-up of the corrective actions taken, and also the implementation of the resources needed to carry out audits in a pre-established timing. To ensure an optimum control of each step, the main concepts of risk management were applied: process approach, root cause analysis, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA). After a critical analysis of our practices, this methodology allowed us to define our "internal audit" process, then to formalize it and to follow it up, with a whole documentary system.

  14. Hot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merwin, S.E.; Moeller, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensees are required to assess the dose to skin from a hot particle contamination event at a depth of skin of7mg/cm 2 over an area of 1 cm 2 and compare the value to the current dose limit for the skin. Although the resulting number is interesting from a comparative standpoint and can be used to predict local skin reactions, comparison of the number to existing limits based on uniform exposures is inappropriate. Most incidents that can be classified as overexposures based on this interpretation of dose actually have no effect on the health of the worker. As a result, resources are expended to reduce the likelihood that an overexposure event will occur when they could be directed toward eliminating the cause of the problem or enhancing existing programs such as contamination control. Furthermore, from a risk standpoint, this practice is not ALARA because some workers receive whole body doses in order to minimize the occurrence of hot particle skin contaminations. In this paper the authors suggest an alternative approach to controlling hot particle exposures

  15. Processing map and hot working mechanisms in a P/M TiAl alloy composite with in situ carbide and silicide dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K.P.; Prasad, Y.V.R.K.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: Mechanical alloying of Ti and Al with small additions of Si and C was used to synthesize metastable phases, which were incorporated in Ti-Al matrices using powder metallurgy techniques. These metastable phases (or also called as precursors), at higher temperatures, transformed in situ into very fine hard reinforcements that develop coherent interface with the surrounding matrix. Typically, Ti5Si3 and TiC are the end products after the synthesis of composite. In this study, hot working behavior of such composites has been studied using the concepts of processing maps to identify the safe and best processing conditions that should be adopted while forming this composite. Also, kinetic analysis of hot deformation has been performed to identify the dominant deformation mechanism. The results are compared with that of base TiAl matrix. The powder metallurgy route offers the advantage of working the material at much lower temperatures compared to the traditional cast and forge route. - Abstract: A titanium aluminide alloy composite with in situ carbide and silicide dispersions has been synthesized by mixing 90% of matrix with elemental composition of 46Ti-46Al-4Nb-2Cr-2Mn and 10% precursor with composition 55Ti-27Al-12Si-6C prepared by mechanical alloying. The powder mixture was blended for 2 h followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at 1150 deg. C for 4 h under a pressure of 150 MPa. In addition to TiAl alloy matrix, the microstructure of the HIP'ed billet showed a small volume fraction of Nb-rich intermetallic phase along with carbide and silicide dispersions formed in situ during HIP'ing. Cylindrical specimens from the HIP'ed billets were compressed at temperatures and strain rates in the ranges of 800-1050 deg. C and 0.0001-1 s -1 . The flow curves exhibited flow softening leading to a steady-state flow at strain rates lower than 0.01 s -1 while fracture occurred at higher strain rates. The processing map developed on the basis of flow stress at

  16. Strain Localization and Weakening Processes in Viscously Deforming Rocks: Numerical Modeling Based on Laboratory Torsion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehmann, M.; Brune, S.; Nardini, L.; Rybacki, E.; Dresen, G.

