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Sample records for hot corrosion behaviour

  1. High temperature cyclic oxidation and hot corrosion behaviours of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    eutectic reaction below 600°C. When the temperature ... blades, consequently corrosion rate rapidly increases due ... the corrosion run. ... Figure 1. Surface macrographs of superalloys subjected to hot corrosion and oxidation .... show the oxide scales of three different chemical compo- .... Li J and Wahi R P 1995 Acta Metall.

  2. Corrosion behaviour of hot dip zinc and zinc-aluminium coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A comparative investigation of hot dip Zn–25Al alloy, Zn–55Al–Si and Zn coatings on steel was performed with attention to their corrosion performance in seawater. The results of 2-year exposure testing of these at Zhoushan test site are reported here. In tidal and immersion environments, Zn–25Al alloy coating is several ...

  3. Corrosion behaviour of hot dip zinc and zinc–aluminium coatings on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A comparative investigation of hot dip Zn–25Al alloy, Zn–55Al–Si and Zn coatings on steel was performed with attention to their corrosion performance in seawater. The results of 2-year exposure testing of these at Zhoushan test site are reported here. In tidal and immersion environments, Zn–25Al alloy coating is.

  4. Hot corrosion behaviour of austenitic steel-303 in molten chloride and carbonate salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Misbahul Amin; Shamsul Baharin Jamaludin; Che Mohd Ruzaidi Ghazali; Khairel Rafezi Ahmad

    2007-01-01

    The investigations are presented for the hot corrosion behaviors of Austenitic Steel-303, under influence of the molten chloride and carbonate salts viz KCl and K 2 CO 3 , oxidised at 1123 K for the period of 60 hour at atmospheric condition. The oxidation kinetic are effect of molten chloride and carbonate salts deposition on the oxidation rate were determined. The susceptibility to suffer a deleterious attack on the alloy by internal corrosion increases with increasing the time. In general, the corrosion resistance austenitic steel-303 in molten carbonate salts is much higher than chloride melt, being an active oxidizing agent providing oxygen during fluxing reaction. However, due to profuse evolution of CO/ CO 2 heavy mass losses are observed during corrosion and scales are porous. The test included mass change monitoring and surface layers were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies. (author)

  5. Oxidation And Hot Corrosion Of ODS Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    Report reviews oxidation and hot corrosion of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys, intended for use at high temperatures. Classifies environmental resistances of such alloys by rates of growth of oxides, volatilities of oxides, spalling of oxides, and limitations imposed by hot corrosion. Also discusses environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. Concludes ODS NICrAl and FeCrAl alloys highly resistant to oxidation and corrosion and can be used uncoated.

  6. The effect of zinc bath temperature on the morphology, texture and corrosion behaviour of industrially produced hot-dip galvanized coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bakhtiari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to identify the influence of zinc bath temperature on the morphology, texture and corrosion behavior of hot-dip galvanized coatings. Hot-dip galvanized samples were prepared at temperature in the range of 450-480 °C in steps of 10 °C, which is the conventional galvanizing temperature range in the galvanizing industries. The morphology of coatings was examined with optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The composition of the coating layers was determined using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS analysis. The texture of the coatings was evaluated using X-ray diffraction. Corrosion behavior was performed using salt spray cabinet test and Tafel extrapolation test. From the experimental results, it was found that increasing the zinc bath temperature affects the morphology of the galvanized coatings provoking the appearance of cracks in the coating structure. These cracks prevent formation of a compact structure. In addition, it was concluded that (00.2 basal plane texture component was weakened by increasing the zinc bath temperature and, conversely, appearance of (10.1 prism component, (20.1 high angle pyramidal component and low angle component prevailed. Besides, coatings with strong (00.2 texture component and weaker (20.1 components have better corrosion resistance than the coatings with weak (00.2 and strong (20.1 texture components. Furthermore, corrosion resistance of the galvanized coatings was decreased by increasing the zinc bath temperature.

  7. Hot Corrosion of Cobalt-Base Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-01

    Alloys 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on revet -se tside lf necessary and identify by block number) ~ lThe sodium sulfate-induced hot corrosion of cobalt and...Figures 12 and 13. The Na2 SO 4 was observed to form puddles on the oxide-covered specimen surface. An oxide slag was usually suspended in the... slag (black arrows) were suspended (30 sees at 1000°C in air). b) After washing the Na2SO 4 from the specimen, the exposed oxide surface was highly

  8. Hot corrosion of low cobalt alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The hot corrosion attack susceptibility of various alloys as a function of strategic materials content are investigated. Preliminary results were obtained for two commercial alloys, UDIMET 700 and Mar-M 247, that were modified by varying the cobalt content. For both alloys the cobalt content was reduced in steps to zero. Nickel content was increased accordingly to make up for the reduced cobalt but all other constituents were held constant. Wedge bar test samples were produced by casting. The hot corrosion test consisted of cyclically exposing samples to the high velocity flow of combustion products from an air-fuel burner fueled with jet A-1 and seeded with a sodium chloride aqueous solution. The flow velocity was Mach 0.5 and the sodium level was maintained at 0.5 ppm in terms of fuel plus air. The test cycle consisted of holding the test samples at 900 C for 1 hour followed by 3 minutes in which the sample could cool to room temperature in an ambient temperature air stream.

  9. Corrosion behaviour of cladded nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandl, W.; Ruczinski, D.; Nolde, M.; Blum, J.

    1995-01-01

    As a consequence of the high cost of nickel base alloys their use as surface layers is convenient. In this paper the properties of SA-as well as RES-cladded NiMo 16Cr16Ti and NiCr21Mo14W being produced in single and multi-layer technique are compared and discussed with respect to their corrosion behaviour. Decisive criteria describing the qualities of the claddings are the mass loss, the susceptibility against intergranular corrosion and the pitting corrosion resistance. The results prove that RES cladding is the most suitable technique to produce corrosion resistant nickel base coatings. The corrosion behaviour of a two-layer RES deposition shows a better resistance against pitting than a three layer SAW cladding. 7 refs

  10. Hot corrosion of pack cementation aluminized carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waheed, A.F.; Mohamed, K.E.; Abd El-Azim, M.E.; Soliman, H.M.

    1998-01-01

    Low carbon steel was aluminized by the pack cementation technique at various aluminizing temperatures and times in or der to have different aluminide coatings. The aluminized specimens were sprayed at the beginning of the hot corrosion experiments with Na C 1+Na 2 SO 4 solution. The hot corrosion tests were carried out by thermal cycling at 850 degree C in air. The results were evaluated by, corrosion kinetics based on weight change measurements, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. It was found that the maximum corrosion resistance to this corrosive environment is achieved by aluminizing at 900 degree C for 19 h or 950 degree C for >4 h. These aliminizing conditions lead to formation of thick aluminide coatings with sufficient aluminium concentration (>15 wt%) at their outer surface necessary for continuous formation of protective Al 2 O 3 scale. The tested materials are used in protection of some components used in electric power stations (conventional or nuclear)

  11. Corrosion, haemocompatibility and bacterial adhesion behaviour of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TiZrN coating was deposited on 316L stainless steel (SS) by the reactive magnetron co-sputtering technique. Cubic phase of TiZrN with uniform surface morphology was observed by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Bacterial adhesion, haemocompatibility and corrosion behaviour of TiZrN coating were ...

  12. Corrosion behaviour and biocorrosion of galvanized steel water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunois, F; Tosar, F; Vitry, V

    2014-06-01

    Galvanized steel tubes are a popular mean for water distribution systems but suffer from corrosion despite their zinc or zinc alloy coatings. First, the quality of hot-dip galvanized (HDG) coatings was studied. Their microstructure, defects, and common types of corrosion were observed. It was shown that many manufactured tubes do not reach European standard (NBN EN 10240), which is the cause of several corrosion problems. The average thickness of zinc layer was found at 41μm against 55μm prescribed by the European standard. However, lack of quality, together with the usual corrosion types known for HDG steel tubes was not sufficient to explain the high corrosion rate (reaching 20μm per year versus 10μm/y for common corrosion types). Electrochemical tests were also performed to understand the corrosion behaviours occurring in galvanized steel tubes. Results have shown that the limiting step was oxygen diffusion, favouring the growth of anaerobic bacteria in steel tubes. EDS analysis was carried out on corroded coatings and has shown the presence of sulphur inside deposits, suggesting the likely bacterial activity. Therefore biocorrosion effects have been investigated. Actually sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) can reduce sulphate contained in water to hydrogen sulphide (H2S), causing the formation of metal sulphides. Although microbial corrosion is well-known in sea water, it is less investigated in supply water. Thus, an experimental water main was kept in operation for 6months. SRB were detected by BART tests in the test water main. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Electrochemical characterisation speeds up prediction of corrosion behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuring, E.W.; Hooijmans, J.W. [ECN Environment and Energy Engineering, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-04-15

    The contents of this presentation show the following elements: Introduction; Corrosion in real life; Why Electrochemical characterisation of corrosion; Applications (corrosion resistance coatings, corrosion behaviour (brazed) joints); Available electrochemical corrosion techniques; Standards; Conclusions. In the Conclusions the corrosion screening method is summarized: ECN method fast; within 1h -1 week results depending on test method; Fast pre-selection of promising materials/combinations (cost savings); Determining of corrosion initiation; Determination of corrosion mechanisms and propagation; Life time predictions possible; Strong combination with metallographic post-investigation; Ranking materials / constructions for corrosion performance.

  14. Role of tantalum in the hot corrosion of a Ni-base single crystal superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J.X.; Wang, D.; Liu, T.; Zhang, G.; Lou, L.H.; Zhang, J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ta is beneficial to hot corrosion resistance. • Ta promoted the formation of a new type sulphide TaS 2 . • Thermodynamic factors affect the constituent of sulphide layer. • Ta can substitute Cr for sulphur catcher in hot corrosion. • The result provides new perspective in hot corrosion resistant superalloys design. - Abstract: Hot corrosion behaviour of a Ni-base single crystal superalloy with low Cr, Ti and high Ta contents in molten sodium sulphate (Na 2 SO 4 ) at 900 °C in static air was investigated using the “deposit recoat” method. The corrosion scale was composed of an outer NiO layer, an inner Al 2 O 3 -dominant oxide network layer and a (CrS x(1.000

  15. DARWIN-HC: A Tool to Predict Hot Corrosion of Nickel-Based Turbine Disks, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hot Corrosion of turbine engine components has been studied for many years. The underlying mechan-isms of Type I Hot Corrosion and Type II Hot Corrosion are...

  16. DARWIN-HC: A Tool to Predict Hot Corrosion of Nickel-Based Turbine Disks, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hot Corrosion of turbine engine components has been studied for many years. The underlying mechan-isms of Type I Hot Corrosion and Type II Hot Corrosion are...

  17. Corrosion penetration monitoring of advanced ceramics in hot aqueous fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus G. Nickel

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Advanced ceramics are considered as components in energy related systems, because they are known to be strong, wear and corrosion resistant in many environments, even at temperatures well exceeding 1000 °C. However, the presence of additives or impurities in important ceramics, for example those based on Silicon Nitride (Si3N4 or Al2O3 makes them vulnerable to the corrosion by hot aqueous fluids. The temperatures in this type of corrosion range from several tens of centigrade to hydrothermal conditions above 100 °C. The corrosion processes in such media depend on both pH and temperature and include often partial leaching of the ceramics, which cannot be monitored easily by classical gravimetric or electrochemical methods. Successful corrosion penetration depth monitoring by polarized reflected light optical microscopy (color changes, Micro Raman Spectroscopy (luminescence changes and SEM (porosity changes will be outlined. The corrosion process and its kinetics are monitored best by microanalysis of cross sections, Raman spectroscopy and eluate chemistry changes in addition to mass changes. Direct cross-calibrations between corrosion penetration and mechanical strength is only possible for severe corrosion. The methods outlined should be applicable to any ceramics corrosion process with partial leaching by fluids, melts or slags.

  18. Corrosion behaviour of laser clad stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damborenea, J.J. de; Weerasinghe, V.M.; West, D.R.F.

    1993-01-01

    The present paper is focussed in the study of the properties of a clad layer of stainless steel on a mild steel. By blowing powder of the alloy into a melt pool generated by a laser of 2 KW, an homogeneous layer of 316 stainless steel can be obtained. Structure, composition and corrosion behaviour are similar to those of a stainless steel in as-received condition. (Author)

  19. Effects of crystalline growth on corrosion behaviour of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion behaviours ... sity and high melting point.7,8 This compound often shows good corrosion and .... Figure 4. TEM image of as-deposited nanocrystalline NiAl coating. Figure 5.

  20. Mechanism of Corrosion of Activated Aluminum Particles by Hot Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razavi-Tousi, S.S.; Szpunar, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanism of corrosion in aluminum particles by hot water treatment for hydrogen generation is evaluated. The aluminum powder was activated by ball milling for different durations, which modified size and microstructure of the particles. Open circuit potential test was carried out to elucidate different stages of the reaction. Tafel test was used to explain the effect of ball milling and growth of hydroxide layer on corrosion of the particles. Surface, cross section and thickness of the grown hydroxide on the aluminum particles were studied in a scanning electron microscope. The corrosion potential of the aluminum powders depends on microstructure of the aluminum particles, growth of the hydroxide layer and a change in pH because of cathodic reactions. The hydrogen production test showed that a deformed microstructure and smaller particle size accelerates the corrosion rate of aluminum by hot water, the effect of the deformed microstructure being more significant at the beginning of the reaction. Effect of growth of the hydroxide layer on corrosion mechanism is discussed

  1. Hot corrosion studies on nickel-based alloys containing silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, T.W.; Simkovich, G.

    1976-01-01

    Alloys of Ni--Cr, Ni--Si and Ni--Cr--Si were oxidized and ''hot corroded'' in pure oxygen at 1000 0 C. In the oxidation experiments it was found that small amounts of either chromium or silicon in nickel increased the oxidation rates in comparison to pure nickel in accord with Wagner's parabolic oxidation theory. At high concentrations of the alloying elements the oxidation rates decreased due to the formation of oxide phases other than nickel oxide in the scale. Hot corrosion experiments were conducted on both binary and ternary alloys by oxidizing samples coated with 1.0 mg/cm 2 of Na 2 SO 4 in oxygen at 1000 0 C. In general it was found that high chromium and high silicon alloys displayed excellent resistance to the hot corrosion process gaining or losing less than 0.5 mg/cm 2 in 1800 min at temperature. Microprobe and x-ray diffraction studies of the alloy and the scale indicate that amorphous SiO 2 probably formed to aid in retarding both the oxidation and the hot corrosion process

  2. Laboratory procedures used in the hot corrosion project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeys, T.R.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the Hot Corrosion Project in the LLNL Metals and Ceramics Division is to study the physical and chemical mechanisms of corrosion of nickel, iron, and some of their alloys when these metals are subjected to oxidizing or sulfidizing environments at temperatures between 850 and 950 0 C. To obtain meaningful data in this study, we must rigidly control many parameters. Parameters are discussed and the methods chosen to control them in this laboratory. Some of the mechanics and manipulative procedures that are specifically related to data access and repeatability are covered. The method of recording and processing the data from each experiment using an LS-11 minicomputer are described. The analytical procedures used to evaluate the specimens after the corrosion tests are enumerated and discussed

  3. Coatings for Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Protection of Disk Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Jim; Gabb, Tim; Draper, Sue; Miller, Bob; Locci, Ivan; Sudbrack, Chantal

    2017-01-01

    Increasing temperatures in aero gas turbines is resulting in oxidation and hot corrosion attack of turbine disks. Since disks are sensitive to low cycle fatigue (LCF), any environmental attack, and especially hot corrosion pitting, can potentially seriously degrade the life of the disk. Application of metallic coatings are one means of protecting disk alloys from this environmental attack. However, simply the presence of a metallic coating, even without environmental exposure, can degrade the LCF life of a disk alloy. Therefore, coatings must be designed which are not only resistant to oxidation and corrosion attack, but must not significantly degrade the LCF life of the alloy. Three different Ni-Cr coating compositions (29, 35.5, 45wt. Cr) were applied at two thicknesses by Plasma Enhanced Magnetron Sputtering (PEMS) to two similar Ni-based disk alloys. One coating also received a thin ZrO2 overcoat. The coated samples were also given a short oxidation exposure in a low PO2 environment to encourage chromia scale formation. Without further environmental exposure, the LCF life of the coated samples, evaluated at 760C, was less than that of uncoated samples. Hence, application of the coating alone degraded the LCF life of the disk alloy. Since shot peening is commonly employed to improve LCF life, the effect of shot peening the coated and uncoated surface was also evaluated. For all cases, shot peening improved the LCF life of the coated samples. Coated and uncoated samples were shot peened and given environmental exposures consisting of 500 hrs of oxidation followed by 50 hrs of hot corrosion, both at 760C). The high-Cr coating showed the best LCF life after the environmental exposures. Results of the LCF testing and post-test characterization of the various coatings will be presented and future research directions discussed.

  4. Quenching behaviour of hot zircaloy tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinchole, A.S.; Kulkarni, P.P.; Nayak, A.K.; Vijayan, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    The quenching process plays a very important role in case of safety of nuclear reactors. During large break Loss of Coolant Accident in a nuclear reactor, the cooling water from the system is lost. Under this condition, cold water is injected from emergency core cooling system. Quenching behaviour of such heated rod bundle is really complex. It is well known that nanofluids have better heat removal capability and high heat transfer coefficient owing to enhanced thermal properties. Alumina nano-particles result in better cooling abilities compared with the traditionally used quenching media. In this paper, the authors have carried out experiments on quenching behaviour of hot zircaloy tube with demineralized water and nanofluids. It was observed that, the tube got quenched within few seconds even with the presence of decay heat and shows slightly reduced quenching time compared with DM water. (author)

  5. Corrosion Behavior of Superalloys in Hot Lithium Molten Salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Soo-Haeng; Hur, Jin-Mok; Seo, Chung-Seok; Park, Seoung-Won

    2006-01-01

    The Li-reduction process involves the chemical reduction of spent fuel oxides by liquid lithium metal in a molten LiCl salt bath at 650 .deg. C followed by a separate electrochemical reduction of lithium oxide (Li 2 O), which builds up in the salt bath. This process requires a high purity inert gas atmosphere inside remote hot cell nuclear facility to prevent unwanted Li oxidation and fires during the handling of chemically active Li metal. In light of the limitations of the Li-reduction process, a direct electrolytic reduction technology is being developed by KAERI to enhance process safety and economic viability. The electrolytic reduction of spent oxide fuel involves the liberation of oxygen in a molten LiCl electrolyte, which results in a chemically aggressive environment that is too corrosive for typical structural materials. Even so, the electrochemical process vessel must be resilient at ∼ 650 .deg. C in the presence of oxygen to enable high processing rates and an extended service life. But, the mechanism and the rate of the corrosion of metals in LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt under oxidation condition are not clear. In the present work, the corrosion behavior and corrosion mechanism of superalloys have been studied in the molten salt of LiCl-Li 2 O under oxidation condition

  6. The corrosion of steels by hot sodium melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, R.

    1996-01-01

    Considerable research has been performed by AEA Technology on the corrosion of steels by hot sodium melts containing sodium hydroxide and sodium oxide. This research has principally been in support of understanding the effects of sodium-water reactions on the internals of fast reactor steam generators. The results however have relevance to sodium fires. It has been determined that the rate of corrosion of steels by melts of pure NaOH can be significantly increased by the addition of Na 2 O. In the case of a sodium-water reaction jet created by a leak of steam into sodium, the composition of the jet varies from 100% sodium through to 100% steam, with a full range of concentrations of NaOH and Na 2 O, depending on axial and radial position. The temperature in the jet also varies with position, ranging from bulk sodium temperature on one boundary to expanded steam temperature on the other boundary, with internal temperatures ranging up to 1300 deg. C, depending on the local pre-reaction mole ratio of steam to sodium. In the case of sodium-water reaction jets, it has been possible to develop a model which predicts the composition of the reaction jet and then, using the data generated on the corrosivity of sodium melts, predict the rate of corrosion of a steel target in the path of the jet. In the case of a spray sodium fire, the sodium will initially contain a concentration of NaOH and the combustion process will generate Na 2 O. If there is sufficient humidity, conversion of some of the Na 2 O to NaOH will also occur. There is therefore the potential for aggressive mixtures of NaOH and Na 2 O to exist on the surface of the sodium droplets. It is therefore possible that the rate of corrosion of steels in the path of the spray may be higher than expected on the basis of assuming that only Na and Na 2 O were present. In the case of a pool sodium fire, potentially corrosive mixtures of NaOH and Na 2 O may be formed at some locations on the surface. This could lead to

  7. Corrosion behaviour, microstructure and phase transitions of Zn ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper is aimed at investigating the corrosion behaviour, microstructure and phase transitions of Zn-based alloys with different compositions. The corrosion tests are carried out both in acidic medium using 1 N HCl solution and in temperature dependence of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). In the two different media, ...

  8. High temperature corrosion behaviour of a new Ni-30Fe-10Ar-Cr-alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloewer, J.; Sauthoff, G.

    1997-01-01

    The high temperature corrosion behaviour of a new duplex nickel-base alloy containing about 30 mass% iron, 10 mass% aluminium and 8 mass% chromium was determined in both air and hot process gases containing methane/hydrogen, sulphur dioxide and hydrogen sulphide, respectively. It was found that the corrosion resistance against carburisation, sulphidation and oxidation was excellent due to the formation of a dense, protective alumina scale. The adherence of the alumina scale was increased by an addition of 0.1 mass% hafnium. The concentration of chromium was found to have a remarkable impact on the oxidation and high temperature corrosion resistance. Alloys without chromium showed increased corrosion rates in both air and sulphur-containing gas atmospheres due to the initial formation of nickel oxides. In sulphidising SO 2 -and H 2 S- containing gases at least 4 mass% chromium are required to stabilise the formation of alumina and to prevent the formation of nickel/sulphur compounds. (orig.)

  9. Corrosion Resistance and Pitting Behaviour of Low-Carbon High-Mn Steels in Chloride Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grajcar A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion resistance of the X4MnSiAlNbTi27-4-2 and X6MnSiAlNbTi26-3-3 type austenitic steels, after hot deformation as well as after cold rolling, were evaluated in 3.5% NaCl solution using potentiodynamic polarization tests. A type of nonmetallic inclusions and their pitting corrosion behaviour were investigated. Additionally, the effect of cold deformation on the corrosion resistance of high-Mn steels was studied. The SEM micrographs revealed that corrosion damage formed in both investigated steels is characterized by various shapes and an irregular distribution at the metallic matrix, independently on the steel state (thermomechanically treated or cold worked. Corrosion pits are generated both in grain interiors, grain boundaries and along the deformation bands. Moreover, corrosion damage is stronger in cold deformed steels in comparison to the thermomechanically treated specimens. EDS analysis revealed that corrosion pits preferentially nucleated on MnS and AlN inclusions or complex oxysulphides. The morphology of corrosion damage in 3.5% NaCl supports the data registered in potentiodynamic tests.

  10. High Velocity Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Resistance of Some ODS Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, C. E.; Deadmore, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    Several oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys were tested for cyclic, high velocity, oxidation, and hot corrosion resistance. These results were compared to the resistance of an advanced, NiCrAl coated superalloy. An ODS FeCrAl were identified as having sufficient oxidation and hot corrosion resistance to allow potential use in an aircraft gas turbine without coating.

  11. Review of hot corrosion of thermal barrier coatings of gas turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Yongbao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The review was done in order to make clear the problem of the hot corrosion of the Thermal Barrier Coatings(TBCsduring gas turbine serving. This paper summarizes the factors resulting from the hot corrosion of TBCs during turbine service and classifies methods for enhancing the corrosive resistance of TBCs. A prospective methodology for improving corrosion resistance is also formulated. The main types of corrosion coating include phase reaction, oxidizing of the bond coating, salt-fog corrosion, CMAS corrosion and fuel impurity corrosion. So far, methods for improving the corrosion resistance of TBCs include developing new coating materials, anticorrosive treatment on the surface of TBCs, modifying the stacking configuration and improving the cleansing functions of the gas turbines. In the future, developing new materials with excellent performance will still be the main direction for boosting the improvement of the hot corrosion resistance of TBCs. Simultaneously, improving the tacking configuration and nanotechnology of TBC coatings are potential approaches for improving corrosion resistance. With the development of a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC, the focus of the hot corrosion of TBCs may turn to that of Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBCs.

  12. Corrosion Behaviour of New Zr Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolksdorf, E.

    1974-01-01

    Corrosion studies have indicated that the most promising replacements for Zicaloy-2 are ZrCrFe, ZrVFe and probably ZrNbTa, provided they are in their optimized condition. These alloys are conventionally manufactured alloys. An internally oxidized ZrMgO alloy is even superior, from the corrosion...

  13. Effect of chlorides on the corrosion behaviour of mild steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Kazuyuki; Shimada, Minoru

    1980-01-01

    In PWR's steam generators, ''denting'' resulted from corrosion of support plate material, carbon steel is an important problem. The role of chlorides in corrosion acceleration of mild steel was studied. Corrosion tests were conducted at temperature from 100 0 C to 280 0 C in deaerated solutions of NaCl and MgCl 2 which are main content of sea water. 1) Solution of MgCl 2 was more corrosive than that of NaCl. The more increased in concentration of each chloride solution, the more corrosive in MgCl 2 soln. but the less corrosive in NaCl soln. 2) The rate of corrosion in the mixed solution of NaCl and MgCl 2 was governed by the concentration of MgCl 2 soln. The corrosion behaviour in sea water was suggested to be not controlled by NaCl but by MgCl 2 . 3) Acidification of MgCl 2 soln. could be evaluated by experiment at 100 0 C, the degree of acidification increased with increasing the concentration. However, the value of pH during corrosion was kept constant by the concentration of dissolved Fe 2+ ions. 4) The corrosion acceleration by MgCl 2 soln. was arised not only from acidification by the solution itself but from continuous supplementation of H + ions with the hydrolysis of dissolved Fe 2+ ions. This autocatalytic corrosion process not exhausting acid was characterized with the corrosion in closed system such as in crevice. In addition to acidification of MgCl 2 soln., the formation of non-protective magnetite film by Mg 2+ ion was estimated to be a reason of accelerated corrosion. (author)

  14. Corrosion, haemocompatibility and bacterial adhesion behaviour of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. TiZrN coating was deposited on 316L stainless steel (SS) by the reactive magnetron co-sputtering tech- nique. .... Uncoated 316L SS exhibited poor corrosion protection ... depletion of native oxide layer present on uncoated substrate.

  15. Corrosion fatigue behaviour of ion nitrided AISI 4140 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genel, K. [Sakarya Univ., Adapazari (Turkey). Mech. Eng. Dept.; Demirkol, M.; Guelmez, T. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Istanbul Technical University, Guemuessuyu, 80191, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2000-08-31

    Machine components suffer from corrosion degradation of fatigue characteristics and improvement can be attained by the application of a nitriding treatment, particularly to low alloy steels. In the present study, the effect of ion nitriding on corrosion fatigue performance of AISI 4140 steel has been investigated by conducting a series of rotary bending corrosion fatigue tests at 95 Hz, in 3% NaCl aqueous solution. Hourglass shaped, 4 mm diameter fatigue specimens were ion nitrided at 748 K for 1, 3, 8 and 16 h prior to the tests. It was observed that distinct fatigue limit behaviour of ion nitrided steel in air completely disappeared in corrosive environment besides severe degradation in fatigue characteristics. An improvement reaching to 60% in corrosion fatigue strength can be attained by successive ion nitriding practice based on a fatigue life of 10{sup 7} cycles. An attempt was made to establish an empirical relationship between corrosion fatigue strength and relative case depth, which considers the size of the ion nitrided specimen. It was also determined that a power relationship holds between corrosion fatigue strength and fatigue life of ion nitrided steel. The presence of white layer has resulted in additional improvement in corrosion fatigue resistance, and it was observed that corrosion fatigue cracks were initiated dominantly under the white layer by pit formation mechanism. (orig.)

  16. Corrosion fatigue behaviour of ion nitrided AISI 4140 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genel, K.

    2000-01-01

    Machine components suffer from corrosion degradation of fatigue characteristics and improvement can be attained by the application of a nitriding treatment, particularly to low alloy steels. In the present study, the effect of ion nitriding on corrosion fatigue performance of AISI 4140 steel has been investigated by conducting a series of rotary bending corrosion fatigue tests at 95 Hz, in 3% NaCl aqueous solution. Hourglass shaped, 4 mm diameter fatigue specimens were ion nitrided at 748 K for 1, 3, 8 and 16 h prior to the tests. It was observed that distinct fatigue limit behaviour of ion nitrided steel in air completely disappeared in corrosive environment besides severe degradation in fatigue characteristics. An improvement reaching to 60% in corrosion fatigue strength can be attained by successive ion nitriding practice based on a fatigue life of 10 7 cycles. An attempt was made to establish an empirical relationship between corrosion fatigue strength and relative case depth, which considers the size of the ion nitrided specimen. It was also determined that a power relationship holds between corrosion fatigue strength and fatigue life of ion nitrided steel. The presence of white layer has resulted in additional improvement in corrosion fatigue resistance, and it was observed that corrosion fatigue cracks were initiated dominantly under the white layer by pit formation mechanism. (orig.)

