WorldWideScience

Sample records for hot fuel examination

  1. Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) is one of the largest hot cells dedicated to radioactive materials research at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The nation's...

  2. Hot Fuel Examination Facility/South

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-05-01

    This document describes the potential environmental impacts associated with proposed modifications to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility/South (HFEF/S). The proposed action, to modify the existing HFEF/S at the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho, would allow important aspects of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept, offering potential advantages in nuclear safety and economics, to be demonstrated. It would support fuel cycle experiments and would supply fresh fuel to the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) at the INEL. 35 refs., 12 figs., 13 tabs.

  3. Hot Fuel Examination Facility/South

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    This document describes the potential environmental impacts associated with proposed modifications to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility/South (HFEF/S). The proposed action, to modify the existing HFEF/S at the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho, would allow important aspects of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept, offering potential advantages in nuclear safety and economics, to be demonstrated. It would support fuel cycle experiments and would supply fresh fuel to the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) at the INEL. 35 refs., 12 figs., 13 tabs

  4. Remote waste handling at the Hot Fuel Examination Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughn, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    Radioactive solid wastes, some of which are combustible, are generated during disassembly and examination of irradiated fast-reactor fuel and material experiments at the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF). These wastes are remotely segregated and packaged in doubly contained, high-integrity, clean, retrievable waste packages for shipment to the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This paper describes the equipment and techniques used to perform these operations

  5. EDF requirements for hot cells examinations on irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segura, J.C.; Ducros, G.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of increasing French Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) availability while lengthening the fuel irradiation cycle and reaching higher burnups lead EDF to carry out on site and hot cell examinations. The data issued from such fuel behaviour monitoring programmes will be used to ascertain that the design criteria are met. Data are also needed for modelling, development and validation. The paper deals quickly with the logistics linked to the selection and transport of fuel rods from NPP to hot cell laboratory. Hot cell PIEs remain a valuable method to obtain data in such fields as PCI (Pellet-Cladding Interaction), internal pressure, FGR (Fission Gas Release), oxide thickness, metallurgical aspects. The paper introduces burnup determination methods, inner pressure evaluation, preparation of samples for further irradiation such as power ramps for PCI and RIA (Reactivity Initiated Accident) testing. The nuclear microprobe of Perre Suee laboratory is also presented. (author)

  6. NDE of PWR fuel: Identifying candidates for hot cell examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, J.E.; Bury, J.G.; Correal, O.A.; Kunishi, H.; Wilson, H.W.

    1992-05-01

    On-site examinations were performed at the Indian Point 3 and Callaway reactors to attempt to identify the leakage mechanism of several leaking fuel rods. The exams consisted of removing the leaking fuel rods from the assembly and performing a visual examination. These results, combined with other available on-site data on leaking fuel rods, were used to select fuel rods for shipment to a hot cell for detailed root cause examination. Three fuel rods from the Indian Point 3 reactor were found to be leaking due to debris-induced fretting. The examinations at Callaway were terminated prior to completion due to utility scheduler conflicts. Rods from the Callaway reactor were selected for shipment to the hot cell along with the rods from the Byron 1 and 2 and V.C. Summer reactors. The data presented in the report summarize the coolant activity history, the UT examination results, and a summary of the review of the fabrication records. The basis for the selection of the rods to be sent to the hot cells is also summarized

  7. PWR fuel monitoring: recent progress with hot cells' examination equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenebault, P.

    1989-01-01

    The 'hot' laboratories set up by the French Atomic Energy Authority (CEA) in its nuclear research centers at Saclay and Grenoble, and by the French Electricity Board (EDF) on the Chinon nuclear power station site, are used for dismantling and examining fuel rod assemblies irradiated in PWRs. This article is limited to a description of a number of new or totally updated items of equipment in these laboratories. Nuclear industry companies are also participating in the development of new examination techniques. As an example, the use of wave-guides for remote transmission of signals in a radioactive environment is described. 2 figs

  8. Hot fuel examination facility element spacer wire-wrap machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, D.A.; Sherman, E.K.

    1989-01-01

    Nondestructive examinations of irradiated experimental fuel elements conducted in the Argonne National Laboratory Hot Fuel Examination Facility/North (HFEF/N) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory include laser and contact profilometry (element diameter measurements), electrical eddy-current testing for cladding and thermal bond defects, bow and length measurements, neutron radiography, gamma scanning, remote visual exam, and photography. Profilometry was previously restricted to spiral profilometry of the element to prevent interference with the element spacer wire wrapped in a helix about the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II)-type fuel element from end to end. By removing the spacer wire prior to conducting profilometry examination, axial profilometry techniques may be used, which are considerably faster than spiral techniques and often result in data acquisition more important to experiment sponsors. Because the element must often be reinserted into the nuclear reactor (EBR-II) for additional irradiation, however, the spacer wire must be reinstalled on the highly irradiated fuel element by remote means after profilometry of the wireless elements. The element spacer wire-wrap machine developed at HFEF is capable of helically wrapping fuel elements with diameters up to 1.68 cm (0.660 in.) and 2.44-m (96-in.) lengths. The machine can accommodate almost any desired wire pitch length by simply inserting a new wrapper gear module

  9. Sampling of airborne radioactivity in a hot fuel examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtney, J.C.; Madison, J.P.; Holson, C.E.; Black, R.L.; Dilorenzo, F.L.; Anderson, J.B.; Hylsky, E.; Lau, L.D.

    1980-01-01

    To ensure the maintenance of a safe working environment, and provide data of interest to operations personnel, a fixed air sampling system (FASS) has been installed at the Hot Fuel Examination Facility/North at Argonne National Laboratory's Idaho site. A design requirement is that the system be operated with a minimum number of person-hours. Sixty-six sampling stations are located throughout the facility to gather data from areas where personnel are normally present without respiratory protection. The effectiveness of in-cell contamination-control programs and materials-handling procedures can be evaluated. Long-term trends are valuable guides to improving radiological controls while airborne activities are still well below operational guidelines. Since the beginning of operation in August 1976, the concentrations have averaged between 1x10 -15 and 5x10 -15 μCi/cm 3 for α emitters and from 4x10 -14 to 4x10 -13 μCi/cm 3 for β-γ emitters. Such values are well below the radiation concentration guides. (author)

  10. Examination in hot laboratories of irradiated fuels from fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clottes, G.; Peray, R.; Ratier, J.L.

    1980-05-01

    Low irradiation rate examinations were carried out soon after the Rapsodie, Rapsodie Fortissimo and Phenix reactors were started up for the first time in order to check the level of maximum temperatures reached and the radial migration of oxygen and plutonium and to assess the movements of fuels inside the cladding. The other examinations were effected at a high specific burnup in order to defines the limit specific burnup securing the integrity of the fuel pin claddings (distortion, ruptures and possible consequences). The examinations carried out so far on fuel elements coming from Phenix or Rapsodie have allowed good fuel surveillance to be undertaken and the acquisition of a large number of data, thanks to which the fuel characteristics of future reactors of the system have been developed [fr

  11. Criticality safety training at the Hot Fuel Examination Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, A.S.; Courtney, J.C.; Thelen, V.N.

    1983-01-01

    HFEF comprises four hot cells and out-of-cell support facilities for the US breeder program. The HFEF criticality safety program includes training in the basic theory of criticality and in specific criticality hazard control rules that apply to HFEF. A professional staff-member oversees the implementation of the criticality prevention program

  12. Los Alamos Hot-Cell-Facility modifications for examining FFTF fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, B.M.; Ledbetter, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Commissioned in 1960, the Wing 9 Hot Cell Facility at Los Alamos was recently modified to meet the needs of the 1980s. Because fuel pins from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) are too long for examination in the original hot cells, we modified cells to accommodate longer fuel pins and to provide other capabilities as well. For instance, the T-3 shipping cask now can be opened in an inert atmosphere that can be maintained for all nondestructive and destructive examinations of the fuel pins. The full-length pins are visually examined and photographed, the wire wrap is removed, and fission gas is sampled. After the fuel pin is cropped, a cap is seal-welded on the section containing the fuel column. This section is then transferred to other cells for gamma-scanning, radiography, profilometry, sectioning for metallography, and chemical analysis

  13. Remote real time x-ray examination of fuel elements in a hot cell environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yapuncich, F.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses the Remote Real Time X-ray System which will allow for detailed examination of fuel elements. This task will be accomplished in a highly radioactive hot cell environment. Two remote handling systems win be utilized at the examination station. One handling system will transfer the fuel element to and from the shielded x-ray system. A second handling system will allow for vertical and rotational inspection of the fuel elements. The process win include removing a single nuclear fuel element from a element fabrication magazine(EFM), positioning the fuel element within the shielding envelope of the x-ray system and transferring the fuel element from the station manipulator to the x-ray system manipulator, performing the x-ray inspection, and then transferring the fuel element to either the element storage magazine(ESM) or a reject bin

  14. Analytical throughput-estimating methods for the Hot Fuel Examination Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyes, R.W.; Phipps, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    The Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) supports the operation and experimental programs of the major Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) test facilities; specifically, the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), and the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) Facility. Successful management of HFEF and of LMFBR safety and fuels and materials programs, therefore, requires reliable information regarding HFEF's capability to handle expected or proposed program work loads. This paper describes the 10-step method that has been developed to consider all variables which significantly affect the HFEF examination throughput and quickly provide the necessary planning information

  15. Proposed power upgrade of the hot fuel examination facility's neutron radiography reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruett, D.P.; Richards, W.J.; Heidel, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Hot Fuel Examination Facility, HFEF, is one of several facilities located at the Argonne Site. HFEF comprises a large hot cell where both non-destructive and destructive examination of highly-irradiated reactor fuels are conducted in support of the LMFBR program. One of the non-destructive examination techniques utilized at HFEF is neutron radiography. When the NRAD facility was designed and constructed, an operating power level of 250 kw was considered to be adequate for obtaining radiographs of the type of specimens envisaged at that time. Since that time, several things have occurred that have tended to increase radiography exposure times to as much as 90 minutes each. In order to decrease exposure times, the reactor power level is to be increased from 250 kW to 1 MW. This increase in power will necessitate several engineering and design changes. The proposed upgrade of the NRAD facility will increase the neutron flux available in the beam tubes appreciably. The increased flux will enable NRAD to continue to meet its operational commitments in a timely manner and to develop state-of-the-art techniques in the future as it has in the past

  16. Hot Cell Post-Irradiation Examination and Poolside Inspection of Nuclear Fuel. Proceedings of the IAEA-HOTLAB Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-04-01

    The growing operational requirements for nuclear fuel, such as longer fuel cycles, higher burnups and wider use of transient regimes, require more robust fuel designs and more radiation resistant materials. Development of such advanced fuels is only possible with testing and analysis of their performance and application of adequate post-irradiation examination (PIE) methods and techniques. In addition, operational feedback data from poolside and PIE facilities are absolutely necessary for verification of fuel modelling codes and analysis of fuel failure mechanisms. For these reasons, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has supported the international exchange of knowledge and sharing of best practices in the application of modern destructive and non-destructive methods of investigation of highly radioactive materials through a series of technical meetings (TMs), the last of which was held in 2006 in Buenos Aires. Since 1963, similar meetings, initially at the European level, have been organized by the Hot Laboratories and Remote Handling Working Group (HOTLAB), a partner in the development of the IAEA's Post Irradiation Examination Facilities Database (PIEDB), part of the IAEA's Integrated Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System. With this successful partnership in mind, in 2010 the IAEA Technical Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology recommended that a joint IAEA-HOTLAB TM be held on 'Hot Cell Post-Irradiation Examination and Pool-Side Inspection of Nuclear Fuel', covering questions relevant to the IAEA sub-programmes on 'Nuclear Power Reactor Fuel Engineering' and 'Management of Spent Fuel from Nuclear Power Reactors'. The TM was held on 23-27 May 2011, in Smolenice, Slovakia, with the participation of a large number of interested organizations and comprehensive coverage of major PIE and poolside inspection issues relating to both operation and storage of fuel for nuclear power reactors. The proceedings, summaries and conclusions of that joint

  17. Measurement of the Tracer Gradient and Sampling System Bias of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility Stack Air Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2011-07-20

    This report describes tracer gas uniformity and bias measurements made in the exhaust air discharge of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility at Idaho National Laboratory. The measurements were a follow-up on earlier measurements which indicated a lack of mixing of the two ventilation streams being discharged via a common stack. The lack of mixing is detrimental to the accuracy of air emission measurements. The lack of mixing was confirmed in these new measurements. The air sampling probe was found to be out of alignment and that was corrected. The suspected sampling bias in the air sample stream was disproved.

  18. Techniques and devices developed by the CEA for hot cell and in-situ examinations of PWR components and PWR fuel assembliess after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Craeynest, J.C.; Leseur, A.; Lhermenier, A.; Cytermann, R.

    1981-11-01

    Within the framework of the electro-nuclear development of the PWR system, the CEA has provided itself with facilities for developing techniques for analyzing assemblies, pins and fuels. These are examinations and tests on irradiated heads and assemblies with the aid of the Fuel Examination Module (FEM), of machining of assemblies and examinations in the Celimene hot laboratory or detailed examinations and analyses on fuel elements using eddy currents, the electronic microprobe and the Fisher ''permeascope'' which enables the outline of the oxide coat present on the cladding to be followed [fr

  19. Hot cell facilities for post irradiation examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Prerna; Bhandekar, Anil; Pandit, K.M.; Dhotre, M.P.; Rath, B.N.; Nagaraju, P.; Dubey, J.S.; Mallik, G.K.; Singh, J.L.

    2017-01-01

    Reliable performance of nuclear fuels and critical core components has a large bearing on the economics of nuclear power and radiation safety of plant operating personnel. In view of this, Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) is periodically carried out on fuels and components to generate feedback information which is used by the designers, fabricators and the reactor operators to bring about changes for improved performance of the fuel and components. Examination of the fuel bundles has to be carried out inside hot cells due to their high radioactivity

  20. Postirradiation examination of HTR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabielek, H.; Reitsamer, G.; Kania, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Fuel for the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) consists of 1 mm diameter coated particles uniformly distributed in a graphite matrix within a cold-molded 60 mm diameter spherical fuel element. Fuel performance demonstrations under simulated normal operation conditions are conducted in accelerated neutron environments available in Material Test Reactors and in real-time environments such as the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) Juelich. Postirradiation examinations are then used to assess fuel element behavior and the detailed performance of the coated particles. The emphasis in postirradiation examination and accident testing is on assessment of the capability for fuel elements and individual coated particles to retain fission products and actinide fuel materials. To accomplish this task, techniques have been developed which measures fission product and fuel material distributions within or exterior to the particle: Hot Gas Chlorination - provides an accurate method to measure total fuel material concentration outside intact particles; Profile Electrolytic Deconsolidation - permits determination of fission product distribution along fuel element diameter and retrieval of fuel particles from positions within element; Gamma Spectrometry - provides nondestructive method to measure defect particle fractions based on retention of volatile metallic fission products; Particle Cracking - permits a measure of the partitioning of fission products between fuel kernel and particle coatings, and the derivation of diffusion parameters in fuel materials; Micro Gas Analysis - provides gaseous fission product and reactive gas inventory within free volume of single particles; and Mass-spectrometric Burnup Determination - utilizes isotope dilution for the measurement of heavy metal isotope abundances

  1. Hot Surface Ignition of A Composite Fuel Droplet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glushkov Dmitrii O.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examines the characteristics of conductive heating (up to ignition temperature of a composite fuel droplet based on coal, liquid petroleum products, and water. In this paper, we have established the difference between heat transfer from a heat source to a fuel droplet in case of conductive (hot surface and convective (hot gas heat supply. The Leidenfrost effect influences on heat transfer characteristics significantly due to the gas gap between a composite fuel droplet and a hot surface.

  2. Characterization of the 309 fuel examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalgh, W.O.; Cornwell, B.C.

    1997-01-01

    This document identifies radiological, chemical and physical conditions inside the Fuel Examination Facility. It is located inside the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor containment structure (309 Building.) The facility was a hot cell used for examination of PRTR fuel and equipment during the 1960's. Located inside the cell is a PRTR shim rod assembly, reported are radiological conditions of the sample. The conditions were assessed as part of overall 309 Building transition

  3. Assessment of the Idaho National Laboratory Hot Fuel Examination Facility Stack Monitoring Site for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2010-01-01

    This document reports on a series of tests to determine whether the location of the air sampling probe in the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) exhaust duct meets the applicable regulatory criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Federal regulations require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that is representative of the effluent stream. The tests conducted by PNNL during July 2010 on the HFEF system are described in this report. The sampling probe location is approximately 20 feet from the base of the stack. The stack base is in the second floor of the HFEF, and has a building ventilation stream (limited potential radioactive effluent) as well as a process stream (potential radioactive effluent, but HEPA-filtered) that feeds into it. The tests conducted on the duct indicate that the process stream is insufficiently mixed with the building ventilation stream. As a result, the air sampling probe location does not meet the criteria of the N13.1-1999 standard. The series of tests consists of various measurements taken over a grid of points in the duct cross section at the proposed sampling-probe location. The results of the test series on the HFEF exhaust duct as it relates to the criteria from ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 are desribed in this report. Based on these tests, the location of the air sampling probe does not meet the requirements of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard, and modifications must be made to either the HVAC system or the air sampling probe for compliance. The recommended approaches are discussed and vary from sampling probe modifications to modifying the junction of the two air exhaust streams.

  4. 14 CFR 25.961 - Fuel system hot weather operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.961 Fuel system hot weather operation. (a) The fuel system must perform satisfactorily in hot weather operation. This... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system hot weather operation. 25.961...

  5. Transfer flask for hot active fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, Roger; Moutard, Daniel.

    1980-01-01

    This invention concerns a flask for transporting active fuel elements removed from a nuclear reactor vessel, after only a few days storage and hence cooling, either within a nuclear power station itself or between such a station and a near-by storage area. This containment system is not a flask for conveyance over long and medium distances. Specifically, the invention concerns a transport flask that enables hot fuel elements to be cooled, even in the event of accidents [fr

  6. 14 CFR 27.961 - Fuel system hot weather operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 27.961 Fuel system hot weather operation. Each suction lift fuel system and other fuel systems with features conducive to... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system hot weather operation. 27.961...

  7. 14 CFR 29.961 - Fuel system hot weather operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.961 Fuel system hot weather operation. Each suction lift fuel system and other fuel systems conducive to vapor... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system hot weather operation. 29.961...

  8. Postirradiation examination of Kori-1 nuclear power plant fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, S.G.; Kim, E.K.; Lee, K.S.; Min, D.K.

    1994-01-01

    Full size fuels discharged from Kori-1 PWR nuclear power plant have been subjected to postirradiation examination. The fuels under investigation were irradiated for one- to four-reactor cycles. Nondestructive examination and dismantling of the fuel assemblies have been conducted in the pool of the postirradiation examination facility (PIEF) of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institue. Subsequently nondestructive and destructive examinations of fuel rods have been performed in the hot cells of the PIEF. An evaluation of fuel burnup behaviors was based on the postirradiation examination data and the nominal design values. The results did not show any evidence of abnormalities in the fuel integrity. (orig.)

  9. Postirradiation examination of Kori-1 nuclear power plant fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seung-Gy, Ro; Eun-Ka, Kim; Key-Soon, Lee; Duck-Kee, Min

    1994-05-01

    Full size fuels discharged from Kori-1 PWR nuclear power plant have been subjected to postirradiation examination. The fuels under investigation were irradiated for one- to four-reactor cycles. Nondestructive examination and dismantling of the fuel assemblies have been conducted in the pool of the postirradiation examination facility (PIEF) of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. Subsequently nondestructive and destructive examinations of fuel rods have been performed in the hot cells of the PIEF. An evaluation of fuel burnup behaviors was based on the postirradiation examination data and the nominal design values. The results did not show any evidence of abnormalities in the fuel integrity.

  10. Preliminary Feasibility Study on the Construction of Steel Hot Cell Facility for Precise Manipulated Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sangbok; Kwon, Hyungmun; Kim, Heemoon; Kim, Dosik; Min, Duckkee; Hong, Kwonpyo

    2006-01-01

    Hot laboratory is essential facility to research and develop in the nuclear industries to examine radioactive materials. The post irradiation examinations for irradiated fuels and materials should be mainly conducted in the hot cell facility to protect radiations to operators. Hot cells are divided into a concrete hot cell and a steel hot cell according to the wall materials. Usually a concrete hot cell is applied to test for high level radioactive materials like as a fuel assembly, rods, and large structure specimens, and a steel hot cell for comparatively lower level activity materials in fuel fragments, and small structural materials. A steel hot cell has many benefits in a specimen manipulation, construction and maintenance costs. In recent the test for the irradiated materials is more frequently required a small and precise manipulating examination for higher degree tests of research and developments. Unfortunately hot laboratory facilities in domestics have mainly constituted of concrete hot cells, and not ready for techniques in steel hot cells. In this paper the construction feasibility of steel hot cell facility is preliminary reviewed in the points of the status of domestic facilities, the test demand prospect and detailed plans

  11. 14 CFR 23.961 - Fuel system hot weather operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system hot weather operation. 23.961... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 23.961 Fuel system hot weather operation. Each fuel system must be free from vapor lock...

  12. Image analysis for remote examination of fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.H.; Nayak, U.P.

    1982-01-01

    An image analysis system operating in the Wing 9 Hot Cell Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory provides quantitative microstructural analyses of irradiated fuels and materials. With this system, fewer photomicrographs are required during postirradiation microstructural examination and data are available for analysis much faster. The system has been used successfully to examine Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division experimental fuel pins

  13. Development of a hot cell for post-irradiation analysis of nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Selma S.C.; Silva Junior, Silverio Ferreira da; Loureiro, Joao Roberto M. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: selmasallam@yahoo.com.br, e-mail: silvasf@cdtn.br, e-mail: jrmattos@cdtn.br

    2009-07-01

    Post irradiation examinations of nuclear fuels are performed in order to verify their in-service behavior. Examinations are conducted in compact structures called hot cells, designed to attend the different types of tests and analysis for fuel's characterization. The characterization of fuel microstructure is an activity performed in hot cells. Usually, hot cells for microstructural fuel analysis are designed to allow the metallographic and ceramographic samples preparation and after that, microscopical analysis of the fuel's microstructure. Due to the complexity of the foreseen operations, the severe limitations imposed by the available space into the hot cells, the capabilities of the remote manipulation devices, the procedures of radiological protection and the needs to obtain samples with an adequate surface quality for microscopic analysis, the design of a hot cell for fuel samples preparation presents a high level of complexity. In this paper, the methodology used to develop a hot cell facility for nuclear fuel's metallographic and ceramographic samples preparation is presented. Equipment, devices and systems used in conventional sample preparation processes were evaluated during bench tests. After the necessary adjustments and processes adaptations, they were assembled in a mock-up of the respective hot cell, where they were tested in conditions as realistic as possible, in order to improve the operations and processes to be performed at the real hot cells. (author)

  14. Development of a hot cell for post-irradiation analysis of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Selma S.C.; Silva Junior, Silverio Ferreira da; Loureiro, Joao Roberto M.

    2009-01-01

    Post irradiation examinations of nuclear fuels are performed in order to verify their in-service behavior. Examinations are conducted in compact structures called hot cells, designed to attend the different types of tests and analysis for fuel's characterization. The characterization of fuel microstructure is an activity performed in hot cells. Usually, hot cells for microstructural fuel analysis are designed to allow the metallographic and ceramographic samples preparation and after that, microscopical analysis of the fuel's microstructure. Due to the complexity of the foreseen operations, the severe limitations imposed by the available space into the hot cells, the capabilities of the remote manipulation devices, the procedures of radiological protection and the needs to obtain samples with an adequate surface quality for microscopic analysis, the design of a hot cell for fuel samples preparation presents a high level of complexity. In this paper, the methodology used to develop a hot cell facility for nuclear fuel's metallographic and ceramographic samples preparation is presented. Equipment, devices and systems used in conventional sample preparation processes were evaluated during bench tests. After the necessary adjustments and processes adaptations, they were assembled in a mock-up of the respective hot cell, where they were tested in conditions as realistic as possible, in order to improve the operations and processes to be performed at the real hot cells. (author)

  15. Postirradiation examination of light water reactor fuel: a United States perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neimark, L.A.; Ocken, H.

    1980-01-01

    Poolside and hot-cell postirradiation examination (PIE) have played and will continue to play a significant role in the US LWR program. The principal uses of PIE are in fuel surveillance, fuel improvement, and failure analysis programs and in the postmortem analysis of safety-related tests. Institutional problems associated with fuel shipping, waste disposal, and fuel disposal can be expected to pose obstacles to hot-cell examinations and likely result in more sophisticated poolside examinations

  16. Fuel fabrication and post-irradiation examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venter, P J; Aspeling, J C [Atomic Energy Corporation of South Africa Ltd., Pretoria (South Africa)

    1990-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of the A/c's Bevan and Eldopar facilities for the fabrication of nuclear fuel. It also describes the sophisticated Hot Cell Complex, which is capable of accommodating pressurised water reactor fuel and various other irradiated samples. Some interesting problems and their solutions are discussed. (author)

  17. Fuel fabrication and post-irradiation examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venter, P.J.; Aspeling, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the A/c's Bevan and Eldopar facilities for the fabrication of nuclear fuel. It also describes the sophisticated Hot Cell Complex, which is capable of accommodating pressurised water reactor fuel and various other irradiated samples. Some interesting problems and their solutions are discussed. (author)

  18. SHOSPA-MOD, Hot Spot Factors for Fuel and Clad, Hot Channel Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendola, A.

    1982-01-01

    1 - Nature of the physical problem solved: SHOSPA evaluates the hot spot factors for fuel and cladding as well as the hot channel factor as a function of the confidence level. Moreover, it evaluates the probability on n hot subassemblies. The code has been developed with emphasis on sodium cooled fast reactors, but it is applicable to any type of reactors constituted of bundled fuel rods with single phase coolant. An option for plotting is available in this version. 2 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: This code is applicable to any type of reactors constituted of fuel rods with single phase coolant

  19. Spent Fuel Handling and Packaging Program: a survey of hot cell facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, M.N.

    1978-07-01

    Hot cell facilities in the United States were surveyed to determine their capabilities for conducting integral fuel assembly and individual fuel rod examinations that are required in support of the Spent Fuel Handling and Packaging Program. The ability to receive, handle, disassemble and reconstitute full-length light water reactor spent fuel assemblies, and the ability to conduct nondestructive and destructive examinations on full-length fuel rods were of particular interest. Three DOE-supported facilities and three commercial facilities were included in the survey. This report provides a summary of the findings

  20. Hot fuel gas dedusting after sorbent-based gas cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    Advanced power generation technologies, such as Air Blown Gasification Cycle (ABGC), require gas cleaning at high temperatures in order to meet environmental standards and to achieve high thermal efficiencies. The primary hot gas filtration process, which removes particulates from the cooled raw fuel gas at up to 600{degree}C is the first stage of gas cleaning prior to desulphurization and ammonia removal processes. The dust concentration in the fuel gas downstream of the sorbent processes would be much lower than for the hot gas filtration stage and would have a lower sulphur content and possibly reduced chlorine concentration. The main aim of this project is to define the requirements for a hot gas filter for dedusting fuel gas under these conditions, and to identify a substantially simpler and more cost effective solution using ceramic or metal barrier filters.

  1. Use of a hot sheath Tormac for advance fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The use of hot electrons in a Tormac sheath is predicted to improve stability and increase ntau by an order of magnitude. An effective ntau for energy containment is derived and system parameters for several advance fuels are shown. In none of the advance fuels cases considered is a reactor with fields greater than 10 Wb or major plasma radius of more than 3 m required for ignition. Minimum systems have power output of under 100 MW thermal. System parameters for a hot sheath Tormac have a wide latitude. Sizes, magnetic fields, operating temperatures can be chosen to optimize engineering and economic considerations

  2. VVER fuel. Results of post irradiation examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, V.P.; Markov, D.V.; Smirnov, A.V.; Polenok, V.S.; Perepelkin, S.O.; Ivashchenko, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    The present paper presents the main results of post-irradiation examination of more than 40 different fuel assemblies (FA) operated in the cores of VVER-1000 and VVER-440-type power reactors in a wide range of fuel burnup. The condition of fuel assembly components from the viewpoint of deformation, corrosion resistance and mechanical properties is described here. A serviceability of the FA design as a whole and interaction between individual FA components under vibration condition and mechanical load received primary emphasis. The reasons of FA damage fuel element failure in a wide range of fuel burnup are also analyzed. A possibility and ways of fuel burnup increase have been proved experimentally for the case of high-level serviceability maintenance of fuel elements to provide for advanced fuel cycles. (author)

  3. Analysis of IFR driver fuel hot channel factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku, J.Y.; Chang, L.K.; Mohr, D.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic uncertainty factors for Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) driver fuels have been determined based primarily on the database obtained from the predecessor fuels used in the IFR prototype. Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The uncertainty factors were applied to the hot channel factors (HCFs) analyses to obtain separate overall HCFs for fuel and cladding for steady-state analyses. A 'semistatistical horizontal method' was used in the HCFs analyses. The uncertainty factor of the fuel thermal conductivity dominates the effects considered in the HCFs analysis; the uncertainty in fuel thermal conductivity will be reduced as more data are obtained to expand the currently limited database for the IFR ternary metal fuel (U-20Pu-10Zr). A set of uncertainty factors to be used for transient analyses has also been derived. (author)

  4. Standard examination stage for the fuels and materials examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, J.W.; Frandsen, G.B.

    1980-01-01

    A Standard Examination Stage (SES) has been designed, fabricated, and tested for use in the Fuel and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) at the Hanford Reservation near Richland, WA. The SES will perform multiple functions in a variety of nuclear fuel, absorber, and blanket pin handling, positioning, and examination operations in 11 of 22 work stations in the FMEF Nondestructive Examination (NDE) cell. Preprogrammable, automated, closed loop computer control provides precision positioning in the X, Y and Z directions and in pin rotational positioning. Modular construction of both the mechanical hardware and the electrical and control system has been used to facilitate in-cell maintainability

  5. AECL hot-cell facilities and post-irradiation examination services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schankula, M.H.; Plaice, E.L.; Woodworth, L.G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) services available at AECL's hot-cell facilities (HCF). The HCFs are used primarily to provide PIE support for operating CANDU power reactors in Canada and abroad, and for the examination of experimental fuel bundles and core components irradiated in research reactors at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) and off-shore. A variety of examinations and analysis are performed ranging from non-destructive visual and dimensional inspections to detailed optical and scanning electron microscopic examinations. Several hot cells are dedicated to mechanical property testing of structural materials and to determine the fitness-for-service of reactor core components. Facility upgrades and the development of innovative examination techniques continue to improve AECL's PIE capabilities. (author)

  6. AECL hot-cell facilities and post-irradiation examination services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schankula, M.H.; Plaice, E.L.; Woodworth, L.G.

    1998-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) services available at AECL's hot-cell facilities (HCF). The HCFs are used primarily to provide PIE support for operating CANDU power reactors in Canada and abroad, and for the examination of experimental fuel bundles and core components irradiated in research reactors at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) and off-shore. A variety of examinations and analyses are performed ranging from non-destructive visual and dimensional inspections to detailed optical and scanning electron microscopic examinations. Several hot cells are dedicated to mechanical property testing of structural materials and to determine the fitness-for-service of reactor core components. Facility upgrades and the development of innovative examination techniques continue to improve AECL's PIE capabilities. (author)

  7. Hot-cell shielding system for high power transmission in DUPIC fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.; Lee, J.; Park, J.; Yang, M.; Park, H.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a newly designed hot-cell shielding system for use in the development of DUPIC (Direct Use of spent PWR fuel In CANDU reactors) fuel at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). This hot-cell shielding system that was designed to transmit high power to sintering furnace in-cell from the out-of-cell through a thick cell wall has three subsystems - a steel shield plug with embedded spiral cooling line, stepped copper bus bars, and a shielding lead block. The dose-equivalent rates of the hot-cell shielding system and of the apertures between this system and the hot-cell wall were calculated. Calculated results were compared with the allowable dose limit of the existing hot-cell. Experiments for examining the temperature changes of the shielding system developed during normal furnace operation were also carried out. Finally, gamma-ray radiation survey experiments were conducted by Co-60 source. It is demonstrated that, from both calculated and experimental results, the newly designed hot-cell shielding system meets all the shielding requirements of the existing hot-cell facility, enabling high power transmission to the in-cell sintering furnace. (author)

  8. Spent fuels conditioning and irradiated nuclear fuel elements examination: the STAR facility and its abilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussard, F.; Huillery, R. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. d`Etudes des Combustibles; Averseng, J.L.; Serpantie, J.P. [Novatome Industries, 92 - Le Plessis-Robinson (France)

    1994-12-31

    This paper is a presentation of the STAR facility, a high activity laboratory located in Cadarache Nuclear Research Center (France). The purpose of the STAR facility and of the associated processes, is the treatment, cleaning and conditioning of spent fuels from Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR) and in particular of about 2300 spent GCR fuel cartridges irradiated more than 20 years ago in Electricite de France (EDF) or CEA Uranium Graphite GCR. The processes are: to separate the nuclear fuel from the clad remains, to chemically stabilize the nuclear material and to condition it in sealed canisters. An additional objective of STAR consists in non-destructive or destructive examinations and tests on PWR rods or FBR pins in the frame of fuel development programs. The paper describes the STAR facility conceptual design (safety design rules, hot cells..) and the different options corresponding to the GCR reconditioning process and to further research and development works on various fuel types. (J.S.). 3 figs.

  9. Spent fuels conditioning and irradiated nuclear fuel elements examination: the STAR facility and its abilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussard, F.; Huillery, R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is a presentation of the STAR facility, a high activity laboratory located in Cadarache Nuclear Research Center (France). The purpose of the STAR facility and of the associated processes, is the treatment, cleaning and conditioning of spent fuels from Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR) and in particular of about 2300 spent GCR fuel cartridges irradiated more than 20 years ago in Electricite de France (EDF) or CEA Uranium Graphite GCR. The processes are: to separate the nuclear fuel from the clad remains, to chemically stabilize the nuclear material and to condition it in sealed canisters. An additional objective of STAR consists in non-destructive or destructive examinations and tests on PWR rods or FBR pins in the frame of fuel development programs. The paper describes the STAR facility conceptual design (safety design rules, hot cells..) and the different options corresponding to the GCR reconditioning process and to further research and development works on various fuel types. (J.S.). 3 figs

  10. Spot Ignition of Natural Fuels by Hot Metal Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Urban, James Linwood

    2017-01-01

    The spot ignition of combustible material by hot metal particles is an important pathway by which wildland and urban spot fires and smolders are started. Upon impact with a fuel, such as dry grass, duff, or saw dust, these particles can initiate spot fires by direct flaming or smoldering which can transition to a flame. These particles can be produced by processes such as welding, powerline interactions, fragments from bullet impacts, abrasive cutting, and pyrotechnics. There is little publi...

  11. Development of Spent Fuel Examination Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Dong; Park, K. J.; Shin, H. S.

    2007-04-01

    For the official operation of ACPF Facility Attachment based on facility declared DIQ was issued by IAEA and officialized upon ROK government approval. This procedure gives an essential ground to negotiate Joint Determination between governments of ROK and US. For ACPF process material accountability a neutron coincidence counting system was developed and calibrated with Cf-252 source. Its performance test demonstrated that over-all counting efficiency was about 21% with random error, 1.5% against calibration source, which found to be satisfactory to the expected design specification. A calibration curve derived by MCNP code with relationship between ASNC doublet counts vs. neutron activity of Cm-244 showed calibration constant to be 2.78x10E5 counts/s.g which would be used for initial ACP hot operation test. Nuclear material transportation and temporary storage system was established for active demonstration of advanced spent fuel management process line and would be directly applied to the effective management of wastes arising from active demonstration and would later contribute as a base data to development of inter hot-cell movement system in pyro-processing line. In addition, an optimal spent fuel for the ACP demonstration was selected and a computer code was developed as a tool to estimate the expected source term at each key measurement point of ACP

  12. Development of Spent Fuel Examination Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ho Dong; Park, K. J.; Shin, H. S. (and others)

    2007-04-15

    For the official operation of ACPF Facility Attachment based on facility declared DIQ was issued by IAEA and officialized upon ROK government approval. This procedure gives an essential ground to negotiate Joint Determination between governments of ROK and US. For ACPF process material accountability a neutron coincidence counting system was developed and calibrated with Cf-252 source. Its performance test demonstrated that over-all counting efficiency was about 21% with random error, 1.5% against calibration source, which found to be satisfactory to the expected design specification. A calibration curve derived by MCNP code with relationship between ASNC doublet counts vs. neutron activity of Cm-244 showed calibration constant to be 2.78x10E5 counts/s.g which would be used for initial ACP hot operation test. Nuclear material transportation and temporary storage system was established for active demonstration of advanced spent fuel management process line and would be directly applied to the effective management of wastes arising from active demonstration and would later contribute as a base data to development of inter hot-cell movement system in pyro-processing line. In addition, an optimal spent fuel for the ACP demonstration was selected and a computer code was developed as a tool to estimate the expected source term at each key measurement point of ACP.

  13. Fabrication of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel by hot pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. G.; Kim, D. J; Park, J. Y.; Kim, W. J.; Lee, S. J

    2014-01-01

    Fully ceramic microencapsulated(FCM) nuclear fuel is one of the recently suggested concept to enhance stability nuclear fuel itself. The requirements to increase the accident tolerance of nuclear fuel are mainly two parts: First, the performance has to be maintained compared to the existing UO 2 nuclear fuel and zircaloy cladding system under the normal operation condition. Second, under the severe accident condition, the high temperature structural integrity has to be kept and the generation rate of hydrogen has to be decrease largely. FCM nuclear fuel consists of tristructural isotropic(TRISO) fuel particle and SiC matrix. The relative thermal conductivity of the SiC matrix as compared to UO 2 is quite good, yielding as-irradiated fuel centerline temperature compared to high temperature for the existing fuel leading to reduced stored energy in the core and reduced operational release of fission products from the fuel. Generally SiC ceramics are fabricated via liquid phase sintering due to strong covalent bonding property and low self-diffusivity coefficient. Hot pressing is very effective method to conduct sintering of SiC powder including different second phase. In this study, SiC-matrix composite including TRISO particles were sintered by hot pressing with Al 2 O 3 -Y 2 O 3 additive system. Various sintering condition were investigated to obtain high relative density above 95%. The internal distribution of TRISO particles within SiC-matrix composite was observed by x-ray radiograph. From the analysis of the cross-section of SiC-matrix composite, the fracture of TRISO particles was investigated. In order to uniform distribution of TRISO particle embedded in the SiC matrix, SiC powder overcoating is considered. SiC matrix composite including TRISO was fabricated by hot pressing. FCM pallets with full density were obtained with Al 2 O 3 -Y 2 O 3 additive system. From the microstructure image, the effect of the sintering additive contents and sintering mechanism

  14. Nondestructive examination techniques on Candu fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gheorghe, G.; Man, I.

    2013-01-01

    During irradiation in nuclear reactor, fuel elements undergo dimensional and structural changes, and changes of surface conditions sheath as well, which can lead to damages and even loss of integrity. Visual examination and photography of Candu fuel elements are among the non-destructive examination techniques, next to dimensional measurements that include profiling (diameter, bending, camber) and length, sheath integrity control with eddy currents, measurement of the oxide layer thickness by eddy current techniques. Unirradiated Zircaloy-4 tubes were used for calibration purposes, whereas irradiated Zircaloy-4 tubes were actually subjected to visual inspection and dimensional measurements. We present results of measurements done by eddy current techniques on Zircaloy- 4 tubes, unirradiated, but oxidized in an autoclave prior to examinations. The purpose of these nondestructive examination techniques is to determine those parameters that characterize the behavior and performance of nuclear fuel operation. (authors)

  15. Postirradiation examination of high-density uranium alloy dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, S.L.; Meyer, M.K.; Hofman, G.L.; Strain, R.V.

    1998-01-01

    Two irradiation test vehicles, designated RERTR-2, were inserted into the Advanced Test reactor in Idaho in August 1997. These tests were designed to obtain irradiation performance information on a variety of potential new, high-density uranium alloy dispersion fuels, including U-10Mo, U-8Mo, U-6Mo, U-4Mo, U-9Nb-3Zr, U-6Nb-4Zr, U-5Nb-3Zr, U-6Mo-1Pt, U-6Mo-0.6Ru and U-10Mo-0.05Sn: the intermetallic compounds U 2 Mo and U-10Mo-0.-5Sn; the intermetallic compounds U 2 Mo and U 3 Si 2 were also included in the fuel test matrix. These fuels are included in the experiments as microplates (76 mm x 22 mm x 1.3mm outer dimensions) with a nominal fuel volume loading of 25% and irradiated at relatively low temperature (∼100 deg C). RERTR-1 and RERTR-2 were discharged from the reactor in November 1997 and July 1998, respectively at calculated peak fuel burnups of 45 and 71 at %-U 235 Both experiments are currently under examination at the Alpha Gamma Hot Cell Facility at Argonne National Laboratory in Chicago. This paper presents the postirradiation examination results available to date from these experiments. (author)

  16. Applying hot-wire anemometry to directly measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Shakhshir, Saher; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Berning, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand and more accurately measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell, our group has recently proposed to apply hot wire anemometry in the fuel cell's anode outlet. It was theoretically shown that the electrical signal obtained from the hot wire sensor...... can be directly converted into the fuel cell water balance. In this work an ex-situ experimental investigation is performed to examine the effect of the wire diameter and the outlet pipe diameter on the voltage signal. For a laboratory fuel cell where the mass flow rate the anode outlet is small...... number Nu range between m = 0.137 and m = 0.246. In general, it is shown that applying hot wire anemometry yields in fact very clear voltage readings with high frequency, and it can be used as a diagnosis tool in various fuel cell applications....

  17. ORNL capability to conduct post irradiation examination of full-length commercial nuclear fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spellman, Donald J.

    2007-01-01

    Hot cells at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are nearing completion of a multi-year upgrade program to implement 21. century capabilities to meet the examination demands for higher burnup fuels and the future demands that will come from fuel recycling programs. Fuel reliability and zero tolerance for fuel failure is more than an industry goal. Fuel reliability is becoming a requirement that supports the renaissance of nuclear power generation. Thus, fuel development and management of new forms of waste that will come from programs such as the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) will require extensive use of the flexible, high-quality, technically advanced hot cells at ORNL. ORNL has the capability to perform post irradiation examination (PIE) of irradiated commercial nuclear fuel rods and the management structure to ensure a timely, cost-effective result. ORNL can: 1) Handle the transportation issues, 2) Perform macroscopic fuel rod examinations, 3) Perform microscopic fuel and clad examinations, and 4) Manage legacy material and waste disposal issues from PIE activities. All four of these items will be managed in a way that allows the customer day-to-day access to the results and data. Hot cell examination equipment that is necessary to determine the characteristics and performance of irradiated materials must operate in a hostile environment and is subject to long-term degradation that may result in reliability and quality assurance (QA) issues. ORNL has modernized its hot cell nuclear fuel examination equipment, installing state-of-the-art automated examination equipment and data gathering capabilities. ORNL is planning a major commitment to nuclear fuel examination and development, and future improvements will continue to be made over the next few years. (author)

  18. Facilities for post-irradiation examination of experimental fuel elements at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizzan, E.; Chenier, R.J.

    1979-10-01

    Expansion of post-irradiation facilities at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories and steady improvement in hot-cell techniques and equipment are providing more support to Canada's reactor fuel development program. The hot-cell facility primarily used for examination of experimental fuels averages a quarterly throughput of 40 elements and 110 metallographic specimens. New developments in ultrasonic testing, metallographic sample preparation, active storage, active waste filtration, and fissile accountability are coming into use to increase the efficiency and safety of hot-cell operations. (author)

  19. Post irradiation examination on test fuel pins for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogaca Filho, N.; Ambrozio Filho, F.

    1981-01-01

    Certain aspects of irradiation technology on test fuel pins for PWR, are studied. The results of post irradiation tests, performed on test fuel pins in hot cells, are presented. The results of the tests permit an evaluation of the effects of irradiation on the fuel and cladding of the pin. (Author) [pt

  20. Heat evaluation examination of fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suto, Shinya; Nakabayashi, Hiroki; Yao, Kaoru

    2007-03-01

    The cooling examination was executed by using the simulated fuel assembly to obtain the basic data of the most effective cooling system in the lazer disassembling process of the spent fuel assembly of prototype fast breeder reactor 'Monju'. As a result, the following have been understood. (1) Before the laser disassembling (there is not any duct tube cutting), it is possible to cool enough by the amount of the wind of 20m 3 /h or more flowing from the handling head side. (2) After the laser disassembling begins (duct tube is cut), 1kW or more of the heat generation cannot be cooled by ventilation from the handling head side. (3) Cooling by the flow across fuel pin is required during lazer disassembling. The basic data of the cooling system was obtained from these examination results. However, for cooling across fuel pin during the laser disassembling, it is necessary to examine shape of the side cooling nozzle, spraying angle, and flow velocity at the nozzle exit, etc. enough. (author)

  1. Techniques for laser processing, assay, and examination of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.H.; Mitchell, R.C.; Rogell, M.L.

    1981-11-01

    Fuel examination studies were performed which have application to interim spent fuel storage. These studies were in three areas, i.e., laser drilling and rewelding demonstration, nondestructive assay techniques survey, and fuel examination techniques survey

  2. Transfer tunnel transporter system for the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, J.A.; Miller, S.C.; Richards, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    The detail design is complete and fabrication is approximately 75% complete on the Transfer Tunnel Transporter System. This system provides material handling capability for large, bulky equipment between two hot cells in a new Breeder Reactor Program support facility, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility. One hot cell has an air atmosphere, the other a high purity inert gas atmosphere which must be maintained during transfer operations. System design features, operational capabilities and remote recovery provisions are described

  3. WWER fuel: Results of post irradiation examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markov, D.V.; Smirnov, V.P.; Smirnov, A.V.; Polenok, V.S.; Perepelkin, S.O.; Ivashchenko, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    Experience in the field of fabrication, operation, testing and post-irradiation examinations (PIE) made it possible to settle the following requirements for a new generation of WWER nuclear fuel: - For WWER-1000 FA, the service life is no less than 5 years, 3 alternative fuel cycles (FC): 12 months x 4 FCs, 12 months x 5 FCs and 18 months x 3 FCs; - For WWER-440 FA, fuel cycle is 12 months x 5 FCs and a part of operating assembly is left for the 6. year; - High fuel burnup - up to 70 MWd/kgU; - Dimensional stability of FA and its components; - FA repairability; - Adaptability of fuel cycles; - Maintenance of maneuvering operating conditions at the NPP; - Reliability of control rod operation; - High serviceability level - FE leakage is no worse than 10-5 l/year. In order to provide the fulfillment of the above-given requirements, designers and production engineers have worked out cumulative measures and engineering solutions, which are introduced in development of a new generation fuel. Currently old design FA-M assemblies provided with steel skeleton are being operated in WWER-1000 reactors at Ukrainian and Bulgarian NPPs. As for Russian NPPs, new-type FAs are operated. These are advanced FAs (AFA), FA-A and FA-2 provided with zirconium alloy skeletons. A design of the second generation of WWER-440 operating assemblies was developed with respect to changes in some geometrical parameters, fastening of FEs in the lower grid (splinting was substituted for collet), usage of reinforcing rib under the lower grid, anti-debris filter and hafnium elements of junction unit as well as hafnium content decrease from 0.05 % mass down to 0.01% mass in zirconium materials. They are basic designs of FAs in order to be introduced in a five-year fuel cycle of WWER-440 NPPs in Czech Republic and Slovakia since 2005 and have got prospects for development. The operating experience of dismountable operating assemblies at the Loviisa NPP, vibration-proof operating assemblies at the

  4. Gamma-spectrometric examination of hot particles emitted during the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balashazy, I.; Szabadine-Szende, G.; Loerinc, M.; Zombori, P.

    1987-05-01

    Ge(Li) gamma-spectrometric examination of hot particles prepared from air filtered dust of Budapest air after the Chernobyl accident is presented. The method of separating hot particles is described and their concentration in the air is determined. The radioactive isotope composition of hot particles is discussed and compared with that of dust samples. Finally, the inhalation probability and radiation burden of hot particles are evaluated. (author)

  5. Safety evaluation report of hot cell facilities for demonstration of advanced spent fuel conditioning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Gil Sung; Choung, W. M.; Ku, J. H.; Cho, I. J.; Kook, D. H.; Park, S. W.; Bek, S. Y.; Lee, E. P.

    2004-10-01

    The advanced spent fuel conditioning process(ACP) proposed to reduce the overall volume of the PWR spent fuel and improve safety and economy of the long-term storage of spent fuel. In the next phase(2004∼2006), the hot test will be carried out for verification of the ACP in a laboratory scale. For the hot test, the hot cell facilities of α- type and auxiliary facilities are required essentially for safe handling of high radioactive materials. As the hot cell facilities for demonstration of the ACP, a existing hot cell of β- type will be refurbished to minimize construction expenditures of hot cell facility. Up to now, the detail design of hot cell facilities and process were completed, and the safety analysis was performed to substantiate secure of conservative safety. The design data were submitted for licensing which was necessary for construction and operation of hot cell facilities. The safety investigation of KINS on hot cell facilities was completed, and the license for construction and operation of hot cell facilities was acquired already from MOST. In this report, the safety analysis report submitted to KINS was summarized. And also, the questionnaires issued from KINS and answers of KAERI in process of safety investigation were described in detail

  6. Irradiated fuel examination using the Cerenkov technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, N.; Dowdy, E.J.

    1981-03-01

    A technique for monitoring irradiated nuclear fuel inventories located in water filled storage ponds has been developed and demonstrated. This technique provides sufficient qualitative information to be useful as a confirmatory technique to International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors. Measurements have been made on the Cerenkov glow light intensity from irradiated fuel that show the intensity of this light to be proportional to the cooling time. Fieldable instruments used in several tests confirm that such measurements can be made easily and rapidly, without fuel assembly movement or the introduction of apparatus into the storage ponds. The Cerenkov technique and instrumentation have been shown to be of potential use to operators of reactor spent fuel facilities and away from reactor storage facilities, and to the International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors who provide surveillance of the irradiated fuel stored in these facilities

  7. Over view of nuclear fuel cycle examination facility at KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Key-Soon; Kim, Eun-Ga; Joe, Kih-Soo; Kim, Kil-Jeong; Kim, Ki-Hong; Min, Duk-Ki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-09-01

    Nuclear fuel cycle examination facilities at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) consist of two post-irradiation examination facilities (IMEF and PIEF), one chemistry research facility (CRF), one radiowaste treatment facility (RWTF) and one radioactive waste form examination facility (RWEF). This paper presents the outline of the nuclear fuel cycle examination facilities in KAERI. (author)

  8. Radiation protection aspects in the metallurgical examination of irradiated fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janardhanan, S.; Pillai, P.M.B.; Jacob, J.; Kutty, K.N.; Wattamwar, S.B.; Mehta, S.K. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Health Physics Div.)

    The operational safety requirements of hot cell facilities for metallurgical examination of irradiated natural and enriched uranium fuel elements are highlighted. The cell shielding is designed for handling activities equivalent of 10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 5/ curies of gamma energy of 1.3 Mev. A brief outline of the built-in design features relevant to safety assessment is also incorporated. Reference is made to some salient features of Radiometallurgy Cells at Trombay. Metallurgical operations include investigations on cladding failure of irradiated material structure and specimen preparation from hot fuel element. The radiation protection aspects presented in this paper show that handling low irradiated fuel elements in these beta-gamma cells do not cause serious operational safety problems. The procedures followed and the containment provided would adequately restrict exposure of operational staff to acceptable limits.

  9. Radiation protection aspects in the metallurgical examination of irradiated fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janardhanan, S.; Pillai, P.M.B.; Jacob, John; Kutty, K.N.; Wattamwar, S.B.; Mehta, S.K.

    1981-01-01

    The operational safety requirements of hot cell facilities for metallurgical examination of irradiated natural and enriched uranium fuel elements are highlighted. The cell shielding is designed for handling activities equivalent of 10 2 to 10 5 curies of gamma energy of 1.3 Mev. A brief outline of the built-in design features relevant to safety assessment is also incorporated. Reference is made to some salient features of Radiometallurgy Cells at Trombay. Metallurgical operations include investigations on cladding failure of irradiated material structure and specimen preparation from hot fuel element. The radiation protection aspects presented in this paper show that handling low irradiated fuel elements in these beta-gamma cells do not cause serious operational safety problems. The procedures followed and the containment provided would adequately restrict exposure of operational staff to acceptable limits. (author)

  10. Gamma spectrometrical examination of irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristof, Edvard; Pregl, Gvido

    1988-01-01

    Gamma scanning is the only non-destructive technique for quantitative measuring of fission or activation products in spent fuel. The negligence of local variation of the linear attenuation coefficient of gamma rays in the irradiated fuel remains the main source of systematic error. To eliminate it we combine the (single) emission gamma ray scanning technique with a transmission measurement. Mathematical procedure joined with the experiment is particularly convenient for fuel elements of circular cross-section. In such a manner good results are obtainable even for relatively small number of measuring data. Accomplished routines enable to esteem the finite width of the collimation slit. The experiment has been partially automated. Trial measurements were carried out, and the measured data were successfully processed

  11. Report of Post Irradiation Examination for Dry Process Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Par, Jang Jin; Jung, I. H.; Kang, K. H.; Moon, J. S.; Lee, C. R.; Ryu, H. J.; Song, K. C.; Yang, M. S.; Yoo, B. O.; Jung, Y. H.; Choo, Y. S.

    2006-08-01

    The spent PWR fuel typically contains 0.9 wt.% of fissile uranium and 0.6 wt.% of fissile plutonium, which exceeds the natural uranium fissile content of 0.711 wt.%. The neutron economy of a CANDU reactor is sufficient to utilize the DUPIC fuel, even though the neutron-absorbing fission products contained in the spent PWR fuel were remained in the DUPIC fuel. The DUPIC fuel cycle offers advantages to the countries operating both the PWR and CANDU reactors, such as saving the natural uranium, reducing the spent fuel in both PWR and CANDU, and acquiring the extra energy by reuse of the PWR spent fuel. This report contains the results of post-irradiation examination of the DUPIC fuel irradiated four times at HANARO from May 2000 to August 2006 present except the first irradiation test of simulated DUPIC fuel at HANARO on August 1999

  12. Posttest examination results of recent treat tests on metal fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, J.W.; Wright, A.E.; Bauer, T.H.; Goldman, A.J.; Klickman, A.E.; Sevy, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    A series of in-reactor transient tests is underway to study the characteristics of metal-alloy fuel during transient-overpower-without-scam conditions. The initial tests focused on determining the margin to cladding breach and the axial fuel motions that would mitigate the power excursion. The tests were conducted in flowing-sodium loops with uranium - 5% fissium EBR-II Mark-II driver fuel elements in the TREAT facility. Posttest examination of the tests evaluated fuel elongation in intact pins and postfailure fuel motion. Microscopic examination of the intact pins studied the nature and extent of fuel/cladding interaction, fuel melt fraction and mass distribution, and distribution of porosity. Eutectic penetration and failure of the cladding were also examined in the failed pins

  13. Radiographic examination methods for fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, V.P.; Dvoretskii, V.G.

    1987-11-01

    To study the fast neutron reactor fuel pins structure the NIIAR Institute used x diffraction, neutronic radiography and autoradiographies. The two first methods are used for internal macrostructure studies, the third method for the plutonium and uranium radial distribution. These methods and the main results are indicated in this document [fr

  14. Analysis of IFR driver fuel hot channel factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku, J.Y.; Chang, L.K.; Mohr, D.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic uncertainty factors for Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) driver fuels have been determined based primarily on the database obtained from the predecessor fuels used in the IFR prototype, Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The uncertainty factors were applied to the channel factors (HCFs) analyses to obtain separate overall HCFs for fuel and cladding for steady-state analyses. A ''semistatistical horizontal method'' was used in the HCFs analyses. The uncertainty factor of the fuel thermal conductivity dominates the effects considered in the HCFs analysis; the uncertainty in fuel thermal conductivity will be reduced as more data are obtained to expand the currently limited database for the IFR ternary metal fuel (U-20Pu-10Zr). A set of uncertainty factors to be used for transient analyses has also been derived

  15. Development status of post irradiation examination techniques at the JMTR Hot Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmi, M.; Ohsawa, K.; Nakagawa, T.; Umino, A.; Shimizu, M.; Satoh, H.; Oyamada, R.

    1992-01-01

    Hot laboratory at Oarai Research Establishment was founded to examine the objects mainly irradiated at JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor) and has been operated since 1971. A wide variety of post-irradiation examinations (PIE) is available using the hot laboratory. Continuous efforts are made to develop new PIE techniques to accommodate the user's requirements. The following are main techniques recently developed in the hot laboratory; 1. Remote capsule assembly including remote weld of irradiated objects for reirradiation in JMTR. 2. Fracture toughness tests of reactor component materials. 3. Creep tests of heat resistance alloys in high temperature conditions. 4. Tests of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). 5. Examination techniques of miniaturized test specimens. This report describes an outline of the hot laboratory with main emphasis on the new PIE techniques. (author)

  16. Effect of Crossflow on Hot Spot Fuel Temperature in Prismatic VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Nam; Tak, Nam-il; Kim, Min Hwan; Noh, Jae Man; Park, Goon-Cherl

    2014-01-01

    Various studies have been conducted to predict the thermal-hydraulics of a prismatic gas-cooled reactor. However, most previous studies have concentrated on the nominal-designed core. The fuel assembly of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor consists of a fuel compact and graphite block used as a moderator. This graphite faces a dimensional change due to irradiation or heating during normal operation. This size change might affect the coolant flow distribution in the active core. Therefore, the hot spot fuel temperature position or value could vary. There are two types of flows by the size change of graphite. One is the bypass flow and the other is the crossflow. The crossflow occurs at the crossflow gap between the vertical stacks of fuel blocks. In this study, the effect of the crossflow on the hot spot fuel temperature has been intensively investigated. (author)

  17. Hot topics in alkaline exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serov, Alexey; Zenyuk, Iryna V.; Arges, Christopher G.; Chatenet, Marian

    2018-01-01

    The tremendous progress from the first discovery of fuel cell principles by Sir William Robert Grove in 1839 [1] and independent observation of electricity generated in electrochemical reaction of hydrogen and air by a Swiss scientist Christian F. Shoenbein [2] to the recent breakthroughs in the fuel cell field resulted in the appearance of this clean energy technology around us. Indeed, fuel cell technology undoubtedly has entered into our life with the first introduction of Toyota Mirai Fuel Cell Vehicle (FCV) by Toyota Motor Co. in December of 2014 [3,4]. This FCV is commercially available and can be purchased in several countries. However, its sticker price of 57,500 substantially limits the number of customers that can purchase it. There are numerous factors that contribute to the high cost of fuel cell stack, however the price of platinum and platinum alloys is the main contributor [5].