    2017-12-01

    Strain localization is an ubiquitous process in earth materials observed over a broad range of scales in space and time. Localized deformation and the formation of shear zones and faults typically involves material softening by various processes, like shear heating and grain size reduction. Numerical modeling enables us to study the complex physical and chemical weakening processes by separating the effect of individual parameters and boundary conditions. Using simple piece-wise linear functions for the parametrization of weakening processes allows studying a system at a chosen (lower) level of complexity (e.g. Cyprych et al., 2016). In this study, we utilize a finite element model to test two weakening laws that reduce the strength of the material depending on either the I) amount of accumulated strain or II) deformational work. Our 2D Cartesian models are benchmarked to single inclusion torsion experiments performed at elevated temperatures of 900 °C and pressures of up to 400 MPa (Rybacki et al., 2014). The experiments were performed on Carrara marble samples containing a weak Solnhofen limestone inclusion at a maximum strain rate of 2.0*10-4 s-1. Our models are designed to reproduce shear deformation of a hollow cylinder equivalent to the laboratory setup, such that material leaving one side of the model in shear direction enters again on the opposite side using periodic boundary conditions. Similar to the laboratory tests, we applied constant strain rate and constant stress boundary conditions.We use our model to investigate the time-dependent distribution of stress and strain and the effect of different parameters. For instance, inclusion rotation is shown to be strongly dependent on the viscosity ratio between matrix and inclusion and stronger ductile weakening increases the localization rate while decreasing shear zone width. The most suitable weakening law for representation of ductile rock is determined by combining the results of parameter tests with

  17. Steam versus hot-water scalding in reducing bacterial loads on the skin of commercially processed poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, T E; Goodwin, T L; Collins, J A; Wyche, R C; Love, B E

    1972-04-01

    A comparison of two types of scalders was conducted to determine their effectiveness in reducing bacterial contamination of poultry carcasses. A conventional hot-water scalder and a prototype model of a steam scalder were tested under commercial conditions. Total plate counts from steam-scalded birds were significantly lower than the counts of water-scalded birds immediately after scalding and again after picking. No differences in the two methods could be found after chilling. Coliform counts from steam-scalded birds were significantly lower than the counts from water-scalded birds immediately after scalding. No significant differences in coliform counts were detected when the two scald methods were compared after defeathering and chilling.

  18. Red electroluminescent process excited by hot holes in SrGa2S4:Ce, Mn thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Katsu; Okamoto, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the first observation of red electroluminescence (EL) in SrGa 2 S 4 :Ce, Mn thin film. The EL spectrum consists of single broad emission band having a peak wavelength of 665 nm. The dominant EL decay time was 31 μs. The relationship between the applied voltage and the EL waveform was measured in single insulating thin film electroluminescent (TFEL) devices. An asymmetric EL waveform was observed in SrGa 2 S 4 :Ce, Mn TFEL devices under a rectangular applied voltage. The polarity of the EL waveform in these devices was different from the waveform in manganese-activated zinc sulfide ZnS:Mn devices. This indicates that hot holes excite the Mn 2+ ions to cause the red EL.

  19. Effect of nose radius on forces, and process parameters in hot machining of Inconel 718 using finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asit Kumar Parida

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the variation of nose radius on forces, cutting temperature, stress, has been studied using finite element modeling in hot turning operation of Inconel 718. Three values of nose radius were taken (0.4, 0.8 and 1.2 mm. Cutting force, thrust force, stress, and cutting temperature have been predicted using commercial DEFORM™ software at different cutting tool nose radius in both room and heated conditions. With the increase of tool nose radius in both room and elevated machining conditions the cutting force and thrust force increased. The cutting temperature, chip thickness and chip tool contact length also have been studied. In order to validate the numerical results an experimental analysis has been performed and good agreement between them has been observed

  20. Laboratory and Cloud Chamber Studies of Formation Processes and Properties of Atmospheric Ice Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisner, T.; Abdelmonem, A.; Benz, S.; Brinkmann, M.; Möhler, O.; Rzesanke, D.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Wagner, R.