  17. Corrosion behaviour of Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mummert, K.; El-Aziz, A.M.; Barkleit, G.; Schultz, L.; Rodewald, W.

    2000-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of Nd-Fe-B permanent magnetic alloys as well as of single phases of these alloys have been investigated in sulphuric acid at room temperature and humid air at 150 C using mass loss and electrochemical techniques. Scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy were used to study the surface topography. The electrostatic surface potential was examined by scanning probe microscopy using tapping mode. A correlation between the electrostatic surface potential and the corrosion rate of these alloys was found. The higher the value of the electrostatic surface potential of the intergranular phases the higher is the corrosion sensitivity. The strength of the corrosion attack on the phases of sintered permanent magnetic alloys is as follows: Ferromagnetic phase < B-rich phase < Nd-rich phase. The differences in the chemical composition as well as in the preparation of these magnetic alloys have distinct influence on the corrosion resistance of the magnetic Nd-Fe-B alloys. (orig.)

  18. Effects of external stresses on hot corrosion behavior of stainless steel TP347HFG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Jiapeng; Zhou, Qulan; Li, Na; Liu, Zhuhan; Liu, Taisheng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Hot corrosion tests of TP347HFG under different stresses were conducted. • The corrosion resistance was strengthened by the exertion of tensile stresses. • External stresses promoted faster formation of the protective Cr_2O_3 layer. • Specimens under critical stress 40 MPa condition present the best resistance. - Abstract: Hot corrosion experiments of alloy TP347HFG under different stresses were conducted. Corroded specimens were examined by means of corrosion products, morphology and compositional changes in corrosion scales. The corrosion behavior was strongly associated with the formation of oxides layers. The corrosion resistance was strengthened by the external stress. It seemed that the exertion of stresses caused many micro cracks and defects, which acted as faster and easier diffusion paths for Cr atoms to diffuse to the surface, and thus, promote faster formation of the protective Cr_2O_3 oxide layer. Critical stress 40 MPa was found, specimens under which present the best resistance.

  19. Study on the hot corrosion behavior of a cast Ni-base superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.; Guo, J.T.; Zhang, J.; Yuan, C.; Zhou, L.Z.; Hu, Z.Q. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang (China). Inst. of Metal Research

    2010-07-01

    Hot corrosion behavior of Nickel-base cast superalloy K447 in 90% Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 10% NaCl melting salt at 850 C and 900 C was studied. The hot corrosion kinetic of the alloy follows parabolic rate law under the experimental conditions. The external layer is mainly Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale which is protective to the alloy, the intermediate layer is the Ti-rich phase, and the internal layer is mainly the international oxides and sulfides. With increased corrosion time and temperature, the oxide scales are gradually dissolved in the molten salt and then precipitate as a thick and non-protective scale. Chlorides cause the formation of volatile species, which makes the oxide scale disintegrate and break off. The corrosion kinetics and morphology examinations tend to support the basic dissolution model for hot corrosion mechanisms. (orig.)

  20. Interrelationship between structure and corrosion behaviour of zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, T [Bayer A.G., Leverkusen (Germany, F.R.)

    1979-05-01

    Due to plant failures caused by the break-down of zirconium grade 702 subjected to sulphuric acid the structure and corrosion behaviour of welded and as delivered specimens were tested for various heat treatments. It was shown by structure investigations and electron microprobe analysis that the corrosion behaviour of zirconium (in boiling 65 pct sulphuric acid) is strongly infuenced by the structure, which in its turn is dependent on the grade of purity and the prehistory of the material. Type, amount, and distribution of residual elements or precipitations caused by them are responsible for the corrosion resistance. This is valid particularly for the element iron. The plant failures mentioned here coincided with the examination results. Measures to improve the chemical resistance of pure zirconium subjected to extremely aggressive media were derived.

  1. Effect of Mg content on microstructure and corrosion behavior of hot dipped Zn–Al–Mg coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Caizhen; Lv, Haibing [Research Centre of Laser Fusion, CAEP, P.O.Box 919-988-5, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Zhu, Tianping [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, PB 92019, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Zheng, Wanguo [Research Centre of Laser Fusion, CAEP, P.O.Box 919-988-5, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Yuan, Xiaodong, E-mail: xdyuan@caep.cn [Research Centre of Laser Fusion, CAEP, P.O.Box 919-988-5, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Gao, Wei, E-mail: w.gao@auckland.ac.nz [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, PB 92019, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand)

    2016-06-15

    In this article, Zn–Al–Mg coatings were prepared by hot dipping method. The surface morphology, cross–section microstructure, microhardness, composition, corrosion behaviour of ZAM coatings were investigated by using X–ray diffraction (XRD), Optical microscope, Environmental scanning electron microscopy equipped with EDS (FESEM–EDS), Microhardness tester and Electrochemical analysis respectively. Corrosion test was also performed in a standard salt fog spray chamber. Microstructure studies indicates that Zn grain size was refined and eutectic areas at Zn grain boundary areas increased with increasing Mg content. ZA5M1.5 and ZA5M2 coatings have two distinct layers. Mg tends to exist in the outer layer while Al is in the inner layer. The inner layer is composed of Al{sub 5}Fe{sub 2}Zn{sub 0.4} intermetallic, which may to contribute to the microhardness. The outer layer is Zn grains surrounded by Zn–Mg etutectics, which may improve the corrosion resistance. The microhardness is more than 700 HV{sub 50g} for Al-rich layer and around 151 HV{sub 25g} for Mg-rich layer. The improved corrosion resistance of Zn–5%Al-1.5%Mg coating comes from the corrosion product of flocculent type simonkolleite, which prolongs the micro-path and impedes the movement of O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, ultimately retards the overall corrosion process. - Highlights: • Two-layer structured Zn–Al–Mg coatings were prepared by hot dipping method. • Mg exists in the outer layer while Al exists in the inner layer of Zn–Al–Mg coating. • Zn–Al–Mg coating has better protective ability than Zn and Zn–Al coatings. • The Mg-modified simonkolleite is the reason of the enhanced corrosion resistance.

  2. Corrosion behaviour of the UO2 pellet in corrosive solutions using electrochemical Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taftanzani, A.; Sucipto; Lahagu, F.; Irianto, B.

    1996-01-01

    The UO 2 electrodes has been made from the local product of UO 2 pellets. The corrosion behaviour of the UO 2 pellets is affected by solution, by pH value and by concentration of salt solution. Investigation into corrosion behaviour of UO 2 electrodes have been carried out in saturated salt solutions using electrochemical technique. The saturated solutions have been made from salts NaCl, Na 2 CO 3 , Na 2 SO 4 and Na 3 PO 4 . The pH value have been done over range 1 pH 10 and the salt concentration (C) over range 0,001 mol/l C 1,0 mol/l, Na 2 CO 3 solution produced the lowest corrosion rates of UO 2 pellets. Those rates were relative constant in the range of pH = 4 - 8. The results indicate an influence of the Na 2 CO 3 concentrations on the corrosions on the corrosion rate, and the lowest rates occur in 0,10 mol/l Na 2 CO 3 . The lowest corrosion rate was 0.3388 mil/year in 0.10 mol/l Na 2 CO 3 by pH = 4. (author)

  3. Hot corrosion testing of Ni-based alloys and coatings in a modified Dean rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, Jason Reid

    Gas turbine blades are designed to withstand a variety of harsh operating conditions. Although material and coating improvements are constantly administered to increase the mean time before turbine refurbishment or replacement, hot corrosion is still considered as the major life-limiting factor in many industrial and marine gas turbines. A modified Dean rig was designed and manufactured at Tennessee Technological University to simulate the accelerated hot corrosion conditions and to conduct screening tests on the new coatings on Ni-based superalloys. Uncoated Ni-based superalloys, Rene 142 and Rene 80, were tested in the modified Dean rig to establish a testing procedure for Type I hot corrosion. The influence of surface treatments on the hot corrosion resistance was then investigated. It was found that grit-blasted specimens showed inferior hot corrosion resistance than that of the polished counterpart. The Dean rig was also used to test model MCrAlY alloys, pack cementation NiAl coatings, and electro-codeposited MCrAlY coatings. Furthermore, the hot corrosion attack on the coated-specimens were also assessed using a statistical analysis approach.

  4. THE USE OF COATINGS FOR HOT CORROSION AND EROSION PROTECTION IN TURBINE HOT SECTION COMPONENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayrettin AHLATCI

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available High pressure turbine components are subjected to a wide variety of thermal and mechanical loading during service. In addition, the components are exposed to a highly oxidizing atmosphere which may contain contaminants such as sulphates, chlorides and sulphuorous gases along with erosive media. So the variety of surface coatings and deposition processes available for the protection of blade and vane components in gas turbines are summarised in this study. Coating types range from simple diffusion aluminides to modified aluminides and a CoCrAlY overlayer. The recommendations for corrosion-resistant coatings (for low temperature and high temperature hot corrosion environments are as follows: silicon aluminide and platinumchromium aluminide for different gas turbine section superalloys substrates. Platinum metal additions are used to improve the properties of coatings on turbine components. Inorganic coatings based on ceramic films which contain aluminium or aluminium and silicon are very effective in engines and gas turbines. Diffusion, overlayer and thermal barrier coatings which are deposited on superalloys gas turbine components by pack cementation, plasma spraying processes and a number of chemical vapour deposition, physical vapour deposition processes (such as electron beam, sputtering, ion plating are described. The principles underlying the development of protective coatings serve as a useful guide in the choice of coatings for other high temperature applications.

  5. Corrosion behaviour of carbon steel in the Tournemire clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foct, F.; Dridi, W.; Cabrera, J.; Savoye, S.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon steels are possible materials for the fabrication of nuclear waste containers for long term geological disposal in argillaceous environments. Experimental studies of the corrosion behaviour of such materials has been conducted in various conditions. Concerning the numerous laboratory experiments, these conditions (water and clay mixture or compacted clay) mainly concern the bentonite clay that would be used for the engineered barrier. On the opposite, only few in-situ experiments has been conducted directly in the local clay of the repository site (such as Boom clay, etc.). In order to better estimate the corrosion behaviour of carbon steels in natural clay site conditions, an experimental study has been conducted jointly by EDF and IRSN in the argillaceous French site of Tournemire. In this study, A42 carbon steel specimens have been exposed in 3 different zones of the Tournemire clay formation. The first type of environmental conditions concerns a zone where the clay has not been affected by the excavation (EDZ) of the main tunnel neither by the main fracture zone of the clay formation. The second and third ones are located in the EDZ of the tunnel. In the second zone, an additional aerated water flows from the tunnel, whereas it does not in the third place. Some carbon steel specimens have been extracted after several years of exposure to these conditions. The average corrosion rate has been measured by the weight loss technique and the pitting corrosion depth has been evaluated under an optical microscope. Corrosion products have also been characterised by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction technique. Results are then discussed regarding the surrounding environmental conditions. Calculations of the oxygen transport from the tunnel through the clay and of the clay re-saturation can explain, in a first approach, the corrosion behaviour of the carbon steel in the different tested zones. (authors)

  6. Corrosion behaviour of sintered duplex stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utrilla, M. Victoria; Urena, Alejandro; Otero, Enrique; Munez, Claudio Jose [Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologia, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/ Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Duplex austenite-ferrite stainless steels were prepared by mixing austenitic (316L) and ferritic (434L) atomized powders. Although different 316L/434L ratios were prepared, present work centred its study on 50% ferrite - 50% austenite sintered steel. The powders were mixed and pressed at 700 MPa and sintered at 1250 deg. C for 30 min in vacuum. The cooling rate was 5 deg. C/min. Solution treatment was carried out to homogenize the microstructure at 1100 deg. C during 20 min. A microstructural study of the material in solution was performed, evaluating the microstructure, proportion and shape of porosity, and ferrite percentage. This last was measured by two methods, quantitative metallography and Fischer ferrito-metry. The materials were heat treated in the range of 700 to 1000 deg. C, for 10, 30 and 60 min and water quenched, to study the microstructural changes and the influence on the intergranular corrosion resistance. The method used to evaluate the sensitization to the intergranular corrosion was the electrochemical potentio-kinetic reactivation procedure (EPR). The test solution was 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0,01 M KSCN at 30 deg. C. The criterion used to evaluate the sensitization was the ratio between the maximum reactivation density (Ir) and the maximum activation density (Ia). The results of the electrochemical tests were discussed in relation with the microstructures observed at the different heat treatments. (authors)

  7. Corrosion behaviour of high chromium ferritic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiesheyer, H.; Lennartz, G.; Brandis, H.

    1976-01-01

    Ferritic steels developed for seawater desalination and containing 20 to 28% chromium, up to 5% Mo and additions of nickel and copper have been tested with respect to their corrosion behaviour, in particular in chloride containing media. The materials in the sensibilized state were tested for intercrystalline corrosion susceptibility in the Strauss-, Streicher-, nitric acid hydrofluoric acid- and Huey-Tests. No intercrystalline corrosion was encountered in the case of the steels with 28% Cr and 2% Mo. The resistance to pitting was assessed on the basis of rupture potentials determined by potentiokinetic tests. The resistance of the steels with 20% Cr and 5% Mo or 28% Cr and 2% Mo is superior to that of the molybdenum containing austenitic types. Addition of nickel yields a significant increase in crevice corrosion resistance; the same applies to resistance in sulfuric acid. In boiling seawater all the materials tested are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. No sign of any type of corrosion was found on nickel containing steels after about 6,000 hours exposure to boiling 50% seawater brine even under salt deposits. (orig.) [de

  8. Corrosion of a hot potassium carbonate CO/sub 2/ removal plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    After ten years of successful operation, a hot potassium carbonate CO/sub 2/ removal plant experienced severe corrosion to the 2'' (50 mm) thick carbon steel absorber process vessel over a fourteen month period. This corrosive attack resulted in complete penetration on three separate occasions. Although the cause of this corrosion is still uncertain, it appears to be the result of decreasing strength of the vanadium pentoxide inhibitor, due to increasing concentrations of hydrogen sulfide in the feed gas. After extensive research, Chevron believes that stainless steel metallurgy or replacement of the hot potassium carbonate process are the only reliable long-term solutions

  9. Hot corrosion of Ti–46Al–8Ta (at.%) intermetallic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godlewska, E.; Mitoraj, M.; Leszczynska, K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Cyclic oxidation tests with salt deposits were conducted on Ti–46Al–8Ta (at.%) alloy. •Mineral contaminants had detrimental effect on oxidation resistance. •Sodium chloride appeared to be the most hazardous among salts used. •Significant material losses were attributed to self-sustaining reaction mechanism. -- Abstract: Hot corrosion behaviour of a fully lamellar Ti–46Al–8Ta (at.%) alloy was studied in air under thermal cycling conditions (20-h cycles) at 700 and 800 °C. The samples were purposely contaminated with salt deposits consisting of NaCl or Na 2 SO 4 or a mixture of these. The progress of degradation was followed by mass change measurements and visual inspection. Post-exposure examination involved scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The composition of salt deposits clearly influenced the rate and type of corrosion. Sodium chloride appeared especially harmful because of the formation of volatile chloride species

  10. Burner Rig Hot Corrosion of a Single Crystal Ni-48Al-Ti-Hf-Ga Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, James A.; Darolia, Ram; Cuy, Michael D.

    1998-01-01

    The hot corrosion resistance of a single crystal Ni-48Al-1Ti-0.5Hf-0.2Ga alloy was examined in a Mach 0.3 burner rig at 900 C for 300 hours. The combustion chamber was doped with 2 ppmw synthetic sea salt. The hot corrosion attack produced a random mound morphology on the surface. Microstructurally, the hot corrosion attack appeared to initiate with oxide-filled pits which were often broad and shallow. At an intermediate stage, the pits increased in size to incorporate unoxidized Ni islands in the corrosion product. The rampant attack stage, which was observed only at sharp sample corners, was characterized by rapid inward growth of alumina in finger-like protrusions incorporating significant amounts of Al-depleted Ni islands. Aluminum consumption in the oxide fingers resulted in the growth of a gamma' layer ahead of the advancing oxide fingers.

  11. Burner rig hot corrosion of a single crystal Ni-48Al-Ti-Hf-Ga alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesbitt, J.A.; Darolia, R.; Cuy, M.D.

    1999-07-01

    The hot corrosion resistance of a single crystal Ni-48Al-1Ti-0.5Hf-0.2Ga alloy was examined in a Mach 0.3 burner rig at 900 C for 300 hours. The combustion chamber was doped with 2 ppmw synthetic sea salt. The hot corrosion attack produced a random mound morphology on the surface. Microstructurally, the hot corrosion attack appeared to initiate with oxide-filled pits which were often broad and shallow. At an intermediate stage, the pits increased in size to incorporate unoxidized Ni islands in the corrosion product. The rampant attack stage, which was observed only at sharp sample corners, was characterized by rapid inward growth of alumina in finger-like protrusions incorporating significant amounts of Al-depleted Ni islands. Aluminum consumption in the oxide fingers resulted in the growth of a {gamma}{prime} layer ahead of the advancing oxide fingers.

  12. The corrosion behaviour of Zr3Al-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, E.V.; Wieler, R.

    1977-07-01

    The corrosion resistance of several zirconium-aluminum alloys with aluminum contents ranging from 7.6 to 9.6 wt% was examined in 300 deg C and 325 deg C water, 350 deg C and 400 deg C steam and in air and wet CO 2 at 325 deg C and 400 deg C. In the transformed alloys there are three phases present, αZr, Zr 2 Al and Zr 3 Al of which the αZr phase is the least corrosion resistant. The most important factor controlling the corrosion behaviour of these alloys was found to be the size, distribution and amount of the αZr phase in the transformed alloys, which in turn was dependent upon the microstructural scale of the untransformed alloys

  13. Effect of postreatment on the corrosion behaviour of tartaric-sulphuric anodic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Rubio, M. [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Department of Surface Technologies, Engineering of Materials and Processes, Airbus Spain, Av. John Lennon s/n 28906 Getafe (Spain); Lara, M.P. de [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Ocon, P. [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: pilar.ocon@uam.es; Diekhoff, S. [Fraunhofer-IFAM, Lesumer Heerstrasse 36, 28717 Bremen (Germany); Beneke, M. [Department of Surface Technologies, Engineering of Materials and Processes, Airbus Deutschland, GmbH Hunefeldstr. 1-5, 28199 Bremen (Germany); Lavia, A.; Garcia, I. [Department of Surface Technologies, Engineering of Materials and Processes, Airbus Spain, Av. John Lennon s/n 28906 Getafe (Spain)

    2009-08-30

    Unclad and clad AA2024 T3 specimens were anodised in a chromium-free tartaric-sulphuric acid bath (TSA) and subsequently postreated by different processes including impregnation in a cold, concentrated chromate solution, Cr-free hot-water sealing, and dichromate hot-water sealing. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the effectiveness of the classical postreatments used in the aircraft industry on the TSA-anodic films and their corrosion resistance behaviour. TSA-anodic films were characterised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and their thicknesses were measured by SEM and the eddy current method. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to characterise the barrier and porous layers, and jointly with potentiodynamic polarisation allowed the evaluation of corrosion resistance parameters with immersion time in NaCl solution for anodised and postreated specimens. In all cases the postreatments increased the resistance of the barrier layer against degradation. However, the NaCl electrolyte easily penetrated TSA-anodised porous layers when they were not postreated, while penetration was slightly more difficult in cold-postreated specimens. The effective pore plugging was observed in the sealed TSA specimens resulting in an improved corrosion resistance. On the other hand, unsealed clad AA2024 specimens showed a self-sealing process of the TSA-anodic layer, which was slower for the cold chromate solution-postreated specimens.

  14. Effect of postreatment on the corrosion behaviour of tartaric-sulphuric anodic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Rubio, M.; Lara, M.P. de; Ocon, P.; Diekhoff, S.; Beneke, M.; Lavia, A.; Garcia, I.

    2009-01-01

    Unclad and clad AA2024 T3 specimens were anodised in a chromium-free tartaric-sulphuric acid bath (TSA) and subsequently postreated by different processes including impregnation in a cold, concentrated chromate solution, Cr-free hot-water sealing, and dichromate hot-water sealing. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the effectiveness of the classical postreatments used in the aircraft industry on the TSA-anodic films and their corrosion resistance behaviour. TSA-anodic films were characterised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and their thicknesses were measured by SEM and the eddy current method. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to characterise the barrier and porous layers, and jointly with potentiodynamic polarisation allowed the evaluation of corrosion resistance parameters with immersion time in NaCl solution for anodised and postreated specimens. In all cases the postreatments increased the resistance of the barrier layer against degradation. However, the NaCl electrolyte easily penetrated TSA-anodised porous layers when they were not postreated, while penetration was slightly more difficult in cold-postreated specimens. The effective pore plugging was observed in the sealed TSA specimens resulting in an improved corrosion resistance. On the other hand, unsealed clad AA2024 specimens showed a self-sealing process of the TSA-anodic layer, which was slower for the cold chromate solution-postreated specimens.

  15. Corrosion behaviour of nickel during anodic polarization in chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, S.A.; Isani, A.A.; Memon, A.N.

    1998-01-01

    This research presents the effect of oxygen and nitrogen on the corrosion behaviour of nickel in the chloride solution, at the steady state polarized and unpolarized potentials. The additives were selected from those, which are used for bright nickel plating. It was observed that the agitation of electrolyte in a particular pH-(Cl)' range increase the potentials in comparison of the potentials to the un-agitated electrolytes. (author)

  16. Corrosion behaviour of zirconium alloys out or under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomazet, J.; Billot, P.

    1997-01-01

    This article describes and compares the results obtained after studies carried out in autoclaves, in loops and in reactor in power on the behaviour of some products. Inversions of behaviour are observed between results of studies in autoclaves and after irradiation. On the contrary, a study in loop under thermal flux reproduces the classifying of tested products without however ensure a reliable quantification. Studies in autoclave are nevertheless useful for a first analysis of effects of modifications of manufacturing range. Nevertheless, a deep analysis of involved phenomena requires a better knowledge of corrosion mechanisms. (O.M.)

  17. Hot Corrosion of Inconel 625 Overlay Weld Cladding in Smelting Off-Gas Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi Zahrani, E.; Alfantazi, A. M.

    2013-10-01

    Degradation mechanisms and hot corrosion behavior of weld overlay alloy 625 were studied. Phase structure, morphology, thermal behavior, and chemical composition of deposited salt mixture on the weld overlay were characterized utilizing XRD, SEM/EDX, DTA, and ICP/OES, respectively. Dilution level of Fe in the weldment, dendritic structure, and degradation mechanisms of the weld were investigated. A molten phase formed on the weld layer at the operating temperature range of the boiler, which led to the hot corrosion attack in the water wall and the ultimate failure. Open circuit potential and weight-loss measurements and potentiodynamic polarization were carried out to study the hot corrosion behavior of the weld in the simulated molten salt medium at 873 K, 973 K, and 1073 K (600 °C, 700 °C, and 800 °C). Internal oxidation and sulfidation plus pitting corrosion were identified as the main hot corrosion mechanisms in the weld and boiler tubes. The presence of a significant amount of Fe made the dendritic structure of the weld susceptible to preferential corrosion. Preferentially corroded (Mo, Nb)-depleted dendrite cores acted as potential sites for crack initiation from the surface layer. The penetration of the molten phase into the cracks accelerated the cracks' propagation mainly through the dendrite cores and further crack branching/widening.

  18. Hot Corrosion of Single-Crystal NiAl-X Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, James A.

    1998-01-01

    Several single-crystal NiAl-X alloys (X=Hf, Ti, Cr, Ga) underwent hot corrosion testing in a Mach 0.3 burner rig at 900 deg. C for 300 1-hr cycles. The surface morphology after testing consisted of either mounds or an inward, uniform-type of attack which preserved surface features. It was observed that the surface morphology was affected by the surface preparation treatments. Microstructurally, the hot corrosion attack initiated as pits but evolved to a rampant attack consisting of the rapid inward growth of Al2O3. Electropolishing and chemical milling produced many pits and grooves on the surface. However, the presence of pits and grooves did not appear to strongly influence the hot corrosion response. Attack on many samples was strongly localized which was attributed to compositional inhomogeneity within the samples. It was found that increasing the Ti content from 1% to 5 % degraded the hot corrosion response of these alloys. In contrast, the addition of 1-2% Cr reduced the susceptibility of these alloys to hot corrosion attack and negated the deleterious effect of the 4-5% Ti addition.

  19. Corrosion behaviour of Al based tritium permeation barriers in flowing Pb-17Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasbrenner, H.; Konys, J.; Voss, Z.; Wedemeyer, O.

    2002-01-01

    Tritium permeation barriers on low-activation steels are required in fusion technology in order to reduce the tritium permeation rate through the structural material into the cooling water system. Al-Fe layers with alumina on top can fulfil the required reduction rate. Three techniques were selected to produce such a multi-layered coating system: chemical vapour deposition (CVD) by CEA, hot-dip aluminising (HDA) by FZK and vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) by JRC Ispra. A sufficient corrosion resistance against Pb-17Li attack is also required for the coating. Therefore, the corrosion behaviour of these three coatings on ferritic-martensitic steels was studied in the PICOLO loop of FZK in flowing Pb-17Li at 480 deg. C up to 10 000 h. Corrosion effects could not be found on HDA and VPS coated specimens even up to the longest time of exposure. The total thickness of the two-layered system remained unchanged at around 130 μm for all examined HDA and VPS specimens. In contrast to this, corrosion effects could be inspected on CVD coated specimens

  20. Cyclic Oxidation and Hot Corrosion of NiCrY-Coated Disk Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Miller, Robert A.; Sudbrack, Chantal K.; Draper, Susan L.; Nesbitt, James A.; Rogers, Richard B.; Telesman, Ignacy; Ngo, Vanda; Healy, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Powder metallurgy disk superalloys have been designed for higher engine operating temperatures through improvement of their strength and creep resistance. Yet, increasing disk application temperatures to 704 degrees Centigrade and higher could enhance oxidation and activate hot corrosion in harmful environments. Protective coatings could be necessary to mitigate such attack. Cylindrical coated specimens of disk superalloys LSHR and ME3 were subjected to thermal cycling to produce cyclic oxidation in air at a maximum temperature of 760 degrees Centigrade. The effects of substrate roughness and coating thickness on coating integrity after cyclic oxidation were considered. Selected coated samples that had cyclic oxidation were then subjected to accelerated hot corrosion tests. This cyclic oxidation did not impair the coating's resistance to subsequent hot corrosion pitting attack.

  1. Cyclic Oxidation and Hot Corrosion of NiCrY-Coated Disk Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, Tim; Miller, R. A.; Sudbrack, C. K.; Draper, S. L.; Nesbitt, J.; Telesman, J.; Ngo, V.; Healy, J.

    2015-01-01

    Powder metallurgy disk superalloys have been designed for higher engine operating temperatures through improvement of their strength and creep resistance. Yet, increasing disk application temperatures to 704 C and higher could enhance oxidation and activate hot corrosion in harmful environments. Protective coatings could be necessary to mitigate such attack. Cylindrical coated specimens of disk superalloys LSHR and ME3 were subjected to thermal cycling to produce cyclic oxidation in air at a maximum temperature of 760 C. The effects of substrate roughness and coating thickness on coating integrity after cyclic oxidation were considered. Selected coated samples that had cyclic oxidation were then subjected to accelerated hot corrosion tests. The effects of this cyclic oxidation on resistance to subsequent hot corrosion attack were examined.

  2. Study by electronic microscopy of corrosion features of graphite after hot oxidation (air, 620 C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jodon de Villeroche, Suzanne

    1968-01-01

    The author reports the study of corrosion features of graphite after hot oxidation in the air at 620 C. It is based on observations made by electronic microscopy. This study comes after another one dedicated to oxidation features obtained by hot corrosion of natural graphite, and aims at comparing pyrolytic graphite before and after irradiation in an atomic pile, and at performing tests on a graphite processed with ozone. After a recall of generalities about natural graphite and of some issues related to hot corrosion of natural graphite, the author presents some characteristics and features of irradiated and non-irradiated pyrolytic graphite. He reports the study of the oxidation of samples of pyrolytic graphite: production of thin lamellae, production of glaze-carbon replicates, oxidation of irradiated and of non-irradiated graphite, healing of irradiation defects, and oxidation of ozone-processed natural graphite [fr

  3. Hot-wall corrosion testing of simulated high level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, G.T.; Zapp, P.E.; Mickalonis, J.I.