  18. Fuels management in the southern Appalachian Mountains, hot continental division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew J. Reilly; Thomas A. Waldrop; Joseph J. O’Brien

    2012-01-01

    The Southern Appalachian Mountains, Hot Continental Mountains Division, M220 (McNab and others 2007) are a topographically and biologically complex area with over 10 million ha of forested land, where complex environmental gradients have resulted in a great diversity of forest types. Abundant moisture and a long, warm growing season support high levels of productivity...

  19. Hot vacuum outgassing to ensure low hydrogen content in MOX fuel pellets for thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.; Nair, M.R.; Kumar, Arun

    1983-01-01

    Hot vacuum outgassing treatment to ensure low hydrogen content in Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX) pellets for thermal reactors has been described. Hypostoichiometric sintered MOX pellets retain more hydrogen than UO 2 pellets. The hydrogen content further increases with the addition of admixed lubricant and pore formers. However, low hydrogen content in the MOX pellets can be ensured by a hot vacuum outgassing treatment at a temperature between 773K to 823K for 2 hrs. (author)

  20. Shield wall evaluation of hot cell facility for advanced spent fuel conditioning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, I. J.; Kuk, D. H.; Ko, J. H.; Jung, W. M.; Yoo, G. S.; Lee, E. P.; Park, S. W.

    2002-01-01

    The future hot cell is located in the Irradiated Material Experiment Facility (IMEF) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). It is β-γ type hot cell that was constructed on the base floor in IMEF building for irradiated material testing. And this hot cell will be used for carrying out the Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process (ACP). The radiation shielding capability of hot cell should be sufficient to meet the radiation dose requirements in the related regulations. Because the radioactive sources of ACP are expected to be higher than radioactive sources of IMEF design criteria, the future hot cell in current status is unsatisfactory to hot test of ACP. So the shielding analysis of the future hot cell is performed to evaluate shielding ability of concrete shield wall. The shielding analysis included (a) identification of ACP source term; (b) photon source spectrum; (c) shielding analysis by QADS and MCNP-4C; and (d) enhancement of concrete shield wall. In this research, dose rates are obtained according to ACP source, geometry and hot cell shield wall thickness. And the evaluation and reinforcement thickness of the shield wall about future hot cell are concluded

  1. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Glimm, J. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3600 (United States); Cheng, B.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    We determine the dependence of key Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hot spot simulation properties on the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat, here modified by addition of energy to the cold shell. Variation of this parameter reduces the simulation to experiment discrepancy in some, but not all, experimentally inferred quantities. Using simulations with radiation drives tuned to match experimental shots N120321 and N120405 from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), we carry out sets of simulations with varying amounts of added entropy and examine the sensitivities of important experimental quantities. Neutron yields, burn widths, hot spot densities, and pressures follow a trend approaching their experimentally inferred quantities. Ion temperatures and areal densities are sensitive to the adiabat changes, but do not necessarily converge to their experimental quantities with the added entropy. This suggests that a modification to the simulation adiabat is one of, but not the only explanation of the observed simulation to experiment discrepancies. In addition, we use a theoretical model to predict 3D mix and observe a slight trend toward less mixing as the entropy is enhanced. Instantaneous quantities are assessed at the time of maximum neutron production, determined dynamically within each simulation. These trends contribute to ICF science, as an effort to understand the NIC simulation to experiment discrepancy, and in their relation to the high foot experiments, which features a higher adiabat in the experimental design and an improved neutron yield in the experimental results.

  2. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Glimm, J.; Cheng, B.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D. C.

    2015-01-01

    We determine the dependence of key Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hot spot simulation properties on the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat, here modified by addition of energy to the cold shell. Variation of this parameter reduces the simulation to experiment discrepancy in some, but not all, experimentally inferred quantities. Using simulations with radiation drives tuned to match experimental shots N120321 and N120405 from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), we carry out sets of simulations with varying amounts of added entropy and examine the sensitivities of important experimental quantities. Neutron yields, burn widths, hot spot densities, and pressures follow a trend approaching their experimentally inferred quantities. Ion temperatures and areal densities are sensitive to the adiabat changes, but do not necessarily converge to their experimental quantities with the added entropy. This suggests that a modification to the simulation adiabat is one of, but not the only explanation of the observed simulation to experiment discrepancies. In addition, we use a theoretical model to predict 3D mix and observe a slight trend toward less mixing as the entropy is enhanced. Instantaneous quantities are assessed at the time of maximum neutron production, determined dynamically within each simulation. These trends contribute to ICF science, as an effort to understand the NIC simulation to experiment discrepancy, and in their relation to the high foot experiments, which features a higher adiabat in the experimental design and an improved neutron yield in the experimental results

  3. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Cheng, B.; Glimm, J.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D. C.

    2015-02-01

    We determine the dependence of key Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hot spot simulation properties on the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat, here modified by addition of energy to the cold shell. Variation of this parameter reduces the simulation to experiment discrepancy in some, but not all, experimentally inferred quantities. Using simulations with radiation drives tuned to match experimental shots N120321 and N120405 from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), we carry out sets of simulations with varying amounts of added entropy and examine the sensitivities of important experimental quantities. Neutron yields, burn widths, hot spot densities, and pressures follow a trend approaching their experimentally inferred quantities. Ion temperatures and areal densities are sensitive to the adiabat changes, but do not necessarily converge to their experimental quantities with the added entropy. This suggests that a modification to the simulation adiabat is one of, but not the only explanation of the observed simulation to experiment discrepancies. In addition, we use a theoretical model to predict 3D mix and observe a slight trend toward less mixing as the entropy is enhanced. Instantaneous quantities are assessed at the time of maximum neutron production, determined dynamically within each simulation. These trends contribute to ICF science, as an effort to understand the NIC simulation to experiment discrepancy, and in their relation to the high foot experiments, which features a higher adiabat in the experimental design and an improved neutron yield in the experimental results.

  4. Hot cell renovation in the spent fuel conditioning process facility at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Seung Nam; Lee, Jong Kwang; Park, Byung Suk; Cho, Il Je; Kim, Ki Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The advanced spent fuel conditioning process facility (ACPF) of the irradiated materials examination facility (IMEF) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been renovated to implement a lab scale electrolytic reduction process for pyroprocessing. The interior and exterior structures of the ACPF hot cell have been modified under the current renovation project for the experimentation of the electrolytic reduction process using spent nuclear fuel. The most important aspect of this renovation was the installation of the argon compartment within the hot cell. For the design and system implementation of the argon compartment system, a full-scale mock-up test and a three-dimensional (3D) simulation test were conducted in advance. The remodeling and repairing of the process cell (M8a), the maintenance cell (M8b), the isolation room, and their utilities were also planned through this simulation to accommodate the designed argon compartment system. Based on the considered refurbishment workflow, previous equipment in the M8 cell, including vessels and pipes, were removed and disposed of successfully after a zoning smear survey and decontamination, and new equipment with advanced functions and specifications were installed in the hot cell. Finally, the operating area and isolation room were also refurbished to meet the requirements of the improved hot cell facility.

  5. Fuel examination at SSEB Hunterston B power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angell, I.; Oldfield, D.

    1988-01-01

    After a brief description of Hunterston 'B' Power Station and its fuel, the need for post irradiation examination is established. Means of providing this on site at various stages of the fuel route are described, i.e. refuelling machine, dismantling cell and storage pond. Techniques used include the human eye, video recording and endoscopy. (author)

  6. Nondestructive examination of 51 fuel and reflector elements from Fort St. Vrain Core Segment 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.M.; Saurwein, J.J.

    1980-12-01

    Fifty-one fuel and reflector elements irradiated in core segment 1 of the Fort St. Vrain High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) were inspected dimensionally and visually in the Hot Service Facility at Fort St. Vrain in July 1979. Time- and volume-averaged graphite temperatures for the examined fuel elements ranged from approx. 400 0 to 750 0 C. Fast neutron fluences varied from approx. 0.3 x 10 25 n/m 2 to 1.0 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E > 29 fJ)/sub HTGR/. Nearly all of the examined elements shrank in both axial and radial dimensions. The measured data were compared with strain and bow predictions obtained from SURVEY/STRESS, a computer code that employs viscoelastic beam theory to calculate stresses and deformations in HTGR fuel elements

  7. Preliminary test results for post irradiation examination on the HTTR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueta, Shohei; Umeda, Masayuki; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Sozawa, Shizuo; Shimizu, Michio; Ishigaki, Yoshinobu; Obata, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    The future post-irradiation program for the first-loading fuel of the HTTR is scheduled using the HTTR fuel handling facilities and the Hot Laboratory in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) to confirm its irradiation resistance and to obtain data on its irradiation characteristics in the core. This report describes the preliminary test results and the future plan for a post-irradiation examination for the HTTR fuel. In the preliminary test, fuel compacts made with the same SiC-coated fuel particle as the first loading fuel were used. In the preliminary test, dimension, weight, fuel failure fraction, and burnup were measured, and X-ray radiograph, SEM, and EPMA observations were carried out. Finally, it was confirmed that the first-loading fuel of the HTTR showed good quality under an irradiation condition. The future plan for the post-irradiation tests was described to confirm its irradiation performance and to obtain data on its irradiation characteristics in the HTTR core. (author)

  8. Examination of fatigue development in elite soccer in a hot environment: a multi-experimental approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Magni; Mujika, I; Santisteban, J

    2010-01-01

    The study examines fatigue in elite soccer played in hot conditions. High-profile soccer players (n=20) were studied during match play at ~31 °C. Repeated sprint and jump performances were assessed in rested state and after a game and activity profile was examined. Additionally, heart rate (HR...

  9. Hypnotherapy to Reduce Hot Flashes: Examination of Response Expectancies as a Mediator of Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwinski, Jim R.; Elkins, Gary R.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of action responsible for hypnotherapy’s effect in reducing hot flashes is not yet known. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of response expectancies as a potential mediator. Hypnotizability was also tested as an effect moderator. Data were collected from a sample of 172 postmenopausal women, who had been randomized to receive either a 5-week hypnosis intervention or structured attention counseling. Measures of response expectancies were analyzed to determine if the relationship between group assignment and hot flashes frequency was mediated by expectancies for treatment efficacy. A series of simple mediation and conditional process analyses did not support mediation of the relationship between treatment condition and hot flash frequency through response expectancy. The effect of hypnotherapy in reducing hot flashes does not appear to be due to placebo effects as determined by response expectancies. Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. PMID:28528570

  10. Minimizing fuel wood consumption through the evolution of hot ston ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The central objective of this paper is to minimize fuelwood consumption through evolving alternative domestic energy. Data on alternative domestic energy sources, and use fuel wood consumption during scarcity of petroleum were collected using structured questionnaires. Data on time spent to cook yam, race and beans ...

  11. Design and construction of the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, C.A.

    1979-01-01

    Final design is more than 85 percent complete on the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility, the facility for post-irradiation examination of the fuels and materials tests irradiated in the FFTF and for fuel process development, experimental test pin fabrication and supporting storage, assay, and analytical chemistry functions. The overall facility is generally described with specific information given on some of the design features. Construction has been initiated and more than 10% of the construction contracts have been awarded on a fixed price basis

  12. Design Evolutuion of Hot Isotatic Press Cans for NTP Cermet Fuel Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mireles, O. R.; Broadway, J.; Hickman, R.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is under consideration for potential use in deep space exploration missions due to desirable performance properties such as a high specific impulse (> 850 seconds). Tungsten (W)-60vol%UO2 cermet fuel elements are under development, with efforts emphasizing fabrication, performance testing and process optimization to meet NTP service life requirements [1]. Fuel elements incorporate design features that provide redundant protection from crack initiation, crack propagation potentially resulting in hot hydrogen (H2) reduction of UO2 kernels. Fuel erosion and fission product retention barriers include W coated UO2 fuel kernels, W clad internal flow channels and fuel element external W clad resulting in a fully encapsulated fuel element design as shown.

  13. About economy of fuel and energy resources in the hot water supply system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotov, P. V.; Sivukhin, A. A.; Zhukov, D. A.; Zhukova, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    The assessment of the power efficiency realized in the current of heat supply system of technology of regulation of loading of the hot water supply system, considering unevenness consumption of hot water is executed. For the purpose of definition the applicability boundary of realized technology comparative analysis of indicators of the effectiveness of its work within the possible range of the parameters of regulations. Developed a software application “The calculation of the total economy of fuel and energy resources in the hot water supply system when you change of the parameters of regulations”, which allows on the basis of multivariate calculations analyses of their results, to choose the optimum mode of operation heat supply system and to assess the effectiveness of load regulation in the hot water supply system.

  14. Status of the nondestructive examination equipment for the fuels and materials examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frandsen, G.B.

    1980-01-01

    The present status of Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Equipment proposed for the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) now under construction at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory is discussed. Items discussed include the NDE cell receiving machine, the dismantling machine, the standard examination stage, profilometry, eddy current, wire wrap removal machine, surface examination, gamma scan and general NDE equipment

  15. Operation of the nuclear fuel cycle test facilities -Operation of the hot test loop facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, S. Y.; Jeong, M. K.; Park, C. K.; Yang, S. K.; Won, S. Y.; Song, C. H.; Jeon, H. K.; Jeong, H. J.; Cho, S.; Min, K. H.; Jeong, J. H.

    1997-01-01

    A performance and reliability of a advanced nuclear fuel and reactor newly designed should be verified by performing the thermal hydraulics tests. In thermal hydraulics research team, the thermal hydraulics tests associated with the development of an advanced nuclear fuel and reactor haven been carried out with the test facilities, such as the Hot Test Loop operated under high temperature and pressure conditions, Cold Test Loop, RCS Loop and B and C Loop. The objective of this project is to obtain the available experimental data and to develop the advanced measuring techniques through taking full advantage of the facilities. The facilities operated by the thermal hydraulics research team have been maintained and repaired in order to carry out the thermal hydraulics tests necessary for providing the available data. The performance tests for the double grid type bottom end piece which was improved on the debris filtering effectivity were performed using the PWR-Hot Test Loop. The CANDU-Hot Test Loop was operated to carry out the pressure drop tests and strength tests of CANFLEX fuel. The Cold Test Loop was used to obtain the local velocity data in subchannel within HANARO fuel bundle and to study a thermal mixing characteristic of PWR fuel bundle. RCS thermal hydraulic loop was constructed and the experiments have been carried out to measure the critical heat flux. In B and C Loop, the performance tests for each component were carried out. (author). 19 tabs., 78 figs., 19 refs

  16. Operation of the nuclear fuel cycle test facilities -Operation of the hot test loop facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, S. Y.; Jeong, M. K.; Park, C. K.; Yang, S. K.; Won, S. Y.; Song, C. H.; Jeon, H. K.; Jeong, H. J.; Cho, S.; Min, K. H.; Jeong, J. H.

    1997-01-01

    A performance and reliability of a advanced nuclear fuel and reactor newly designed should be verified by performing the thermal hydraulics tests. In thermal hydraulics research team, the thermal hydraulics tests associated with the development of an advanced nuclear fuel and reactor haven been carried out with the test facilities, such as the Hot Test Loop operated under high temperature and pressure conditions, Cold Test Loop, RCS Loop and B and C Loop. The objective of this project is to obtain the available experimental data and to develop the advanced measuring techniques through taking full advantage of the facilities. The facilities operated by the thermal hydraulics research team have been maintained and repaired in order to carry out the thermal hydraulics tests necessary for providing the available data. The performance tests for the double grid type bottom end piece which was improved on the debris filtering effectivity were performed using the PWR-Hot Test Loop. The CANDU-Hot Test Loop was operated to carry out the pressure drop tests and strength tests of CANFLEX fuel. The Cold Test Loop was used to obtain the local velocity data in subchannel within HANARO fuel bundle and to study a thermal mixing characteristic of PWR fuel bundle. RCS thermal hydraulic loop was constructed and the experiments have been carried out to measure the critical heat flux. In B and C Loop, the performance tests for each component were carried out. (author). 19 tabs., 78 figs., 19 refs.

  17. HOT CELL SYSTEM FOR DETERMINING FISSION GAS RETENTION IN METALLIC FUELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sell, D. A.; Baily, C. E.; Malewitz, T. J.; Medvedev, P. G.; Porter, D. L.; Hilton, B. A.

    2016-09-01

    A system has been developed to perform measurements on irradiated, sodium bonded-metallic fuel elements to determine the amount of fission gas retained in the fuel material after release of the gas to the element plenum. During irradiation of metallic fuel elements, most of the fission gas developed is released from the fuel and captured in the gas plenums of the fuel elements. A significant amount of fission gas, however, remains captured in closed porosities which develop in the fuel during irradiation. Additionally, some gas is trapped in open porosity but sealed off from the plenum by frozen bond sodium after the element has cooled in the hot cell. The Retained fission Gas (RFG) system has been designed, tested and implemented to capture and measure the quantity of retained fission gas in characterized cut pieces of sodium bonded metallic fuel. Fuel pieces are loaded into the apparatus along with a prescribed amount of iron powder, which is used to create a relatively low melting, eutectic composition as the iron diffuses into the fuel. The apparatus is sealed, evacuated, and then heated to temperatures in excess of the eutectic melting point. Retained fission gas release is monitored by pressure transducers during the heating phase, thus monitoring for release of fission gas as first the bond sodium melts and then the fuel. A separate hot cell system is used to sample the gas in the apparatus and also characterize the volume of the apparatus thus permitting the calculation of the total fission gas release from the fuel element samples along with analysis of the gas composition.

  18. Estimation of radiation exposure for hot cell workers during DUPIC fuel fabrication process in IMEF M6 cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Yong Bum; Baek, Sang Yeol; Park, Dae Kyu

    1997-06-01

    DUPIC(Direct Use of spent PWR fuel In CANDU) fuel cycle to utilize the PWR spent fuel in fabricating CANDU fuel, which is expected to reduce not only the total amount of high level radwastes but the energy sources is underway. IMEF M6 cell to be used as DUPIC fuel fabrication facility is refurbished and retrofitted. Radiation exposure for the hot cell worker by dispersion of the radioactive materials during the DUPIC process were estimated on the basis of the hot cell design information. According to the estimation results, DUPIC fuel fabrication process could be run without any severe impacts to the hot cell workers when the ventilation system to maintain the sufficient pressure difference between hotcell and working area and radiation monitoring system is supports the hot cell operation properly. (author). 4 tabs., 6 figs.

  19. Guidebook on destructive examination of water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    As a result of common efforts of fuel vendors, utilities and research institutes the average burnup pf design batch fuels was increased for both PWRs and BWRs and the fuel failure rate has been reduced. The previously published Guidebook on Non-Destructive Examination of Water Reactor Fuel recommended that more detailed destructive techniques are required for complete understanding of fuel performance. On the basis of contributions of the 14 participants in the ED-WARF-II CRP and proceedings of IAEA Technical Committee on Recent Developments in Post-irradiation Examination Techniques for Water Reactor Fuel this guidebook was compiled. It gives a complete survey of destructive techniques available to date worldwide. The following examination techniques are described in detailed including major principles of equipment design: microstructural studies; elemental analysis; isotopic analysis; measurement of physical properties; measurement of mechanical properties. Besides the examination techniques, methods for refabrication of experimental rods from high burnup power reactor rods as well as methods for verification of non-destructive techniques by using destructive techniques is included

  20. An examination of fuel consumption trends in construction projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Valerie A.; Manley, Dawn K.

    2012-01-01

    Recent estimates of fuel consumption in construction projects are highly variable. Lack of standards for reporting at both the equipment and project levels make it difficult to quantify the magnitude of fuel consumption and the associated opportunities for efficiency improvements in construction projects. In this study, we examined clusters of Environmental Impact Reports for seemingly similar construction projects in California. We observed that construction projects are not characterized consistently by task or equipment. We found wide variations in estimates for fuel use in terms of tasks, equipment, and overall projects, which may be attributed in part to inconsistencies in methodology and parameter ranges. Our analysis suggests that standardizing fuel consumption reporting and estimation methodologies for construction projects would enable quantification of opportunities for efficiency improvements at both the equipment and project levels. With increasing emphasis on reducing fossil fuel consumption, it will be important to quantify opportunities to increase fuel efficiency, including across the construction sector. - Highlights: ► An analysis of construction projects reveals inconsistencies in fuel use estimates. ► Fuel consumption estimates for similar construction equipment can vary greatly. ► Standards would help to quantify efficiency opportunities in construction.

  1. CFD Analysis of Hot Spot Fuel Temperature in the Control Fuel Block Assembly of a VHTR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Hwan; Tak, Nam Il; Noh, Jae Man

    2010-01-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) dedicated for efficient hydrogen production requires core outlet temperatures of more than 950 .deg. C. As the outlet temperature increases, the thermal margin of the core decreases, which highlights the need for a detailed analysis to reduce its uncertainty. Tak et al. performed CFD analysis for a 1/12 fuel assembly model and compared the result with a simple unit-cell model in order to emphasize the need of a detailed CFD analysis for the prediction of hot spot fuel temperatures. Their CFD model, however, was focused on the standard fuel assembly but not on the control fuel assembly in which a considerable amount of bypass flow is expected to occur through the control rod passages. In this study, a CFD model for the control fuel block assembly is developed and applied for the hot spot analyses of PMR200 core. Not only the bypass flow but also the cross flow is considered in the analyses

  2. Guidebook on non-destructive examination of water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    To date, a significant quantity of data has been collected and published on power reactor fuel examination to determine the performance when subjected to radiation. The data have been published in technical reports and papers in technical journals. However, the usefulness of the published data to the IAEA Member States is limited. This is due to a number of reasons, including the large variety of examination methods, incomplete documentation of the data and lack of sufficiently detailed information on pre-irradiation data and irradiation history. To alleviate some of these problems, the Agency initiated a Co-ordinated Research Programme in 1983 entitled ''Examination and Documentation Methodology for Water Reactor Fuel''. The programme meetings usually involved technical contributions from the programme participants, followed by a detailed discussion of the various examination methods presented in these contributions. Based on these discussions and contributions, a guidebook on the examination and documentation methodology for light and heavy water reactor fuel has been prepared. The guidebook addresses the most commonly used examination methods for the various water reactor fuel systems. Limitations of each of the measurement techniques are also discussed, including their accuracy and precision. A detailed description of the measurement equipment is given and the common methods of documenting the data are also addressed. With the adoption of the uniform set of procedures and documentation methods, it is hoped that the IAEA Member States will be able to use effectively both the existing data and the future data from the various national programmes. It is also expected that this guidebook will be useful for adaptation of measurement techniques that are unique to specific fuel systems to other fuel types. 59 refs, 33 figs, 4 tabs

  3. Examination of irradiated fuel elements using gamma scanning technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichim, O.; Mincu, M.; Man, I.; Stanica, M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to validate the gamma scanning technique used to calculate the activity of gamma fission products from CANDU/TRIGA irradiated fuel elements. After a short presentation of the equipments used and their characteristics, the paper describes the calibration technique for the devices and how computed tomography reconstruction is done. Following the previously mentioned steps is possible to obtain the axial and radial profiles and the computed tomography reconstruction for calibration sources and for the irradiated fuel elements. The results are used to validate the gamma scanning techniques as a non-destructive examination method. The gamma scanning techniques will be used to: identify the fission products in the irradiated CANDU/TRIGA fuel elements, construct the axial and radial distributions of fission products, get the distribution in cross section through computed tomography reconstruction, and determine the nuclei number and the fission products activity of the irradiated CANDU/TRIGA fuel elements. (authors)

  4. Postmortem metallurgical examination of a fire-exposed spent fuel shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, H.J.; Yoshimura, H.R.

    1980-04-01

    A potmortem examination of a large fire-exposed rail-transported spent fuel shipping container has revealed the presence of two macrofissures in the outer cask shell. The first, a part-thru crack located within the seam weld fusion zone of the outer cask shell, was typical of hot cracks that may be found in stainless steel weldments. The second, located within the stainless steel base metal, apparently originated at microcracks formed during the welding of a copper-stainless steel dissimilar metal joint. The latter microcrack then propagated during the fire-test, ultimately penetrating the outer shall of the cask. 18 figures, 2 tables

  5. CFD Analysis for Hot Spot Fuel Temperature of Deep-Burn Modular Helium Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tak, Nam Il; Jo, Chang Keun; Jun, Ji Su; Kim, Min Hwan; Venneri, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    As an alternative concept of a conventional transmutation using fast reactors, a deep-burn modular helium reactor (DB-MHR) concept has been proposed by General Atomics (GA). Kim and Venneri published an optimization study on the DB-MHR core in terms of nuclear design. The authors concluded that more concrete evaluations are necessary including thermo-fluid and safety analysis. The present paper describes the evaluation of the hot spot fuel temperature of the fuel assembly in the 600MWth DB-MHR core under full operating power conditions. Two types of fuel shuffling scheme (radial and axial hybrid shuffling and axial-only shuffling) are investigated. For accurate thermo-fluid analysis, the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed on a 1/12 fuel assembly using the CFX code

  6. Research on nondestructive examination methods for CANDU fuel channel inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soare, M.; Petriu, F.; Toma, V.; Revenco, V.; Calinescu, A.; Ciocan, R.; Iordache, C.; Popescu, L.; Mihalache, M.; Murgescu, C.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of the 1994 edition of CAN/CSA-N285.4 Periodic Inspection Standard, which address all known and postulated degradation mechanisms and introduce material surveillance demands, involve a growing need for improved nondestructive examination (NDE) methods and technologies. In order to have a proper technical support in its decisions concerning fuel channel inspections at Cernavoda NPP, the Romanian Power Authority (RENEL) initiated a Research Program regarding the nondestructive characterization of the fuel channels structural integrity. The paper presents the most significant results obtained on this Research Program: the ENDUS experimental system for Laboratory simulation of the fuel channel inspection, ultrasonic Rayleigh-Lamb waves technique for pressure tubes examination, phase analysis technique for near-surface flaws, influence of the metallurgical state of the pressure tube material on the eddy current defectoscopic signals, characterization of plastic deformation and fracture of zirconium alloys by acoustic emission. (author)

  7. Fusion yield rate recovery by escaping hot-spot fast ions in the neighboring fuel layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xian-Zhu; McDevitt, C. J.; Guo, Zehua; Berk, H. L.

    2014-02-01

    Free-streaming loss by fast ions can deplete the tail population in the hot spot of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target. Escaping fast ions in the neighboring fuel layer of a cryogenic target can produce a surplus of fast ions locally. In contrast to the Knudsen layer effect that reduces hot-spot fusion reactivity due to tail ion depletion, the inverse Knudsen layer effect increases fusion reactivity in the neighboring fuel layer. In the case of a burning ICF target in the presence of significant hydrodynamic mix which aggravates the Knudsen layer effect, the yield recovery largely compensates for the yield reduction. For mix-dominated sub-ignition targets, the yield reduction is the dominant process.

  8. Advanced fuels for gas turbines: Fuel system corrosion, hot path deposit formation and emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seljak, Tine; Širok, Brane; Katrašnik, Tomaž

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Technical feasibility analysis of alternative fuels requires a holistic approach. • Fuel, combustion, corrosion and component functionality are strongly related. • Used approach defines design constraints for microturbines using alternative fuels. - Abstract: To further expand the knowledge base on the use of innovative fuels in the micro gas turbines, this paper provides insight into interrelation between specific fuel properties and their impact on combustion and emission formation phenomena in micro gas turbines for stationary power generation as well as their impact on material corrosion and deposit formation. The objective of this study is to identify potential issues that can be related to specific fuel properties and to propose counter measures for achieving stable, durable, efficient and low emission operation of the micro gas turbine while utilizing advanced/innovative fuels. This is done by coupling combustion and emission formation analyses to analyses of material degradation and degradation of component functionality while interpreting them through fuel-specific properties. To ensure sufficiently broad range of fuel properties to demonstrate the applicability of the method, two different fuels with significantly different properties are analysed, i.e. tire pyrolysis oil and liquefied wood. It is shown that extent of required micro gas turbine adaptations strongly correlates with deviations of the fuel properties from those of the baseline fuel. Through the study, these adaptations are supported by in-depth analyses of impacts of fuel properties on different components, parameters and subsystems and their quantification. This holistic approach is further used to propose methodologies and innovative approaches for constraining a design space of micro gas turbine to successfully utilize wide spectra of alternative/innovative fuels.

  9. Applying hot wire anemometry to directly measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell - Part 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Al Shakhshir, Saher

    2015-01-01

    In order to accurately determine the water balance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell it has recently been suggested to employ constant temperature anemometry (CTA), a frequently used method to measure the velocity of a fluid stream. CTA relies on convective heat transfer around a heated wire...... the equations required to calculate the heat transfer coefficient and the resulting voltage signal as function of the fuel cell water balance. The most critical and least understood part is the determination of the Nusselt number to calculate the heat transfer between the wire and the gas stream. Different...... expressions taken from the literature will be examined in detail, and it will be demonstrated that the power-law approach suggested by Hilpert is the only useful one for the current purposes because in this case the voltage response from the hot-wire sensor E/E0 shows the same dependency to the water balance...

  10. The post-irradiation examination of fuel in support of Bruce A Nuclear Division fueling with flow program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montin, J.; Sagat, S.

    1995-10-01

    Bruce A Nuclear Division (BAND) units are operating at ∼ 75% of full power, because of the potential of a power pulse in the event of an inlet header break. As a result, BAND is converting to fueling with flow, to eliminate the potential of a power pulse and to allow for full-power operation. Concerns regarding the integrity of the end-of-life (EOL) bundles interacting with the latch at the downstream end of the fuel channel were raised. BAND carried out a test program in which EOL bundles in the upstream position of 13 of Unit 2 were cascaded into the downstream latch position 1 of another channel. Six of twelve cascaded bundles and two typical EOL position 13 (benchmark) bundles were selected for post-irradiation examination (PIE). Incipient cracks were found in the benchmark bundles. Metallographic and fractographic examination, along with crack dating, and hydrogen and deuterium analyses, indicated that the incipient cracks were the result of delayed-hydride assisted cracking at the EOL. Consequently, Ontario Hydro changed the design of the outlet shield plug to support all three rings of the fuel bundle, to minimize stress and prevent end plate cracking. Also, an ultrasonic end plate inspection tool (UT) was developed and located in the fuel bay, to inspect fuel-bundle end plates for cracks. A second test was done involving a series of four bundle cascades in BAND Unit 4 channels that had new outlet shield plugs. The latch bundles were discharged after a hot shutdown. The cascaded Unite 2 and Unit 4 latch bundles were checked for cracks using the UT. The PIE found incipient cracks or less-than-ideal welds in the assembly welds of fuel elements from Unit 2 (latch-supported fuel bundles) that had been identified by the UT as having incipient cracks. No incipient cracks were found in the assemble welds of fuel elements from Unit 4 (new outlet shield-supported fuel bundles) confirming the UT results. (author). 5 refs., 8 figs

  11. A comparison of spent fuel shipping cask response to 10 CFR 71 normal conditions and realistic hot day extremes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson, S.J.; Gianoulakis, S.E.

    1994-04-01

    An examination of the effect of a realistic (though conservative) hot day environment on the thermal transient behavior of spent fuel shipping casks is made. These results are compared to those that develop under the prescribed normal thermal condition of 10 CFR 71. Of specific concern are the characteristics of propagating thermal waves, which are set up by diurnal variations of temperature and insolation in the outdoor environment. In order to arrive at a realistic approximation of these variations on a conservative hot day, actual temperature and insolation measurements have been obtained from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) for representatively hot and high heat flux days. Thus, the use of authentic meteorological data ensures the realistic approach sought. Further supporting the desired realism of the modeling effort is the use of realistic cask configurations in which multiple laminations of structural, shielding, and other materials are expected to attenuate the propagating thermal waves. The completed analysis revealed that the majority of wall temperatures, for a wide variety of spent fuel shipping cask configurations, fall well below those predicted by enforcement of the regulatory environmental conditions of 10 CFR 71. It was found that maximum temperatures at the cask surface occasionally lie above temperatures predicted under the prescribed regulatory conditions. However, the temperature differences are small enough that the normal conservative assumptions that are made in the course of typical cask evaluations should correct for any potential violations. The analysis demonstrates that diurnal temperature variations that penetrate the cask wall all have maxima substantially less than the corresponding regulatory solutions. Therefore it is certain that vital cask components and the spent fuel itself will not exceed the temperatures calculated by use of the conditions of 10 CFR 71

  12. The post irradiation examination of fuel in support of Bruce A nuclear division fueling with flow program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montin, J.; Sagat, S.; Day, R.; Novak, J.; Bromfield, H.

    1995-01-01

    Bruce A Nuclear Division (BAND) units are operating at ∼ 75% of full power, because of the potential of a power pulse in the event of an inlet header break. As a result, BAND is converting to fueling with flow, to eliminate the potential of a power pulse and to allow for full-power operation. Concerns regarding the integrity of the end-of-life (EOL) bundles interacting with the latch at the downstream end of the fuel channel were raised. BAND carried out a test program in which EOL bundles in the upstream position 13 of Unit 2 were cascaded into the downstream latch position 1 of another channel. Six of twelve cascaded bundles and two typical EOL position 13 (benchmark) bundles were selected for post-irradiation examination (PIE). Incipient cracks were found in the assembly welds (endplateto-endcap welds) of all six cascaded bundles. No incipient cracks were found in the benchmark bundles. Metallographic and fractographic examination, along with crack dating, and hydrogen and deuterium analyses, indicated that the incipient cracks were the result of delayed-hydride assisted cracking at the EOL. Consequently, Ontario Hydro changed the design of the outlet shield plug to support all three rings of the fuel bundle, to minimize stress and prevent endplate cracking. Also, an ultrasonic endplate inspection tool (UT) was developed and located in the fuel bay. to inspect fuelbundle endplates for cracks. A second test was done involving a series of four bundle cascades in BAND Unit 4 channels that had new outlet shield plugs. The latch bundles were discharged after a hot shutdown. The cascaded Unit 2 and Unit 4 latch bundles were checked for cracks using the UT. The PIE found incipient cracks or less-than-ideal welds in the assembly welds of fuel elements from Unit 2 (latch-supported fuel bundles) that had been identified by the UT as having incipient cracks. No incipient cracks were found in the assembly welds of fuel elements from Unit 4 (new outlet shield

  13. Technical Development of Gamma Scanning for Irradiated Fuel Rod after Upgrade of System in Hot-cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, Hee Moon; Baik, Seung Je; Yoo, Byung Ok; Choo, Yong Sun

    2007-06-15

    Non-destructive test system was installed at hot-cell(M1) in IMEF(Irradiated Materials Examination Facility) more than 10 years ago for the diametric measurement and gamma scanning of fuel rod. But this system must be needed to be remodeled for the effective operations. In 2006, the system was upgraded for 3 months. The collimator bench can be movable with horizontal direction(x-direction) by motorized system for sectional gamma scanning and 3-dimensional tomography of fuel rod. So, gamma scanning for fuel rod can be detectable by x, y and rotation directions. It may be possible to obtain the radioactivities with radial and axial directions of pellet. This system is good for the series experiments with several positions. Operation of fuel bench and gamma detection program were linked each other by new program tools. It can control detection and bench moving automatically when gamma inspection of fuel rod is carried out with axial or radial positions. Some of electronic parts were added in PLC panel, and operating panel was re-designed for the remote control. To operate the fuel bench by computer, AD converter and some I/O cards were installed in computer. All of software were developed in Windows-XP system instead of DOS system. Control programs were made by visual-C language. After upgrade of system, DUPIC fuel which was irradiated in HANARO research reactor was detected by gamma scanning. The results were good and operation of gamma scanning showed reduced inspection time and easy control of data on series of detection with axial positions. With consideration of ECT(Eddy Current Test) installation, the computer program and hardware were set up as well. But ECT is not installed yet, so we have to check abnormal situation of program and hardware system. It is planned to install ECT in 2007.

  14. Microscopic Examination of a Corrosion Front in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.A. Fortner; A.J. Kropf; R.J. Finch; J.C. Cunnane

    2006-01-01

    /enhance nucleation of NpO 2 and Np 2 O 5 . Alternatively, Np may be incorporated into uranyl (UO 2 2+ ) alteration phases [2]. In some cases, less-soluble elements such as plutonium will be enriched near the surface of the corroding fuel [3]. We have used focused synchrotron x-rays from the MRCAT beam line at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Lab to examine a specimen of spent nuclear fuel that had been subject to 10 years of corrosion testing in an environment of humid air and dripping groundwater at 90 C [4]. We find evidence of a region, approximately 20 microns in thickness, enriched in plutonium and neptunium at the corrosion front that exists between the uranyl silicate alteration mineral rind and the unaltered uranium oxide fuel (Figures 1 and 2). The uranyl silicate is itself found to be depleted in these transuranic elements relative to their abundance relative to uranium in the parent fuel. This suggests a low mobility of these components owing to a resistance to oxidize further in the presence of a UO 2 2+ /U 4+ couple [5

  15. Post-Irradiation Examination and In-Pile Measurement Techniques for Water Reactor Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-12-01

    in the 1960s when the construction of NPPs was being started. Evidently it can be assumed that infrastructure with basic unique equipments is old enough, both morally and physically, and needs to be up-graded or replaced. Thus, a sharp increase of the hydrocarbon fuel cost, green-house effect, necessity to construct more safe and efficient NPPs, justification of the lifetime prolongation of the existing NPPs, moral and physical ageing of the hot labs and research reactors equipment lead to the strong necessity to develop more perfect and more precise methods and equipment to examine irradiated components of nuclear reactors, first of all the most expensive one - nuclear fuel. Now the national hot laboratories and material testing reactors usually act as individual independent research establishments without any common and coordinated technical and business strategy towards the future needs and challenges. Even if there are not many joint programs for the development of nuclear power engineering in different countries, the method base and accumulated experience of the in- and post-reactor experiments should be widely shared so as to decrease the cost of this base in each country and to enforce its development. Thus, both problems and results of the application of new techniques to examine nuclear reactor components, as well as the conditions of separate labs should be discussed at the international level. The IAEA technical meetings are one of the most convenient means of arranging such discussion on the problems of the hot labs and research reactors development and application of new original techniques for examination of reactor materials properties. This publication represents a summary and proceedings of the two technical meetings (TMs) organized by IAEA on the subjects of Hot Cell Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE) Techniques and Pool Side Inspection of Water Reactor Fuel Assemblies and Fuel Rod Instrumentation and In-Pile Measurement Techniques. The first TM was

  16. Solubility of hot fuel particles from Chernobyl--influencing parameters for individual radiation dose calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garger, Evgenii K; Meisenberg, Oliver; Odintsov, Oleksiy; Shynkarenko, Viktor; Tschiersch, Jochen

    2013-10-15

    Nuclear fuel particles of Chernobyl origin are carriers of increased radioactivity (hot particles) and are still present in the atmosphere of the Chernobyl exclusion zone. Workers in the zone may inhale these particles, which makes assessment necessary. The residence time in the lungs and the transfer in the blood of the inhaled radionuclides are crucial for inhalation dose assessment. Therefore, the dissolution of several kinds of nuclear fuel particles from air filters sampled in the Chernobyl exclusion zone was studied. For this purpose filter fragments with hot particles were submersed in simulated lung fluids (SLFs). The activities of the radionuclides (137)Cs, (90)Sr, (239+240)Pu and (241)Am were measured in the SLF and in the residuum of the fragments by radiometric methods after chemical treatment. Soluble fractions as well as dissolution rates of the nuclides were determined. The influence of the genesis of the hot particles, represented by the (137)Cs/(239+240)Pu ratio, on the availability of (137)Cs was demonstrated, whereas the dissolution of (90)Sr, (239+240)Pu and (241)Am proved to be independent of genesis. No difference in the dissolution of (137)Cs and (239+240)Pu was observed for the two applied types of SLF. Increased solubility was found for smaller hot particles. A two-component exponential model was used to describe the dissolution of the nuclides as a function of time. The results were applied for determining individual inhalation dose coefficients for the workers at the Chernobyl construction site. Greater dose coefficients for the respiratory tract and smaller coefficients for the other organs were calculated (compared to ICRP default values). The effective doses were in general lower for the considered radionuclides, for (241)Am even by one order of magnitude. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Criticality detector exclusion zone in a spent-fuel hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.S.; Sterbentz, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    The main purpose of a criticality alarm system (CAS) is to protect personnel by detecting a criticality event (neutron radiation) and actuating an alarm system to initiate emergency response. Inadvertent criticality alarms from noncritical events, such as spurious voltage spikes or intense gamma radiation fields, can produce work cessation and time-consuming and costly event assessments and may result in harm to personnel during an evacuation. It therefore becomes a major concern to ensure that inadvertent or false criticality alarms do not occur or at least are minimized. Minimization of inadvertent criticality alarms due to intense gamma radiation emitted from spent-nuclear-fuel (SNF) elements as opposed to neutron radiation from an actual criticality event is the primary focus of this calculational and experimental study. The Irradiated Fuel Storage Facility (IFSF) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility whose mission is to provide safe handling and dry storage for various types of SNFs. Although other fuel types (lower burnup) are stored in the IFSF, it is the high-burnup elements with the associated intense gamma radiation fields that have the potential to inadvertently set off the criticality alarms in the fuel-handling area adjacent to the storage vault. Typically, in the fuel-handling cave or hot cell of the IFSF, the cask lid is removed, and individual fuel elements are extracted from the cask and placed in special storage canisters. It is during the time period when fuel elements are extracted from their casks or when fully loaded canisters are moved in the hot cell that the CAS detectors are exposed to the intense gamma radiation fields from the spent fuel. The neutron detectors positioned in one of the manipulator ports are designed such that fast neutrons from a criticality event are thermalized by a polyethylene moderator, strike the scintillator detector material, and

  18. Fuel bundle examination techniques for the Phebus fission product test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, J.Y.; Clement, B.; Hardt, P. von der

    1996-01-01

    The paper develops the non-destructive examinations, with a special emphasis on transmission tomography, performed in the Phebus facility, using a linear accelerator associated with a line scan camera based on PCD components. This particular technique enabled the high level of penetration to be obtained, necessary for this high density application. Spatial resolution is not far from the theoretical limit and the density resolution is often adequate. This technique permitted: 1) to define beforehand the cuts on a precise basis, avoiding a long step-by-step choice as in previous in-pile tests; 2) to determine, at an early stage, mass balance, material relocations (in association with axial gamma spectrometry), and FP distribution, as an input into re-calculations of the bundle events. However, classical cuttings, periscopic visual examinations, macrographies, micrographies and EPMA analyses remain essential to give oxidation levels (in the less degraded zones), phase aspect and composition, to distinguish between materials of identical density, and, if possible, to estimate temperatures. Oxidation resistance of sensors (thermocouples or ultrasonic thermometers) is also traced. The EPMA gives access to the molten material chemical analyses, especially in the molten fuel blockage area. The first results show that an important part of the fuel bundle melted (which was one of the objectives of this test) and that the degradation level is close to TIMI-2 with a molten plug under a cavity surrounded by an uranium-rich crust. In lower and upper areas fuel rods are less damaged. Complementaries between these examination techniques and between international teams involved will be major advantages in the Phebus FPT0 test comprehension. 3 refs, 9 figs

  19. Hot Experiment on Fission Gas Release Behavior from Voloxidation Process using Spent Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Geun Il; Park, J. J.; Jung, I. H.; Shin, J. M.; Cho, K. H.; Yang, M. S.; Song, K. C.

    2007-08-01

    Quantitative analysis of the fission gas release characteristics during the voloxidation and OREOX processes of spent PWR fuel was carried out by spent PWR fuel in a hot-cell of the DFDF. The release characteristics of 85 Kr and 14 C fission gases during voloxidation process at 500 .deg. C is closely linked to the degree of conversion efficiency of UO 2 to U 3 O 8 powder, and it can be interpreted that the release from grain-boundary would be dominated during this step. Volatile fission gases of 14 C and 85 Kr were released to near completion during the OREOX process. Both the 14 C and 85 Kr have similar release characteristics under the voloxidation and OREOX process conditions. A higher burn-up spent fuel showed a higher release fraction than that of a low burn-up fuel during the voloxidation step at 500 .deg. C. It was also observed that the release fraction of semi-volatile Cs was about 16% during a reduction at 1,000 .deg. C of the oxidized powder, but over 90% during the voloxidation at 1,250 .deg. C

  20. The reliability improvement plan of hot cell examination data by introducing of Kolas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Kwon Pyo; Park, Dae Gyu; Ahn, Sang Bok; Choo, Yong Sun; Song, Wung Sup; Jung, Yang Hong; Yoo, Byung Ok; Baik, Seung Je; Lim, Nam Jin; Nam Ju Hee

    2000-01-01

    For enhancement of hot cell data reliability produced at Irradiated Material Examination Facility in KAERI,Korea a project to introduce Kolas of National Quality Assurance Institute. By Kolas introduction the examination data currently produced would be reinforced by additional function of uncertainty evaluation and would obtained more reliable data. The all of data collected would be quality controlled, so that it would be re-traceable. Presently at IMEF shock test, tension test, dimension measurement test, hardness test, density test, and composition analysis test will be subject to Kolas. It is also planned to expand the number of test items in near future. At the end of 2000 year IMEF aims to secure the certificate issued by the National Quality Assurance Institute. (Hong, J. S.)

  1. Post-irradiation examinations of THERMHET composite fuels for transmutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noirot, J.; Desgranges, L.; Chauvin, N.; Georgenthum, V.

    2003-07-01

    The thermal behaviour of composite targets dedicated to minor actinide transmutation was studied using THERMHET (thermal behaviour of heterogeneous fuel) irradiation in the SILOE reactor. Three inert matrix fuel designs were tested (macro-mass, jingle and microdispersion) all with a MgAl 2O 4 spinel inert matrix and around 40% weight of UO 2 to simulate minor actinide inclusions. The post-irradiation examinations led to a new interpretation of the temperature measurement by thermocouples located in the central hole of the pellets. A major change in the micro-dispersed structure was detected. The examinations enabled us to understand the behaviour of the spinel during the different stages of irradiation. They revealed an amorphisation at low temperature and then a nano re-crystallisation at high temperature of the spinel in the micro-dispersed case. These results, together with those obtained in the MATINA irradiation of an equivalent structure, show the importance of the irradiation temperature on spinel behaviour.

  2. Post-irradiation examinations of THERMHET composite fuels for transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noirot, J. E-mail: jnoirot@cea.fr; Desgranges, L.; Chauvin, N.; Georgenthum, V

    2003-07-01

    The thermal behaviour of composite targets dedicated to minor actinide transmutation was studied using THERMHET (thermal behaviour of heterogeneous fuel) irradiation in the SILOE reactor. Three inert matrix fuel designs were tested (macro-mass, jingle and microdispersion) all with a MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel inert matrix and around 40% weight of UO{sub 2} to simulate minor actinide inclusions. The post-irradiation examinations led to a new interpretation of the temperature measurement by thermocouples located in the central hole of the pellets. A major change in the micro-dispersed structure was detected. The examinations enabled us to understand the behaviour of the spinel during the different stages of irradiation. They revealed an amorphisation at low temperature and then a nano re-crystallisation at high temperature of the spinel in the micro-dispersed case. These results, together with those obtained in the MATINA irradiation of an equivalent structure, show the importance of the irradiation temperature on spinel behaviour.

  3. Post-irradiation examinations of THERMHET composite fuels for transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noirot, J.; Desgranges, L.; Chauvin, N.; Georgenthum, V.

    2003-01-01

    The thermal behaviour of composite targets dedicated to minor actinide transmutation was studied using THERMHET (thermal behaviour of heterogeneous fuel) irradiation in the SILOE reactor. Three inert matrix fuel designs were tested (macro-mass, jingle and microdispersion) all with a MgAl 2 O 4 spinel inert matrix and around 40% weight of UO 2 to simulate minor actinide inclusions. The post-irradiation examinations led to a new interpretation of the temperature measurement by thermocouples located in the central hole of the pellets. A major change in the micro-dispersed structure was detected. The examinations enabled us to understand the behaviour of the spinel during the different stages of irradiation. They revealed an amorphisation at low temperature and then a nano re-crystallisation at high temperature of the spinel in the micro-dispersed case. These results, together with those obtained in the MATINA irradiation of an equivalent structure, show the importance of the irradiation temperature on spinel behaviour

  4. Development of a new bench for puncturing of irradiated fuel rods in STAR hot laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitprez, B.; Silvestre, P.; Valenza, P.; Boulore, A.; David, T.

    2018-01-01

    A new device for puncturing of irradiated fuel rods in commercial power plants has been designed by Fuel Research Department of CEA Cadarache in order to provide experimental data of high precision on fuel pins with various designs. It will replace the current set-up that has been used since 1998 in hot cell 2 of STAR facility with more than 200 rod puncturing experiments. Based on this consistent experimental feedback, the heavy-duty technique of rod perforation by clad punching has been preserved for the new bench. The method of double expansion of rod gases is also retained since it allows upgrading the confidence interval of volumetric results obtained from rod puncturing. Furthermore, many evolutions have been introduced in the new design in order to improve its reliability, to make the maintenance easier by remote handling and to reduce experimental uncertainties. Tightness components have been studied with Sealing Laboratory Maestral at Pierrelatte so as to make them able to work under mixed pressure conditions (from vacuum at 10-5 mbar up to pressure at 50 bars) and to lengthen their lifetime under permanent gamma irradiation in hot cell. Bench ergonomics has been optimized to make its operating by remote handling easier and to secure the critical phases of a puncturing experiment. A high pressure gas line equipped with high precision pressure sensors out of cell can be connected to the bench in cell for calibration purposes. Uncertainty analyses using Monte Carlo calculations have been performed in order to optimize capacity of the different volumes of the apparatus according to volumetric characteristics of the rod to be punctured. At last this device is composed of independent modules which allow puncturing fuel pins out of different geometries (PWR, BWR, VVER). After leak tests of the device and remote handling simulation in a mock-up cell, several punctures of calibrated specimens have been performed in 2016. The bench will be implemented soon in hot

  5. Studies and research concerning BNFP: evaluation of spent-fuel-examination techniques for the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.T.; Gray, J.H.; Rogell, M.L.

    1982-09-01

    A study was made of various examinations which could be remotely performed on a production basis with spent fuel at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP). These techniques could form an integral portion of fuel disassembly and canning operations. Their benefits accrue to either improved fuel storage, reprocessing, or both. In conjunctoin with these studies, evaluations have been made of the operational impact of receiving failed or canned fuel at the BNFP

  6. Post-irradiation examination and R and D programs using irradiated fuels at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Yong Bum; Min, Duck Kee; Kim, Eun Ka and others

    2000-12-01

    This report describes the Post-Irradiation Examination(PIE) and R and D programs using irradiated fuels at KAERI. The objectives of post-irradiation examination (PIE) for the PWR irradiated fuels, CANDU fuels, HANARO fuels and test fuel materials are to verify the irradiation performance and their integrity as well as to construct a fuel performance data base. The comprehensive utilization program of the KAERI's post-irradiation examination related nuclear facilities such as Post-Irradiation Examination Facility (PIEF), Irradiated Materials Examination Facility (IMEF) and HANARO is described

  7. Post-irradiation examination and R and D programs using irradiated fuels at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Yong Bum; So, Dong Sup; Lee, Byung Doo; Lee, Song Ho; Min, Duck Kee

    2001-09-01

    This report describes the Post-Irradiation Examination(PIE) and R and D programs using irradiated fuels at KAERI. The objectives of post-irradiation examination (PIE) for the PWR irradiated fuels, CANDU fuels, HANARO fuels and test fuel materials are to verify the irradiation performance and their integrity as well as to construct a fuel performance data base. The comprehensive utilization program of the KAERI's post-irradiation examination related nuclear facilities such as Post-Irradiation Examination Facility (PIEF), Irradiated Materials Examination Facility (IMEF) and HANARO is described

  8. Hot cell examination on the surveillance capsule and HANARO capsule in IMEF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Yong Sun; Oh, Wan Ho; Yoo, Byung Ok; Jung, Yang Hong; Ahn, Sang Bok; Baik, Seung Je; Song, Wung Sup; Hong, Kwon Pyo

    2000-01-01

    For the maintenance of integrity and safety of pressurizer of commercial power plant until its life span, it is required by US NRC 10CFR50 APP. G and H and ASTM E185-94 to periodically monitor irradiation embrittlement by neutron irradiation. In order to accomplished the requirement reactor operator has been carrying out the test by extracting the monitoring capsule embeded in reactor during the period of planned preventive maintenance. In relation to this irradiation samples are being used for prediction of reactor vessel life span and reactor vessel's adjusted reference temperature by irradiation of neutron flux enough to reach to end of life span. And also irradiation capsules with and without instrumentation are used for R and D on nuclear materials. Each capsule contains high radioactivity, therefore, post irradiation examination has to be handled by all means in the hot cell. The facility available for this purpose is Irradiated material examination facility (IMEF) to handle such works as capsule receiving, capsule cut and dismantling, sample classification, various examination, and finally development and improvement of examination equipment and instrumentation. (Hong, J. S.)

  9. Employing Hot Wire Anemometry to Directly Measure the Water Balance of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shakhshir, Saher Al; Berning, Torsten

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are currently being commercialized for various applications ranging from automotive to stationary such as powering telecom back-up units. In PEMFC’s, oxygen from air is internally combined with hydrogen to form water and produce electricity and waste......-hoc and real time electrical signal of the fuel cell water balance by employing hot wire anemometry. The hot wire sensor is placed into a binary mixture of hydrogen and water vapour, and the voltage signal received gives valuable insight into heat and mass transfer phenomena in a PEMFC. A central question...

  10. Examination of spent fuel radiation energy conversion for electricity generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Haneol; Yim, Man-Sung, E-mail: msyim@kaist.ac.kr

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Utilizing conversion of radiation energy of spent fuel to electric energy. • MCNPX modeling and experiment were used to estimate energy conversion. • The converted energy may be useful for nuclear security applications. • The converted energy may be utilized for safety applications through energy storage. - Abstract: Supply of electricity inside nuclear power plant is one of the most important considerations for nuclear safety and security. In this study, generation of electric energy by converting radiation energy of spent nuclear fuel was investigated. Computational modeling work by using MCNPX 2.7.0 code along with experiment was performed to estimate the amount of electric energy generation. The calculation using the developed modeling work was validated through comparison with an integrated experiment. The amount of electric energy generation based on a conceptual design of an energy conversion module was estimated to be low. But the amount may be useful for nuclear security applications. An alternative way of utilizing the produced electric energy could be considered for nuclear safety application through energy storage. Further studies are needed to improve the efficiency of the proposed energy conversion concept and to examine the issue of radiation damage and economic feasibility.

  11. Post-irradiation examination of overheated fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, D.F.; Primeau, M.F.; Leach, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    Post-irradiation examinations (PIE) were conducted on prototype 43-element CANDU fuel bundles that overheated during test irradiations in the NRU reactor. PIE revealed that the bundles remained physically intact, but on several elements the Zr-4 sheath collapsed into axial gaps between the pellet stack and end caps, between adjacent pellets within the stacks, and into missing pellet chips and cracks. Helium pressurization tests showed that none of the collapsed elements leaked. Hydride blisters were discovered on a few elements, but the source of the hydrogen was not linked to a breach of the cladding or end caps. These defects were attributed to primary hydriding. Microstructural changes in the fuel and cladding indicate that the cladding-was briefly exposed to temperatures in the range 600-800 o C and pressures above 11.2 MPa. The results show that Zr-4 cladding behaves in a highly ductile manner during such transient, high-temperature and high-pressure excursions. (author)

  12. Post-irradiation examination of overheated fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, D.F.; Primeau, M.F.; Leach, D.A.

    1997-08-01

    Post-irradiation examinations (PIE) were conducted on prototype 43-element CANDU fuel bundles that overheated during test irradiations in the NRU reactor. PIE revealed that the bundles remained physically intact, but on several elements the Zr-4 sheath collapsed into axial gaps between the pellet stack and end caps, between adjacent pellets within the stacks, and into missing pellet chips and cracks. Helium pressurization tests showed that none of the collapsed elements leaked. Hydride blisters were discovered on a few elements, but the source of the hydrogen was.not linked to a breach of the cladding or end caps. These defects were attributed to primary hydriding. Microstructural changes in the fuel and cladding indicate that the cladding was briefly exposed to temperatures in the range 600-800 o C and pressures above 11.2MPa. The results show that Zr-4 cladding behaves in a highly ductile manner during such transient, high-temperature and high-pressure excursions. (author)

  13. Post-irradiation examinations on the KNK II/1 fuel element NY-203 with 400 equivalent full-power days residence time and 10 % burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patzer, G.; Geier, F.

    1984-09-01

    The fuel assembly NY-203 has been irradiated in the first core of KNK II up to a burnup of about 10 % and a residence time of 400 equivalent full-power days. The assembly contained 211 fuel pins with 6.0 mm outer diameter and fuel pellets with the composition (U 0 .7Pu 0 .3)O 2 .00. The cladding material was the austenitic steel 1.4988 lg. Some selected pins were examined in the hot cells of the KfK Karlsruhe. The post-irradiation examinations did not reveal any critical design aspects [de

  14. Three-Dimensional Analysis of the Hot-Spot Fuel Temperature in Pebble Bed and Prismatic Modular Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, W. K.; Lee, S. W.; Lim, H. S.; Lee, W. J.

    2006-01-01

    High temperature gas-cooled reactors(HTGR) have been reviewed as potential sources for future energy needs, particularly for a hydrogen production. Among the HTGRs, the pebble bed reactor(PBR) and a prismatic modular reactor(PMR) are considered as the nuclear heat source in Korea's nuclear hydrogen development and demonstration project. PBR uses coated fuel particles embedded in spherical graphite fuel pebbles. The fuel pebbles flow down through the core during an operation. PMR uses graphite fuel blocks which contain cylindrical fuel compacts consisting of the fuel particles. The fuel blocks also contain coolant passages and locations for absorber and control material. The maximum fuel temperature in the core hot spot is one of the important design parameters for both a PBR and a PMR. The objective of this study is to predict the hot-spot fuel temperature distributions in a PBR and a PMR at a steady state. The computational fluid dynamics(CFD) code, CFX-10 is used to perform the three-dimensional analysis. The latest design data was used here based on the reference reactor designs, PBMR400 and GTMHR60

  15. Structural Safety Analysis of Openable Working Table in ACP Hot Cell for Spent Fuel Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Ki Chan; Ku, Jeong Hoe; Lee, Eun Pyo; Choung, Won Myung; You, Gil Sung; Lee, Won Kyung; Cho, IL Je; Kuk, Dong Hak

    2006-01-01

    A demonstration facility for advanced spent fuel conditioning process (ACP) is under construction in KAERI. In this hot cell facility, all process equipment and materials are taken in and out only through the rear door. The working table in front of the process rear door is specially designed to be openable for the efficient use of the space. This paper presents the structural safety analysis of the openable working table, for the normal operational load condition and accidental drop condition of heavy object. Both cases are investigated through static and dynamic finite element analyses. The analysis results show that structural safety of the working table is sufficiently assured and the working table is not collapsed even when an object of 500 kg is dropped from the height of 50 cm.