    2009-04-01

    The formation of ice in tropospheric clouds controls the evolution of precipitation and thereby influences climate and weather via a complex network of dynamical and microphysical processes. At higher altitudes, ice particles in cirrus clouds or contrails modify the radiative energy budget by direct interaction with the shortwave and longwave radiation. In order to improve the parameterisation of the complex microphysical and dynamical processes leading to and controlling the evolution of tropospheric ice, laboratory experiments are performed at the IMK Karlsruhe both on a single particle level and in the aerosol and cloud chamber AIDA. Single particle experiments in electrodynamic levitation lend themselves to the study of the interaction between cloud droplets and aerosol particles under extremely well characterized and static conditions in order to obtain microphysical parameters as freezing nucleation rates for homogeneous and heterogeneous ice formation. They also allow the observation of the freezing dynamics and of secondary ice formation and multiplication processes under controlled conditions and with very high spatial and temporal resolution. The inherent droplet charge in these experiments can be varied over a wide range in order to assess the influence of the electrical state of the cloud on its microphysics. In the AIDA chamber on the other hand, these processes are observable under the realistic dynamic conditions of an expanding and cooling cloud- parcel with interacting particles and are probed simultaneously by a comprehensive set of analytical instruments. By this means, microphysical processes can be studied in their complex interplay with dynamical processes as for example coagulation or particle evaporation and growth via the Bergeron - Findeisen process. Shortwave scattering and longwave absorption properties of the nucleating and growing ice crystals are probed by in situ polarised laser light scattering measurements and infrared extinction

  1. Design of Experiment as a powerful tool when applying Finite Element Method: a case study on prediction of hot rolling process parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo G. Bordonaro

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate goal in hot roll pass design is to manufacture a rolled product with the required dimensional accuracy, defect free surface, and mechanical properties. The proper selection of process parameters is crucial to meet increasing requirements for desired quality and geometrical properties of rolled products. Due to the complex behavior of the metal flow at high temperatures and the severe plastic deformations in shape rolling, most efforts that have been made so far only rely upon the practical experience gained by operators. The large number of variables involved and the difficulty in investigating the process characteristics, make the use of finite element (FE tools an effective and attractive opportunity towards a thorough understanding of the rolling process. In this work, Design of Experiment (DOE is proposed as a powerful and viable method for the prediction of rolling process parameters while reducing the computational effort. Nonlinear 3D FE models of the hot rolling process are developed for a large set of complex cross-section shapes and validated against experimental evidences provided by real plant products at each stage of the deformation sequence. Based on the accuracy of the validated FE models, DOE is applied to investigate the flat rolling process under a series of many parameters and scenarios. Effects of main roll forming variables are analyzed on material flow behavior and geometrical features of a rolled product. The selected DOE factors are the workpiece temperature, diameter size, diameter reduction (draught, and rolls angular velocity. The selected DOE responses are workpiece spread, effective stresses, contact stresses, and rolls reaction loads. Eventually, the application of Pareto optimality (a Multi-Criteria Decision Making method allows to detect an optimal combination of design factors which respect desired target requirements for the responses.

  2. Stellar Laboratories . [VI. New Mo IV - VII Oscillator Strengths and the Molybdenum Abundance in the Hot White Dwarfs G191-B2B and RE 0503-289

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, T.; Quinet, T.; Hoyer, D.; Werner, K.; Demleitner, M.; Kruk, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    For the spectral analysis of high-resolution and high signal-to-noise (SN) spectra of hot stars, state-of-the-art non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) model atmospheres are mandatory. These are strongly dependent on the reliability of the atomic data that is used for their calculation. Aims: To identify molybdenum lines in the ultraviolet (UV) spectra of the DA-type white dwarf G191B2B and the DO-type white dwarf RE 0503289 and, to determine their photospheric Mo abundances, reliable Mo iv-vii oscillator strengths are used. Methods: We newly calculated Mo iv-vii oscillator strengths to consider their radiative and collisional bound-bound transitions indetail in our NLTE stellar-atmosphere models for the analysis of Mo lines exhibited in high-resolution and high SN UV observations of RE 0503289.Results. We identified 12 Mo v and nine Mo vi lines in the UV spectrum of RE 0503289 and measured a photospheric Mo abundance of 1.2 3.0 104(mass fraction, 22 500 56 400 times the solar abundance). In addition, from the As v and Sn iv resonance lines,we measured mass fractions of arsenic (0.51.3 105, about 300 1200 times solar) and tin (1.33.2 104, about 14 300 35 200 times solar). For G191B2B, upper limits were determined for the abundances of Mo (5.3 107, 100 times solar) and, in addition, for Kr (1.1106, 10 times solar) and Xe (1.7107, 10 times solar). The arsenic abundance was determined (2.35.9 107, about 21 53 times solar). A new, registered German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (GAVO) service, TOSS, has been constructed to provide weighted oscillator strengths and transition probabilities.Conclusions. Reliable measurements and calculations of atomic data are a prerequisite for stellar-atmosphere modeling. Observed Mo v-vi line profiles in the UV spectrum of the white dwarf RE 0503289 were well reproduced with our newly calculated oscillator strengths. For the first time, this allowed the photospheric Mo abundance in a white dwarf to be determined.