    1995-01-01

    Three materials of construction for steam tubes used in the evaporation of high level radioactive waste were tested under heat flux conditions, referred to as hot-wall tests. The materials were type 304L stainless steel alloy C276, and alloy G3. Non-radioactive acidic and alkaline salt solutions containing halides and mercury simulated different high level waste solutions stored or processed at the United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site. Alloy C276 was also tested for corrosion susceptibility under steady-state conditions. The nickel-based alloys C276 and G3 exhibited excellent corrosion resistance under the conditions studied. Alloy C276 was not susceptible to localized corrosion and had a corrosion rate of 0.01 mpy (0.25 μm/y) when exposed to acidic waste sludge and precipitate slurry at a hot-wall temperature of 150 degrees C. Type 304L was susceptible to localized corrosion under the same conditions. Alloy G3 had a corrosion rate of 0.1 mpy (2.5 μm/y) when exposed to caustic high level waste evaporator solution at a hot-wall temperature of 220 degrees C compared to 1.1 mpy (28.0 μ/y) for type 304L. Under extreme caustic conditions (45 weight percent sodium hydroxide) G3 had a corrosion rate of 0.1 mpy (2.5 μm/y) at a hot-wall temperature of 180 degrees C while type 304L had a high corrosion rate of 69.4 mpy (1.8 mm/y)

  4. Corrosion behaviour of martensitic and austenitic steels in flowing lead-bismuth eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Munoz, F.J.; Soler-Crespo, L.; Gomez-Briceno, D.

    2011-01-01

    The LINCE loop is a forced convection loop designed for long-term corrosion tests in lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at CIEMAT. The LBE volume of in the loop is 250 l and the maximum flow velocity in the region of specimens is approximately 1 m s -1 . An oxygen control system has been implemented in the loop. The corrosion behaviour of AISI 316L and T91 steels was investigated in flowing LBE at temperatures of 575 and 725 K for exposure times of 2000, 5000 and 10,000 h. At 575 K, the results showed a good response, with no weight loss detected in any of the materials after exposure to the flowing LBE up to 10,000 h. A similar behaviour was observed for the specimens tested at 725 K during 2000 and 10,000 h. Specimens extracted at intermediate time (5000 h) showed an anomalous behaviour with important weight loss. These specimens were placed at the bottom of the hot test section, and this position probably made them to suffer an accused process of cavitation-erosion.

  5. Corrosion behaviour of high temperature alloys in impure helium environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Masami; Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.

    1986-01-01

    Corrosion tests with Ni-base high temperature alloys were carried out at 900 and 950 0 C in simulated high temperature reactor helium environments. It is shown that the carburization and decarburization behaviour is strongly affected by the Cr and Ti(Al) contents of the alloys. In carburizing environments, additions of Ti, alone or in combination with Al, significantly improve the carburization resistance. In oxidizing environment, the alloys with high Cr and Al(Ti) contents are the most resistant against decarburization. In this environment alloys with additions of Ti and Al show poor oxidation resistance. The experimental results obtained are compared with a recently developed theory describing corrosion of high temperature alloys in high temperature reactor helium environments. (orig.)

  6. Hot corrosion behavior of Ni based Inconel 617 and Inconel 738 superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Awadi, G.A., E-mail: gaberelawdi@yahoo.com [Atomic Energy Authority, NRC, Cyclotron Project, Abo-zabal, 13759 Cairo (Egypt); Abdel-Samad, S., E-mail: salem_abdelsamad@yahoo.com [Atomic Energy Authority, NRC, Cyclotron Project, Abo-zabal, 13759 Cairo (Egypt); Elshazly, Ezzat S. [Atomic Energy Authority, NRC, Metallurgy Dept., Abo-zabal, 13759 Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Supperalloy good resistance to high temperature oxidation. • Ni-base alloy IN738 and Inconel 617 good resistance to hot corrosion. • Corrosion resistance of supperalloys depending on environment of abrasive ions such as (NaCl or NaSO{sub 4}). • Hot corrosion resistance depend on what the oxides phases where formed. - Abstract: Superalloys are extensively used at high temperature applications due to their good oxidation and corrosion resistance properties in addition to their high stability were made at high temperature. Experimental measurements of hot corrosion at high temperature of Inconel 617 and Inconel 738 superalloys. The experiments were carried out at temperatures 700 °C, 800 °C and 900 °C for different exposure times to up to 100 h. The corrosive media was NaCl and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} sprayed on the specimens. Seven different specimens were used at each temperature. The corrosion process is endothermic and the spontaneity increased by increasing temperature. The activation energy was found to be Ea = 23.54 and E{sub a} = 25.18 KJ/mol for Inconel 738 and Inconel 617 respectively. X-ray diffraction technique (XRD) was used to analyze the formed scale. The morphology of the specimen and scale were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that the major corrosion products formed were NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and Co Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinles, in addition to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  7. The effect of boron implantation on the corrosion behaviour, microhardness and contact resistance of copper and silver surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, O.; Johnson, E.; Johansen, A.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.

    1986-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of boron implantation on the corrosion resistance of electrical contacts, a number of pure copper, pure silver and copper edge connector samples have been implanted with boron (40 keV) to fluences of 5.10 20 m -2 and 2.10 21 m -2 . Atmospheric corrosion tests of the implanted species were conducted using the following exposures: H 2 S (12.5 ppm, 4 days), SO 2 (25 ppm, 21 days), saltfog (5% NaCl, 1 day), moist air (93% RH, 56 days), and hot/dry air (70 C, 56 days). The boron implantations lead to a significant reduction in the sulphidation rate of copper and silver. The corrosive film formed during exposure in H 2 S and SO 2 atmospheres is confined to pitted regions on the implanted areas, while a thick and relatively uniform film formation is observed on the unimplanted samples. The corrosion resistance of copper and silver in saltfog atmosphere is somewhat improved by boron implantation, whilst the results from exposures to moist air or hot/dry air are inconclusive. The improved corrosion behaviour is accompanied by an increase in the contact resistance and in the microhardness of the implanted samples. (orig.)

  8. Hot corrosion behavior of magnesia-stabilized ceramic material in a lithium molten salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Soo-Haeng, E-mail: nshcho1@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Wook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae-Young [Graduate School of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong-Hyeon, E-mail: jonglee@cnu.ac.kr [Graduate School of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Rapidly Solidified Materials Research Center, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Hur, Jin-Mok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    The isothermal and cyclic corrosion behaviors of magnesia-stabilized zirconia in a LiCl-Li{sub 2}O molten salt were investigated at 650 °C in an argon atmosphere. The weights of as-received and corroded specimens were measured and the microstructures, morphologies, and chemical compositions were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. For processes where Li is formed at the cathode during electrolysis, the corrosion rate was about five times higher than those of isothermal and thermal cycling processes. During isothermal tests, the corrosion product Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} was formed after 216 h. During thermal cycling, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} was not detected until after the completion of 14 cycles. There was no evidence of cracks, pores, or spallation on the corroded surfaces, except when Li was formed. We demonstrate that magnesia-stabilized zirconia is beneficial for increasing the hot corrosion resistance of structural materials subjected to high temperature molten salts containing Li{sub 2}O. - Highlights: •Corrosion mechanism of MSZin LiCl-Li{sub 2}O molten salt is proposed. •Formation of Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}is main corrosion mechanism. •There were no cracks, pores and spallation after corrosion test. •MSZ shows high corrosion resistance to LiCl-Li{sub 2}O molten salt.

  9. Impact of chlorinated disinfection on copper corrosion in hot water systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, J. Castillo [Centre Scientifique et Technique du Bâtiment Nantes, 11 rue Henri Picherit, BP 82341, 44323 Nantes Cedex 03 (France); Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur pour l’Environnement, UMR-CNRS 7356, Université de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crépeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Hamdani, F. [Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur pour l’Environnement, UMR-CNRS 7356, Université de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crépeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Creus, J., E-mail: jcreus@univ-lr.fr [Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur pour l’Environnement, UMR-CNRS 7356, Université de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crépeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Touzain, S. [Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur pour l’Environnement, UMR-CNRS 7356, Université de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crépeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Correc, O. [Centre Scientifique et Technique du Bâtiment Nantes, 11 rue Henri Picherit, BP 82341, 44323 Nantes Cedex 03 (France)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Impact of disinfectant treatment on the durability of copper pipes. • Synergy between disinfectant concentration and temperature. • Pitting corrosion of copper associated to the corrosion products formation on copper. - Abstract: In France, hot water quality control inside buildings is occasionally ensured by disinfection treatments using temperature increases or addition of sodium hypochlorite (between 0.5 ppm and 1 ppm residual free chlorine). This disinfectant is a strong oxidiser and it could interact with metallic pipes usually used in hot water systems. This work deals with the study of the impact of these treatments on the durability of copper pipes. The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of sodium hypochlorite concentration and temperature on the copper corrosion mechanism. Copper samples were tested under dynamic and static conditions of ageing with sodium hypochlorite solutions ranging from 0 to 100 ppm with temperature at 50 °C and 70 °C. The efficiency of a corrosion inhibitor was investigated in dynamic conditions. Visual observations and analytical analyses of the internal surface of samples was studied at different ageing duration. Corrosion products were characterised by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Temperature and disinfectant were found to considerably affect the copper corrosion mechanism. Surprisingly, the corrosiveness of the solution was higher at lower temperatures. The temperature influences the nature of corrosion products. The protection efficiency is then strongly depend on the nature of the corrosion products formed at the surface of copper samples exposed to the aggressive solutions containing different concentration of disinfectant.

  10. The corrosion behaviour of nanograined metals and alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrasti, P.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available There has been considerable interest in the properties of nanocrystalline materials over the last decade. Such materials include metals and alloys with a crystal size within the order of 1 to 100 nm. The interest arises due to the substantial differences in electrical, optical and magnetic properties and also due to their high adsorption capability and chemical reactivity compared to their larger grained counterparts. In this paper, the corrosion of nanocrystalline metals and alloys is investigated and compared to the corrosion of microcrystalline materials having a similar composition. The focus is on the corrosion of nickel, copper, cobalt and iron alloys. Key aspects of different corrosion behaviour such grain boundaries and size are identified.

    En la última década ha habido un gran interes en las propiedades de materiales nanocristalinos. Estos materiales incluyen metales y aleaciones con un tamaño de cristal del orden de 1 a 100 nm. El interes por estos materiales es debido a las grandes diferencias en cuanto a sus propiedades electricas, opticas y magneticas, asi como a su alta capacidad de adsorción y reactividad química en relación a los mismos materiales con tamaños de grano mayores. En este trabajo se ha investigado y comparado la corrosión de materiales nano y microcristalinos de similar composición química. Principalmente se ha centrado en la corrosión de metales tales como niquel, cobre, cobalto y aleaciones de hierro. Se ha comprobado que los diferentes comportamientos frente al proceso de corrosión están intimamente ligados con los bordes de grano y el tamaño de dichos granos.

  11. Comparison of corrosion behaviour of friction stir processed and laser melted AA 2219 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surekha, K.; Murty, B.S.; Prasad Rao, K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Poor corrosion resistance of AA 2219 can be improved by surface treatments. → FSP and LM leads to dissolution of second phase particles. → No literature available on comparison of corrosion behaviour after FSP and LM. → The study implies FSP is as good as LM in improving the corrosion resistance of AA 2219. -- Abstract: Dissolution of second phase particles (CuAl 2 ) present in AA 2219 aluminium improves the corrosion resistance of the alloy. Two surface treatment techniques, viz., solid state friction stir processing and fusion based laser melting lead to the reduction in CuAl 2 content and the effect of these processes on the corrosion behaviour of the alloy is compared in this study. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests were carried out to compare corrosion behaviour. The corrosion resistance achieved by friction stir processing is comparable to that obtained by the laser melting technique.

  12. Hot temperature corrosion of a zircon-1%niobium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, Sebastian; Lanzani, Liliana

    2010-01-01

    The reaction of the Zr-1%Niobium alloy to corrosion is studied in this work, which is used as fuel elements sheath material in Russian VVER reactors. For comparative purposes, the conventional alloys Zircaloy-4 y Zr-2.5%Nb have been tested as well. Autoclave tests were carried out in water and in solutions of LiOH with concentrations of 0-1 to 1M at 343 o C and in water vapor at 400 o C (following ASTM G2/G2M-06). The gain in weight/unit of area of the autoclaved samples was determined in order to evaluate the corrosion, and metallographics were performed to characterize the oxides and hydrides that formed. The results show that for tests of 16 hours, a minimum concentration of 0.65M LiOH is needed to accelerate corrosion in Zr-1%Nb and Zr-2.5%Nb, while acceleration occurs in Zircaloy-4 at a concentration of 0.45M. In solutions of LiOH 1M the hydrogen 'uptake' in Zr-1Nb and Zr-2,5Nb is considerably lower in Zircaloy-4. The lesser amount of β-Zr phase present in the Zr-1Nb alloy produces thinner and more compact oxides, with better visual characteristics than for those formed in Zr-2.5Nb

  13. The corrosion behaviour of galvanized steel in cooling tower water containing a biocide and a corrosion inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnoş, Bihter; Ilhan-Sungur, Esra; Çotuk, Ayşın; Güngör, Nihal Doğruöz; Cansever, Nurhan

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of galvanized steel in cooling tower water containing a biocide and a corrosion inhibitor was investigated over a 10-month period in a hotel. Planktonic and sessile numbers of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) and heterotrophic bacteria were monitored. The corrosion rate was determined by the weight loss method. The corrosion products were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. A mineralized, heterogeneous biofilm was observed on the coupons. Although a biocide and a corrosion inhibitor were regularly added to the cooling water, the results showed that microorganisms, such as SRB in the mixed species biofilm, caused corrosion of galvanized steel. It was observed that Zn layers on the test coupons were completely depleted after 3 months. The Fe concentrations in the biofilm showed significant correlations with the weight loss and carbohydrate concentration (respectively, p < 0.01 and p < 0.01).

  14. Evaluation of surface characteristics under fretting of electrical contacts: Removal behaviour of hot dipped tin coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Young Woo; Ramesh Bapu, G.N.K.; Lee, Kang Yong

    2009-01-01

    The fretting corrosion behaviour of hot dipped tin coating is investigated at low fretting cycles at ±25 μm displacement amplitude, 0.5N normal load, 3 Hz frequency, 45-50% relative humidity, and 25 ± 1 deg. C temperature. The typical characteristics of the change in contact resistance with fretting cycles are explained. The fretted surface is examined using laser scanning microscope, scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray analysis to assess the surface profile, extent of fretting damage, extent of oxidation and elemental distribution across the contact zone. The interdependence of extent of wear and oxidation increases the complexity of the fretting corrosion behaviour of tin coating. The variation of contact resistance clearly revealed the fretting of tin coating from 50 to 1200 cycles and the fretting of the substrate above 1200 cycles. The observed low and stable contact resistance region and the fluctuating resistance region at various fretting cycles are explained and substantiated with Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser scanning microscope (LSM) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) analysis results of the fretted surface.

  15. Hot corrosion behavior of plasma-sprayed partially stabilized zirconia coatings in a lithium molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Hong, Sun Seok; Kang, Dae Seong; Park, Byung Heong; Hur, Jin Mok; Lee, Han Soo

    2008-01-01

    The electrolytic reduction of spent oxide fuel involves the liberation of oxygen in a molten LiCl electrolyte, which results in a chemically aggressive environment that is too corrosive for typical structural materials. It is essential to choose the optimum material for the process equipment handling molten salt. IN713LC is one of the candidate materials proposed for application in electrolytic reduction process. In this study, Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) top coat was applied to a surface of IN713LC with an aluminized metallic bond coat by an optimized plasma spray process, and were investigated the corrosion behavior at 675 .deg. C for 216 hours in the molten salt LiCl-Li 2 O under an oxidizing atmosphere. The as-coated and tested specimens were examined by OM, SEM/EDS and XRD, respectively. The bare superalloy reveals obvious weight loss, and the corrosion layer formed on the surface of the bare superalloy was spalled due to the rapid scale growth and thermal stress. The top coatings showed a much better hot-corrosion resistance in the presence of LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt when compared to those of the uncoated superalloy and the aluminized bond coatings. These coatings have been found to be beneficial for increasing to the hot-corrosion resistance of the structural materials for handling high temperature lithium molten salts

  16. Study of corrosion-erosion behaviour of stainless alloys in industrial phosphoric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenbour, Abdellah; Hajji, Mohamed-Adil; Jallouli, El Miloudi; Bachir, Ali Ben

    2006-01-01

    The corrosion and corrosion-abrasion resistance of some stainless steels in industrial phosphoric acid 30% P 2 O 5 has been studied using electrochemical techniques. The corrosion rate of materials increases with the increase of temperature. Alloys which contain chromium, molybdenum and nitrogen in sufficient quantities present the best behaviour. In the abrasion-corrosion conditions, the experimental device set up allowed to follow continually samples electrochemical behaviour. Under dynamic conditions and without solid particles, the increase of acid projection speed has no effect on the alloys corrosion behaviour. The adding of abrasive leads to a general increase of corrosion rate and to a decrease of material resistance. Under these conditions, materials attack is controlled by synergistic effect between the abrasion and the impurities. The cast 30% Cr shows good resistance according to his high chromium content

  17. Study of corrosion-erosion behaviour of stainless alloys in industrial phosphoric acid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenbour, Abdellah [Laboratory of Electrochemistry-Corrosion, Av. Ibn Batouta, BP1014-Faculty of Science, Rabat (Morocco)]. E-mail: guenbour@fsr.ac.ma; Hajji, Mohamed-Adil [Group Corrosion and Protection of Materials, ENIM, Rabat (Morocco); Jallouli, El Miloudi [Group Corrosion and Protection of Materials, ENIM, Rabat (Morocco); Bachir, Ali Ben [Laboratory of Electrochemistry-Corrosion, Av. Ibn Batouta, BP1014-Faculty of Science, Rabat (Morocco)

    2006-12-30

    The corrosion and corrosion-abrasion resistance of some stainless steels in industrial phosphoric acid 30% P{sub 2}O{sub 5} has been studied using electrochemical techniques. The corrosion rate of materials increases with the increase of temperature. Alloys which contain chromium, molybdenum and nitrogen in sufficient quantities present the best behaviour. In the abrasion-corrosion conditions, the experimental device set up allowed to follow continually samples electrochemical behaviour. Under dynamic conditions and without solid particles, the increase of acid projection speed has no effect on the alloys corrosion behaviour. The adding of abrasive leads to a general increase of corrosion rate and to a decrease of material resistance. Under these conditions, materials attack is controlled by synergistic effect between the abrasion and the impurities. The cast 30% Cr shows good resistance according to his high chromium content.

  18. Influence of Al content on the corrosion resistance of micro-alloyed hot rolled steel as a function of grain size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaban, Abdullah; Naher, Sumsun

    2018-05-01

    High-strength low-alloy steel (HSLA) has been widely used in many applications involving automobiles, aerospace, construction, and oil and gas pipelines due to their enhanced mechanical and chemical properties. One of the most critical elements used to improve these properties is Aluminium. This work will explore the effect of Al content on the corrosion behaviour of hot rolled high-strength low-alloy steel as a function of grain size. The method of investigation employed was weight loss technique. It was obvious that the increase in Al content enhanced corrosion resistance through refinement of grain size obtained through AlN precipitation by pinning grain boundaries and hindering their growth during solidification which was found to be beneficial in reducing corrosion rate.

  19. Corrosion rate of construction materials in hot phosphoric acid with the contribution of anodic polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouril, M. [Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Christensen, E. [Technical University of Denmark, Kemitorvet, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Eriksen, S.; Gillesberg, B. [Tantaline A/S, Nordborgvej 81, 6430 Nordborg (Denmark)

    2012-04-15

    The paper is focused on selection of a proper material for construction elements of water electrolysers, which make use of a 85% phosphoric acid as an electrolyte at temperature of 150 C and which might be loaded with anodic polarization up to 2.5 V versus a saturated Ag/AgCl electrode (SSCE). Several grades of stainless steels were tested as well as tantalum, niobium, titanium, nickel alloys and silicon carbide. The corrosion rate was evaluated by means of mass loss at free corrosion potential as well as under various levels of polarization. The only corrosion resistant material in 85% phosphoric acid at 150 C and at polarization of 2.5 V/SSCE is tantalum. In that case, even a gentle cathodic polarization is harmful in such an acidic environment. Hydrogen reduction leads to tantalum hydride formation, to loss of mechanical properties and to complete disintegration of the metal. Contrary to tantalum, titanium is free of any corrosion resistance in hot phosphoric acid. Its corrosion rate ranges from tens of millimetres to metres per year depending on temperature of the acid. Alloy bonded tantalum coating was recognized as an effective corrosion protection for both titanium and stainless steel. Its serviceability might be limited by slow dissolution of tantalum that is in order of units of mm/year. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Hot Corrosion Test Facility at the NASA Lewis Special Projects Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Raymond C.; Cuy, Michael D.

    1994-01-01

    The Hot Corrosion Test Facility (HCTF) at the NASA Lewis Special Projects Laboratory (SPL) is a high-velocity, pressurized burner rig currently used to evaluate the environmental durability of advanced ceramic materials such as SiC and Si3N4. The HCTF uses laboratory service air which is preheated, mixed with jet fuel, and ignited to simulate the conditions of a gas turbine engine. Air, fuel, and water systems are computer-controlled to maintain test conditions which include maximum air flows of 250 kg/hr (550 lbm/hr), pressures of 100-600 kPa (1-6 atm), and gas temperatures exceeding 1500 C (2732 F). The HCTF provides a relatively inexpensive, yet sophisticated means for researchers to study the high-temperature oxidation of advanced materials, and the injection of a salt solution provides the added capability of conducting hot corrosion studies.

  1. Corrosion Performance of Nano-ZrO₂ Modified Coatings in Hot Mixed Acid Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenhua; Wang, Zhenyu; Han, En-Hou; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Qian

    2018-06-01

    A nano-ZrO₂ modified coating system was prepared by incorporation of nano-ZrO₂ concentrates into phenolic-epoxy resin. The corrosion performance of the coatings was evaluated in hot mixed acid solution, using electrochemical methods combined with surface characterization, and the effects of nano-ZrO₂ content were specially focused on. The results showed that 1% and 3% nano-ZrO₂ addition enhanced the corrosion resistance of the coatings, while 5% nano-ZrO₂ addition declined it. The coating with 3% nano-ZrO₂ presented the minimum amount of species diffusion, the lowest average roughness (5.94 nm), and the highest C/O ratio (4.55) and coating resistance, and it demonstrated the best corrosion performance among the coating specimens.

  2. Effect of ageing time and temperature on corrosion behaviour of aluminum alloy 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadpale, Vikas; Banjare, Pragya N.; Manoj, Manoranjan Kumar

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of corrosion behaviour of aluminium alloy 2014 were studied by potentiodynamic polarization in 1 mole of NaCl solution of aged sample. The experimental testing results concluded that, corrosion resistance of Aluminum alloy 2014 degraded with the increasing the temperature (150°C & 200°C) and time of ageing. Corroded surface of the aged specimens was tested under optical microscopes for microstructures for phase analysis. Optical micrographs of corroded surfaces showed general corrosion and pitting corrosion. The corrosion resistance of lower ageing temperature and lower ageing time is higher because of its fine distribution of precipitates in matrix phase.

  3. Corrosion behaviour of container materials for the disposal of high-level waste forms in rock salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailos, E.; Schwarzkopf, W.; Koester, R.

    1987-05-01

    Extensive laboratory-scale experiments to evaluate the long-term corrosion behaviour of selected materials in brines and first in situ experiments were performed. In the laboratory experiments the materials Ti 99.8-Pd, Hastelloy C4 and hot-rolled low carbon steel as well cast steel, spheroidal cast iron, Si-cast iron and the Ni-Resists type D2 and D4 were investigated. The investigated parameters were: temperature, gamma-radiation and different compositions of salt brines. (orig./PW) [de

  4. Corrosion behaviour of non-ferrous metals in sea water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birn, Jerzy; Skalski, Igor [Ship Design and Research Centre, Al. Rzeczypospolitej 8, 80-369 Gdansk (Poland)

    2004-07-01

    The most typical kinds of corrosion of brasses are selective corrosion (dezincification) and stress corrosion. Prevention against these kinds of corrosion lies in application of arsenic alloy addition and appropriate heat treatment removing internal stresses as well as in maintaining the arsenic and phosphorus contents on a proper level. The most typical corrosion of cupronickels is the local corrosion. Selective corrosion occurs less often and corrosion cracking caused by stress corrosion in sea water does not usually occur. Crevice corrosion is found especially in places of an heterogeneous oxidation of the surface under inorganic deposits or under bio-film. Common corrosive phenomena for brasses and cupronickels are the effects caused by sea water flow and most often the impingement attack. Alloy additions improve resistance to the action of intensive sea water flow but situation in this field requires further improvement, especially if the cheaper kinds of alloys are concerned. Contaminants of sea water such as ammonia and hydrogen sulphide are also the cause of common corrosion processes for all copper alloys. Corrosion of copper alloys may be caused also by sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB). Galvanic corrosion caused by a contact with titanium alloys e.g. in plate heat exchangers may cause corrosion of both kinds copper alloys. Bronzes belong to copper alloys of the highest corrosion resistance. Failures that sometimes occur are caused most often by the cavitation erosion, by an incorrect chemical composition of alloys or at last by their inadequate structure. The main problems of aluminium alloys service in sea water are following phenomena: local corrosion (pitting and crevice corrosion), galvanic corrosion, exfoliation and corrosion in the presence of OH- ions. The cause of local corrosion are caused by presence of passive film on the alloy's surface and presence of chlorides in sea water which are able to damage the passive film. Galvanic corrosion is

  5. Effect of the electrochemical passivation on the corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbucci, A.; Delucchi, M.; Panizza, M.; Farne, G.; Cerisola, G.

    2004-01-01

    Cold rolled SS is also fruitfully used in deep drawing however the presence of scales or oxides on the surface reduces the life of the tools and emphasises creep phenomena of the material. Then a cleaning of the SS surface from these impurities is necessary. Oxides can be formed during the hot rolling preceding the cold one, or during the annealing performed between the several steps of thickness reduction. The annealing helps to decrease the work hardening occurring during the process. Normally this heat treatment is performed in reducing atmosphere of pure hydrogen (bright annealing), but even in this conditions oxides are formed on the SS surface. To avoid this uncontrolled oxide growth one method recently applied is an electrochemical cleaning performed in an electrolytic solution containing chrome, generally called electrochemical passivation. The electrochemical passivation allows the dissolution of the contaminating hard particles on the strips. Few scientific contributions are available in literature, which explain in detail the process mechanism. The aim of this work is to investigate if the electrochemical passivated surface acts in a different way with regard to corrosion phenomena with respect to conventional SS. Electrochemical measurements like polarisation, chrono-amperometries and surface analysis were used to investigate the corrosion behaviour of electrochemically passivated AISI 304L and AISI 305. The effect of some process parameters were considered, too. (authors)

  6. Effect of the electrochemical passivation on the corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbucci, A.; Delucchi, M.; Panizza, M.; Farne, G.; Cerisola, G. [DICheP, University of Genova, P.le Kennedy 1, 16129 Genova (Italy)

    2004-07-01

    Cold rolled SS is also fruitfully used in deep drawing however the presence of scales or oxides on the surface reduces the life of the tools and emphasises creep phenomena of the material. Then a cleaning of the SS surface from these impurities is necessary. Oxides can be formed during the hot rolling preceding the cold one, or during the annealing performed between the several steps of thickness reduction. The annealing helps to decrease the work hardening occurring during the process. Normally this heat treatment is performed in reducing atmosphere of pure hydrogen (bright annealing), but even in this conditions oxides are formed on the SS surface. To avoid this uncontrolled oxide growth one method recently applied is an electrochemical cleaning performed in an electrolytic solution containing chrome, generally called electrochemical passivation. The electrochemical passivation allows the dissolution of the contaminating hard particles on the strips. Few scientific contributions are available in literature, which explain in detail the process mechanism. The aim of this work is to investigate if the electrochemical passivated surface acts in a different way with regard to corrosion phenomena with respect to conventional SS. Electrochemical measurements like polarisation, chrono-amperometries and surface analysis were used to investigate the corrosion behaviour of electrochemically passivated AISI 304L and AISI 305. The effect of some process parameters were considered, too. (authors)

  7. Hot Corrosion Behavior of Stainless Steel with Al-Si/Al-Si-Cr Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guangyan; Wu, Yongzhao; Liu, Qun; Li, Rongguang; Su, Yong

    2017-03-01

    The 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel with Al-Si/Al-Si-Cr coatings is prepared by slurry process and vacuum diffusion, and the hot corrosion behavior of the stainless steel with/without the coatings is studied under the condition of Na2SO4 film at 950 °C in air. Results show that the corrosion kinetics of stainless steel, the stainless steel with Al-Si coating and the stainless steel with Al-Si-Cr coating follow parabolic laws in several segments. After 24 h corrosion, the sequence of the mass gain for the three alloys is the stainless steel with Al-Si-Cr coating coating coating. The corrosion products of the three alloys are layered. Thereinto, the corrosion products of stainless steel without coating are divided into two layers, where the outside layer contains a composite of Fe2O3 and FeO, and the inner layer is Cr2O3. The corrosion products of the stainless steel with Al-Si coating are also divided into two layers, of which the outside layer mainly consists of Cr2O3, and the inner layer is mainly SiO2. The corrosion film of the stainless steel with Al-Si-Cr coating is thin and dense, which combines well with substrate. Thereinto, the outside layer is mainly Cr2O3, and the inside layer is Al2O3. In the matrix of all of the three alloys, there exist small amount of sulfides. Continuous and protective films of Cr2O3, SiO2 and Al2O3 form on the surface of the stainless steel with Al-Si and Al-Si-Cr coatings, which prevent further oxidation or sulfide corrosion of matrix metals, and this is the main reason for the much smaller mass gain of the two alloys than that of the stainless steel without any coatings in the 24 h hot corrosion process.