  16. Transport experience of NH-25 spent fuel shipping cask for post irradiation examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Ryuji

    1982-01-01

    Since the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co. hot laboratories are located far off from the port which can handle spent fuel shipping casks, it is necessary to use a trailer-mounted cask which can be transported by public roads, bridges and intersections for the transportation of spent fuel specimens to these hot laboratories. Model NH-25 shipping cask was designed, manufactured and oualification tested to meet Japanese regulations and was officially registered as a BM type cask. The NH-25 cask accomodates two BWR fuel assemblies, one PWR assembly or one ATR fuel assembly using interchangeable inner containers. The cask weight is 29.2 t. The cask has three concentric stainless steel shells. Gamma shielding is lead cast between the inner shell and the intermediate shell. Neutro n shielding consists of ethylene-glycol-aqueous solution layer formed between the intermediate shell and the outer shell. The NH-25 cask now has been in operation for 2.5 yr. It was used for the transportation of spent fuel assemblies from six LWR power plants to the port on shipping cask carrier ''Hinouramaru'' on the sea, as well as from the port to the hot laboratory on a trailer. The capability of safe handling and transporting of spent fuel assemblies has been well demonstrated. (author)

  17. An examination of fire spread thresholds in discontinuous fuel beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Finney; Jack D. Cohen; Isaac C. Grenfell; Kara M. Yedinak

    2010-01-01

    Many fuel beds, especially live vegetation canopies (conifer forests, shrub fields, bunch-grasses) contain gaps between vegetation clumps. Fires burning in these fuel types often display thresholds for spread that are observed to depend on environmental factors like wind, slope, and fuel moisture content. To investigate threshold spread behaviours, we conducted a set...

  18. Main results of post-irradiation examinations of new-generation fuel assemblies VVER-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvir, E.; Markov, D.; Polenok, V.; Zhitelev, V.; Kobylyansky, G.

    2009-01-01

    To increase the competitiveness of Russian nuclear fuel at the foreign market and to improve its technical and economic performance in order to provide a necessary level of safety, it is necessary to solve certain important tasks: Increase of fuel burn-up; Extension of operational lifetime of fuel assemblies and operational reliability of nuclear fuel; Introduction of cost-beneficial and flexible fuel cycles. Alternative fuel assemblies TVSA VVER-1000 and TVS-2 are used as a basis to optimize the nuclear fuel and develop advanced fuel cycles for nuclear power plants with VVER-1000 reactor types. Four fuel assemblies TVSA operated during 1 and up to 6 reactor cycles, reference fuel assembly TVS-2 operated during three reactor cycles and achieved an average fuel burnup of 48MW·day/kgU as well as failed fuel assembly TVS-2 operated during one cycle were examined at RIAR in recent years. The main objectives of these examinations were to obtain experimental data in support of operational integrity of products or to find out reasons of their failure. The performed post-irradiation examinations confirmed the operational integrity of alternative fuel assemblies TVSA including their geometrical stability up to the average fuel burnup of 55 MW·day/kgU over the fuel assembly (FA) (up to the maximal fuel burnup of ∼73 MW·day/kgU in fuel rods) and of TVS-2 up to the average fuel burnup of 48 MW·day/kgU over the fuel assembly. The changes introduced in the design of VVER-1000 fuel assembly during the development of alternative fuel assembly TVSA and TVS-2 did not make any negative effect on fuel rods. It was proved that causes of fuel rod failure were not related to design features of fuel assemblies. The design features and operating conditions of fuel assemblies under examinations are briefly described. Post-irradiation examinations proved the geometrical stability of fuel assemblies TVSA and TVS-2 under operation up to the fuel burnup of ∼50 MW day/kgU, as for the

  19. Post-irradiation examination of U3SIX-AL fuel element manufactured and irradiated in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggirello, Gabriel; Calabroni, Hector; Sanchez, Miguel; Hofman, Gerard

    2002-01-01

    As a part of CNEA's qualification program as a supplier of low enriched Al-U 3 Si 2 dispersion fuel elements for research reactors, a post irradiation examination (PIE) of the first prototype of this kind, called P-04, manufactured and irradiated in Argentina, was carried out. The main purpose of this work was to set up various standard PIE techniques in the hot cell, looking forward to the next steps of the qualification program, as well as to acquire experience on the behaviour of this nuclear material and on the control of the manufacturing process. After an appropriate cooling period, on May 2000 the P-04 was transported to the hot cell in Ezeiza Atomic Centre. Non destructive and destructive tests were performed following the PIE procedures developed in Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), this mainly included dimensional measurement, microstructural observations and chemical burn-up analyses. The methodology and results of which are outlined in this report. The results obtained show a behaviour consistent with that of other fuel elements of the same kind, tested previously. On the other hand the results of this PIE, specially those concerning burn-up analysis and stability and corrosion behaviour of the fuel plates, will be of use for the IAEA Regional Program on the characterization of MTR spent fuel. (author)

  20. Scope and dissolution studies and characterization of irradiated nuclear fuel in Atalante Hot Cell Facilities (abstract and presentation slides)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dancausse, Jean-Philippe; Reynier Tronche, Nathalie; Ferlay, Gilles; Herlet, Nathalie; Eysseric, Cathrine; Esbelin, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Since 1999, several studies on nuclear fuels were realised in C11/C12 Atalante Hot Cell. This paper presents firstly an overview of the apparatus used for fuel dissolution and characterisation like reactor design, gas trapping flask and solid/liquid separation. Then, the general methodology is described as a function of fuel, temperature, reagents, showing for each step, the reachable experimental data: Dissolution rate, chemical and radiochemical fuel composition including volatile LLRN, insoluble mass, composition, morphology, cladding chemical, radiochemical and physical characterisation using SIMS (made in Cadarache/LECA facilities), MEB. To conclude, some of the obtained results on 129I and 14C composition of oxide fuels, rate of dissolution and first results on dissolution studies of RERTR UMo fuel will be detailed. (Author)

  1. Nuclear Materials Characterization in the Materials and Fuels Complex Analytical Hot Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriquez, Michael

    2009-01-01

    As energy prices skyrocket and interest in alternative, clean energy sources builds, interest in nuclear energy has increased. This increased interest in nuclear energy has been termed the 'Nuclear Renaissance'. The performance of nuclear fuels, fuels and reactor materials and waste products are becoming a more important issue as the potential for designing new nuclear reactors is more immediate. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Analytical Laboratory Hot Cells (ALHC) are rising to the challenge of characterizing new reactor materials, byproducts and performance. The ALHC is a facility located near Idaho Falls, Idaho at the INL Site. It was built in 1958 as part of the former Argonne National Laboratory West Complex to support the operation of the second Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II). It is part of a larger analytical laboratory structure that includes wet chemistry, instrumentation and radiochemistry laboratories. The purpose of the ALHC is to perform analytical chemistry work on highly radioactive materials. The primary work in the ALHC has traditionally been dissolution of nuclear materials so that less radioactive subsamples (aliquots) could be transferred to other sections of the laboratory for analysis. Over the last 50 years though, the capabilities within the ALHC have also become independent of other laboratory sections in a number of ways. While dissolution, digestion and subdividing samples are still a vitally important role, the ALHC has stand alone capabilities in the area of immersion density, gamma scanning and combustion gas analysis. Recent use of the ALHC for immersion density shows that extremely fine and delicate operations can be performed with the master-slave manipulators by qualified operators. Twenty milligram samples were tested for immersion density to determine the expansion of uranium dioxide after irradiation in a nuclear reactor. The data collected confirmed modeling analysis with very tight

  2. Ceramographic Examinations of Irradiated AGR-1 Fuel Compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Demkowicz; Scott Ploger; John Hunn

    2012-05-01

    The AGR 1 experiment involved irradiating 72 cylindrical fuel compacts containing tri-structural isotropic (TRISO)-coated particles to a peak burnup of 19.5% fissions per initial metal atom with no in-pile failures observed out of almost 300,000 particles. Five irradiated AGR 1 fuel compacts were selected for microscopy that span a range of irradiation conditions (temperature, burnup, and fast fluence). These five compacts also included all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR experiment. The five compacts were cross-sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, mounted, ground, and polished after development of careful techniques for preserving particle structures against preparation damage. Approximately 40 to 80 particles within each cross section were exposed near enough to mid-plane for optical microscopy of kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. The microstructural analysis focused on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracture, debonding between the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC) layers, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Three basic particle morphologies were established according to the extent of bonding between the buffer and IPyC layers: complete debonding along the interface (Type A), no debonding along the interface (Type B), and partial debonding (Type AB). These basic morphologies were subdivided according to whether the buffer stayed intact or fractured. The resulting six characteristic morphologies were used to classify particles within each cross section, but no spatial patterns were clearly observed in any of the cross-sectional morphology maps. Although positions of particle types appeared random within compacts, examining a total of 830 classified particles allowed other relationships among morphological types to be established.

  3. Ceramographic Examinations of Irradiated AGR-1 Fuel Compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demkowicz, Paul; Ploger, Scott; Hunn, John

    2012-01-01

    The AGR 1 experiment involved irradiating 72 cylindrical fuel compacts containing tri-structural isotropic (TRISO)-coated particles to a peak burnup of 19.5% fissions per initial metal atom with no in-pile failures observed out of almost 300,000 particles. Five irradiated AGR 1 fuel compacts were selected for microscopy that span a range of irradiation conditions (temperature, burnup, and fast fluence). These five compacts also included all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR experiment. The five compacts were cross-sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, mounted, ground, and polished after development of careful techniques for preserving particle structures against preparation damage. Approximately 40 to 80 particles within each cross section were exposed near enough to mid-plane for optical microscopy of kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. The microstructural analysis focused on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracture, debonding between the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC) layers, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Three basic particle morphologies were established according to the extent of bonding between the buffer and IPyC layers: complete debonding along the interface (Type A), no debonding along the interface (Type B), and partial debonding (Type AB). These basic morphologies were subdivided according to whether the buffer stayed intact or fractured. The resulting six characteristic morphologies were used to classify particles within each cross section, but no spatial patterns were clearly observed in any of the cross-sectional morphology maps. Although positions of particle types appeared random within compacts, examining a total of 830 classified particles allowed other relationships among morphological types to be established.

  4. Post irradiation examination of HANARO nucler mini-element fuel (metallographic and density test)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Byung Ok; Hong, K. P.; Park, D. G.; Choo, Y. S.; Baik, S. J.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, H. C.; Jung, Y. H.

    2001-05-01

    The post irradiation examination of a HANARO mini-element nuclear fuel, KH96C-004, was done in June 6, 2000. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the in-core performance and reliability of mini-element nuclear fuel for HANARO developed by the project T he Nuclear Fuel Material Development of Research Reactor . And, in order to examine the performance of mini-element nuclear fuel in normal output condition, the post irradiation examination of a nuclear fuel bundle composed by 6 mini nuclear fuel rods and 12 dummy fuel rods was performed. Based on these examination results, the safety and reliability of HANARO fuel and the basic data on the design of HANARO nuclear fuel can be ensured and obtained,

  5. Workshop on instrumentation and analyses for a nuclear fuel reprocessing hot pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babcock, S.M.; Feldman, M.J.; Wymer, R.G.; Hoffman, D.

    1980-05-01

    In order to assist in the study of instrumentation and analytical needs for reprocessing plants, a workshop addressing these needs was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from May 5 to 7, 1980. The purpose of the workshop was to incorporate the knowledge of chemistry and of advanced measurement techniques held by the nuclear and radiochemical community into ideas for improved and new plant designs for both process control and inventory and safeguards measurements. The workshop was athended by experts in nuclear and radiochemistry, in fuel recycle plant design, and in instrumentation and analysis. ORNL was a particularly appropriate place to hold the workshop since the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) is centered there. Requirements for safeguarding the special nuclear materials involved in reprocessing, and for their timely measurement within the process, within the reprocessing facility, and at the facility boundaries are being studied. Because these requirements are becoming more numerous and stringent, attention is also being paid to the analytical requirements for these special nuclear materials and to methods for measuring the physical parameters of the systems containing them. In order to provide a focus for the consideration of the workshop participants, the Hot Experimental Facility (HEF) being designed conceptually by the CFRP was used as a basis for consideration and discussions

  6. Fuel rod puncturing and fission gas monitoring system examination techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Woong Sup

    1999-02-01

    Fission gas products accumulated in irradiated fuel rod is 1-2 cm 3 in CANDU and 40-50 cm 3 in PWR fuel rod. Fuel rod puncturing and fission gas monitoring system can be used for both CANDU and PWR fuel rod. This system comprises puncturing device located at in cell part and monitoring device located at out cell part. The system has computerized 9 modes and can calculate both void volume and mass volume only single puncturing. This report describes techniques and procedure for operating fuel rod puncturing and gas monitoring system which can be play an important role in successful operation of the devices. Results obtained from the analysis can give more influence over design for fuel rods. (Author). 6 refs., 9 figs

  7. An examination of the variables influencing the fuel retail industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sartorius

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose/objectives: The objective of the study is to contribute to a better understanding of the key variables that influence the profitability of this sector, as well as to develop a reliable model to predict retail fuel sales volumes in an urban setting. Problem investigated: South African fuel retail outlets are confronted by a wide range of variables that constrain profit and a significant number of outlets are not profitable. In the event of further deregulation, it is conceivable that many fuel stations will go out of business. Methodology: A combination of a quantitative and a case study methodology, in conjunction with a literature review, was used to test the principal research questions. Findings/implications: The results suggest that location significantly influences urban retail fuel sales volumes whilst fuel station size and the fuel price play a lesser role. Other significant factors, however, also influence fuel station profitability. The demand for petrol appears to be relatively inelastic in the short term and more elastic over the long term. Conversely, the demand for diesel appears to be completely inelastic. Value: The article promotes a better understanding of the cost dynamics of the fuel industry. In this regard, the model constructed to predict urban fuel station turnover indicated high levels of reliability. Furthermore, few comparable studies have been published in accounting journals. Conclusion: The study concludes that urban petrol stations selling more than 370 000 liters of fuel per month are likely to be profitable and that location is a key variable influencing sales. In the event of deregulation, many operators are likely to be eliminated because of high levels of competition and low profit margins. An even greater number of fuel stations, therefore, will be reliant on non forecourt activities to survive.

  8. Post-irradiation examination of a failed PHWR fuel bundle of KAPS-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Prerna; Unnikrishnan, K.; Viswanathan, U.K.; Shriwastaw, R.S.; Singh, J.L.; Ouseph, P.M.; Alur, V.D.; Singh, H.N.; Anantharaman, S.; Sah, D.N.

    2006-08-01

    Detailed post irradiation examination was carried out on a PHWR fuel bundle irradiated at Kakrapar Atomic Power Station unit 2 (KAPS-2). The fuel bundle had failed early in life at a low burnup of 387 MWd/T. Non destructive and destructive examination was carried out to identify the cause of fuel failure. Visual examination and leak testing indicated failure in two fuel pins of the outer ring of the bundle in the form of axial cracks near the end plug location. Ultrasonic testing of the end cap weld indicated presence of lack of fusion type defect in the two fuel pins. No defect was found in other fuel pins of the bundle. Metallographic examination of fuel sections taken from the crack location in the failed fuel pin showed extensive restructuring of fuel. The centre temperature of the fuel had exceeded 1700 degC at this location in the failed fuel pin, whereas fuel centre temperature in the un-failed fuel pin was only about 1300 degC. Severe fuel clad interaction was observed in the failed fuel pin at and near the location of failure but no such interaction was observed in the un-failed fuel pins. Several incipient cracks originating from the inside surface were found in the cladding near failure location in addition to the main through wall crack. The incipient cracks were filled with interaction products and hydride platelets were present at tip of the cracks. It was concluded from the observations that the primary cause of failure was the presence of a part-wall defect in the end cap weld of the fuel pins. These defects opened up during reactor operation leading to steam ingress into the fuel, which caused high fuel centre temperature and severe fuel-cladding interaction resulting in secondary failures. A more stringent inspection and quality control of end plug weld during fabrication using ultrasonic test has been recommended to avoid such failure. (author)

  9. Examination of Urinary Beta-Naphthol as a Biomarker Indicative of Jet Fuel Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    government or personal vehicle and what type of fuel . Flight line time Exposure to spills ( fuel ) Exposure to skin ( fuel ) Inhalation exposure (type...AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2015-0085 EXAMINATION OF URINARY β-NAPHTHOL AS A BIOMARKER INDICATIVE OF JET FUEL EXPOSURES Jeanette S. Frey Henry M... Fuel Exposures 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER NA 5c. PROGRA7757M ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jeanette Frey1; Trevor J. Bihl2;Asao

  10. Applying hot-wire anemometry to directly measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell for a pre-humidified hydrogen stream

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Shakhshir, Saher Al

    2016-01-01

    In a recent publication it has been shown how the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell can be determined employing hot wire anemometry. The hot wire sensor has to be placed into the anode outlet pipe of the operating fuel cell, and the voltage signal E that is read from the senso....... Finally, it will be shown how previously developed dew point diagrams for the anode side in a fuel cell can be corrected for a humidified hydrogen inlet stream....

  11. Results of Microstructural Examinations of Irradiated LEU U-Mo Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiser, D.D. Jr.; Jue, J.F.; Robinson, A.B. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2528, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Finlay, M.R. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (Australia)

    2009-06-15

    Introduction: The RERTR program is responsible for converting research reactors that use high-enriched uranium fuels to ones that use low-enriched uranium fuels [1]. As part of the development of LEU fuels, a variety of irradiation experiments are being conducted using the Advanced Test Reactor. Based on the results of initial fuel plate testing, adjustments have been made to the characteristics of fuel plates to improve the stability of the fuel microstructure. One improvement has been to add Si to the matrix of a dispersion fuel. This material is also being added at the fuel/cladding interface of a monolithic fuel. This paper will discuss the irradiation performance of these fuels, in terms of the stability of their microstructures during irradiation. Results and discussion: The post-irradiation examinations of fuel plates are performed at the Idaho National Laboratory. These examinations consist of visual examinations of fuel plates, gamma scanning, thickness measurements, oxide thickness measurements, and optical metallographic examinations of the fuel plate microstructures. Microstructural analysis is also performed using scanning electron microscopy. Overall, U-7Mo and U-10Mo alloy fuels have displayed the best irradiation performance, particularly, when a Si-containing Al alloy is used as the dispersion fuel matrix. The benefit of using this type of matrix is that the commonly observed fuel/cladding interaction that occurs during irradiation is reduced and the interaction layer that forms exhibit stable behavior during irradiation. Monolithic-type fuels, which consist of a U-Mo foil encased in Al alloy cladding, are also being developed. These types of fuels are also showing promise and will continue to be developed. One challenge with this type of fuel is in trying to maximize the bond strength at the foil/cladding interface. Fuel/cladding interactions can affect the quality of the boding at this interface. Si is being added to improve the characteristics

  12. Main examination results of WWER-1000 fuel after its irradiation in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibiliashvili, Yu.; Dubrovin, K.; Vasilchenko, I.; Yenin, A.; Kushmanov, A.; Smirnov, A.; Smirnov, V.

    1994-01-01

    WWER-1000 fuel examination has been undertaken to specify the properties of fuel assembly members by defining the parameters of their materials and their interconnection in power reactor operation conditions. Nine fuel assemblies are examined. The examination program includes: visual inspection, measurement of overall dimensions, eddy-current test, gamma-scanning, X-ray and neutron radiography, analysis of gas pressure and composition inside fuel rods, ceramography/metallography, mass spectrometry, microanalysis and electron microscopy of fuel and fuel claddings. The examination results suggest that WWER-1000 fuel spent at steady-state operation conditions up to 50 Mwd/kg U of burnup is in satisfactory condition. The examination of all types of fuel cladding failures indicates that the reason lies in the interaction of cladding with coolant solid impurities. The nodular cladding corrosion of fuel assembly discharged from the South-Ukrainian NPP is caused by the graphite compounds deposited on the fuel rod. Those deposits are a result of the circulating pump damage and had accidental, non-typical character. Some of the rods were found to have a small cladding 'fretting' of the spacer grid cell material. The values of the majority of parameters determining the fuel efficiency allow to assume that there is a potential for further extension of fuel burnup and operation length. 1 tab., 11 figs

  13. Main examination results of WWER-1000 fuel after its irradiation in power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibiliashvili, Yu [Vsesoyuznyj Nauchno-Issledovatel` skij Inst. Neorganicheskikh Materialov, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dubrovin, K [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Vasilchenko, I [Opytno-Konstruktorskoe Byuro Gidropress, Podol` sk (Russian Federation); Yenin, A; Kushmanov, A [AO Novosibirskij Zavod Khimcontsentratov, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Smirnov, A; Smirnov, V [Nauchno-Issledovatel` skij Inst. Atomnykh Reaktorov, Dimitrovgrad (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    WWER-1000 fuel examination has been undertaken to specify the properties of fuel assembly members by defining the parameters of their materials and their interconnection in power reactor operation conditions. Nine fuel assemblies are examined. The examination program includes: visual inspection, measurement of overall dimensions, eddy-current test, gamma-scanning, X-ray and neutron radiography, analysis of gas pressure and composition inside fuel rods, ceramography/metallography, mass spectrometry, microanalysis and electron microscopy of fuel and fuel claddings. The examination results suggest that WWER-1000 fuel spent at steady-state operation conditions up to 50 Mwd/kg U of burnup is in satisfactory condition. The examination of all types of fuel cladding failures indicates that the reason lies in the interaction of cladding with coolant solid impurities. The nodular cladding corrosion of fuel assembly discharged from the South-Ukrainian NPP is caused by the graphite compounds deposited on the fuel rod. Those deposits are a result of the circulating pump damage and had accidental, non-typical character. Some of the rods were found to have a small cladding `fretting` of the spacer grid cell material. The values of the majority of parameters determining the fuel efficiency allow to assume that there is a potential for further extension of fuel burnup and operation length. 1 tab., 11 figs.

  14. Post-irradiation examination of Oconee 1 fuel: end-of-cycle 2 nondestructive test phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-11-01

    Standard B and W Mark B (15 x 15) pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies were nondestructively examined at the end of the second cycle of Oconee 1 reactor operation. Burnups of the 16 fuel assemblies examined ranged from 13,100 to 20,000 MWd/mtU. The examinations were conducted in the Oconee 1 and 2 spent fuel storage pool using the installed underwater test equipment. Data obtained included fuel rod and fuel assembly dimensions, water channel spacings, holddown spring forces, fuel rod crud characteristics, and fuel column axial gap and stack lengths. Visual examinations revealed no evidence of significant rod bowing, cladding deformation, cocked grids, or rod defects. The results, summarized in this report, indicate that the assemblies performed well through two cycles of reactor operation

  15. Multifrequency eddy current examination for surface defects detection of hot steel products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroshima, Tatsuo; Sakamoto, Takahide; Takahashi, Akio; Miyata, Kenichi.

    1985-01-01

    Multifrequency eddy current testing method using probe coils has been studied for surface defects detection in hot steel products at high temperature over the magnetic Curie point. The conventional signal processing method is not available for suppression of an undesirable signal caused by lift-off variation or unevenness in inspected surfaces, because the undesirable signal pattern is similar to a defect signal pattern. In order to suppress the undesirable signal a new dual frequency signal processing method using three phase rotators has been developed, and was applied to several hot steel inspections. The results are as follows. 1. In the rotating eddy current machine for hot steel rods, the lift-off variation signal caused by a wobble of rods or the difference between rotating center and pass center of rods can be suppressed. A long seam or crack whose depth is more than 0.5mm can be detected. 2. In the hot inspection for continuously cast slabs, the signal caused by oscillation mark whose depth is under 1 mm can be suppressed. A fine transversal crack whose depth is 2 mm can be detected. 3. In the hot inspection for round billets, the lift-off variation signal caused by oval shape can be eliminated, and a crack which is deeper than 1.5 mm can be clearly detected. The detectability of defects can be improved by the analysis of dual frequency signal pattern. (author)

  16. A micro hot test of the Chalmers-GANEX extraction system on used nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauhn, L.; Hedberg, M.; Aneheim, E.; Ekberg, C.; Loefstroem-Engdahl, E.; Skarnemark, G. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivaegen 4, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2013-07-01

    In the present study, a 'micro hot test' has been performed using the Chalmers-GANEX (Group Actinide Extraction) system for partitioning of used nuclear fuel. The test included a pre-extraction step using N,N-di-2- ethylhexyl-butyramide (DEHBA) in n-octanol to remove the bulk part of the uranium. This pre-extraction was followed by a group extraction of actinides using the mixture of TBP and CyMe{sub 4}-BTBP in cyclohexanone as suggested in the Chalmers-GANEX process, and a three stage stripping of the extracted actinides. Distribution ratios for the extractions and stripping were determined based on a combination of γ- and α-spectrometry, as well as ICP-MS measurements. Successful extraction of uranium, plutonium and the minor actinides neptunium, americium and curium was achieved. However, measurements also indicated that co-extraction of europium occurs to some extent during the separation. These results were expected based on previous experiments using trace concentrations of actinides and lanthanides. Since this test was only performed in one stage with respect to the group actinide extraction, it is expected that multi stage tests will give even better results. (authors)

  17. Standard recommended practice for examination of fuel element cladding including the determination of the mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Guidelines are provided for the post-irradiation examination of fuel cladding and to achieve better correlation and interpretation of the data in the field of radiation effects. The recommended practice is applicable to metal cladding of all types of fuel elements. The tests cited are suitable for determining mechanical properties of the fuel elements cladding. Various ASTM standards and test methods are cited

  18. Employing Hot Wire Anemometry to Directly Measure the Water Balance in a Proton Exchange membrane Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shakhshir, Saher Al; Hussain, Nabeel; Berning, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Water management in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) remains a critical problem for their durability, cost, and performance. Because the anode side of this fuel cell has the tendency to become dehydrated, measuring the water balance can be an important diagnosis tool during fuel cell...... operation. The water balance indicates how much of the product water leaves at the anode side versus the cathode side. Previous methods of determining the fuel cell water balance often relied on condensing the water in the exhaust gas streams and weighing the accumulated mass which is a time consuming...... process that has limited accuracy. Currently, our group is developing a novel method to accurately determine the water balance in a PEMFC in real time by employing hot-wire anemometry. The amount of heat transferred from the wire to the anode exhaust stream can be translated into a voltage signal which...

  19. Hot impact densification (HID) - a new method of producing ceramic nuclear fuel pellets with tight dimensional tolerances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrovat, M.; Rachor, L.; Muehling, G.; Vollath, D.; Zimmermann, H.

    1984-01-01

    The hot impact densification (HID) is a new powerful method for producing ceramic fuel pellets for nuclear reactors. Green ceramic bodies are directly processed to pellets by high speed shaping in the plastic temperature region of ceramic material. Opposed to the well established press sintering procedure it can be heated, densified, and cooled by orders of magnitude faster. Therefore, at high throughputs, small equipment dimensions become possible. The fuel pellets produced meet all requirements, particular the dimensional tolerances achieved are very closed, consequently circular grinding is omitted. Furthermore, the relatively high temperature level of the impact pressing favors the mixed crystal formation of uranium and plutonium oxide. This improves the solubility of the fuel in nitric acid, an essential point at reprocessing. A prototype facility is designed so that automatic fabrication in continuous operation will be possible. The target working cycle for a fuel pellet is in the range of some seconds. (orig.)

  20. Nondestructive analysis of irradiated fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudey, N.D.; Frick, D.C.

    1977-01-01

    The principal nondestructive examination techniques presently used to assess the physical integrity of reactor fuels and cladding materials include gamma-scanning, profilometry, eddy current, visual inspection, rod-to-rod spacing, and neutron radiography. LWR fuels are generally examined during annual refueling outages, and are conducted underwater in the spent fuel pool. FBR fuels are primarily examined in hot cells after fuel discharge. Although the NDE techniques are identical, LWR fuel examinations emphasize tests to demonstrate adherence to technical specification and reliable fuel performance; whereas, FBR fuel examinations emphasize aspects more related to the relative performance of different types of fuel and cladding materials subjected to variable irradiation conditions

  1. Channel Bow in Boiling Water Reactors - Hot Cell Examination Results and Correlation to Measured Bow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, S.T.; Lin, Y.P.; Dubecky, M.A.; Edsinger, K.; Mader, E.V.

    2007-01-01

    An increase in frequency of fuel channel-control blade interference has been observed in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) in recent years. Many of the channels leading to interference were found to bow towards the control blade in a manner that was inconsistent with the expected bow due to other effects. The pattern of bow appeared to indicate a new channel bow mechanism that differed from the predominant bow mechanism caused by differential growth due to fast-fluence gradients. In order to investigate this new type of channel bow, coupons from several channels with varying degrees of bow were returned to the GE Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) for Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE). This paper describes the characteristics of channel corrosion and hydrogen pickup observed, and relates the observations to the channel exposure level, control history, and measured channel bow. The channels selected for PIE had exposures in the range of 36-48 GWd/MTU and covered a wide range of measured bow. The coupons were obtained at 4 elevations from opposing channel sides adjacent and away from the control blade. The PIE performed on these coupons included visual examination, metallography, and hydrogen concentration measurements. A new mechanism of control-blade shadow corrosion-induced channel bow was found to correlate with differences in the extent of corrosion and corresponding differences in the hydrogen concentration between opposite sides of the channels. The increased corrosion on the control blade sides was found to be dependent on the level of control early in the life of the channel. The contributions of other potential factors leading to increased channel bow and channel-control blade interference are also discussed in this paper. (authors)

  2. Examination of sludge from the Hanford K Basins fuel canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makenas, B.J.

    1998-01-01

    Samples of sludges with a high uranium content have been retrieved from the fuel canisters in the Hanford K West and K East basins. The composition of these samples contrasts markedly with the previously reported content of sludge samples taken from the K East basin floor. Chemical composition, chemical reactivity, and particle size of sludge are summarized in this paper

  3. Overview of P.I.E. techniques for L.W.R. fuels at Saclay hot cells with special emphasis on new apparatus and on mechanical testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, J.Y.; Hardy, J.L.; Trotabas, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the state-of-the-art in the Saclay hot cells for examining L.W.R. fuels. First, we present the classical path followed by a fuel rod in the laboratory, to begin with non-destructive testing. This is completed by destructive examinations, such as free volume determination and fission gases analyses, density measurement and metallographies including X-rays diffraction and microprobe (EPMA/WDX). These two last techniques enable the identification of elements and chemical nature of compounds which are present. We also perform mechanical tests on metallic components, on clads and guide-tubes (tensile tests, creep, burst or fatigue tests by internal pressure). Another apparatus is devoted to the study of irradiated clad behaviour during LOCA-type transients. In the second chapter, a particular emphasis is given to the developments in progress, or planned in the near future. This includes: (a) The implementation of a new non-destructive testing bench to inspect more fuel rods simultaneously. (b) A new image analyzer to be applied e.g. to hydrides analysis in the clad, or to the inspection of safety test fuel bundles. (c) As for mechanical testing, we describe here the tensile tests on clads or on guide-tubes, performed on longitudinal samples or ring samples

  4. Thermophysical instruments for non-destructive examination of tightness and internal gas pressure or irradiated power reactor fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastoushin, V.V.; Novikov, A.Yu.; Bibilashvili, Yu.K.

    1998-01-01

    The developed thermophysical method and technical instruments for non-destructive leak-tightness and gas pressure inspection inside irradiated power reactor fuel rods and FAs under poolside and hot cell conditions are described. The method of gas pressure measuring based on the examination of parameters of thermal convection that aroused in gas volume of rod plenum by special technical instruments. The developed method and technique allows accurate value determination of not only one of the main critical rod parameters, namely total internal gas pressure, that forms rod mean life in the reactor core, but also the partial pressure of every main constituent of gaseous mixture inside irradiated fuel rod, that provides the feasibility of authentic and reliable leak-tightness detection. The described techniques were experimentally checked during the examination of all types power reactor fuel rods existing in Russia (WWER, BN, RBMK) and could form the basis for new technique development for non-destructive examination of PWR (and other) type rods and FAs having gas plenum filled with spring or another elements of design. (author)

  5. Destructive examination of 3-cycle LWR fuel rods from Turkey Point Unit 3 for the Climax-Spent Fuel Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkin, S.D.

    1981-06-01

    The destructive examination results of five light water reactor rods from the Turkey Point Unit 3 reactor are presented. The examinations included fission gas collection and analyses, burnup and hydrogen analyses, and a metallographic evaluation of the fuel, cladding, oxide, and hydrides. The rods exhibited a low fission gas release with all other results appearing representative for pressurized water reactor fuel rods with similar burnups (28 GWd/MTU) and operating histories

  6. Thermodynamic assessment of IGCC power plants with hot fuel gas desulfurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuffrida, Antonio; Romano, Matteo C.; Lozza, Giovanni G.

    2010-01-01

    In IGCC power plants, hot gas desulfurization (HGD) represents an attractive solution to simplify syngas treatments and to improve the efficiency, potentially reducing the final cost of electricity. In the present study, the various consequences of the introduction of a HGD station in the power plant are discussed and evaluated, in comparison with conventional near-ambient temperature clean-up. Attention is paid to the potential improvements of the overall energy balance of the complete power station, along with the requirements of the sorbent regeneration process, to the influence of the desulfurization temperature and to the different solutions needed to control the NO x emissions (altered by the presence of HGD). The net performance of complete IGCC power plants (with HGD or with conventional desulfurization) were predicted, with reference to status-of-the-art solutions based on an entrained flow, dry-feed, oxygen-blown gasifier and on an advanced, FB-class combined cycle. The net efficiency experiences about 2.5% point improvement with HGD, even if a small reduction in the power output was predicted, when using the same combustion turbine. An exhaustive sensitivity analysis was carried out to evaluate the effects of different working conditions at the HGD station, e.g. desulfurization temperature and oxygen content in the gaseous stream for sorbent regeneration. According to the obtained results, these parameters have a weak influence on the efficiency. In particular, a very elevated desulfurization temperature (above 400-500 o C) does not provide decisive thermodynamic advantages. Therefore, the HGD unit optimization can be driven by technical and economical aspects and by emission abatement requirements. For instance, utilization of nitrogen for HGD sorbent regeneration (rather than for syngas dilution) and higher fuel temperature may improve the NO formation. Hence, different strategies to achieve acceptable NO x emissions (e.g. steam dilution) and their

  7. Integrated hot fuel gas cleaning for advanced gasification combined cycle process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieminen, M.; Kangasmaa, K.; Laatikainen, J.; Staahlberg, P.; Kurkela, E. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Gasification and Advanced Combustion

    1996-12-01

    The fate of halogens in pressurised fluidized-bed gasification and hot gas filtration is determined. Potential halogen removal sorbents, suitable for integrated hot gas cleaning, are screened and some selected sorbents are tested in bench scale. Finally, halogen removal results are verified using the PDU-scale pressurised fluidized-bed gasification and integrated hot gas cleaning facilities of VTT. The project is part of the JOULE II Extension programme of the European Union. (author)

  8. Examination of fuel reinsertion strategies for out-of core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comes, S.A.; Turinsky, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    A computer code for determining out-of-core fuel loading strategies in order to minimize levelized fuel cycle cost within constraints has been developed and previously reported by the authors. While past work in this area has dealt with optimizations during equilibrium operating conditions, this work has considered the more realistic conditions of nonequilibrium cycles. The code, called OCEON, seeks to determine a family of economically attractive fuel reload strategies through the optimum selection of feed batch sizes, enrichments, and partially burned fuel reinsertion strategies within operating constraints. This paper presents recent work on expanding the code to allow for different fuel reinsertion options when determining the family of near-optimum fuel reload strategies

  9. Management of spent fuel from research and prototype power reactors and residues from post-irradiation examination of fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    The safe and economic management of spent fuel is important for all countries which have nuclear research or power reactors. It involves all aspects of the handling, transportation, storage, conditioning and reprocessing or final disposal of the spent fuel. In the case of spent fuel management from power reactors the shortage of available reprocessing capacity and the rising economic interest in the direct disposal of spent fuel have led to an increasing interest in the long term storage and management of spent fuel. The IAEA has played a major role in coordinating the national activities of the Member States in this area. It was against this background that the Technical Committee Meeting on ''Safe Management of Spent Fuel From Research Reactors, Prototype Power Reactors and Fuel From Commercial Power Reactors That Has Been Subjected to PIE (Post Irradiated Examination)'' (28th November - 1st December 1988) was organised. The aims of the current meeting have been to: 1. Review the state-of-the-art in the field of management of spent fuel from research and prototype power reactors, as well as the residues from post irradiation examination of commercial power reactor fuel. The emphasis was to be on the safe handling, conditioning, transportation, storage and/or disposal of the spent fuel during operation and final decommissioning of the reactors. Information was sought on design details, including shielding, criticality and radionuclide release prevention, heat removal, automation and remote control, planning and staff training; licensing and operational practices during each of the phases of spent fuel management. 2. Identify areas where additional research and development are needed. 3. Recommend areas for future international cooperation in this field. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. Post-irradiation examination of Oconee 1 fuel - cycle 1 destructive test phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    Standard B and W Mark-B (15 x 15) pressurized water reactor fuel rods were destructively examined after one cycle of irradiation in the Oconee 1 reactor. Fuel rod average burnup ranged from 10,603 to 11,270 MWd/mtU for the rods examined. Data obtained included fuel rod extraction loads, rod dimensional changes, cladding tensile properties, fuel pellet gap length, fission product distribution, fission gas and crud composition, fuel densification, chemical burnup analysis, and fuel and cladding microstructure. As expected, parametric changes were well within the design envelope. Superficial corrosion and wear were found at spacer grid contact points. However, the 19 rods examined were structurally sound and exhibited no indications of cladding defects associated with pelletcladding interactions

  11. Nondestructive examination of Oconee 1 fuel assemblies after four cycles of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyecha, T.D.; Mayer, J.T.; Guthrie, B.A. III; Riordan, J.E.

    1980-12-01

    Five B and W Mark B (15 x 15) pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies were nondestructively examined after four cycles of irradiation in the Oconee 1 reactor. Four of the five assemblies examined had a burnup of 40,000 MWd/mtU; the fifth assembly had a burnup of 36,800 MWd/mtU. This effort is part of a Department of Energy program to improve uranium utilization by extending the burnup of light water reactor fuel. The examinations were conducted in the Oconee 1 and 2 spent fuel storage pool. Data obtained included fuel assembly and fuel rod dimensions, water channel spacings, spacer grid and holddown spring forces, fuel column stack and axial gap lengths, and crud samples. The results indicate that the assemblies performed well through four cycles of operation; all of the data were within design limits

  12. Spallation as a dominant source of pusher-fuel and hot-spot mix in inertial confinement fusion capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Charles D.

    2016-02-01

    We suggest that a potentially dominant but previously neglected source of pusher-fuel and hot-spot "mix" may have been the main degradation mechanism for fusion energy yields of modern inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules designed and fielded to achieve high yields—not hydrodynamic instabilities. This potentially dominant mix source is the spallation of small chunks or "grains" of pusher material into the fuel regions whenever (1) the solid material adjacent to the fuel changes its phase by nucleation and (2) this solid material spalls under shock loading and sudden decompression. We describe this mix mechanism, support it with simulations and experimental evidence, and explain how to eliminate it and thereby allow higher yields for ICF capsules and possibly ignition at the National Ignition Facility.

  13. FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility]/IEM [Interim Examination and Maintenance] Cell Fuel Pin Weighing System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, P.W.

    1987-09-01

    A Fuel Pin Weighing Machine has been developed for use in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell to assist in identifying an individual breached fuel pin from its fuel assembly pin bundle. A weighing machine, originally purchased for use in the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) at Hanford, was used as the basis for the IEM Cell system. Design modifications to the original equipment were centered around: 1) adapting the FMEF machine for use in the IEM Cell and 2) correcting operational deficiencies discovered during functional testing in the IEM Cell Mockup

  14. Fabrication and post-irradiation examination of a zircaloy-2 clad UO2-1.5 wt% PuO2 fuel pin irradiated in PWL, CIRUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, D.N.; Sahoo, K.C.; Chatterjee, S.; Majumdar, S.; Kamath, H.S.; Ramachandran, R.; Bahl, J.K.; Purushottam, D.S.C.; Ramakumar, M.S.; Sivaramakrishnan, K.S.; Roy, P.R.

    1977-01-01

    A zircaloy-2 clad UO 2 -1.5 wt% PuO 2 fuel pin was fabricated at the Radiometallurgy Section of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, for irradiation in the pressurised water loop in CIRUS. Requisite development work related to powder conditioning, blending, pressing and sintering parameters was carried out to meet the exacting fuel pellet specifications of CANDU fuel. The fuel pin ruptured while being irradiated in the pressurised water loop in CIRUS, after experiencing a low burn-up of 507 MWD/MTM and was subsequently examined at the Radiometallurgy Hot Cells Facility. The results showed that internal clad hydriding led to primary failure of the fuel pin. Subsequent ingress of the coolant water caused excessive swelling of the thermal insulating magnesia pellets located at the ends of the fuel column. The swelling of magnesia pellets caused severe rupturing of the fuel pin at the two ends. The delayed rupturing of the fuel pin at the upper end, caused the fuel column to be displaced downwards by 5.85mm. (author)

  15. Metallographic examinations of the wear-marks on fuel pins of the KNK II/2 fuel assembly NY-308

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patzer, G.

    1987-12-01

    On the fuel pins and pin spacers of the fuel assembly NY-308 of the second core of KNK II pronounced wear marks had been found in the area of the contact points. In order to determine the exact form of the marks, metallographic investigations were performed on two test pieces of fuel pins in the Hot Cells of the KfK Karlsruhe. It was found that the wear marks did show the already observed stratified structure. Next to the unchanged cladding area there is a peripheral zone with modified grain structure, followed by a layer of moved material and finally there is a flake-like zone of accumulated cladding material at the lower end of the wear marks. Longitudinal cuts do not show grain deformations, which could indicate axial friction forces between pin and spacer. The wear marks are rapidly dropping to their maximum depth at the ends and the depth shows a relatively uniform pattern between both. The findings are confirming the picture, that a stirring movement of the fuel pins took place, which caused adhesive wear [de

  16. Oscillatory Shear Rheology in Examining the Drug-Polymer Interactions Relevant in Hot Melt Extrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aho, Johanna; Edinger, Magnus; Botker, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The flow properties of drug-polymer mixtures have a significant influence on their processability when using techniques such as hot melt extrusion (HME). Suitable extrusion temperature and screw speed to be used in laboratory scale HME were evaluated for mixtures containing 30% of paracetamol (PRC...... of the drug substances. Consecutively, the mixtures were extruded, and the maximum plasticizing weight fraction of each drug was determined by means of rheological measurements. IBU was found to have an efficient plasticizing functionality, decreasing the viscosity of the mixtures even above its apparent...

  17. Hot cell examination on the surveillance capsule of SA 533 cl. 1 reactor pressure vessel (1st test report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Yong Sun; Jung, Y. H.; Yoo, B. O.; Baik, S. J.; Oh, W. H.; Soong, W. S.; Hong, K. P

    2000-08-01

    The post-irradiated examinations such as impact test, tensile test, composition analysis and etc. were conducted to monitor and to evaluate the radiation-induced changes, so called radiation embrittlement, in the mechanical properties of ferritic materials. Those data should be applied to confirm safety as well as reliability of reactor pressure vessel. The scopes and contents of hot cell examination on the surveillance capsule are as follows; - Capsule transportation, cutting, dismantling and classification - Shim block and Dosimeter cutting and dismantling - Impact test - Tensile test - Composition analysis by EPMA - SEM observation on the fractured surface - Hardness test - Radwaste treatment.

  18. The results of postirradiation examinations of VVER-1000 and VVER-440 fuel rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovin, K. P.; Ivanov, E. G.; Strijov, P. N.; Yakovlev, V. V.

    1991-02-01

    The paper presents the results of postirradiation examination of the fuel rods having different fuel-cladding gaps, pellet densities, pellet inner diameters and so on. The fuel rods were irradiated in the material science reactor (MR) of the Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy and at 4 unit of the Novo-Voronezh nuclear powerplant. Some data on fission gas release and rod geometry and compared with computer code predictions.

  19. Examination process of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly and examination machine to bring the process into operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaroche, P.; Leseur, A.; Saglio, R.; Vaubert, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The machine to examine a fuel assembly of a nuclear reactor includes a support on which the assembly to be examined is placed, a source emitting waves, directed to the assembly to be examined, devices to examine the assembly to be examined that receive the emitted wave by the said source and that have been reflected by the assembly. The examination devices have an axis, this axis being directed to a mirror, this mirror being inclined in such a way that it reflects the waves reflected by the assembly to the examination devices, a radiation protection, to avoid the radiation emitted by the assembly, being diposed between the assembly and the examination devices [fr

  20. Survey of post-irradiation examinations made of mixed carbide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coquerelle, M.

    1997-01-01

    Post-irradiation examinations on mixed carbide, nitride and carbonitride fuels irradiated in fast flux reactors Rapsodie and DFR were carried out during the seventies and early eighties. In this report, emphasis was put on the fission gas release, cladding carburization and head-end gaseous oxidation process of these fuels, in particular, of mixed carbides. (author). 8 refs, 16 figs, 3 tabs

  1. End-of-life destructive examination of light water breeder reactor fuel rods (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, K.D.

    1987-10-01

    Destructive examination of 12 representative Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods was performed following successful operation in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station for 29,047 effective full power hours, about five years. Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods were unique in that the thorium oxide and uranium-233 oxide fuel was contained within Zircaloy-4 cladding. Destructive examinations included analysis of released fission gas; chemical analysis of the fuel to determine depletion, iodine, and cesium levels; chemical analysis of the cladding to determine hydrogen, iodine, and cesium levels; metallographic examination of the cladding, fuel, and other rod components to determine microstructural features and cladding corrosion features; and tensile testing of the irradiated cladding to determine mechanical strength. The examinations confirmed that Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rod performance was excellent. No evidence of fuel rod failure was observed, and the fuel operating temperature was low (below 2580 0 F at which an increased percentage of fission gas is released). 21 refs., 80 figs., 20 tabs

  2. Importance of Electrode Hot-Pressing Conditions for the Catalyst Performance of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Dhiman, Rajnish; Larsen, Mikkel Juul

    2015-01-01

    The catalyst performance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) depends on not only the choice of materials, but also on the electrode structure and in particular on the interface between the components. In this work, we demonstrate that the hot-pressing conditions used during electrode...... lamination have a great influence on the catalyst properties of a low-temperature PEMFC, especially on its durability. Lamination pressure, temperature and duration were systematically studied in relation to the electrochemical surface area, platinum dissolution, platinum particle size and electrode surface...

  3. Predictions of the thermomechanical code ''RESTA'' compared with fuel element examinations after irradiation in the BR3 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitgrand, S.

    1980-01-01

    A large number of fuel rods have been irradiated in the small power plant BR3. Many of them have been examined in hot cells after irradiation, giving thus valuable experimental information. On the other hand a thermomechanical code, named RESTA, has been developed by the C.E.A. to describe and predict the behaviour of a fuel pin in a PWR environment and in stationary conditions. The models used in that code derive chiefly from the C.E.A.'s own experience and are briefly reviewed in this paper. The comparison between prediction and experience has been performed for four power history classes: (1) moderate (average linear rating approximately equal to 20 kw m -1 ) and short (approximately equal to 300 days) rating, (2) moderate (approximately equal to 20 kw m -1 ) and long (approximately equal to 600 days) rating, (3) high (25-30 kw m -1 ) and long (approximately equal to 600 days) rating and (4) very high (30-40 kw m -1 ) and long (approximately equal to 600 days) rating. Satisfactory agreement has been found between experimental and calculated results in all cases, concerning fuel structural change, fission gas release, pellet-clad interaction as well as clad permanent strain. (author)

  4. Examination of Zircaloy-clad spent fuel after extended pool storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, E.R.; Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Lowry, L.M.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents the results from metallurgical examinations of Zircaloy-clad fuel rods from two bundles (0551 and 0074) of Shippingport PWR Core 1 blanket fuel after extended water storage. Both bundles were exposed to water in the reactor from late 1957 until discharge. The estimated average burnups were 346 GJ/kgU (4000 MWd/MTU) for bundle 0551 and 1550 GJ/kgU (18,000 MWd/MTU) for bundle 0074. Fuel rods from bundle 0551 were stored in deionized water for nearly 21 yr prior to examination in 1980, representing the world's oldest pool-stored Zircaloy-clad fuel. Bundle 0074 has been stored in deionized water since reactor discharge in 1964. Data from the current metallurgical examinations enable a direct assessment of extended pool storage effects because the metallurgical condition of similar fuel rods was investigated and documented soon after reactor discharge. Data from current and past examinations were compared, and no significant degradation of the Zircaloy cladding was indicated after almost 21 yr in water storage. The cladding dimensions and mechanical properties, fission gas release, hydrogen contents of the cladding, and external oxide film thicknesses that were measured during the current examinations were all within the range of measurements made on fuel bundles soon after reactor discharge. The appearance of the external surfaces and the microstructures of the fuel and cladding were also similar to those reported previously. In addition, no evidence of accelerated corrosion or hydride redistribution in the cladding was observed

  5. An examination of the flame spread limits in a dual fuel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badr, O.; Karim, G.A.; Liu, B. [Calgary Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1999-10-01

    The performance of a gas-fuelled diesel engine (dual fuel) is examined at light load and an effective threshold limit to the combustion of the gaseous fuel through bulk flame spread is identified. The relationship of such a limit to some of the key operating parameters is then discussed. A comparison between the measured values of the limit with those corresponding to the lower flammability limits of the gaseous fuel when evaluated under the prevailing cylinder conditions during pilot diesel fuel ignition showed similar trends. It is suggested that such a similarity may form a basis for estimating the lean operation limits for duel a fuel combustion in engines. A simple approach for estimating the limiting equivalence ratio for the apparent bulk flame spread limit is described for a methane-fuelled dual fuel engine. (Author)

  6. Data base and postirradiation examination results of spent WWER-1000 fuel elements and assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanashov, B.A.; Polenok, V.S.; Smirnov, A.V.; Zhitelev, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    The report presents the results of the postirradiation shape change examination of standard fuel elements and fuel assemblies irradiated in standard conditions in Russian power reactors of the WWER-1000 type. The information is based on the results obtained at the Fuel Research Department of the Federal Scientific Centre Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (FSC RIAR, Dimitrovgrad, Russian Federation) within the period from 1987 to 1994. Emphasis is placed on such experimental and calculational data as: length, cross-section dimensions and shape of FAs with wrapper; change of standard FA skeleton members dimensions; fuel bundle elongation; change of the fuel cladding outer diameter; and elongation and change of the fuel stack outer diameter. (author)

  7. Plan for shipment, storage, and examination of TMI-2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, G.J.; Engen, I.A.; Tyacke, M.J.; Reno, H.W.

    1984-05-01

    This Plan addresses the preparation and shipment of core debris from Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for receipt, storage, and examination. The Manager of the Nuclear Materials Evaluation Programs Division of EG and G Idaho, Inc. will manage two separate but integrated programs, one located at TMI (Part 1) and the other at INEL (Part 2). The Technical Integration Office (at TMI) is responsible for developing and implementing Part 1, TMI-2 Core Shipment Program. That portion of the Plan establishes coordination between TMI and INEL (and others) for shipment of core debris, and it provides the coordination by which handling systems at both locations are designed, constructed, or modified to establish and maintain system compatibility. The Technical Support Branch (at INEL) is responsible for developing and implementing Part 2, Core Activities Program. That portion of the Plan details operational and examination activities at INEL, as well as defines core-related activities planned at other DOE laboratories

  8. Postirradiation examination of Peach Bottom HTGR Driver Fuel Element E06-01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, F.F.; Wichner, R.P.; Martin, W.J.; Fairchild, L.L.; Kedl, R.J.; de Nordwall, H.J.

    1976-04-01

    The report presented describes the postirradiation examinations of driver fuel element E06-01, which had been irradiated an equivalent of 384 full-power days in Peach Bottom, Unit 1. The fuel element is described in detail and its temperature and irradiation service history briefly outlined. Results presented include: (1) visual observations; (2) critical dimensions of fuel compacts, sleeve, and spine; (3) axial distributions of gamma-emitting nuclides plus 3 H and 90 Sr; (4) radial distributions of these nuclides in the sleeve and spine at three axial locations in the fueled regions and three locations in the upper reflector; (5) metallographic examination of samples of fuel compact material; and (6) burnup determinations via radiochemical analyses at two compact locations

  9. Post-irradiation examination of CANDU fuel bundles fuelled with (Th, Pu)O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, M.; Dimayuga, F.C.; Montin, J.

    2010-01-01

    AECL has extensive experience with thoria-based fuel irradiations as part of an ongoing R&D program on thorium within the Advanced Fuel Cycles Program. The BDL-422 experiment was one component of the thorium program that involved the fabrication and irradiation testing of six Bruce-type bundles fuelled with (Th, Pu)O 2 pellets. The fuel was manufactured in the Recycle Fuel Fabrication Laboratories (RFFL) at Chalk River allowing AECL to gain valuable experience in fabrication and handling of thoria fuel. The fuel pellets contained 86.05 wt.% Th and 1.53 wt.% Pu in (Th, Pu)O 2 . The objectives of the BDL-422 experiment were to demonstrate the ability of 37-element geometry (Th, Pu)O 2 fuel bundles to operate to high burnups up to 1000 MWh/kgHE (42 MWd/kgHE), and to examine the (Th, Pu)O 2 fuel performance. This paper describes the post-irradiation examination (PIE) results of BDL-422 fuel bundles irradiated to burnups up to 856 MWh/kgHE (36 MWd/kgHE), with power ratings ranging from 52 to 67 kW/m. PIE results for the high burnup bundles (>1000 MWh/kgHE) are being analyzed and will be reported at a later date. The (Th, Pu)O 2 fuel performance characteristics were superior to UO 2 fuel irradiated under similar conditions. Minimal grain growth was observed and was accompanied by benign fission gas release and sheath strain. Other fuel performance parameters, such as sheath oxidation and hydrogen distribution, are also discussed. (author)

  10. Selection of the reference concept for the surface examination stations in the fuels and materials examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frandsen, G.B.; Nash, C.R.

    1978-01-01

    The prototype surface examination station for the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) will use closed circuit television (CCTV) for routine modes of operation along with a nuclear periscope for special examination needs. The CCTV and the nuclear periscope were evaluated against prescribed station requirements and compared in a side-by-side demonstration. A quantitative evaluation of their outputs showed that both systems were capable of meeting surface anomaly detection requirements. The CCTV system was superior in its ability to collect, suppress and present data into a more useful form for the experimenters

  11. Examination on the safety of handling the fuel elements in the nuclear ship 'Mutsu'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This is the report of the Examination Committee on Total Inspection and Repair Technologies for Mutsu to the Director of Science and Technology Agency and the Minister of Transport dated July 29, 1977. The committee concluded before that the total inspection on safety and the repair of shielding can be carried out as the fuel elements are loaded, and the safety can be secured sufficiently. It was decided at the meeting of ministers concerned with Mutsu on May 17 that the safety concerning handling the fuel elements of Mutsu should be examined by the committee. Under the premise that the fuel elements are loaded again and used after the total inspection on safety and the repair of shielding, the committee examined the methods and the basic concept of safety about the taking-out, transport and preservation of the fuel elements, and the conclusions obtained are reported. The contents of the examination are the outline of the fuel elements, the present condition of the fuel elements, the safety concerning taking-out, transport and preservation of the fuel elements, and the other measures required for securing safety. The committee thinks that the safety can be secured sufficiently if the works are carried out carefully. (Kako, I.)

  12. Non-destructive test for irradiated fuels using X-ray CT system in hot-laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Heemoon; Kim, Gil-Soo; Yoo, Boung-Ok; Tahk, Young-Wook; Cho, Moon-Sung; Ahn, Sang-Bok

    2015-01-01

    To inspect inside of irradiated fuel rod for PIE in hotcell, neutron beam and X-ray have been used. Many hot laboratories in the world have shown the results for NDT by 2-D film data. Currently, computed image processing technology instead of film has been developed and CT was applied to the X-ray and neutron beam system. In this trend, our facility needed to set up X-ray system for irradiated fuel inspection and installed in hotcell with consideration of radiation damage. In this study, X-ray system was tested to be operated with radioactive samples and was performed to inspect fuel rods and observe internal damage and dimensional change. 450kV X-ray CT system was installed in hotcell with modification and tested to check image resolution and radiation damage. The image data were analyzed by 3-D computer software. 8 fuel plates and VHTR rods were inspected and measured internal shape and dimension

  13. The hot continental division: Oak forests, fire, and ecosystem management frame fuels management questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan L. Stout; Matthew B. Dickinson; Gregory J. Nowacki

    2012-01-01

    The Hot Continental Division is one of the larger ecoregions within the continental United States (McNab and Avers 1994), incorporating portions of 19 States and extending from the eastern seacoast to areas west of the Mississippi River (chapter 1). The Division includes the Eastern (Oceanic) and Eastern (Continental) Broadleaf Forest Provinces and two Mountain...

  14. KEY RESULTS FROM IRRADIATION AND POST-IRRADIATION EXAMINATION OF AGR-1 UCO TRISO FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demkowicz, Paul A.; Hunn, John D.; Petti, David A.; Morris, Robert N.