  3. Laboratory stand for examination of the operational thermal parameters of polyvalent system for heating, cooling and domestic hot water supply using renewable energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlateva, Merima

    2014-01-01

    The report presents the structure of an universal laboratory stand for determine the operating parameters of a polyvalent system for utilization of renewable energy sources. The system is a combination of three modules using different technologies for renewable sources – solar energy, atmospheric air and biomass, incorporated in a common heat accumulator. The structural scheme permits the possibility to use the stand in different operating modes, to demonstrate the feasibility of using any one of the renewable energy sources both individually and in various combinations. The author express gratitude to the partners of the companies Robert Bosch Bulgaria Ltd, Ahi Carrier Bulgaria and Eratermtotal, with whose generous support is build the stand. Key words: Renewable energy sources (RES), Heating with RES, Biomass, Air to Water Heat pumps

  4. Image-Processing-Based Study of the Interfacial Behavior of the Countercurrent Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow in a Hot Leg of a PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo A. Montoya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The interfacial behavior during countercurrent two-phase flow of air-water and steam-water in a model of a PWR hot leg was studied quantitatively using digital image processing of a subsequent recorded video images of the experimental series obtained from the TOPFLOW facility, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. (HZDR, Dresden, Germany. The developed image processing technique provides the transient data of water level inside the hot leg channel up to flooding condition. In this technique, the filters such as median and Gaussian were used to eliminate the drops and the bubbles from the interface and the wall of the test section. A Statistical treatment (average, standard deviation, and probability distribution function (PDF of the obtained water level data was carried out also to identify the flow behaviors. The obtained data are characterized by a high resolution in space and time, which makes them suitable for the development and validation of CFD-grade closure models, for example, for two-fluid model. This information is essential also for the development of mechanistic modeling on the relating phenomenon. It was clarified that the local water level at the crest of the hydraulic jump is strongly affected by the liquid properties.

  5. Study on the process of sintering matrix metallic Fe-Cu-25%Nb and Fe-Cu-25%Co during hot pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, A.C.; Oliveira, H.C.P.; Souza, M.H.; Assis, P.S.

    2016-01-01

    The sintering process promotes densification and the evolution of the microstructure of the material, with consequent significant increase in hardness and mechanical strength. However, few studies show the influence of pressure and temperature during sintering by hot pressing. In this sense, this work aims to evaluate the microstructural changes and properties with the variation of pressure and temperature and the type suffered by sintering metal powders during sintering by hot pressing. For this, two samples were studied by changing the sintering parameters: 25% Fe-50% Cu-25% Nb and 25% Fe-50% Cu-25% Co. Samples were analyzed by SEM / EDS in order to check the morphology and the presence of pores, as well as the interaction between the metallic constituents of each sample by the EDS analysis in line. They also determined the relative density, porosity and Vickers hardness (HV5). At the end of the study it was concluded that niobium alloy composite element by sintering activated suffered together with the liquid phase sintering. For cobalt alloys were observed by liquid phase sintering. The increase in the severity of the sintering conditions (temperature and pressure) led to an improvement in physical and mechanical properties of the alloys, which indicates that these parameters are directly related to the mechanisms of diffusion in the sintering process, improving the properties and diffusivity between elements. (author)