  8. Hot mechanical behaviour of dispersion strengthened Cu alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia G, Jose; Espinoza G, Rodrigo; Palma H, Rodrigo; Sepulveda O, Aquiles

    2003-01-01

    This work is part of a research project which objective is the improvement of the high-temperature mechanical properties of copper, without an important decrease of the electrical or thermal conduction properties. The general hypothesis is that this will be done by the incorporation of nanometric ceramic dispersoids for hindering the dislocation and grain boundaries movement. In this context, the object of the present work is the study of the resistance to hot deformation of dispersion-strengthened copper alloys which have prepared by reactive milling. Two different alloys, Cu-2,39wt.%Ti-0.56wt.%C and Cu-1.18wt.%Al, were prepared so as obtain a copper matrix reinforced with nanometric TiC y Al 2 O 3 particles with a nominal total amount of 5 vol.%. The particles were developed by an in-situ formation process during milling. The materials were prepared in an attritor mill, and consolidated by extrusion at 750 o C, with an area reduction rate of 10:1. The resistance to hot deformation was evaluated by hot compression tests at 500 and 850 o C, at initial strain rates of 10 -3 and 10 -4 s-1. To evaluate the material softening due temperature, annealing at 400, 650 y 900 o C during 1h were applied; after that, hardness was measured at room temperature. Both studies alloys presented a higher resistance to hot deformation than pure copper, with or without milling. Moreover, the Cu-Ti-C alloy presented a mechanical resistance higher than that of the Cu-Al one. Both alloys presented strain-stress compression curves with a typical hot-work shape: an initial maximum followed by a stationary plateau. The Cu-Ti-C alloy had a higher hardness and did not present a hardness decay even after annealings at the higher temperature imposed (900 o C), while the Cu-Al alloy did exhibit a strong decay of hardness after the annealing at 900 o C. The best behaviour exhibited by the Cu-Ti C alloy, was attributed to the formation of a major quantity of dispersoids that in the Cu-Al alloy. In

  9. Corrosion behaviour of 2124 aluminium alloy-silicon carbide metal matrix composites in sodium chloride environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Nirbhay; Vadera, K.K.; Ramesh Kumar, A.V.; Singh, R.S.; Monga, S.S.; Mathur, G.N.

    1999-01-01

    Aluminium alloy based particle reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) are being considered for a range of applications. Their mechanical properties have been investigated in detail, but more information about their corrosion resistance is needed. In this investigation, the corrosion behaviour of silicon carbide particulates (SiC p )-2124 aluminium metal matrix composites was studied in 3 wt% sodium chloride solution by means of electrochemical technique and optical microscope. The effects of weight percentages and particle size of silicon carbide particulates on corrosion behaviour of the composite were studied in NaCl and it was observed that corrosion rate increases linearly with the increasing weight percentage of SiC p . The corrosion rate of the MMC increases by increasing the size of SiC particles. Anodization improved corrosion resistance of the composites. (author)

  10. Corrosion behaviour of Nd-Fe-B magnets containing Co and Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlowska, G.; Bala, H.; Szymura, S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of partial substitution of iron by Co and Cr on corrosion behaviour of Nd 16 Fe 76 B 8 permanent magnets has been investigated. Small additions of Cr (1 to 4%at) are enough to ensure maximal corrosion inhibition. Greater amount of Cr into Nd-Fe-B alloy (>8%at), against expectations, practically do not affect the corrosion behaviour and additionally, considerably worsen its magnetic properties. Corrosion tests have shown a distinct effect of cobalt addition on the inhibition of both acid corrosion and the abnormal dissolution process of the Nd-Fe-Co-B magnets. Cobalt additions inhibit the atmosphere corrosion of Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets, especially a salt-spray environment. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  11. Corrosion Behaviour of Steels in Nigerian Food Processing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    quality regulatory agencies and food processing equipment fabricators. It is our desire that ... poisoning. ... corrosive effect under two special conditions; in solution with ..... Loto C.A and Atanda P.O (1998) Corrosion of Mild ... Health Paper. No.

  12. Corrosion behaviour of Fe-Mn-Si based shape memory steels trained by cold rolling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederberg, O.; Liu, X.W.; Ullakko, K.; Lindroos, V.K.

    1999-01-01

    Fe-Mn-Si based high nitrogen steels have been studied in recent years for potential industrial applications. These steels show good shape memory properties, high strength and excellent ductility. In the present study, the effects of training history on the corrosion properties of Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni based high nitrogen steels were investigated. The corrosion behaviour of shape memory alloys was analyzed by implementing anodic polarisation measurements and immersion tests. The shape memory steels in annealed, deformed and recovered conditions were studied to examine the training effect on their corrosion behaviour. The features of the anodic polarisation curves indicated a general corrosion type of these steels. The experimental results showed that Cr and Mn had a marked influence on the corrosion behaviour of the steels, followed by Ni, N and V. It was also apparent that the deformation during the shape memory training by cold rolling decreased the corrosion stability, and the recovery heating reduced further their corrosion resistance. However, further studies are needed in order to better understand the corrosion behaviour of the investigated alloys. (orig.)

  13. Corrosion behaviour of Ni–Co alloy coatings at Kish Island

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, the corrosion behaviour of Ni-Co alloys with low Co content, electroplated on steel substrate in sulphate bath, was investigated. The morphology of coatings was studied by optical and SEM microscopy. The corrosion products were analyzed using EDX. The results showed that Ni–1% Co coatings had a better ...

  14. Corrosion behaviour of electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni-W and Ni-Fe-W alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriraman, K.R.; Ganesh Sundara Raman, S.; Seshadri, S.K.

    2007-01-01

    The present work deals with evaluation of corrosion behaviour of electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni-W and Ni-Fe-W alloys. Corrosion behaviour of the coatings deposited on steel substrates was studied using polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques in 3.5% NaCl solution while their passivation behaviour was studied in 1N sulphuric acid solution. The corrosion resistance of Ni-W alloys increased with tungsten content up to 7.54 at.% and then decreased. In case of Ni-Fe-W alloys it increased with tungsten content up to 9.20 at.% and then decreased. The ternary alloy coatings exhibited poor corrosion resistance compared to binary alloy coatings due to preferential dissolution of iron from the matrix. Regardless of composition all the alloys exhibited passivation behaviour over a wide range of potentials due to the formation of tungsten rich film on the surface

  15. Progress in the understanding of the long-term corrosion behaviour of copper canisters

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Fraser; Lilja, Christina; Vähänen, Marjut

    2013-07-01

    Copper has been proposed as a canister material for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep geologic repository in a number of countries worldwide. Since it was first proposed for this purpose in 1978, a significant number of studies have been performed to assess the corrosion performance of copper under repository conditions. These studies are critically reviewed and the suitability of copper as a canister material for nuclear waste is re-assessed. Over the past 30-35 years there has been considerable progress in our understanding of the expected corrosion behaviour of copper canisters. Crucial to this progress has been the improvement in the understanding of the nature of the repository environment and how it will evolve over time. With this improved understanding, it has been possible to predict the evolution of the corrosion behaviour from the initial period of warm, aerobic conditions in the repository to the long-term phase of cool, anoxic conditions dominated by the presence of sulphide. An historical review of the treatment of the corrosion behaviour of copper canisters is presented, from the initial corrosion assessment in 1978, through a major review of the corrosion behaviour in 2001, through to the current level of understanding based on the results of on-going studies. Compared with the initial corrosion assessment, there has been considerable progress in the treatment of localised corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and microbiologically influenced corrosion of the canisters. Progress in the mechanistic modelling of the evolution of the corrosion behaviour of the canister is also reviewed, as is the continuing debate about the thermodynamic stability of copper in pure water. The overall conclusion of this critical review is that copper is a suitable material for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and offers the prospect of containment of the waste for an extended period of time. The corrosion behaviour is influenced by the presence of the

  16. Corrosion behaviour of container materials for the disposal of high-level wastes in rock salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailos, E.; Schwarzkopf, W.; Koester, R.

    1986-01-01

    In 1983-84 extensive laboratory-scale experiments (immersion tests) to evaluate the long-term corrosion behaviour of selected materials in salt brines and first in situ experiments were performed. In the laboratory experiments the materials Ti 99.8-Pd, Hastelloy C4 and hot-rolled low carbon steel (reference materials in the joint European corrosion programme) as well as cast steel, spheoroidal cast iron, Si-cast iron and the Ni-Resists type D2 and D4 were investigated. The investigated parameters were: temperature (90 0 C; 170 0 C, 200 0 C), gamma-radiation (10 5 rad/h) and different compositions of salt brines. The results obtained show that, in addition to Ti 99.8-Pd, also Hastelloy C4 and unalloyed steels are in principle suitable for being used for long-term stable HLW-containers if the gamma dose rate is reduced by suitable shielding. Furthermore, the susceptibility of Hastelloy C4 to crevice corrosion must be taken into account. Further studies will be necessary to provide final evidence of the suitability of the materials examined. These will mainly involve clarification of questions related to hydrogen embrittlement (Ti 99.8-Pd, unalloyed steels) and to the influence of pressure and saline impurities (e.g. antiJ, antiBr) on corrosion

  17. Stress corrosion cracking behaviour of Alloy 600 in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.L.; Burke, M.G.

    1995-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of Alloy 600 in deaerated water at 360 deg. C, as measured with statistically-loaded U-bend specimens, is dependent upon microstructure and whether the material was cold-worked and annealed (CWA) or hot-worked and annealed (HWA). All cracking was intergranular, and materials lacking grain boundary carbides were most susceptible to SCC initiation. CWA tubing materials are more susceptible to SCC initiation than HWA ring-rolled forging materials with similar microstructures, as determined by light optical metallography (LOM). In CWA tubing materials one crack dominated and grew to a large size that was observable by visual inspection. HWA materials with a low hot-working finishing temperature (below 925 deg. C) and final anneals at temperatures ranging from 1010 deg. C to 1065 deg. C developed both large cracks, similar to those found in CWA materials, and also small intergranular microcracks, which are detectable only by destructive metallographic examination. HWA materials with a high hot-working finishing temperature (above 980 deg. C) and high-temperature final anneal (above 1040 deg. C), with grain boundaries that are fully decorated, developed only microcracks, which were observed in all specimens examined. These materials developed no large, visually detectable cracks, even after more than 300 weeks exposure. A low-temperature thermal treatment (610 deg. C for 7h), which reduced or eliminates SCC in Alloy 600, did not eliminate microcrack formation in the high temperature processed HWA materials. Detailed microstructural characterization using conventional metallographic and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) techniques was performed on selected materials to identify the factors responsible for the observed differences in cracking behaviour. 11 refs, 12 figs, 3 tabs

  18. Hot corrosion behavior of Ni-based superalloys in lithium molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Lim, Jong Ho; Chung, Joon Ho; Hur, Jin Mok; Seo, Chung Seok; Park, Seoung Won

    2004-01-01

    The Li-reduction process involves the chemical reduction of spent fuel oxides by liquid lithium metal in a molten LiCl salt bath at 650 .deg. C followed by a separate electrochemical reduction of lithium oxide (Li 2 O), which builds up in the salt bath. This process requires a high purity inert gas atmosphere inside remote hot cell nuclear facility to prevent unwanted Li oxidation and fires during the handling of chemically active Li metal. In light of the limitations of the Li-reduction process, a direct electrolytic reduction technology is being developed by KAERI to enhance process safety and economic viability. The electrolytic reduction of spent oxide fuel involves the liberation of oxygen in a molten LiCl electrolyte, which results in a chemically aggressive environment that is too corrosive for typical structural materials. Even so, the electrochemical process vessel must be resilient at 650 .deg. C in the presence of oxygen to enable high processing rates and an extended service life. But, the mechanism and the rate of the corrosion of metals in LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt under oxidation condition are not clear. In the present work, the corrosion behavior and corrosion mechanism of Ni-based superalloys have been studied in the molten salt of LiCl-Li 2 O under oxidation condition

  19. Corrosion Behavior of a Surface Modified Inconel 713LC in a Hot Lithium Molten Salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Lim, Jong Ho; Seo, Chung Seok; Jung, Ki Jung; Park, Seoung Won

    2005-01-01

    The Li-reduction process involves the chemical reduction of spent fuel oxides by liquid lithium metal in a molten LiCl salt bath at 650 .deg. C followed by a separate electrochemical reduction of the lithium oxide (Li 2 O), which builds up in the salt bath. This process requires a high purity inert gas atmosphere inside a remote hot cell nuclear facility to prevent an unwanted Li oxidation and fires during the handling of the chemically active Li metal. In light of the limitations of the Li-reduction process, a direct electrolytic reduction technology is being developed by KAERI to enhance the process safety and economic viability. The electrolytic reduction of spent oxide fuel involves the liberation of the oxygen in a molten LiCl electrolyte, which results in a chemically aggressive environment that is too corrosive for typical structural materials. Even so, the electrochemical process vessel must be resilient at 650 .deg. C in the presence of oxygen to enable high processing rates and an extended service life. But, the mechanism and the rate of the corrosion of the metals in a LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt under an oxidation condition are not clear. In the present work, the corrosion behavior and corrosion mechanism of a surface modified Inconel 713LC have been studied in the molten salt of LiCl-Li 2 O under an oxidation condition

  20. Influence of coatings on the corrosion fatigue behaviour on 13% chromium steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt-Thomas, K G; Meisel, H; Sessler, W

    1986-01-01

    The influence of coatings on the corrosion fatigue behaviour of 13% chromium steel has been studied. There have been selected different coating systems: Barrier coating (enamel), diffusion coatings, (aluminizing, chromizing) and anodic coating, (aluminium, zinc, tin, cadmium). The corrosion fatigue limits of coated with uncoated specimens in neutral NaCl-solution are compared. Salt-concentrations were 0,01 and 22% (=0,38 M) NaCl at 80/sup 0/C and 150/sup 0/C. The tests were carried out with alternating tensions and a constant frequency of 50 Hz. Only the use of anodic coatings improved the corrosion fatigue behaviour of the chromium steel.

  1. Multi-secular corrosion behaviour of low carbon steel in anoxic soils: Characterisation of corrosion system on archaeological artefacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saheb, M.; Neff, D.; Dillmann, P.; Foy, E.; Saheb, M.; Dillmann, P.; Matthiesen, H.; Bellot-Gurlet, L.

    2009-01-01

    In the context of the prediction of materials behaviour used in the nuclear waste storage, the understanding of iron corrosion mechanisms in anoxic environment is of great importance. Information can be obtained using complementary analytical tools. Interactions between burial soil and archaeological artefacts are studied by performing on site soil measurements. Moreover, archaeological artefacts are studied on transverse sections using a combination of microbeam techniques. The specific interest of this project lies in the study of ferrous thick corrosion layers formed in anoxic environment. (authors)

  2. Effects of climate and corrosion on concrete behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Mohammad; Egba, Ernest Ituma

    2017-11-01

    Corrosion of steel is a damaging agent that reduces the functional and structural responsibilities of reinforced concrete structures. Accordingly, reinforced concrete members in the environments that are prone to concrete carbonation or chloride attack coupled with high temperature and relative humidity suffer from accelerated corrosion of reinforcing material. Also, literature proves that climate influences corrosion of concrete, and suggests investigation of impact of corrosion on concrete based on climate zone. Therefore, this paper presents the effects of climate and corrosion on concrete behavior, using bond strength of concrete as a case study. Concrete specimens were prepared form concrete mix that was infested with 3.5 kgm-3 of sodium chloride to accelerate corrosion. The specimens were cured sodium chloride solution 3.5% by weight of water for 28 days before placing them in the exposure conditions. Pull-out tests were conducted at time intervals for one year to measure the impact of exposure condition and corrosion on bond strength of concrete. The results show reduction of bond strength of concrete by 32%, 28% and 8% after one year of subjection of the specimens to the unsheltered natural climate, sheltered natural climate, and laboratory ambient environment respectively. The findings indicate that the climate influences corrosion, which reduces the interlocking bond between the reinforcing bar and the adjacent concrete.

  3. Corrosion behaviour of mooring chain steel in seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Noel, N.; Ferrari, G.; Hoogland, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    Failures of mooring lines on floating production, storage and offloading systems (FPSOs) raise concern to the offshore industry. Localized corrosion of mooring chain is regarded as one of main failure mechanisms. The project of Localized Mooring Chain Corrosion (LMCC) is aiming at studying the

  4. The crevice corrosion behaviour of stainless steel in sodium chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Qian; Zhang Guoan; Qiu Yubin; Guo Xingpeng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → There are three stages in crevice corrosion of 13Cr stainless steel in NaCl solution. → The decrease of crevice thickness shortens the incubation period of crevice corrosion. → The incubation period of crevice corrosion prolongs as the increase of the area ratio. → Corrosion develops preferentially at crevice bottom and hydrogen reduction occurs inside the crevice. → Crevice corrosion of 13Cr stainless steel in NaCl solution follows the passive dissolution mechanism. - Abstract: The crevice corrosion behaviour of 13Cr stainless steel in NaCl solution was investigated mainly by electrochemical noise measurements, considering the influences of the crevice opening dimension (a) and the area ratio of the electrode outside the crevice to the one inside the crevice (r). Results show that the increase of r value prolongs the incubation period of crevice corrosion, but crevice corrosion develops rapidly once the crevice corrosion occurs. The crevice corrosion develops preferentially at the crevice bottom and then spreads to the whole electrode surface. Proton could reduce on the uncorroded area and hydrogen bubbles form inside the crevice.

  5. Corrosion behaviour of metallic containers during long term interim storages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desgranges, C.; Feron, D.; Mazaudier, F.; Terlain, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two main corrosion phenomena are encountered in long term interim storage conditions: dry oxidation by the air when the temperature of high level nuclear wastes containers is high enough (roughly higher than 100 C) and corrosion phenomena as those encountered in outdoor atmospheric corrosion when the temperature of the container wall is low enough and so condensation is possible on the container walls. Results obtained with dry oxidation in air lead to predict small damages (less than 1μm on steels over 100 years at 100 C) and no drastic changes with pollutants. For atmospheric corrosion, first developments deal with a pragmatic method that gives assessments of the indoor atmospheric corrosivities. (author)

  6. Synthesis of recent investigations on corrosion behaviour of radioactive waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1985-03-01

    Work which has appeared since the earlier report (EIR--477) on the corrosion behaviour of borosilicate glasses as a solidification matrix for high-level radioactive waste has been evaluated. Many works have confirmed that for a particular glass, besides temperature and pH-value, the silicate concentration of the solution exerts the strongest influence on corrosion rate. The effect of silicate can be described in terms of simple reaction kinetics models which provides a more sound basis for prediction of long-term behaviour of glasses than previously existed. Meanwhile, the effects of backfill- and canister-materials and their corrosion products have been given the attention they merit. These materials affect glass corrosion primarily through regulation of silicic acid concentration. A particular finding which is of interest is the strong inhibition of glass corrosion by lead ions. Stationary corrosion rates in the order of magnitude of 10 -5 g/cm 2 .d can be derived from long-term corrosion experiments in stagnant water at 90 0 C. At the envisaged repository temperature of 55 0 C they will be one to two orders of magnitude less. The effects of radioactive decay on corrosion rate are either very small or not detectable at all. (Auth.)

  7. Study of corrosive-erosive wear behaviour of Al6061/albite composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.C.; Krishna, M.; Murthy, H.N. Narasimha; Tarachandra, R.; Satyamoorthy, M.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2006-01-01

    This investigation analyses the influence of dispersed alumina particles on the wear behaviour of the Al/albite composites in a corrosive environment. The composites were prepared by modified pressure die-casting technique. The corrosive-erosive wear experiments were carried out on a proprietary corrosion-erosion wear tester to study the wear characteristics of the composites. The slurry was made up of water and alumina (size: 90-150 μm, proportion: 0-30 wt.%), while H 2 SO 4 (0.01, 0.1 and 1N) was added to create the corrosive conditions. Experiments were arranged to test the relationships among the corrosive-erosive wear rate, concentrations of H 2 SO 4 and alumina in the slurry, weight percent of albite in the composite, erosion speed and distance. Wear rate varies marginally at low speeds but sharply increases at higher speeds. The corrosive wear rate logarithmically increased with the increasing concentration of the corrosive medium. The effect of abrasive particles and corrosion medium on the wear behaviour of the composite is explained experimentally, theoretically and using scanning electron microscopy

  8. Corrosion behaviour of construction materials for high temperature steam electrolysers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikiforov, Aleksey; Petrushina, Irina; Christensen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) steam electrolysers. Steady-state voltammetry was used in combination with scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to evaluate the stability of the mentioned materials. It was found that stainless steels were the least resistant...... to corrosion under strong anodic polarisation. Among alloys, Ni-based showed the highest corrosion resistance in the simulated PEM electrolyser medium. In particular, Inconel 625 was the most promising among the tested corrosion-resistant alloys for the anodic compartment in high temperature steam electrolysis...

  9. Influence of alloying elements and density on aqueous corrosion behaviour of some sintered low alloy steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandavel, T.K.; Chandramouli, R.; Karthikeyan, P.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosion of low alloy P/M steels under HCl acid pickling environment has been studied. ► Influence of density, strain and alloying elements on the rate of corrosion of the steels has been investigated. ► Residual porosity has significant effect on acid corrosion. ► Addition of the alloying elements Cu, Mo and Ti reduces the corrosion rate significantly. ► Carbide forming elements Mo and Ti improve further the resistance of the steels to aqueous corrosion. -- Abstract: Low alloy steels produced through powder metallurgy route of sintering followed by forging are promising candidate materials for high strength small components. Porosity in such steels poses a real challenge during acid pickling treatment, which is one of the processing steps during manufacturing. The present research work attempts to investigate the mechanism underlying the acid corrosion behaviour of some sintered low alloy steels under induced acid pickling conditions. Sintered-forged low alloy steel samples containing molybdenum (Mo), copper (Cu) and titanium (Ti) were subjected to aqueous corrosion attack by immersing the samples in 18% HCl (Hydrochloric acid) solution for 25 h. Sample weight loss and Fe (Iron) loss were estimated for the corroded samples. The morphology of the corroded surfaces was studied through metallography and scanning electron microscopy. Higher porosity alloys underwent enhanced corrosion rates. Both corrosion rate and iron loss are found to decrease linearly with reduction in porosity in all cases of the alloys. The alloying elements Mo, Ti and Cu, when added in combination, have played a complementary role in the reduction of corrosion rate by almost one order of magnitude compared to unalloyed steel. Presence of carbides of the carbide forming elements Mo and Ti played a positive role on the corrosion behaviour of the low alloy steels.

  10. Cyclic Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Behavior of Nickel-Iron-Based Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellaganesh, D.; Adam Khan, M.; Winowlin Jappes, J. T.; Sathiyanarayanan, S.

    2018-01-01

    The high temperature oxidation and hot corrosion behavior of nickel-iron-based superalloy are studied at 900 ° and 1000 °C. The significant role of alloying elements with respect to the exposed medium is studied in detail. The mass change per unit area was catastrophic for the samples exposed at 1000 °C and gradual increase in mass change was observed at 900 °C for both the environments. The exposed samples were further investigated with SEM, EDS and XRD analysis to study the metallurgical characteristics. The surface morphology has expressed the in situ nature of the alloy and its affinity toward the environment. The EDS and XRD analysis has evidently proved the presence of protective oxides formation on prolonged exposure at elevated temperature. The predominant oxide formed during the exposure at high temperature has a major contribution toward the protection of the samples. The nickel-iron-based superalloy is less prone to oxidation and hot corrosion when compared to the existing alloy in gas turbine engine simulating marine environment.

  11. Corrosion behaviour and galvanic coupling with steel of Al-based coating alternatives to electroplated cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasuba, O.A.; Yerokhin, A., E-mail: A.Yerokhin@sheffield.ac.uk; Matthews, A.; Leyland, A.

    2013-08-15

    The galvanic corrosion behaviour of bare steel coupled to steel with an Al–Zn flake inorganic spin coating, an Al-based slurry sprayed coating, an arc sprayed Al coating and electroplated cadmium has been investigated. The sacrificial and galvanic behaviour of the coatings was studied in 3.5 wt. % NaCl solution using open-circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical noise measurements. The coatings were characterised by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Experimental results showed that the Al-based slurry sprayed coating exhibited an open-circuit potential closer to the steel substrate than other coatings, as well as a low corrosion current density and a more positive corrosion potential. In terms of the galvanic suitability of the investigated coatings for the steel substrate, both the Al–Zn flake inorganic spin coating and the Al-based slurry sprayed coating show low galvanic current, in comparison with the arc sprayed Al coating and electroplated cadmium. This behaviour confirms their superior cathodic protection capability and galvanic compatibility over other coatings tested. Electrochemical noise measurements provide accurate information on the coatings' galvanic behaviour, which can be complimented by the data obtained from superposition of potentiodynamic corrosion scans of the coating and bare steel, provided that the corrosion potential difference between the two materials does not exceed 300 mV. - Highlights: • Al-based slurry coating has best galvanic compatibility with steel. • Mg, Cr, P in Al-based slurry coating reinforce its corrosion resistance. • Ennoblement of Al–Zn flake coating compromises its cathodic protection. • Poor corrosion behaviour of arc sprayed Al coating caused by rough morphology. • Electrochemical noise provides adequate estimates of galvanic behaviour.

  12. Corrosion product behaviour in the primary circuit of the KNK nuclear reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamm, H.H.; Stade, K.Ch.

    1976-01-01

    During nuclear operation of the KNK facility from 1972 until September 1974 the composition and behaviour of radionuclides occuring in the primary circuit were investigated. Besides traces of 140 Ba/ 140 La, no fission product activity was detectable in the KNK primary circuit. The fuel element purification from sodium deposits (prior to transport to the reprocessing plant) did not yield any indication of a fuel element failure during KNK-I operation. The activity inventory of the primary loop was exclusively made up of activated corrosion products and 22 Na. The main activity was due to 65 Zn, followed by 54 Mn, 22 Na, sup(110m)Ag, 182 Ta, 60 Co and 124 Sb. It was found that the sorption of 65 Zn and 54 Mn on crucibles made from nickel was condiserably higher than on vessels made from other materials. This observation was confirmed both in tests with material samples from the primary circuit and for disks of gate valves of the primary circuit. sup(110m)Ag did hardly exhibit any sorption effects and had been dissolved largely homogeneously in the hot primary coolant. In the first primary cold trap which was removed from the circuit after some 20,000 hours of operation, only 65 Zn and 54 Mn were detected in addition to traces of 60 Co and 182 Ta. (author)

  13. Influence of surface roughness on the corrosion behaviour of magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, R.; Kannan, M. Bobby

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Surface roughness of AZ91 magnesium alloy plays a critical role in the passivation behaviour of the alloy. → The passivation behaviour of the alloy influences the pitting tendency. → Increase in surface roughness of AZ91 magnesium alloy increases the pitting tendency of the alloy. -- Abstract: In this study, the influence of surface roughness on the passivation and pitting corrosion behaviour of AZ91 magnesium alloy in chloride-containing environment was examined using electrochemical techniques. Potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests suggested that the passivation behaviour of the alloy was affected by increasing the surface roughness. Consequently, the corrosion current and the pitting tendency of the alloy also increased with increase in the surface roughness. Scanning electron micrographs of 24 h immersion test samples clearly revealed pitting corrosion in the highest surface roughness (Sa 430) alloy, whereas in the lowest surface roughness (Sa 80) alloy no evidence of pitting corrosion was observed. Interestingly, when the passivity of the alloy was disturbed by galvanostatically holding the sample at anodic current for 1 h, the alloy underwent high pitting corrosion irrespective of their surface roughness. Thus the study suggests that the surface roughness plays a critical role in the passivation behaviour of the alloy and hence the pitting tendency.

  14. Corrosion behaviour of zirconium alloys in the autoclaves of Embalse nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordoni, Roberto A.; Olmedo, Ana M.; Villegas, Marina; Miyagusuku, Marcela; Maroto, Alberto J. G.; Sainz, Ricardo A.; Fernandez, Alberto N.; Allemandi, Walter D.