    2016-11-01

    The AGR-1 irradiation experiment was performed as the first test of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel in the US Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The experiment consisted of 72 right cylinder fuel compacts containing approximately 3×105 coated fuel particles with uranium oxide/uranium carbide (UCO) fuel kernels. The fuel was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor for a total of 620 effective full power days. Fuel burnup ranged from 11.3 to 19.6% fissions per initial metal atom and time average, volume average irradiation temperatures of the individual compacts ranged from 955 to 1136°C. This paper focuses on key results from the irradiation and post-irradiation examination, which revealed a robust fuel with excellent performance characteristics under the conditions tested and have significantly improved the understanding of UCO coated particle fuel irradiation behavior within the US program. The fuel exhibited a very low incidence of TRISO coating failure during irradiation and post-irradiation safety testing at temperatures up to 1800°C. Advanced PIE methods have allowed particles with SiC coating failure to be isolated and meticulously examined, which has elucidated the specific causes of SiC failure in these specimens. The level of fission product release from the fuel during irradiation and post-irradiation safety testing has been studied in detail. Results indicated very low release of krypton and cesium through intact SiC and modest release of europium and strontium, while also confirming the potential for significant silver release through the coatings depending on irradiation conditions. Focused study of fission products within the coating layers of irradiated particles down to nanometer length scales has provided new insights into fission product transport through the coating layers and the role various fission products may have on coating integrity. The broader implications of these results and the application of

  15. Post irradiation examinations of uranium-plutonium mixed carbide fuels irradiated at low linear power rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Atsushi; Sasayama, Tatsuo; Iwai, Takashi; Aizawa, Sakuei; Ohwada, Isao; Aizawa, Masao; Ohmichi, Toshihiko; Handa, Muneo

    1988-11-01

    Two pins containing uranium-plutonium carbide fuels which are different in stoichiometry, i.e. (U,Pu)C 1.0 and (U,Pu)C 1.1 , were constructed into a capsule, ICF-37H, and were irradiated in JRR-2 up to 1.0 at % burnup at the linear heat rate of 420 W/cm. After being cooled for about one year, the irradiated capsule was transferred to the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility where the non-destructive examinations of the fuel pins in the β-γ cells and the destructive ones in two α-γ inert gas atmosphere cells were carried out. The release rates of fission gas were low enough, 0.44 % from (U,Pu)C 1.0 fuel pin and 0.09% from (U,Pu)C 1.1 fuel pin, which is reasonable because of the low central temperature of fuel pellets, about 1000 deg C and is estimated that the release is mainly governed by recoil and knock-out mechanisms. Volume swelling of the fuels was observed to be in the range of 1.3 ∼ 1.6 % for carbide fuels below 1000 deg C. Respective open porosities of (U,Pu)C 1.0 and (U,Pu)C 1.1 fuel were 1.3 % and 0.45 %, being in accordance with the release behavior of fission gas. Metallographic observation of the radial sections of pellets showed the increase of pore size and crystal grain size in the center and middle region of (U,Pu)C 1.0 pellets. The chemical interaction between fuel pellets and claddings in the carbide fuels is the penetration of carbon in the fuels to stainless steel tubes. The depth of corrosion layer in inner sides of cladding tubes ranged 10 ∼ 15 μm in the (U,Pu)C 1.0 fuel and 15 #approx #25 μm in the (U,Pu)C 1.1 fuel, which is correlative with the carbon potential of fuels posibly affecting the amount of carbon penetration. (author)

  16. Postirradiation examinations of fuel pins from the GCFR F-1 series of mixed-oxide fuel pins at 5.5 at. % burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strain, R.V.; Johnson, C.E.

    1978-05-01

    Postirradiation examinations were performed on five fuel pins from the Gas-Cooled Fast-Breeder Reactor F-1 experiment irradiated in EBR-II to a peak burnup of approximately 5.5 at. %. These encapsulated fuel pins were irradiated at peak-power linear ratings from approximately 13 to 15 kW/ft and peak cladding inside diameter temperatures from approximately 625 to 760 0 C. The maximum diametral change that occurred during irradiation was 0.2% ΔD/D 0 . The maximum fuel-cladding chemical interaction depth was 2.6 mils in fuel pin G-1 and 1 mil or less in the other three pins examined destructively. Significant migration of the volatile fission products occurred axially to the fuel-blanket interfaces. Teh postirradiation examination data indicate that fuel melted at the inner surface of the annular fuel pellets in the two highest power rating fuel pins, but little axial movement of fuel occurred

  17. Post-irradiation examination of fuel elements of Tarapur Atomic Power Station (Report-I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahl, J.K.; Sah, D.N.; Chatterjee, S.; Sivaramkrishnan, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    Detailed post-irradiation examination of three initial load fuel elements of the Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) has been carried out. The causes of the element failures have been analysed. It was observed that almost 90% of the length of the elements exoerienced nodular corrosion. It has been estimated that nodular corrosion would seriously affect the wall thickness and surface temperature of higher rated elements. Lunar shaped fret marks have also been observed at some spacer grid locations in the elements. The depth of the largest fret mark was measured to be 16.9% clad wall thickness. Detailed metallographic examination of the clad and fuel in the three elements has been done. The temperatures at different structural regions of the fuel cross-sections have been estimated. The change in fuel density during irradiation has been evaluated by comparing the irradiated fuel diameter with the mean pellet design diameter. The performance of the end plug welds and spacer grid sites in the elements has been assessed. The burnup distribution along the length of the elements has been evaluated by gamma scanning. The redistribution of fission products in the fuel has been examined by gamma scanning and beta-gamma autoradiography. Mechanical properties of the irradiated cladding have been examined by ring tensile testing. (auth.)

  18. Nondestructive examination of irradiated fuel rods by pulsed eddy current techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, W.C.; Quapp, W.J.; Martin, M.R.; Gibson, G.W.

    1976-02-01

    A number of fuel rods and unfueled zircaloy cladding tubes which had been irradiated in the Saxton reactor have undergone extensive nondestructive and corroborative destructive examinations by Aerojet Nuclear Company as part of the Water Reactor Safety Research Program, Irradiation Effects Test Series. This report discusses the pulsed eddy current (PEC) nondestructive examinations on the fuel rods and tubing and the metallography results on two fuel rods and one irradiated zircaloy tube. The PEC equipment, designed jointly by Argonne National Laboratory and Aerojet, performed very satisfactorily the functions of diameter, profile, and wall thickness measurements and OD and ID surface defect detection. The destructive examination provided reasonably good confirmation of ''defects'' detected in the nondestructive examination

  19. Postirradiation examination results from the LP-FP-2 center fuel module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, S.M.; Akers, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    The LP-FP-2 experiment was conducted on July 9, 1985 in the Loss of Fluid Test (LOFT) facility located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The primary purpose of this experiment was to provide information of the release, transport, and deposition of fission products and aerosols during a sever core damage event performed in a large scale nuclear reactor facility. Postirradiation nondestructive and destructive examinations of the fuel bundle provided information to assist in achieving this objective, as well as providing information on the material behavior and interactions that occurred within the fuel bundle during this sever core damage experiment. This was a large-scale integral test, incorporating an 11 x 11 array of fuel rods, control rods, and instrumentation tubes, with an active core length of 1.68 m. Peak temperatures in the fuel bundle exceeded 2100 K or approximately 4.5 min, with localized peak temperatures exceeding the melting point of the UO 2 fuel (3120 K). Large amounts of zircaloy oxidation and material relocation occurred during the experiment. The transient phase was terminated by a rapid reflood of cooling water, which resulted in significant oxidation and hydrogen generation. Zircaloy oxidation during the reflood period caused a rapid temperature excursion to occur in the upper two-thirds of the fuel bundle. This article summarizes the data and analysis from the postirradiation examinations of the LP-FP-2 fuel bundle. 12 refs., 39 figs., 8 tabs

  20. Assessment of Radiographic Image Quality by Visual Examination of Neutron Radiographs of the Calibration Fuel Pin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    Up till now no reliable radiographic image quality standards exist for neutron radiography of nuclear reactor fuel. Under the Euratoro Neutron Radiography Working Group (NRWG) Test Program neutron radiographs were produced at different neutron radiography facilities within the European Community...... of a calibration fuel pin. The radiographs were made by the direct, transfer and tracketch methods using different film recording materials. These neutron radiographs of the calibration fuel pin were used for the assessement of radiographic image quality. This was done by visual examination of the radiographs...

  1. Examination of U3Si2-Al fuel elements from the Oak Ridge Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, G.L.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Hofman, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    The results of postirradiation examination of low-enriched U 3 Si 2 fuel elements from the Oak Ridge Research Reactor are presented. The elements replaced standard high-enriched elements and were handled routinely except that the burnup of half the elements was extended beyond normal limits up to about 98% peak. The elements were manufactured by commercial fuel suppliers. The performance was completely satisfactory for all the elements

  2. Standard model of WWER-440 fuel rod for Transuranus and its application for RELAP5 hot channel validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatala, B.; Cvan, M.

    2001-01-01

    Within the PECO European Commission project of 'Extension of the validation matrix of the TRANSURANUS code' is developed a generic model of WWER-440 fuel rod. The model is intended to be applied for both realistic and licensing, conservative analysis. For such an application the TRANSURANUS code would be complementary tool to generally used system codes, e.g. RELAP5, providing realistic, more detailed insight into processes and safety criteria, relevant to the fuel rod. The paper presents general description of the model for TRANSURANUS code, brief discussion of approaches used in TRANSURANUS and RELAP5 code safety analysis, accompanied with information about RELAP5 model (whole scope unit model, used for licensing analysis). The existing model for RELAP5 code for WWER-440/V-213 Bohunice V2 unit is checked and modified in hot channel part to allow transparent comparison with the TRANSURANUS code. The results from comparison calculations of the both codes are presented for fresh fuel and quasi steady state scenario and are in good agreement, almost identical. These results might be used as a basis for transient analysis

  3. Performance of a solid oxide fuel cell CHP system coupled with a hot water storage tank for single household

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Zhao, Yingru; Yang, Wenyuan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system for cogeneration of heat and power integrated with a stratified heat storage tank is studied. Thermal stratification in the tank increases the heat recovery performance as it allows existence of a temperature gradient with the benefit of deliver......In this paper a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system for cogeneration of heat and power integrated with a stratified heat storage tank is studied. Thermal stratification in the tank increases the heat recovery performance as it allows existence of a temperature gradient with the benefit...... of delivering hot water for the household and returning the coldest fluid back to SOFC heat recovery heat-exchanger. A model of the SOFC system is developed to determine the energy required to meet the hourly average electric load of the residence. The model evaluates the amount of heat generated and the amount...... of heat used for thermal loads of the residence. Two fuels are considered, namely syngas and natural gas. The tank model considers the temperature gradients over the tank height. The results of the numerical simulation is used to size the SOFC system and storage heat tank to provide energy for a small...

  4. Optimized manufacture of nuclear fuel cladding tubes by FEA of hot extrusion and cold pilgering processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillac, Alexis; Ly, Céline

    2018-05-01

    Within the forming route of Zirconium alloy cladding tubes, hot extrusion is used to deform the forged billets into tube hollows, which are then cold rolled to produce the final tubes with the suitable properties for in-reactor use. The hot extrusion goals are to give the appropriate geometry for cold pilgering, without creating surface defects and microstructural heterogeneities which are detrimental for subsequent rolling. In order to ensure a good quality of the tube hollows, hot extrusion parameters have to be carefully chosen. For this purpose, finite element models are used in addition to experimental tests. These models can take into account the thermo-mechanical coupling conditions obtained in the tube and the tools during extrusion, and provide a good prediction of the extrusion load and the thermo-mechanical history of the extruded product. This last result can be used to calculate the fragmentation of the microstructure in the die and the meta-dynamic recrystallization after extrusion. To further optimize the manufacturing route, a numerical model of the cold pilgering process is also applied, taking into account the complex geometry of the tools and the pseudo-steady state rolling sequence of this incremental forming process. The strain and stress history of the tube during rolling can then be used to assess the damage risk thanks to the use of ductile damage models. Once validated vs. experimental data, both numerical models were used to optimize the manufacturing route and the quality of zirconium cladding tubes. This goal was achieved by selecting hot extrusion parameters giving better recrystallized microstructure that improves the subsequent formability. Cold pilgering parameters were also optimized in order to reduce the potential ductile damage in the cold rolled tubes.

  5. Analysis of the hot cell lay-out for the advanced spent fuel conditioning process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Song, T. G.; Hong, D. H.; Kim, Y. H.; Yoon, J. S

    2003-04-01

    Equipment used for ACP must operate in intense radiation fields enclosed in a hot cell and be remotely maintained. For the reliable remote maintenance operation, several design aspects should be considered. Even though the design results seem to be satisfactory, all the remote operation should be checked prior to the hot demonstration. The best way to check the remote operability is a real mock-up test, but the mock-up test is too expensive and time consuming, and need refabrication of the design to deal with the problem found in the test operation. The 3D graphic simulator gives an alternate solution for this. It can check the remote operability of the process without fabrication of the process equipment. In other words, using a graphic simulator, remote operation task can be simulated in a computer(virtual environment), not the real environment. In this report, for the analysis on the hat cell layout for the ACP process, the verification from the concept of the process to the detailed motion of the equipment and the remote operation devices using virtual prototyping is described. Also, the requirement of the process equipment in the sense of size and remote maintenance, and that of the transportation and handling for the process material are described. Finally, from these results, the hot cell layout alternatives and the bases for the selection of the optimum layout are implemented. The graphical simulator and the results from this analysis can be effectively used not only for optimizing the hot cell layout but also designing the ACP equipment and maintenance process.

  6. Life cycle cost analysis to examine the economical feasibility of hydrogen as an alternative fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji-Yong; Yoo, Moosang; Cha, Kyounghoon; Hur, Tak; Lim, Tae Won

    2009-01-01

    This study uses a life cycle costing (LCC) methodology to identify when hydrogen can become economically feasible compared to the conventional fuels and which energy policy is the most effective at fostering the penetration of hydrogen in the competitive fuel market. The target hydrogen pathways in this study are H 2 via natural gas steam reforming (NG SR), H 2 via naphtha steam reforming (Naphtha SR), H 2 via liquefied petroleum gas steam reforming (LPG SR), and H 2 via water electrolysis (WE). In addition, the conventional fuels (gasoline, diesel) are also included for the comparison with the H 2 pathways. The life cycle costs of the target fuels are computed and several key factors are examined to identify the economical feasibilities of the target systems: fuel cell vehicle (FCV) price, social cost of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and regulated air emissions (CO, VOC, SO x , NO x , PM), fuel efficiency of FCV, capital costs of H 2 equipments at a H 2 fueling station. The life cycle costs of a H 2 pathway also depend on the production capacity. Although, at present, all H 2 pathways are more cost efficient than the conventional fuels in the fuel utilization stage, the H 2 pathways have lack competitiveness against the conventional fuels in the life cycle (well to wheel) costs due to the high price of FCV. From future scenario analyses in 2015, all H 2 pathways are expected to have lower life cycle costs than the conventional fuels as a transportation fuel. It is evident that the FCV price is the most important factor for encouraging the hydrogen economy and FCVs. Unless the FCV price is below US $62,320, it is necessary for the institution to subsidize the FCV price by any amount over US $62,320 in order to inject H 2 into the market of transportation fuel. The incentive or taxes on GHGs and regulated air emissions are also expected to effectively encourage the diffusion of H 2 and FCV, especially for the H 2 pathway of WE with wind power (WE[Wind]). The uncertainties

  7. Growth kinetics and microstructural evolution during hot isostatic pressing of U-10 wt.% Mo monolithic fuel plate in AA6061 cladding with Zr diffusion barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y.; Yoo, J.; Huang, K.; Keiser, D.D.; Jue, J.F.; Rabin, B.; Moore, G.; Sohn, Y.H.

    2014-01-01

    Phase constituents and microstructure changes in RERTR fuel plate assemblies as functions of temperature and duration of hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) during fabrication were examined. The HIP process was carried out as functions of temperature (520, 540, 560 and 580 °C for 90 min) and time (45–345 min at 560 °C) to bond 6061 Al-alloy to the Zr diffusion barrier that had been co-rolled with U-10 wt.% Mo (U10Mo) fuel monolith prior to the HIP process. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies were employed to examine the phase constituents, microstructure and layer thickness of interaction products from interdiffusion. At the interface between the U10Mo and Zr, following the co-rolling, the UZr 2 phase was observed to develop adjacent to Zr, and the α-U phase was found between the UZr 2 and U10Mo, while the Mo 2 Zr was found as precipitates mostly within the α-U phase. The phase constituents and thickness of the interaction layer at the U10Mo-Zr interface remained unchanged regardless of HIP processing variation. Observable growth due to HIP was only observed for the (Al,Si) 3 Zr phase found at the Zr/AA6061 interface, however, with a large activation energy of 457 ± 28 kJ/mole. Thus, HIP can be carried to improve the adhesion quality of fuel plate without concern for the excessive growth of the interaction layer, particularly at the U10Mo-Zr interface with the α-U, Mo 2 Zr, and UZr 2 phases

  8. Growth kinetics and microstructural evolution during hot isostatic pressing of U-10 wt.% Mo monolithic fuel plate in AA6061 cladding with Zr diffusion barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y.; Yoo, J.; Huang, K. [Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Keiser, D.D.; Jue, J.F.; Rabin, B.; Moore, G. [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Sohn, Y.H., E-mail: Yongho.sohn@ucf.edu [Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Phase constituents and microstructure changes in RERTR fuel plate assemblies as functions of temperature and duration of hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) during fabrication were examined. The HIP process was carried out as functions of temperature (520, 540, 560 and 580 °C for 90 min) and time (45–345 min at 560 °C) to bond 6061 Al-alloy to the Zr diffusion barrier that had been co-rolled with U-10 wt.% Mo (U10Mo) fuel monolith prior to the HIP process. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies were employed to examine the phase constituents, microstructure and layer thickness of interaction products from interdiffusion. At the interface between the U10Mo and Zr, following the co-rolling, the UZr{sub 2} phase was observed to develop adjacent to Zr, and the α-U phase was found between the UZr{sub 2} and U10Mo, while the Mo{sub 2}Zr was found as precipitates mostly within the α-U phase. The phase constituents and thickness of the interaction layer at the U10Mo-Zr interface remained unchanged regardless of HIP processing variation. Observable growth due to HIP was only observed for the (Al,Si){sub 3}Zr phase found at the Zr/AA6061 interface, however, with a large activation energy of 457 ± 28 kJ/mole. Thus, HIP can be carried to improve the adhesion quality of fuel plate without concern for the excessive growth of the interaction layer, particularly at the U10Mo-Zr interface with the α-U, Mo{sub 2}Zr, and UZr{sub 2} phases.

  9. Growth kinetics and microstructural evolution during hot isostatic pressing of U-10 wt.% Mo monolithic fuel plate in AA6061 cladding with Zr diffusion barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y.; Yoo, J.; Huang, K.; Keiser, D. D.; Jue, J. F.; Rabin, B.; Moore, G.; Sohn, Y. H.

    2014-04-01

    Phase constituents and microstructure changes in RERTR fuel plate assemblies as functions of temperature and duration of hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) during fabrication were examined. The HIP process was carried out as functions of temperature (520, 540, 560 and 580 °C for 90 min) and time (45-345 min at 560 °C) to bond 6061 Al-alloy to the Zr diffusion barrier that had been co-rolled with U-10 wt.% Mo (U10Mo) fuel monolith prior to the HIP process. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies were employed to examine the phase constituents, microstructure and layer thickness of interaction products from interdiffusion. At the interface between the U10Mo and Zr, following the co-rolling, the UZr2 phase was observed to develop adjacent to Zr, and the α-U phase was found between the UZr2 and U10Mo, while the Mo2Zr was found as precipitates mostly within the α-U phase. The phase constituents and thickness of the interaction layer at the U10Mo-Zr interface remained unchanged regardless of HIP processing variation. Observable growth due to HIP was only observed for the (Al,Si)3Zr phase found at the Zr/AA6061 interface, however, with a large activation energy of 457 ± 28 kJ/mole. Thus, HIP can be carried to improve the adhesion quality of fuel plate without concern for the excessive growth of the interaction layer, particularly at the U10Mo-Zr interface with the α-U, Mo2Zr, and UZr2 phases.

  10. Hot-cell verification facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschenbaum, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The Hot Cell Verification Facility (HCVF) was established as the test facility for the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) examination equipment. HCVF provides a prototypic hot cell environment to check the equipment for functional and remote operation. It also provides actual hands-on training for future FMEF Operators. In its two years of operation, HCVF has already provided data to make significant changes in items prior to final fabrication. It will also shorten the startup time in FMEF since the examination equipment will have been debugged and operated in HCVF

  11. An experiment to examine the mechanistic behaviour of irradiated CANDU fuel stored under dry conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldaker, I.E.; Crosthwaite, J.L.; Keltie, R.J.; Truss, K.J.

    1979-01-01

    A program has begun to use the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment dry-storage canisters to store some selected CANDU irradiated fuel bundles in an 'easily retrievable basket.' The object of the experimental program is to study the long-term stability of the Zircaloy-sheathed UO 2 and UC fuel elements when stored in air. Bundles were loaded into a canister in October 1979 following detailed examination and removal of up to three complete elements from most bundles. These elements are currently being subjected to detailed destructive examinations, including metallography and scanning electron micrography, to fully characterize their pre-storage condition. After four years, and every five years thereafter, further elements will be examined similarly to study the effects of the storage environment on the stability of the Zircaloy sheathing, and on its continued ability to contain the fuel safely in an interim storage facility. (author)

  12. Design of an Online Fission Gas Monitoring System for Post-irradiation Examination Heating Tests of Coated Fuel Particles for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawn Scates

    2010-10-01

    A new Fission Gas Monitoring System (FGMS) has been designed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for use of monitoring online fission gas-released during fuel heating tests. The FGMS will be used with the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) at the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) within the INL campus. Preselected Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) TRISO (Tri-isotropic) fuel compacts will undergo testing to assess the fission product retention characteristics under high temperature accident conditions. The FACS furnace will heat the fuel to temperatures up to 2,000ºC in a helium atmosphere. Released fission products such as Kr and Xe isotopes will be transported downstream to the FGMS where they will accumulate in cryogenically cooledcollection traps and monitored with High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors during the heating process. Special INL developed software will be used to monitor the accumulated fission products and will report data in near real-time. These data will then be reported in a form that can be readily available to the INL reporting database. This paper describes the details of the FGMS design, the control and acqusition software, system calibration, and the expected performance of the FGMS. Preliminary online data may be available for presentation at the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) conference.

  13. Test plan for surface and subsurface examinations of K-east and K-west fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitner, A.L.

    1997-01-01

    The test plan for subsurface examinations on damaged K East and K West Basin fuel elements is presented. The purpose of these examinations is to inspect damaged areas on the fuel elements for the presence of voids, sludge, or broken fuel, and to obtain samples from the damaged areas for subsequent characterization tests

  14. Hot cells for testing the UO{sub 2} fuel elements after irradiation. Radiation protection conditions for hot cells design; Vruce celije za ispitivanje gorivnih elemenata UO{sub 2} posle ozracivanja, Uslovi zastite pri projektovanju vrucih celija

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlovic, A; Devic, J; Mihailovic, K [Institut za nuklearne nauke Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1969-07-01

    This paper includes protection conditions which hot cells should satisfy for the investigation of fuel elements after reactor irradiation. The basic elements of hot cells are given, and the conditions for a special ventilation, dosimetric control and a special treatment of contaminated water are established (author) U radu su obuhvaceni uslovi zastite koje treba da zadovolje vruce celije za ispitivanje gorivnih elemenata posle ozracivanja u reaktoru, dati su osnovni elementi vrucih celija i postavljeni su uslovi za specijalnu ventilaciju, dozimentrijsku kontrolu i specijalni tretman otpadnih voda (author)

  15. Postirradiation examination and evaluation of Fort St. Vrain fuel element 1-0743

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saurwein, J.J.; Miller, C.M.; Young, C.A.

    1981-05-01

    Fort St. Vrain (FSV) fuel element 1-0743 was irradiated in core location 17.04.F.06 from July 3, 1976 until February 1, 1979. The element experienced an average fast neutron exposure of about 0.95 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E > 29 fJ)/sub HTGR/, a time-and-volume-averaged fuel temperature in the vicinity of 680 0 C, fissile and fertile particle burnups of approximately 6.2% and 0.3%, respectively, and a total burnup of 12,210 MWd/tonne. The postirradiation examination revealed that the element was in excellent condition. No cracks were observed on any of the element surfaces. The structural integrity of the fuel rods was good. No evidence of mechanical interaction between the fuel rods and fuel body was observed. Calculated irradiation parameters obtained with HTGR design codes were compared with measured data. Radial and axial power distributions, irradiation temperatures, neutron fluences, and fuel burnups were in good agreement with measurements. Calculated fuel rod strains were about a factor of three greater than were observed

  16. Hot Surface Ignition

    OpenAIRE

    Tursyn, Yerbatyr; Goyal, Vikrant; Benhidjeb-Carayon, Alicia; Simmons, Richard; Meyer, Scott; Gore, Jay P.

    2015-01-01

    Undesirable hot surface ignition of flammable liquids is one of the hazards in ground and air transportation vehicles, which primarily occurs in the engine compartment. In order to evaluate the safety and sustainability of candidate replacement fuels with respect to hot surface ignition, a baseline low lead fuel (Avgas 100 LL) and four experimental unleaded aviation fuels recommended for reciprocating aviation engines were considered. In addition, hot surface ignition properties of the gas tu...

  17. Post-irradiation examination of HTR-fuel at the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsamer, G.; Proksch, E.; Stolba, G.; Strigl, A.; Falta, G.; Zeger, J.

    1985-01-01

    Austrian R and D activities in the HTR-field reach back almost to the beginning of this advanced reactor line. For more than 20 years post-irradiation examination (PIE) of HTR-fuel has been performed at the laboratories of the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf Ltd. (OEFZS) (formerly OESGAE) and a high degree of qualification has been achieved in the course of that time. Most of the PIE-work has been carried out by international cooperation on contract basis with the OECD-DRAGON-project and with KFA-Juelich (FRG). There has also been some collaboration with GA (USA), Belgonucleaire and others in the past. HTR-fuel elements contain the fissile and fertile materials in form of coated particles (CPs) which are embedded in a graphite matrix. Because of this special design it has been necessary from the very beginning of the PIE work up to now to develop new methods (i.e. fuel element disintegration methods, chlorine gas leach, single particle examination techniques...) as well as to adapt and improve already existing methods (i.e. gamma spectrometry, mass-spectrometry, optical methods...). The main interests on PIE-work at Seibersdorf are concentrated on particle performance, fission product distribution and the 'free' Uranium content (contamination and broken particles) of the fuel elements (fuel spheres or cylindrical compacts). A short compilation of the applied methods and of available instrumental facilities is given as follows: deconsolidation of fuel elements; equipment for electrochemical deconsolidation; examinations and measurements of graphite and electrolyte samples; examination of coated particles; single particle examinations

  18. Post-irradiation examination of HTR-fuel at the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf Ltd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitsamer, G; Proksch, E; Stolba, G; Strigl, A; Falta, G; Zeger, J [Department of Chemistry, Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf Ltd., Seibersdorf (Austria)

    1985-07-01

    Austrian R and D activities in the HTR-field reach back almost to the beginning of this advanced reactor line. For more than 20 years post-irradiation examination (PIE) of HTR-fuel has been performed at the laboratories of the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf Ltd. (OEFZS) (formerly OESGAE) and a high degree of qualification has been achieved in the course of that time. Most of the PIE-work has been carried out by international cooperation on contract basis with the OECD-DRAGON-project and with KFA-Juelich (FRG). There has also been some collaboration with GA (USA), Belgonucleaire and others in the past. HTR-fuel elements contain the fissile and fertile materials in form of coated particles (CPs) which are embedded in a graphite matrix. Because of this special design it has been necessary from the very beginning of the PIE work up to now to develop new methods (i.e., fuel element disintegration methods, chlorine gas leach, single particle examination techniques...) as well as to adapt and improve already existing methods (i.e. gamma spectrometry, mass-spectrometry, optical methods...). The main interests on PIE-work at Seibersdorf are concentrated on particle performance, fission product distribution and the 'free' Uranium content (contamination and broken particles) of the fuel elements (fuel spheres or cylindrical compacts). A short compilation of the applied methods and of available instrumental facilities is given as follows: deconsolidation of fuel elements; equipment for electrochemical deconsolidation; examinations and measurements of graphite and electrolyte samples; examination of coated particles; single particle examinations.

  19. Integration of post-irradiation examination results of failed WWER fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, A.; Markov, D.; Smirnov, V.; Polenok, V.; Perepelkin, S.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the work is to investigate the causes of WWER fuel rod failures and to reveal the dependence of the failed fuel rod behaviour and state on the damage characteristics and duration of their operation in the core. The post-irradiation examination of 12 leaky fuel assemblies (5 for WWER-440 and 7 for WWER-1000) has been done at SSC RF RIAR. The results show that the main mechanism responsible for the majority of cases of the WWER fuel rod perforation is debris-damage of the claddings. Debris fretting of the claddings spread randomly over the fuel assembly cross-section and they are registered in the area of the bundle supporting grid or under the lower spacer grids along the fuel assembly height. In the WWER fuel rods, the areas of secondary hydrogenating of cladding are spaced from the primary defects by ∼2500-3000 mm, as a rule, and are often adjacent closely to the upper welded joints. There is no pronounced dependence of the distance between the primary and secondary cladding defects neither on the linear power, at which the fuel rods were operated, nor on the period of their operation in the leaky state. The time period of the significant secondary damage formation is about 250 ± 50 calendar days for the WWER fuel rods with slight through primary defects (∼0.1 - 0.5 mm 2 ) operated in the linear power range 170-215 W/cm. Cladding degradation, taking place due to the secondary hydrogenating, does not occur in case of large through debris-defects during operation up to 600 calendar days

  20. Out pile test of a disassembly tool for the intermediate examination of nuclear fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jintae; Joung, Chang-Young; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Yang, Tae-Ho; Jang, Seo-Yoon; Park, Seung-Jae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The two fuel rod assemblies are assembled with a bayonet coupler, and the non-instrumented fuel rod assembly can be disassembled for intermediate examination. A tool to disassemble the non-instrumented fuel rod assembly from the test rig was developed, and steel wires are connected to the tool to operate release function. In this study, an assembly plug with a quick plug typed bayonet coupler and the accompanying disassembly tool was designed to prevent the interference problem. A test rig mockup was fabricated, and performance test was carried out in the laboratory. And, the out pile test was also carried out in the single channel test loop established in the KAERI. In this study, a modified coupler design to disassemble the non-instrumented fuel rod assembly from the test rig for the intermediate examination was suggested to solve interference problem of previous design. The performance of the modified design was verified by test mockup fabricated with the modified coupler design and accompanied disassembly tool design. Finally, out pile test was carried out in the single channel test loop in the KAERI, and the test rig and the disassembly tool showed good performance and reliability. The developed technique will be useful to the periodic intermediate examination of nuclear fuel rods.

  1. Out pile test of a disassembly tool for the intermediate examination of nuclear fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jintae; Joung, Chang-Young; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Yang, Tae-Ho; Jang, Seo-Yoon; Park, Seung-Jae

    2016-01-01

    The two fuel rod assemblies are assembled with a bayonet coupler, and the non-instrumented fuel rod assembly can be disassembled for intermediate examination. A tool to disassemble the non-instrumented fuel rod assembly from the test rig was developed, and steel wires are connected to the tool to operate release function. In this study, an assembly plug with a quick plug typed bayonet coupler and the accompanying disassembly tool was designed to prevent the interference problem. A test rig mockup was fabricated, and performance test was carried out in the laboratory. And, the out pile test was also carried out in the single channel test loop established in the KAERI. In this study, a modified coupler design to disassemble the non-instrumented fuel rod assembly from the test rig for the intermediate examination was suggested to solve interference problem of previous design. The performance of the modified design was verified by test mockup fabricated with the modified coupler design and accompanied disassembly tool design. Finally, out pile test was carried out in the single channel test loop in the KAERI, and the test rig and the disassembly tool showed good performance and reliability. The developed technique will be useful to the periodic intermediate examination of nuclear fuel rods

  2. Refitting of the 'Celimene' hot cell for following up the fuel assembly of 900 MWe PWR power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lhermenier, Andre; Van Craeynest, J.-C.

    1980-05-01

    The 'Celimene' cell adjoining the EL3 reactor provides for the acceptance, handling and the examination of irradiated fuel assemblies from power reactors (length approximately 4m, weight approximately 700 kg). Within the framework of the PWR fuel behavior follow-up or reprocessing, it is possible to extract an assembly representative of the normal fuel cycle, carry out non destructive tests on this assembly, extract pencils from it and re-insert this assembly, after refitting the head, into the normal fuel cycle for handling in a reprocessing plant or storage pond. Given suitable refitting techniques, the re-irradiation of the assembly can be considered after examination. Significant changes have been made to the buildings and the hoist facilities for handling very heavy flasks. It was necessary to rearrange the handling, machining and in-cell storage facilities. The development of an inspection rig will make it possible, some time in 1980, to carry out non destructive tests of assemblies, optical and metrological examination of assemblies prior to dismantling or of the structure after dismantling [fr

  3. Experimental study of the form of "hot" steel particles on the ignition characteristics of liquid fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharevich, Arkadiy V.

    2015-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of laws governing the ignition of liquid propellants (kerosene, diesel fuel and petroleum residue) by the single spherical steel particle heated to high temperatures are presented. Is carried out the comparison of the ignition delay times of the investigated flammable substances by the particles in the sphere and disk forms. It is established that the particle shape does not exert a substantial influence on the ignition process characteristics.

  4. Application of eddy currents to post-irradiation examination of fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domizzi, G.; Ruch, M.; Ruggirello, G.; Spinosa, C.

    1997-01-01

    Postirradiation tests are performed on the fuel bundles of nuclear power plants, in order to evaluate their performance. The Zircaloy-4 cladding, the first containment of the fission products, is a very important part of these bundles. A fundamental step of these tests is the in-pool identification of the failed bars in the 'suspect' bundles. Later, once in the hot cell facility and prior to the destructive tests, it is necessary to characterize the defects in the cladding. The eddy current method provides a means for fast and reliable detection and characterisation of defects unobservable in visual inspection, such as tiny cracks, pores and anomalously hydride regions. The project for the application of this method in postirradiation tests has been divided into three stages, namely laboratory set up, in-pool tests, hot-cell application, the first one being described here. Techniques for the construction of synthetic defects (machined, micro cracks, abnormal hydride concentration, hydride blisters, oxide layers) were developed. A mechanical device for automatic probe movement was designed and constructed. Special external probes for the particular defects were developed. The inspection procedure was prepared. (author) [es

  5. TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station] fuel canister and core sample handling equipment used in INEL hot cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Shurtliff, W.T.; Lynch, R.J.; Croft, K.M.; Whitmill, L.J.; Allen, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the specialized remote handling equipment developed and used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to handle samples obtained from the core of the damaged Unit 2 reactor at Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station (TM-2). Samples of the core were removed, placed in TMI-2 fuel canisters, and transported to the INEL. Those samples will be examined as part of the analysis of the TMI-2 accident. The equipment described herein was designed for removing sample materials from the fuel canisters, assisting with initial examination, and processing samples in preparation for detailed examinations. The more complex equipment used microprocessor remote controls with electric motor drives providing the required force and motion capabilities. The remaining components were unpowered and manipulator assisted

  6. Serus, an expert system for the ultrasonic examination of fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondard, C.; Papezyk, F.; Wident, P.

    1987-01-01

    The use of pattern recognition functions and the modelization of the human expert reasoning, allow the automatic identification of defects in welds or structures. The proposed application uses an ultrasonic examination to detect and classify 3 types of defects in end plug welds of PWR fuel rods

  7. Pulsed eddy current inspection system for nondestructive examination of irradiated fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yancey, M.E.

    1979-01-01

    An inspection system has been developed for nondestructive examination of irradiated fuel rods utilizing pulsed eddy current techniques. The system employs an encircling type pulsed eddy current transducer capable of sensing small defects located on both the inner and outer diameter fuel rod surfaces during a single scan. Pulsed eddy current point probes are used to provide fuel rod wall thikness data and an indication of radial defect location. Two linear variable differential transformers are used to provide information on fuel rod diameter variation. A microprocessor based control system is used to automatically scan fuel rods up to 4.06 meters in length at predetermined radial locations. Defects as small as 0.005 cm deep by 0.254 cm long by 0.005 cm wide have been detected on outside diameter surfaces of a 1.43 cm outside diameter fuel rod cladding with a 0.094 cm wall thickness and 0.010 cm deep by 0.254 cm long by 0.005 cm wide on the inside diameter surface

  8. Experience of development of the methods and equipment and the prospects for creation of WWER fuel examination stands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlov, S.; Smirnov, V.

    1998-01-01

    The report presents the basic methods and equipment developed for inspection of the fuel elements and fuel assemblies in the spent fuel pools. It considers their characteristics and results of the tests under laboratory and experimental fuel examination stand conditions. In particular, the following techniques are presented: visual inspection, measurement of the geometrical dimensions, definition of the form change in fuel assemblies and fuel elements, detection of the failed fuel elements, etc. The experience of the experimental fuel examination stand operation is generalized. The concept of the creation of the WWER-440 and WWER-1000 FA and FE inspection stands is presented. The concept is based on the modular principle which runs as follows. A set of the basic functional blocks is being developed based on which it is possible to make such a stand configuration which is necessary to fulfil the specific program of the examination at the particular nuclear power plant. (author)

  9. Metallographic examination of damaged N reactor spent nuclear fuel element SFEC5,4378

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marschman, S.C.; Pyecha, T.D.; Abrefah, J.

    1997-08-01

    N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is currently residing underwater in the K Basins at the Hanford site, in Richland, Washington. This report presents results of the metallographic examination of specimens cut from an SNF element (Mark IV-E) with breached cladding. The element had resided in the K-West (KW) Storage Basin for at least 10 years after it was discharged from the N-Reactor. The storage containers in the KW Basin were nominally closed, isolating the SNF elements from the open pool environment. Seven specimens from this Mark IV-E outer fuel element were examined using an optical metallograph. Included were two specimens that had been subjected to a conditioning process recommended by the Independent Technical Assessment Team, two specimens that had been subjected to a conditioning process recommended in the Integrated Process Strategy Report, and three that were in the as-received, as-cut condition. One of the as-received specimens had been cut from the damaged (or breached) end of the element. All other specimens were cut from the undamaged mid-region of the fuel element. The specimens were visually examined to (1) identify uranium hydride inclusions present in the uranium metal fuel, (2) measure the thickness of the oxide layer formed on the uranium edges and assess the apparent integrity and adhesion of the oxide layer, and (3) look for features in the microstructure that might provide an insight into the various corrosion processes that occurred during underwater storage in the KW Basin. These features included, but were not limited to, the integrity of the cladding and the fuel-to-cladding bond, obvious anomalies in the microstructure, excessive pitting or friability of the fuel matrix, and obvious anomalies in the distribution of uranium hydride or uranium carbide inclusions. Also, the observed metallographic features of the conditioned specimens were compared with those of the as-received (unconditioned) specimens. 11 refs., 93 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Post-test examination of the VVER-1000 fuel rod bundle CORA-W2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.; Noack, V.; Burbach, J.; Metzger, H.; Schanz, G.; Hagen, S.; Sepold, L.

    1995-01-01

    The upper half of the bundle is completely oxidized, the lower half has kept the fuel rods relatively intact. The post-test examination results show the strong impact of the B 4 C absorber rod and the stainless steel grid spacers on the 'low-temperature' bundle damage initiation and progression. The B 4 C absorber rod completely disappeared in the upper half of the bundle. The multicomponent melts relocated and formed coolant channel blockages on solidification with a maximum extent of about 30% in the lower part of the bundle. At temperatures above the melting point of the ZrNb1 cladding extensive fuel dissolution occured. (orig./HP)

  11. Experience of steam generator tube examination in the hot laboratory of EDF: analysis of recent events concerning the secondary side

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thebault, Y.; Bouvier, O. de; Boccanfuso, M.; Coquio, N.; Barbe, V.; Molinie, E.

    2011-01-01

    Until 2010, more than 60 steam generator (SG) tubes have been removed and analysed in the EDF hot laboratory of CEIDRE/Chinon. This article is particularly related to three recent events that lead to the extraction of several tubes dedicated to laboratory destructive examinations. The first event that constitutes a first occurrence on the EDF Park, concerns the detection of a circumferential crack on the external surface of a tube located at tube support plate elevation. After this observation, several tubes have been extracted from Bugey 3 and Fessenheim 2 nuclear power plants with steam generators equipped with 600 MA bundle. The other two events concern the consequences of chemical cleaning of the tube bundle steam generators. The examples chosen are from Cruas 4 et Chinon B2 units whose tubes were extracted following non destructive testing performed immediately after or at the completion of cycle following the chemical cleaning. In the case of Cruas 4, Eddy Current Testing (ET) were performed for requalification of steam Generators after chemical cleaning. They allowed the detection of an indication located at the bottom of tube for a large number of tubes; the ET signal was similar to that corresponding to 'deposit' corrosion. Moreover, inspections of Chinon-B2 SGs at the end of the operation cycle following the chemical cleaning, showed the presence of conductor deposits at the bottom of some tubes. The first part of this document presents the major results of laboratory examinations of the pulled tubes of Bugey 3 and Fessenheim 2 and their analysis. Hypothesis concerning damage mechanisms of the tubes are also proposed. The second part of the paper relates the results of the laboratory examinations of the pulled tubes of Cruas 4 and Chinon B 2 after chemical cleaning and their analysis. (authors)

  12. Technique Comparison of the Fracture Toughness Tests for Irradiated Fuel Claddings in a Hot Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sangbok; Kim, Dosik; Jung, Yanghong; Choo, Yongsun; Ryu, Wooseog

    2007-01-01

    The degradation of a fracture toughness in a fuel cladding is a important factor to restrict the operation safety in nuclear power plants. The fracture properties of claddings were traditionally measured through a rubber bung test, a burst test, etc. Those results were the qualitative fracture characteristics, and could not be used as design or operation safety evaluation data. We need to evaluate the quantitative characteristics of claddings under normal operation and in accidents. The application of a fracture mechanics concept in testing a fuel cladding is restricted by the cladding geometry and creating the correct stress-state conditions. The geometry of claddings does not meet the requirement of the ASTM Standards for a specimen configuration and an applied load. The specimen may be produced from previously flattened claddings, but the flattening causes some uncertainties in the results due to changes in the microstructure of the material and a new distribution of the internal stresses. Therefore many efforts have been devoted to developing new test techniques, to quantify the fracture characteristics of claddings. Researchers from JAEA and NFI in Japan, Studsvik Company Ltd in Sweden, IAEA in Australia, and KAERI in Korea have independently developed fracture test techniques. This study is designed to review the independently developed techniques and to compare of their merits. Finally we shall apply the other techniques to upgrade our developing techniques

  13. Examinations of fuel debris samples from Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Fumihisa

    2012-01-01

    In the accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plants, fuels were molten due to loss of coolant and heat-up of the reactor core. Information on properties of molten fuels (debris) is important to analyze progress of the accident, estimate the status inside the damaged reactors and work on a plan for debris removal. Extensive examinations for properties of debris have been conducted after the accident at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 in 1979. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency conducted a part of the examinations in the frame of the OECD/NEA Three Mile Island Vessel Investigation Program. This issue report outline and main results of the TMI-2 debris examination programs. (author)

  14. State of the VVER-1000 spent U-Gd fuel rods based on the results of post-irradiation examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevlyakov, G.; Zvir, E.; Strozhuk, A.; Polenok, V.; Sidorenko, O.; Volkova, I.; Nikitin, O.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper is devoted to post-irradiation examinations (PIE) of U-Gd fuel rods with different geometry of the fuel pellets irradiated as part of the VVER-1000 fuel assembly. As evidenced by their PIE data, they did not exhaust their service life based on the main parameters (geometrical dimensions, corrosion state, and release of fission product gases). (author)

  15. Post-Irradiation Examination Test of the Parts of X-Gen Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, S. B.; Ryu, W. S.; Choo, Y. S.

    2008-08-01

    The mechanical properties of the parts of a nuclear fuel assembly are degraded during the operation of the reactor, through the mechanism of irradiation damage. The properties changes of the parts of the fuel assembly should be quantitatively estimated to ensure the safety of the fuel assembly and rod during the operation. The test techniques developed in this report are used to produce the irradiation data of the grid 1x1 cell spring, the grid 1x1 cell, the spring on one face of the 1x1 cell, the inner/outer strip of the grid and the welded part. The specimens were irradiated in the CT test hole of HANARO of a 30 MW thermal output at 300 deg. C during about 100 days From the spring test of mid grid 1x1 cell and grid plate, the irradiation effects can be examined. The irradiation effects on the irradiation growth also were occurred. The buckling load of mid grid 1x1 cell does not change with a neutron irradiation. From the tensile tests, the strengths increased but the elongations decreased due to an irradiation. The tensile test and microstructure examination of the spot and fillet welded parts are performed for the evaluation of an irradiation effects. Through these tests of components, the essential data on the fuel assembly design could be obtained. These results will be used to update the irradiation behavior databases, to improve the performance of fuel assembly, and to predict the service life of the fuel assembly in a reactor

  16. Advanced post-irradiation examination techniques for water reactor fuel. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to provide and overview of the status of post-irradiation examination (PIE) techniques for water cooled reactor fuel assemblies and their components with emphasis given to advanced PIE techniques applied to high burnup fuel. Papers presented at the meeting described progress obtained in non-destructive (e.g. dimensional measurements, oxide layer thickness measurements, gamma scanning and tomography, neutron and X-ray radiography, etc.) and destructive PIE techniques (e.g. microstructural studies, elemental and isotopic analysis, measurement of physical and mechanical properties, etc.) used for investigation of water reactor fuel. Recent practice in high burnup fuel investigation revealed the importance of advanced PIE techniques, such as 3-D tomography, secondary ion mass spectrometry, laser flash, high resolution transmission and scanning electron microscopy, image analysis in microstructural studies, for understanding mechanisms of fuel behaviour under irradiation. Importance and needs for in-pile irradiation of samples and rodlets in instrumented rigs were also discussed. This TECDOC contains 20 individual papers presented at the meeting; each of the papers has been indexed separately

  17. Development of hot test equipment for advanced nuclear fuel cycle development in JNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, K.; Shibata, A.; Nemoto, S.; Aoshima, A.; Funasaka, H.

    2001-01-01

    JNC (Japan nuclear fuel cycle development institute) has been developing a mini centrifugal contactor. JNC has experience of the development of the RETF (Recycle equipment test facility; under construction at Tokai-works) type centrifugal contactor and the mini centrifugal contactor is designed on the basis of this knowledge. The followings were carried out in order to estimate the performance of the mini centrifugal contactor: functional test for evaluating basic performance of this extractor, acid-solvent test and uranium test for confirming that sufficient performance is attained. The results showed wide performance in comparison with the mini mixer settler used so far and it is expected that shortening in operating time and higher efficiency of extracting tests will be achieved. (author)

  18. Determination of hot spot factors for calculation of the maximum fuel temperatures in the core thermal and hydraulic design of HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Soh; Yamashita, Kiyonobu; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Murata, Isao; Shindo, Ryuichi; Sudo, Yukio

    1988-12-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been designing the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), which is 30 MW in thermal power, 950deg C in reactor outlet coolant temperature and 40 kg/cm 2 G in primary coolant pressure. This report summarizes the hot spot factors and their estimated values used in the evaluation of the maximum fuel temperature which is one of the major items in the core thermal and hydraulic design of the HTTR. The hot spot factors consist of systematic factors and random factors. They were identified and their values adopted in the thermal and hydraulic design were determined considering the features of the HTTR. (author)

  19. Metallographic examination of (uth) O2 and UO2 fuel tested in power ramp conditions in triga reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioncescu, M.; Uta, O.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to determine the behavior of two fuel experimental elements (EC1 and EC2), by destructive post-irradiation examination. The fuel elements were mounted inside a pattern port, one in extension of the other and irradiated in power ramp conditions in order to check their behavior. Fuel element 1 (EC1) contains (UTh)O''2 pellet, and other one (EC2) UO''2 pellet. The results of destructive post-irradiation examination are evidenced by metallographic and ceramographic analyses. The data obtained from the post-irradiation examinations are used, first to confirm the security, reliability and nuclear fuel performance, and second, for the development of CANDU fuel. The results obtained by destructive examinations regarding the integrity, sheath hydrating and oxidation as well as the structural modifications are typical for fuel elements tested in power ramp conditions. (authors)

  20. Systematic approach to remote maintenance in the fuels and materials examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frandsen, G.B.; Nash, C.R.; Divona, C.J.; May, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    The Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) is systematically analyzed from a remote maintenance standpoint using functional analysis methods. From the analysis the remote maintainability of equipment is ascertained, required tooling lists are formed, and maintenance downtimes are established. These techniques identify deficiencies or inefficiencies in the early design stage where changes have a minimum impact on cost. Special tooling and fixture requirements are minimized by standardizing remote maintenance design features

  1. Structural analysis of hatch cover plates on Fuels and Materials Examination Facility high bay mezzanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixson, G.E.

    1997-01-01

    In order to move the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) trailer into position for testing on the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) 42 ft level mezzanine one of the trailer's wheels will have to sit on a circular hatch cover fabricated from one-inch thick steel plate. The attached calculations verify that the hatch cover plate is strong enough to support the weight of the INEL LDUA trailer's wheel

  2. Posttest examination of the VVER-1000 fuel rod bundle CORA-W2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepold, L.

    1995-06-01

    The bundle meltdown experiment CORA-W2, representing the behavior of a Russian type VVER-1000 fuel element, with one B 4 C/stainless steel absorber rod was selected by the OECD/CSNI as International Standard Problem (ISP-36). The experimental results of CORA-W2 serve as data base for comparison with analytical predictions of the high-temperature material behavior by various code systems. The first part of the experimental results is described in KfK 5363 (1994), the second part is documented in this report which contains the destructive post-test examination results. The metallographical and analytical (SEM/EDX) post-test examinations were performed in Germany and Russia and are summarized in five individual contributions. The upper half of the bundle is completely oxidized, the lower half has kept the fuel rods relatively intact. The post-test examination results show the strong impact of the B 4 C absorber rod and the stainless steel grid spacers on the ''low-temperature'' bundle damage initiation and progression. The B 4 C absorber rod completely disappeared in the upper half of the bundle. The multicomponent melts relocated and formed coolant channel blockages on solidification with a maximum extent of about 30% in the lower part of the bundle. At temperatures above the melting point of the ZrNb1 cladding extensive fuel dissolution occurred. (orig.) [de

  3. Some Windscale experience of the underwater examination of water reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, D.A.; Prestwood, J.; Stuttard, A.

    1981-01-01

    Windscale Nuclear Laboratories have been involved in the underwater post irradiation examination of irradiated water reactor fuel since the early 1970's. Since the work of the laboratories covers a wide range of fuel types, the equipment has had to be capable of handling any design, long or short, circular or square. There has so far been no element of routine work in the tasks performed at Windscale, for in this period fuel assemblies from 9 LWR's and WSGHWR have been examined successfully. Individual jobs have ranged from visual examination which may be carried out at several magnifications, to the complete breakdown of a PWR assembly to its separate rods and grids. Between these limits rod bow and rod diameter have been measured, rod withdrawal forces determined, and eddy current test methods devised. Cutting equipment has been used for a variety of dismantling tasks, and underwater cameras have been employed for monochrome and colour photography, using standard and macro lenses. The equipment is described. (author)

  4. Extended burnup demonstration: reactor fuel program. Pre-irradiation characterization and summary of pre-program poolside examinations. Big Rock Point extended burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exarhos, C.A.; Van Swam, L.F.; Wahlquist, F.P.

    1981-12-01

    This report is a resource document characterizing the 64 fuel rods being irradiated at the Big Rock Point reactor as part of the Extended Burnup Demonstration being sponsored jointly by the US Department of Energy, Consumers Power Company, Exxon Nuclear Company, and General Public Utilities. The program entails extending the exposure of standard BWR fuel to a discharge average of 38,000 MWD/MTU to demonstrate the feasibility of operating fuel of standard design to levels significantly above current limits. The fabrication characteristics of the Big Rock Point EBD fuel are presented along with measurement of rod length, rod diameter, pellet stack height, and fuel rod withdrawal force taken at poolside at burnups up to 26,200 MWD/MTU. A review of the fuel examination data indicates no performance characteristics which might restrict the continued irradiation of the fuel

  5. Demonstration of Fuel Hot-Spot Pressure in Excess of 50 Gbar for Direct-Drive, Layered Deuterium-Tritium Implosions on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Cao, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Davis, A. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Hohenberger, M.; Hu, S. X.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Janezic, R.; Karasik, M.; Keck, R. L.; Kelly, J. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Kosc, T. Z.; Loucks, S. J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Obenschain, S. P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Radha, P. B.; Rice, B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Shoup, M. J.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Ulreich, J.; Wittman, M. D.; Woo, K. M.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2016-07-01

    A record fuel hot-spot pressure Phs=56 ±7 Gbar was inferred from x-ray and nuclear diagnostics for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion cryogenic, layered deuterium-tritium implosions on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA Laser System. When hydrodynamically scaled to the energy of the National Ignition Facility, these implosions achieved a Lawson parameter ˜60 % of the value required for ignition [A. Bose et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, LM15119ER (2016)], similar to indirect-drive implosions [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 255003 (2015)], and nearly half of the direct-drive ignition-threshold pressure. Relative to symmetric, one-dimensional simulations, the inferred hot-spot pressure is approximately 40% lower. Three-dimensional simulations suggest that low-mode distortion of the hot spot seeded by laser-drive nonuniformity and target-positioning error reduces target performance.

  6. Postirradiation examination of a low enriched U3Si2-Al fuel element manufactured and irradiated at Batan, Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suripto, A.; Sugondo, S.; Nasution, H.

    1994-01-01

    The first low-enriched U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion plate-type fuel element produced at the Nuclear Fuel Element Center, BATAN, Indonesia, was irradiated to a peak 235 U burnup of 62%. Postirradiation examinations performed to data shows the irradiation behavior of this element to be similar to that of U 3 Si 2 -Al plate-type fuel produced and tested at other institutions. The main effect of irradiation on the fuel plates is a thickness increase of 30--40 μm (2.5-3.0%). This thickness increase is almost entirely due to the formation of a corrosion layer (Boehmite). The contribution of fuel swelling to the thickness increase is rather small (less than 10 μm) commensurate with the burnup of the fuel and the relatively moderate as-fabricated fuel volume fraction of 27% in the fuel meat

  7. Examination of methods of proliferation control for application to nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, F.A.

    1980-01-01

    Potential methods are examined that could be applied to the nuclear fuel reprocessing facility as a means of more effectively controlling the proliferation threat and, at the same time, permitting the further development of nuclear power as an energy source. The proposed remedies for this problem are basically technical or economic and political in nature and include: ''technical fixes'', institutional arrangements, and international political solutions. Each of these approaches to the problem is examined, along with a consideration of their interaction and an estimation of their effectiveness, either individually or in combination. 22 refs

  8. AGR-1 Fuel Compact 6-3-2 Post-Irradiation Examination Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul demkowicz; jason Harp; Scott Ploger

    2012-12-01

    Destructive post-irradiation examination was performed on fuel Compact 6-3-2, which was irradiated in the AGR-1 experiment to a final compact average burnup of 11.3% FIMA and a time-average, volume-average temperature of 1070°C. The analysis of this compact was focused on characterizing the extent of fission product release from the particles and examining particles to determine the condition of the kernels and coating layers. The work included deconsolidation of the compact and leach-burn-leach analysis, visual inspection and gamma counting of individual particles, measurement of fuel burnup by several methods, metallurgical preparation of selected particles, and examination of particle cross-sections with optical microscopy. A single particle with a defective SiC layer was identified during deconsolidation-leach-burn-leach analysis, which is in agreement with previous measurements showing elevated cesium in the Capsule 6 graphite fuel holder associated with this fuel compact. The fraction of the compact europium inventory released from the particles and retained in the matrix was relatively high (approximately 6E-3), indicating release from intact particle coatings. The Ag-110m inventory in individual particles exhibited a very broad distribution, with some particles retaining =80% of the predicted inventory and others retaining less than 25%. The average degree of Ag-110m retention in 60 gamma counted particles was approximately 50%. This elevated silver release is in agreement with analysis of silver on the Capsule 6 components, which indicated an average release of 38% of the Capsule 6 inventory from the fuel compacts. In spite of the relatively high degree of silver release from the particles, virtually none of the Ag-110m released was found in the compact matrix, and presumably migrated out of the compact and was deposited on the irradiation capsule components. Release of all other fission products from the particles appears to be less than a single

  9. Postirradiation examinations of fuel pins from the GCFR F-1 series of mixed-oxide fuel pins at 5. 5 at. % burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strain, R V; Johnson, C E

    1978-05-01

    Postirradiation examinations were performed on five fuel pins from the Gas-Cooled Fast-Breeder Reactor F-1 experiment irradiated in EBR-II to a peak burnup of approximately 5.5 at. %. These encapsulated fuel pins were irradiated at peak-power linear ratings from approximately 13 to 15 kW/ft and peak cladding inside diameter temperatures from approximately 625 to 760/sup 0/C. The maximum diametral change that occurred during irradiation was 0.2% ..delta..D/D/sub 0/. The maximum fuel-cladding chemical interaction depth was 2.6 mils in fuel pin G-1 and 1 mil or less in the other three pins examined destructively. Significant migration of the volatile fission products occurred axially to the fuel-blanket interfaces. Teh postirradiation examination data indicate that fuel melted at the inner surface of the annular fuel pellets in the two highest power rating fuel pins, but little axial movement of fuel occurred.

  10. Examination of the creep behaviour of ceramic fuel elements under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brucklacher, D.

    1978-01-01

    This paper examines the creeping of UO 2 , UO 2 -PuO 2 and UN under neutron irradiation. It starts with the experimental results about the relation between the thermal creep rate and the load, the temperature, as well as characteristic material values, stoichiometry, grain size and porosity. These correlation are first qualitatively discussed and then compared with the statements of actual quantitative equations. From the models and theories on which these equations are based a modified Nabarro-Heering-equation results for the correlation between the creep rate of ceramic fuels, stress, temperature and the fission rate. In the experimental part of the examination, length-changes of creep samples of UO 2 , (U,Pu)O 2 and UN were measured in specially developed irradiation creep casings in different reactors. The measuring data were corrected and evaluated considering the thermal expansion effects, irregular temperature distribution and swelling effects in such a way that the dependences of the creep rate of UO 2 , UO 2 -PuO 2 and UN under irradiation on stress, temperature, fission rate, burn-up and porosity is obtained. It shows that creeping of fuels under irradiation at high temperatures is equivalent to thermally activated creeping, while at low temperature the creep rate induced by irradiation is much higher than the condition without irradiation. The increment of oxidic nuclear fuels is greater than in UN, the stress dependence on low burn-up is proportional in both cases, and the influence of temperature is quite small. (orig.) [de

  11. Examining the Conservatisms in Dissolution Rates of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, Brady D.

    2008-01-01

    Most models for commercial spent nuclear fuel dissolution are based on data obtained from single-pass flow-through tests. These tests are designed to have a high water volume to fuel surface area ratio so that the concentration of radionuclides in solution are below solubility limits and thus back reactions and the formation of alteration products are minimized. While this method is ideal for determining the dependence of the dissolution rate on various parameters, it is important to examine the differences between these tests and the realistic scenarios that will exist in a geologic repository. Many of the inherent conservatisms that are part of the models are examined. These conservatisms include: limited water, short-term vs. long-term rates, groundwater effects, non-congruent release, radiolysis, and fuel chemistry effects. Each of these conservatisms has the potential to decrease the currently modeled dissolution rates by between a factor of 2 and 200. The combined effects are unknown, but, if quantified, could significantly improve the waste form performance relative to current models.

  12. Examination of the surface coatings removed from K-East Basin fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; Jenson, E.D.