  6. Integrating terrestrial through aquatic processing of water, carbon and nitrogen over hot, cold and lukewarm moments in mixed land use catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, L. E.; Lin, L.; Duncan, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    A major challenge in understanding and managing freshwater volumes and quality in mixed land use catchments is the detailed heterogeneity of topography, soils, canopy, and inputs of water and biogeochemicals. The short space and time scale dynamics of sources, transport and processing of water, carbon and nitrogen in natural and built environments can have a strong influence on the timing and magnitude of watershed runoff and nutrient production, ecosystem cycling and export. Hydroclimate variability induces a functional interchange of terrestrial and aquatic environments across their transition zone with the temporal and spatial expansion and contraction of soil wetness, standing and flowing water over seasonal, diurnal and storm event time scales. Variation in sources and retention of nutrients at these scales need to be understood and represented to design optimal mitigation strategies. This paper discusses the conceptual framework used to design both simulation and measurement approaches, and explores these dynamics using an integrated terrestrial-aquatic watershed model of coupled water-carbon-nitrogen processes at resolutions necessary to resolve "hot spot/hot moment" phenomena in two well studied catchments in Long Term Ecological Research sites. The potential utility of this approach for design and assessment of urban green infrastructure and stream restoration strategies is illustrated.

  7. Coercivity of the Nd–Fe–B hot-deformed magnets diffusion-processed with low melting temperature glass forming alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seelam, U.M.R. [Elements Strategy Initiative Center for Magnetic Materials (ESICMM), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Liu, Lihua [Elements Strategy Initiative Center for Magnetic Materials (ESICMM), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Akiya, T.; Sepehri-Amin, H.; Ohkubo, T. [Elements Strategy Initiative Center for Magnetic Materials (ESICMM), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Sakuma, N.; Yano, M.; Kato, A. [Advanced Material Engineering Division, Toyota Motor Corporation, Susono 410-1193 (Japan); Hono, K., E-mail: kazuhiro.hono@nims.go.jp [Elements Strategy Initiative Center for Magnetic Materials (ESICMM), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Nd- and Pr-based alloys with bulk glass forming ability and low melting temperatures, Nd{sub 60}Al{sub 10}Ni{sub 10}Cu{sub 20} and Pr{sub 60}Al{sub 10}Ni{sub 10}Cu{sub 20}, were used for grain boundary diffusion process to enhance the coercivity of hot-deformed magnets. The coercivity increment was proportional to the weight gain after the diffusion process. For the sample with 64% weight gain, the coercivity increased up to 2.8 T, which is the highest value for bulk Nd–Fe–B magnets that do not contain heavy rare-earth elements, Dy or Tb. Approximately half of the intergranular regions were amorphous and the remaining regions were crystalline. Magnetic isolation of the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains by the Nd-rich amorphous/crystalline intergranular phases is attributed to the large coercivity enhancement. The coercivity does not change after the crystallization of the intergranular phase, indicating that the coercivity is not influenced by the strain at the interface with the crystalline intergranular phase. - Highlights: • Bulk-glass forming alloys were infiltrated into hot-deformed Nd–Fe–B magnets. • Very high coercivity of 2.8 T was attained without heavy rare-earth elements. • Approximately half of the inter-granular regions were amorphous. • Crystallization of amorphous intergranular phase does not change coercivity.