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of zirconium alloys coupons attached to the holders of the autoclaves located out of core in the primary circuit of Embalse nuclear power plant is described. The Zr-2.5 Nb coupons of the autoclaves at the higher temperature (305 C degrees) and the Zry-4 coupons of the autoclaves at 265 and 305 C degrees installed in 1988 had a normal corrosion behaviour, after 3500 of full power days. While, the Zr-2.5 Nb coupons, at 265 C degrees, showed the presence of white oxide nuclei and a weight gain indicating an abnormal corrosion behaviour which might be attributed to the material microstructure. Complementary tests, made in the period September 1991-April 1993, showed that the abnormal corrosion behaviour observed for the Canadian coupons installed in 1983 was due to a surface contamination of the Zry-4 coupons and due to the microstructure of the Zr-2.5 Nb coupons. The normal corrosion behaviour for both alloys installed in 1986, showed that the resin ingress to the primary circuit that occurred in 1988, do not affect the performance of these materials. (author)

  15. The Effect of Fly Ash on the Corrosion Behaviour of Galvanised Steel Rebarsin Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittarelli, Francesca; Mobili, Alessandra; Bellezze, Tiziano

    2017-08-01

    The effect of fly ash on the corrosion behaviour of galvanised steel rebars in cracked concrete specimens exposed to wet-dry cycles in a chloride solution has been investigated. The obtained results show that the use of fly ash, replacing either cement or aggregate, always improves the corrosion behaviour of galvanised steel reinforcements. In particular, the addition of fly ash, even in the presence of concrete cracks, decreases the corrosion rate monitored in very porous concretes, as those with w/c = 0.80, to values comparable with those obtained in good quality concretes, as those with w/c = 0.45. Therefore, fly ash cancels the negative effect, at least from the corrosion point of view, of a great porosity of the cement matrix.

  16. Electrochemical and corrosion behaviour of ion and laser-beam modified metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonora, P.L.

    1989-01-01

    Ion implantation may improve the resistance of metals to wear and corrosion both: by the formation of stable or metastable chemical compounds localized in a thin external layer; or by the so-called 'radiation damage' which is mainly active in lowering the potential gradients between different grains and between grain and grain boundaries as an effect of subdivision into substructures, up to a quasi-amorphous inert surface. The changes in the corrosion fatigue behaviour of iron as well as in its catalytic properties as a consequence of ion implantation are considered. The electrochemical behaviour of laser irradiated and ion mixed metals in terms of changed corrosion rate, corrosion morphology, passivability or breakdown of passivity is also explained. 27 refs.; 12 figs.; 5 tabs

  17. Corrosion behaviour of construction materials for high temperature water electrolysers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforov, A.; Petruchina, I.; Christensen, E.; Bjerrum, N.J.; Tomas-Garcya, A.L. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Chemistry, Materials Science Group

    2010-07-01

    This presentation reported on a study in which the feasibility of using different corrosion resistant stainless steels as a possible metallic bipolar plate and construction material was evaluated in terms of corrosion resistance under conditions corresponding to the conditions in high temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) water electrolysers (HTPEMWE). PEM water electrolysis technology has been touted as an effective alternative to more conventional alkaline water electrolysis. Although the energy efficiency of this technology can be increased considerably at temperatures above 100 degrees C, this increases the demands to all the used materials with respect to corrosion stability and thermal stability. In this study, Ni-based alloys as well as titanium and tantalum samples were exposed to anodic polarization in 85 per cent phosphoric acid electrolyte solution. Tests were performed at 80 and 120 degrees C to determine the dependence of corrosion speed and working temperature. Platinum and gold plates were also tested for a comparative evaluation. Steady-state voltammetry was used along with scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Titanium showed the poorest corrosion resistance, while Ni-based alloys showed the highest corrosion resistance, with Inconel R 625 being the most promising alloy for the bipolar plate of an HTPEMWE. 3 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  18. The corrosion behaviour of rare-earth containing magnesium alloys in borate buffer solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, R. [ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal); Ferreira, M.G.S. [ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal); CICECO, Universidade de Aveiro (Portugal); Carmezim, M.J. [ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal); Instituto Politecnico de Setubal, ESTSetubal, DEM (Portugal); Montemor, M.F., E-mail: mfmontemor@ist.utl.p [ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal)

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the corrosion behaviour of magnesium alloys ZK31, EZ33 and WE54 was studied in sodium borate buffer solution at pH 9.2. The electrochemical processes were studied by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The composition and morphology of the alloys and corrosion products formed were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The experimental findings highlighted the differences in the corrosion mechanisms of the different alloys tested. The results showed that the presence of rare-earth elements (RE) only increases the corrosion resistance when present in solid solution, as is the case of the WE54 alloy. At pH 9.2, an amorphous yttrium oxide/hydroxide thick film was formed, which possesses greater stability when compared to magnesium oxide/hydroxide. The role of RE in the corrosion mechanism was discussed.

  19. Corrosion behaviour of high temperature alloys in the cooling gas of high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.

    1989-01-01

    The reactive impurities in the primary cooling helium of advanced high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR) can cause oxidation, carburization or decarburization of the heat exchanging metallic components. By studies of the fundamental aspects of the corrosion mechanisms it became possible to define operating conditions under which the metallic construction materials show, from the viewpoint of technical application, acceptable corrosion behaviour. By extensive test programmes with exposure times of up to 30,000 hours, a data base has been obtained which allows a reliable extrapolation of the corrosion effects up to the envisaged service lives of the heat exchanging components. (author). 6 refs, 7 figs

  20. An experimental study of crevice corrosion behaviour of 316L stainless steel in artificial seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Baoping [School of Electromechanical Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Dongying, Shandong 257061 (China); Liu Yonghong, E-mail: liuyhupc@126.co [School of Electromechanical Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Dongying, Shandong 257061 (China); Tian Xiaojie; Wang Fei; Li Hang; Ji Renjie [School of Electromechanical Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Dongying, Shandong 257061 (China)

    2010-10-15

    The effects of applied torque on corrosion behaviour of 316L stainless steel with crevices were investigated using the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization method. Three kinds of crevices (316L-to-polytetrafluoroethylene, 316L-to-fluoroelastomeric and 316L-to-316L) were tested in artificial seawater at 50 {sup o}C. Corroded surface morphology was also investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Results indicate similar trends in crevice corrosion susceptibility with increasing applied torque. Among the three crevices, the 316L stainless steel specimen, coupled to the 316L stainless steel crevice former, is the most susceptible to crevice corrosion.

  1. An experimental study of crevice corrosion behaviour of 316L stainless steel in artificial seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Baoping; Liu Yonghong; Tian Xiaojie; Wang Fei; Li Hang; Ji Renjie

    2010-01-01

    The effects of applied torque on corrosion behaviour of 316L stainless steel with crevices were investigated using the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization method. Three kinds of crevices (316L-to-polytetrafluoroethylene, 316L-to-fluoroelastomeric and 316L-to-316L) were tested in artificial seawater at 50 o C. Corroded surface morphology was also investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Results indicate similar trends in crevice corrosion susceptibility with increasing applied torque. Among the three crevices, the 316L stainless steel specimen, coupled to the 316L stainless steel crevice former, is the most susceptible to crevice corrosion.

  2. Evaluation of microstructural effects on the corrosion behaviour of AZ91D magnesium alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan; Aung, Naing Naing; Zhou, W.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of microconstituents on the corrosion and electrochemical behaviour of AZ91D alloy prepared by die-casting and ingot casting route has been investigated in 3.5% NaCl solution at pH 7.25. The experimental techniques used include constant immersion technique, in-situ corrosion monitoring....... The corrosion products for ingot consisted of Mg(OH)(2) with small amounts beta phase, magnesium-aluminum oxide and MgH2 while for die-cast, the product showed a highly amorphous structure. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  3. Comparison of anti-corrosive properties between hot alkaline nitrate blackening and hydrothermal blackening routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattah-alhosseini, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan 65178-38695 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yazdani Khan, H., E-mail: hamid.yazdanikhan@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan 65178-38695 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Heidarpour, A. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Hamedan University of Technology, Hamedan, 65155-579 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    In this study, the oxide films were formed on carbon steel by using hot alkaline nitrate and hydrothermal treatments. A dense and protective oxide film was obtained by hydrothermal method due to application of high pressure and by increasing solution temperature from boiling temperature (155 °C) to 250 °C. Oxide films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and electrochemical tests including potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). These analyses showed that the magnetite film which was formed on carbon steel surface by hydrothermal treatment offers the best resistance in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. Although thicker oxide film could be obtained via hot alkaline nitrate black oxidizing, corrosion resistance was lower as a result of being highly porous and the presence of hematite. - Highlights: • Oxide films have been formed on steel by using of hot alkaline nitrate and hydrothermal treatments. • A dense and protective oxide film was obtained by hydrothermal treatment. • SEM micrographs showed that a dense and protective oxide film was obtained by hydrothermal treatment. • Film formed by hydrothermal treatment could have the best resistance in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution.

  4. Brief description of out-of-pile test facilities for study in corrosion and fission product behaviour in flowing sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizawa, K.; Sekiguchi, N.; Atsumo, H.

    1976-01-01

    The experimental methods to perform tests for study in corrosion and fission products behaviour in flowing sodium are outlined. Flow diagrams for the activated materials and fission products behaviour test loop are given

  5. Reactive-transport model for the prediction of the uniform corrosion behaviour of copper used fuel containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Kolar, M.; Maak, P.

    2008-01-01

    Used fuel containers in a deep geological repository will be subject to various forms of corrosion. For containers made from oxygen-free, phosphorus-doped copper, the most likely corrosion processes are uniform corrosion, underdeposit corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and microbiologically influenced corrosion. The environmental conditions within the repository are expected to evolve with time, changing from warm and oxidizing initially to cool and anoxic in the long-term. In response, the corrosion behaviour of the containers will also change with time as the repository environment evolve. A reactive-transport model has been developed to predict the time-dependent uniform corrosion behaviour of the container. The model is based on an experimentally-based reaction scheme that accounts for the various chemical, microbiological, electrochemical, precipitation/dissolution, adsorption/desorption, redox, and mass-transport processes at the container surface and in the compacted bentonite-based sealing materials within the repository. Coupling of the electrochemical interfacial reactions with processes in the bentonite buffer material allows the effect of the evolution of the repository environment on the corrosion behaviour of the container to be taken into account. The Copper Corrosion Model for Uniform Corrosion predicts the time-dependent corrosion rate and corrosion potential of the container, as well as the evolution of the near-field environment

  6. Corrosion behaviour of unalloyed steel in Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1988-04-01

    The production of hydrogen can cause problems in a repository for low and intermediate level waste. Since the production of gas is mainly due to the corrosion of unalloyed steel, it is important to have as reliable data as possible for the corrosion rate in anaerobic cement. A review of the literature shows that the corrosion current densities are in the range of 0.01 to 0.1 μA/cm 2 (corresponding to corrosion rates between 0.1 and 1.2 μm/a). This implies hydrogen production rates between 0.022 and 0.22 mol/(m 2 a). Corrosion rates of the abovementioned order of magnitude are technically irrelevant, so that there is little interest in determining them accurately. Furthermore, their determination entails problems of measurement technique. In the present situation it would therefore appear risky to accept the lower value as proven. Experiments are proposed to reduce the present uncertainty. (author) 35 refs., 10 figs

  7. Corrosion behaviour of unalloyed steel in Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1988-01-01

    The production of hydrogen can cause problems in a repository for low and intermediate level waste. Since the production of gas is mainly due to the corrosion of unalloyed steel, it is important to have as reliable data as possible for the corrosion rate in anaerobic cement. A review of the literature shows that the corrosion current densities are in the range of 0.01 to 0.1 μA/cm 2 (corresponding to corrosion rates between 0.1 and 1.2 μm/a). This implies hydrogen production rates between 0.022 and 0.22 mol/(m 2 xa). Corrosion rates of the abovementioned order of magnitude are technically irrelevant, so that there is little interest in determining them accurately. Furthermore, their determination entails problems of measurement technique. In the present situation it would therefore appear risky to accept the lower value as proven. Experiments are proposed to reduce the present uncertainty. (author) 35 refs., 10 figs

  8. The corrosion behaviour of carbon steel in Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1988-01-01

    The production of hydrogen can cause problems in a repository for low- and intermediate-level waste. Since gas production is mainly due to the corrosion of carbon steel, it is important to have as reliable data as possible on the corrosion rate of steel in anaerobic cement. A review of the literature shows that the corrosion current densities lie in the range 0.01 to 0.1 μA/cm 2 (corresponding to corrosion rates between 0.1 and 1.2 μm/a). This implies hydrogen production rates between 0.022 and 0.22 mol/(m 2 .a). Corrosion rates of this order of magnitude are technically irrelevant, with the result that there is very little interest in determining them accurately. Furthermore, their determination entails problems of measurement technique. Given the current situation, it would appear somewhat risky to accept the lower value for hydrogen production as proven. Proposals are made for experiments which would reduce this element of uncertainty. (author) 10 figs., 35 refs

  9. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters. Topical report for part 1 of high temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spear, K.E.; Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Tressler, R.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-11

    This program consists of two separate research areas. Part 1, for which this report is written, studied the high temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic hot gas filters, while Part 2 studied the long-term durability of ceramic heat exchangers to coal combustion environments. The objectives of Part 1 were to select two candidate ceramic filter materials for flow-through hot corrosion studies and subsequent corrosion and mechanical properties characterization. In addition, a thermodynamic database was developed so that thermochemical modeling studies could be performed to simulate operating conditions of laboratory reactors and existing coal combustion power plants, and to predict the reactions of new filter materials with coal combustion environments. The latter would make it possible to gain insight into problems that could develop during actual operation of filters in coal combustion power plants so that potential problems could be addressed before they arise.

  10. Corrosion behaviour of materials selected for FMIT lithium system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazinet, G.D.; Brehm, W.F.

    1983-09-01

    The corrosion behavior of selected materials in a liquid lithium environment was studied in support of system and component designs for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. Testing conditions ranged from about 3700 to about6500 hours of exposure to flowing lithium at temperatures from 230/sup 0/ to 270/sup 0/C and static lithium at temperatures from 200/sup 0/ to 500/sup 0/C. Principal areas of investigation included lithium corrosion/erosion effects on FMIT lithium system baseline and candidate materials. Material coupons and full-size prototypic components were evaluated to determine corrosion rates, fatigue crack growth rates, structural compatibility, and component acceptability for the lithium system. Based on the results of these studies, concerns regarding system materials and component designs were satisfactorily resolved to support a 20-year design life requirement for the FMIT lithium system.

  11. Corrosion behaviour of materials selected for FMIT lithium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazinet, G.D.; Brehm, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of selected materials in a liquid lithium environment was studied in support of system and component designs for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. Testing conditions ranged from about 3700 to about6500 hours of exposure to flowing lithium at temperatures from 230 0 to 270 0 C and static lithium at temperatures from 200 0 to 500 0 C. Principal areas of investigation included lithium corrosion/erosion effects on FMIT lithium system baseline and candidate materials. Material coupons and full-size prototypic components were evaluated to determine corrosion rates, fatigue crack growth rates, structural compatibility, and component acceptability for the lithium system. Based on the results of these studies, concerns regarding system materials and component designs were satisfactorily resolved to support a 20-year design life requirement for the FMIT lithium system

  12. Corrosion behaviour of stainless steels by internal friction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postnikov, V.S.; Kovalevskij, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    Corrosion of austenite chromium-nickel stainless steels 12 Kh18N9, 12Kh18N9T, 12Kh18N10 and 12Kh18N10T is investigated. Wire samples 0.7...0.8 mm in diameter before tests were subjected to quenching in water from the temperature of 1050...1100 deg C and part of them - to tempering at 650 deg C for 2 h. Pitting corrosion was brought about by different concentration of iron chloride solutions (C FeCl 3 ). Total corrosion has a slight effect on the character of IF (internal friction) variation that increases without the whole test period up to the moment when mechanical strength of the sample

  13. Corrosion behaviour of aluminium plates in aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.F. de; Gaio, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    The process of corrosion concerning the aluminium 1050 plate was studied at room temperatures, 45 and 60 0 C in deionized water, the same Argonauta Reactor Water. Beyond the temperature influence, it was verified the effect of chloride ion and oxygen. It ws found that the amount of oxyde formed at room temperatures is almost negligible; at 45 and 60 0 C the samples were covered with bayerita, the quantity of oxide formed at 45 0 C being higher than at 60 0 C. It was observed that there will be risk of corrosion in the case of Reactor Water to undergo contamination with chloride ions. The results have shown that the material can be used since the medium don't be strongly oxidizing. At potentials higher than - 900M sup(V) ess (-280 m sup(V) sub(H)), the material will undergo pitting corrosion. (Author) [pt

  14. Corrosion behaviour of AISI 304 stainless steel subjected to massive laser shock peening impacts with different pulse energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, J.Z.; Qi, H.; Luo, K.Y.; Luo, M.; Cheng, X.N.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Laser shock peening caused an obvious increase of corrosion resistance of 304 steel. •Corrosion resistance of stainless steel increased with increasing pulse energy. •Mechanism of laser shock peening on corrosion behaviour was also entirely determined. -- Abstract: Effects of massive laser shock peening (LSP) impacts with different pulse energies on ultimate tensile strength (UTS), stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility, fracture appearance and electrochemical corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel were investigated by slow strain rate test, potentiodynamic polarisation test and scanning electron microscope observation. The influence mechanism of massive LSP impacts with different pulse energies on corrosion behaviour was also determined. Results showed that massive LSP impacts effectively caused a significant improvement on UTS, SCC resistance, and electrochemical corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel. Increased pulse energy can also gradually improve its corrosion resistance

  15. Corrosion behaviour of some conventional stainless steels in electrolyzing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal NASSAR

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, attempts were made to increase the amount of hydrogen generated from the water electrolysis process. Some conventional stainless steels (316; 409; 410 and 430 were used as anode and cathode in electrolysis process. Further study was carried out on the corrosion trend in all the investigated metals. It is observed that the electrode material can effect on the amount of hydrogen generate by electrolyzing process and metal composition of the stainless steels effects on the rate of corrosion.

  16. Corrosion resistance of zirconium: general mechanisms, behaviour in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinard Legry, G.

    1990-01-01

    Corrosion resistance of zirconium results from the strong affinity of this metal for oxygen; as a result a thin protective oxide film is spontaneously formed in air or aqueous media, its thickness and properties depending on the physicochemical conditions at the interface. This film passivates the underlying metal but obviously if the passive film is partially or completely removed, localised or generalised corrosion phenomena will occur. In nitric acid, this depassivation may be chemical (fluorides) or mechanical (straining, creep, fretting). In these cases it is useful to determine the physicochemical conditions (concentration, temperature, potential, stress) which will have to be observed to use safely zirconium and its alloys in nitric acid solutions [fr

  17. Effect of Ni on the corrosion resistance of bridge steel in a simulated hot and humid coastal-industrial atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong-liang; Fu, Gui-qin; Zhu, Miao-yong; Li, Qing; Yin, Cheng-xiang

    2018-03-01

    The corrosion resistance of weathering bridge steels containing conventional contents of Ni (0.20wt%, 0.42wt%, 1.50wt%) and a higher content of Ni (3.55wt%) in a simulated hot and humid coastal-industrial atmosphere was investigated by corrosion depth loss, scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrochemical methods. The results showed that, with increasing Ni content, the mechanical properties of the bridge steel were markedly improved, the welding parameters were satisfactory at room temperature, and the corrosion resistance was enhanced. When the Ni content was low (≤0.42wt%), the crystallization process of the corrosion products was substantially promoted, enhancing the stability of the rust layer. When the Ni content was higher ( 3.55wt%), the corrosion reaction of the steel quickly reached a balance, because the initial rapid corrosion induced the formation of a protective rust layer in the early stage. Simultaneously, NiO and NiFe2O2 were generated in large quantities; they not only formed a stable, compact, and continuous oxide protective layer, but also strongly inhibited the transformation process of the corrosion products. This inhibition reduced the structural changes in the rust layer, thereby enhancing the protection. However, when the Ni content ranged from 0.42wt% to 1.50wt%, the corrosion resistance of the bridge steel increased only slightly.

  18. The effects of RE and Si on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of Zn–6Al–3Mg hot dip coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shiwei; Gao, Bo; Yin, Shaohua; Tu, Ganfeng; Zhu, Guanglin; Sun, Shuchen; Zhu, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • ZAM coating has been prepared by using an experimental hot-dip galvanizing simulator. • The corrosion resistance of ZAM coating can be improved by additions of Si and RE. • Zn–6Al–3Mg–Si–RE coating forms a dense and stabilized corrosion product layer. • Zn–6Al–3Mg–Si–RE coating shows uniform corrosion. - Abstract: The effects of Si and RE on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of Zn–6Al–3Mg coating (ZAM) have been investigated. Surface morphology observations of the coating and corrosion products reveal that the additions of Si and rare earth metals (RES) improve the microstructural homogeneity of ZAMSR coating and stability of corrosion products formed on ZAMSR coating. Moreover, only uniform corrosion occurs in ZAMSR coating during the corrosion test, while intergranular corrosion and pitting occur in ZAM. As a result, the corrosion resistance of ZAM coating is improved by the additions of Si and RES.

  19. The effects of RE and Si on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of Zn–6Al–3Mg hot dip coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shiwei [State Key Laboratory of Complex Nonferrous Metal Resources Clean Utilization, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Gao, Bo, E-mail: surfgao@aliyun.com [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Yin, Shaohua [State Key Laboratory of Complex Nonferrous Metal Resources Clean Utilization, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Tu, Ganfeng; Zhu, Guanglin; Sun, Shuchen; Zhu, Xiaoping [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • ZAM coating has been prepared by using an experimental hot-dip galvanizing simulator. • The corrosion resistance of ZAM coating can be improved by additions of Si and RE. • Zn–6Al–3Mg–Si–RE coating forms a dense and stabilized corrosion product layer. • Zn–6Al–3Mg–Si–RE coating shows uniform corrosion. - Abstract: The effects of Si and RE on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of Zn–6Al–3Mg coating (ZAM) have been investigated. Surface morphology observations of the coating and corrosion products reveal that the additions of Si and rare earth metals (RES) improve the microstructural homogeneity of ZAMSR coating and stability of corrosion products formed on ZAMSR coating. Moreover, only uniform corrosion occurs in ZAMSR coating during the corrosion test, while intergranular corrosion and pitting occur in ZAM. As a result, the corrosion resistance of ZAM coating is improved by the additions of Si and RES.

  20. Synthesis of recent investigations on corrosion behaviour of radioactive waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1985-03-01

    By way of a supplement to an earlier report (NTB 83-01, EIR-Report Nr. 477), work which has appeared in the meantime on the corrosion behaviour of borosilicate glasses as a solidification matrix for high-level radioactive waste has been evaluated. Many works have confirmed that for a particular glass, besides temperature and pH-value, the silicate concentration of the solution exerts the strongest influence on corrosion rate. The effect of silicate can be described in terms of simple reaction kinetic models which provides a more sound basis for prediction of longterm behaviour of glasses than previously existed. Meanwhile, the effects of backfill- and canister-materials and their corrosion products have been given the attention they merit. These materials affect glass corrosion primarily through regulation of silicic acid concentration. A particular finding which is of interest is the strong inhibition of glass corrosion by lead ions. Stationary corrosion rates in the order of magnitude of 10 -5 g/cm 2 ·d can be derived from long-term corrosion experiments in stagnant water at 90 C. At the envisaged repository temperature of 55 C they will be one to two orders of magnitude less. The effects of radioactive decay on corrosion rate are either very small or not detectable at all. No further new viewpoints have been put forward with regard to a possible thermal re-structuring of glasses under repository conditions: re-crystallisation (devitrification) is not to be feared. With regard to future experiments, further work on quantification of the effects of canister- and backfill-materials and experiments with corrosion inhibitors would be of primary interest. (author)

  1. Study of hot corrosion of flakes of non purified graphite and of purified graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boule, Michel

    1967-01-01

    The author reports the study of hot corrosion of the Ticonderoga graphite. He reports the study of the defects of graphite flakes (structure defects due to impurities), the dosing of these impurities, and then their removal by purification. Flakes have then been oxidised by means of a specially designed apparatus. Based on photographs taken by optical and electronic microscopy, the author compares the oxidation features obtained in dry air and in humid air, between purified and non purified flakes. He also reports the study of the evolution of oxidation with respect to the initial rate of impurities, and the study of the evolution of oxidation features in humid air during oxidation. All these comparisons are made while taking the oxidation rate into account [fr

  2. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  3. Corrosion behaviour of pure iron implanted with Pd ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sang, J.M.; Lin, W.L.; Wu, Z.D.; Wang, H.S.

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of pure iron implanted with Pd ions up to doses in the range 1x10 16 -1x10 18 ions/cm 2 at an extracting voltage 45kV by using MEVVA source ion implanter has been investigated. The concentration profiles and valence states of elements at the near surface of Pd implanted iron specimens were analyzed by AES and XPS respectively. The Anodic dissolution process of Pd implanted pure iron was measured by means of potentiokinetic sweep in a 0.5 mol/1 NaAc/Hac buffer solution with pH5.0. The open circuit corrosion potential as a function of immersion time was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of Pd implanted iron specimens. The experimental results show that Pd ion implantation decreases the critical passive current of iron and maintains a better passivity in acetate buffer solution with pH5.0. It is interesting that the active corrosion rate of Pd implanted iron is even higher than that of unimplanted one, when the oxide layer on the surface of iron has been damaged. (author)

  4. Aqueous corrosion behaviour of Zr-1 Nb and Zr-20 Nb with different heat treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaime Solis, F.; Bordoni, Roberto; Olmedo, Ana M.; Villegas, Marina; Miyagusuku, Marcela

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of Zr-1 Nb and Zr-20 Nb coupons annealed at 850 C degrees during 1 hour and afterwards aged at different temperatures and time periods was studied. The Zr-1 Nb samples were aged at 400 and 500 C degrees and the Zr-20 Nb samples at 265 and 550 C degrees. The results have shown that ageing increases the corrosion resistance because the aged microstructure is somewhat closer to the equilibrium one. This was not the case of Zr-1 Nb aged 72 hs at 400 C degrees. The presence of the ω-phase does not have a deleterious effect in the corrosion behaviour of Zr-20 Nb. Also, an ageing of 2200 h at 265 C degrees induced a relevant decrease in the corrosion rate of Zr-20 Nb indicating a decomposition of the β- Zr phase. This effect was observed at the inlet of pressure tubes in CANDU reactors. The results obtained will be used to establish the relative importance of the α-Zr and β-Zr phases in the corrosion behaviour of pressure tubes. (author)

  5. Electrochemical corrosion behaviour of nickel chromium-chromium carbide coating by HVOF process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amudha, A.; Nagaraja, H. S.; Shashikala, H. D.

    2018-04-01

    To overcome the corrosion problem in marine industry, coatings are one of the most economical solutions. In this paper, the corrosion behaviour of 25(NiCr)-75Cr3C2 cermet coating on low carbon steel substrate by HVOF process is studied. Different phases such as Cr7C3 and Cr3C2, along with Ni and chromium oxide(Cr3O2) constituents present in the coating were revealed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis. The morphology of the coating obtained by scanning electron microscope (SEM) gave confirmation for the XRD analysis. Electrochemical corrosion techniques such as Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were used to study the corrosion behaviour of the cermet in 3.5wt% NaCl electrolyte solution. The corrosion current density of the coated sample and substrate were found to be 6.878µA/cm-2 and 21.091µA/cm-2 respectively. The Nyquist Impedance spectra were used to derive an equivalent circuit to analyze the interaction between the coating and electrolyte. The Bode Impedance plots obtained by EIS for the coating showed a typical passive material capacitive behaviour, indicated by medium to low frequency with phase angle approaching -60o, suggesting that a stable film is formed on the tested material in the electrolyte used.

  6. Effect of flow velocity on erosion-corrosion behaviour of QSn6 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weijiu; Zhou, Yongtao; Wang, Zhenguo; Li, Zhijun; Zheng, Ziqing

    2018-05-01

    The erosion-corrosion behaviour of QSn6 alloy used as propellers in marine environment was evaluated by erosion-corrosion experiments with/without cathodic protection, electrochemical tests and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations. The analysis was focused on the effect of flow velocity. The dynamic polarization curves showed that the corrosion rate of the QSn6 alloy increased as the flow velocity increased, due to the protective surface film removal at higher velocities. The lowest corrosion current densities of 1.26 × 10‑4 A cm‑2 was obtained at the flow velocity of 7 m s‑1. Because of the higher particle kinetic energies at higher flow velocity, the mass loss rate of the QSn6 alloy increased as the flow velocity increased. The mass loss rate with cathodic protection was lower than that without cathodic protection under the same conditions. Also, the lowest mass loss rate of 0.7 g m‑2 · h‑1 was acquired at the flow velocity of 7 m s‑1 with cathodic protection. However, the increase rate of corrosion rate and mass loss were decreased with increasing the flow velocity. Through observation the SEM morphologies of the worn surfaces, the main wear mechanism was ploughing with/without cathodic protection. The removal rates of the QSn6 alloy increased as the flow velocity increased in both pure erosion and erosion-corrosion, whereas the erosion and corrosion intensified each other. At the flow velocity of 7 m s‑1, the synergy rate (ΔW) exceeded by 5 times the erosion rate (Wwear). Through establishment and observation the erosion-corrosion mechanism map, the erosion-corrosion was the dominant regime in the study due to the contribution of erosion on the mass loss rate exceeded the corrosion contribution. The QSn6 alloy with cathodic protection is feasible as propellers, there are higher security at lower flow velocity, such as the flow velocity of 7 m s‑1 in the paper.