    1998-05-01

    This report provides the results of studies conducted on coatings discovered on the surfaces of some N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) elements stored at the Hanford K-East Basin. These elements had been removed from the canisters and visually examined in-basin during FY 1996 as part of a series of characterization tests. The characterization tests are being performed to support the Integrated Process Strategy developed to package, dry, transport, and store the SNF in an interim storage facility on the Hanford site. Samples of coating materials were removed from K-East canister elements 2350E and 2540E, which had been sent, along with nine other elements, to the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (327 Building) for further characterization following the in-basin examinations. These coating samples were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory using various analytical methods. This report is part of the overall studies to determine the drying behavior of corrosion products associated with the K-Basin fuel elements. Altogether, five samples of coating materials were analyzed. These analyses suggest that hydration of the coating materials could be an additional source of moisture in the Multi-Canister Overpacks being used to contain the fuel for storage

  13. Examination of the surface coating removed from K-East Basin fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; Jenson, E.D.

    1998-05-01

    This report provides the results of studies conducted on coatings discovered on the surfaces of some N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) elements stored at the Hanford K-East Basin. These elements had been removed from the canisters and visually examined in-basin during FY 1996 as part of a series of characterization tests. The characterization tests are being performed to support the Integrated Process Strategy developed to package, dry, transport, and store the SNF in an interim storage facility on the Hanford site. Samples of coating materials were removed from K-East canister elements 2350E and 2540E, which had been sent, along with nine other elements, to the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (327 Building) for further characterization following the in-basin examinations. These coating samples were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory using various analytical methods. This report is part of the overall studies to determine the drying behavior of corrosion products associated with the K-Basin fuel elements. Altogether, five samples of coating materials were analyzed. These analyses suggest that hydration of the coating materials could be an additional source of moisture in the Multi-Canister Overpacks being used to contain the fuel for storage.

  14. Post-test examination of the VVER-1000 fuel rod bundle CORA-W2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, P.; Noack, V.; Burbach, J.; Metzger, H.; Schanz, G.; Hagen, S.; Sepold, L.

    1995-08-01

    The upper half of the bundle is completely oxidized, the lower half has kept the fuel rods relatively intact. The post-test examination results show the strong impact of the B{sub 4}C absorber rod and the stainless steel grid spacers on the `low-temperature` bundle damage initiation and progression. The B{sub 4}C absorber rod completely disappeared in the upper half of the bundle. The multicomponent melts relocated and formed coolant channel blockages on solidification with a maximum extent of about 30% in the lower part of the bundle. At temperatures above the melting point of the ZrNb1 cladding extensive fuel dissolution occured. (orig./HP)

  15. Nondestructive examination of 54 fuel and reflector elements from Fort St. Vrain core segment 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saurwein, J.J.

    1982-10-01

    Fifty-four fuel and reflector elements irradiated in core segment 2 of the Fort St. Vrain high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) were nondestructively examined. The time- and volume-averaged graphite irradiation temperatures for the elements ranged from approx. 350 0 to 750 0 C. The element-averaged fast neutron fluences ranged from approx. 0.2 to 1.6 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E > 29 fJ)/sub HTGR/. The elements, except for two fuel elements in which single localizeed cracks developed during irradiation, were in excellent condition. No evidence was observed of significant graphite oxidation or mechanical interaction beween elements. The cracks in the two elements did not affect their performance or handling. These elements were, otherwise, in excellent condition. Nearly all elements shrank in both the axial and radial directions, but the dimensional changes were relatively small

  16. Fuels and Materials Examination Facility: Environmental assessment, Hanford site, Richland, Washington: Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    The Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) and the High Performance Fuel Laboratory (HPFL) were originally proposed to be constructed as separate facilities in the 400 Area of the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The environmental effects of these two facilities were described and evaluated in the FMEF Environmental Assessment and the HPFL Final Environmental Impact Statement, ERDA-1550. For economic reasons, the two facilities will no longer be built as separate facilities. The FMEF facility plans have been modified to incorporate some of the features of the proposed HPFL facility while retaining essentially all of the capabilities of the original FMEF proposal. The purpose of this document is to update the FMEF Environmental Assessment to appropriately reflect addition of certain HPFL features into the FMEF facility and to assess the environmental affects of the facility which resulted from inclusion of HPFL features into the FMEF facility

  17. Metallographic examination in irradiated materials examination facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Yong Sun; Lee, Key Soon; Park, Dae Gyu; Ahn, Sang Bok; Yoo, Byoung Ok

    1998-01-01

    It is very important to have equipment of metallographic examination in hot-cell to observe the micro-structure of nuclear fuels and materials irradiated at nuclear power and/or research reactor. Those equipment should be operated by master-slave manipulators, so they are designed, manufactured and modified to make exercise easy and no trouble. The metallographic examination equipment and techniques as well as its operation procedure are described, so an operator can practice the metallography in hot-cell. (author). 5 refs., 7 tabs., 21 figs.

  18. BRET fuel assembly dismantling machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titzler, P.A.; Bennett, K.L.; Kelley, R.S. Jr.; Stringer, J.L.

    1984-08-01

    An automated remote nuclear fuel assembly milling and dismantling machine has been designed, developed, and demonstrated at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) in Richland, Washington. The machine can be used to dismantle irradiated breeder fuel assemblies from the Fast Flux Test Facility prior to fuel reprocessing. It can be installed in an existing remotely operated shielded hot cell facility, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF), at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington

  19. Microscopic Examination of Distribution and Phenotypic Properties of Phylogenetically Diverse Chloroflexaceae-Related Bacteria in Hot Spring Microbial Mats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nübel, U.; Bateson, Mary M.; Vandieken, V.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the diversity, distribution, and phenotypes of uncultivated Chloroflexaceae-related bacteria in photosynthetic microbial mats of an alkaline hot spring (Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park). By applying a directed PCR approach, molecular cloning, and sequence analysis of 16S...

  20. A data recording and processing system for examination of irradiated fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olshausen, K.D.; Christiansen, J.F.; Larsen, J.K.; Stevens, T.

    1978-03-01

    Over the past eight years a system has been developed at Institutt for atomenergi, Kjeller, Norway, which helps to collect and analyze data obtained during certain post-irradiation examination techniques employed at IFA's Hot Laboratory. At present computer codes are in use for treating results from: profilometry, gamma scanning, eddy current testing and tensile testing. The system is easily adaptable to any othermeasuring data with the structure: -axial position, time interval etc.; signal A (DC-voltage, counts); signal B (DC-voltage, counts). Anextention of the system for transverse gamma scanning and gap measurement (mechanical compression method) is planned for the future. The various programmes in the system are described and examples of the outputs are given in a series of appendices. (JIW)

  1. Postirradiation Examination Of U3O8-AL Plate Type Dispersion Fuel Element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasution-Hasbullah; Sugondo; Amin, D.L.; Siti-Amini

    1996-01-01

    Postirradiation examination of plate type spent fuel element RIE-01 has been carried out in order to observer its physical changes and performance under irradiation in the reactor. The irradiation has been time more than two years with a declared burnup of 51.04 %. The examination included visual and dimensional measurement, measurement of burn-up distribution, wipe test and metallographic analysis. The results showed that all fuel plates retained their integrity. The colour changes were occurred on most of the plates significant suggesting that it was generated from the oxide layer formation. From gamma-scanning examination it could be deducted that the highest burn-up distribution of the plate was at position of 30 cm from the bottom. A more homogeneous distribution was found in the middle plate of the bundle. The increased plate thickness, as revealed by dimensional measurements as in agreement with the burn-up distribution pattern. Despite the changes observed in could be concluded that all changes occurred were still within the allowable limits and therefore it can recommended that an increase of the burn-up level above 51,04 % is still quite possible

  2. Non destructive examination of UN / U-Si fuel pellets using neutrons (preliminary assessment)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourke, Mark Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vogel, Sven C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Voit, Stewart Lancaster [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Losko, Adrian S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tremsin, Anton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Tomographic imaging and diffraction measurements were performed on nine pellets; four UN/ U Si composite formulations (two enrichment levels), three pure U3Si5 reference formulations (two enrichment levels) and two reject pellets with visible flaws (to qualify the technique). The U-235 enrichments ranged from 0.2 to 8.8 wt.%. The nitride/silicide composites are candidate compositions for use as Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF). The monophase U3Si5 material was included as a reference. Pellets from the same fabrication batches will be inserted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho during 2016. The goal of the Advanced Non-destructive Fuel Examination work package is the development and application of non-destructive neutron imaging and scattering techniques to ceramic and metallic nuclear fuels. Data reported in this report were collected in the LANSCE run cycle that started in September 2015 and ended in March 2016. Data analysis is ongoing; thus, this report provides a preliminary review of the measurements and provides an overview of the characterized samples.

  3. Remotely operated organic liquid waste incinerator for the fuels and materials examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sales, W.L.; Barker, R.E.; Hershey, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    The search for a practical method for the disposal of small quantities of oraganic liquid waste, a waste product of metallographic sample preparation at the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility has led to the design of an incinerator/off-gas system to burn organic liquid wastes and selected organic solids. The incinerator is to be installed in a shielded inert-atmosphere cell, and will be remotely operated and maintained. The off-gas system is a wet-scrubber and filter system designed to release particulate-free off-gas to the FMEF Building Exhaust System

  4. MICRO/NANO-STRUCTURAL EXAMINATION AND FISSION PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION IN NEUTRON IRRADIATED AGR-1 TRISO FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Rooyen, I. J.; Lillo, T. M.; Wen, H. M.; Hill, C. M.; Holesinger, T. G.; Wu, Y. Q.; Aguiara, J. A.

    2016-11-01

    Advanced microscopic and microanalysis techniques were developed and applied to study irradiation effects and fission product behavior in selected low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO-coated particles from fuel compacts in six capsules irradiated to burnups of 11.2 to 19.6% FIMA. Although no TRISO coating failures were detected during the irradiation, the fraction of Ag-110m retained in individual particles often varied considerably within a single compact and at the capsule level. At the capsule level Ag-110m release fractions ranged from 1.2 to 38% and within a single compact, silver release from individual particles often spanned a range that extended from 100% retention to nearly 100% release. In this paper, selected irradiated particles from Baseline, Variant 1 and Variant 3 type fueled TRISO coated particles were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atom Probe Tomography; Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy; Precession Electron Diffraction, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM), High Resolution Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) examinations and Electron Probe Micro-Analyzer. Particle selection in this study allowed for comparison of the fission product distribution with Ag retention, fuel type and irradiation level. Nano sized Ag-containing features were predominantly identified in SiC grain boundaries and/or triple points in contrast with only two sitings of Ag inside a SiC grain in two different compacts (Baseline and Variant 3 fueled compacts). STEM and HRTEM analysis showed evidence of Ag and Pd co-existence in some cases and it was found that fission product precipitates can consist of multiple or single phases. STEM analysis also showed differences in precipitate compositions between Baseline and Variant 3 fuels. A higher density of fission product precipitate clusters were identified in the SiC layer in particles from the Variant 3 compact compared with the Variant 1 compact. Trend analysis shows

  5. The post irradiation examination of three fuel rods from the IFA 429 experiment irradiated in the Halden Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.

    1979-11-01

    A series of fuel rod irradiation experiments were performed in the Halden Heavy Boiling Water Reactor in Norway. These were designed to provide a range of fuel property data as a function of burn-up. One of these experiments was the IFA-429. This was designed to study the absorption of helium filling gas by the UO 2 fuel pellets, steady state and transient fission gas release and fuel thermal behaviour to high burn-up. This data was to be obtained as a function of fuel density, fuel grain size, initial fuel/cladding gap, average linear heat rating, burn-up and overpower transients. All the fuel is in the form of pressed and sintered UO 2 pellets enriched to 13 weight percent 235 U. All the rods were clad in Zircaloy 4 tube. The details of the experiment are given. The post irradiation examination included: visual examination, neutron radiography, dimensional measurements, gamma scanning, measurement of gases in fuel rods and internal free volume, burn-up analysis, metallographic examination, measurement of retained gas in UO 2 pellets, measurement of bulk density of UO 2 . The results are given and discussed. (U.K.)

  6. Post irradiation examination and analysis of 13(U,Pu) C-fuel pins irradiated in the thermal flux of FR 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weimar, P.; Steiner, H.

    1979-01-01

    The post-irradiation examination of the pins at Karlsruhe Hot Cells revealed the following results: Nearly all specimens showed noteworthy clad deformations (up to 3%). Defects in the form of cracks in the clad were found at three pins. The observed clad deformations resulted from mechanical interaction between fuel and cladding in consequence of an inexorable fuel swelling. A linear relationship between burnup and clad deformation was found. Defects were observed for burnups greater than 50 MWd/kgM and can be explained by the small fabrications clearances between clad and fuel pellets (50-90 μm) and high smear densities. Fission gas measurements were performed in a three fold way, gas release, gas trapped in pores and gas in solid solution in the lattice of the mixed carbide were determined. The gas release fraction showed values between 10 and 15%. Whereas the fission gas content trapped in large pores (> 1 μm) was linearly dependent on burnup, fission gas in small pores and in solid solution reached a saturation value at about 20 MWd/kgM. Measurements of micro-hardness revealed carburization depths of the clad of up to 40% at temperatures of about 650 0 C. Furtermore, it could be confirmed that the carburization depth followed an Arrhenius law. (orig.)

  7. Post-irradiation examinations of uranium-plutonium mixed nitride fuel irradiated in JMTR (89F-3A capsule)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Takashi; Nakajima, Kunihisa; Kikuchi, Hironobu; Arai, Yasuo; Kimura, Yasuhiko; Nagashima, Hisao; Sekita, Noriaki

    2000-03-01

    Two helium-bonded fuel pins filled with uranium-plutonium mixed nitride pellets were encapsulated in 89F-3A and irradiated in JMTR up to 5.5% FIMA at a maximum linear power of 73 kW/m. The capsule cooled for ∼5 months was transported to Reactor Fuel Examination Facility and subjected to non-destructive and destructive post irradiation examinations. Any failure was not observed in the irradiated fuel pins. Very low fission gas release rate of about 2 ∼ 3% was observed, while the diametric increase of fuel pin was limited to ∼0.4% at the position of maximum reading. The inner surface of cladding tube did not show any signs of chemical interaction with fuel pellet. (author)

  8. Evaluation of Nondestructive Assay/Nondestructive Examination Capabilities for Department of Energy Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luptak, A.J.; Bulmahn, K.D.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes an evaluation of the potential use of nondestructive assay (NDA) and nondestructive examination (NDE) technologies on DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF). It presents the NDA/NDE information necessary for the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) and the SNF storage sites to use when defining that role, if any, of NDA/NDE in characterization and certification processes. Note that the potential role for NDA/NDE includes confirmatory testing on a sampling basis and is not restricted to use as a primary, item-specific, data collection method. The evaluation does not attempt to serve as a basis for selecting systems for development or deployment. Information was collected on 27 systems being developed at eight DOE locations. The systems considered are developed to some degree, but are not ready for deployment on the full range of DOE SNF and still require additional development. The system development may only involve demonstrating performance on additional SNF, packaging the system for deployment, and developing calibration standards, or it may be as extensive as performing additional basic research. Development time is considered to range from one to four years. We conclude that NDA/NDE systems are capable of playing a key role in the characterization and certification of DOE SNF, either as the primary data source or as a confirmatory test. NDA/NDE systems will be able to measure seven of the nine key SNF properties and to derive data for the two key properties not measured directly. The anticipated performance goals of these key properties are considered achievable except for enrichment measurements on fuels near 20% enrichment. NDA/NDE systems can likely be developed to measure the standard canisters now being considered for co-disposal of DOE SNF. This ability would allow the preparation of DOE SNF for storage now and the characterization and certification to be finalize later

  9. State of the art report: Underwater examination techniques for spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Yong Bum

    1997-06-01

    In these days, much efforts are being put to increase the final discharge burnup of PWR fuels. Therefore, the necessity of the inspection of irradiated nuclear fuels assembly during the the refueling outage is greatly increased to evaluate the safe operation and soundness of fuel assemblies in their next cycles in core, and apply the results for safe operation and effective core management. The necessity to evaluate the irradiation performance of indigenous nuclear fuels pushes the relative researchers to the development of on-site fuel inspection techniques and devices which can perform the underwater inspection and measurement of irradiated nuclear fuels during refueling outage. To ensure the technologies, the status of in situ underwater fuel inspection techniques and equipment were investigated and reviewed. Those information provides the fuel inspection capability to evaluate and certificate the performance and integrity of nuclear fuels which leads to the safe operation of NPP. (author). 49 refs., 52 figs

  10. Report on operation utilization and technical development of research reactors and hot laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    Activities of the Division of Research Reactor Operation in fiscal 1980 are described. The division is responsible for operation and maintenance of JRR-2, JRR-3, JRR-4 and Hot Laboratory. In the above connection, various other works are performed, including technical management of fuel and coolant, radiation control, irradiation technique, etc. In Hot Laboratory, postirradiation examinations of fuels and materials are made, and also development of examination methods. (author)

  11. Report on operation, utilization and technical development of research reactors and hot laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    Activities of the Division of Research Reactor Operation in fiscal 1978 are described. The division is responsible for operation and maintenance of JRR-2, JRR-3, JRR-4 and Hot Laboratory. In the above connection, various other works are performed, including technical management of fuel and coolant, radiation control, irradiation technique, etc. In Hot Laboratory, postirradiation examinations of fuels and materials are made, and also development of examination methods. (author)

  12. Report on operation, utilization and technical development of Research Reactors and Hot Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    Activities of the Division of Research Reactor Operation in fiscal 1981 are described. The division is responsible for operation and maintenance of JRR-2, JRR-3, JRR-4 and Hot Laboratory. In the above connection, various other works are performed, including technical management of fuel and coolant, radiation control, irradiation technique, etc. In Hot Laboratory, postirradiation examinations of fuels and materials are made, and also development of examination methods. (author)

  13. Development of examination technique for oxide layer thickness measurement of irradiated fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, D. S.; Park, S. W.; Kim, J. H.; Seo, H. S.; Min, D. K.; Kim, E. K.; Chun, Y. B.; Bang, K. S.

    1999-06-01

    Technique for oxide layer thickness measurement of irradiated fuel rods was developed to measure oxide layer thickness and study characteristic of fuel rods. Oxide layer thickness of irradiated fuels were measured, analyzed. Outer oxide layer thickness of 3 cycle-irradiated fuel rods were 20 - 30 μm, inner oxide layer thickness 0 - 10 μm and inner oxide layer thickness on cracked cladding about 30 μm. Oxide layer thickness of 4 cycle-irradiated fuel rods were about 2 times as thick as those of 1 cycle-irradiated fuel rods. Oxide layer on lower region of irradiated fuel rods was thin and oxide layer from lower region to upper region indicated gradual increase in thickness. Oxide layer thickness from 2500 to 3000 mm showed maximum and oxide layer thickness from 3000 to top region of irradiated fuel rods showed decreasing trend. Inner oxide layer thicknesses of 4 cycle-irradiated fuel rod were about 8 μm at 750 - 3500 mm from the bottom end of fuel rod. Outer oxide layer thickness were about 8 μm at 750 - 1000 mm from the bottom end of fuel rod. These indicated gradual increase up to upper region from the bottom end of fuel rod. These indicated gradual increase up to upper region from the bottom end of fuel. Oxide layer thickness technique will apply safety evaluation and study of reactor fuels. (author). 6 refs., 14 figs

  14. Development of non-destructive examination system for irradiated fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumerling, R.; Goldsmith, L.A.; Cross, M.T.; McKee, F.

    1978-12-01

    The development of non-destructive examination (NDE) system for irradiated fuel rods is described. The system is used for testing rods within a concrete cave and consists of three parts: a fully-automated fuel rod-drive machine, designed for easy maintenance; a series of plug-in NDE modules which fit into the central space provided in the machine, plus optical/TV viewing devices and gamma-scan equipment lined up on the rod; and on electronic control equipment situated outside the concrete shielding. The equipment is at present routinely used for viewing, eddy-current testing, gamma-scanning and diameter measurement of rods. The system is flexible in that additional modules can be added later as they are developed, since there is room for three modules of standard size (about 10cm x 10 cm x 3cm) in the machine or one large module taking the full space. New developments include the use of dual frequency eddy-current testing, which allows much greater discrimination against unwanted signals, and measurement of oxide thickness using a high frequency eddy-current probe. (author)

  15. Hot cell renovation in the spent fuel conditioning process facility at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Nam Yu

    2015-10-01

    Results and conclusion: Based on the considered refurbishment workflow, previous equipment in the M8 cell, including vessels and pipes, were removed and disposed of successfully after a zoning smear survey and decontamination, and new equipment with advanced functions and specifications were installed in the hot cell. Finally, the operating area and isolation room were also refurbished to meet the requirements of the improved hot cell facility.

  16. Ceramic containers for spent nuclear fuel. II. Reactions between TiO2 and the steel canning during hot isostatic processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, B.; Forberg, S.

    1984-01-01

    Rutile was selected for some practical studies of processing and properties of ceramic containers. Hot isostatic pressing at 1280 0 C has resulted in reaction zones between the TiO 2 powder and the steel canning. The phases ilmenite, pseudobrookite, rutile, and iron have been identified by x-ray diffraction and by microprobe analysis. The microstructures have been interpreted by classical metallographic methods, and some microstructures obtained by hot pressing and rapid cooling have also been examined for purposes of comparison. Some implications of the microstructures have been discussed in terms of microcracking and slow crack growth. 13 refs., 7 figs

  17. Postimpact examinations of three DOP 4 iridium shells from simulant fuel sphere assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, E.M.; Hecker, S.S.

    1975-12-01

    Three fuel sphere assemblies, with thoria in doped iridium containment shells, were examined after a simulated earth impact from an aborted orbital mission of a multihundred-watt thermoelectric heat source. The extent of deformation of each unit was measured. Damage to the containment shells was minimal in comparison to that in undoped iridium. Metallographic sections from critical areas indicated that superficial grain boundary cracking in weld zones and microscopic cracking in regions of maximum diameter had occurred in addition to local thinning and coining. The improved properties of the doped iridium are attributed to the retention of a small grain size and to an additional fracture resistance over iridium of a comparable grain size, imparted by either a change in grain boundary chemistry or the flow characteristics of the doped material

  18. Post-irradiation examination of prototype Al-64 wt% U3Si2 fuel rods from NRU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, D.F.; Primeau, M.F.; Buchanan, C.; Rose, D.

    1997-01-01

    Three prototype fuel rods containing Al-64 wt% U 3 Si 2 (3.15 gU/cm 3 ) have been irradiated to their design burnup in the NRU reactor without incident. The fuel was fabricated using production-scale equipment and processes previously developed for Al-U 3 Si fuel fabrication at Chalk River Laboratories, and special equipment developed for U 3 Si 2 powder production and handling. The rods were irradiated in NRU up to 87 at% U-235 burnup under typical driver fuel conditions; i.e., nominal coolant inlet temperature 37 degrees C, inlet pressure 654 kPa, mass flow 12.4 L/s, and element linear power ratings up to 73 kW/m. Post-irradiation examinations showed that the fuel elements survived the irradiation without defects. Fuel core diametral increases and volumetric swelling were significantly lower than that of Al-61 wt% U 3 Si fuel irradiated under similar conditions. This irradiation demonstrated that the fabrication techniques are adequate for full-scale fuel manufacture, and qualified the fuel for use in AECL's research reactors

  19. Post-pulse detail metallographic examinations of low-enriched uranium silicide plate-type miniature fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki

    1991-10-01

    Pulse irradiation at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) was performed using low-enriched (19.89 w% 235 U) unirradiated silicide plate-type miniature fuel which had a density of 4.8 gU/cm 3 . Experimental aims are to understand the dimensional stability and to clarify the failure threshold of the silicide plate-type miniature fuel under power transient conditions through post-pulse detail metallographic examinations. A silicide plate-type miniature fuel was loaded into an irradiation capsule and irradiated by a single pulse. Deposited energies given in the experiments were 62, 77, 116 and 154 cal/g·fuel, which lead to corresponding peak fuel plate temperatures, 201 ± 28degC, 187 ± 10degC, 418 ± 74degC and 871 ± 74degC, respectively. Below 400degC, reliability and dimensional stability of the silicide plate fuel was sustained, and the silicide plate fuel was intact. Up to 540degC, wall-through intergranular crackings occurred in the Al-3%Mg alloy cladding. With the increase of the temperature, the melting of the aluminum cladding followed by recrystallization, the denudation of fuel core and the plate-through intergranular cracking were observed. With the increase of the temperature beyond 400degC, the bowing of fuel plate became significant. Above the temperature of 640degC molten aluminum partially reacted with the fuel core, partially flowed downward under the influence of surface tension and gravity, and partially formed agglomerations. Judging from these experimental observations, the fuel-plate above 400degC tends to reduce its dimensional stability. Despite of the apparent silicide fuel-plate failure, neither generation of pressure pulse nor that of mechanical energy occurred at all. (J.P.N.)

  20. Two gamma-ray detectors method for examination of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristof, E.; Pregl, G.

    1979-01-01

    Th initial experiment and method for the nondestructive determination of a fuel element burnup is given. The method eliminates the error which originates from the unknown local dependency of the attenuation coefficient for gamma rays in fuel. (author)

  1. Characterisation study of radionuclides in Hot Cell Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghare, P.T.; Rath, D.P.; Govalkar, Atul; Mukherjee, Govinda; AniIKumar, S.; Yadav, R.K.B.; Mallik, G.K.

    2016-01-01

    Examination of different types of experimental as well as power reactor irradiated fuels and validation of fuel modeling codes is carried out in general Hot cell facility. The Hot cell facility has six concrete shielded hot cells, capable of handling radioactivity varying from 3.7 TBQ to 3700 TBq gamma activity. The facility was augmented with two hot cells having designed capacity to handle radioactivity of 9250 TBQ of equivalent activity of 60 Co. The study of characterization of various radionuclides present inside the hot cell of PIE facility was taken up. This study will help in providing valuable inputs for various radiological safety parameters to keep personnel exposure to ALARA level as per the mandate of radiation safety program

  2. Examining the microtexture evolution in a hole-edge punched into 780 MPa grade hot-rolled steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, J.H.; Kim, M.S. [Department of Printed Electronics Engineering, Sunchon National University, 315 Maegok, Sunchon, Jeonnam 540-950 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.I.; Seo, S.J. [POSCO Technical Research Laboratories, Gwangyang 545-090 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, S.-H., E-mail: shihoon@sunchon.ac.kr [Department of Printed Electronics Engineering, Sunchon National University, 315 Maegok, Sunchon, Jeonnam 540-950 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    The deformation behavior in the hole-edge of 780 MPa grade hot-rolled steel during the punching process was investigated via microstructure characterization and computational simulation. Microstructure characterization was conducted to observe the edges of punched holes through the thickness direction, and electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) was used to analyze the heterogeneity of the deformation. Finite element analysis (FEA) that could account for a ductile fracture criterion was conducted to simulate the deformation and fracture behaviors of 780 MPa grade hot-rolled steel during the punching process. Calculation of rotation rate fields at the edges of the punched holes during the punching process revealed that metastable orientations in Euler space were confined to specific orientation groups. Rotation-rate fields effectively explained the stability of the initial texture components in the hole-edge region during the punching process. A visco-plastic self-consistent (VPSC) polycrystal model was used to calculate the microtexture evolution in the hole-edge region during the punching process. FEA revealed that the heterogeneous effective strain was closely related to the heterogeneity of the Kernel average misorientation (KAM) distribution in the hole-edge region. A simulation of the deformation microtexture evolution in the hole-edge region using a VPSC model was in good agreement with the experimental results. - Highlights: •We analyzed the microstructure in a hole-edge punched in HR 780HB steel. •Rotation rate fields revealed the stability of the initial texture components. •Heterogeneous effective stain was closely related to the KAM distribution. •VPSC model successfully simulated the deformation microtexture evolution.

  3. An examination of flame shape related to convection heat transfer in deep-fuel beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara M. Yedinak; Jack D. Cohen; Jason M. Forthofer; Mark A. Finney

    2010-01-01

    Fire spread through a fuel bed produces an observable curved combustion interface. This shape has been schematically represented largely without consideration for fire spread processes. The shape and dynamics of the flame profile within the fuel bed likely reflect the mechanisms of heat transfer necessary for the pre-heating and ignition of the fuel during fire spread....

  4. The Manufacture of W-UO2 Fuel Elements for NTP Using the Hot Isostatic Pressing Consolidation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadway, Jeramie; Hickman, Robert; Mireles, Omar

    2012-01-01

    NTP is attractive for space exploration because: (1) Higher Isp than traditional chemical rockets (2)Shorter trip times (3) Reduced propellant mass (4) Increased payload. Lack of qualified fuel material is a key risk (cost, schedule, and performance). Development of stable fuel form is a critical path, long lead activity. Goals of this project are: Mature CERMET and Graphite based fuel materials and Develop and demonstrate critical technologies and capabilities.

  5. UO2 fuel behaviour at rod burn-ups up to 105 MWd/kgHM. A review of 10 years of high burn-up examinations commissioned by AREVA NP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goll, W.; Hoffmann, P.B.; Hellwig, C.; Sauser, W.; Spino, J.; Walker, C.T.

    2007-01-01

    Irradiation experience gained on fuel rods with burn-ups greater than 60 MWd/kgHM irradiated in the Nuclear Power Plant Goesgen, Switzerland, is described. Emphasis is placed on the fuel behaviour, which has been analysed by hot cell examinations at the Institute for Transuranium Elements and the Paul-Scherrer-Institute. Above 60 MWd/kgHM, the so-called high burn-up structure (HBS) forms and the fission gas release increases with burn-up and rod power. Examinations performed in the outer region of the fuel revealed that most if not all of the fission gas created was retained in the HBS, even at 25% porosity. Furthermore, the HBS has a relatively low swelling rate, greatly increased plasticity, and its thermal conductivity is higher than expected from the porosity. The post-irradiation examinations showed that the HBS has no detrimental effects on the performance of stationary irradiated PWR fuel irradiated to the high burn-ups that can be achieved with 5 wt% U-235 enrichment. On the contrary, the HBS results in fuel performance that is generally better than it would have been if the HBS had not formed. (orig.)

  6. Results of post-irradiation examination of WWER fuel assembly structural components made of E110 and E635 alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, A.; Markov, D.; Smirnov, V.; Polenok, V.; Ivashchenko, A.; Strozhuk, A.

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents the main examination results on the condition of fuel rods claddings, guide tubes and spacer grids of the WWER FA made of E110 and E635 alloys operated under standard operating conditions. The paper is based on the data obtained during the examination of 28 WWER-1000 FA and 12 WWER-400 FA. E110 alloy is shown to be suitable material for the WWER fuel rod claddings under the normal operating conditions. E635 alloy is attractive to manufacturing of the skeleton components. The currently used combination (E110 as a material of fuel rods claddings and E635 - as a material of the skeleton components) is the optimal solution for the WWER fuel assembly because the advantages of the both alloys are used. (authors)

  7. Post-irradiation examinations of inert matrix nitride fuel irradiated in JMTR (01F-51A capsule)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Takashi; Nakajima, Kunihisa; Kikuchi, Hironobu; Honda, Junichi; Hatakeyama, Yuichi; Ono, Katsuto; Matsui, Hiroki; Arai, Yasuo

    2007-03-01

    A plutonium nitride fuel pin containing inert matrix such as ZrN and TiN was encapsulated in 01F-51A and irradiated in JMTR. Minor actinides are surrogated by plutonium. Average linear powers and burnups were 408W/cm, 30000MWd/t(Zr+Pu) [132000MWd/t-Pu] for (Zr,Pu)N and 355W/cm, 38000MWd/t(Ti+Pu) [153000MWd/t-Pu] for (TiN,PuN). The irradiated capsule was transported to Reactor Fuel Examination Facility and subjected to non-destructive and destructive post irradiation examinations. Any failure was not observed in the irradiated fuel pin. Very low fission gas release rate of about 1.6% was measured. The inner surface of cladding tube did not show any signs of chemical interaction with fuel pellet. (author)

  8. Development of underwater high-definition camera for the confirmation test of core configuration and visual examination of BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Masato; Tuji, Kenji; Ito, Keisuke

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop underwater High-Definition camera for the confirmation test of core configuration and visual examination of BWR fuels in order to reduce the time of these tests and total cost regarding to purchase and maintenance. The prototype model of the camera was developed and examined in real use condition in spent fuel pool at HAMAOKA-2 and 4. The examination showed that the ability of prototype model was either equaling or surpassing to conventional product expect for resistance to radiation. The camera supposes to be used in the dose rate condition of under about 10 Gy/h. (author)

  9. Fuel and fuel pin behaviour in a high burnup fast breeder fuel subassembly: Results of destructive post-irradiation examinations of the KNK II/1 fuel subassembly NY-205

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patzer, G.

    1991-05-01

    The report gives a summarizing overview of the design characteristics, of the irradiation history and of the results of the destructive post-irradiation examinations of the fuel pins of the high-burnup fuel subassembly NY-205 of the KNK II first core. This element was operated for about 10 years and reached a maximum local burnup of 175 MWd/kg(HM) and a maximum neutron dose of 67 dpa-NRT. The main design data of this subassembly agree with those of the SNR 300 Mark-Ia, and it reached more than twice of the burnup and a similar neutron dose as foreseen for the SNR 300 fuel subassemblies [de

  10. Example of answers to the problems of the 37th examination for the Chief Engineer of Nuclear Fuel. 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Akio; Nakajima, Kunihisa; Yachi, Shigeyasu; Komuro, Yuichi; Kushita, Kouhei

    2005-09-01

    This report provides an example of answers to the problems of the 37th examination for the Chief Engineer of Nuclear Fuel. This examination was done as a national qualification in March 2005. Brief explanations or references are added to some answers. (author)

  11. Demonstration of Fuel Hot-Spot Pressure in Excess of 50 Gbar for Direct-Drive, Layered Deuterium-Tritium Implosions on OMEGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, S P; Goncharov, V N; Igumenshchev, I V; Sangster, T C; Betti, R; Bose, A; Boehly, T R; Bonino, M J; Campbell, E M; Cao, D; Collins, T J B; Craxton, R S; Davis, A K; Delettrez, J A; Edgell, D H; Epstein, R; Forrest, C J; Frenje, J A; Froula, D H; Gatu Johnson, M; Glebov, V Yu; Harding, D R; Hohenberger, M; Hu, S X; Jacobs-Perkins, D; Janezic, R; Karasik, M; Keck, R L; Kelly, J H; Kessler, T J; Knauer, J P; Kosc, T Z; Loucks, S J; Marozas, J A; Marshall, F J; McCrory, R L; McKenty, P W; Meyerhofer, D D; Michel, D T; Myatt, J F; Obenschain, S P; Petrasso, R D; Radha, P B; Rice, B; Rosenberg, M J; Schmitt, A J; Schmitt, M J; Seka, W; Shmayda, W T; Shoup, M J; Shvydky, A; Skupsky, S; Solodov, A A; Stoeckl, C; Theobald, W; Ulreich, J; Wittman, M D; Woo, K M; Yaakobi, B; Zuegel, J D

    2016-07-08

    A record fuel hot-spot pressure P_{hs}=56±7  Gbar was inferred from x-ray and nuclear diagnostics for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion cryogenic, layered deuterium-tritium implosions on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA Laser System. When hydrodynamically scaled to the energy of the National Ignition Facility, these implosions achieved a Lawson parameter ∼60% of the value required for ignition [A. Bose et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 011201(R) (2016)], similar to indirect-drive implosions [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 255003 (2015)], and nearly half of the direct-drive ignition-threshold pressure. Relative to symmetric, one-dimensional simulations, the inferred hot-spot pressure is approximately 40% lower. Three-dimensional simulations suggest that low-mode distortion of the hot spot seeded by laser-drive nonuniformity and target-positioning error reduces target performance.

  12. Pre-test nondestructive examination data summary report on Turkey Point spent fuel assemblies D01, D04 and D06 for the climax-spent fuel test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Fuel assembly sip testing conducted at Turkey Point and Battelle Columbus Laboratories (BCL) confirmed no leaking rods were among the thirteen fuel assemblies included in the Climax-Spent Fuel Test. A detailed nondestructive examination was conducted on three of the thirteen assemblies. Fuel assembly lengths and widths averaged 153.6 inches and 8.3 inches, respectively. The assemblies weighed 1459 +- 3 lbs. Total neutron flux measured at the fuel column midplane was 1.06 x 10 4 N/cm 2 /s with an average neutron energy of 1.4 MeV. Gamma dose rates were measured axially and vertically to the fuel column with maximum contact dose rate of 9.52 x 10 4 R/h. Twenty rods underwent detailed rod nondestructive examination. Rod lengths and weights averaged 152.5 inches and 6.82 lb, respectively. Spiral profilometry scans showed the maximum ovality for the twenty rods was 0.0105 inch with average rod diameters ranging from 0.4201 inch to 0.4211 inch. Extensive ridging from pellet cladding interaction was evident over most of the length on all rods. Gamma scan results showed no cesium peaking and no unusually large pellet to pellet gaps. Approximate 10% gamma activity depressions were found at the grid spacer locations. Several areas were identified as locations with an internal anomaly using eddy current results. Fifteen rods were reinserted into the three fuel assemblies at the completion of the nondestructive examinations. Five rods remained at BCL for destructive characterization

  13. Development of cutting device for irradiated fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. P.; Jun, Y. B.; Hong, K. P.; Min, D. K.; Lee, H. K.; Su, H. S.; Kim, K. S.; Kwon, H. M.; Joo, Y. S.; Yoo, K. S.; Joo, J. S.; Kim, E. K.

    2004-01-01

    Post Irradiation Examination(PIE) on irradiated fuel rods is essential for the evaluation of integrity and irradiation performance of fuel rods of commercial reactor fuel. For PIE, fuel rods should be cut very precisely. The cutting positions selected from NDT data are very important for further destructive examination and analysis. A fuel rod cutting device was developed witch can cut fuel rods longitudinal very precisely and can also cut the fuels into the same length rod cuts repeatedly. It is also easy to remove the fuel cutting powder after cutting works and it can extend the life time of cutting device and lower the contamination level of hot cell

  14. Post-irradiation examination of Al-61 wt% U3Si fuel rods from the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, D.F.; Wang, N.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the post-irradiation examination of 4 intact low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel rods from the national research universal (NRU) reactor at the Chalk River Laboratories of AECL. The rods were irradiated during the period 1993 through 1995, under typical driver fuel operating conditions in NRU, i.e., nominal D 2 O coolant inlet temperature 37E C, inlet pressure 654 kPa and mass flow 12.4 L/s. Irradiation exposures ranged from 147 to 251 full-power days, corresponding to 40 to 84 atom % 235 U burnup. The maximum rod power was ∼2 MW, with element linear power ratings up to 68 kW/m. Post-irradiation examinations, conducted in 1997, focused on optical metallography to measure cladding oxide thickness and fuel core and cladding microstructural examinations. The cladding oxide was approximately 24 : m thick at the mid-plane of fuel rods irradiated to 251 full-power days, with small areas up to 34 : m thick on the fins. The cladding retained significant ductility after irradiation, and its microstructure appeared unchanged. Fuel core diametral increases were small (up to 4%) and within the range previously observed on Al-61 wt% U 3 Si fuel irradiated in the NRU reactor. (author)

  15. Post-irradiation examination of A1-61 wt % U3Si fuel rods from the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, D.F.; Wang, N.

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes the post-irradiation examination of 4 intact low-enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel rods from the national research universal (NRU) reactor at the Chalk River Laboratories of AECL. The rods were irradiated during the period 1993 through 1995, under typical driver fuel operating conditions in NRU, i.e., nominal D 2 0 coolant inlet temperature 37 degrees C, inlet pressure 654 kPa and mass flow 12.4 L/s. Irradiation exposures ranged from 147 to 251 full-power days, corresponding to 40 to 84 atom % 235 U burnup. The maximum rod power was ∼2 MW, with element linear power ratings up to 68 kW/m. Post-irradiation examinations, conducted in 1997, focused on optical metallography to measure cladding oxide thickness and fuel core and cladding microstructural examinations. The cladding oxide was approximately 24 μm thick at the mid-plane of fuel rods irradiated to 251 full-power days, with small areas up to 34 μm thick on the fins. The cladding retained significant ductility after irradiation, and its microstructure appeared unchanged. Fuel core diametral increases were small (up to 4%) and within the range previously observed on A1-61 wt % U 3 Si fuel irradiated in the NRU reactor. (author)

  16. Feasibility study for a 10-MM-GPY fuel ethanol plant, Brady Hot Springs, Nevada. Volume 1. Process and plant design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    An investigation was performed to determine the technical and economic viability of constructing and operating a geothermally heated, biomass, motor fuel alcohol plant at Brady's Hot Springs. The results of the study are positive, showing that a plant of innovative, yet proven design can be built to adapt current commerical fermentation-distillation technology to the application of geothermal heat energy. The specific method of heat production from the Brady's Hot Spring wells has been successful for some time at an onion drying plant. Further development of the geothermal resource to add the capacity needed for an ethanol plant is found to be feasible for a plant sized to produce 10 million gallons of motor fuel grade ethanol per year. A very adequate supply of feedgrains is found to be available for use in the plant without impact on the local or regional feedgrain market. The effect of diverting supplies from the animal feedlots in Northern Nevada and California will be mitigated by the by-product output of high-protein feed supplements that the plant will produce. The plant will have a favorable impact on the local farming economies of Fallon, Lovelock, Winnemucca and Elko, Nevada. It will make a positive and significant socioeconomic contribution to Churchill County, providing direct employment for an additional 61 persons. Environmental impact will be negligible, involving mostly a moderate increase in local truck traffic and railroad siding activity. The report is presented in two volumes. Volume 1 deals with the technical design aspects of the plant. The second volume addresses the issue of expanded geothermal heat production at Brady's Hot Springs, goes into the details of feedstock supply economics, and looks at the markets for the plant's primary ethanol product, and the markets for its feed supplement by-products. The report concludes with an analysis of the economic viability of the proposed project.

  17. Decommissioning of the Risoe Hot Cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsen, H.

    1991-02-01

    The Hot Cell facility at Risoe has been in active use since 1964. During the years several types of nuclear fuels have been handled and examined: test reactor fuel pins from the Danish reactor DR3, the Norwegian Halden reactor, etc; power reactor fuel pins from several foreign reactors, including plutonium enriched pins; HTGR fuel from the Dragon reactor. All kinds of physical and chemical non-destructive and destructive post irradiation examinations have been performed. Besides, different radiotherapy sources have been produced, mainly cobalt sources. The general object of the decommissioning programme for the Hot Cell facility was to obtain a safe condition for the total building that does not require the special safety provisions. The hot cell building will be usable for other purposes after decommissioning. The facilicy comprised six concrete cells, lead cells, glove boxes, a shielded unit for temporary storage of waste, frogman area, decontamination areas, workshops, various installations of importance for safe operation of the plant, offices, etc. The tasks comprised e.g. removal of all irradiated fuel items, removal of other radioactive items, removal of contaminated equipment, and decontamination of all the cells and rooms. The goal was to decontaminate all the concrete cells to a degree where no loose contamination exists in the cells, and where the radiation level is so low, that total removal of the cell structures can be done at any time in the future without significant dose commitments. (AB)

  18. Some results on development, irradiation and post-irradiation examinations of fuels for fast reactor-actinide burner (MOX and inert matrix fuel)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poplavsky, V.; Zabudko, L.; Moseev, L.; Rogozkin, B.; Kurina, I.

    1996-01-01

    Studies performed have shown principal feasibility of the BN-600 and BN-800 cores to achieve high efficiency of Pu burning when MOX fuel with Pu content up to 45% is used. Valuable experience on irradiation behaviour of oxide fuel with high Pu content (100%) was gained as a result of operation of two BR-10 core loadings where the maximum burnup 14 at.% was reached. Post-irradiation examination (PIE) allowed to reveal some specific features of the fuel with high plutonium content. Principal irradiation and PIE results are presented in the paper. Use of new fuel without U-238 provides the maximum burning capability as in this case the conversion ratio is reduced to zero. Technological investigations of inert matrix fuels have been continued now. Zirconium carbide, zirconium nitride, magnesium oxide and other matrix materials are under consideration. Inert matrices selection criteria are discussed in the paper. Results of technological study, of irradiation in the BOR-60 reactor and PIE results of some inert matrix fuels are summarized in this report. (author). 2 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs

  19. Fuels and materials research under the high neutron fluence using a fast reactor Joyo and post-irradiation examination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soga, Tomonori; Ito, Chikara; Aoyama, Takafumi; Suzuki, Soju

    2009-01-01

    The experimental fast reactor Joyo at Oarai Research and Development Center (ORDC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is Japan's sodium-cooled fast reactor (FR). In 2003, this reactor's upgrade to the 140MWt MK-III core was completed to increase the irradiation testing capability. The MK-III core provides the fast neutron flux of 4.0x10 15 n/cm 2 s as an irradiation test bed for improving the fuels and material of FR in Japan. Three post-irradiation examination (PIE) facilities named FMF, MMF and AGF related to Joyo are in ORDC. Irradiated subassemblies and core components are carried into the FMF (Fuel Monitoring Facility) and conducted nondestructive examinations. Each subassembly is disassembled to conduct some destructive examinations and to prepare the fuel and material samples for further detailed examinations. Fuel samples are sent to the AGF (Alpha-Gamma Facility), and material samples are sent to the MMF (Materials Monitoring Facility). These overall and elaborate data provided by PIE contribute to investigate the irradiation effect and behavior of fuels and materials. This facility complex is indispensable to promote the R and D of FR in Japan. And, the function and technology of irradiation test and PIE enable to contribute to the R and D of innovative fission or fusion reactor material which will be required to use under the high neutron exposure. (author)

  20. Employing Hot Wire Anemometry to Directly Measure the Water Balance of a Commercial Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shakhshir, Saher Al; Berning, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are currently being commercialized for various applications ranging from automotive (e.g. the Toyota Mirai) to stationary such as powering telecom backup units. In PEMFC’s, oxygen from air is internally combined with hydrogen to form water and produce...... and increased degradation rates. Clearly, a fundamental understanding of all aspects of water management in PEMFC is imperative. This includes the fuel cell water balance, i.e. which fraction of the product water leaves the fuel cell via the anode channels versus the cathode channel. Our research group...... signal received gives valuable insight into heat and mass transfer phenomena in a PEMFC....

  1. Results and comments on the gamma spectrometry examinations carried out on PWR and fast neutron fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineira, Thomas; Mouchnino, Michel; Juste, Guy; Vignesoult, Nicole.

    1980-05-01

    The gamma spectrometry analyses on the fuel elements of PWR and fast neutron systems have experienced a significant growth in the CEA. This nondestructive, quick, inexpensive and quantitative method, seems to us particularly advantageous for qualifying the behavior of fuel under irradiation. However, in order to use it to the maximum, it must have reached a high degree of automation and the interpretation of the results must be the outcome of a coherent team that includes gamma spectrometry and fuel element specialists, since the growth of hot cell gamma spectrometry involves the processing of a considerable number of data upon which the quality of the results depends (large number of spectra per pencil analyzed, dimension of the 2000 or 4000 channel spectra, number of lines studied, etc.). Therefore the need to make the most of the information and, in particular, to present the results in a form suitable for direct processing in a minimum response time, requires a highly automated system. Further, the more specific results of gamma spectrometry correlated to the metallurgical results obtained in the laboratories should contribute efficiently to obtaining major information [fr

  2. Nondestructive examination of Oconee 1 fuel assemblies after three cycles of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyecha, T.D.; Davis, H.H.; Mayer, J.T.; Guthrie, B.A. III; Larson, J.G.

    1979-09-01

    The Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W) in conjunction with Duke Power Company is participating in a Department of Energy sponsored research and development program to qualify current design pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies for extended burnup (>40,000 MWd/mtU). The information obtained from this program will provide a basis for future design improvements in PWR fuel assemblies culminating in an extended burnup assembly having a nominal operating limit of approximately 50,000 MWd/mtU. An extension of the current assembly design to higher burnups will result in the following benefits: (1) lower uranium ore requirements, (2) greater fuel cycle efficiency, (3) reduction in spent fuel storage requirements, and (4) increased flexibility in tailoring fuel batch sizes to better accommodate the varying energy requirements of the utilities

  3. Examinations of the irradiation behaviour of U3Si2 test fuel plates with low enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muellauer, J.

    1989-01-01

    Five low-enriched (19.7% 235 U), high-density (4.7 gU/cm/ 3 ) U 3 Si 2 -test fuel plates (miniplates) with different fine grain contents have been qualified under irradiation. During the course of irradiation up to burnup of 63% 235 U depletion, no released fractions of gaseous or solid fission products from the fuel plate to the rig coolant were detected. The measured swelling rate of the fuel zone (meat) is less than 0.45% ΔV/10 20 fissions/cm 3 the blister-threshold temperature of the fuel plates is above 520 0 C. The favourable irradiation behavior of the U 3 Si 2 fuel plates was not influenced by using higher amounts of fine grained particles (40% [de

  4. A study of the effects of changing burn-up and gap gaseous compound on the gap convection coefficient (in a hot fuel pin) in VVER-1000 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahgoshay, M.; Rahmani, Y.

    2007-01-01

    In this article we worked on the result and process of calculation of the gap heat transfer coefficient for a hot fuel pin in accordance with burn-up changes in the VVER-1000 reactor at the Bushehr nuclear power plant (Iran). With regard to the fact that in calculating the fuel gap heat transfer coefficient, various parameters are effective and the need for designing a model is being felt, therefore, in this article we used Ross and Stoute gap model to study impacts of different effective parameters such as thermal expansion and gaseous fission products on the h gap change rate. Over time and with changes in fuel burn-up some gaseous fission products such as xenon, argon and krypton gases are released to the gas mixture in the gap, which originally contained helium. In this study, the composition of gaseous elements in the gap volume during different times of reactor operation was found using ORIGEN code. Considering that the thermal conduction of these gases is lower than that of helium, and by using the Ross and Stoute gap model, we find first that the changes in gaseous compounds in the gap reduce the values of gap thermal conductivity coefficient, but considering thermal expansion (due to burn-up alterations) of fuel and clad resulting in the reduction of gap thickness we find that the gap heat transfer coefficient will augment in a broad range of burn-up changes. These changes result in a higher rate of gap thickness reduction than the low rate of decrease of heat conduction coefficient of the gas in the gap during burn-up. Once these changes have been defined, we can proceed with the analysis of the results of calculations based on the Ross and Stoute model and compare the results obtained with the experimental results for a hot fuel pin as presented in the final safety analysis report of the VVER-1000 reactor at Bushehr. It is noteworthy that the results of accomplished calculations based on the Ross and Stoute model correspond well with the existing

  5. Gamma-ray monitor for plutonium uniformity in fuel tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winn, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    Plutonium fuel tubes must be examined for abnormal PuO 2 densities. A fuel-gamma densitometer (FGD) was developed to measure the PuO 2 content within 3.2-mm-diameter areas. The FGD measurement of hot spot densities is an extension of the usual gamma-scanner application of verifying fuel uniformity within a few percent

  6. Post-irradiation examination of a 13000C-HTR fuel experiment Project J 96.M3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueger, J. de; Roettger, H.

    1977-01-01

    A large variety of loose coated fuel particles have been irradiated in the BR2 at Mol/Belgium at temperatures between 1200 0 C and 1400 0 C and up to a fast neutron fluence of 1.2x1022 cm -2 (E>0.1 MeV) as a Euratom sponsored experiment for the advanced testing of HTR fuel. The specimens have been provided by Belgonucleaire and the Dragon Project. A short description of the experiment as well as the results of post-irradiation examination mainly carried out at Petten (N.H.), The Netherlands, are presented here. The post-irradiation examination has shown that the required performance can be achieved by a number of the tested fuel specimens without serious damage

  7. Examining Rhodium Catalyst complexes for Use with Conducting Polymers Designed for Fuel Cells in Preparing Biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpio, M.M.; Kerr, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Biosensing devices are important because they can detect, record, and transmit information regarding the presence of, or physiological changes in, different chemical or biological materials in the environment. The goal of this research is to prepare a biosensing device that is effective, quick, and low cost. This is done by examining which chemicals will work best when placed in a biosensor. The first study involved experimenting on a rhodium catalyst complexed with ligands such as bipyridine and imidazole. The rhodium catalyst is important because it is reduced from RhIII to RhI, forms a hydride by reaction with water and releases the hydride to react with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to selectively produce 1,4-NADH, the reduced form of NAD+. The second study looked at different types of ketones and enzymes for the enzyme-substrate reaction converting a ketone into an alcohol. Preliminary results showed that the rhodium complexed with bipyridine was able to carry out all the reactions, while the rhodium complexed with imidazole was not able to produce and release hydrides. In addition, the most effective ketone to use is benzylacetone with the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase from baker’s yeast. Future work includes experimenting with bis-imidazole, which mimics the structure of bipyridine to see if it has the capability to reduce and if the reduction rate is comparable to the bipyridine complex. Once all testing is completed, the fastest catalysts will be combined with polymer membranes designed for fuel cells to prepare biosensing devices that can be used in a variety of applications including ones in the medical and environmental fields.

  8. Comparative examination of the fresh and spent nuclear TRIGA fuel by neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinca, M.

    2016-01-01

    At the Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) there is in operation an underwater (wet) neutron radiography facility (INUM) designed especially for nuclear fuel investigation. INUM was involved in CANDU experimental type and TRIGA type nuclear fuel investigations. In this paper are presented the results after investigation of the nuclear fuel TRIGA-HEU and TRIGA-LEU, fresh and spent, using transfer method with metallic foils of dysprosium and indium and radiographic films (38 cm x 10 cm). This method is the most suitable for spent fuel and offers a high geometrical resolution of the images that subsequently are digitalized with a professional scanner for films. From the images obtained for TRIGA-HEU and TRIGA-LEU with different degree of burn-up there are established the opportunities to use dysprosium or indium converter foils based on their response to thermal or epithermal neutrons to evaluate the degree of burn-up, dimensional measurements, defects etc. (authors)

  9. Post-Irradiation Examinations for Resolving Fuel Issues in Long Term Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Joakim K.H.; Alvarez Holston, Anna-Maria

    2014-01-01

    In many countries extended long term dry storage is the solution for storage of spent nuclear fuel for the foreseeable future. The expected storage times have increased over the last years and today storage times of up to 300 years is anticipated. With such long storage times, requirements on transportability and retrievability of the fuel have become more important. Hitherto most investigations on fuel behaviour during dry storage have been focused on cladding creep and the impact of hydrogen and hydrides in the cladding. Creep data gives input to creep models and creep to rupture data helps to set criteria for maximum allowable internal rod pressure. Hydrides lower the ductility of the cladding and this is more pronounced with radially oriented hydrides. As the temperature decreases over time in a dry storage cask dissolved hydrogen will precipitate forming hydrides in addition to hydrides already present. Assuming there is sufficient hoop stress in the cladding, the new hydrides would be radially oriented. Together with lost ductility Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) could be a potential mechanism for rod failure over tens of years of dry storage as the temperature drops from about 350 deg. C to 150 deg. C. Hydride embrittlement and the DHC mechanism have been studied in the first Studsvik Cladding Integrity Project (SCIP), although the focus in this program has mainly been on higher temperatures relevant for operating conditions rather than on dry storage conditions. In addition to the mechanisms mentioned there are other failure mechanisms that could potentially threaten the cladding fuel integrity and retrievability. In case there is residual water or moisture available in the cask, or even in the fuel due to existing fuel failures, radiolysis gives free hydrogen and oxygen. In failed fuel this may cause fuel oxidation and swelling affecting fuel integrity. The hydrogen gas pressure will not threaten the cask but be available for cladding uptake. Furthermore

  10. Mechanical properties examined by nanoindentation for selected phases relevant to the development of monolithic uranium-molybdenum metallic fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newell, Ryan; Park, Youngjoo; Mehta, Abhishek [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, 32826 (United States); Keiser, Dennis [Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID, 83402 (United States); Sohn, Yongho, E-mail: Yongho.Sohn@ucf.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, 32826 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Nanomechanical properties, specifically the reduced modulus and hardness of several intermetallic and solid solution phases are reported to assist the development of the U-10 wt% Mo (U-10Mo) monolithic fuel system for research and test reactors. Findings from this study and reported values of mechanical properties provide data critical for understanding and predicting the structural behavior of the fuel system during fabrication and irradiation. The phases examined are products of interdiffusion and reaction between (1) the AA6061 cladding and the Zr diffusion barrier, namely (Al,Si){sub 3}Zr and Al{sub 3}Zr, (2) the U-10Mo fuel and the Zr diffusion barrier, namely UZr{sub 2}, Mo{sub 2}Zr, and α-U, and (3) the U (or U-10Mo) and Mo, namely a mixture gradient of α- and γ-phases. The UC inclusions observed within the fuel alloy were also examined. Only phases present in thick or continuous microstructure on cross-sectioned fuel plates and diffusion couples were investigated for reduced modulus and hardness. Concentration-dependence of room-temperature reduced modulus in U solid solution with 0–10 wt% Mo was semi-quantitatively modeled based on mixture of α- and γ-phases and solid solutioning within the γ-phase.

  11. Fabrication of ORNL Fuel Irradiated in the Peach Bottom Reactor and Postirradiation Examination of Recycle Test Elements 7 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Jr. E.L.

    2001-01-01

    Seven full-sized Peach Bottom Reactor fuel elements were fabricated in a cooperative effort by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Gulf General Atomic (GGA) as part of the National HTGR Fuel Recycle Development Program. These elements contain bonded fuel rods and loose beds of particles made from several combinations of fertile and fissile particles of interest for present and future use in the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). The portion of the fuel prepared for these elements by ORNL is described in detail in this report, and it is in conjunction with the GGA report (GA-10109) a complete fabrication description of the test. In addition, this report describes the results obtained to date from postirradiation examination of the first two elements removed from the Peach Bottom Reactor, RTE-7 and -4. The fuel examined had relatively low exposure, up to about 1.5 x 10 21 neutrons/cm* fast (>0.18 MeV) fluence, compared with the peak anticipated HTGR fluence of 8.0 x 10 21 , but it has performed well at this exposure. Dimensional data indicate greater irradiation shrinkage than expected from accelerated test data to higher exposures. This suggests that either the method of extrapolation of the higher exposure data back to low exposure is faulty, or the behavior of the coated particles in the neutron spectrum characteristic of the accelerated tests does not adequately represent the behavior in an HTGR spectrum

  12. Mechanical properties examined by nanoindentation for selected phases relevant to the development of monolithic uranium-molybdenum metallic fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Ryan; Park, Youngjoo; Mehta, Abhishek; Keiser, Dennis; Sohn, Yongho

    2017-04-01

    Nanomechanical properties, specifically the reduced modulus and hardness of several intermetallic and solid solution phases are reported to assist the development of the U-10 wt% Mo (U-10Mo) monolithic fuel system for research and test reactors. Findings from this study and reported values of mechanical properties provide data critical for understanding and predicting the structural behavior of the fuel system during fabrication and irradiation. The phases examined are products of interdiffusion and reaction between (1) the AA6061 cladding and the Zr diffusion barrier, namely (Al,Si)3Zr and Al3Zr, (2) the U-10Mo fuel and the Zr diffusion barrier, namely UZr2, Mo2Zr, and α-U, and (3) the U (or U-10Mo) and Mo, namely a mixture gradient of α- and γ-phases. The UC inclusions observed within the fuel alloy were also examined. Only phases present in thick or continuous microstructure on cross-sectioned fuel plates and diffusion couples were investigated for reduced modulus and hardness. Concentration-dependence of room-temperature reduced modulus in U solid solution with 0-10 wt% Mo was semi-quantitatively modeled based on mixture of α- and γ-phases and solid solutioning within the γ-phase.