  8. An Incremental Physically-Based Model of P91 Steel Flow Behaviour for the Numerical Analysis of Hot-Working Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Murillo-Marrodán

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at modelling the flow behaviour of P91 steel at high temperature and a wide range of strain rates for constant and also variable strain-rate deformation conditions, such as those in real hot-working processes. For this purpose, an incremental physically-based model is proposed for the P91 steel flow behavior. This formulation considers the effects of dynamic recovery (DRV and dynamic recrystallization (DRX on the mechanical properties of the material, using only the flow stress, strain rate and temperature as state variables and not the accumulated strain. Therefore, it reproduces accurately the flow stress, work hardening and work softening not only under constant, but also under transient deformation conditions. To accomplish this study, the material is characterised experimentally by means of uniaxial compression tests, conducted at a temperature range of 900–1270 °C and at strain rates in the range of 0.005–10 s−1. Finally, the proposed model is implemented in commercial finite element (FE software to provide evidence of the performance of the proposed formulation. The experimental compression tests are simulated using the novel model and the well-known Hansel–Spittel formulation. In conclusion, the incremental physically-based model shows accurate results when work softening is present, especially under variable strain-rate deformation conditions. Hence, the present formulation is appropriate for the simulation of the hot-working processes typically conducted at industrial scale.

  9. Optimum Condition for Plutonium Electrodeposition Process in Radiochemistry and Environment Laboratory, Nuclear Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yii, Mei-Wo; Abdullah Siddiqi Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Determination of alpha emitting plutonium radionuclides such as Pu-238, Pu-239 and Pu-240 concentrations inside a sample require lots of radiochemistry purification process to separate them from other interfering alpha emitters. These pure isotopes are then been electrodeposited onto a stainless steel disc and quantified using alpha spectrometry counter. In Radiochemistry and Environment Laboratory (RAS), Nuclear Malaysia, the quantification is done by comparing these isotopes with the recovery of known amount plutonium tracer, Pu-242, that been added into the sample prior analysis. This study been conducted to find the optimum conditions for the electrolysis process used at RAS. Four variable parameters that may interfere the percentage recovery of tracer hence the current, cathode to anode distance, pH and electrolysis duration had been identify and studied. Study was carry out using Pu-242 standard solution and the deposition disc was counted using Zinc Sulphite (silver) counter. Studies outcome suggested that the optimum conditions to reduce plutonium ion happens at 1-1.1 ampere of current, 3-5 mm of electrodes distance, pH 2.2-2.5 and a minimal electrolysis duration of 2 hours. (author)

  10. Electrokinetic demonstration at Sandia National Laboratories: Use of transference numbers for site characterization and process evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindgren, E.R.; Mattson, E.D.

    1997-01-01

    Electrokinetic remediation is generally an in situ method using direct current electric potentials to move ionic contaminants and/or water to collection electrodes. The method has been extensively studied for application in saturated clayey soils. Over the past few years, an electrokinetic extraction method specific for sandy, unsaturated soils has been developed and patented by Sandia National Laboratories. A RCRA RD ampersand D permitted demonstration of this technology for the in situ removal of chromate contamination from unsaturated soils in a former chromic acid disposal pit was operated during the summer and fall of 1996. This large scale field test represents the first use of electrokinetics for the removal of heavy metal contamination from unsaturated soils in the United States and is part of the US EPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program. Guidelines for characterizing a site for electrokinetic remediation are lacking, especially for applications in unsaturated soil. The transference number of an ion is the fraction of the current carried by that ion in an electric field and represents the best measure of contaminant removal efficiency in most electrokinetic remediation processes. In this paper we compare the transference number of chromate initially present in the contaminated unsaturated soil, with the transference number in the electrokinetic process effluent to demonstrate the utility of evaluating this parameter

  11. Laboratory modelling of the physico-chemical processes in the cosmic gas-dust clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakulina, I.N.; Blashenkov, N.M.; Varshalovich, D.A.; Lavrent'ev, G.Ya.; Shustrov, B.N.

    1980-01-01

    The preliminary results of an experiment on the complex laboratory modelling of the physico-chemical processes proceeding in the interstellar gas clouds are presented. The purpose of the modelling is an analysis of the molecule formation and dissociation processes kinetics. The basic component of the modelling system is 10 cm diameter s