  7. Stainless steel corrosion in conditions simulating WWER-1000 primary coolant. Corrosion behaviour in mixed core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnorutskij, V.S.; Petel'guzov, I.A.; Gritsina, V.M.; Zuek, V.A.; Tret'yakov, M.V.; Rud', R.A.; Svichkar', N.V.; Slabospitskaya, E.A.; Ishchenko, N.I.

    2011-01-01

    Research into corrosion kinetics of austenitic stainless steels (06Cr18Ni10Ti, 08Cr18Ni10Ti, 12Cr18Ni10Ti) in medium which corresponds to composition and parameters of WWER-1000 primary coolant with different pH values in autoclave out-pile conditions during 14000 hours is given. Surface of oxide films on stainless steels is investigated. Visual inspection of Westinghouse and TVEL fuel was carried out after 4 cycles in WWER-1000 primary water chemistry conditions at South Ukraine NPP. Westinghouse and TVEL fuel cladding materials possess high corrosion resistance. Blushing of weldments was observed. No visual corrosion defects or deposits were observed on fuel rods.

  8. Corrosion of welded steel piping in domestic hot water: A case history. Corrosion de una instalacion de tubos soldados de acero galvanizado para agua caliente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, E J; Soria, L; Gallardo, J M

    1993-01-01

    Many leaks had occurred after seven years of service in the hot sanitary water system of building. The results of the failure analysis have led to the conclusion that the reduced life of the piping system was primarily promoted by the use of a dissimilar metal (galvanized steel-copper) installation and by an excessive service temperature. Through precuations were taking to electrically insulate both types of tubing by employing dielectric fittings and water flow followed the ''rule of flow'' (zinc[yields] copper), an indirect galvanic attach on galvanized steel took place. Localized corrosion was originated by microcells formed by plating out of soluble copper. Corrosive attack was most severe at weld seams. The microstructure of the weld zone was very different from that of the surrounding pipe. In addition, some pipes presented signs of incomplete fusion (welding without filling metal) and others had protruding weld seams which produced crevice attack and erosion-corrosion, respectively. Author (10 refs.)

  9. Mechanistic modelling of the corrosion behaviour of copper nuclear fuel waste containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, F; Kolar, M

    1996-10-01

    A mechanistic model has been developed to predict the long-term corrosion behaviour of copper nuclear fuel waste containers in a Canadian disposal vault. The model is based on a detailed description of the electrochemical, chemical, adsorption and mass-transport processes involved in the uniform corrosion of copper, developed from the results of an extensive experimental program. Predictions from the model are compared with the results of some of these experiments and with observations from a bronze cannon submerged in seawater saturated clay sediments. Quantitative comparisons are made between the observed and predicted corrosion potential, corrosion rate and copper concentration profiles adjacent to the corroding surface, as a way of validating the long-term model predictions. (author). 12 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Corrosion behaviour of Mg/Al alloys in high humidity atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrabal, R.; Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Mohedano, M.; Casajus, P. [Facultad de Quimicas, Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Merino, S. [Departamento de Tecnologia Industrial, Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio, Villanueva de la Canada, 28691 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-04-15

    The influence of relative humidity (80-90-98% RH) and temperature (25 and 50 C) on the corrosion behaviour of AZ31, AZ80 and AZ91D magnesium alloys was evaluated using gravimetric measurements. The results were compared with the data obtained for the same alloys immersed in Madrid tap water. The corrosion rates of AZ alloys increased with the RH and temperature and were influenced by the aluminium content and alloy microstructure for RH values above 90%. The initiation of corrosion was localised around the Al-Mn inclusions in the AZ31 alloy and at the centre of the {alpha}-Mg phase in the AZ80 and AZ91D alloys. The {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase acted as a barrier against corrosion. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Effect of cerium on the corrosion behaviour of sintered (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lijing; Bi, Mengxue; Jiang, Jianjun; Ding, Xuefeng; Zhu, Minggang; Li, Wei; Lv, Zhongshan; Song, Zhenlun

    2017-06-01

    For the balanced consumption of rare-earth elements, cerium (Ce) was partially used for NdFeB magnets instead of Nd. The corrosion behaviour of the (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet with different Ce contents in 3.5% NaCl solution was investigated by SEM, XRD, EDS and electrochemical tests. After immersion, the weight loss was calculated and the magnetic properties of the samples were measured. Results showed that Ce affected the corrosion of the (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet. Compared with the NdFeB magnet without Ce but of the same grade as the magnetic energy product, (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet showed better corrosion resistance. With increased Ce content, the corrosion resistances and magnetic properties of (Nd,Ce)FeB magnets were investigated.

  12. Corrosion behaviour of electropolished AISI 316L austenitic biomaterial in physiological solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatkalíková, V.; Markovičová, L.; Škorvanová, M.

    2017-11-01

    Due to suitable mechanical properties, satisfactory corrosion resistance and relatively low cost, austenitic stainless steels are important biomaterials for manufacture of implants and various medical instruments and devices. Their corrosion properties and biocompatibility are significantly affected by protective passive surface film quality, which depends on used mechanical and chemical surface treatment. This article deals with corrosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel, which is the most widely used Cr-Ni-Mo austenitic biomaterial. Corrosion behaviour of five various surfaces (original, electropolished, three surfaces with combined treatment finished by electropolishing) is evaluated on the bases of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests performed in physiological solution at the temperature of 37± 0.5 °C.

  13. Effect of cerium on the corrosion behaviour of sintered (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lijing [CAS Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Application Technology, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Bi, Mengxue [CAS Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Application Technology, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Nano Science and Technology Institute, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Jiang, Jianjun; Ding, Xuefeng [CAS Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Application Technology, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Zhu, Minggang; Li, Wei [Functional Materials Research Institute, Central Iron & Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China); Lv, Zhongshan [Ningbo Shuo Teng new material Co., Ltd., Cixi 315301 (China); Song, Zhenlun, E-mail: songzhenlun@nimte.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Application Technology, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • A little Ce could promote the magnets for a better corrosion resistance. • With increased Ce contents, the corrosion resistances of magnets decrease. • As the corrosion developed, the magnetic properties decreased. - Abstract: For the balanced consumption of rare-earth elements, cerium (Ce) was partially used for NdFeB magnets instead of Nd. The corrosion behaviour of the (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet with different Ce contents in 3.5% NaCl solution was investigated by SEM, XRD, EDS and electrochemical tests. After immersion, the weight loss was calculated and the magnetic properties of the samples were measured. Results showed that Ce affected the corrosion of the (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet. Compared with the NdFeB magnet without Ce but of the same grade as the magnetic energy product, (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet showed better corrosion resistance. With increased Ce content, the corrosion resistances and magnetic properties of (Nd,Ce)FeB magnets were investigated.

  14. Corrosion products behaviour under VVER primary coolant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grygar, T.; Zmitko, M.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work was to collect data on thermodynamic stability of Cr, Fe, and Ni oxides, mechanisms of hydrothermal corrosion of stainless steels and to compare the real observation with the theory. We found that the electrochemical potential and pH in PWR and VVER are close to the thermodynamic boundary between two fields of stable spinel type oxides. The ways of degradation of the passivating layers due to changes in water chemistry were considered and PWR and VVER systems were found to be potentially endangered by reductive attack. In certain VVER systems the characteristics of the passivating layer on steels and also concentration of soluble corrosion products seem to be in contradiction with the theoretical expectations. (author)

  15. Corrosion behaviour of dimensionally stable anodes in chlorine electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evdokimov, S.V.

    2000-01-01

    Dependence of ruthenium anodic dissolution rate in active coating of oxide ruthenium-titanium anodes on time both in chloride and perchlorate solutions was studied using radiometric methods. It is shown that i chloride solutions effect of a high and long-term decrease in ruthenium dissolution rate takes place. The data confirm the previously made conclusion that adsorbed chlorine produces inhibiting effect on anodic dissolution of a precious metal. Influence of pH on steady-state rate of the anode corrosion is considered. Effect of abrupt increase in corrosion rate with pH increase from 2 to 4 with its subsequent slow decrease to the values characteristic of the process rate in solutions with pH 2 is revealed [ru

  16. Corrosion behaviour of Ni–Co alloy coatings at Kish Island (marine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. In this study, the corrosion behaviour of Ni-Co alloys with low Co content, electroplated on steel ... charge flow from the water molecule to the substrate is produced. ... is also a gas refinery in the west side of the island so its pollutants ...

  17. Thermal characteristics and corrosion behaviour of Mg–xZn alloys ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 36; Issue 6. Thermal characteristics and corrosion behaviour of Mg–Zn alloys for biomedical applications. Amir Fereidouni Lotfabadi Mohd Hasbullah Idris Ali Ourdjini Mohammed Rafiq Abdul Kadir Saeed Farahany Hamid Reza Bakhsheshi-Rad. Volume 36 Issue 6 ...

  18. Corrosion behaviour of layers obtained by nitrogen implantation into boron films deposited onto iron substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetti, F.; Fedrizzi, L.; Giacomozzi, F.; Guzman, L.; Borgese, A.

    1985-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviour and corrosion resistance of boron films deposited onto Armco iron after bombardment with 100 keV N + ions were determined in various test solutions. The changes in the electrochemical parameters give evidence of lower anodic dissolution rates for the treated samples. Scanning electron microscopy and Auger analysis of the corroded surfaces confirm the presence of protective layers. (Auth.)

  19. An ac impedance study of the corrosion behaviour of mild steel coated with electrochemically synthesized polyoxyphenylenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musiani, M.M.; Mengoli, G.; Pagura, C.

    1985-04-01

    Electrochemically synthesized polyoxphenylene coatings on mild steel exposed to NaCl or H2SO4 solutions were investigated by ac impedance measurements. The influence of coating cohesion, adhesion to substrate, and surface pretreatment on the corrosion behaviour of the samples is clarified.

  20. Corrosion behaviour of WC-VC-Co hardmetals in acidic media

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Konadu, DS

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of increasing vanadium carbide (VC) content on the corrosion behaviour of tungsten carbide – 10 wt% cobalt hard metals was investigated in 1 M hydrochloric (HCl), and sulphuric (H2SO4) acids solutions. Increasing VC content makes the open...

  1. Corrosion behaviour of zircaloy 4 fuel rod cladding in EDF power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romary, H; Deydier, D [EDF, Direction de l` Equipment SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-02-01

    Since the beginning of the French nuclear program, a surveillance of fuel has been carried out in order to evaluate the fuel behaviour under irradiation. Until now, nuclear fuels provided by suppliers have met EDF requirements concerning fuel behaviour and reliability. But, the need to minimize the costs and to increase the flexibility of the power plants led EDF to the definition of new targets: optimization of the core management and fuel cycle economy. The fuel behaviour experience shows that some of these new requirements cannot be fully fulfilled by the present standard fuel due to some technological limits. Particularly, burnup enhancement is limited by the oxidation and the hydriding of the Zircaloy 4 fuel rod cladding. Also, fuel suppliers and EDF need to have a better knowledge of the Zy-4 cladding behaviour in order to define the existing margins and the limiting factors. For this reason, in-reactor fuel characterization programs have been set up by fuel suppliers and EDF for a few years. This paper presents the main results and conclusions of EDF experience on Zy-4 in-reactor corrosion behaviour. Data obtained from oxide layer or zirconia thickness measurements show that corrosion performance of Zy-4 fuel rod cladding, as irradiated until now in EDF reactors, is satisfactory but not sufficient to meet the future needs. The fuel suppliers propose in order to improve the corrosion resistance of fuel rod cladding, low tin Zy-4 cladding and then optimized Zy-4 cladding. Irradiation of these claddings are ongoing. The available corrosion data show the better in-reactor corrosion resistance of optimized Zy-4 fuel rod cladding compared to the standard Zy-4 cladding. The scheduled fuel surveillance program will confirm if the optimized Zy-4 fuel rod cladding will meet the requirements for the future high burnup and high flexibility fuel. (author). 10 refs, 19 figs, 4 tabs.

  2. Mechanical behaviour of austenitic stainless steels in inert environment and in hot chloride environment: influence of molybdenum addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daret, Jacques

    1978-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the influence of molybdenum addition. It is based on an experimental method which brings to the fore correlations between mechanical and electrochemical parameters of the phenomenon of stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels. After having recalled some characteristics of dry corrosion and electrochemical corrosion, presented austenitic stainless steels (mechanical properties such as elastic modulus, yield strength, tensile strength, ultimate elongation, creep behaviour, inter-crystalline and pitting corrosion, stress corrosion cracking behaviour), the author addresses the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of these steels in chloride environment (general characteristics, parameters, proposes theories to explain stress corrosion cracking), reports the study of the influence of molybdenum in these steels, notably on corrosion resistance and on stress corrosion cracking. Experimental method and results are described and discussed: tensile tests and creep tests in inert environment, stress corrosion cracking test in chloride environment with analysis based either on corrosion potential evolution or on sample elongation evolution. Results are notably discussed in terms of crack situation within metal lattice, crack growth rate, and scanning electronic microscopy observations [fr

  3. BETHSY ISP-38 flow behaviour in hot leg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petelin, S.; Jurkovic, M.

    1998-01-01

    Betsy Test 6.9c OECD ISP-38 RELAP5/MOD3.2 input model was developed and simulation performed for loss of RHR system during mid-loop operation. Initial liquid level in RCS was at horizontal axis of the hot legs. Pressurizer and steam generator manways were opened 1 s after the transient was initiated. Secondary side is full of air and isolated. Results of calculations were satisfied except in surge line and in pressurizer where larger amount of water is presented. Liquid was entrained in that part of the system during bubbly or varies stratified flow in the hot leg. Due to non-physical results in hot leg pipe with connected surge line and pressurizer, RELAP5 horizontal stratification model deficiencies was studied and possible improvements investigated.(author)

  4. Corrosion behaviour of Arc-PVD coatings and hybrid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichel, K.

    1992-01-01

    To achieve a comprehensive protective effect against corrosion and wear stresses, coating systems are increasingly being developed, in which there is a separation of the tasks of the coating materials regarding the protective effect. On the one hand, pure PVD coating systems are used, on the other hand hybrid coatings are examined, where galvanic processes are combined with PVD technique. The results of experiments introduced in this article were determined on Arc-PVD coatings. By this process, titanium nitride and chromium nitride coatings are both deposited directly on the basic material and are also deposited as combination coatings of Ti/TiN and chemical nickel/TiN. (orig.) [de

  5. Investigation into the role of sodium chloride deposited on oxide and metal substrates in the initiation of hot corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birks, N.

    1983-01-01

    Sodium chloride is deposited on the surface of alumina substrates and exposed to air containing 1% SO2 at temperatures between 500 C and 700 C. In all cases the sodium chloride was converted to sodium sulfate. The volatilization of sodium chloride from the original salt particles was responsible for the development of a uniform coating of sodium sulfate on the alumina substrate. At temperatures above 625 C, a liquid NaCl-Na2SO4 autectic was formed on the substrate. The mechanisms for these reactions are given. One of the main roles of NaCl in low temperature hot corrosion lies in enabling a corrosive liquid to form.

  6. Corrosion behaviour of the WAK-HLW glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grambow, B.; Luckscheiter, B.; Nesovic, M.

    1997-01-01

    Sorption studies were performed on corrosion products from the glass GP WAK1 formed over a period of 40 days in deionized water at 80 C and S/V=1000 m -1 . After 40 days the pH of the solution was adjusted to various preselected values in the pH range 2-10. The pH was kept constant during the experiments by daily addition of either HNO 3 or NaOH. The sorption experiments were run at ambient temperature and 80 C for up to 10 days using various starting concentrations of Eu, Th and U. Sorption isotherms of Eu, Th and U(VI) on corrosion products were determined in deionized water, in NaCl-rich and MgCl 2 -rich solution. Presently, data of the sorption studies in deionized water are available.Furthermore the investigations of the pH dependence of saturation concentration of silica and of the release of various glass constituent of the glass GP WAK1 were continued with studies in the MgCl 2 -rich solution 1 at 80 C. Results of these studies (30 days) are given in terms of normalized elemental mass losses. (MM)

  7. Effects of alpha-decay on spent fuel corrosion behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiss, T.; Rondinella, V.V.; Cobos, J.; Wegen, D.H.; Amme, M.; Ronchi, C.

    2004-01-01

    An overview of results in the area of spent fuel characterization as nuclear waste is presented. These studies are focused on primary aspects of spent fuel corrosion, by considering different fuel compositions and burn ups, as well as a wide set of environmental conditions. The key parameter is the storage time of the fuel e.g. in view of spent fuel retrieval or in view of its final disposal. To extrapolate data obtainable from a laboratory-acceptable timescale to those expected after storage periods of interest have elapsed (amounting in the extreme case to geological ages) is a tough challenge. Emphasis is put on key aspects of fuel corrosion related to fuel properties at a given age and environmental conditions expected in the repository: e.g. the fuel activity (radiolysis effects), the effects of helium build-up and of groundwater composition. A wide range of techniques, from traditional leaching experiments to advanced electrochemistry, and of materials, including spent fuel with different compositions/burnups and analogues like the so-called alpha-doped UO 2 , are employed for these studies. The results confirm the safety of European underground repository concepts. (authors)

  8. Comparative evaluation of corrosion behaviour of type K thin film thermocouple and its bulk counterpart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.K.; Barhai, P.K.; Srikanth, S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Anodic vacuum arc deposited chromel and alumel films are more 'noble' in 5% NaCl solution than their respective wires. → Chromel undergoes localised corrosion while alumel shows uniform corrosion. → Virgin samples of chromel-alumel TFTCs exhibit good thermoelectric response. → Their thermoelectric outputs remain largely unaffected when shelved under normal atmospheric conditions. → After 288 h of exposure in salt spray environment, their thermoelectric outputs show noticeable change due to size effects. - Abstract: This paper investigates the corrosion behaviour of type K thermoelements and their thin films, and compares the performance of chromel-alumel thin film thermocouple with its wire counterpart before and after exposure to 5% NaCl medium. Potentiodynamic polarisation tests reveal that chromel and alumel films are more 'noble' than their respective wires. Alumel corrodes faster when coupled with chromel in films than as wires. Secondary electron micrographs and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements suggest that chromel shows localised corrosion while alumel undergoes uniform corrosion. Corrosion adversely affects the thermocouple output and introduces an uncertainty in the measurement.

  9. The corrosion behaviour and structure of amorphous and thermally treated Fe-B-Si alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raicheff, R.; Zaprianova, V.; Petrova, E.

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of magnetic amorphous alloys Fe 78 B 13 Si 9 , Fe 81 B 13 Si 4 C 2 and Fe 67 Co 18 Bi 4 S 1 obtained by rapid quenching from the melts are investigated in a model corrosive environment of 1N H 2 SO 4 . The structure of the alloys, is, characterized by DTA, SEM, TEM, X-ray and electron diffraction techniques. The dissolution kinetics of the,alloys is studied using gravimetric and electrochemical polarization measurements. It is established that the corrosion rate of the amorphous Fe 67 Co 18 Bt 4 S 1 alloy is up to 50 times lower than that of Fe 78 Bi 3 Si 9 alloy and the addition of cobalt leads to a considerable reduction of the rates of both partial corrosion reactions, while the addition of carbon results only in a moderate decrease (2-3 times) of the corrosion rate. It is also shown that the crystallization of the amorphous Fe 78 B 13 Si 9 alloy (at 700 o C for 3 h) leads to formation of multiphase structure consisting of crystalline phases α-Fe and Fe 3 (B,Si). After crystallization an increase of the rate of both hydrogen evolution and anodic dissolution reactions is observed which results in a considerable (an order of magnitude) increase of the corrosion rate of the alloy. (Original)

  10. Influence of microstructure on the microbial corrosion behaviour of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, D. A.; Ibars, J. R.; Ranninger, C.

    2000-01-01

    Several stainless steels (Type UNS S30300, S30400, S30403; S31600, S31603 and S42000) with different microstructural characteristics have been used to study the influence of heat treatments on microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Bio corrosion and accelerated electrochemical testing was performed in various microbiological media. Two species of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have been used in order to ascertain the influence of microstructure. The morphology of corrosion pits produced in both chloride and chloride plus sulphide-SRB metabolites, was inspected by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) complemented with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Results have shown different behaviours regarding corrosion resistance in each case studied. Sensitized austenitic stainless steels were more affected by the presence of aggressive anions and pitting potential (Ep) values were more cathodic than those of as-received state. A corrosion enhancement is produced by the synergistic action of biogenic sulphides and chloride anions. Pitting corrosion in martensitic stainless steel Type UNS S42000 was found in biocorrosion test. The pitting morphology is correlated to the chemical composition, the microstructure and the electrolyte. (Author) 36 refs

  11. Corrosion behaviour of steels and CRA in sour gas environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, M. Alvarez de; Lancha, A.M.; Hernandez, F.; Gomez-Briceno, D. [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Coca, P. [ELCOGAS, S.A., C.T. GICC Puertollano, Carretera de Calzada de Calatrava a Puertollano, km 27, 13500 Puertollano, Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    The ELCOGAS power plant in Puertollano (Spain), with 335 MWe (ISO conditions), is an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant built to demonstrate both the technical and economic feasibility of this alternative for clean generation of electricity from coal. IGCC technology is based on a coal gasification process, namely the conversion of coal into combustible gas, which is then subjected to an exhaustive cleaning process. The result is a synthetic gas, virtually free of pollutants that can be burned with a high efficiency in a combined cycle electricity-generating unit. Basically, the ELCOGAS plant consists of three islands jointly designed and integrated into the process: gasification island, air separation island and combined cycle island. In the gasification island, the gas from the gasifier is cleaned (de-dusted and washed) and desulfurized before being sent to the combined cycle island. The washing system consists of a Venturi scrubber with a separator where halogens and alkalis (NH{sub 3}, HCl, HF) are removed from the previously de-dusted gas by means of the wash water. The halogens and alkalis removed are then stripped from the wash water as stripped gas, which is a sour gas. The coal-gas coming from the separator proceeds to sulphur removal in a MDEA system and then, the clean gas (mainly CO, H{sub 2}) is sent to the combined cycle plant. As COS is a significant part of the sulphur containing gases in the coal gas, hydrolysis of the COS to H{sub 2}S takes place before the desulfurization stage, since MDEA is a selective amine for H{sub 2}S. There are many important areas related to materials corrosion within the gas cleaning system. In the ELCOGAS plant carbon steels, austenitic stainless steels and nickel based alloys, such as AISI 316Ti, AISI 904L and Hastelloy C276, are used in the Venturi, the water separator and the strippers. AISI 316Ti is used for the gas piping from the separator to the COS hydrolysis system. Laboratory tests to evaluate

  12. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Spear, K.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    A vertical flow-through furnace has been built to study the effect of corrosion on the morphology and mechanical properties of ceramic hot gas filters. Sections of 3M Type 203 and DuPont Lanxide SiC-SiC filter tubes were sealed at one end and suspended in the furnace while being subjected to a simulated coal combustion environment at 870{degrees}C. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy is used to identify phase and morphology changes due to corrosion while burst testing determines the loss of mechanical strength after exposure to the combustion gases. Additionally, a thermodynamic database of gaseous silicon compounds is currently being established so that calculations can be made to predict important products of the reaction of the environment with the ceramics. These thermodynamic calculations provide useful information concerning the regimes where the ceramic may be degraded by material vaporization. To verify the durability and predict lifetime performance of ceramic heat exchangers in coal combustion environments, long-term exposure testing of stressed (internally pressurized) tubes must be performed in actual coal combustion environments. The authors have designed a system that will internally pressurize 2 inch OD by 48 inch long ceramic heat exchanger tubes to a maximum pressure of 200 psi while exposing the outer surface of the tubes to coal combustion gas at the Combustion and Environmental Research Facility (CERF) at the Pittsburgh Energy and Technology Center. Water-cooled, internal o-ring pressure seals were designed to accommodate the existing 6 inch by 6 inch access panels of the CERF. Tubes will be exposed for up to a maximum of 500 hours at temperatures of 2500 and 2600{degrees}F with an internal pressure of 200 psi. If the tubes survive, their retained strength will be measured using the high temperature tube burst test facility at Penn State University. Fractographic analysis will be performed to identify the failure source(s) for the tubes.

  13. Modelling the long-term corrosion behaviour of candidate alloys for Canadian SCWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steeves, G.; Cook, W., E-mail: wcook@unb.ca, E-mail: graham.steeves@unb.ca [University of New Brunswick, Department of Chemical Engineering, Fredericton, NB (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Corrosion behaviour of Inconel 625 and Incoloy 800H, two of the candidate fuel cladding materials for Canadian supercritical water (SCW) reactor designs, were evaluated by exposing the metals to SCW in UNB's SCW flow loop. Individual experiments were conducted over a range of 370{sup o}C and 600{sup o}C. Exposure times were typically intervals of 100, 250, and 500 hours. Experimental data was used to create an empirical kinetic equation for each material. Activation energies for the alloys were determined, and showed a distinct difference between low-temperature electrochemical corrosion mechanism and direct high-temperature chemical oxidation. (author)

  14. Microstructure and corrosion behaviour of pulsed plasma-nitrided AISI H13 tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basso, Rodrigo L.O.; Pastore, Heloise O.; Schmidt, Vanessa; Baumvol, Israel J.R.; Abarca, Silvia A.C.; Souza, Fernando S. de; Spinelli, Almir; Figueroa, Carlos A.; Giacomelli, Cristiano

    2010-01-01

    The effect of pulsed plasma nitriding temperature and time on the pitting corrosion behaviour of AISI H13 tool steel in 0.9% NaCl solutions was investigated by cyclic polarization. The pitting potential (E pit ) was found to be dependent on the composition, microstructure and morphology of the surface layers, whose properties were determined by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The best corrosion protection was observed for samples nitrided at 480 o C and 520 o C. Under such experimental conditions the E pit -values shifted up to 1.25 V in the positive direction.

  15. Pitting Corrosion Behaviour of New Corrosion-Resistant Reinforcement Bars in Chloride-Containing Concrete Pore Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jin-Yang; Liu, Yao; Chu, Hong-Yan; Wang, Danqian; Ma, Han; Sun, Wei

    2017-08-04

    In this study, the pitting behaviour of a new corrosion-resistant alloy steel (CR) is compared to that of low-carbon steel (LC) in a simulated concrete pore solution with a chloride concentration of 5 mol/L. The electrochemical behaviour of the bars was characterised using linear polarisation resistance (LPR) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The pitting profiles were detected by reflective digital holographic microscopy (DHM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the chemical components produced in the pitting process were analysed by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results show that the CR bars have a higher resistance to pitting corrosion than the LC bars. This is primarily because of the periodic occurrence of metastable pitting during pitting development. Compared to the pitting process in the LC bars, the pitting depth grows slowly in the CR bars, which greatly reduces the risk of pitting. The possible reason for this result is that the capability of the CR bars to heal the passivation film helps to restore the metastable pits to the passivation state.

  16. Corrosion behaviours of the dental magnetic keeper complexes made by different alloys and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min-Ke; Song, Ning; Liu, Fei; Kou, Liang; Lu, Xiao-Wen; Wang, Min; Wang, Hang; Shen, Jie-Fei

    2016-09-29

    The keeper and cast dowel-coping, as a primary component for a magnetic attachment, is easily subjected to corrosion in a wet environment, such as the oral cavity, which contains electrolyte-rich saliva, complex microflora and chewing behaviour and so on. The objective of this in vitro study was to examine the corrosion resistance of a dowel and coping-keeper complex fabricated by finish keeper and three alloys (cobalt-chromium, CoCr; silver-palladium-gold, PdAu; gold-platinum, AuPt) using a laser-welding process and a casting technique. The surface morphology characteristics and microstructures of the samples were examined by means of metallographic microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) with SEM provided elements analysis information for the test samples after 10% oxalic acid solution etching test. Tafel polarization curve recordings demonstrated parameter values indicating corrosion of the samples when subjected to electrochemical testing. This study has suggested that massive oxides are attached to the surface of the CoCr-keeper complex but not to the AuPt-keeper complex. Only the keeper area of cast CoCr-keeper complex displayed obvious intergranular corrosion and changes in the Fe and Co elements. Both cast and laser-welded AuPt-keeper complexes had the highest free corrosion potential, followed by the PdAu-keeper complex. We concluded that although the corrosion resistance of the CoCr-keeper complex was worst, the keeper surface passive film was actually preserved to its maximum extent. The laser-welded CoCr- and PdAu-keeper complexes possessed superior corrosion resistance as compared with their cast specimens, but no significant difference was found between the cast and laser-welded AuPt-keeper complexes. The Fe-poor and Cr-rich band, appearing on the edge of the keeper when casting, has been proven to be a corrosion-prone area.

  17. Corrosion behaviour of borated aluminium used as neutron absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmerich, R. [EaglePicher Technologies GmbH, Oehringen (Germany); Ensinger, W.; Enders, B. [Philipps-Univ. of Marburg, Dept. of Chemistry, Material Science Centre (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of pure and borated aluminium was examined. Measurements were performed in two different electrolytes at 90 C containing different trace-amounts of chloride. For borated aluminium current transients, i.e. metastable depassivation events were found. It is suggested to attribute these transients to less stable passivation layers in comparison to pure aluminium.