  13. Spent Nuclear Fuel Transportation: An Examination of Potential Lessons Learned From Prior Shipping Campaigns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Keister; K, McBride

    2006-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, assigned the Department of Energy (DOE) responsibility for developing and managing a Federal system for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for accepting, transporting, and disposing of SNF and HLW at the Yucca Mountain repository (if licensed) in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. OCRWM faces a near-term challenge--to develop and demonstrate a transportation system that will sustain safe and efficient shipments of SNF and HLW to a repository. To better inform and improve its current planning, OCRWM has extensively reviewed plans and other documents related to past high-visibility shipping campaigns of SNF and other radioactive materials within the United States. This report summarizes the results of this review and, where appropriate, lessons learned. The objective of this lessons learned study was to identify successful, best-in-class trends and commonalities from past shipping campaigns, which OCRWM could consider when planning for the development and operation of a repository transportation system. Note: this paper is for analytical and discussion purposes only, and is not an endorsement of, or commitment by, OCRWM to follow any of the comments or trends. If OCRWM elects to make such commitments at a future time, they will be appropriately documented in formal programmatic policy statements, plans and procedures. Reviewers examined an extensive study completed in 2003 by DOE's National Transportation Program (NTP), Office of Environmental Management (EM), as well as plans and documents related to SNF shipments since issuance of the NTP report. OCRWM examined specific planning, business, institutional and operating practices that have been identified by DOE, its transportation contractors

  14. Postirradiation examination and evaluation of Peach Bottom fuel test element FTE-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallroth, C.F.; Holzgraf, J.F.; Jensen, D.D.

    1977-09-01

    Fuel test element FTE-6 was irradiated in the Peach Bottom high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) for 645 equivalent full power days. Four fuel varieties, contained in H-327 graphite bodies, were tested. A primary result of this test has been to demonstrate acceptable performance even with calculated high stresses in the graphite bodies. Heterogeneous fuel loadings in the element caused local power peaking and azimuthal power variations, deforming the graphite fuel bodies and thereby causing bowing nearly five times as large as the diametral clearance within the sleeve. The axial stresses resulting from interference between the fuel bodies and sleeve were estimated to have reached 45% of the ultimate material strength at the end of the irradiation. Residual stresses from differential contraction within the fuel body resulted in probable in-plane stress levels of 130% of the material strength at the end-of-life shutdown and of up to 150% of the strength at shutdown during the irradiation cycle. The high in-plane stresses are local peaks at the corners of a sharp notch in the element, which may account for the stresses failing to cause damage. The lack of observable damage, however, indicates that the methods and data used for stress analysis give results that are either fairly accurate or conservative

  15. Low-enriched research reactor fuel: Post-Irradiation Examinations at SCK-CEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Berghe, S.; Leenaers, A.

    2007-01-01

    Generally, research and test reactors are fuelled with fuel plates instead of pins. In most cases in the past, these plates consisted of high enriched (higher than 95 percent 235 U) UAl 3 powder mixed with a pure Al matrix (called the meat) in between two aluminium alloy plates (the cladding). These plates are then assembled in fuel elements of different designs to fit the needs of the various reactors. Since the 1970's, efforts have been going on to replace the high-enriched, low-density UAl 3 fuel with high-density, low enriched ( 235 U) replacements. This search is driven by the attempt to reduce the civil use of high-enriched materials because of proliferation risks and terrorist threats. American initiatives, such as the Global Threat Reduction Initiative and the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program have triggered the development of reliable low-enriched fuel types for these reactors, which can replace the high enriched ones without loss of performance. Most success has been obtained with U 3 Si 2 fuel, which is currently used in many research reactors in the world. However, efforts to search for a better replacement have continued and are currently directed towards the U-Mo alloy fuel (7-10 weight percent Mo)

  16. Current status of JAERI Tokai hot cell facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itami, Hiroharu; Morozumi, Minoru; Yamahara, Takeshi

    1992-01-01

    JAERI has 4 hot cell facilities in order to examine high radioactive materials. Three of them, the Research Hot Laboratory, the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility and the Waste Safety Testing Facility are located in the JAERI Tokai site, and the rest is the JMTR Hot Laboratory in the Oarai site. The Research Hot Laboratory (RHL) was constructed for post-irradiation examination (PIE), especially nuclear related basic research experiment, such as metallurgical, chemical and mechanical examination on fuels and materials irradiated in research and test reactors. This facility has 10 large dimension concrete and 38 lead cells. At present the RHL is used for various kinds of examinations of high radioactive samples such as fuels of research and test reactors, power reactors and high temperature testing reactor (HTTR), and structural materials. The Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF) was designed and constructed for carrying out PIE of irradiated full-size fuel assemblies of light water reactors (LWRs). This facility has a storage pool, 8 concrete and 5 lead cells. They are currently used for safety evaluation on high burnup and advanced lWR fuels as part of the national program. The Waste Safety Testing Facility (WASTEF) was designed and constructed for safety research on long-term storage and disposal of high level radioactive wastes, generated by fuel reprocessing. The WASTEF has 5 concrete cells and 1 lead cell. Examinations on the behavior of various long-lived fission products in a glass form and in a canister and, releasing behavior of them out of a canister are carrying out under the condition at storage. (author)

  17. Hot Laboratories and Remote Handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Opening talk of the workshop 'Hot Laboratories and Remote Handling' was given by Marin Ciocanescu with the communication 'Overview of R and D Program in Romanian Institute for Nuclear Research'. The works of the meeting were structured into three sections addressing the following items: Session 1. Hot cell facilities: Infrastructure, Refurbishment, Decommissioning; Session 2. Waste, transport, safety and remote handling issues; Session 3. Post-Irradiation examination techniques. In the frame of Section 1 the communication 'Overview of hot cell facilities in South Africa' by Wouter Klopper, Willie van Greunen et al, was presented. In the framework of the second session there were given the following four communications: 'The irradiated elements cell at PHENIX' by Laurent Breton et al., 'Development of remote equipment for DUPIC fuel fabrication at KAERI', by Jung Won Lee et al., 'Aspects of working with manipulators and small samples in an αβγ-box, by Robert Zubler et al., and 'The GIOCONDA experience of the Joint Research Centre Ispra: analysis of the experimental assemblies finalized to their safe recovery and dismantling', by Roberto Covini. Finally, in the framework of the third section the following five communications were presented: 'PIE of a CANDU fuel element irradiated for a load following test in the INR TRIGA reactor' by Marcel Parvan et al., 'Adaptation of the pole figure measurement to the irradiated items from zirconium alloys' by Yury Goncharenko et al., 'Fuel rod profilometry with a laser scan micrometer' by Daniel Kuster et al., 'Raman spectroscopy, a new facility at LECI laboratory to investigate neutron damage in irradiated materials' by Lionel Gosmain et al., and 'Analysis of complex nuclear materials with the PSI shielded analytical instruments' by Didier Gavillet. In addition, eleven more presentations were given as posters. Their titles were: 'Presentation of CETAMA activities (CEA analytic group)' by Alain Hanssens et al. 'Analysis of

  18. Hot Flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hot flashes Overview Hot flashes are sudden feelings of warmth, which are usually most intense over the face, neck and chest. Your skin might redden, as if you're blushing. Hot flashes can also cause sweating, and if you ...

  19. HOT 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Sara Stefansen

    2016-01-01

    HOT samler og formidler 21 literacykyndiges bud på, hvad der er hot, og hvad der bør være hot inden for literacy – og deres begrundelser for disse bud.......HOT samler og formidler 21 literacykyndiges bud på, hvad der er hot, og hvad der bør være hot inden for literacy – og deres begrundelser for disse bud....

  20. How hot is he? A psychophysiological and psychosocial examination of the arousal patterns of sexually functional and dysfunctional men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Sabina; Amsel, Rhonda; Binik, Yitzchak M

    2014-07-01

    Despite much theorizing about the interchangeability of desire and arousal, research has yet to identify whether men with desire vs. arousal disorders can be differentiated based on their psychophysiological patterns of arousal. Additionally, little research has examined the relationship between subjective (SA) and genital arousal (GA) in sexually dysfunctional men. To compare patterns of SA and GA in a community sample of men meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD), erectile dysfunction (ED), both HSDD and ED (ED/HSDD), and healthy controls. Seventy-one men (19 controls, 13 HSDD, 19 ED, 20 ED/HSDD) completed self-report measures and watched two 15-minute film clips (neutral and erotic), while GA and SA were measured both continuously and discretely. Groups were compared on genital temperature (as an indicator of GA), SA, and psychosocial variables (i.e., body image, emotion regulation, sexual attitudes, sexual inhibition/excitation, mood, and trauma). Genital temperature increased for all groups during the erotic condition, yet men with ED and ED/HSDD showed less GA than men without erectile difficulties. All groups increased in SA during the erotic condition, yet ED/HSDD men reported less SA than controls or ED men. SA and GA were highly correlated for controls, and less strongly correlated for clinical groups; men with ED showed low agreement between SA and GA. Groups also differed on body image, sexual inhibition/excitation, sexual attitudes and alexithymia. Low desire vs. arousal sufferers have unique patterns of response, with those with both difficulties showing greatest impairment. Results have important implications for the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  1. FFTF/IEM [Fast Flux Test Facility/Interim Examination and Maintenance] cell fuel pin weighing system: Remote maintenance design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, P.W.

    1986-06-01

    A Fuel Pin Weighing Machine has been developed for use in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell to assist in identifying an individual breached fuel pin from its fuel assembly pin bundle. Optimum configuration for remote maintenance was a major consideration in the design of each element of the Pin Weighing System

  2. Report of the generation of the nuclear bank Presto-Hot for the SVEA-96 fuel with the FMS codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso V, G.

    1991-12-01

    In this work it is described in a general way the form in that was generated the database of the SVEA-96 fuel for Laguna Verde. The formation of the bank it was carried out with the ECLIPSE 86-2D, RECORD 89-1A and POLGEN 88-lB codes of the FMS package installed in the VAX system of the offices of the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards in Mexico, D.F. The formed bank is denominated 'LlPG9102'. All this was carried out following the '6F3/I/CN029/90/P1' procedure. By means of the MERGE code of the FMS package installed in the VAX system of the offices of the Federal Commission of Electricity in Mexico, D.F., it was annex this information to the contained bank 'LlPG3314' being generated the one bank 'LlPG9701'. This contains the information of the 5 fuel types of the initial load of the unit 1 and of the first reload of Laguna Verde as well as the information corresponding to the SVEA-96 fuel. The results obtained during the formation of the data bank of the fuel as for the behavior of those different cell parameters regarding the burnt of the fuel and the variation of vacuums in the coolant channel is compared with those reported in the documents of fuel design provided by ABB-ATOM. These comparisons, although they are not exhaustive they show the general tendency of the results the which is quite favorable. The generated database contains the enough information in terms of constant in two dependent groups of burnt and instantaneous vacuums, for the different arrangements of present fuel bars in the one assemble as well as those coefficients that take into account the presence of the control bar, the variation in the fuel temperature and the one effect of the 'historical' vacuums. All this included in that is knows as SUPER option of the bank for PRESTO with the options PRCOEF and POLRAM. Also, in the Annex G of this report its were provided for separate the M-Factor, the coefficients of Xenon and the parameters of burnt of the control bar for Presto

  3. Post-irradiation examination of fifteen UO2/PuO2-fuel pins from the experiment DFR-350

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geithoff, D.

    1975-06-01

    Within the framework of the fuel pin development for a sodium-cooled fast reactor a subassembly containing 77 fuel pins has been irradiated up to 5.65% fima in the Dounreay fast reactor. The pins were prototypes in terms of fuel and cladding material. The fuel consisted of mechanically mixed UO 2 (80%) and PuO 2 (20%) pressed into pellets whereas austenitic steels (W.-No. 1,4961 and 1,4988) were used as cladding material. Furthermore a blanket column of UO 2 pellets and a gas plenum were incorporated in the pin. For irradiation the conditions in a fast breeder were simulated by a linear rod power of 450 W/cm and a maximum cladding temperature of 630 0 C. After the successful completion of the irradiation, the subassembly was dismantled and fifteen pins were selected for a nondestructive and destructive examination. The tests included visual control, measurement of external dimensions, γ-spectroscopy, X-ray radiography, fission gas measurement, ceramography, radiochemical burn-up measurement. The results are presented. The most important results of the examinations seem to be the migration of fission product cesium and the fact that no signs of impending pin failure have been found. Thus the pin specification tested in this experiment is capable of achieving higher burnups under the irradiation conditions described above. (orig./AK) [de

  4. Post-irradiation examination of HTR-fuel at the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsamer, G.; Proksch, E.; Stolba, G.; Strigl, A.; Falta, G.; Zeger, J.

    1984-02-01

    This paper describes methods and measurements developed at the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf for the evaluation of the irradiation performance of HTR fuel. Main interest is concentrated on particle failure rates, fission product release, burn-up and inventory measurements (solid and gaseous fission products, uranium inventory). (Author) [de

  5. Examination of the Properties of a Spent Fuel based Electricity Generation System - Scintillator Performance Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Haneol; Yim, Man-Sung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Gammavoltaic was proposed by Karl Scharf in 1960. The low efficiency resulted in gammavoltaic being used as a radiation detector. In the 1990s the efficiency of gammavoltaic increased by the use of a scintillator. Gammavoltaic was further studied as a power source for spent fuel transportation and a nuclear battery in the 2000s Haneol Lee and Man-Sung Yim also suggested electricity generation system based on spent fuel stored inside the fuel pool of a nuclear power plant. This study proposed the systematic design of an electricity conversion system using CsI(Tl) scintillator and a-Si photovoltaic cell. As such, this study is selected to be a reference paper. The results of this paper indicate a self-absorption effect from the reference model. This effect is negligible while the irradiation degradation has to be considered. Two main ways to reduce radiation induced degradation are scintillator shielding and replacing scintillator material with a material having higher radiation resistance. The analysis of the scintillator used in the 'electricity generation system using gamma radiation from spent fuel' was performed to evaluate the ideal electricity generation in the reference research.

  6. Eddy current examination of the nuclear fuel elements of IPR-R1 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Roger F.; Frade, Rangel T.; Oliveira, Paulo F.; Silva, Marlucio A.; Silva Junior, Silverio F.

    2015-01-01

    Tubes of AISI 304 stainless steel as well as tubes of Aluminum 1100-F are used as cladding of the fuel elements of TRIGA MARK 1 nuclear research reactor. Usually, these tubes are periodically inspected by means of visual test and sipping test. The visual test allows the detection of changes occurred at the external fuel elements surface, such as those promoted by corrosion processes. However, this test method cannot be used for detection of internal discontinuities at the tube walls. Sipping test allows the detection of fuel elements in which the cladding has failed, but it is not able to determine the place where the discontinuity is located. In turn, eddy current testing, an electromagnetic nondestructive test method, allows the detection of discontinuities and monitoring their growth. In this paper, a study about the use of eddy current testing for detection and characterization of discontinuities in the fuel elements cladding is proposed. The study involves the development of probes able to operate in underwater inspections, the design and manufacture of reference standards and the development of a test methodology to perform the evaluations. (author)

  7. Eddy current examination of the nuclear fuel elements of IPR-R1 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Roger F.; Frade, Rangel T.; Oliveira, Paulo F.; Silva, Marlucio A.; Silva Junior, Silverio F., E-mail: rfs@cdtn.br, E-mail: rtf@cdtn.br, E-mail: pfo@cdtn.br, E-mail: mas@cdtn.br, E-mail: silvasf@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Tubes of AISI 304 stainless steel as well as tubes of Aluminum 1100-F are used as cladding of the fuel elements of TRIGA MARK 1 nuclear research reactor. Usually, these tubes are periodically inspected by means of visual test and sipping test. The visual test allows the detection of changes occurred at the external fuel elements surface, such as those promoted by corrosion processes. However, this test method cannot be used for detection of internal discontinuities at the tube walls. Sipping test allows the detection of fuel elements in which the cladding has failed, but it is not able to determine the place where the discontinuity is located. In turn, eddy current testing, an electromagnetic nondestructive test method, allows the detection of discontinuities and monitoring their growth. In this paper, a study about the use of eddy current testing for detection and characterization of discontinuities in the fuel elements cladding is proposed. The study involves the development of probes able to operate in underwater inspections, the design and manufacture of reference standards and the development of a test methodology to perform the evaluations. (author)

  8. Examination of the Properties of a Spent Fuel based Electricity Generation System - Scintillator Performance Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Haneol; Yim, Man-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Gammavoltaic was proposed by Karl Scharf in 1960. The low efficiency resulted in gammavoltaic being used as a radiation detector. In the 1990s the efficiency of gammavoltaic increased by the use of a scintillator. Gammavoltaic was further studied as a power source for spent fuel transportation and a nuclear battery in the 2000s Haneol Lee and Man-Sung Yim also suggested electricity generation system based on spent fuel stored inside the fuel pool of a nuclear power plant. This study proposed the systematic design of an electricity conversion system using CsI(Tl) scintillator and a-Si photovoltaic cell. As such, this study is selected to be a reference paper. The results of this paper indicate a self-absorption effect from the reference model. This effect is negligible while the irradiation degradation has to be considered. Two main ways to reduce radiation induced degradation are scintillator shielding and replacing scintillator material with a material having higher radiation resistance. The analysis of the scintillator used in the 'electricity generation system using gamma radiation from spent fuel' was performed to evaluate the ideal electricity generation in the reference research

  9. The SKB spent fuel corrosion programme. An evaluation of results from the experimental programme performed in the Studsvik Hot Cell Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, R. [Forsyth Consulting, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1997-12-01

    During the last few years, many of the specimens in the SKB programme on the corrosion of spent fuel have been analysed by the ICP-MS technique, shortly after conclusion of the corrosion tests, or by the analysis of archive samples. Together with the previous results, this has made available a much more extended analytical data base than that available before, and this has been used in a new evaluation which complements those published earlier. Some of the new analytical data is for tests performed on fuel specimens (from two reference fuel rods, one BWR and one PWR) which have been corrosion tested for over ten years. Most of the data refers to 16 fuel/clad specimens from a short BWR fuel rod, which had burnups over a range of 27.0 to 48.8 MWd/kg U. Detailed examination and characterisation of three other fuel specimens from the rod had shown that the specimens with the higher burnups in this series would have a fuel microstructure and alpha activity content and distribution which, theoretically, may promote enhanced corrosion. These specimens had been exposed to over 5 years of corrosion during nine water contact periods. The corrodants used were a simulated bicarbonate groundwater and de-ionised water, and both oxic and nominally anoxic conditions were included in the test matrix. Most of the emphasis in the evaluation has, therefore, been on the possible effects on corrosion behaviour of the linear heat rating and burnup of the fuels. However, examination of the variation with water contact time of the fractional release rates of selected fission products and their total release over the five years of corrosion, have shown that the corrosion rates during the first few weeks of corrosion of the specimens with the higher burnups were lower than those for specimens with slightly lower burnup. Later, the corrosion rates converged for all specimens. This has been interpreted to be due to burnup-related differences in the fuel microstructure, particularly in the

  10. The post-irradiated examination of CANDU type fuel irradiated in the Institute for Nuclear Research TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuturici, I.L.; Parvan, M.; Dobrin, R.; Popov, M.; Radulescu, R.; Toma, V.

    1995-01-01

    This post-irradiation examination work has been done under the Research Contract No. 7756/RB, concluded between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Institute for Nuclear Research. The paper contains a general description of the INR post-irradiation facility and methods and the relevant post-irradiation examination results obtained from an irradiated experimental CANDU type fuel element designed, manufactured and tested by INR in a power ramp test in the 100 kW Pressurised Water Irradiation Loop of the TRIGA 14 MW(th) Reactor. The irradiation experiment consisted in testing an assembly of six fuel elements, designed to reach a bumup of ∼ 200 MWh/kgU, with typical CANDU linear power and ramp rate. (author)

  11. Nuclear fuel cycle. Which way forward for multilateral approaches? An international expert group examines options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellaud, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    For several years now, the debate on the proliferation of nuclear weapons has been dominated by individuals and countries that violate rules of good behaviour - as sellers or acquirers of clandestine nuclear technology. As a result, the 1968 Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) has been declared to be 'inadequate' by some, 'full of loopholes' by others. Two basic approaches have been put forward to tighten up the NPT; both seek to ensure that the nuclear non-proliferation regime maintains its authority and credibility in the face of these very real challenges. One calls for non-nuclear weapon States to accept a partial denial of technology through a reinterpretation of the NPT's provisions governing the rights of access to nuclear technologies. The unwillingness of most non-nuclear-weapon States to accept additional restrictions under the NPT makes this approach difficult. The other approach would apply multinational alternatives to the national operation of uranium-enrichment and plutonium-separation technologies, and to the disposal of spent nuclear fuel. In this perspective, IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei proposed in 2003 to revisit the concept of multilateral nuclear approaches (MNA) that was intensively discussed several decades ago. Several such approaches were adopted at that time in Europe, which became the true homeland of MNAs. Nonetheless, MNAs have failed so far to materialise outside Europe due to different political and economic perceptions. In June 2004, the Director General appointed an international group of experts to consider possible multilateral approaches to the nuclear fuel cycle. The overall purpose was to assess MNAs in the framework of a double objective: strengthening the international nuclear non-proliferation regime and making the peaceful uses of nuclear energy more economical and attractive. In the report submitted to the Director General in February 2005, the Group identified a number of options - options

  12. Hot Laboratories and Remote Handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bart, G.; Blanc, J.Y.; Duwe, R.

    2003-01-01

    The European Working Group on ' Hot Laboratories and Remote Handling' is firmly established as the major contact forum for the nuclear R and D facilities at the European scale. The yearly plenary meetings intend to: - Exchange experience on analytical methods, their implementation in hot cells, the methodologies used and their application in nuclear research; - Share experience on common infrastructure exploitation matters such as remote handling techniques, safety features, QA-certification, waste handling; - Promote normalization and co-operation, e.g., by looking at mutual complementarities; - Prospect present and future demands from the nuclear industry and to draw strategic conclusions regarding further needs. The 41. plenary meeting was held in CEA Saclay from September 22 to 24, 2003 in the premises and with the technical support of the INSTN (National Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology). The Nuclear Energy Division of CEA sponsored it. The Saclay meeting was divided in three topical oral sessions covering: - Post irradiation examination: new analysis methods and methodologies, small specimen technology, programmes and results; - Hot laboratory infrastructure: decommissioning, refurbishment, waste, safety, nuclear transports; - Prospective research on materials for future applications: innovative fuels (Generation IV, HTR, transmutation, ADS), spallation source materials, and candidate materials for fusion reactor. A poster session was opened to transport companies and laboratory suppliers. The meeting addressed in three sessions the following items: Session 1 - Post Irradiation Examinations. Out of 12 papers (including 1 poster) 7 dealt with surface and solid state micro analysis, another one with an equally complex wet chemical instrumental analytical technique, while the other four papers (including the poster) presented new concepts for digital x-ray image analysis; Session 2 - Hot laboratory infrastructure (including waste theme) which was

  13. Modifications to HFEF/S for IFR fuel cycle demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D.; Forrester, R.J.; Carnes, M.D.; Rigg, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Modifications have begun to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility-South (HFEF/S) in order to demonstrate the technology of the integral fast reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. This paper describes the status of the modifications to the facility and briefly reviews the status of the development of the process equipment. The HFEF/S was the demonstration facility for the early Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) melt refining/injection-casting fuel cycle. Then called the Fuel Cycle Facility, ∼400 EBR-II fuel assemblies were recycled in the two hot cells of the facility during the 1964-69 period. Since then it has been utilized as a fuels examination facility. The objective of the IFR fuel cycle program is to upgrade HFEF/S to current standards, install new process equipment, and demonstrate the commercial feasibility of the IFR pyroprocess fuel cycle

  14. Safety analysis of DUPIC fuel development facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. H.; Park, J. J.; Shin, J. M.; Yang, M. S.; Baek, S. Y.; Ahn, J. Y.

    2001-01-01

    Various experimental facilities are necessary in order to perform experimental verification for development of DUPIC fuel fabrication technology. In special, since highly radioactive material such as spent PWR fuel is used for this experiment, DUPIC fuel fabrication has to be performed in hot cell by remote handling. Therefore, it should be provided with proper engineering requirement and safety. M6 hot cell of IMEF which is to used for DUPIC fuel fabrication experiment was constructed as an α-γ hot cell for material examination of small amount of high-burnup fuel. The characteristics and amount of spent fuel for DUPIC fuel fabrication experiment will be different from the original design criteria. Therefore, the increased amount of spent fuel and different characteristics of experiment result in not only change of shielding and enviornmental evaluation results but new requirement of nuclear criticality evaluation. Therefore, this study includes evaluation of shielding, environmental effect and nuclear criticality in case that IMEF M6 hot cell is used for DUPIC fuel fabrication

  15. Annual report on operation, utilization and technical development of Research Reactors and Hot Laboratory, from April 1, 1983 to March 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    Activities of the Department of Research Reactor Operation in fiscal year 1983 are described. The department is responsible for operation and maintenance of JRR-2, JRR-3, JRR-4 and Hot Laboratory. In the above connection, various other work has also been performed, such as technical management of fuel and coolant, radiation control, irradiation technique, etc. In Hot Laboratory, we have performed post-irradiation examinations of fuels and materials, and also development of examination procedures, too. (author)

  16. Examination of the Mg-Zn phase formation in hot-dip galvanized steel sheet; Untersuchung der Mg-Zn-Phasenbildung in feuerverzinktem Stahlblech

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zywitzki, Olaf; Modes, Thomas; Scheffel, Bert; Metzner, Christoph [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Elektronenstrahl- und Plasmatechnik, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Zinc-magnesium layers have been produced by a combination of conventional hot-dip galvanizing and PVD magnesium coating. A subsequent short heat treatment causes the diffusion of magnesium into the zinc layer. The influence of the maximum temperature of the heat treatment on the diffusion of magnesium and on the type and distribution of the formed intermetallic Mg-Zn phases has been examined in detail in a temperature range from 300 to 400 C by means of X-ray phase analyses and metallographic cross sections. With increasing temperature a sequential intermetallic Mg-Zn phase formation has been detected. At 300 C, an initial magnesium rich, intermetallic MgZn{sub 2} surface layer is formed, which, at higher temperatures from 335 to 379 C, is progressively transformed into a zinc rich Mg{sub 2}Zn{sub 11} layer by interdiffusion. In this context, the nucleation of the Mg{sub 2}Zn{sub 11} phase takes place on the interface between the MgZn{sub 2} and the Zn phase. Above the peritectic temperature of 381 C, the microstructure is composed of a zinc matrix in which precipitated MgZn{sub 2} is dispersed. (orig.)

  17. Onsite nondestructive examination techniques for irradiated water-cooled power reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency, in response to the recommendations from several Member States, has prepared this Guidebook on Onsite Non-Destructive Techniques for Irradiated Water-Cooled Power Reactor Fuel with the assistance of a number of experts and organizations in this field. During the preparation of this report it became evident that a comparison between different techniques is a most difficult task and depends on a number of factors related to fuel design, plant characteristics and operating conditions. Consequently the emphasis of the report is on the survey of different techniques presently available. It is also to be noted that because the degree of development for any given technique varies significantly among organizations, it is understood that the report should not be used as consensus standard of the minimum capabilities for each class of techniques, nor does it give recommendations in the regulatory sense. Furthermore, the inclusion of some commercial pieces of equipment, services and other products are for illustrative purposes only and neither implies any preference by the Agency nor can the Agency be liable for any material presented in the report

  18. Mechanical shielded hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgy, H.R.; Abdel-Rassoul, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    A plan to erect a mechanical shielded hot cell in the process hall of the Radiochemical Laboratory at Inchas is described. The hot cell is designed for safe handling of spent fuel bundles, from the Inchas reactor, and for dismantling and cutting the fuel rods in preparation for subsequent treatment. The biological shielding allows for the safe handling of a total radioactivity level up to 10,000 MeV-Ci. The hot cell consists of an α-tight stainless-steel box, connected to a γ-shielded SAS, through an air-lock containing a movable carriage. The α-box is tightly connected with six dry-storage cavities for adequate storage of the spent fuel bundles. Both the α-box, with the dry-storage cavities, and the SAS are surrounded by 200-mm thick biological lead shielding. The α-box is equipped with two master-slave manipulators, a lead-glass window, a monorail crane and Padirac and Minirag systems. The SAS is equipped with a lead-glass window, tong manipulator, a shielded pit and a mechanism for the entry of the spent fuel bundle. The hot cell is served by adequate ventilation and monitoring systems. (author)

  19. Annual report on operation and management of hot laboratories and facilities. From April 1, 2006 to March 31, 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-02-01

    This is an annual report in a fiscal year 2006 that describes activities of the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF), the Waste Safety Testing Facility (WASTEF), the Research Hot Laboratory (RHL) and the other research hot facilities in the Department of Hot laboratories and facilities. In RFEF, destructive examinations of BWR fuel rods and re-assembly were carried out as PIEs for a fuel assembly irradiated for 5 cycles in the Fukushima-2 Nuclear Power Station Unit-1. Mechanical property measurement of high burn-up fuel rods were performed as spent fuel integrity test for long term dry storage in order to formulate guidelines and technical criteria. In WASTEF, Slow Strain Rate Tests (SSRT) and Uni-axial Constant Load Tensile tests (UCLT) of in-core materials in pressurized high-temperature water condition, stress corrosion cracking tests for high-performance fuel cladding material and calorific value measurement of pulse irradiated fuel in NSRR were carried out. In RHL, equipment un-installations and decontamination were performed to lead cells according to the decommissioning plan. And modification of fuel storage room were started in order to utilize the facility for un-irradiated fuel storage after a fiscal year 2007. In addition, management of the other research hot facilities (No.1 Plutonium Laboratory, No.2 Research Laboratory, No.4 Research Laboratory, Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, Uranium Enrichment Laboratory, (Simulation Test for Environmental Radionuclide Migration (STEM), Clean Laboratory for Environmental Analysis and Research (CLEAR) and fuel storage) were carried out. (author)

  20. Characterisation of nuclear dispersion fuels. The non-destructive examination of silicon carbide by selenium immersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambler, J.F.R.; Ferguson, I.F.

    1974-07-15

    The non-destructive microscopic examination of silicon-carbide-coated spheres containing uranium carbide, which involves immersing the coated spheres in selenium, is particularly suited for the examination of flaws in the coats but it is not possible to measure coating thicknesses by this method. Some coats are found to be opaque and this is related to their porosity. (auth)

  1. Conversion of hot coke oven gas into light fuel gas over Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, L.Y.; Morishita, K.; Takarada, T. [Gunma University, Gunma (Japan). Dept. of Biology & Chemical Engineering

    2006-04-15

    Conversion of hot coke oven gas (COG, containing tarry material) into light fuel gas over a Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was studied. Laboratory scale tests were carried out in a two-stage fixed-bed reactor at ambient pressure. The nickel catalyst promoted the hydropyrolysis reaction of tarry materials. High yields of total product gas and methane were obtained at high hydrogen concentrations. If the hydrogen supply was adequate for hydropyrolysis of the tarry material, conversion of coal volatiles was high, at more than 95% on carbon balance, even with a gas residence time as short as 0.15 s in the catalyst bed. The product gas yield depended on catalytic temperature. At 923 K, the maximum conversion of coal volatiles into the light gas was achieved at 95.0% on carbon balance, with methane 86.7 vol% of the carbonaceous gas product. Although carbon deposits deactivated the catalyst after a long period of use, the catalyst could be regenerated by treatment with oxygen at 800 K, providing high activity in subsequent decomposition of tarry material. The influence of sulphide on the tarry material decomposition reaction was small even in a 2000 ppm H{sub 2}S atmosphere.

  2. Aviation investigation report : hard landing : fuel leak and fire[Sundance Balloons International Firefly 12B (hot air balloon) C-FNVM, Winnipeg, Manitoba, 15 nm NE, 11 August 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-08-15

    This investigation report discussed an incident in Winnipeg in which a hot air balloon attempting to land during strong winds was dragged on its side for approximately 700 feet. The balloon's burners struck the ground as the balloon came to a stop, after which a propane leak occurred. An intense, uncontrolled fire ensued as balloon passengers were exiting from the partially-inverted basket. The pilot and 2 passengers suffered serious injuries, while another 4 passengers suffered minor injuries. The balloon's 2 propane tanks and a fire extinguisher canister exploded during the fire, which destroyed the balloon's basket. The rigging of the balloon was examined and no failures were discovered. Pressure tests showed that the balloon's hoses started leaking at the crimped sleeve fittings at 150 psi. While the pilot had been informed of potentially heavy winds and thunderstorms, changes in wind speed and direction occurred earlier than the forecasted time of 10:00. It was concluded that standards are needed to ensure balloon cabin safety. Balloon operators do not currently require the use of protective helmets or gloves in case of dragged landings. A review will be conducted to address the issue of proposed emergency fuel shut-offs for balloons carrying fare-paying passengers. 2 figs.

  3. Multipurpose reprocessing hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, R.D.

    1975-01-01

    A multipurpose hot cell is being designed for use at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant for handling future scheduled fuels that cannot be adequately handled by the existing facilities and equipment. In addition to providing considerable flexibility to handle a wide variety of fuel sizes up to 2,500 lb in weight the design will provide for remote maintenance or replacement of the in-cell equipment with a minimum of exposure to personnel and also provide process piping connections for custom processing of small quantities of fuel. (auth)

  4. Data summary report for the destructive examination of Rods G7, G9, J8, I9, and H6 from Turkey Point Fuel Assembly B17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R B; Pasupathi, V

    1981-04-01

    Destructive examination results of five spent fuel rods from a Turkey Point Unit 3 pressurized water reactor are reported. Examinations included fission gas analysis, cladding hydrogen content analysis, fuel burnup analysis, metallographic examination, autoradiography and shielded electron microprobe analysis. All rods were found to be of sound integrity with an average burnup of 27 GWd/MTU and a 0.3% fission gas release.

  5. Methodology and a preliminary data base for examining the health risks of electricity generation from uranium and coal fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Bassioni, A.A.

    1980-08-01

    An analytical model was developed to assess and examine the health effects associated with the production of electricity from uranium and coal fuels. The model is based on a systematic methodology that is both simple and easy to check, and provides details about the various components of health risk. A preliminary set of data that is needed to calculate the health risks was gathered, normalized to the model facilities, and presented in a concise manner. Additional data will become available as a result of other evaluations of both fuel cycles, and they should be included in the data base. An iterative approach involving only a few steps is recommended for validating the model. After each validation step, the model is improved in the areas where new information or increased interest justifies such upgrading. Sensitivity analysis is proposed as the best method of using the model to its full potential. Detailed quantification of the risks associated with the two fuel cycles is not presented in this report. The evaluation of risks from producing electricity by these two methods can be completed only after several steps that address difficult social and technical questions. Preliminary quantitative assessment showed that several factors not considered in detail in previous studies are potentially important. 255 refs., 21 figs., 179 tabs.

  6. Deformations of fuel elements under irradiation (Examination of the 2000 C set, investigation of the Cottrell effect)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, P.; Allain, C.

    1959-04-01

    The authors report visual and radiographic examinations of cartridges of the 2000 C solution C in order to study the influence of the combustion rate on deformations of these cartridges which spent about a year in an atomic pile. The deformation measurements are interpreted in terms of creep phenomena (Cottrell effect), of surface condition, and buckling. The authors discuss the validity of mechanical tests, the distinction between creep and flow, the deformation of fuel assemblies, the validity of thermal cycle tests, the effects of alloy compositions

  7. Hot-wire air flow meter for gasoline fuel-injection system. Calculation of air mass in cylinder during transient condition; Gasoline funsha system yo no netsusenshiki kuki ryuryokei. Kato untenji no cylinder juten kukiryo no keisan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Y [Hitachi Car Engineering, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Nishimura, Y; Osuga, M; Yamauchi, T [Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Air flow characteristics of hot-wire air flow meters for gasoline fuel-injection systems with supercharging and exhaust gas recycle during transient conditions were investigated to analyze a simple method for calculating air mass in cylinder. It was clarified that the air mass in cylinder could be calculated by compensating for the change of air mass in intake system by using aerodynamic models of intake system. 3 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Examination of microbial fuel cell start-up times with domestic wastewater and additional amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangli; Yates, Matthew D; Cheng, Shaoan; Call, Douglas F; Sun, Dan; Logan, Bruce E

    2011-08-01

    Rapid startup of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and other bioreactors is desirable when treating wastewaters. The startup time with unamended wastewater (118 h) was similar to that obtained by adding acetate or fumarate (110-115 h), and less than that with glucose (181 h) or Fe(III) (353 h). Initial current production took longer when phosphate buffer was added, with startup times increasing with concentration from 149 h (25 mM) to 251 h (50 mM) and 526 h (100 mM). Microbial communities that developed in the reactors contained Betaproteobacteria, Acetoanaerobium noterae, and Chlorobium sp. Anode biomass densities ranged from 200 to 600 μg/cm(2) for all amendments except Fe(Ш) (1650 μg/cm(2)). Wastewater produced 91 mW/m(2), with the other MFCs producing 50 mW/m(2) (fumarate) to 103mW/m(2) (Fe(III)) when amendments were removed. These experiments show that wastewater alone is sufficient to acclimate the reactor without the need for additional chemical amendments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Examination of microbial fuel cell start-up times with domestic wastewater and additional amendments

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Guangli

    2011-08-01

    Rapid startup of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and other bioreactors is desirable when treating wastewaters. The startup time with unamended wastewater (118h) was similar to that obtained by adding acetate or fumarate (110-115h), and less than that with glucose (181h) or Fe(III) (353h). Initial current production took longer when phosphate buffer was added, with startup times increasing with concentration from 149h (25mM) to 251h (50mM) and 526h (100mM). Microbial communities that developed in the reactors contained Betaproteobacteria, Acetoanaerobium noterae, and Chlorobium sp. Anode biomass densities ranged from 200 to 600μg/cm2 for all amendments except Fe(Sh{cyrillic}) (1650μg/cm2). Wastewater produced 91mW/m2, with the other MFCs producing 50mW/m2 (fumarate) to 103mW/m2 (Fe(III)) when amendments were removed. These experiments show that wastewater alone is sufficient to acclimate the reactor without the need for additional chemical amendments. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Examination of microbial fuel cell start-up times with domestic wastewater and additional amendments

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Guangli; Yates, Matthew D.; Cheng, Shaoan; Call, Douglas F.; Sun, Dan; Logan, Bruce E.

    2011-01-01

    Rapid startup of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and other bioreactors is desirable when treating wastewaters. The startup time with unamended wastewater (118h) was similar to that obtained by adding acetate or fumarate (110-115h), and less than that with glucose (181h) or Fe(III) (353h). Initial current production took longer when phosphate buffer was added, with startup times increasing with concentration from 149h (25mM) to 251h (50mM) and 526h (100mM). Microbial communities that developed in the reactors contained Betaproteobacteria, Acetoanaerobium noterae, and Chlorobium sp. Anode biomass densities ranged from 200 to 600μg/cm2 for all amendments except Fe(Sh{cyrillic}) (1650μg/cm2). Wastewater produced 91mW/m2, with the other MFCs producing 50mW/m2 (fumarate) to 103mW/m2 (Fe(III)) when amendments were removed. These experiments show that wastewater alone is sufficient to acclimate the reactor without the need for additional chemical amendments. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Operation and postirradiation examination of ORR capsule OF-2: accelerated testing of HTGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiegs, T.N.; Thoms, K.R.

    1979-03-01

    Irradiation capsule OF-2 was a test of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor fuel types under accelerated irradiation conditions in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results showed good irradiation performance of Triso-coated weak-acid-resin fissile particles and Biso-coated fertile particles. These particles had been coated by a fritted gas distributor in the 0.13-m-diam furnace. Fast-neutron damage (E > 0.18 MeV) and matrix-particle interaction caused the outer pyrocarbon coating on the Triso-coated particles to fail. Such failure depended on the optical anisotropy, density, and open porosity of the outer pyrocarbon coating, as well as on the coke yield of the matrix. Irradiation of specimens with values outside prescribed limits for these properties increased the failure rate of their outer pyrocarbon coating. Good irradiation performance was observed for weak-acid-resin particles with conversions in the range from 15 to 75% UC 2

  12. Microstructural examination of fuel rods subjected to a simulated large-break loss of coolant accident in reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garlick, A.

    1985-01-01

    A series of tests has been conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor, Chalk River, Canada, to investigate the behaviour of full-length 32-rod PWR fuel bundles during a simulated large-break loss of coolant accident (LOCA). In one of these tests (MT-3), 12 central rods were pre-pressurized in order to evaluate the ballooning and rupture of cladding in the Zircaloy high-α/α+β temperature region. All 12 rods ruptured after experiencing < 90% diametral strain but there was no suggestion of coplanar blockage. Post-irradiation examination was carried out on cross-sections of cladding from selected rods to determine the aximuthal distribution of wall thinning along the ballooned regions. These data are assessed to check whether they are consistent with a mechanism in which fuel stack eccentricity generates temperature gradients around the ballooning cladding and leads to premature rupture during a LOCA. After anodizing, the cladding microstructures were examined for the presence of prior-beta phase that would indicate the α/α+β transformation temperature (1078K) had been exceeded. These results were compared with isothermal annealing test data on unirradiated cladding from the same manufacturing batch

  13. Single-phase CFD applicability for estimating fluid hot-spot locations in a 5 x 5 fuel rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Kazuo; Makino, Yasushi; Hoshi, Masaya

    2006-01-01

    High-thermal performance PWR spacer grids require both of low pressure loss and high critical heat flux (CHF) properties. Therefore, a numerical study using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was carried out to estimate pressure loss in strap and mixing vane structures. Moreover, a CFD simulation under single-phase flow condition was conducted for one specific condition in a water departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) test to examine the applicability of the CFD model for predicting the CHF rod position. Energy flux around the rod surface in a water DNB test is the sum of the intrinsic energy flux from a rod and the extrinsic energy flux from other rods, and increments of the enthalpy and decrements of flow velocity near the rod surface are assumed to affect CHF performance. CFD makes it possible to model the complicated flow field consisting of a spacer grid and a rod bundle and evaluate the local velocity and enthalpy distribution around the rod surface, which are assumed to determine the initial conditions for the two-phase structure. The results of this study indicate that single-phase CFD can play a significant role in designing PWR spacer grids for improved CHF performance

  14. Example of answers to problems of the 26th and 27th examination for the chief technician of nuclear fuel-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuta, Takashi; Minato, Kazuo; Morita, Yasuji; Nishiza, Masahiro; Akatsu, Eiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1995-10-01

    This is an example of the answers to the 26th and 27th examination problems for certification of the chief technician of nuclear fuel. Short explanations or references are given for each answer. (author).

  15. Example of answers to problems of the 26th and 27th examination for the chief technician of nuclear fuel-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuta, Takashi; Minato, Kazuo; Morita, Yasuji; Nishiza, Masahiro; Akatsu, Eiko

    1995-10-01

    This is an example of the answers to the 26th and 27th examination problems for certification of the chief technician of nuclear fuel. Short explanations or references are given for each answer. (author)

  16. Examples of CEA managements of spent fuels from a prototype power reactor (PHENIX) and from commercial power reactors after post irradiation examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guay, P.

    1988-01-01

    CEA gained a good experience in the management of spent fuels from its research or power prototype reactors and of the fuel samples for post irradiation examinations. The solution for these products is the reprocessing. The delay to apply that solution is bound to the disponibility of the reprocessing facilities, and in several cases induce a delayed reprocessing. Only particular and limited fuels are planned to be sent in a definitive storage. The definitive storage is choosen only for a few fuels essentially requiring important modifications of the dissolution process. The treatments and operations on the spent fuels must be carried out following the French safety rules. Long and detailed flowsheet studies are therefore necessary before the setting up of the operations. Generally the cost of the management of limited quantities of fuels, as it is the case here, is high. The flowsheets are established in taking into account, as far as possible, the use of existing facilities, procedures, transport casks

  17. HOT 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette Romme

    Undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og hvad der burde være hot på læseområdet med 21 læsekyndige. Undersøgelsen er gennemført siden 2010. HOT-undersøgelsen er foretaget af Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning - Professionshøjskolerne i samarb. med Dansklærerforeningen......Undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og hvad der burde være hot på læseområdet med 21 læsekyndige. Undersøgelsen er gennemført siden 2010. HOT-undersøgelsen er foretaget af Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning - Professionshøjskolerne i samarb. med Dansklærerforeningen...

  18. HOT 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette

    Undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og hvad der burde være hot på læseområdet med 21 læsekyndige. Undersøgelsen er gennemført siden 2010. HOT-undersøgelsen er foretaget af Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning - Professionshøjskolerne i samarb. med Dansklærerforeningen...

  19. HOT 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette Romme

    En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager 21 læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet.......En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager 21 læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet....

  20. Three Transducer Ultrasonic Examination of Nuclear Fuel Rod Flush Welds At ENUSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domingo, A.; Jimenez, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    From 1991 ENUSA are using UT microscope examination of flush weld with longitudinal wave (perpendicular to weld) looking for welding defects as porosity, weld thickness and penetration. In 1994 we included a new transducer off set placed, with shear waves to control cracks in welding. In 1997 we incorporated a new shear transducer, 30 degree centigrade angle, in order to control different orientation of cracks or Grain Boundary Separation (GBS) and to improve software capabilities. Then actual UT microscope equipment used to inspect rod welds consist, mainly in three transducer of 50 MHz mounted over a rotatory head. UT system is electronically synchronized and obtains 750 data points per revolution by transducer. A set of seven images of approx 100.000 data points is obtained for each weld. Thickness, pore size, pore depth, two of crack size and two of crack depth are presented and evaluated evaluated by the computer to obtain weld disposition. Resolution of 0,05 mm pore size is achieved by this equipment, thickness and penetration precision should be in the order of 0,005 mm and 0,05 mm respectively. Crack detection depend basically on its orientation, nevertheless position of transducer assures a high capability detection of cracks which should be formed at these welds. (Author)

  1. Cells for the examination of irradiated plutonium fuel elements - two years operation - may 1961/may 1963 (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentin, A.

    1963-01-01

    Within the framework of the 'Rapsodie' fast reactor program, prototype plutonium fuel elements are irradiated and then examined in an α β γ laboratory at Saclay. This laboratory consists of five in line cells and a lead enclosure microscope. Each cell contains an α sealed removable box 4 ft 3 in. high, 4 ft 11 in. wide and 5 ft 1 in. deep, fitted with one or two magnetic transmission indirect manipulators. The boxes are contained in an β γ shielded enclosure whose front face is constructed of cast iron panels 21-2/3 in. thick. Nitrogen circulating in a closed loop forms the atmosphere of the boxes. This laboratory is essentially intended for metallurgical research. The functions of the various cells are as follows: transferring and packing, cutting, density measurement and cathodic etching, storage and metallography. Work on radioactive materials began in April 1961. Operational incidents have always been of a material nature only. (author) [fr

  2. Post-irradiation examination of prototype Al-64 wt% U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel rods from NRU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, D.F.; Primeau, M.F.; Buchanan, C.; Rose, D. [Chalk River Labs., Ontario (Canada)

    1997-08-01

    Three prototype fuel rods containing Al-64 wt% U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} (3.15 gU/cm{sup 3}) have been irradiated to their design burnup in the NRU reactor without incident. The fuel was fabricated using production-scale equipment and processes previously developed for Al-U{sub 3}Si fuel fabrication at Chalk River Laboratories, and special equipment developed for U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} powder production and handling. The rods were irradiated in NRU up to 87 at% U-235 burnup under typical driver fuel conditions; i.e., nominal coolant inlet temperature 37{degrees}C, inlet pressure 654 kPa, mass flow 12.4 L/s, and element linear power ratings up to 73 kW/m. Post-irradiation examinations showed that the fuel elements survived the irradiation without defects. Fuel core diametral increases and volumetric swelling were significantly lower than that of Al-61 wt% U{sub 3}Si fuel irradiated under similar conditions. This irradiation demonstrated that the fabrication techniques are adequate for full-scale fuel manufacture, and qualified the fuel for use in AECL`s research reactors.

  3. Development of a hot heat exchanger and a cleaning system for a 35 kW hermetic four cylinder Stirling engine for solid biomass fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Henrik; Marinitsch, Gerald; Schöch, Martin

    2005-01-01

    been operated for more than 9,000 hours. Operating experiences gained from these plants formed the basis for the further development of this technology. The experiences showed that the efficiency of the Stirling hot gas heat exchanger and of the hot gas heat exchanger cleaning system have to be further...... optimised. Within the scope of a RD&D project, a new hot gas heat exchanger and a new cleaning system have been developed and optimised in cooperation of the AUSTRIAN BIOENERGY CENTRE GmbH, the Technical University of Denmark, MAWERA Holzfeuerungsanlagen GmbH, Austria, and BIOS BIOENERGIESYSTEME Gmb......H, Austria. The new design of the Stirling hot gas heat exchanger has been developed in order to optimise the performance of the engine and simplify the geometry. In this respect, an equal distribution of the heat transfer across each tube in the hot gas heat exchanger, the reduction of the internal Helium...

  4. Uncertainty analysis for hot channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panka, I.; Kereszturi, A.

    2006-01-01

    The fulfillment of the safety analysis acceptance criteria is usually evaluated by separate hot channel calculations using the results of neutronic or/and thermo hydraulic system calculations. In case of an ATWS event (inadvertent withdrawal of control assembly), according to the analysis, a number of fuel rods are experiencing DNB for a longer time and must be regarded as failed. Their number must be determined for a further evaluation of the radiological consequences. In the deterministic approach, the global power history must be multiplied by different hot channel factors (kx) taking into account the radial power peaking factors for each fuel pin. If DNB occurs it is necessary to perform a few number of hot channel calculations to determine the limiting kx leading just to DNB and fuel failure (the conservative DNBR limit is 1.33). Knowing the pin power distribution from the core design calculation, the number of failed fuel pins can be calculated. The above procedure can be performed by conservative assumptions (e.g. conservative input parameters in the hot channel calculations), as well. In case of hot channel uncertainty analysis, the relevant input parameters (k x, mass flow, inlet temperature of the coolant, pin average burnup, initial gap size, selection of power history influencing the gap conductance value) of hot channel calculations and the DNBR limit are varied considering the respective uncertainties. An uncertainty analysis methodology was elaborated combining the response surface method with the one sided tolerance limit method of Wilks. The results of deterministic and uncertainty hot channel calculations are compared regarding to the number of failed fuel rods, max. temperature of the clad surface and max. temperature of the fuel (Authors)

  5. Examination of fast reactor fuels, FBR analytical quality assurance standards and methods, and analytical methods development: irradiation tests. Progress report, April 1--June 30, 1976, and FY 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, R.D.

    1976-08-01

    Characterization of unirradiated and irradiated LMFBR fuels by analytical chemistry methods will continue, and additional methods will be modified and mechanized for hot cell application. Macro- and microexaminations will be made on fuel and cladding using the shielded electron microprobe, emission spectrograph, radiochemistry, gamma scanner, mass spectrometers, and other analytical facilities. New capabilities will be developed in gamma scanning, analyses to assess spatial distributions of fuel and fission products, mass spectrometric measurements of burnup and fission gas constituents and other chemical analyses. Microstructural analyses of unirradiated and irradiated materials will continue using optical and electron microscopy and autoradiographic and x-ray techniques. Analytical quality assurance standards tasks are designed to assure the quality of the chemical characterizations necessary to evaluate reactor components relative to specifications. Tasks include: (1) the preparation and distribution of calibration materials and quality control samples for use in quality assurance surveillance programs, (2) the development of and the guidance in the use of quality assurance programs for sampling and analysis, (3) the development of improved methods of analysis, and (4) the preparation of continuously updated analytical method manuals. Reliable analytical methods development for the measurement of burnup, oxygen-to-metal (O/M) ratio, and various gases in irradiated fuels is described

  6. Hot conditioning equipment conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, F.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-06

    This report documents the conceptual design of the Hot Conditioning System Equipment. The Hot conditioning System will consist of two separate designs: the Hot Conditioning System Equipment; and the Hot Conditioning System Annex. The Hot Conditioning System Equipment Design includes the equipment such as ovens, vacuum pumps, inert gas delivery systems, etc.necessary to condition spent nuclear fuel currently in storage in the K Basins of the Hanford Site. The Hot Conditioning System Annex consists of the facility of house the Hot Conditioning System. The Hot Conditioning System will be housed in an annex to the Canister Storage Building. The Hot Conditioning System will consist of pits in the floor which contain ovens in which the spent nuclear will be conditioned prior to interim storage.

  7. Hot conditioning equipment conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, F.W.

    1996-01-01

    This report documents the conceptual design of the Hot Conditioning System Equipment. The Hot conditioning System will consist of two separate designs: the Hot Conditioning System Equipment; and the Hot Conditioning System Annex. The Hot Conditioning System Equipment Design includes the equipment such as ovens, vacuum pumps, inert gas delivery systems, etc.necessary to condition spent nuclear fuel currently in storage in the K Basins of the Hanford Site. The Hot Conditioning System Annex consists of the facility of house the Hot Conditioning System. The Hot Conditioning System will be housed in an annex to the Canister Storage Building. The Hot Conditioning System will consist of pits in the floor which contain ovens in which the spent nuclear will be conditioned prior to interim storage

  8. Fabrication, irradiation and post-irradiation examinations of MO2 and UO2 sphere-pac and UO2 pellet fuel pins irradiated in a PWR loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linde, A. van der; Lucas Luijckx, H.J.B.; Verheugen, J.H.N.

    1982-01-01

    The document reports in detail the fuel pin fabrication data and describes the irradiation conditions and history. All the relevant results of the non-destructive and destructive post-irradiation examinations are reported. They include: visual inspection and chemical analysis of crud; length and diameter measurements; neutron radiography and gamma scanning; juncture tests and fission gas analysis (including residual gas in fuel samples); microscopy and alpha + beta/gamma autoradiography; microprobe investigations; burn-up and isotopic analysis; and hydrogen analysis in clad. The data and observations obtained are discussed in detail and conclusions are given. The irradiation and post-irradiation examinations of the R-109 pins have shown the safe, pre-calculable performance of LWR fuel pins containing mixed-oxide sphere-pac fuel with the fissile material mainly present in the large spheres

  9. Example of answers to the problems of 31st to 35th examinations for the chief engineer of nuclear fuel. 1999 to 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yachi, Shigeyasu; Satoh, Tadashi; Suga, Shin-ichi

    2003-09-01

    This report contains example of answers to the Problems of 31st(1999) to 35th(2003) Examinations for the Chief Engineer of Nuclear Fuel which were conducted as a national qualification examination. Brief explanations or references are given to some answers. (author)

  10. Fabrication, irradiation and post-irradiation examinations of MO2 and UO2 sphere-pac and UO2 pellet fuel pins irradiated in a PWR loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linde, A. van der; Lucas Luijckx, H.J.B.; Verheugen, J.H.N.

    1981-04-01

    Three fuel pin bundles, R-109/1, 2 and 3, were irradiated in a PWR loop in the HFR at Petten during respectively 131, 57 and 57 effective full power days at average powers of approximately 39 kW.m -1 and at peak powers of approximately 60 kW.m -1 . The results of the post-irradiation examinations of these fuel bundles are presented. (Auth.)

  11. Express diagnostics of WWER fuel rods at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlov, S.; Amosov, S.; Sagalov, S.; Kostyuchenko, A.

    2009-01-01

    Higher safety and economical efficiency of nuclear power plants (NPP) call for a continuous design modification and technological development of fuel assemblies and fuel rods as well as optimization of their operating conditions. In doing so the efficiency of new fuel introduction depends on the completeness of irradiated fuel data in many respects as well as on the rapidity and cost of such data obtaining. Standard examination techniques of fuel assemblies (FA) and fuel rods (FR) intended for their use in hot cell conditions do not satisfy these requirements in full extent because fuel assemblies require preliminary cooling at NPP to provide their shipment to the research center. Expenditures for FA transportation, capacity of hot cells and expenditures for the examined fuel handling do not make it possible to obtain important information about the condition of fuel assemblies and fuel rods after their operation. In order to increase the comprehensiveness of primary data on fuel assemblies and fuel rods immediately after their removal from the reactor, inspection test facilities are widely used for these purposes. The inspection test facilities make it possible to perform nondestructive inspection of fuel in the NPP cooling pools. Moreover these test facilities can be used to repair failed fuel assemblies. The ultrasonic testing of failed fuel rods inside the fuel assembly was developed for stands of inspection and repair of TVSA WWER-1000 for the Kalinin NPP and Temelin NPP. This method was tested for eight leaking fuel assemblies WWER-440 and WWER-1000 with a burnup of ∼14 up to 38 MW·day/kgU. The ultrasonic testing proved its high degree of reliability and efficiency. The defectoscopy by means of the pulsed eddy-current method was adapted for the stand of inspection and repair of TVSA WWER-1000 for the Kalinin NPP. This method has been used at RIAR as an express testing method of FR claddings during the post-irradiation examinations of fuel assemblies WWER

  12. Remote Robotic Cleaning System for Contaminated Hot-Cell Floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Ho; Park, Jang Jin; Yang, Myung S.; Kwon, Hyo Kjo

    2005-01-01

    The M6 hot-cell of the Irradiated Material Examination Facility at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been contaminated with spent fuel debris and other radioactive waste due to the DUPIC nuclear fuel development processes. As the hot-cell is active, direct human workers' access, even with protection, to the in-cell is not possible because of the nature of the high radiation level of the spent PWR fuel. A remote robotic cleaning system has been developed for use in a highly radioactive environment of the M6 hot-cell. The remote robotic cleaning system was designed to completely eliminate human interaction with hazardous radioactive contaminants. This robotic cleaning system was also designed to remove contaminants or contaminated smears placed or fixed on the floor of the M6 hot-cell by mopping it in a remote manner. The environmental, functional and mechanical design considerations, control system and capabilities of the developed remote robotic cleaning system are presented

  13. HOT 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette Romme

    En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager en række læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet. Undersøgelsen er gentaget hvert år siden 2010.......En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager en række læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet. Undersøgelsen er gentaget hvert år siden 2010....

  14. HOT 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette Romme

    En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager en række læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet. Undersøgelsen er gentaget hvert år siden 2010.......En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager en række læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet. Undersøgelsen er gentaget hvert år siden 2010....