  18. Layer texture of hot-rolled BCC metals and its significance for stress-corrosion cracking of main gas pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlovich, Yu. A.; Isaenkova, M. G.; Krymskaya, O. A.; Morozov, N. S.

    2016-10-01

    Based on data of X-ray texture analysis of hot-rolled BCC materials it was shown that the layerwise texture inhomogeneity of products is formed during their manufacturing. The effect can be explained by saturation with interstitial impurities of the surface layer, resulting in dynamical deformation aging (DDA). DDA prevents the dislocation slip under rolling and leads to an increase of lattice parameters in the external layer. The degree of arising inhomogeneity correlates with the tendency of hot-rolled sheets and obtained therefrom tubes to stress-corrosion cracking under exploitation, since internal layers have a compressive effect on external layers, and prevents opening of corrosion cracks at the tube surface.

  19. A multiple linear regression analysis of hot corrosion attack on a series of nickel base turbine alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    Multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine an equation for estimating hot corrosion attack for a series of Ni base cast turbine alloys. The U transform (i.e., 1/sin (% A/100) to the 1/2) was shown to give the best estimate of the dependent variable, y. A complete second degree equation is described for the centered" weight chemistries for the elements Cr, Al, Ti, Mo, W, Cb, Ta, and Co. In addition linear terms for the minor elements C, B, and Zr were added for a basic 47 term equation. The best reduced equation was determined by the stepwise selection method with essentially 13 terms. The Cr term was found to be the most important accounting for 60 percent of the explained variability hot corrosion attack.

  20. Optimizing the Hot-Corrosion Resistance-of-Novel gamma-Ni+gamma-prime-Ni3A1-Based Alloys and Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gleeson, Brian

    2006-01-01

    .... The protection of high-temperature components against hot corrosion or oxidation is typically conferred by the application of either a diffusion or overlay metallic coating that is able to form...

  1. Influence of pH and oxygen content of buffer solutions on the corrosion behaviour of metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, K.H.

    1977-05-01

    The application of solutions to the decontamination of materials in nuclear installations is based on the condition that their corrosion behaviour is clearly understood. Since electrochemical corrosion is due to cathodic and anodic partial reactions which are influenced in different ways by the pH of the solution and the oxygen content it is suggested that the results of electrochemical experiments with buffer solutions be used as a model for predicting the corrosion behaviour of materials in other solutions. In the tests described here potentio-kinetic current-potential-curves have been traced and galvanic corrosion tests have been made. The results obtained in ascorbic acid, potassium hydrogen phthalate, ammonium citrate and acetate, sodium and potassium tartrate, ammonium hydrogen phosphate, sodium carbonate, hexamethylene tetramin, ethylene diamine enable - on the basis of summarized current-potential-curves - the metals studied to be classified in four groups characterized by clear differences concerning the influence of pH on the corrosion behaviour. (Auth.)

  2. Effect of Annealing Temperature on the Corrosion Protection of Hot Swaged Ti-54M Alloy in 2 M HCl Pickling Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Sayed M. Sherif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion of Ti-54M titanium alloy processed by hot rotary swaging and post-annealed to yield different grain sizes, in 2 M HCl solutions is reported. Two annealing temperatures of 800 °C and 940 °C, followed by air cooling and furnace cooling were used to give homogeneous grain structures of 1.5 and 5 μm, respectively. It has been found that annealing the alloy at 800 °C decreased the corrosion of the alloy, with respect to the hot swaged condition, through increasing its corrosion resistance and decreasing the corrosion current and corrosion rate. Increasing the annealing temperature to 940 °C further decreased the corrosion of the alloy.

  3. Influence of heat treatment on corrosion behaviour of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Zr-Sc alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Y.P.; Liu, X.Y.; He, Y.B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Pan, Q.L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Materials Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410083 (China); Li, W.B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); School of Civil Engineering, Hunan City University, Yiyang 413000 (China)

    2012-05-15

    Corrosion behaviour of different tempers (namely NA, UA, PA and OA) of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Zr-Sc alloy was studied by potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), optical microscopy (OM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Over aged (OA) can decrease the susceptibility to exfoliation due to the discontinuous distribution of the {eta} precipitates at the grain boundaries, cause a negative shift of the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}), and lead to the prolonging of the time of the appearance of two time constants in impedance diagrams. In addition, Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Zr-Sc alloy with over aged treatment has an enhanced resistance to exfoliation corrosion. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Corrosion behaviour of container materials for geological disposal of high level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accary, A.

    1985-01-01

    The disposal of high level radioactive waste in geological formations, based on the multibarrier concept, may include the use of a container as one of the engineered barriers. In this report the requirements imposed on this container and the possible degradation processes are reviewed. Further on an overview is given of the research being carried out by various research centres in the European Community on the assessment of the corrosion behaviour of candidate container materials. The results obtained on a number of materials under various testing conditions are summarized and evaluated. As a result, three promising materials have been selected for a detailed joint testing programme. It concerns two highly corrosion resistant alloys, resp. Ti-Pd (0.2 Pd%) and Hastelloy C4 and one consumable material namely a low carbon steel. Finally the possibilities of modelling the corrosion phenomena are discussed

  5. Corrosion behaviour of powder metallurgical and cast Al-Zn-Mg base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sameljuk, A.V.; Neikov, O.D.; Krajnikov, A.V.; Milman, Yu.V.; Thompson, G.E.

    2004-01-01

    The behaviour of Al-Zn-Mg base alloys produced by powder metallurgy and casting has been studied using potentiodynamic polarisation in 0.3% and 3% NaCl solutions. The influence of alloy production route on microstructure has been examined by scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. An improvement in performance of powder metallurgy (PM) materials, compared with the cast alloy, was evident in solutions of low chloride concentration; less striking differences were revealed in high chloride concentration. Both powder metallurgy and cast alloys show two main types of precipitates, which were identified as Zn-Mg and Zr-Sc base intermetallic phases. The microstructure of the PM alloys is refined compared with the cast material, which assists understanding of the corrosion performance. The corrosion process commences with dissolution of the Zn-Mg base phases, with the relatively coarse phases present in the cast alloy showing ready development of corrosion

  6. Mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour of MIG welded 5083 aluminium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durmus, Huelya [Celal Bayar Univ., Turgutlu-Manisa (Turkey)

    2011-07-01

    For this study 5083 Aluminium alloy plates, as used in automobiles and watercraft, were experimentally MIG welded. The plates were joined with different wires and at various currents. The effects of welding with different parameters on the mechanical and corrosion properties were investigated. The corrosion behaviour of the MIG welded 5083 Aluminium base material was also investigated. The effects of the chemical composition of the filler material on the mechanical properties were examined by metallographic inspection and tensile testing. By EDS and XRD analyses of specimens it turned out that different structures in the weld metal (Cu3Si) affect its mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of the specimens welded with 5356 filler metal were found as quite well improved as compared to those specimens welded with 4043 and 5183 filler material. The results of the metallographic analysis, and mechanical and corrosion tests exhibited that the 5356 filler material was most suitable for the 5083 Al alloy base material. (orig.)

  7. Corrosion and wear behavior of functionally graded Al2024/SiC composites produced by hot pressing and consolidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, Fatih; Canakci, Aykut, E-mail: aykut@ktu.edu.tr; Varol, Temel; Ozkaya, Serdar

    2015-09-25

    Highlights: • Functionally graded Al2024/SiC composites were produced by hot pressing. • Effect of the number of graded layers was investigated on the corrosion behavior. • Functionally graded composites has the most corrosion resistant than composites. • Wear mechanisms of Al2024/SiC composites were explained. - Abstract: Functionally graded Al2024/SiC composites (FGMs) with varying percentage of SiC (30–60%) were produced by hot pressing and consolidation method. The effects of SiC content and number of layers of Al2024/SiC FGMs on the corrosion and wear behaviors were investigated. The microstructures of these composites were characterized by a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The corrosion performances of composites were evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization scans in 3.5% NaCl solution. Corrosion experiments shows that corrosion rate (1109 mpy) of two layered FGMs which containing 50 wt.% SiC were much higher than Al2024 matrix (2569 mpy) and Al2024/50 wt.% SiC composite (2201 mpy). Mechanical properties of these composites were evaluated by microhardness measurements and ball-on-disk wear tests. As the applied load change from 15 to 20 N, the wear rates of the Al2024 increased significantly and wear mechanism transformed from mild to severe wear regime. It has been shown that Al2024/40 wt.% SiC composite has lower wear rate where adhesive and abrasive wear mechanisms play a major role.

  8. Interactive Effects of Corrosion, Copper, and Chloramines on Legionella and Mycobacteria in Hot Water Plumbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, William J; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc A

    2017-06-20

    Complexities associated with drinking water plumbing systems can result in undesirable interactions among plumbing components that undermine engineering controls for opportunistic pathogens (OPs). In this study, we examine the effects of plumbing system materials and two commonly applied disinfectants, copper and chloramines, on water chemistry and the growth of Legionella and mycobacteria across a transect of bench- and pilot-scale hot water experiments carried out with the same municipal water supply. We discovered that copper released from corrosion of plumbing materials can initiate evolution of >1100 times more hydrogen (H 2 ) from water heater sacrificial anode rods than does presence of copper dosed as soluble cupric ions. H 2 is a favorable electron donor for autotrophs and causes fixation of organic carbon that could serve as a nutrient for OPs. Dosed cupric ions acted as a disinfectant in stratified stagnant pipes, inhibiting culturable Legionella and biofilm formation, but promoted Legionella growth in pipes subject to convective mixing. This difference was presumably due to continuous delivery of nutrients to biofilm on the pipes under convective mixing conditions. Chloramines eliminated culturable Legionella and prevented L. pneumophila from recolonizing biofilms, but M. avium gene numbers increased by 0.14-0.76 logs in the bulk water and were unaffected in the biofilm. This study provides practical confirmation of past discrepancies in the literature regarding the variable effects of copper on Legionella growth, and confirms prior reports of trade-offs between Legionella and mycobacteria if chloramines are applied as secondary disinfectant residual.

  9. Hot corrosion behavior of Ni-Cr-W-C alloys in impure helium gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmura, Taizo; Sahira, Kensho; Sakonooka, Akihiko; Yonezawa, Noboru

    1976-01-01

    Influence of the minor alloy constituents such as Al, Mn and Si on the hot corrosion behavior of Ni-20Cr-20W-0.07C alloy was studied in 99.995% helium gas at 1000 0 C, comparing with that behavior of commercial Ni-base superalloys (Hastelloy X and Inconel 617). The low oxidizing potential in the impure helium gas usually causes selective oxidation of these elements and the growth of oxide whiskers on the surface of specimen at elevated temperature. The intergranular attack was caused by selective oxidation of Al, Si and Mn. The spalling of oxide film was restrained by addition of Mn and Si, providing tough spinel type oxide film on the surface and 'Keyes' on the oxide-matrix interface respectively. The amount and the morphology of the oxide whiskers depended on Si and Mn content. More than 0.29% of Si content without Mn always caused the growth of rather thinner whiskers with smooth surface, and the whiskers analyzed by electron diffraction patterns and EPMA to be Cr 2 O 3 containing Si. Mn addition changed the whiskers to thicker ones of spinel type oxide (MnCr 2 O 1 ) with rough surface. On the basis of these results, the optimum content of Al, Mn and Si to minimize the growth of whiskers, the intergranular attack and the spalling of oxide film was discussed. (auth.)

  10. Hot corrosion behavior of Ni-Cr-W-C alloys in impure He gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmura, Taizo; Sahira, Kensho; Sakonooka, Akihiko; Yonezawa, Noboru

    1977-01-01

    Influence of the minor alloy constituents such as Al, Mn and Si on the hot corrosion behavior of Ni-20Cr-20W-0.07C alloy was studied in 99.995%He gas at 1,000 0 C, in comparison with the behavior of commercial Ni-base superalloys (Hastelloy X and Inconel 617). The low oxidizing potential in the impure He gas usually causes selective oxidation of the elements described above and the growth of oxide whiskers on the surface of specimen at elevated temperatures. The intergranular attack was caused by selective oxidation of Al, Si and Mn. The spalling of oxide film was restrained by additions of Mn and Si, providing tough spinel type oxide film on the surface and 'keys' on the oxide-matrix interface respectively. The amount and morphology of the oxide whiskers depended on Si and Mn contents. Si of more than 0.29% without Mn always caused the growth of rather thinner whiskers with smooth surface, and the whiskers analyzed by electron diffraction patterns and EPMA to be Cr 2 O 3 containing Si. Mn addition changes the whiskers to thicker ones of spinel type oxide (MnCr 2 O 4 ) with rough surface. On the basis of these results, the optimum contents of Al, Mn and Si to minimize the growth of whiskers, the intergranular attack, and the spalling of oxide film were discussed. (auth.)

  11. Chemical reactions involved in the initiation of hot corrosion of IN-738

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Sodium-sulfate-induced hot corrosion of preoxidized IN-738 was studied at 975 C with special emphasis placed on the processes occurring during the long induction period. Thermogravimetric tests were run for predetermined periods of time, and then one set of specimens was washed with water. Chemical analysis of the wash solutions yielded information about water soluble metal salts and residual sulfate. A second set of samples was cross sectioned dry and polished in a nonaqueous medium. Element distributions within the oxide scale were obtained from electron microprobe X-ray micrographs. Evolution of SO was monitored throughout the thermogravimetric tests. Kinetic rate studies were performed for several pertinent processes; appropriate rate constants were obtained from the following chemical reactions; Cr203 + 2 Na2S04(1) + 3/2 02 yields 2 Na2Cr04(1) + 2 S03(g)n TiO2 + Na2S04(1) yields Na20(T102)n + 503(g)n T102 + Na2Cro4(1) yields Na2(T102)n + Cr03(g).

  12. Effect of cerium addition on the corrosion behaviour of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, S.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Mungole, M.N.; Bharagava, S.; Baligidad, R.G.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of Ce addition on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides Fe-20.0Al-2.0C, Fe-18.5Al-3.6C and Fe-19.2Al-3.3C-0.07Ce (in at.%) has been studied. The potentiodynamic polarization behaviour of the alloys was evaluated in freely aerated 0.25 mol/l H 2 SO 4 . A 0.05% C steel was used for comparison purposes. All the alloys exhibited active-passive behaviour in the acidic solution. The addition of Ce destroyed passivity as indicated by lower breakdown potentials in polarization studies. This has been related to the finer distribution of the carbides in the microstructure. Corrosion rates were evaluated by immersion testing. The iron aluminide with Ce addition exhibited a lower corrosion rate compared to the aluminides without Ce addition. This has been attributed to modifications in surface film with Ce addition. Scanning electron microscopy of corroded surfaces indicated that the carbon-alloyed intermetallics were susceptible to localized galvanic corrosion due to the presence of carbides in the microstructure

  13. Corrosion behaviour of WC-Co based hardmetal in neutral chloride and acid sulphate media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozzini, B.; Serra, M.; Fanigliulo, A.; Bogani, F. [Lecce Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione; Gaudenzi, G.P. de [Harditalia s.r.l. (OMCD Group), Genova (Italy)

    2002-05-01

    A comparative study of the corrosion behaviour of WC-Co based hardmetals with Ni and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} additions is carried out. The aggressive environments are neutral and acidic aerated aqueous solutions of NaCl and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. This study is based on electrochemical (linear sweep voltammery), compositional (surface EDX analyses, AAS analyses of attack solutions), structural (XRD) and morphological (SEM) investigations. Electrochemical figures of merit were computed from linear sweep voltammograms in order to rank the corrosion behaviour close to free-immersion conditions in the studied environments and with presence of oxidising agents. EDX and XRD analyses allow to accurately characterise the penetration depth of the attack as well as the preferential dissolution of the constituents. Binders containing Ni show a significantly improved corrosion resistance in the studied systems. The amount of Ni in the binder is the single most important factor affecting corrosion performance. Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} additions to hardmetals with lower-Ni binders cannot balance the effect of Ni, but give an improved resistance in neutral chloride-containing solutions. (orig.)

  14. Sliding Wear Characteristics and Corrosion Behaviour of Selective Laser Melted 316L Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y.; Moroz, A.; Alrbaey, K.

    2014-02-01

    Stainless steel is one of the most popular materials used for selective laser melting (SLM) processing to produce nearly fully dense components from 3D CAD models. The tribological and corrosion properties of stainless steel components are important in many engineering applications. In this work, the wear behaviour of SLM 316L stainless steel was investigated under dry sliding conditions, and the corrosion properties were measured electrochemically in a chloride containing solution. The results show that as compared to the standard bulk 316L steel, the SLM 316L steel exhibits deteriorated dry sliding wear resistance. The wear rate of SLM steel is dependent on the vol.% porosity in the steel and by obtaining full density it is possible achieve wear resistance similar to that of the standard bulk 316L steel. In the tested chloride containing solution, the general corrosion behaviour of the SLM steel is similar to that of the standard bulk 316L steel, but the SLM steel suffers from a reduced breakdown potential and is more susceptible to pitting corrosion. Efforts have been made to correlate the obtained results with porosity in the SLM steel.

  15. Hot tensile behaviour in silicon-killed boron microalloyed steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chown, Lesley H.; Cornish, Lesley A.

    2017-10-01

    Low carbon steel for drawing and cold heading applications should have low strength, high ductility and low strain ageing rates. To achieve this, nitrogen must be removed from solid solution, which can be done by low additions of boron. A wire producer had been experiencing occasional problems with severe cracking on silicon-killed, boron steel billets during continuous casting, but the solution was not obvious. Samples from four billets, each from different casts, were removed for analysis and testing. The tested steel compositions were within the specification limits, with boron to nitrogen ratios of 0.40-1.19. Hot ductility testing was performed on a Gleeble 1500 using parameters approximating the capabilities of this particular billet caster. The steel specimens were subjected to in situ melting, then cooled at a rate of 2 C.s-1 to temperatures in the range 750-1250°C, where they were then pulled to failure at a strain rate of 8x10-4 s-1. In this work, it was found that both the boron to nitrogen ratio and the manganese to sulphur ratio influenced the hot ductility and hence the crack susceptibility. Excellent hot ductility was found for B:N ratios above 1.0, which confirmed that the B:N ratio should be above a stoichiometric value of 0.8 to remove all nitrogen from solid solution. TEM analysis showed that coarse BN precipitates nucleated on other precipitates, such as (Fe,Mn)S, which have relatively low melting points, and are detrimental to hot ductility. Low Mn:S ratios of 10 - 12 were shown to promote precipitation of FeS, so a Mn:S > 14 was recommended. A narrower billet surface temperature range for straightening was recommended to prevent transverse surface cracking. Additionally, analysis of industrial casting data showed that the scrap percentage due to transverse cracking increased significantly for Mn:S < 14. An exponential decay relationship between the manganese to sulphur ratio and the average scrap percentage due to transverse cracking was

  16. Corrosion behaviour of 8090 alloy in saline solution with moderate aggressiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conde, A.; Damborenea, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion studies of Al-Li alloys are not so extensive and concentrate almost exclusively on atmospheric exposure tests and accelerated laboratory tests due to the fact they provide a reasonable approximation to the real behaviour of the alloy in service conditions. This paper attempts to establish a correlation between the evolution of the impedance diagrams and the process of the attack undergone by a commercial 8090 T8171 alloy, with the aim of establishing the kinetics of the corrosion process. After 100 h of immersion, samples showed only a slight intergranular attack. As a results of the low aggressiveness of the solution no major deviations from the ideal behaviour described by the Randles circuit are expected in the impedance plots. After 50 hours of testing, the impedance diagram evolves towards two semicircles which seem to be related with the charge transfer and ionic migration through the oxide layer and the adsorption of electrolyte anions. (Author) 7 refs

  17. Electrochemical noise evaluation of anodized aluminum. Comparative study against corrosion behaviour in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betancourt, N.; Corvo, F.; Mendoza, A.; Simancas, J.; Morcillo, M.; Gonzalez, J. A.; Fragata, F.; Pena, J. J.; Sanchez de Villalaz, M.; Flores, S.; Almeida, E.; Rivero, S.; Rincon, O. T. de.

    2003-01-01

    The present work reports the evaluation of aluminum and anodized aluminum by electrochemical noise, as a part of the PATINE/CYTED project of the working group NS5. A visual examination is also made. The samples were exposed at several Ibero-American atmospheres up to 2 years of exposure. Different thickness of anodized aluminum were evaluated. The electrochemical potential noise of the 5 μm unexposed sample (pattern) showed a different behaviour to that showed by the other anodized specimens. This could be due to a slower sealed of the samples of higher thickness. The same behavior was observed on the samples exposed at the rural station. el Pardo. According to the visual examination, the samples of bare aluminum and those of anodized 5 μm thickness were the most affected by pitting corrosion in the highly polluted atmospheres. A good correlation between corrosion behaviour determined by visual examination and EN was obtained. (Author) 4 refs

  18. Inhibitive Behaviour of Corrosion of Aluminium Alloy in NaCl by Mangrove Tannin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solhan Yahya; Afidah Abdul Rahim; Affaizza Mohd Shah; Rohana Adnan

    2011-01-01

    Anticorrosion potential of mangrove tannins on aluminium alloys AA6061 in NaCl solution has been studied using potentiodynamic polarisation method and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The study was carried out in different pH of corrosive medium in the absence and presence of various concentrations of tannin. The corrosion inhibition behaviour of the mangrove tannin on AA6061 aluminium alloy corrosion was found to be dependant on the pH of NaCl solution. Our results showed that the inhibition efficiency increased with increasing tannins concentration in chloride solution at pH 6. Treatment of aluminium alloy 6061 with all concentrations of mangrove tannins reduced the current density, thus decreased the corrosion rate. Tannins behaved as mixed inhibitors at pH 6 and reduction in current density predominantly affected in cathodic reaction. Meanwhile, at pH 12, addition of tannins shifted the corrosion potential to more cathodic potentials and a passivating effect was observed in anodic potentials. SEM studies have shown that the addition of tannins in chloride solution at pH 12 reduced the surface degradation and the formation of pits. (author)

  19. Corrosion behaviour of 6063 aluminium alloy in acidic and in alkaline media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhu Deepa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of 6063 aluminium alloy was investigated in different concentrations of phosphoric acid medium and sodium hydroxide medium at different temperatures. The study was done by electrochemical method, using Tafel polarization technique and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS technique. The surface morphology was investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM with Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. The results showed that the 6063 aluminium alloy undergoes severe corrosion in sodium hydroxide medium than in phosphoric acid medium. The corrosion rate of 6063 aluminium alloy increased with an increase in the concentration of acid as well as with alkali. The corrosion rate was increased with an increase in temperature. The kinetic parameters and thermodynamic parameters were calculated using Arrhenius theory and transition state theory. Suitable mechanism was proposed for the corrosion of 6063 aluminium alloy in phosphoric acid medium and sodium hydroxide medium. The results obtained by Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS techniques were in good agreement with each other.

  20. The effect of PVD coatings on the corrosion behaviour of AZ91 magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altun, Hikmet; Sen, Sadri

    2006-01-01

    In this study, multilayered AlN (AlN + AlN + AlN) and AlN + TiN were coated on AZ91 magnesium alloy using physical vapour deposition (PVD) technique of DC magnetron sputtering, and the influence of the coatings on the corrosion behaviour of the AZ91 alloy was examined. A PVD system for coating processes, a potentiostat for electrochemical corrosion tests, X-ray difractometer for compositional analysis of the coatings, and scanning electron microscopy for surface examinations were used. It was determined that PVD coatings deposited on AZ91 magnesium alloy increased the corrosion resistance of the alloy, and AlN + AlN + AlN coating increased the corrosion resistance much more than AlN + TiN coating. However, it was observed that, in the coating layers, small structural defects e.g., pores, pinholes, cracks that could arise from the coating process or substrate and get the ability of protection from corrosion worsened were present

  1. Corrosion behaviour of boiler tube materials during combustion of fuels containing Zn and Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bankiewicz, D.

    2012-11-01

    Many power plants burning challenging fuels such as waste-derived fuels experience failures of the superheaters and/or increased waterwall corrosion due to aggressive fuel components already at low temperatures. To minimize corrosion problems in waste-fired boilers, the steam temperature is currently kept at a relatively low level which drastically limits power production efficiency. The elements found in deposits of waste and waste-derived fuels burning boilers that are most frequently associated with high-temperature corrosion are: Cl, S, and there are also indications of Br; alkali metals, mainly K and Na, and heavy metals such as Pb and Zn. The low steam pressure and temperature in waste-fired boilers also influence the temperature of the waterwall steel which is nowadays kept in the range of 300 deg C - 400 deg C. Alkali chloride (KCl, NaCl) induced high-temperature corrosion has not been reported to be particularly relevant at such low material temperatures, but the presence of Zn and Pb compounds in the deposits have been found to induce corrosion already in the 300 deg C - 400 deg C temperature range. Upon combustion, Zn and Pb may react with Cl and S to form chlorides and sulphates in the flue gases. These specific heavy metal compounds are of special concern due to the formation of low melting salt mixtures. These low melting, gaseous or solid compounds are entrained in the flue gases and may stick or condense on colder surfaces of furnace walls and superheaters when passing the convective parts of the boiler, thereby forming an aggressive deposit. A deposit rich in heavy metal (Zn, Pb) chlorides and sulphates increases the risk for corrosion which can be additionally enhanced by the presence of a molten phase. The objective of this study was to obtain better insight into high-temperature corrosion induced by Zn and Pb and to estimate the behaviour and resistance of some boiler superheater and waterwall materials in environments rich in those heavy metals

  2. Ductile Fracture Behaviour of Hot Isostatically Pressed Inconel 690 Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, A. J.; Brayshaw, W. J.; Sherry, A. H.

    2018-04-01

    Herein we assess the differences in Charpy impact behavior between Hot Isostatically Pressed and forged Inconel 690 alloy over the temperature range of 300 °C to - 196 °C. The impact toughness of forged 690 exhibited a relatively small temperature dependence, with a maximum difference of ca. 40 J measured between 300 °C and - 196 °C, whereas the HIP'd alloy exhibited a difference of approximately double that of the forged alloy over the same temperature range. We have conducted Charpy impact testing, tensile testing, and metallographic analyses on the as-received materials as well as fractography of the failed Charpy specimens in order to understand the mechanisms that cause the observed differences in material fracture properties. The work supports a recent series of studies which assess differences in fundamental fracture behavior between Hot Isostatically Pressed and forged austenitic stainless steel materials of equivalent grades, and the results obtained in this study are compared to those of the previous stainless steel investigations to paint a more general picture of the comparisons between HIP vs forged material fracture behavior. Inconel 690 was selected in this study since previous studies were unable to completely omit the effects of strain-induced martensitic transformation at the tip of the Chary V-notch from the fracture mechanism; Inconel 690 is unable to undergo strain-induced martensitic transformation due to the alloy's high nickel content, thereby providing a sister study with the omission of any martensitic transformation effects on ductile fracture behavior.

  3. Hot corrosion of arc ion plating NiCrAlY and sputtered nanocrystalline coatings on a nickel-based single-crystal superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jinlong; Chen, Minghui; Cheng, Yuxian; Yang, Lanlan; Bao, Zebin; Liu, Li; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •Hot corrosion of three metallic coatings was investigated. •NiCrAlY coating loses protectiveness against hot corrosion due to scale spallation. •The two nanocrystalline coatings perform better than NiCrAlY in hot corrosion. •Ta oxidation leads to scale pitting and corrosion of the nanocrystalline coating. •Y addition in the nanocrystalline coating reduces such harmful effect of Ta. -- Abstract: Hot corrosion in sulfate salt at 850 °C of three metallic coatings is investigated comparatively. The NiCrAlY coating loses its protectiveness after 200 h corrosion. Its oxide scale spalls off partly and becomes porous as a consequence of basic fluxing. The nanocrystalline coating (SN) performs better than the NiCrAlY one, but its scale is porous as well. Oxidation and/or sulfidation of Ta account for the formation of pores. The yttrium modified nanocrystalline coating (SNY) provides the highest corrosion resistance. Yttrium completely inhibits oxidation and sulfidation of Ta. Its scale is intact and adherent, and exclusively composted of alumina.

  4. A study on the corrosion test of equipment material handling hot molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Seung Gy; Jeong, M.S.; Hong, S.S.; Cho, S.H.; Shin, Y.J.; Park, H.S.; Zhang, J.S.