  15. Annual report on operation, utilization and technical development of hot laboratories. From April 1, 1996 to March 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This report describes activities, in fiscal year 1996, of the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF), the Research Hot Laboratory (RHL) and the Waste Safety Testing Facility (WASTEF) which belong to the Department of Hot laboratories. In the RFEF, Post-Irradiation Examinations (PIEs) of PWR fuel assemblies irradiated in the Takahama Unit 3, a BWR fuel assembly irradiated in the Fukusima Daini Unit have been performed. Also, PIEs of assembly materials irradiated in the Fugen Reactor have been carried out. To support R and D works in JAERI, refabrication of segmented fuel rods have been done using irradiated LWR fuel rods for pulse irradiation in the NSRR and re-irradiation tests in the JMTR. PIEs have been performed on high burnup fuel rods and ROX fuel rods. For the RHL, PIEs have been performed on segment fuels irradiated in the NSRR, fuels and materials for HTTR, standard fuels for JRR-3M and materials for nuclear fusion reactor. In addition, a monitoring test of fuel elements in accordance with the surveillance program of the Magnox reactor of the Japan Atomic Power Corporation has been continued. In the WASTEF, leaching tests on TRU in simulated glass forms and a low flow rate tests on glass waste forms have been carried out. The examinations of alpha damage acceleration for the Synroc waste forms have also been performed. (author)

  16. International interest in the BONAPARTE measurement bench. Post-irradiation examination of lower-enriched fuel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Belgian Nuclear Research Center SCK-CEN has developed a measurement bench (BONAPARTE) for the non-destructive analysis on fuel plate and rod type fuel elements. BONAPARTE is a modular device that can be employed for many purposes. The article discusses the employment of the BONAPARTE device for the accurate full post-irradiation mapping of fuel plate swelling with degree of precision of just a few micrometers.

  17. 25th-year jubilee edition of the Hot Laboratory's annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bart, G.

    1989-07-01

    The topics discussed in this report concern the history of PSI's Hot Laboratory, nuclear fuel development performed there during the last twenty years, post irradiation examination work, basic research for a final repository of radioactive wastes, and neutron embrittlement experiments. 44 figs., 1 tab., 82 refs

  18. Hot Cell Window Shielding Analysis Using MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, Chad L.; Scates, Wade W.; Taylor, J. Todd

    2009-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex nuclear facilities are undergoing a documented safety analysis upgrade. In conjunction with the upgrade effort, shielding analysis of the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) hot cell windows has been conducted. This paper describes the shielding analysis methodology. Each 4-ft thick window uses nine glass slabs, an oil film between the slabs, numerous steel plates, and packed lead wool. Operations in the hot cell center on used nuclear fuel (UNF) processing. Prior to the shielding analysis, shield testing with a gamma ray source was conducted, and the windows were found to be very effective gamma shields. Despite these results, because the glass contained significant amounts of lead and little neutron absorbing material, some doubt lingered regarding the effectiveness of the windows in neutron shielding situations, such as during an accidental criticality. MCNP was selected as an analysis tool because it could model complicated geometry, and it could track gamma and neutron radiation. A bounding criticality source was developed based on the composition of the UNF. Additionally, a bounding gamma source was developed based on the fission product content of the UNF. Modeling the windows required field inspections and detailed examination of drawings and material specifications. Consistent with the shield testing results, MCNP results demonstrated that the shielding was very effective with respect to gamma radiation, and in addition, the analysis demonstrated that the shielding was also very effective during an accidental criticality.

  19. Does a Change in Price of Fuel Affect GDP Growth? An Examination of the U.S. Data from 1950–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Aucott

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We examined data on fuel consumption and costs for the years 1950 through 2013, along with economic and population data, to determine the percent of U.S. gross domestic product (GDP spent each year on fuels, including fossil fuels and nuclear ore, and the growth of the economy. We found that these variables are inversely correlated. This suggests that the availability and cost of energy is a significant determinant of economic performance. We believe this relation is consistent with analyses based on the energy return on investment (EROI concept in that increasingly scarce, and hence expensive, fuels are a drag on economic growth. The best-fitting linear equation relating the percent of GDP (energy cost share and year-over-year (YoY GDP change variables suggests that a threshold exists in the vicinity of 4%; if the percent of GDP spent on fuels is greater than this, poorer economic performance has been likely. Currently, about 5% of GDP is spent on fuels; most of this is for liquids. Continued weak economic performance appears likely unless improvements in energy efficiency, on the order of a factor of 3 for liquid fuels, and/or a more rapid adoption of renewable or nuclear energy sources can be achieved, provided that the EROI of these new sources proves to be sufficiently high.

  20. Construction of concrete hot cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    The standard is to be applied to rooms (hot cells) which are enclosed by a concrete shield and in which radioactive material is handled by remote control. The rooms may be in facilities for experimental purposes (e.g. development of fuel elements and materials or of chemical processes) or in facilities for production purposes (e.g. reprocessing of nuclear fuel or treatment of radioactive wastes). The standard is to give a design hasis for concrete hot cells and their installations which is to be applied by designers, constructors, future users and competent authorities as well as independent experts. (orig.) [de

  1. Construction of concrete hot cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The standard is to be applied to rooms (hot cells) which are enclosed by a concrete shield and in which radioactive material is handled by remote control. The rooms may be in facilities for experimental purposes (e.g. development of fuel elements and materials or of chemical processes) or in facilities for production purposes (e.g. reprocessing of nuclear fuel or treatment of radioactive wastes). The standard is to give a design basis for concrete hot cells and their installations which is to be applied by designers, constructors, future users and competent authorities as well as independent experts. (orig.) [de

  2. Possibilities and prospects of investigation of irradiated structural and fuel materials using scanning electron microscope PHILLIPS XL 30 ESEM-TMP installed in the hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovanov, V. N.; Novoselov, A.E.; Kuzmin, S.V.; Yakovlev, V. V.

    2005-01-01

    Scanning electron microscope Philips XL 30 ESEM - TMP with X-ray microanalysis system INCA has been installed at SSC RF RIAR. The microscope is placed in the hot cell. Monitoring and control system is installed in the operator's room. Irradiated specimens are supplied to the hot cell through the transport terminal and installed into the microscope by manipulators. Direct contact of the personnel with radioactive materials is impossible. In addition it is developed the system of remote placement of the irradiated specimens into the specimen chamber of microscope. The system includes a stage with three seats, holders for different types of specimens and equipment for their remote loading in the holders. (Author)

  3. Analysis of hot rolling and hot forging effects on mechanical properties and microstructure of ZrNbMoGe alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AH Ismoyo; Parikin; Bandriyana

    2014-01-01

    Research on formation technique by a combined method of rolling and forging has been carried out in order to improve the mechanical properties of ZrNbMoGe alloy to be used as fuel cladding in NPP (Nuclear Power Plant) application. The effects of rolling and forging were analyzed several tests. The tests were conducted for zirconium alloy specimen with a composition of (in % wt.) 97% Zr, 0,5% Mo, 2% Nb and 0,5% Ge, where the specimen was melted with an arc-furnace. The hot rolling and forging were conducted at 900 °C and 950 °C respectively. Hardness test was carried out by using a microhardness testing machine, while microstructure examination and crystal structure analysis were conducted with an optical microscope and an X-ray diffractometer. The results show that the hardness of the alloy increase from 141.21 HV (starting material) to 210.47 HV (hot rolled material) and 365.75 HV (hot forged material). Texturing phenomenon is clearly figured on the microstructure due to hot rolling and forging process. Analysis by diffractogram also indicates that the hot rolling and forging process has influence on the crystal orientation of dominant preferred direction in the reflection plane of (10ī1), recorded from the rise of intensity counting from about 2500 to 3000. In summary, hot forging and rolling process can change the mechanical properties (hardness and texture) and microstructure of materials. (author)

  4. Operation of post-irradiation examination facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ka; Park, Kwang Joon; Jeon, Yong Bum [and others; Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    In 1995, the post-irradiation examination (PIE) of nuclear fuels was performed as follows. The relation between burnup and top nozzle spring force of fuel assembly was obtained by measuring the holddown spring force on the Kori-1 reactor fuel assemblies. The resonance ultrasonic test for inspection of defect and moisture in fuel rod was carried out on fuel rods of C15 and J14 assemblies, and the change of fuel rod condition by storing in pool has been analyzed on the intentionally defected fuel rods (ID-C and ID-L) as well as intact fuel rod (1-2) by NDT in ht cell. The oxide layer thickness on cladding surface of J44-L12 fuel rod was measured by NDT method and metallography to reveal the oxidation as a function of temperature in the fuel rod, and the burnup of J44 fuel assembly was measured by chemical analysis. HVAC system and pool water treatment system of the PIE facility were continuously operated for air filtration and water purification. The monitoring of radiation and pool water in PIE facility has been carried out to maintain the facility safety, and electric power supply system was checked and maintained to supply the electric power to the facility normally. The developed measurement techniques of oxide layer thickness on fuel rod cladding and holddown spring force of top nozzle in fuel assembly were applied to examine the nuclear fuels. Besides, a radiation shielding glove box was designed and a hot cell compressor for volume reduction of radioactive materials was fabricated. 19 tabs., 38 figs., 7 refs. (Author) .new.

  5. Post-irradiation examination of a fuel pin using a microscopic X-ray system: Measurement of carbon deposition and pin metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, Ch.; Stanley, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents some interesting aspects associated with X-ray imaging and its potential application in the nuclear industry. The feasibility of using X-ray technology for the post-irradiation examination of a fuel pin has been explored, more specifically pin metrology and carbon deposition measurement. The non-active sample was specially designed to mimic the structure of an AGR fuel pin whilst a carbon based material was applied to the mock up fuel rod in order to mimic carbon deposition. Short duration low energy (50 kV) 2D digital radiography was employed and provided encouraging results (with respect to carbon deposition thickness and structure measurements) for the mock up fuel pin with a spatial resolution of around 10 μm. Obtaining quantitative data from the resultant images is the principal added value associated with X-ray imaging. A higher intensity X-ray beam (≥90 kV) was also used in conjunction with the low energy set-up to produce a clear picture of the cladding as well as the interface between the lead (Pb mimics the uranium oxide) and stainless steel cladding. Spent fuel metrology and routine radiography are two additional tasks that X-ray imaging could perform for the post-irradiation examination programme. Therefore, when compared to other techniques developed to deliver information on one particular parameter, X-ray imaging offers the possibility to extract useful information on a range of parameters

  6. Results of the post-irradiation examination of a highly-rated mixed oxide fuel rod from the Mol 7B experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coquerelle, M.; Walker, C.T.; Whitlow, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    The experiment MOL 7B was carried out in a epithermal flux in the Belgian reactor BR2. The pin examined contained fuel of initial composition (Usub(0.7)Pusub(0.3))Osub(1.98). It had been irradiated to a maximum burn-up of 13.2 at% at a maximum linear power of 568Wcm -1 . The fuel was clad with coldworked stainless steel. Electron microprobe analysis indicated that a Cr 2 O 3 type oxide was the main constituent of the grey phases in the gap. A metallic phase on the fuel surface had apparently resulted from the mechanical compaction of fragments of cladding that had been depleted in chromium by oxidation. Thus the main components of the phase were iron and nickel. Chromium loss from the inner cladding surface was significant only in the upper regions of the pin. In pin sections that were metallographically examined sigma phase and carbides of the type M 23 C 6 were present at the grain boundaries of the cladding. Cladding corrosion was not an Arrhenius function of the cladding temperature: the amount of metal lost from the inner cladding surface decreased with rise in cladding temperature above 910 K. A contributor to metal loss was the mechanical detachment of fragments of cladding which reformed as a metallic layer on the surface of the fuel. Chromium depletion and sigma phase formation at grain boundaries lowered the cohesive forces between grains which were then mechanically detached. Chromium loss from grain boundaries is mainly the results of oxidation of the cladding by the mixed oxide fuel. Data are presented to support the view that the local average O/M of the fuel determined the rate of oxidation and consequently the extent of chromium depletion. Fuel-cladding mechanical interactions were weak in the upper regions of the pin where metal loss was small

  7. Long-term maintenance of reducing conditions in a spent nuclear fuel repository. A re-examination of critical factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gascoyne, M. [Gascoyne GeoProjects Inc, Pinawa, MB (Canada)

    1999-04-01

    Penetration of oxidising groundwaters to depths of 500 m in a permeable bedrock, over a glacial/interglacial cycle, may compromise the stability of a spent nuclear fuel repository and cause the release and migration towards the surface of actinides and associated fission products. This report examines the potential for the penetration of oxygen (O{sub 2}) to depths of 500 m in a fractured crystalline rock environment, typical of the Fennoscandian Shield. Previous studies performed for the Swedish program of nuclear waste disposal (principally the SITE-94 safety assessment) have indicated that O{sub 2} might reach repository depths during a deglaciation when melt-water from the base of an ice sheet could enter the bedrock, driven by strong hydraulic gradients. This report re-examines aspects of this scenario and finds that: 1. The capacity of flow-path minerals to scavenge O{sub 2} from recharging groundwater may be lower than expected due to a previously unrecognised depletion of Fe(II)-bearing minerals in the active flow-paths in a fractured crystalline rock. 2. Assumptions in the SITE-94 assessment, such as the use of a continental-scale flow model, the lack of structural controls on groundwater flow, a preferred horizontal permeability, and the use of permeabilities to depths of 10 km that are up to two orders of magnitude greater than comparable environments, are disproportionately simplistic and represent an extremely conservative case. 3. Assumptions of a thin, discontinuous permafrost, a warm-based ice sheet, and high-O{sub 2} content melt-water at the repository site are unrealistic and overly conservative. A more realistic scenario, which includes a greater influence of permafrost, a cold based ice sheet, lower bedrock permeabilities and a more-limited, regional-scale flow path, is recommended as being more appropriate for use in the safety assessment. Under this revised scenario, it is believed that O{sub 2} will not penetrate to repository depths over

  8. Long-term maintenance of reducing conditions in a spent nuclear fuel repository. A re-examination of critical factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gascoyne, M.

    1999-04-01

    Penetration of oxidising groundwaters to depths of 500 m in a permeable bedrock, over a glacial/interglacial cycle, may compromise the stability of a spent nuclear fuel repository and cause the release and migration towards the surface of actinides and associated fission products. This report examines the potential for the penetration of oxygen (O 2 ) to depths of 500 m in a fractured crystalline rock environment, typical of the Fennoscandian Shield. Previous studies performed for the Swedish program of nuclear waste disposal (principally the SITE-94 safety assessment) have indicated that O 2 might reach repository depths during a deglaciation when melt-water from the base of an ice sheet could enter the bedrock, driven by strong hydraulic gradients. This report re-examines aspects of this scenario and finds that: 1. The capacity of flow-path minerals to scavenge O 2 from recharging groundwater may be lower than expected due to a previously unrecognised depletion of Fe(II)-bearing minerals in the active flow-paths in a fractured crystalline rock. 2. Assumptions in the SITE-94 assessment, such as the use of a continental-scale flow model, the lack of structural controls on groundwater flow, a preferred horizontal permeability, and the use of permeabilities to depths of 10 km that are up to two orders of magnitude greater than comparable environments, are disproportionately simplistic and represent an extremely conservative case. 3. Assumptions of a thin, discontinuous permafrost, a warm-based ice sheet, and high-O 2 content melt-water at the repository site are unrealistic and overly conservative. A more realistic scenario, which includes a greater influence of permafrost, a cold based ice sheet, lower bedrock permeabilities and a more-limited, regional-scale flow path, is recommended as being more appropriate for use in the safety assessment. Under this revised scenario, it is believed that O 2 will not penetrate to repository depths over the next 100,000 years

  9. Estimation of burnup with cesium isotopes based on gamma-scanning of a instrumented fuel capsule(02F-11K) in hot-cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ung Sup; Kim, Hee Moon; Park, Dae Gyu; Paik, Seung Je; Lee, Hong Gi; Choo, Yong Sun; Hong Kwon Pyo

    2004-01-01

    Many experimental inspection have been performed to obtain the burnup of fuel. In the case, chemical analysis were popular with high reliability. High radioactivity of fuel was severe problem during destructive procedure. Afterward, many researchers have studied calculation of burnup using gamma detector as the non-destructive method. methodologies of gamma-scanning test have been developed as well as higher accuracy of detector. Generally, Cs-137 and Cs-134 are standard isotopes for long-term cooling spent fuel to estimate burnup, because atomic ratio of them follows the linearity with burnup

  10. Recent developments in post-irradiation examination techniques for water reactor fuel. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting held in Cadarache, France, 17-21 October 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    At the invitation of the Government of France, following a proposal of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT) the IAEA convened a Technical Committee meeting from 14 to 21 October 1994 in Cadarache to discuss recent technical advances and improvements in the field of post-irradiation examination (PIE) of fuel used in nuclear power plants. Fifty participants representing 14 countries attended the meeting and 30 papers were presented and discussed during five technical sessions. Working Groups composed of the session chairmen and authors of papers prepared summaries of each session including conclusions and recommendations for future work. Refs, figs and tabs.

  11. Recent developments in post-irradiation examination techniques for water reactor fuel. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting held in Cadarache, France, 17-21 October 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    At the invitation of the Government of France, following a proposal of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT) the IAEA convened a Technical Committee meeting from 14 to 21 October 1994 in Cadarache to discuss recent technical advances and improvements in the field of post-irradiation examination (PIE) of fuel used in nuclear power plants. Fifty participants representing 14 countries attended the meeting and 30 papers were presented and discussed during five technical sessions. Working Groups composed of the session chairmen and authors of papers prepared summaries of each session including conclusions and recommendations for future work. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Work plan for development of K-Basin fuel handling tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridges, A.E.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the engineering work plan for the development of handling tools for the removal of N-Reactor fuel elements from their storage canisters in the K-Basins storage pool and insertion into the Single Fuel Element Cans for subsequent shipment to a Hot Cell for examination. Examination of these N-Reactor fuel elements is part of the overall characterization effort. New hand tools are required since previous fuel movement has involved grasping the fuel in a horizontal position. These tools are required to lift an element from the storage canister

  13. DECOMMISSIONING OF SHIELDED FACILITIES AT WINFRITH USED FOR POST IRRADIATION EXAMINATION OF NUCLEAR FUELS and OTHER ACTIVE ITEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, K.D.; Parkinson, S.J.; Cornell, R.M.; Staples, A.T.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the approaches used in the clearing, cleaning, decontamination and decommissioning of a very large suite of seven concrete shielded caves and other facilities used by UKAEA at Winfrith Technology Centre, England over a period of about 30 years for the postirradiation examination (PIE) of a wide range of nuclear fuels and other very active components. The basic construction of the facilities will first be described, setting the scene for the major challenges that 1970s' thinking posed for decommissioning engineers. The tendency then to use large and heavy items of equipment supported upon massive steel bench structures produced a series of major problems that had to be overcome. The means of solving these problems by utilization of relatively simple and inexpensive equipment will be described. Later, a further set of challenges was experienced to decontaminate the interior surfaces to allow man entries to be undertaken at acceptable dose rates. The paper will describe the types of tooling used and the range of complementary techniques that were employed to steadily reduce the dose rates down to acceptable levels. Some explanations will also be given for the creation of realistic dose budgets and the methods of recording and continuously assessing the progress against these budgets throughout the project. Some final considerations are given to the commercial approaches to be adopted throughout this major project by the decommissioning engineers. Particular emphasis will be given to the selection of equipment and techniques that are effective so that the whole process can be carried out in a cost-effective and timely manner. The paper also provides brief complementary information obtained during the decommissioning of a plutonium-contaminated facility used for a range of semi-experimental purposes in the late 1970s. The main objective here was to remove the alpha contamination in such a manner that the volume of Plutonium Contaminated Materials (P

  14. Code Analyses Supporting PIE of Weapons-Grade MOX Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, Larry J.; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Spellman, Donald J.; McCoy, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Department of energy has decided to dispose of a portion of the nation's surplus weapons-grade plutonium by reconstituting it into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and irradiating the fuel in commercial power reactors. Four lead test assemblies (LTAs) were manufactured with weapons-grade mixed oxide (WG-MOX) fuel and irradiated in the Catawba Nuclear Station Unit 1, to a maximum fuel rod burnup of ∼47.3 GWd/MTHM. As part of the fuel qualification process, five rods with varying burnups and initial plutonium contents were selected from one assembly and shipped to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for hot cell examination. ORNL has provided analytical support for the post-irradiation examination (PIE) of these rods via extensive fuel performance modeling which has aided in instrument settings and PIE data interpretation. The results of these fuel performance simulations are compared in this paper with available PIE data.

  15. Preparations for the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    Modifications to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility-South (HFEF/S) have been in progress since mid-1988 to ready the facility for demonstration of the unique Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) pyroprocess fuel cycle. This paper updates the last report on this subject to the American Nuclear Society and describes the progress made in the modifications to the facility and in fabrication of the new process equipment. The IFR is a breeder reactor, which is central to the capability of any reactor concept to contribute to mitigation of environmental impacts of fossil fuel combustion. As a fast breeder, fuel of course must be recycled in order to have any chance of an economical fuel cycle. The pyroprocess fuel cycle, relying on a metal alloy reactor fuel rather than oxide, has the potential to be economical even at small-scale deployment. Establishing this quantitatively is one important goal of the IFR fuel cycle demonstration

  16. HOT 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Sara Stefansen

    HOT er en kvalitativ undersøgelse, der hvert år diskuterer og undersøger en lille udvalgt skare af danskkyndige fagpersoners bud på, hvad de er optagede af på literacyområdet her og nu – altså hvilke emner, de vil vurdere som aktuelle at forholde sig til i deres nuværende praksis.......HOT er en kvalitativ undersøgelse, der hvert år diskuterer og undersøger en lille udvalgt skare af danskkyndige fagpersoners bud på, hvad de er optagede af på literacyområdet her og nu – altså hvilke emner, de vil vurdere som aktuelle at forholde sig til i deres nuværende praksis....

  17. Hot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merwin, S.E.; Moeller, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensees are required to assess the dose to skin from a hot particle contamination event at a depth of skin of7mg/cm 2 over an area of 1 cm 2 and compare the value to the current dose limit for the skin. Although the resulting number is interesting from a comparative standpoint and can be used to predict local skin reactions, comparison of the number to existing limits based on uniform exposures is inappropriate. Most incidents that can be classified as overexposures based on this interpretation of dose actually have no effect on the health of the worker. As a result, resources are expended to reduce the likelihood that an overexposure event will occur when they could be directed toward eliminating the cause of the problem or enhancing existing programs such as contamination control. Furthermore, from a risk standpoint, this practice is not ALARA because some workers receive whole body doses in order to minimize the occurrence of hot particle skin contaminations. In this paper the authors suggest an alternative approach to controlling hot particle exposures

  18. Upgrades of Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory hot cell facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daubert, R.L.; DesChane, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory operates the 327 Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PITL) and the 324 Shielded Materials Facility (SMF). These hot cell facilities provide diverse capabilities for the postirradiation examination and testing of irradiated reactor fuels and materials. The primary function of these facilities is to determine failure mechanisms and effects of irradiation on physical and mechanical properties of reactor components. The purpose of this paper is to review major equipment and facility upgrades that enhance customer satisfaction and broaden the engineering capabilities for more diversified programs. These facility and system upgrades are providing higher quality remote nondestructive and destructive examination services with increased productivity, operator comfort, and customer satisfaction

  19. The second Euratom sponsored 9000C HTR fuel irradiation experiment in the HFR Petten Project E 96.02: Pt.2. Post-irradiation examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roettger, R.; Bueger, J. de; Schoots, T.

    1977-01-01

    A large variety of HTR fuel specimens, loose coated particles, coupons and compacts provided by Belgonucleaire, the Dragon Project and the KFA Juelich have been irradiated in the HFR at Petten at about 900 0 C up to a maximum fast neutron fluence of about 7x10 21 cm -2 (EDN) as a Euratom sponsored experiment. The maximum burn-ups were between 11 and 18.5% FIMA. The results of the post-irradiation examinations, comprising visual inspection, dimensional measurements, microradiography, metallography, and burn-up determinations are presented in this part 2 of the final report. The examinations have shown that the endurance limit of most of the tested fuel varieties is beyond the reached irradiation values

  20. Historical summary of the fuel and waste handling and disposition activities of the TMI-2 Information and Examination Program (1980-1988)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reno, H.W.; Schmitt, R.C.

    1988-10-01

    This report is a historical summary of the major activities conducted by the TMI-2 Information and Examination Program in managing fuel and special radioactive wastes resulting from the accident at the Unit 2 reactor of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station (TMI-2). The activities often required the development and use of advanced handling, processing, and/or disposal technologies for those wastes

  1. Utilization of plastic detector for pool water radioactivity control of IEA-R1 reactor. Examination of fuel element irradiation behaviour fabricated at IPEN/CNEN-SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berretta, J.R.; Mesquita, C.H. de; Madi Filho, T.

    1989-01-01

    For the examination of fuel element irradiation behavior that were fabricated at IPEN/CNEN/SP Metalurgical Departament, it was provided a detection system for pool water radioactivity measurements. This system uses a plastic scintillator detector produced at IPEN/CNEN-SP Health Physics Department, with dimensions and shape apropriated for such work. The detection system shows a sensibility of 4.125x10 -2 dps/cm 3 and 20% of efficiency for 131 I radiations. (author) [pt

  2. Annual report on operation, utilization and technical development of research reactors and hot laboratory, from April 1, 1987 to March 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    Activities of the Department of Research Reactor Operation in fiscal year 1987 are described. The department is responsible for operation and maintenance of JRR-2, JRR-4, Research Reactor Development Division which performed upgraded JRR-3 and other R D, and Hot Laboratory. In the above connection various other work has also been performed, such as technical management of fuel and coolant, radiation control, irradiation technique, etc. In Hot Laboratory, we have performed post-irradiation examinations of fuels and materials, and also development of examination procedures, too. (author)

  3. Annual report on operation, utilization and technical development of research reactors and hot laboratory, from April 1, 1985 to March 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    Activities of the Department of Research Reactor Operation in fiscal year 1985 are described. The department is responsible for operation and maintenance of JRR-2, JRR-4, Research Reactor Development Division which performed upgraded JRR-3 and other R and D, and Hot Laboratory. In the above connection various other work has also been performed, such as technical management of fuel and coolant, radiation control, irradiation technique, etc. In Hot Laboratory, we have performed post-irradiation examinations of fuels and materials, and also development of examination procedures, too. (author)

  4. Hot laboratory in Saclay. Equipment and radio-metallurgy technique of the hot lab in Saclay. Description of hot cell for handling of plutonium salts. Installation of an hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazire, R.; Blin, J.; Cherel, G.; Duvaux, Y.; Cherel, G.; Mustelier, J.P.; Bussy, P.; Gondal, G.; Bloch, J.; Faugeras, P.; Raggenbass, A.; Raggenbass, P.; Fufresne, J.

    1959-01-01

    Describes the conception and installation of the hot laboratory in Saclay (CEA, France). The construction ended in 1958. The main aim of this laboratory is to examine fuel rods of EL2 and EL3 as well as nuclear fuel studies. It is placed in between both reactors. In a first part, the functioning and specifications of the hot lab are given. The different hot cells are described with details of the ventilation and filtration system as well as the waste material and effluents disposal. The different safety measures are explained: description of the radiation protection, decontamination room and personnel monitoring. The remote handling equipment is composed of cutting and welding machine controlled with manipulators. Periscopes are used for sight control of the operation. In a second part, it describes the equipment of the hot lab. The unit for an accurate measurement of the density of irradiated uranium is equipped with an high precision balance and a thermostat. The equipment used for the working of irradiated uranium is described and the time length of each operation is given. There is also an installation for metallographic studies which is equipped with a manipulation bench for polishing and cleaning surfaces and a metallographic microscope. X-ray examination of uranium pellets will also be made and results will be compared with those of metallography. The last part describes the hot cells used for the manipulation of plutonium salts. The plutonium comes from the reprocessing plant and arrived as a nitric solution. Thus these cells are used to study the preparation of plutonium fluorides from nitric solution. The successive operations needed are explained: filtration, decontamination and extraction with TBP, purification on ion exchangers and finally formation of the plutonium fluorides. Particular attention has been given to the description of the specifications of the different gloveboxes and remote handling equipment used in the different reaction steps and

  5. Examination of stainless steel-clad Connecticut Yankee fuel assembly S004 after storage in borated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langstaff, D.C.; Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Landow, M.P.; Pasupathi, V.; Klingensmith, R.W.

    1982-09-01

    A Connecticut Yankee fuel assembly (S004) was tested nondestructively and destructively. It was concluded that no obvious degradation of the 304L stainless steel-clad spent fuel from assembly S004 occurred during 5 y of storage in borated water. Furthermore, no obvious degradation due to the pool environment occurred on 304 stainless steel-clad rods in assemblies H07 and G11, which were stored for shorter periods but contained operationally induced cladding defects. The seam welds in the cladding on fuel rods from assembly S004, H07, and G11 were similar in that they showed a wrought microstructure with grains noticeably smaller than those in the cladding base metal. The end cap welds showed a dendritically cored structure, typical of rapidly quenched austenitic weld metal. Some intergranular melting may have occurred in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) in the cladding adjacent to the end cap welds in rods from assemblies S004 and H07. However, the weld areas did not show evidence of corrosion-induced degradation

  6. Equipment for detach the fuel elements of the irradiated candu fuel bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cojocaru, V.; Dinuta, G.

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring the behaviour of the fuel bundles during their combustion provides useful information for the operation of the nuclear power plant as well as for the fuel manufacturer. Before placing it inside the reactor, the fuel bundle is inspected visually, dimensionally and, during combustion in the reactor, its radioactive behaviour is monitored. The purpose of the presented equipment is to allow the visual external inspection of the damaged fuel bundle in order to identify visible defects and to detach the fuel element by breaking the welded connection between the cap and grid. These devices are operated using the handler devices already existing in the hot cells Post-Irradiation Examination Laboratory (LEPI). This equipment has been used successfully in the LEPI laboratory at SCN Pitesti to inspect the damaged fuel from Cernavoda NPP, in March 2013. (authors)

  7. Fuel cycles using adulterated plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooksbank, R.E.; Bigelow, J.E.; Campbell, D.O.; Kitts, F.G.; Lindauer, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Adjustments in the U-Pu fuel cycle necessitated by decisions made to improve the nonproliferation objectives of the US are examined. The uranium-based fuel cycle, using bred plutonium to provide the fissile enrichment, is the fuel system with the highest degree of commercial development at the present time. However, because purified plutonium can be used in weapons, this fuel cycle is potentially vulnerable to diversion of that plutonium. It does appear that there are technologically sound ways in which the plutonium might be adulterated by admixture with 238 U and/or radioisotopes, and maintained in that state throughout the fuel cycle, so that the likelihood of a successful diversion is small. Adulteration of the plutonium in this manner would have relatively little effect on the operations of existing or planned reactors. Studies now in progress should show within a year or two whether the less expensive coprocessing scheme would provide adequate protection (coupled perhaps with elaborate conventional safeguards procedures) or if the more expensive spiked fuel cycle is needed as in the proposed civex pocess. If the latter is the case, it will be further necessary to determine the optimum spiking level, which could vary as much as a factor of a billion. A very basic question hangs on these determinations: What is to be the nature of the recycle fuel fabrication facilities. If the hot, fully remote fuel fabrication is required, then a great deal of further development work will be required to make the full cycle fully commercial

  8. Development of the high temperature sintering furnace for DUPIC fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Won; Kim, B. G.; Park, J. J.; Yang, M. S.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, J. H.; Cho, K. H.; Lee, D. Y.; Lee, Y. S.

    1998-11-01

    This report describes the development of the high temperature sintering furnace for manufacturing DUPIC (Direct Use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors) fuel pellets. The furnace has to be remotely operated and maintained in a high radioactive hot cell using master-slave manipulators. The high temperature sintering furnace for manufacturing DUPIC fuel pellets, which is satisfied with the requirements of remote operation and maintenance in a hot cell, was successfully developed and installed in the M6 hot cell at IMEF (Irradiated Material Examination Facility). The functional and thermal performance test was also successfully completed. The technology accumulated during developing this sintering furnace became the basis of other DUPIC equipment development, and will be very helpful in the development of equipment for use in hot cell in the future. (author). 20 figs

  9. Gamma-ray spectroscopy on irradiated fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac

    2009-01-01

    The recording of gamma-ray spectra along an irradiated fuel rod allows the fission products to be qualitatively and quantitatively examined. Among all nondestructive examinations performed on irradiated fuel rods by gamma-ray spectroscopy, the most comprehensive one is the average burnup measurement, which is quantitative. Moreover, burnup measurements by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy are less time-consuming and waste-generating than burnup measurements by radiochemical, destructive methods. This work presents the theoretical foundations and experimental techniques necessary to measure, using nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, the average burnup of irradiated fuel rods in a laboratory equipped with hot cells. (author)

  10. The ''hot'' patella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kipper, M.S.; Alazraki, N.P.; Feiglin, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    Increased patellar uptake on bone scans is seen quite commonly but the possible or probable etiologies of this finding have not been previously well described. A review of 100 consecutive bone scans showed that the incidence of bilateral ''hot'' patellae is 15%. Identified etiologies include osteoarthritic degenerative disease (35%), fracture, possible metastatic disease, bursitis, Paget's disease, and osteomyelitis. The value of careful history, physical examination, and radiographs is stressed

  11. Test plan for K-Basin fuel handling tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridges, A.E.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the test plan and procedures for the acceptance testing of the handling tools enveloped for the removal of an N-Reactor fuel element from its storage canister in the K-Basins storage pool and insertion into the Single fuel Element Can for subsequent shipment to a Hot Cell for examination. Examination of these N-Reactor fuel elements is part of the overall characterization effort. New hand tools were required since previous fuel movement has involved grasping the fuel in a horizontal position. The 305 Building Cold Test Facility will be used to conduct the acceptance testing of the Fuel Handling Tools. Upon completion of this acceptance testing and any subsequent training of operators, the tools will be transferred to the 105 KW Basin for installation and use

  12. Health assessment of children and adolescents living in a residential area of production for the disposal of rocket fuel: according to the results of the medical examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uiba V.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to determine the real prevalence separate nosological forms in the child population living in residential zone installations for the disposal of rocket fuel. Materials and methods. By mobile teams of pediatric physicians there was conducted a comprehensive medical examination of 1621 children in the area of the site location for disposal of rocket engines solid fuel. Results. The surveyed contingent of the most common diseases of the endocrine system, disorders of nutrition and metabolism (21.2% of diagnoses, diseases of the musculoskeletal and connective tissue (19.2 percent, as well as individual symptoms, signs and deviations from the norm by 14.4%. Conclusion. Data indicating the pronounced impact of adverse environmental factors, not identified.

  13. Conceptual design of a commercial tokamak hybrid reactor fueling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matney, K.D.; Donnert, H.J.; Yang, T.F.

    1979-12-01

    A conceptual design of a fuel injection system for CTHR (Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor) is discussed. Initially, relative merits of the cold-fueling concept are compared with those of the hot-fueling concept; that is, fueling where the electron is below 1 eV is compared with fueling where the electron temperature exceeds 100 eV. It is concluded that cold fueling seems to be somewhat more free of drawbacks than hot fueling. Possible implementation of the cold-fueling concept is exploited via frozen-pellet injection. Several methods of achieving frozen-pellet injection are discussed and the light-gas-gun approach is chosen from these possibilities. A modified version of the ORNL Neutral Gas Shielding Model is used to simulate the pellet injection process. From this simulation, the penetration-depth dependent velocity requirement is determined. Finally, with the velocity requirement known, a gas-pressure requirement for the proposed conceptual design is established. The cryogenic fuel-injection and fuel-handling systems are discussed. A possible way to implement the conceptual device is examined along with the attendant effects on the total system

  14. Conceptual design of a commercial tokamak hybrid reactor fueling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matney, K.D.; Donnert, H.J.; Yang, T.F.

    1979-12-01

    A conceptual design of a fuel injection system for CTHR (Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor) is discussed. Initially, relative merits of the cold-fueling concept are compared with those of the hot-fueling concept; that is, fueling where the electron temperature is below 1 eV is compared with fueling where the electron temperature exceeds 100 eV. It is concluded that cold fueling seems to be somewhat more free of drawbacks than hot fueling. Possible implementation of the cold-fueling concept is exploited via frozen-pellet injection. Several methods of achieving frozen-pellet injection are discussed and the light-gas-gun approach is chosen from these possibilities. A modified version of the ORNL Neutral Gas Shielding Model is used to simulate the pellet injection process. From this simulation, the penetration-depth dependent velocity requirement is determined. Finally, with the velocity requirement known, a gas-pressure requirement for the proposed conceptual design is established. The cryogenic fuel-injection and fuel-handling systems are discussed. A possible way to implement the conceptual device is examined along with the attendant effects on the total system

  15. Conceptual design of a commercial tokamak hybrid reactor fueling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matney, K.D.; Donnert, H.J.; Yang, T.F.

    1979-12-01

    A conceptual design of a fuel injection system for CTHR (Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor) is discussed. Initially, relative merits of the cold-fueling concept are compared with those of the hot-fueling concept; that is, fueling where the electron is below 1 eV is compared with fueling where the electron temperature exceeds 100 eV. It is concluded that cold fueling seems to be somewhat more free of drawbacks than hot fueling. Possible implementation of the cold-fueling concept is exploited via frozen-pellet injection. Several methods of achieving frozen-pellet injection are discussed and the light-gas-gun approach is chosen from these possibilities. A modified version of the ORNL Neutral Gas Shielding Model is used to simulate the pellet injection process. From this simulation, the penetration-depth dependent velocity requirement is determined. Finally, with the velocity requirement known, a gas-pressure requirement for the proposed conceptual design is established. The cryogenic fuel-injection and fuel-handling systems are discussed. A possible way to implement the conceptual device is examined along with the attendant effects on the total system.

  16. Design support document for the K Basins Vertical Fuel Handling Tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridges, A.E.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the design support information for the Vertical Fuel Handling Tools, developed for the removal of N Reactor fuel elements from their storage canisters in the K Basins storage pool and insertion into the Single Fuel Element Can for subsequent shipment to a Hot Cell for examination. Examination of these N Reactor fuel elements is part of the overall characterization effort. These new hand tools are required since previous fuel movement has involved grasping the fuel in a horizontal position. These tools are required to lift an element vertically from the storage canister. Additionally, a Mark II storage canister Lip Seal Protector was designed and fabricated for use during fuel retrieval. This device was required to prevent damage to the canister lip should a fuel element accidentally be dropped during its retrieval, using the handling tools. Supporting documentation for this device is included in this document

  17. Development of Radioactive Substance Contamination Diffusion Preventive Equipment for a Hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Yong Sun; Kim, Do Sik; Baik, Seung Je; Yoo, Byung Ok; Kim, Ki Ha; Lee, Eun Pyo; Ahn, Sang Bok; Ryu, Woo Seok

    2009-01-01

    The hot cell of irradiated materials examination facility (IMEF), which has been operating since 1996, is generally contaminated by the radioactive nuclides of irradiated nuclear fuels and structural steels like Cs-137, Co-60, Co-134 and Ru-106. Especially Cs-137 is a main contaminated radioactive isotope which is easily moved here and there due to air flow in the hot cell, water-soluble, extremely toxic, and has a half-life of 30.23 years. To repair or fix the abnormal function of test apparatus installed in the hot cell, the maintenance door, so called a rear door and located at an intervention area, is opened to enter the hot cell inside. In a moment of opening the maintenance door, dirty air diffusion from the hot cell to an intervention area could be occurred in spite of increasing the rpm of exhaust fan to maintain much low under pressure, but an adjacent area to a maintenance door, i.e. intervention area, is very severely contaminated due to the unpredictable air flow. In this paper, the development of the radioactive substance contamination diffusion preventive equipment for a hot cell is studied to prevent dirty and toxic gaseous radioactive nuclides diffusion from a hot cell and installed at an intervention area of IMEF

  18. Operation of post-irradiation examination facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, E. G.; Jeon, Y. B.; Ku, D. S.

    1996-12-01

    In 1996, the post-irradiation examination(PIE) of nuclear fuels was performed as follows. It has been searched for the caution of defection of defected fuel rods of Youngkwang-4 reactor through NDT and metallographic examination that had been required by KEPCO. And in-pool inspection of Kori-1 spent fuel assembly(FO2) was carried out. HVAC system and pool water treatment system have been operated to maintain the facility safely, and electric power supply system was checked and maintained for the normal and steady supply electric power to the facility. Image processing software was developed for measurement of defection of spent fuel rods. Besides, a radiation shielding glove box was fabricated and a hot cell compressor for volume reduction of radioactive materials was fabricated and installed in hot cell. Safeguards of nuclear materials were implemented in strict accordance with the relevant Korean rules and regulations as well as the international non-proliferation regime. Also the IAEA inspection was carried out on the quarterly basis. (author). 31 tabs., 71 figs., 4 refs.

  19. Spent fuel storage facility, Kalpakkam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shreekumar, B.; Anthony, S.

    2017-01-01

    Spent Fuel Storage Facility (SFSF), Kalpakkam is designed to store spent fuel arising from PHWRs. Spent fuel is transported in AERB qualified/authorized shipping cask by NPCIL to SFSF by road or rail route. The spent fuel storage facility at Kalpakkam was hot commissioned in December 2006. All systems, structures and components (SSCs) related to safety are designed to meet the operational requirements

  20. Spent fuel treatment to allow storage in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    During Fiscal Year 1987 (FY-87), research began at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop a treatment material and process to coat fuel rods in commercial spent fuel assemblies to allow the assemblies to be stored in hot (up to 380 0 C) air without oxidation of the fuel. This research was conducted under a research and development fund provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and independently administered by EG and G Idaho, Inc., DOE's prime contractor at the INEL. The objectives of the research were to identify and evaluate possible treatment processes and materials, identify areas of uncertainty, and to recommend the most likely candidate to allow spent fuel dry storage in hot air. The results of the research are described: results were promising and several good candidates were identified, but further research is needed to examine the candidates to the point where comparison is possible

  1. Role of non-destructive examinations in leak testing of glove boxes for industrial scale plutonium handling at nuclear fuel fabrication facility along with case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aher, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    Non Destructive Examinations has the prominent role at Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Facilities. Specifically NDE has contributed at utmost stratum in Leak Testing of Glove Boxes and qualifying them as a Class-I confinement for safe Plutonium handling at industrial scale. Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility, BARC, Tarapur is engaged in fabrication of Plutonium based MOX (PuO 2 , DDUO 2 ) fuel with different enrichments for first core of PFBR reactor. Alpha- Leak Tight Glove Boxes along with HEPA Filters and dynamic ventilation form the promising engineering system for safe and reliable handling of plutonium bearing materials considering the radiotoxicity and risk associated with handling of plutonium. Leak Testing of Glove Boxes which involves the leak detection, leak rectification and leak quantifications is major challenging task. To accomplish this challenge, various Non Destructive Testing methods have assisted in promising way to achieve the stringent leak rate criterion for commissioning of Glove Box facilities for plutonium handling. This paper highlights the Role of various NDE techniques like Soap Solution Test, Argon Sniffer Test, Pressure Drop/Rise Test etc. in Glove Box Leak Testing along with procedure and methodology for effective rectification of leakage points. A Flow Chart consisting of Glove Box leak testing procedure starting from preliminary stage up to qualification stage along with a case study and observations are discussed in this paper. (author)

  2. Nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D Hondt, P.

    1998-01-01

    The research and development programme on nuclear fuel at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN is described. The objective of this programme is to enhance the quantitative prediction of the operational limits of nuclear fuel and to assess the behaviour of fuel under incidental and accidental conditions. Progress is described in different domains including the modelling of fission gas release in LWR fuel, thermal conductivity, basic physical phenomena, post-irradiation examination for fuel performance assessment, and conceptual studies of incidental and accidental fuel experiments

  3. TMI-2 instrument nozzle examinations at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neimark, L.A.; Shearer, T.L.; Purohit, A.; Hins, A.G.

    1993-09-01

    Six of the 14 instrument-penetration-tube nozzles removed from the lower head of TMI-2 were examined to identify damage mechanisms, provide insight to the fuel relocation scenario, and provide input data to the margin-to-failure analysis. Visual inspection, gamma scanning, metallography, microhardness measurements, and scanning electron microscopy were used to obtain the desired information. The results showed varying degrees of damage to the lower head nozzles, from ∼50% melt-off to no damage at all to near-neighbor nozzles. The elevations of nozzle damage suggested that the lower elevations (near the lower head) were protected from molten fuel, apparently by an insulating layer of fuel debris. The pattern of nozzle damage was consistent with fuel movement toward the hot-spot location identified in the vessel wall. Evidence was found for the existence of a significant quantity of control assembly debris on the lower head before the massive relocation of fuel occurred

  4. Evaluation and selection of hot channel (peaking) factors for research reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, W.L.

    1987-01-01

    A proposed method for selecting and applying hot channel factors is presented along with some justification for these selections. The method is illustrated by example, and the sensitivity to some of the choices is examined. The uncertainty in the heat transfer coefficient is a major contributor to the reduction in thermal-hydraulic safety margins. The uncertainty introduced by the heterogeneity in the fuel is another important contributor and an area where more information may be useful in reducing this uncertainty. (Author)

  5. Postirradiation examination results for the irradiation effects scoping test 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehner, A.S.; Quapp, W.J.; Goetzmann, O.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1976-09-01

    A zircaloy-clad UO 2 fuel rod was operated above its critical heat flux within the in-pile test loop of the Power Burst Facility and later examined in the hot cells. The results of the postirradiation examinations are presented in this report. A Zr-UO 2 reaction at the fuel-cladding interface embrittled nearly as much of the cladding wall thickness as the Zr-water reaction on the exterior. Data on both the internal and external reactions, and cladding and fuel microstructures, are presented. Cladding embrittlement and rod failure are compared with several rod fragmentation criteria, and conclusions concerning fuel rod failure propagation in a power reactor system are made

  6. Postirradiation examination results for the irradiation effects scoping test 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehner, A.S.; Quapp, W.J.; Goetzmann, O.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1976-09-01

    A zircaloy-clad UO 2 fuel rod was operated above its critical heat flux within the in-pile test loop of the Power Burst Facility and later examined in the hot cells. The results of the postirradiation examinations are presented. A Zr-UO 2 reaction at the fuel-cladding interface embrittled nearly as much of the cladding wall thickness as the Zr-water reaction on the exterior. Data on both the internal and external reactions and the cladding and fuel microstructures are presented. Cladding embrittlement and rod failure are compared with several rod fragmentation criteria, and conclusions concerning fuel rod failure propagation in a power reactor system are made

  7. Postirradiation examination results for the irradiation effects scoping test 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehner, A.S.; Quapp, W.J.; Goetzmann, O.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1976-09-01

    A zircaloy-clad UO/sub 2/ fuel rod was operated above its critical heat flux within the in-pile test loop of the Power Burst Facility and later examined in the hot cells. The results of the postirradiation examinations are presented in this report. A Zr-UO/sub 2/ reaction at the fuel-cladding interface embrittled nearly as much of the cladding wall thickness as the Zr-water reaction on the exterior. Data on both the internal and external reactions, and cladding and fuel microstructures, are presented. Cladding embrittlement and rod failure are compared with several rod fragmentation criteria, and conclusions concerning fuel rod failure propagation in a power reactor system are made.

  8. Fuel savings with conventional hot water space heating systems by incorporating a natural gas powered heat pump. Preliminary project: Development of heat pump technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanheyden, L.; Evertz, E.

    1980-12-01

    Compression type air/water heat pumps were developed for domestic heating systems rated at 20 to 150 kW. The heat pump is driven either by a reciprocating piston or rotary piston engine modified to operate on natural gas. Particular features of natural gas engines as prime movers, such as waste heat recovery and variable speed, are stressed. Two systems suitable for heat pump operation were selected from among five different mass produced car engines and were modified to incorporate reciprocating piston compressor pairs. The refrigerants used are R 12 and R 22. Test rig data transferred to field conditions show that the fuel consumption of conventional boilers can be reduced by 50% and more by the installation of engine driven heat pumps. Pilot heat pumps based on a 1,600 cc reciprocating piston engine were built for heating four two-family houses. Pilot pump operation confirms test rig findings. The service life of rotary piston and reciprocating piston engines was investigated. The tests reveal characteristic curves for reciprocating piston engines and include exhaust composition measurements.

  9. The operation of post-irradiation examination facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ka; Park, Kwang Jun; Lee, Won Sang [and others; Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-01-01

    The operation and management of PIE facility was executed in 1993. An indigenous 16 x 16 PWR type fuel assembly (ID No. J44) which was discharged from Kori unit 2 power reactor was transported to KAERI`s PIE facility and in-pool nondestructive examination and hot cell examination for the fuel were carried out. Because the above-mentioned 16 x 16 fuel is different from 14 x 14 fuel in its size and array of fuel rods, several examination and handling equipment for the 16 x 16 type fuel were designed and fabricated. PIE facility was operated in normal condition with the periodical check and inspection of the devices. The filter housing on the roof hood in chemical analysis hot cell was modified mounting air pressure gauge to indicate the optimal filter exchanging time. The burst air heating coil plate and the broken blowing fan of the HVAC system were repaired. The defaced grand packing in pool water circulation pump was replaced with the mechanical seal to prevent the leakage from the pump shaft sealing. The radiation monitoring in the facility was carried out to maintain the safe working condition and several radiation monitors were repaired. Spare parts for the radiation monitoring system were prepared to maintain the facility safely. The performance test of the emergency electric power supply system including UPS, battery and diesel generator was carried out. Oxide layer thickness measuring device for the performance test. Several devices including spent fuel handling equipment for the 17 x 17 PWR type fuel assembly were designed and fabricated for the subsequent PIE of nuclear fuels. 35 tabs., 17 figs., 7 refs. (Author) .new.

  10. Development of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell cogeneration system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Jenn Jiang; Zou, Meng Lin [Department of Greenergy, National University of Tainan, Tainan 700 (China)

    2010-05-01

    A proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) cogeneration system that provides high-quality electricity and hot water has been developed. A specially designed thermal management system together with a microcontroller embedded with appropriate control algorithm is integrated into a PEM fuel cell system. The thermal management system does not only control the fuel cell operation temperature but also recover the heat dissipated by FC stack. The dynamic behaviors of thermal and electrical characteristics are presented to verify the stability of the fuel cell cogeneration system. In addition, the reliability of the fuel cell cogeneration system is proved by one-day demonstration that deals with the daily power demand in a typical family. Finally, the effects of external loads on the efficiencies of the fuel cell cogeneration system are examined. Results reveal that the maximum system efficiency was as high as 81% when combining heat and power. (author)

  11. Pie technique of LWR fuel cladding fracture toughness test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Shinya; Usami, Koji; Nakata, Masahito; Fukuda, Takuji; Numata, Masami; Kizaki, Minoru; Nishino, Yasuharu

    2006-01-01

    Remote-handling techniques were developed by cooperative research between the Department of Hot Laboratories in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the Nuclear Fuel Industries Ltd. (NFI) for evaluating the fracture toughness on irradiated LWR fuel cladding. The developed techniques, sample machining by using the electrical discharge machine (EDM), pre-cracking by fatigue tester, sample assembling to the compact tension (CT) shaped test fixture gave a satisfied result for a fracture toughness test developed by NFL. And post-irradiation examination (PIE) using the remote-handling techniques were carried out to evaluate the fracture toughness on BWR spent fuel cladding in the Waste Safety Testing Facility (WASTEF). (author)

  12. Evaluation of the ceramographies of the KNK II/1 test zone fuel assembly NY-202-IA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geier, F.

    1983-12-01

    From the 211 fuel pins of the KNK II/1 fuel assembly NY-202-IA six intact fuel pins were selected in addition to the defective pin for destructive post-irradiation examinations in the Hot Cells of the KfK Karlsruhe. The assembly had been unloaded due to a pin failure after 192 equivalent full-power days and a maximum burnup of 5.4 %. The main aspect of these investigations was to record the fuel and fuel pin behavior and thus to allow a comparison of the status before and after irradiation. The results can also be used for comparative calculations and adaptations of existing calculational models. This report documents in detailed form the results of the fuel and fuel pin examinations [de

  13. Fuel Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberstein, A.

    1982-09-01

    FRAGEMA has developed most types of inspection equipments to work on irradiated fuel assemblies and on single fuel rods during reactor outages with an efficiency compatible with the utilities operating priorities. In order to illustrate this statement, two specific examples of inspection equipments are shortly described: the on-site removable fuel rod assembly examination stand, and the fuel assembly multiple examination device. FRAGEMA has developed techniques for the identifiction of the leaking fuel rods in the fuel assembly and the tooling necessary to perform the replacement of the faulted element. These examples of methods, techniques and equipments described and the experience accumulated through their use allow FRAGEMA to qualify for offering the supply of the corresponding software, hardware or both whenever an accurate understanding of the fuel behaviour is necessary and whenever direct intervention on the assembly and associated components is necessary due to safety, operating or economical reasons

  14. Smokin` hot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustonen, A; Ahokas, T; Nordström, T

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Daily smoking has been associated with a greater risk of psychosis. However, we are still lacking studies to adjust for baseline psychotic experiences and other substance use. We examined associations between daily smoking and psychosis risk in a 15-year follow-up while accounting for ...

  15. Post-irradiation handling and examination at the HFEF complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacca, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    The Hot Fuel Examination Facility provides postirradiation handling and examination of fast reactor irradiation experiments and safety tests for the United States Breeder Reactor Program. Nondestructive interim examinations and destructive terminal examinations at HFEF derive data from tests irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor No. II, in the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT), and in the Sodium Loop Safety Facility. Similar support will be provided in the near future for tests irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility, and for the larger sodium loops to be irradiated in TREAT

  16. Data report for the nondestructive examination of Turkey Point spent fuel assemblies B02, B03, B17, B41, and B43

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, R.B.

    1980-04-01

    The fuel assembly sip test on all rods from assembly B17 were of sound intergrity. Visual examination showed three general regions of rod surface appearance: a dark adherent crud layer at the bottom of the rod, black spalling crud layers in the middle, and a spotty gray loose powdery coating with dark crud or oxide underneath towards the top. Rod lengths varied from 152.395 inches to 152.707 inches. Maximum rod bow measurements for rods G9, I9, and G7 were 0.038 to 040 inch and 0.022 inch for rods H6 and J8. Results from profilometry scans showed the maximum ovality for the five rods was 0.0066 inch with average diameters ranging from 0.4187 to 0.4198 inch. Extensive ridging from pellet-clad interaction over the entire length was evident on all rods. Gamma scan results showed no cesium peaking and no pellet gaps greater than 0.025 inch. No unusual areas, other than ridging and possible fuel-cladding bonding, were seen in the eddy current results

  17. Design verification test of instrumented capsule (02F-11K) for nuclear fuel irradiation in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Sohn, J. M.; Oh, J. M. [and others

    2004-01-01

    An instrumented capsule is being developed to be able to measure fuel characteristics, such as fuel temperature, internal pressure of fuel rod, fuel elongation, and neutron flux, etc., during the irradiation test of nuclear fuel in HANARO. The instrumented capsule for measuring and monitoring fuel centerline temperature and neutron flux was designed and manufactured. The instrumented capsule includes three test fuel rods installed thermocouple to measure fuel centerline temperature and three SPNDs (Self-Powered Neutron Detector) to monitor the neutron flux. Its stability was verified by out-of-pile performance test, and its safety evaluation was also shown that the safety requirements were satisfied. And then, to verify the design of the instrumented capsule in the test hole, it was successfully irradiated in the test hole of HANARO from March 14, 2003 to June 1, 2003 (53.8 full power days at 24 MWth). During irradiation, the centerline temperature of PWR UO{sub 2} fuel pellets fabricated by KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Company and the neutron flux were continuously measured and monitored. The test fuel rods were irradiated at less than 350 W/cm to 5.13 GWD/MTU with fuel centerline peak temperature below 1,375 .deg. C. The structural stability of the capsule was satisfied by the naked eye in service pool of HANARO. The capsule and test fuel rods were dismantled and test fuel rods were examined at the hot cell of IMEF (Irradiated Material Examination Facility)

  18. Solar 'hot spots' are still hot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Taeil

    1990-01-01

    Longitude distributions of solar flares are not random but show evidence for active zones (or hot spots) where flares are concentrated. According to a previous study, two hot spots in the northern hemisphere, which rotate with a synodic period of about 26.72 days, produced the majority of major flares, during solar cycles 20 and 21. The more prominent of these two hot spots is found to be still active during the rising part of cycle 22, producing the majority of northern hemisphere major flares. The synodic rotation period of this hot spot is 26.727 + or - 0.007 days. There is also evidence for hot spots in the southern hemisphere. Two hot spots separated by 180 deg are found to rotate with a period of 29.407 days, with one of them having persisted in the same locations during cycles 19-22 and the other, during cycles 20-22.

  19. Solar hot spots are still hot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, T.

    1990-01-01

    Longitude distributions of solar flares are not random but show evidence for active zones (or hot spots) where flares are concentrated. According to a previous study, two hot spots in the northern hemisphere, which rotate with a synodic period of about 26.72 days, produced the majority of major flares, during solar cycles 20 and 21. The more prominent of these two hot spots is found to be still active during the rising part of cycle 22, producing the majority of northern hemisphere major flares. The synodic rotation period of this hot spot is 26.727 + or - 0.007 days. There is also evidence for hot spots in the southern hemisphere. Two hot spots separated by 180 deg are found to rotate with a period of 29.407 days, with one of them having persisted in the same locations during cycles 19-22 and the other, during cycles 20-22. 14 refs

  20. State-of-the-art report of spent fuel management technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, S. G.; Park, S. W.; Shin, Y. J. and others

    1998-06-01

    Essential technologies for a long-term management of domestic nuclear fuel have been described in this report. The technologies of interest are advanced processes for spent fuel management, spent fuel examination technology, evaluation of radiation effect on equipment, chemical characterization of spent fuel, and hot cell-related technology state of the art for the above-mentioned technologies has been reviewed and analyzed in detail. As a result, a future R and D direction that seems to be appropriate for us is drawn up in due consideration of in- and out-circumstances encountered with. (author). 304 refs., 28 tabs., 43 figs

  1. Program description for the qualification of CNEA - Argentina as a supplier of LEU silicide fuel and post-irradiation examinations plan for the first prototype irradiated in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rugirello, Gabriel; Adelfang, Pablo; Denis, Alicia; Zawerucha, Andres; Marco, Agustin di; Guillaume, Eduardo; Sbaffoni, Monica; Lacoste, Pablo

    1998-01-01

    In this report we present a description of the ongoing and future stages of the program for the qualification of CNEA, Argentina, as a supplier of low enriched uranium silicide fuel elements for research reactor. Particularly we will focus on the characteristics of the future irradiation experiment on a new detachable prototype, the post-irradiation examinations (PIE) plan for the already irradiated prototype PO4 and an overview of the recently implemented PIE facilities and equipment. The program is divided in several steps, some of which have been already completed. It concludes: development of the uranium silicide fissile material, irradiation and PIE of several full-scale prototypes. Important investments have been already carried out in the facilities for the FE production and PIE. (author)

  2. The second eddy current testing of zircaloy tube samples from the OECD Halden reactor project at Reactor Fuel Examination Facility, Tokai, JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohwada, Isao; Nishino, Yasuharu

    1986-07-01

    The Reactor Fuel Examination Facility in Tokai/JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) joined to the second round robin programme on eddy current test of the Halden/IFE. In the programme, two zircaloy tube samples with some artificial defects were provided for measurements. To clarify the locations in axial and azimuthal directions, types and dimensions of the provided artificial defects, measured signals from eddy current test were analysed in comparison with the known defects on the calibration tube. As a result, fourteen defects were determined from the measurements. Then, the location, the type and the relative dimension of them were also revealed. The results of those eddy current test are described in this paper. (author)

  3. Annual report on operation, utilization and technical development of research reactors and hot laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This report describes the activities of the Department of Research Reactor Operation in fiscal year of 1989. It also presents some technical topics on the reactor operation and utilization in details. The Department is responsible for operation of the research reactors, JRR-2 and JRR-4, and the Hot Laboratory. The research reactor JRR-3 was reconstructed to enhance the performance for utilization. The first criticality was achieved on March 22, 1989, and it subsequently went into operation. In connection with the reactor operation, the various research and development activities in the area of fuel management, water chemistry, radiation monitoring and material irradiation have been made. In the Hot Laboratory, post-irradiation examinations of fuels and materials have been carried out along with the development of related techniques. (author)

  4. Current activities in development of PIE techniques in JMTR hot laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Toshimitsu; Ohmi, Masao; Shimizu, Michio; Kaji, Yoshiyuki; Ueno, Fumiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    A wide variety of post-irradiation examinations (PIEs) for research and development of nuclear fuels and materials to be utilized in nuclear field has been carried out since 1971 in three kinds of β-γ hot cells; concrete, lead and steel cells in the JMTR Hot Laboratory (JMTR HL) associated with the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). In addition to PIEs, the re-capsuling work including re-instrumentation was also conducted for the power ramping tests of the irradiated LWR fuels using Boiling Water Capsule (BOCA). Recently, new PIE techniques are required for the advanced irradiation studies. In this paper, the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) growth test technique of irradiated in-core structural materials and the remote operation technique of the atomic force microscope (AFM) are described as JMTR HL's current activities in the development of new PIE techniques. (author)

  5. Characterization of fission gas bubbles in irradiated U-10Mo fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casella, Andrew M.; Burkes, Douglas E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Buck, Edgar C.

    2017-09-01

    Irradiated U-10Mo fuel samples were prepared with traditional mechanical potting and polishing methods with in a hot cell. They were then removed and imaged with an SEM located outside of a hot cell. The images were then processed with basic imaging techniques from 3 separate software packages. The results were compared and a baseline method for characterization of fission gas bubbles in the samples is proposed. It is hoped that through adoption of or comparison to this baseline method that sample characterization can be somewhat standardized across the field of post irradiated examination of metal fuels.

  6. A comprehensive in-pile test of PWR fuel bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang Rixin; Zhang Shucheng; Chen Dianshan (Academia Sinica, Beijing (China). Inst. of Atomic Energy)

    1991-02-01

    An in-pile test of PWR fuel bundle has been conducted in HWRR at IAE of China. This paper describes the structure of the test bundle (3x3-2), fabrication process and quality control of the fuel rod, irradiation conditions and the main Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) results. The test fuel bundle was irradiated under the PWR operation and water chemistry conditions with an average linear power of 381 W/cm and reached an average burnup of 25010 MWd/tU of the fuel bundle. After the test, destructive and non-destructive examination of the fuel rods was conducted at hot laboratories. The fission gas release was 10.4-23%. The ridge height of cladding was 3 to 8 {mu}m. The hydrogen content of the cladding was 80 to 140 ppm. The fuel stack height was increased by 2.9 to 3.3 mm. The relative irradiation growth was about 0.11 to 0.17% of the fuel rod length. During the irradiation test, no fuel rod failure or other abnormal phenomena had been found by the on-line fuel failure monitoring system of the test loop and water sampling analysis. The structure of the test fuel assembly was left undamaged without twist and detectable deformation. (orig.).

  7. Development of PHWR fuel fabrication in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, K.S.; Yang, M.S.; Kim, D.H.; Rim, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    Korea Advanced Energy Research Institute (KAERI) started a research project to develop the PHWR (CANDU) nuclear fuel fabrication technology in 1981. Based on the results of the intensive developmental work, several prototype fuel bundles were fabricated and tested in the Hot Test Loop at KAERI continuously in 1983 and 1984. After that, irradiation test and post-irradiation examination were carried out for two KAERI-made fuel bundles at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories in Canada in 1984. Since the results of in-pile and out-of-pile tests with prototype fuel bundles proved to be satisfactory, 48 additional fuel bundles were loaded in Wolsung reactor (CANDU) in 1984 and 1985, and all of them were discharged without a defect after excellent performance in the power reactor. In 1985, the Korean government decided that KAERI supplies all the fuel necessary for the Wolsung reactor. For the mass production of nuclear fuel bundle, several process equipment, facilities and automation methods have been improved making use of experience accumulated during research. A quality assurance program was also established, and quality inspection technology was reviewed and improved to fit the mass production. This paper deals with the development experience so far obtained with the design and fabrication of the Korean PHWR fuel

  8. Implementation of a cabin X-rays in hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berduola, F.; Caral, L.

    2001-01-01

    The Fabrice process for the reconstituted short length irradiated rods in a hot cell was developed by the CEA especially for power ramp testing. This technique requires intricate operations in a hot cell with specially adapted equipment and great skill people. And end plug is inserted under pressure and fitted to the opening end of a cladding tube. The meeting surfaces of the en plug and the opening end are welded by a TIG (tunsten inert gas) process. Nevertheless, somo predominate defects may occur in the end plug weld joints, such as lack of penetration and cavity. So, particular attention must be paid to non-destructive examination in particular X-ray control of welding areas. A radioscopy technique has been applied to the control of TIG welds of the end plugs to rod assemblies in a hot cell mock-up to be tested under realistic geometric conditions. This X-rays method enables immediate monitoring of any welding defaults on a TV screen. A remote positioning system for the Fabrice rod is being developed to position fuel rods below a X-ray source. Radioscopy pictures will be recorded during remote positioning of the rod movement. This document presents the modifications achieved by the constructor in cooperation with our laboratory staff, concerning the nuclearization of the apparatus as well as its implementation in the shielded hot cell n paragraph 2 of the CEA-DEC/SLS/LECA Laboratory in Cadarache. Hot operation of the rod positioner is planned for september 2022 because of recent refurbishing works in the plant. (Author)

  9. Hot atom chemistry of carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.P.

    1975-01-01

    The chemistry of energetic carbon atoms is discussed. The experimental approach to studies that have been carried out is described and the mechanistic framework of hot carbon atom reactions is considered in some detail. Finally, the direction that future work might take is examined, including the relationship of experimental to theoretical work. (author)

  10. A Study on Structural Strength of Irradiated Spacer Grid for PWR Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Y. G.; Baek, S. J.; Kim, D. S.; Yoo, B. O.; Ahn, S. B.; Chun, Y. B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J. I.; Kim, Y. H.; Lee, J. J. [KEPCO NF, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    A fuel assembly consists of an array of fuel rods, spacer grids, guide thimbles, instrumentation tubes, and top and bottom nozzles. In PWR (Pressurized light Water Reactor) fuel assemblies, the spacer grids support the fuel rods by the friction forces between the fuel rods and springs/dimples. Under irradiation, the spacer grids supporting the fuel rods absorb vibration impacts due to the reactor coolant flow, and also bear static and dynamic loads during operation inside the nuclear reactor and transportation for spent fuel storage. Thus, it is important to understand the characteristics of deformation behavior and the change in structural strength of an irradiated spacer grid.. In the present study, the static compression test of a spacer grid was conducted to investigate the structural strength of the irradiated spacer grid in a hot cell at IMEF (Irradiated Materials Examination Facility) of KAERI. To evaluate the structural strength of an irradiated spacer grid, hot cell tests were carried out at IMEF of KAERI. The fuel assembly was dismantled and the irradiated spacer grid was obtained for the compression test. The apparatus for measuring the compression strength of the irradiated spacer grid was developed and installed successfully in the hot cell.

  11. Progress on the Application of Metallic Fuels for Actinide Transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, J. Rory; Fielding, Randall; Janney, Dawn; Mariani, Robert; Teague, Melissa; Egeland, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is developing actinide bearing alloy metallic fuels intended for effecting the transmutation of long-lived isotopes in fast reactor application as part of a partitioning and transmutation strategy. This presentation will report on progress in three areas of this effort: demonstration of the fabrication of fuels under remote (hot cell) conditions directly coupled to the product from the Pyro-processing of spent fuel as part of the Joint Fuel Cycle Studies (JFCS) collaboration with the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI); the chemical sequestration of lanthanide fission products to mitigate fuel-cladding-chemical-interaction (FCCI); and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) studies on the as-cast microstructure of the metallic fuel alloy. For the JFCS efforts, we report on the implementation of the Glove-box Advanced Casting System (GACS) as a prototype casting furnace for eventual installation into the INL Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) where the recycled fuel will be cast. Results from optimising process parameters with respect to fuel characteristics, americium volatility, materials interaction, and lanthanide fission product carry over distribution will be discussed. With respect to the lanthanide carry over from the Pyro-processing product, encouraging studies on concepts to chemically sequester the FCCI promoting lanthanides within the fuel matrix thus inhibiting migration and interaction with the cladding will be presented. Finally, in relation to advanced modelling and simulation efforts, detailed investigations and interpretation on the nano-scale as cast microstructure of possible recycle fuel composition containing U, Pu, Am, Np as well as carry-over lanthanide species will be discussed. These studies are important for establishing the initial conditions from which advanced physics based fuel performance codes will run. (authors)

  12. Techniques and results of examination of fission product release from VVER fuel rods with artificial defects and a burnup of ∼60 MWd/kgU at the MIR loop facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burukin, A.; Goryachev, A.; Ilyenko, S.; Izhutov, A.; Konyashov, V.; Shishin, V.; Shulimov, V.; Luzanova, L.; Miglo, V.

    2009-01-01

    Complex of equipment and several techniques for examination of radioactive fission product release from defective fuel rods were developed, prepared and tested at the PV-1 loop facility of the MIR reactor. During the first test, which was conducted at the PV-1 loop facility and aimed at testing of developed equipment and techniques, measurement of radioactive fission product release from an experimental re-fabricated fuel rod with a burnup of ∼60 MWd/kgU and an artificial defect was performed under design-basis steady-state operating conditions of the VVER-1000 reactor. PIE of all main parameters of the experimental defective fuel rod did not reveal any state peculiarities which could be caused by the artificial defect, i.e. fuel and cladding characteristics in the defect area did not differ from the initial ones (before testing) as well as their characteristics in areas distant from the defect; they are typical for fuel rods with a similar irradiation history in the VVER NPP. The gap in the experimental fuel rod was bridged due to close contact between fuel and cladding at increased fuel burnup; it can appreciable reduce release of radioactive fission products into the PV-1 primary coolant. This suggestion and quantitative characteristics of effect of gap bridging in a high-burnup fuel rod on radioactive fission product release should be investigated during the next tests performed at the PV-1 loop facility. Values of radioactive fission product release measured during the first test at the PV-1 loop facility in the MIR reactor will be used for development of an empirical engineering model in order to take into account high burnup effects and their impact on fission product release from fuel and defective fuel rods

  13. Qualification of high-density fuel manufacturing for research reactors at CNEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelfang, P.; Alvarez, L.; Boero, N.; Calabrese, R.; De La Fuente, M.; Echenique, P.; Markiewicz, M.; Pasqualini, E.; Ruggirello, G.; Taboada, H. [CNEA, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    CNEA, the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina, is at the present a qualified supplier of uranium oxide fuel for research reactors. A new objective in this field is to develop and qualify the manufacturing of LEU high-density fuel for this type of reactors. According with the international trend Silicide fuel and U-xMo fuel are included in our program as the most suitable options. The facilities to complete the qualification of high-density MTR fuels, like the manufacturing plant installations, the reactor, the pool side fuel examination station and the hot cells are fully operational and equipped to perform all the activities required within the program. The programs for both type of fuels include similar activities: development and set up of the fuel material manufacturing technology, set up of fuel plate manufacturing, fabrication and irradiation of miniplates, fabrication and irradiation of full scale fuel elements, post-irradiation examination and feedback for manufacturing improvements. For silicide fuels most of these steps have already been completed. For U-xMo fuel the activities also include the development of alternative ways to obtain U-xMo powder, feasibility studies for large-scale manufacturing and the economical assessment. Set up of U-xMo fuel plate manufacturing is also well advanced and the fabrication of the first full scale prototype is foreseen during this year. (author)

  14. Experimental support of WWER-440 fuel reliability and serviceability at high burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, A; Ivanov, V; Pnyushkin, A [Nauchno-Issledovatel` skij Inst. Atomnykh Reaktorov, Dimitrovgrad (Russian Federation); Tzibulya, V [AO Mashinostroitelnij Zavod Electrostal (Russian Federation); Kolosovsky, V; Bibilashvili, Yu [Vsesoyuznyj Nauchno-Issledovatel` skij Inst. Neorganicheskikh Materialov, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dubrovin, K [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    Results from post-reactor examination of two WWER-440 fuel assemblies spent at the Kola NPP Unit 3 during 4 and 5 fuel cycles are presented. The fuel assembly states and their serviceability allowance are estimated experimentally at the RIAR hot laboratory and studied by non-destructive and destructive methods. The following parameters are examined: fuel assembly overall dimensions change; fuel element diameter change; fuel element cladding corrosion and hydriding; fuel element cladding mechanical properties; fission gas release from fuel and gas pressure; fuel macro- and microstructure. it has been found that the maximum fuel burnup of fuel assemblies No. 1 and No.2 achieved is 58.3 and 64.0 MWd/kg, respectively. The mechanical fuel pellets-cladding interaction has been observed at the average fuel burnup above 45 MWd/kg that occurred with increasing the local cladding diameter at the areas of pellets end arrangement (bamboo stick). The gas release linearly increases at the range 2.7% per 10 MWd/kg within burnup of 43-60 MWd/kg. 9 figs., 3 refs.

  15. Packaging and transport case of test fuel assembly irradiated in the Creys-Malville reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geffroy, J.; Vivien, J.; Pouard, M.; Dujardin, G.N.; Veron, B.; Michoux, H.

    1986-06-01

    Some irradiated fuel assemblies from the fast neutron Creys Malville reactor will be sent to hot laboratories to follow fuel behavior. These test assemblies will be examined after a limited cooling time and transport is realized at high residual power (about 10kW) and cladding temperature should not rise over 500deg C. The fuel assemblies are not dismantled and transported into sodium. The assembly is placed into a case containing sodium plugged and put into a packaging. Dimensioning, thermal behavior, radiation protection and containment are examined [fr

  16. The development of in-process inventory walk-through examination system in the process at borrowing inspection between LEU fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Norihito; Namekawa, Masaru; Owada, Isao; Kikuchi, Masaru; Kodani, Yoshiki; Nozawa, Yukio

    2005-01-01

    Since the Nuclear Material Control Center (NMCC) was designed the safeguards inspection organization by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) in December 1999, the NMCC has been performing safeguards inspection for the Nuclear Facilities in Japan. The NMCC has carried out the safeguards inspections to LEU Fuel Fabrication Plants (FFPs) and the NMCC has improved the method of safeguards inspection as it has changed over to the integrated safeguards from the year of 2005. Concerning the Borrowing inspection between LEU FFPs, which is the precondition to change over to the integrated safeguards, it is needed to estimate the entire inventory in the facility within the limited time. Therefore, the NMCC has developed the system called IWES (In-process inventory Walk-through Examination System) to examine the inventory in process smoothly, quickly and correctly at borrowing inspection, check the entire inventory quantity and evaluate them. This report describes how IWES aiming at effective/efficient confirmation of in-process inventory has been developed and how it is applied to the borrowing inspection activities. (author)

  17. Hot tub folliculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... survives in hot tubs, especially tubs made of wood. Symptoms The first symptom of hot tub folliculitis ... may help prevent the problem. Images Hair follicle anatomy References D'Agata E. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other ...

  18. Residential solar hot water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-06-01

    This report examines the feasibility of using solar energy to preheat domestic water coming from the city supply at a temperature of approximately 4{degree}C. Four solar collectors totalling 7 m{sup 2} were installed on a support structure facing south at an angle of 60{degree} from the horizontal. The system worked most efficiently in the spring and early summer when the combination of long hours of sunshine, clean air and clear skies allowed for maximum availability of solar radiation. Performance dropped in late summer and fall mainly due to cloudier weather conditions. The average temperature in the storage tank over the 10 months of operation was 42{degree}C, ranging from a high of 83{degree}C in July to a low of 6{degree}C in November. The system provided a total of 7.1 GJ, which is approximately one-third the annual requirement for domestic hot water heating. At the present time domestic use of solar energy to heat water does not appear to be economically viable. High capital costs are the main problem. As a solar system with present day technology can only be expected to meet half to two-thirds of the hot water energy demand the savings are not sufficient for the system to pay for itself within a few years. 5 figs.

  19. Irradiation of a 19 pin subassembly with mixed carbide fuel in KNK II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geithoff, D.; Mühling, G.; Richter, K.

    1992-06-01

    The presentation deals with the fabrication, irradiation and nondestructive postirradiation examinations of LMR fuel pins with mixed (U, Pu)-carbide fuels. The mixed carbide fuel was fabricated by the European Institute of Transuranium Elements using various fabrication procedures. Fuel composition varied therefore in a wide range of tolerances with respect to oxygen and phase content and microstructure. The 19 carbide pins were irradiated in the fast neutron flux of the KNK II reactor to a burn-up of about 7 at% without any failure in the centre of a KNK "carrier element" at a maximum linear rating of 800 W/cm. After dismantling in the Hot Cells of KfK nondestructive examinations were carried out comprising dimensional controls, radiography, γ-scanning and eddy-current testing. The results indicate differences in fuel behaviour with respect to composition of the fuel.

  20. Irradiation test plan of instrumented capsule(05F-01K) for nuclear fuel irradiation in Hanaro (Revision 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Jae Min; Kim, B. G.; Choi, M. H. (and others)

    2006-09-15

    An instrumented capsule was developed to be able to measure fuel characteristics, such as fuel temperature, internal pressure of fuel rod, fuel pellet elongation, and neutron flux, etc., during the irradiation test of nuclear fuel in HANARO. The instrumented capsule for measuring and monitoring fuel centerline temperature and neutron flux was designed and manufactured. And then, to verify the design of the instrumented capsule in the test hole, it was successfully irradiated in the test hole of HANARO from March 14, 2003 to June 1, 2003 (53.84 full power days at 24 MW). In the year of 2004, 3 test fuel rods and the 03F-05K instrumented fuel capsule were designed and fabricated to measure fuel centerline temperature, internal pressure of fuel rod, and fuel axial deformation during irradiation test. Now, this capsule was successfully irradiated in the test hole OR5 of HANARO reactor from April 27, 2004 to October 1, 2004 (59.5 full power days at 24-30 MW). The capsule and fuel rods have been be dismantled and fuel rods have been examined at the hot cell of IMEF. The instrumented fuel capsule (05F-01K) was designed and manufactured for a design verification test of the dual instrumented fuel rods. The irradiation test of the 05F-01K instrumented fuel capsule will be carried out at the OR5 vertical experimental hole of HANARO.

  1. Hot Hydrogen Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W. David Swank

    2007-01-01

    The core in a nuclear thermal rocket will operate at high temperatures and in hydrogen. One of the important parameters in evaluating the performance of a nuclear thermal rocket is specific impulse, ISp. This quantity is proportional to the square root of the propellant's absolute temperature and inversely proportional to square root of its molecular weight. Therefore, high temperature hydrogen is a favored propellant of nuclear thermal rocket designers. Previous work has shown that one of the life-limiting phenomena for thermal rocket nuclear cores is mass loss of fuel to flowing hydrogen at high temperatures. The hot hydrogen test facility located at the Idaho National Lab (INL) is designed to test suitability of different core materials in 2500 C hydrogen flowing at 1500 liters per minute. The facility is intended to test non-uranium containing materials and therefore is particularly suited for testing potential cladding and coating materials. In this first installment the facility is described. Automated Data acquisition, flow and temperature control, vessel compatibility with various core geometries and overall capabilities are discussed

  2. Modelling Hot Air Balloons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimicombe, M. W.

    1991-01-01

    A macroscopic way of modeling hot air balloons using a Newtonian approach is presented. Misleading examples using a car tire and the concept of hot air rising are discussed. Pressure gradient changes in the atmosphere are used to explain how hot air balloons work. (KR)

  3. Remarks to the hot channel power characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinka, I.; Tinkova, E.

    2002-01-01

    In connection with methodological improvements of safety analyses, some effects of detail power distributions, that should be taken into account for the hot channel characteristics determination, have been studied. This determination concerns the whole channel power (power of the fuel rod) and its axial (along the channel) and radial (across the fuel pellet radius) distribution. The total power of the channel is studied from the point of possible restrictions for different numbers of main cooling loops in operation. For radial power distribution the effect of burnup has been studied and for axial distribution the effect of the control rod vicinity (its coupler part) has been evaluated. The DNBR and fuel temperatures have been the key safety parameters influenced by these hot channel characteristics and have been evaluated in this study (Authors)

  4. Workbench experiments on interaction of nuclear fuel with channel reactor materials: the LFCM congestions criticality and accident scenario in both re-examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryakhtar, V.; Gonchar, V.; Zhidkov, A.

    2002-01-01

    The heavy radioecological consequences of 1986 accident were mainly stipulated by destruction of both a significant part of fuel envelopes and fuel matrix due to high-temperature interaction with silicates, when nuclear fuel has lost an important property to keep the fission products inside its volume. In this respect the silicate material application in thermal-insulating filling is a crucial fault had been made when Chornobyl NPP channel reactor designing

  5. Decommissioning program and future plan for research hot laboratory (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koya, Toshio; Nozawa, Yukio; Hanada, Yasushi; Ono, Katsuto; Kanazawa, Hiroyuki; Nihei, Yasuo; Owada, Isao

    2010-01-01

    The Research Hot Laboratory (RHL) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was constructed in 1961, as the first one in JAPAN, to perform the examinations of irradiated fuels and materials. RHL consists of 10 heavy concrete cells and 38 lead cells, which had been contributed to research and development program in or out of JAEA for the investigation of irradiation behavior for fuels and nuclear materials. However, RHL is the one of target as the rationalization program for decrepit facilities in former Tokai institute. Therefore the decommissioning works of RHL have been started on April 2003. The decommissioning work will be progressing, dismantling the lead cells and decontamination of concrete caves then release in the regulation of controlled area. The 18 lead cells (including semi-hot cell and junior-cell) had been dismantled. Removal of the applause from the cells, survey of the contamination revel in the lead cells and prediction of radio active waste have been finished as the preparing work for dismantling of the remained 20 lead cells. The future plan of decommissioning work has been prepared to incarnate the basic vision and dismantling procedure. (author)

  6. Fresh-Core Reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) Reactor with Uranium(20)-Erbium-Zirconium-Hydride Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Thomas L. Maddock; Margaret A. Marshall; Leland M. Montierth

    2011-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA® (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The 60-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The initial critical configuration developed during the fuel loading process, which contains only 56 fuel elements, has not been evaluated as it is very similar to the evaluated core configuration. The benchmark eigenvalue is 1.0012 ± 0.0029. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (~±1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  7. Fresh-Core Reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) Reactor with Uranium(20)-Erbium-Zirconium-Hydride Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Thomas L. Maddock; Margaret A. Marshall; Leland M. Montierth

    2013-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA® (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The initial critical configuration developed during the fuel loading process, which contains only 56 fuel elements, has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The 60-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has also been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (~±1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  8. Fresh-Core Reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) Reactor with Uranium(20)-Erbium-Zirconium-Hydride Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bess, John D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maddock, Thomas L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Marshall, Margaret A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Montierth, Leland M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Ning [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Phillips, Ann Marie [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schreck, Kenneth A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Briggs, J. Blair [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Woolstenhulme, Eric W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bolin, John M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Veca, Anthony [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); McKnight, Richard D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lell, Richard M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA® (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The 60-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The initial critical configuration developed during the fuel loading process, which contains only 56 fuel elements, has not been evaluated as it is very similar to the evaluated core configuration. The benchmark eigenvalue is 1.0012 ± 0.0029. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (~±1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  9. Menopausal Hot Flashes and White Matter Hyperintensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Rebecca C.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Derby, Carol A.; Sejdić, Ervin; Maki, Pauline M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hot flashes are the classic menopausal symptom. Emerging data links hot flashes to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, yet how hot flashes are related to brain health is poorly understood. We examined the relationship between hot flashes - measured via physiologic monitor and self-report - and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) among midlife women. Methods Twenty midlife women ages 40-60 without clinical CVD, with their uterus and both ovaries, and not taking hormone therapy were recruited. Women underwent 24 hours of ambulatory physiologic and diary hot flash monitoring to quantify hot flashes; magnetic resonance imaging to assess WMH burden; 72 hours of actigraphy and questionnaires to quantify sleep; and a blood draw, questionnaires, and physical measures to quantify demographics and CVD risk factors. Test of a priori hypotheses regarding relations between physiologically-monitored and self-reported wake and sleep hot flashes and WMH were conducted in linear regression models. Results More physiologically-monitored hot flashes during sleep were associated with greater WMH, controlling for age, race, and body mass index [beta(standard error)=.0002 (.0001), p=.03]. Findings persisted controlling for sleep characteristics and additional CVD risk factors. No relations were observed for self-reported hot flashes. Conclusions More physiologically-monitored hot flashes during sleep were associated with greater WMH burden among midlife women free of clinical CVD. Results suggest that relations between hot flashes and CVD risk observed in the periphery may extend to the brain. Future work should consider the unique role of sleep hot flashes in brain health. PMID:26057822

  10. Technical report: fabrication of PWR type rodlet fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Uno, Hisao; Sasajima, Hideo

    1990-06-01

    With respect to the simulated reactivity initiated accident (RIA) experiments with pre-irradiated LWR type fuel rods at nuclear safety research reactor (NSRR), there were principally three technical difficulties which should be overcome: (1) Fabrication of the rodlet fuel; Fuel rods from the commercial power reactors had an active column length by 3.6m. To utilize this for NSRR pulse experiment, rodlet fuel having an active column length by 0.12m (reduced to one thirtieth) is requested to fabricate without changing the inside fuel conditions. (2) Development of in-core instrumentations: During pre-irradiation stages, a long-sized fuel rod had dimensional changes by waterside corrosion, bowing, creep down and so on. The fuel also had greater amount of radioactive fission products. This condition is significant to in-core instrumentations to be attached to the fuel rods. Well characterized data to be obtained from these, however, are quite necessary and important from research point of view. Remote handling techniques to attach the rod pressure sensor, the cladding extensometer, the fuel extensometer, and the cladding surface thermocouple to pre-irradiated fuel rods are, therefore, requested to develop. (3) Installation of PIE equipments for pulsed rodlet fuels: PIE on the pulsed rodlet fuels are necessary to better understanding the fuel performance detaily. Equipments which can easily detect the data related to PCMI type fuel failure are matter of concern. Since 1986, the technical difficulties have been tried to overcome by all staffs belonging to Reactivity Accident Laboratory, NSRR Operation Division, Department of Reactor Fuel Examination and Hot Laboratory. This report describes the technical achievements obtained through four years work. (author)

  11. Small-scale irradiated fuel electrorefining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, R.W.; Krsul, J.R.; Mariani, R.D.; Park, K.; Teske, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    In support of the metallic fuel cycle development for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR), a small scale electrorefiner was built and operated in the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at Argonne National Laboratory-West. The initial purpose of this apparatus was to test the single segment dissolution of irradiated metallic fuel via either direct dissolution in cadmium or anodic dissolution. These tests showed that 99.95% of the uranium and 99.99% of the plutonium was dissolved and separated from the fuel cladding material. The fate of various fission products was also measured. After the dissolution experiments, the apparatus was upgraded to stady fission product behavior during uranium electrotransport. Preliminary decontamination factors were estimated for different fission products under different processing conditions. Later modifications have added the following capabilities: Dissolution of multiple fuel segments simultaneously, electrotransport to a solid cathode or liquid cathode and actinide recovery with a chemical reduction crucible. These capabilities have been tested with unirradiated uranium-zirconium fuel and will support the Fuel Cycle Demonstration program

  12. Fuel deposits, chemistry and CANDU® reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.G.

    2014-01-01

    'Hot conditioning' is a process which occurs as part of commissioning and initial start-up of each CANDU® reactor, the first being the Nuclear Power Demonstration - 2 reactor (NPD). Later, understanding of the cause of the failure of the Pickering Unit 1 G16 fuel channelled to a revised approach to 'hot conditioning', initially demonstrated on Bruce Unit 5. The difference being that during 'hot conditioning' of CANDU® heat transport systems fuel was not in-core until Bruce Unit 5. The 'hot conditioning' processes will be briefly described along with the consequences to fuel. (author)

  13. The operation of post-irradiation examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Ka; Min, Duk Ki; Lee, Young Kil

    1994-12-01

    The operation of post-irradiation examination facility was performed as follow. HVAC and pool water treatment system were continuously operated, and radiation monitoring in PIE facility has been carried out to maintain the facility safely. Inspection of the fuel assembly (F02) transported from Kori Unit 1 was performed in pool, and fuel rods extracted from the fuel assembly (J44) of Kori Unit 2 NPP were examined in hot cell. A part of deteriorated pipe line of drinking water was exchanged for stainless steel pipe to prevent leaking accidents. Halon gas system was also installed in the exhausting blower room for fire fighting. And IAEA inspection camera for safeguard of nuclear materials was fixed at the wall in pool area. Radiation monitoring system were improved to display the area radioactive value at CRT monitor in health physics control room. And automatic check system for battery and emergency diesel generator was developed to measure the voltage and current of them. The performance test of oxide thickness measuring device installed in hot cell for irradiated fuel rod and improvement of the device were performed, and good measuring results using standard sample were obtained. The safeguard inspection of nuclear materials and operation inspection of the facility were carried out through the annual operation inspection, quarterly IAEA inspection and quality assurance auditing. 26 tabs., 43 figs., 14 refs. (Author) .new

  14. 40 CFR 86.1238-96 - Hot soak test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....1238-96 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... as preparation for the hot soak test. (2) Gaseous-fueled vehicles. Since gaseous-fueled vehicles are.... (iii) Fresh impingers shall be installed in the methanol sample collection system immediately prior to...

  15. 40 CFR 86.138-96 - Hot soak test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....138-96 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... preparation for the hot soak test. (2) Gaseous-fueled vehicles. Since gaseous-fueled vehicles are not required.... (iii) Fresh impingers shall be installed in the methanol sample collection system immediately prior to...

  16. PWR fuel inspection and repair technology development in the Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.Y.

    1998-01-01

    As of September 1997, 10 PWRs and 2 PHWRs generate 10,320MW electricity in Korea. And another 8 PWRs and 2 PHWRs will be constructed by 2006. These will need about 400 MTU of PWR fuels and 400 MTU of PHWR fuels. To improve average burnup, thermal power, fuel usability and plant safety, better poolside fuel service technologies are strongly recommended as well as the fuel design and fabrication technology improvements. During the last twenty years of nuclear power plant operation in Korea, more than 4,000 fuel assemblies has been used. At the site, continuous coolant activity measurement, pool-side visual inspection and ultrasonic tests have been performed. Some of the fuels are damaged or failed for various reasons. Some of the defected fuels were examined in hot cell to investigate the cause of failure. Even though 30 PWR fuel assemblies were repaired by foreign engineers, fuel inspection and repair technologies are not established yet. Various kind of design for the fuel make the inspection, repair and reconstitution equipment more complex. As a result, recently, a plant to obtain overall technology for poolside fuel inspection, failed fuel repair and reconstitution through R and D activities are set forth. (author)

  17. Experiences from Refurbishment of Metallography Hot Cells and Application of a New Preparation Concept for Materialography Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberlander, B. C.; Espeland, M.; Solum, N. O.

    2001-01-01

    After more than 30 years of operation the lead shielded metallography hot cells needed a basic renewal and modernisation not least of the specimen preparation equipment. Preparation in hot cells of radioactive samples for metallography and ceramography is challenging and time consuming. It demands a special design and quality of all in-cell equipment and skill and patience from the operator. Essentials in the preparation process are: simplicity and reliability of the machines, and a good quality, reproducibility and efficiency in performance. Desirable is process automation, flexibility and an alara amounto of radioactive waste produced per sample prepared. State of the art preparation equipment for materialography seems to meet most of the demands, however, it cannot be used in hot cells without modifications. Therefore. IFE and Struers in Copenhagen modified a standard model of a Strues precision cutting machine and a microprocessor controlled grinding and polishing machine for Hot Cell application. Hot cell utilisation of the microcomputer controlled grinding and polishing machine and the existing automatic dosing equipment made the task of preparing radioactive samples more attractive. The new grinding and polishing system for hot cells provides good sample preparation quality and reproductibility at reduced preparation time and reduced amount of contaminated waste produced per sample prepared. the sample materials examined were irradiated cladding materials and fuels

  18. The Distinction of Hot Herbal Compress, Hot Compress, and Topical Diclofenac as Myofascial Pain Syndrome Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonruab, Jurairat; Nimpitakpong, Netraya; Damjuti, Watchara

    2018-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial aimed to investigate the distinctness after treatment among hot herbal compress, hot compress, and topical diclofenac. The registrants were equally divided into groups and received the different treatments including hot herbal compress, hot compress, and topical diclofenac group, which served as the control group. After treatment courses, Visual Analog Scale and 36-Item Short Form Health survey were, respectively, used to establish the level of pain intensity and quality of life. In addition, cervical range of motion and pressure pain threshold were also examined to identify the motional effects. All treatments showed significantly decreased level of pain intensity and increased cervical range of motion, while the intervention groups exhibited extraordinary capability compared with the topical diclofenac group in pressure pain threshold and quality of life. In summary, hot herbal compress holds promise to be an efficacious treatment parallel to hot compress and topical diclofenac.

  19. Activity of safety review for the facilities using nuclear material (2). Safety review results and maintenance experiences for hot laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amagai, Tomio; Fujishima, Tadatsune; Mizukoshi, Yasutaka; Sakamoto, Naoki; Ohmori, Tsuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    In the site of O-arai Research and Development Center of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), five hot laboratories for post-irradiation examination and development of plutonium fuels are operated more than 30 years. A safety review method for preventive maintenance on these hot laboratories includes test facilities and devices are established in 2003. After that, the safety review of these facilities and devices are done and taken the necessary maintenance based on the results in each year. In 2008, 372 test facilities and devices in these hot laboratories were checked and reviewed by this method. As a results of the safety review, repair issues of 38 facilities of above 372 facilities were resolved. This report shows the review results and maintenance experiences based on the results. (author)

  20. Fuel flexible distributed combustion for efficient and clean gas turbine engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, Ahmed E.E.; Gupta, Ashwani K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Examined distributed combustion for gas turbines applications using HiTAC. • Gaseous, liquid, conventional and bio-fuels are examined with ultra-low emissions. • Novel design of fuel flexibility without any atomizer for liquid fuel sprays. • Demonstrated fuel flexibility with emissions x and CO, low noise, enhanced stability, higher efficiency and alleviation of combustion instability. Distributed reaction conditions were achieved using swirl for desirable controlled mixing between the injected air, fuel and hot reactive gases from within the combustor prior to mixture ignition. In this paper, distributed combustion is further investigated using a variety of fuels. Gaseous (methane, diluted methane, hydrogen enriched methane and propane) and liquid fuels, including both traditional (kerosene) and alternate fuels (ethanol) that cover a wide range of calorific values are investigated with emphasis on pollutants emission and combustor performance with each fuel. For liquid fuels, no atomization or spray device was used. Performance evaluation with the different fuels was established to outline the flexibility of the combustor using a wide range of fuels of different composition, phase and calorific value with specific focus on ultra-low pollutants emission. Results obtained on pollutants emission and OH * chemiluminescence for the specific fuels at various equivalence ratios are presented. Near distributed combustion conditions with less than 8 PPM of NO emission were demonstrated under novel premixed conditions for the various fuels tested at heat (energy) release intensity (HRI) of 27 MW/m 3 -atm. and a rather high equivalence ratio of 0.6. Higher equivalence ratios lacked favorable distributed combustion conditions. For the same conditions, CO emission varied for each fuel; less than 10 ppm were demonstrated for methane based fuels, while heavier liquid fuels provided less than 40 ppm CO emissions. Lower emissions of NO ( x can be possible by

  1. Hot Cell Installation and Demonstration of the Severe Accident Test Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linton, Kory D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burns, Zachary M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yan, Yong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    A Severe Accident Test Station (SATS) capable of examining the oxidation kinetics and accident response of irradiated fuel and cladding materials for design basis accident (DBA) and beyond design basis accident (BDBA) scenarios has been successfully installed and demonstrated in the Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL), a hot cell facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The two test station modules provide various temperature profiles, steam, and the thermal shock conditions necessary for integral loss of coolant accident (LOCA) testing, defueled oxidation quench testing and high temperature BDBA testing. The installation of the SATS system restores the domestic capability to examine postulated and extended LOCA conditions on spent fuel and cladding and provides a platform for evaluation of advanced fuel and accident tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding concepts. This document reports on the successful in-cell demonstration testing of unirradiated Zircaloy-4. It also contains descriptions of the integral test facility capabilities, installation activities, and out-of-cell benchmark testing to calibrate and optimize the system.

  2. Post-irradiation examination of the first SAP clad UO{sub 2} fuel elements irradiated in the X-7 organic loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, R. D.; Aspila, K.

    1962-02-15

    Seven fuel elements composing the first in-reactor test at Chalk River of SAP sheathing were irradiated in the X-7 organic loop. Activity, denoting a fuel failure, was detected in the loop coolant immediately after reactor start up; the fuel string was consequently removed from the loop nine hours later. Leak tests disclosed that five of the seven elements were defective. Inspection of the specimens showed essentially no change in element dimensions. Practically no organic fouling film was observed on the surface of the SAP cladding; organic coolant was found inside four of the defective elements. The appearance of the UO{sub 2} fuel was consistent with the irradiation time and the heat ratings achieved during the test. (author)

  3. Post-Irradiation Examination of Fuel Pin R54-F20A, Irradiated in a NaK Environment. RCN Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwast, H.

    1972-12-01

    Fuel pin R54-F20A has been irradiated in a NaK-environment. Temperature measurements in the NaK were carried out at average linear fission powers of 552 and 825 W/cm respectively. A maximum average canning temperature of 920°C was reached. The fuel pin was irradiated for about 50 minutes at the maximum irradiation conditions, while the total irradiation time was two hours. The irradiation had to be broken off before the end condition was reached because of malfunctioning of the fuelfailure detection system. No power peaking did occur at the upper and lower interfaces between the 50%-enriched UO 2 - and the natural UO 2 + 8 w/o UB 4 pellet. About 35% of the fuel has molten, but the fuel pin did not fail. The irradiation has been carried out in the Poolside Facility (PSF) of the High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten. (author)

  4. Safety aspects of the IFR pyroprocess fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrester, R.J.; Lineberry, M.J.; Charak, I.; Tessier, J.H.; Solbrig, C.W.; Gabor, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper addresses the important safety considerations related to the unique Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle technology, the pyroprocess. Argonne has been developing the IFR since 1984. It is a liquid metal cooled reactor, with a unique metal alloy fuel, and it utilizes a radically new fuel cycle. An existing facility, the Hot Fuel Examination Facility-South (HFEF/S) is being modified and equipped to provide a complete demonstration of the fuel cycle. This paper will concentrate on safety aspects of the future HFEF/S operation, slated to begin late next year. HFEF/S is part of Argonne's complex of reactor test facilities located on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. HFEF/S was originally put into operation in 1964 as the EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) (Stevenson, 1987). From 1964--69 FCF operated to demonstrate an earlier and incomplete form of today's pyroprocess, recycling some 400 fuel assemblies back to EBR-II. The FCF mission was then changed to one of an irradiated fuels and materials examination facility, hence the name change to HFEF/S. The modifications consist of activities to bring the facility into conformance with today's much more stringent safety standards, and, of course, providing the new process equipment. The pyroprocess and the modifications themselves are described more fully elsewhere (Lineberry, 1987; Chang, 1987). 18 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Design, irradiation, and post-irradiation examination of the UC and (U,Pu)C fuel rods of the test groups Mol-11/K1 and Mol-11/K2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, D.; Elbel, H.; Steiner, H.

    1976-06-01

    The test groups K1 and K2 of the irradiation experiment Mol-11 are reported. Design, irradiation, and post-irradiation examination of the fuel rods irradiated are described. Mol-11/K1 consisted of one fuel rod with UC of 94% T.D. and helium bonding. This test group was intended to prove the high power irradiation capsule in pile. Mol-11/K2 consists of three fuel rods in total. One of these is presently still in the reactor. In this test group mixed carbide fuel of 83% T.D. and 15% Pu content under helium bonding is irradiated. The fuel rod K2-2 was provided with a capillary tube for the continuous measurement of fission gas pressure built up. 1.4988 stainless steel was chosen as cladding material. The final burnup lies between 35 and 70 MWd/kg M. Post-irradiation examination of the two test groups covers a theoretical analysis of the irradiation behaviour. (orig./GSCH) [de

  6. OECD-IAEA Paks Fuel Project. Detailed Description of the Results of Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-05-01

    On 10 April 2003 severe damage of fuel assemblies took place during an incident at Unit 2 of Paks Nuclear Power Plant in Hungary. The assemblies were being cleaned in a special tank below the water level of the spent fuel storage pool in order to remove crud buildup. That afternoon, the chemical cleaning of assemblies was completed and the fuel rods were being cooled by circulation of storage pool water. The first sign of fuel failure was the detection of some fission gases released from the cleaning tank during that evening. The cleaning tank cover locks were released after midnight and this operation was followed by a sudden increase in activity concentrations. The visual inspection revealed that all 30 fuel assemblies were severely damaged. The first evaluation of the event showed that the severe fuel damage happened due to inadequate coolant circulation within the cleaning tank. The damaged fuel assemblies will be removed from the cleaning tank in 2005 and will be stored in special canisters in the spent fuel storage pool of the Paks NPP. Following several discussions between expert from different countries and international organisations the OECD-IAEA Paks Fuel Project was proposed. The project is envisaged in two phases. - Phase 1 is to cover organization of visual inspection of material, preparation of database, performance of analyses and preparatory work for fuel examination. - Phase 2 is to cover the fuel transport and the hot cell examination

  7. Studsvik`s fuel R and D projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grounes, M [Studsvik Nuclearr AB, Nykoping (Sweden)

    1997-08-01

    The report reviews some recently performed, ongoing and planned fuel R and D projects, executed by Studsvik Nuclear AB, a subsidiary of Studsvik AB. Data from these projects are used as experimental support for fuel modelling at high burnup. Much of Studsvik Nuclear`s R and D work has been concentrated on fuel testing, which can be made in the R2 test reactor with high precision under realistic water reactor conditions. This type of work started in the early 1960s. The fuel testing projects executed at Studsvik have been organized under three different types of sponsorship: International (multilateral) fuel projects: jointly sponsored internationally on a world-wide basis, with project information remaining restricted to the project participants throughout the project`s duration and for some pre-determined time after project completion; Bilateral fuel projects: sponsored by one single organization, or a few co-operating organizations, with project information remaining restricted to the sponsor, sometimes published later; in-house R and D work: sponsored by Studsvik Nuclear. The fuel testing activities can be divided into a number of well-defined steps as follows: Base irradiation, performed in a power reactor, or in Studsvik`s R2 test reactor; power ramping and/or other in-pile measurements, performed in Studsvik`s R2 test reactor. Non-destructive testing between different phases of an experiment, performed in Studsvik`s R2 reactor pool, or in Studsvik`s Hot Cell Laboratory; destructive post-irradiation examinations, performed in Studsvik`s Hot Cell Laboratory, or in the sponsor`s hot cell laboratory. 47 refs, 2 tabs.

  8. Water for energy and fuel production

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Yatish T

    2014-01-01

    Water, in all its forms, may be the key to an environmentally friendly energy economy. Water is free, there is plenty of it, plus it carries what is generally believed to be the best long-term source of green energy-hydrogen. Water for Energy and Fuel Production explores the many roles of water in the energy and fuel industry. The text not only discusses water's use as a direct source of energy and fuel-such as hydrogen from water dissociation, methane from water-based clathrate molecules, hydroelectric dams, and hydrokinetic energy from tidal waves, off-shore undercurrents, and inland waterways-but also: Describes water's benign application in the production of oil, gas, coal, uranium, biomass, and other raw fuels, and as an energy carrier in the form of hot water and steam Examines water's role as a reactant, reaction medium, and catalyst-as well as steam's role as a reactant-for the conversion of raw fuels to synthetic fuels Explains how supercritical water can be used to convert fossil- and bio-based feed...

  9. IFR fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battles, J.E.; Miller, W.E.; Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    The next major milestone of the IFR program is engineering-scale demonstration of the pyroprocess fuel cycle. The EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility has just entered a startup phase, which includes completion of facility modifications and installation and cold checkout of process equipment. This paper reviews the development of the electrorefining pyroprocess, the design and construction of the facility for the hot demonstration, the design and fabrication of the equipment, and the schedule and initial plan for its operation

  10. Annual report on operation, utilization and technical development of hot laboratories. From April 1, 2001 to March 31, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-01-01

    This is an annual report in a fiscal year of 2001 that describes activities of the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF), the Waste Safety Testing Facility (WASTEF), and the Research Hot Laboratory (RHL) in the Department of Hot laboratories. In RFEF, PIEs including destructive and nondestructive tests were performed on a BWR fuel assembly and/or its fuel rod irradiated in the Fukushima-2 Nuclear Power Station Unit-1 and a fuel assembly with UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel pellets for Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute. In addition, 34 fuel assemblies irradiated in the nuclear ship ''Mutsu'' were conveyed from Mutsu Establishment, and re-assembly and PIEs for the assemblies were carried out. In WASTEF, tests for evaluating barrier performance in terms of disposal of waste, high temperature tests for evaluating stable on TRansUraniums (TRU) nitrides, leaching tests on Rock-like OXide (ROX) fuels were performed. The slow Strain Rate Tests (SSRT) apparatuses were installed for investigation of Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) on light water structural materials, and characterization tests for the apparatus were performed. In RHL, PIEs for light water reactor materials, fusion materials, and target materials of Proton Accelerator Facilities were carried out for laboratories in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. PIEs for zirconium alloys for ultra-high burn-up irradiated in the Kashiwazaki Nuclear Power Station Unit-5 were also performed. In order to investigate roots cause of pipe rupture in Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station Unit-1 of Chubu Electric Power Company, several examinations including SEM observation, EPMA, and Vickers hardness test were performed in those three facilities. The data from the examinations greatly contribute to clarify roots cause of the pipe rupture. (author)

  11. Annual report on operation, utilization and technical development of hot laboratories. From April 1, 2001 to March 31, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This is an annual report in a fiscal year of 2001 that describes activities of the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF), the Waste Safety Testing Facility (WASTEF), and the Research Hot Laboratory (RHL) in the Department of Hot laboratories. In RFEF, PIEs including destructive and nondestructive tests were performed on a BWR fuel assembly and/or its fuel rod irradiated in the Fukushima-2 Nuclear Power Station Unit-1 and a fuel assembly with UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel pellets for Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute. In addition, 34 fuel assemblies irradiated in the nuclear ship ''Mutsu'' were conveyed from Mutsu Establishment, and re-assembly and PIEs for the assemblies were carried out. In WASTEF, tests for evaluating barrier performance in terms of disposal of waste, high temperature tests for evaluating stable on TRansUraniums (TRU) nitrides, leaching tests on Rock-like OXide (ROX) fuels were performed. The slow Strain Rate Tests (SSRT) apparatuses were installed for investigation of Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) on light water structural materials, and characterization tests for the apparatus were performed. In RHL, PIEs for light water reactor materials, fusion materials, and target materials of Proton Accelerator Facilities were carried out for laboratories in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. PIEs for zirconium alloys for ultra-high burn-up irradiated in the Kashiwazaki Nuclear Power Station Unit-5 were also performed. In order to investigate roots cause of pipe rupture in Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station Unit-1 of Chubu Electric Power Company, several examinations including SEM observation, EPMA, and Vickers hardness test were performed in those three facilities. The data from the examinations greatly contribute to clarify roots cause of the pipe rupture. (author)

  12. Statistical Hot Channel Factors and Safety Limit CHFR/OFIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byeonghee; Park, Suki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The fuel integrity of research reactors are usually judged by comparing the critical heat flux ratio (CHFR) and the maximum fuel temperature (MFT) with the safety limits. Onset of flow instability ratio (OFIR) can also be used for the examination with CHFR. Hot channel factors (HCFs) are incorporated when calculating the CHFR/OFIR and MFT, to consider the uncertainties of fuel properties and thermo-hydraulic variables affecting them. The HCFs and safety limit CHFR is sometimes estimated to include too much conservatism, deteriorating the design flexibilities and operating margins. In this paper, a statistical estimation of HCFs and the safety limit CHFR/OFIR is presented by a random sampling of uncertainty parameters. A 15MW pool type research reactor is selected as the sample reactor for the estimation. The HCFs and the safety limit CHFR/OFIR of a 15MW pool type research reactor are evaluated statistically. The parameters affecting the HCF and the safety limit CHFR/OFIR are listed and their uncertainties are estimated. The relevant parameter uncertainties are sampled randomly and the HCFs and the safety limits are evaluated from them. The HCFs and the safety limit CHFR/OFIR with 95% probability are smaller than those estimated deterministically because the statistical evaluation convolute the correlation uncertainties and the other uncertainties in probabilistic way, whereas the deterministic evaluation simply multiply them.

  13. Statistical calculation of hot channel factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhadi, K.

    2007-01-01

    It is a conventional practice in the design of nuclear reactors to introduce hot channel factors to allow for spatial variations of power generation and flow distribution. Consequently, it is not enough to be able to calculate the nominal temperature distributions of fuel element, cladding, coolant, and central fuel. Indeed, one must be able to calculate the probability that the imposed temperature or heat flux limits in the entire core is not exceeded. In this paper, statistical methods are used to calculate hot channel factors for a particular case of a heterogeneous, Material Testing Reactor (MTR) and compare the results obtained from different statistical methods. It is shown that among the statistical methods available, the semi-statistical method is the most reliable one

  14. Eddy current examination of the nuclear fuel elements with aluminum 1100-F cladding of IPR-R1 research reactor: An initial study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Roger F. da; Silva Júnior, Silvério F. da; Frade, Rangel T.; Rodrigues, Juliano S.

    2017-01-01

    Tubes of aluminum 1100-F as well as tubes of AISI 304 stainless steel are used as cladding of the fuel elements of TRIGA IPR-R1 nuclear research reactor. Usually, these tubes are inspected by means of visual test and sipping test. The visual test allows the detection of changes occurred at the external fuel elements surface, such as those promoted by corrosion processes. However, this test method cannot be used for detection of internal discontinuities at the tube walls. Sipping test allows the detection of fuel elements whose cladding has failed, but it is not able to determine the place where the discontinuity is located. On the other hand, eddy current testing, an electromagnetic nondestructive test method, allows the detection of discontinuities and monitoring their growth. In previous works, the application of eddy current testing to evaluate the AISI 304 cladding fuel elements of TRIGA IPR-R1 was studied. In this paper, it is proposed an initial study about the use of eddy current testing for detection and characterization of discontinuities in the aluminum 1100-F fuel elements cladding. The study includes the development of probes and the design and manufacture of reference standards. (author)

  15. Eddy current examination of the nuclear fuel elements with aluminum 1100-F cladding of IPR-R1 research reactor: An initial study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Roger F. da; Silva Júnior, Silvério F. da; Frade, Rangel T. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nucelar (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Rodrigues, Juliano S., E-mail: rfs@cdtn.br, E-mail: silvasf@cdtn.br, E-mail: rtf@cdtn.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Tubes of aluminum 1100-F as well as tubes of AISI 304 stainless steel are used as cladding of the fuel elements of TRIGA IPR-R1 nuclear research reactor. Usually, these tubes are inspected by means of visual test and sipping test. The visual test allows the detection of changes occurred at the external fuel elements surface, such as those promoted by corrosion processes. However, this test method cannot be used for detection of internal discontinuities at the tube walls. Sipping test allows the detection of fuel elements whose cladding has failed, but it is not able to determine the place where the discontinuity is located. On the other hand, eddy current testing, an electromagnetic nondestructive test method, allows the detection of discontinuities and monitoring their growth. In previous works, the application of eddy current testing to evaluate the AISI 304 cladding fuel elements of TRIGA IPR-R1 was studied. In this paper, it is proposed an initial study about the use of eddy current testing for detection and characterization of discontinuities in the aluminum 1100-F fuel elements cladding. The study includes the development of probes and the design and manufacture of reference standards. (author)

  16. Experimental approach to Chernobyl hot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tcherkezian, V.; Shkinev, V.; Khitrov, L.; Kolesov, G.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental approach to the investigation of Chernobyl hot particles and some results are presented in this study. Hot particles (HP) were picked out from soil samples collected during the 1986-1990 radiogeochemical expeditions in the contaminated zone (within 30 km of the Nuclear Power Plant). A number of hot particles were studied to estimate their contribution to the total activity, investigate their surface morphology and determine the size distribution. Hot particles contribution to the total activity in the 30 km zone was found to be not less than 65%. Investigation of HP element composition (by neutron activation analysis and EPMA) and radionuclide composition (direct alpha- and gamma-spectrometry, including determination of Pu and Am in Hp) revealed certain peculiarities of HP, collected in the vicinity of the damaged Nuclear Power Plant. Some particles were shown to contain uranium and fission products in proportion to one another, correlating with those in the partially burnt fuel, which proves their 'fuel' origin. Another part of the HP samples has revealed element fractionation as well as the presence of some terrestrial components. (Author)

  17. Current status and future prospects of JMTR Hot Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Osamu; Ooka, Norikazu; Hoshiya, Taiji

    1999-01-01

    A wide variety of post-irradiation examinations (PIEs) for research and development of nuclear fuels and materials to be utilized in nuclear field is available in three kinds of β - γ hot cells; concrete, lead and steel cells in the JMTR Hot Laboratory (JMTR HL) associated with the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). In addition to PIEs, re-capsuling including re-instrumentation on the irradiated specimen is currently conducted for the power ramping tests of the LWR fuels using the Boiling Water Capsule (BOCA) or for the re-irradiation tests in the different neutron fields (coupling irradiation test). The newly developed techniques by the JMTR HL have provided us with the key information about the irradiation effects on mechanical and physical properties of the specimen in various environments as fission and fusion reactors. These techniques are focused on several topics as follows; (1) miniaturized specimen test as an advanced mechanical test, (2) slow strain rate tensile test (SSRT) and crack propagation measurement in high temperature and pressure water for the study of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) of LWR core internals, (3) handling technique on materials containing tritium for the research and development of tritium breeders and neutron multiplier for fusion reactors, (4) jointing method using the conventional Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding for re-assembling of irradiation capsules and/or re-fabrication of specimen, and (5) Nondestructive examination using ultrasonic wave and infrared thermography for the quantitative evaluation of irradiation embrittlement of structural materials in fission and fusion reactors. As there are various PIE facilities around Oarai site, mutual exchange of PIE information, interchange of researchers and mutual utilization on PIE facilities are desired to raise the scientific and technical potential on PIE and to get the break-through of the study in the field of nuclear applications. (author)

  18. Advanced fuel system technology for utilizing broadened property aircraft fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    Possible changes in fuel properties are identified based on current trends and projections. The effect of those changes with respect to the aircraft fuel system are examined and some technological approaches to utilizing those fuels are described.

  19. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace system for high temperature performance testing of VHTR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demkowicz, Paul A., E-mail: paul.demkowicz@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 Fremont Avenue, MS 3860, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3860 (United States); Laug, David V.; Scates, Dawn M.; Reber, Edward L.; Roybal, Lyle G.; Walter, John B.; Harp, Jason M. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 Fremont Avenue, MS 3860, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3860 (United States); Morris, Robert N. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A system has been developed for safety testing of irradiated coated particle fuel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FACS system is designed to facilitate remote operation in a shielded hot cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer System will measure release of fission gases and condensable fission products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fuel performance can be evaluated at temperatures as high as 2000 Degree-Sign C in flowing helium. - Abstract: The AGR-1 irradiation of TRISO-coated particle fuel specimens was recently completed and represents the most successful such irradiation in US history, reaching peak burnups of greater than 19% FIMA with zero failures out of 300,000 particles. An extensive post-irradiation examination (PIE) campaign will be conducted on the AGR-1 fuel in order to characterize the irradiated fuel properties, assess the in-pile fuel performance in terms of coating integrity and fission metals release, and determine the fission product retention behavior during high temperature safety testing. A new furnace system has been designed, built, and tested to perform high temperature accident tests. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system is designed to heat fuel specimens at temperatures up to 2000 Degree-Sign C in helium while monitoring the release of volatile fission metals (e.g. Cs, Ag, Sr, and Eu), iodine, and fission gases (Kr, Xe). Fission gases released from the fuel to the sweep gas are monitored in real time using dual cryogenic traps fitted with high purity germanium detectors. Condensable fission products are collected on a plate attached to a water-cooled cold finger that can be exchanged periodically without interrupting the test. Analysis of fission products on the condensation plates involves dry gamma counting followed by chemical analysis of selected isotopes. This paper will describe design and operational details of the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system and the associated

  20. HOTLAB: European hot laboratories research and capacities and needs. Plenary meeting 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberlaender, B.C.; Jenssen, H.K. (ed.)

    2005-01-01

    The report presents proceedings from the 2004 annual HOTLAB plenary meeting at Halden and Kjeller, Norway. The goal of the yearly plenary meeting was to: Exchange experience on analytical methods, their implementation in hot cells, the methodologies used and their application in nuclear research. Share experience on common infrastructure exploitation matters such as remote handling techniques, safety features, QA-certification, waste handling, etc. Promote normalisation and co-operation, e.g. by looking at mutual complementarities. Prospect present and future demands from the nuclear industry and to draw strategic conclusions regarding further needs. The main themes of the five topical oral sessions of the Halden plenary meeting cover: Work package leaders report and specific papers, presentation of PIE facility databases, i.e. one worldwide (IAEA) and one inside the European communities. Reports from present and future needs and on nuclear transports. Refabrication and instrumentation: Available equipment, technical characteristics such as fabrication procedures, hot-cell compatibility, and practical experiences. Post irradiation examination: Updated and new remote techniques and methodologies, new materials such as inert matrix fuels, spallation sources and neutron absorber materials. Refurbishment and decommissioning: reports on refurbishment and decommissioning of PIE facilities. Waste and transport: Hot laboratory waste characteristics and handling, spent fuel research. Several posters are presented.