    1999-02-01

    On this technical report, corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels of SUS 316L and SUS 304L in molten salt of LiCl-Li 2 O has been investigated in the temperature range of 650 - 850 dg C. Corrosion products of SUS 316L in molten salt consisted of two layers, an outer layer of LiCrO 2 and inner layer of Cr 2 O 3 .The corrosion layer was uniform in molten salt of LiCl, but the intergranular corrosion occurred in addition to the uniform corrosion in mixed molten salt of LiCl-Li 2 O. The corrosion rate increased slowly with the increase of temperature up to 750 dg C, but above 750 dg C rapid increase in corrosion rate observed. SUS 316L stainless steel showed slower corrosion rate and higher activation energy for corrosion than SUS 304L, exhibiting higher corrosion resistance in the molten salt. In heat-resistant alloy, dense protective oxide scale of LiCrO 2 was formed in molten salt of LiCl. Whereas in mixed molten salt of LiCl-Li 2 O, porous non-protective scale of Li(Cr, Ni, Fe)O 2 was formed. (Author). 44 refs., 4 tabs., 16 figs

  5. Corrosion behaviour of hyper duplex stainless steel in various metallurgical conditions for sea water cooled condensers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Umesh Pratap; Kain, Vivekanand; Chandra, Kamlesh

    2011-01-01

    The sea water cooled condensers have to resist severe corrosion as marine environment is the most corrosive natural environment. Copper alloys are being phased out due to difficulties in water chemistry control and Titanium base alloys are extremely expensive. Austenitic stainless steels (SS) remain prone to localized corrosion in marine environments hence not suitable. These heat exchangers operate at temperatures not exceeding 50 deg C and at very low pressures. The tubes of these heat exchangers are joined to the carbon steel tube sheets by roll expansion or by roll expansion followed by seam welding. These conditions are expected to affect the localized corrosion resistance of the tube in roll joined region due to cold working and in the tube-tube sheet welded joint due to thermal effects of welding. In this study, the localized corrosion behaviour of a Hyper Duplex Stainless Steel (HDSS) has been evaluated, and compared with other materials e.g. types 304L SS, 316L SS, Duplex SS 2205, Titanium grade - 2, and Al Brass. The evaluation is done in three metallurgical conditions (a) as received, (b) cold rolled and (c) welded condition in synthetic sea water at room temperature and at 50 deg C to assess the resistance to crevice, pitting and stress corrosion cracking using standard ASTM exposure and electrochemical techniques. The results provide comparative assessment of these alloys and show their susceptibility in the three metallurgical conditions as encountered in condensers. Hyper-duplex SS has been shown to be highly resistant in sea water for the condenser tubing application. (author)

  6. Morphological characterisation and spectroscopic studies of the corrosion behaviour of tungsten heavy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogundipe, A.; Greenberg, B.; Braida, W.; Christodoulatos, C.; Dermatas, D.

    2006-01-01

    Tungsten-based alloys have been used in a wide variety of industrial and military applications. These alloys are composed mainly of tungsten (88-95%) with various combinations of nickel, cobalt, iron and copper usually making up the remaining fraction. The corrosion behaviours of five munitions grade tungsten alloys of interest have been examined using immersion tests and wet-dry cycle tests to determine the mechanisms involved in the release of the metallic components. Analyses carried out using SEM, EDS and grazing incidence XRD techniques, show the release of tungsten as well as alloying elements due to galvanic corrosion resulting from the difference in electrode potential between the tungsten phase and the binder phase in all cases studied. The extent of corrosion was directly related with the dissolution of tungsten in the binder phase during the sintering stage of manufacture. In W-Ni-Co-Fe alloys binder phase corrosion was observed while the relatively noble tungsten phase was less affected. The reverse was observed for a W-Cu alloy

  7. Comparative Studies on microstructure, mechanical and corrosion behaviour of DMR 249A Steel and its welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Dilkush; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    DMR249A Medium strength (low carbon) Low-alloy steels are used as structural components in naval applications due to its low cost and high availability. An attempt has been made to weld the DMR 249A steel plates of 8mm thickness using shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Welds were characterized for metallography to carry out the microstructural changes, mechanical properties were evaluated using vickers hardness tester and universal testing machine. Potentio-dynamic polarization tests were carried out to determine the pitting corrosion behaviour. Constant load type Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) testing was done to observe the cracking tendency of the joints in a 3.5%NaCl solution. Results of the present study established that SMA welds resulted in formation of relatively higher amount of martensite in ferrite matrix when compared to gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). It is attributed to faster cooling rates achieved due to high thermal efficiency. Improved mechanical properties were observed for the SMA welds and are due to higher amount of martensite. Pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking resistance of SMA welds were poor when compared to GTA welds.

  8. Cavitation erosion - corrosion behaviour of ASTM A27 runner steel in natural river water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tôn-Thât, L

    2014-01-01

    Cavitation erosion is still one of the most important degradation modes in hydraulic turbine runners. Part of researches in this field focuses on finding new materials, coatings and surface treatments to improve the resistance properties of runners to this phenomenon. However, only few studies are focused on the deleterious effect of the environment. Actually, in some cases a synergistic effect between cavitation erosion mechanisms and corrosion kinetics can establish and increase erosion rate. In the present study, the cavitation erosion-corrosion behaviour of ASTM A27 steel in natural river water is investigated. This paper state the approach which has been used to enlighten the synergy between both phenomena. For this, a 20 kHz vibratory test according ASTM G32 standard is coupled to an electrochemical cell to be able to follow the different corrosion parameters during the tests to get evidence of the damaging mechanism. Moreover, mass losses have been followed during the exposure time. The classical degradation parameters (cumulative weight loss and erosion rate) are determined. Furthermore, a particular effort has been implemented to determine the evolution of surface damages in terms of pitting, surface cracking, material removal and surface corrosion. For this, scanning electron microscopy has been used to link the microstructure to the material removal mechanisms

  9. Robust tribo-mechanical and hot corrosion resistance of ultra-refractory Ta-Hf-C ternary alloy films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yate, Luis; Coy, L Emerson; Aperador, Willian

    2017-06-08

    In this work we report the hot corrosion properties of binary and ternary films of the Ta-Hf-C system in V 2 O 5 -Na 2 SO 4 (50%wt.-50%wt.) molten salts at 700 °C deposited on AISI D3 steel substrates. Additionally, the mechanical and nanowear properties of the films were studied. The results show that the ternary alloys consist of solid solutions of the TaC and HfC binary carbides. The ternary alloy films have higher hardness and elastic recoveries, reaching 26.2 GPa and 87%, respectively, and lower nanowear when compared to the binary films. The corrosion rates of the ternary alloys have a superior behavior compared to the binary films, with corrosion rates as low as 0.058 μm/year. The combination and tunability of high hardness, elastic recovery, low nanowear and an excellent resistance to high temperature corrosion demonstrates the potential of the ternary Ta-Hf-C alloy films for applications in extreme conditions.

  10. The study of tribological and corrosion behavior of plasma nitrided 34CrNiMo6 steel under hot and cold wall conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniee, A.; Mahboubi, F.; Soleimani, R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 34CrNiMo6 steel was plasma nitrided under hot and cold wall conditions. • The amount of ε phase in hot wall condition was more than that of cold wall condition. • Wear resistance of hot wall nitrided samples was more than cold wall treated ones. • Hot wall nitriding provides better corrosion behavior than cold wall nitriding. - Abstract: This paper reports on a comparative study of tribological and corrosion behavior of plasma nitrided 34CrNiMo6 low alloy steel under modern hot wall condition and conventional cold wall condition. Plasma nitriding was carried out at 500 °C and 550 °C with a 25% N 2 + 75% H 2 gas mixture for 8 h. The wall temperature of the chamber in hot wall condition was set to 400 °C. The treated specimens were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), microhardness and surface roughness techniques. The wear test was performed by pin-on-disc method. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests were also used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of the samples. The results demonstrated that in both nitriding conditions, wear and corrosion resistance of the treated samples decrease with increasing temperature from 500 °C to 550 °C. Moreover, nitriding under hot wall condition at the same temperature provided slightly better tribological and corrosion behavior in comparison with cold wall condition. In consequence, the lowest friction coefficient, and highest wear and corrosion resistance were found on the sample treated under hot wall condition at 500 °C, which had the maximum surface hardness and ε-Fe 2–3 N phase

  11. Long-term corrosion behaviour of low-/medium-level waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jendras, M.; Bach, F.W.; Behrens, S.; Birr, Ch.; Hassel, Th.

    2009-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Storage of low- and medium-level radioactive waste requires safe packages. This means that all materials used for the manufacturing of such packages have to show a sufficient resistance especially against corrosive attacks. Since these packages are generally made from carbon steel an additional coating for corrosion protection - mainly solvent-based polymers - is necessary. However, it is not enough to consider the selection and combination of the materials. Regarding the construction and manufacturing of corrosion-resistant drums for low- and medium-level radioactive waste there also has to be paid closer attention to the joining technologies such as welding. For lifetime prediction of low-/medium-level waste packages reliable experimental data concerning the long-term corrosion behaviour of each material as well as of the components is needed. Therefore sheet metals from carbon steel were galvanized or coated with different solvent-based and water-based corrosion protection materials (epoxy as well as silicone resins). After damaging the anti-corrosion coating of some of these sheets with predefined scratches sets of these samples were stored at higher temperatures in climatic chamber, in simulated waste or aged according to standard DIN EN ISO 9227. All corrosion damages were analyzed by means of metallography (light microscopy as well as scanning electron microscopy of micro-sections). The quantitative influence of the corrosive attacks on the mechanical properties of the materials was examined by mechanical testing according to DIN EN 10002. Besides reduction of tensile strength drastic reduction of percentage of elongation after fracture (from 30 % to 10 %) was found. Further experiments were carried out using components or scaled-down drums joined by means of innovative welding techniques such as Cold Arc or Force Arc. The relevant welding parameters (e.g. welding current, proper volume of shielding gas or wire feed) were

  12. Effect of Iron-Containing Intermetallic Particles on the Corrosion Behaviour of Aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan

    2006-01-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the corrosion behaviour of binary Al-Fe alloys containing iron at levels between 0.04 and 0.42 wt.% was investigated by electrochemical measurements in both acidic and alkaline chloride solutions. Comparing solution heat-treated and quenched materials with samples...... with {100} facets, and are observed to contain numerous intermetallic particles. Fine facetted filaments also radiate out from the periphery of pits. The results demonstrate that the corrosion of "pure" 99.96% Al is thus dominated by the role of iron, which is the main impurity, and its electrochemical...... that had been subsequently annealed to promote precipitation of Al3Fe intermetallic particles, it was found that annealing increases both the cathodic and anodic reactivity. The increased cathodic reactivity is believed to be directly related to the increased available surface area of the iron...

  13. Effect of Mg on the Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of the Continuously Hot-Dip Galvanizing Zn-Mg Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anping Dong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of continuously hot-dip galvanizing Zn-Mg coating was investigated in order to obtain the mechanism of the effects of Mg on the corrosion resistance. In this paper, the vertical section of the Zn-0.20 wt % Al-Mg ternary phase diagram near the Al-low corner was calculated. The results indicates that the phase composition of the Zn-0.20 wt % Al-Mg ternary phase diagram near the Al-low corner is the same as Zn-Mg binary phase diagram, suggesting Al in the Zn-Mg (ZM coatings mainly concentrates on the interfacial layer between the coating and steel substrate. The microstructure of continuously hot-dip galvanizing ZM coatings with 0.20 wt % Al containing 1.0–3.0 wt % Mg was investigated using tunneling electron microscopy (TEM. The morphology of Zn in the coating changes from bulk to strip and finally to mesh-like, and the MgZn2 changes from rod-like to mesh-like with the Mg content increasing. Al in the ZM coatings mainly segregates at the Fe2Al5 inhibition layer and the Mg added to the Zn bath makes this inhibition layer thinner and uneven. Compared to GI coating, the time of the first red rust appears increases by more than two-fold and expansion rate of red rust reduces by more than four-fold in terms of salt spray experiment. The ZM coating containing 2.0 wt % Mg has the best corrosion resistance. The enhanced corrosion resistance of ZM coatings mainly depends on different corrosion products.

  14. Microstructure and hot corrosion behavior of the Ni-based superalloy GH202 treated by laser shock processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Jiangdong [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Mechanical and Electrical Department, Nantong Shipping College, Nantong, Jiangsu 226010 (China); Zhang, Junsong [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Hua, Yinqun, E-mail: huayq@ujs.edu.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Chen, Ruifang [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Li, Zhibao [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Ye, Yunxia [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China)

    2017-03-15

    The effects of laser shock processing on microstructure, the residual stress, and hot corrosion behavior of the Ni-based superalloy GH202 were investigated. The microstructures of GH202 before and after laser shock processing (LSP) were characterized by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). A large number of crystal defects (twins, dislocation arrays, and high dense tangles) were generated on the surface of GH202 treated with LSP. The cross-sectional compressive residual stress and micro-hardness of specimens treated by LSP were improved significantly. The corrosion kinetics of GH202 with or without LSP treatment at 800 °C and 900 °C were investigated. Analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that the corrosion products mainly consist of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, NiO, CrS, Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}, and Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}. The surface and cross-section morphologies were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results confirmed that the crystal defects induced by LSP promotes the creation of diffusion paths for elements (Cr, Al, and Ti), allowing the formation of tiny homogeneous oxidation films in a very short time. Additionally, the spallation of oxidation film on the treated specimens was alleviated significantly. Overall, the hot corrosion resistance of Ni-based GH202 induced by LSP was improved in Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaCl molten salt from 800 °C to 900 °C. - Highlights: • Microstructure changes of GH202 before and after LSP were observed by EBSD and TEM. • The hardness and residual compressive stress after LSP were significantly increased. • The increased diffusion paths for elements helped to form oxidation films quickly. • Hot corrosion resistance of GH202 after LSP was significantly improved.

  15. On the corrosion behaviour of phosphoric irons in simulated concrete pore solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Gadadhar; Balasubramaniam, R.

    2008-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of three phosphoric irons P 1 (Fe-0.11P-0.028C), P 2 (Fe-0.32P-0.026C) and P 3 (Fe-0.49P-0.022C) has been studied in simulated concrete pore solution (saturated Ca(OH) 2 solution) containing different chloride concentration. This has been compared with that of two commercial concrete reinforcement steels, a low carbon steel TN (Fe-0.148C-0.542Mn-0.128Si) and a microalloyed corrosion resistant steel CS (Fe-0.151C-0.088P-0.197Si-0.149Cr-0.417Cu). The beneficial aspect of phosphoric irons was revealed from potentiodynamic polarization experiments. The pitting potentials and pitting nucleation resistances for phosphoric irons and CS were higher than that for TN. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies revealed thickening and growth of passive film as a function of time in case of phosphoric irons and CS in saturated Ca(OH) 2 pore solutions without chloride and in the same solution with 0.05% Cl - and 0.1% Cl - . In case of TN, breakdown of passive film resulted in active corrosion in simulated pore solution containing 0.1% Cl - . Linear polarization resistance measurements complemented EIS results. Visual observations indicated that phosphoric iron P 3 was immune to corrosion even after 125 days of immersion in saturated Ca(OH) 2 solution containing 5% NaCl. The good corrosion resistance of phosphoric irons in simulated concrete pore solution containing chloride ions has been related to the formation of phosphate, based on ultraviolet spectrophotometric analysis and Pourbaix diagram of phosphorus-water system

  16. Corrosion behaviour of E110- and E635- type zirconium alloys under PWR irradiation simulating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markelov, V.A.; Novikov, V.V.; Kon'kov, V.F.; Tselishchev, A.V.; Dologov, A.B.; Zmitko, M.; Maserik, V.; Kocik, J.

    2008-01-01

    As structural materials for VVER 1000 fuel rod claddings and FA components use is made of zirconium alloys E110 (Zr 1Nb) and E635 (Zr 1.2Sn 1Nb 0.35Fe) that meet the design parameters of operation. Nonetheless, the work is in progress to perfect those alloys to reach higher corrosion and shape change resistance. At VNIINM updated E110M and E635M alloys have been developed on E110 and E635 bases. To assess the corrosion behaviour of the updated alloys in comparison to the base alloys their cladding samples were tested in RVS 3 loop of LWR 15 reactor (NRI, Rez) in PWR water chemistry with coolant surface and volume boiling. The data are presented on the influence effected by in pile irradiation for up to 324 days on oxide coat thickness and microstructure of fuel claddings produced from the four tested alloys. It has been revealed that E110 alloy its updated version E110M and E635M alloy compared to E635 have higher corrosion resistances. The paper discusses th+e results on the in pile corrosion of cladding samples from the alloys under study in comparison to the results acquired for similar samples tested in LWR 15 inactive channel and under autoclave conditions. Using methods of TEM, EDX analyses of extraction replicas dislocation structure and phase composition changes were studied in samples of all four alloy claddings LWR 15 reactor irradiated to the material damage dose of 1.5 dpa. The interrelation is discussed between irradiation effected strengthening and corrosion of fuel claddings made of E110 and E635 type zirconium alloys and the evolution of their structure and phase states

  17. Study of Hot Salt Stress Corrosion Crack Initiation of Alloy IMI 834 by using DC Potential Drop Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pustode, Mangesh D. [Bharat Forge Ltd., Pune (India); Dewangan, Bhupendra [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India); Raja, V. S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai (India); Paulose, Neeta; Babu, Narendra [Gas Turbine Research Establishment (GTRE), Bangalore (India)

    2016-10-15

    DC potential drop technique was employed during the slow strain rate tests to study the hot salt stress corrosion crack (HSSCC) initiation at 300 and 400 ℃. Threshold stresses for HSSCC initiation were found to about 88 % of the yield strength at both temperatures, but the time from crack initiation to final failure (Δtscc) decreased significantly with temperature, which reflects larger tendency for brittle fracture and secondary cracking. The brittle fracture features consisted of transgranular cracking through the primary α grain and discontinuous faceted cracking through the transformed β grains.

  18. Corrosion behaviour of Al-Fe-Ti-V medium entropy alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodunrin, M. O.; Obadele, B. A.; Chown, L. H.; Olubambi, P. A.

    2017-12-01

    Alloys containing up to four multi-principal elements in equiatomic ratios are referred to as medium entropy alloys (MEA). These alloys have attracted the interest of many researchers due to the superior mechanical properties it offers over the traditional alloys. The design approach of MEA often results to simple solid solution with either body centered cubic; face centered cubic structures or both. As the consideration for introducing the alloys into several engineering application increases, there have been efforts to study the corrosion behaviour of these alloys. Previous reports have shown that some of these alloys are more susceptible to corrosion when compared with traditional alloys due to lack of protective passive film. In this research, we have developed AlFeTiV medium entropy alloys containing two elements (Ti and Al) that readily passivate when exposed to corrosive solutions. The alloys were produced in vacuum arc furnace purged with high purity argon. Open circuit potential and potentiodynamic polarisation tests were used to evaluate the corrosion behaviour of the as-cast AlFeTiV alloy in 3.5 wt% NaCl and 1 M H2SO4. The corrosion performance of the alloy was compared with Ti-6Al-4V alloy tested under similar conditions. The results show that unlike in Ti-6Al-4V alloy, the open circuit potential of the AlFeTiV alloy move towards the negative values in both 3.5 wt% NaCl and 1 M H2SO4 solutions indicating that self-activation occurred rapidly on immersion. Anodic polarisation of the alloys showed that AlFeTiV alloy exhibited a narrow range of passivity in both solutions. In addition, the alloys exhibited lower Ecorr and higher Icorr when compared with traditional Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The traditional Ti-6Al-4V alloy showed superior corrosion resistant to the AlFeTiV alloy in both 3.5 wt.% NaCl and 1 M H2SO4 solutions.

  19. Corrosion behaviour of low alloy steels: from ancient past to far future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santarini, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA-Saclay DEN/DPC, Bat 450, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    With the envisaged concepts of long term storage and underground disposal of high level radioactive waste, corrosion science has to face a new challenge: to obtain reliable behaviour predictions over very long periods of time, up to thousands of years. For such durations, the development of mechanistically based models becomes an absolute necessity. In France, the first candidate materials considered for the containers of high level waste are low alloy steels because of their relatively low sensitivity to localized corrosion, when compared, for example, to passive materials: this characteristics makes their corrosion behaviour less difficult to predict. In this mechanistic modelling, numerous physicochemical steps have to be taken into consideration, such as chemical and/or electrochemical reactions, solid state diffusion of point defects, liquid state diffusion of chemical species in oxide pores, etc. However, since the complex links between all these steps highly depend on the nature and on the characteristics (porosity, conductivity, protectiveness, etc.) of the corrosion products, the first stage before the model construction is to obtain experimental data on this phenomenology in the very near environment of the metal. At the opposite, once a model constructed, it is necessary to compare its predictions to field experience, and to verify that the mechanisms and phenomenology retained in the model remain unchanged over very long periods of time. In the various stages of a progressive iterative model improvement, the examination of archaeological objects is liable to provide useful information. The considerable interest of such objects, in this context, comes from the long duration of the contact with a natural environment, a duration of the same order of magnitude as the one considered for high level waste storage. However, the differences between the ancient materials and the modern ones and also the poor knowledge about the initial conditions and about the

  20. A Comparative Study of Cyclic Oxidation and Sulfates-Induced Hot Corrosion Behavior of Arc-Sprayed Ni-Cr-Ti Coatings at Moderate Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenmin; Wu, Yuping; Zhang, Jianfeng; Hong, Sheng; Chen, Liyan; Qin, Yujiao

    2015-06-01

    The cyclic oxidation and sulfates-induced hot corrosion behaviors of a Ni-43Cr-0.3Ti arc-sprayed coating at 550-750 °C were characterized and compared in this study. In general, all the oxidation and hot corrosion kinetic curves of the coating followed a parabolic law, i.e., the weight of the specimens showed a rapid growth initially and then reached the gradual state. However, the initial stage of the hot corrosion process was approximately two times longer than that of the oxidation process, indicating a longer preparation time required for the formation of a protective scale in the former process. At 650 °C, the parabolic rate constant for the hot corrosion was 7.2 × 10-12 g2/(cm4·s), approximately 1.7 times higher than that for the oxidation at the same temperature. The lower parabolic rate constant for the oxidation was mainly attributed to the formation of a protective oxide scale on the surface of corroded specimens, which was composed of a mixture of NiO, Cr2O3, and NiCr2O4. However, as the liquid molten salts emerged during the hot corrosion, these protective oxides would be dissolved and the coating was corrupted acceleratedly.

  1. Characterization of the behaviour of electro-galvanised steel sheets in terms of corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finoly, Guylene

    1992-01-01

    This research thesis reports the development of a test method for the characterization of the behaviour of electro-galvanised steel sheets (i.e. zinc coated steel sheets as those used in the automotive industry) with respect to corrosion, and the definition of a classification of these materials with respect to their surface activity. After an overview of the different existing methods of determination of corrosion rate, the author reports the development of an experimental device adapted to the electrochemical study of electro-galvanised sheets, i.e. adapted to their low thickness (0,7 mm) and coating characteristics (10 μm thick). This device is then used in the case of solid zinc. The authors reports the study of the behaviour of sheets in a NaCl solution in order to meet industrial conditions used to activate the surface before the phosphate conversion process which aims at ensuring paint adherence. A test is proposed and validated by comparison with other electrochemical or chemical methods, and used to study the behaviour of electro-galvanised sheets submitted to a phosphate conversion coating process [fr

  2. In vitro corrosion behaviour of Ti-Nb-Sn shape memory alloys in Ringer's physiological solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosalbino, F; Macciò, D; Scavino, G; Saccone, A

    2012-04-01

    The nearly equiatomic Ni-Ti alloy (Nitinol) has been widely employed in the medical and dental fields owing to its shape memory or superelastic properties. The main concern about the use of this alloy derives form the fact that it contains a large amount of nickel (55% by mass), which is suspected responsible for allergic, toxic and carcinogenic reactions. In this work, the in vitro corrosion behavior of two Ti-Nb-Sn shape memory alloys, Ti-16Nb-5Sn and Ti-18Nb-4Sn (mass%) has been investigated and compared with that of Nitinol. The in vitro corrosion resistance was assessed in naturally aerated Ringer's physiological solution at 37°C by corrosion potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements as a function of exposure time, and potentiodynamic polarization curves. Corrosion potential values indicated that both Ni-Ti and Ti-Nb-Sn alloys undergo spontaneous passivation due to spontaneously formed oxide film passivating the metallic surface, in the aggressive environment. It also indicated that the tendency for the formation of a spontaneous oxide is greater for the Ti-18Nb-5Sn alloy. Significantly low anodic current density values were obtained from the polarization curves, indicating a typical passive behaviour for all investigated alloys, but Nitinol exhibited breakdown of passivity at potentials above approximately 450 mV(SCE), suggesting lower corrosion protection characteristics of its oxide film compared to the Ti-Nb-Sn alloys. EIS studies showed high impedance values for all samples, increasing with exposure time, indicating an improvement in corrosion resistance of the spontaneous oxide film. The obtained EIS spectra were analyzed using an equivalent electrical circuit representing a duplex structure oxide film, composed by an outer and porous layer (low resistance), and an inner barrier layer (high resistance) mainly responsible for the alloys corrosion resistance. The resistance of passive film present on the metals' surface

  3. Corrosion behaviour of container materials for geological disposal of high-level waste. Joint annual progress report 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Within the framework of the Community R and D programme on management and storage of radioactive waste (shared-cost action), a research activity is aiming at the assessment of corrosion behaviour of potential container materials for geological disposal of vitrified high-level wastes. In this report, the results obtained during the year 1983 are described. Research performed at the Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie/Centre d'Etudes de l'Energie Nucleaire (SCK/CEN) at Mol (B), concerns the corrosion behaviour in clay environments. The behaviour in salt is tested by the Kernforschungszentrum (KfK) at Karlsruhe (D). Corrosion behaviour in granitic environments is being examined by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) at Fontenay-aux-Roses (F) and the Atomic Energy Research Establishment (AERE) at Harwell (UK); the first is concentrating on corrosion-resistant materials and the latter on corrosion-allowance materials. Finally, the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) at Vitry (F) is examining the formation and behaviour of passive layers on the metal alloys in the various environments

  4. Sulphide stress corrosion behaviour of a nickel coated high-strength low-alloyed steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvago, G; Fumagalli, G; Cigada, A; Scolari, P

    1987-01-01

    The sulphide stress corrosion cracking (SSCC) of the quenched and tempered AISI 4137 H steel either bare or coated with nickel alloys was examined. Both traditional electrochemical and linear elastic fracture mechanics methods were used to examine cracking in the NACE environment and in environments simulating the geothermal fluids found in the area of Larderello in Italy. Some tests were carried out on a geothermal well in Ferrara. High nickel content coatings seem to increase the SSCC resistance of the AISI 4137-H steel. Galvanic couplings effects are possible factors responsible for the behaviour in SSCC.

  5. Strength and corrosion behavior of SiC - based ceramics in hot coal combustion environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breder, K.; Parten, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    As part of an effort to evaluate the use of advanced ceramics in a new generation of coal-fired power plants, four SiC-based ceramics have been exposed to corrosive coal slag in a laboratory furnace and two pilot scale combustors. Initial results indicate that the laboratory experiments are valuable additions to more expensive pilot plant experiments. The results show increased corrosive attack with increased temperature, and that only slight changes in temperature may significantly alter the degree of strength degradation due to corrosive attack. The present results are part of a larger experimental matrix evaluating the behavior of ceramics in the coal combustion environment.

  6. Simulation of the hot flow behaviour of a medium carbon microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera, J.M.; Al Omar, A.; Prado, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    According to the part 1 of this work the constitutive equations of the hot flow behaviour of a commercial microalloyed steel have been obtained. For this purpose, the uniaxial hot compression tests described in the part 2 were employed. Tests were carried out over a range of 5 orders of magnitude in strain rate and 300 degree centigree of temperature. Experimental results are compared with the theoretical model introduced in the first part of this study. It is concluded that deviations between experimental and theoretical curves are lower than 10%. It is shown that the classical hyperbolic sine constitutive equation described accurately the experimental behaviour provided that stresses are normalized by the Young's modulus and strain rates by the self-diffusion coefficient. An internal stress must also be introduced in the latter equation when the initial grain size is fine enough. (Author) 24 refs

  7. Behaviour and damage of a superalloy prepared by hot isostatic compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubiez-Le-Goff, Sophie

    2003-01-01

    This work deals with the behavior and damage of Udimet 720 superalloy prepared by hot isostatic compression. This alloy is considered for manufacturing turbine disks of high temperature reactors (HTR). The material choice for HTR turbine disk depends on the following criteria: a good creep resistance until 700 C, a good behaviour under an helium impure atmosphere, a possible implementation under a disk of 1.5 m diameter. (author) [fr

  8. Effect of antimony, bismuth and calcium addition on corrosion and electrochemical behaviour of AZ91 magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Wei; Aung, Naing Naing; Sun Yangshan

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of antimony, bismuth and calcium addition on the corrosion and electrochemical behaviour of AZ91 magnesium alloy in 3.5% NaCl solution. Techniques including constant immersion, electrochemical potentiodynamic polarisation, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersed spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterise electrochemical and corrosion properties and surface topography. It was found that corrosion attack occurred preferentially on Mg 3 Bi 2 and Mg 3 Sb 2 particles while Mg 17 Al 8 Ca 0.5 and Mg 2 Ca phases showed no detrimental effect on corrosion. Combined addition of small amounts of bismuth and antimony to the AZ91 alloy resulted in significant increase in corrosion rate

  9. Hot corrosion resistance of a Pb-Sb alloy for lead acid battery grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osorio, Wislei R.; Garcia, Amauri [Department of Materials Engineering, University of Campinas - UNICAMP, PO Box 6122, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Aoki, Claudia S.C. [Research and Development Centre - CPqD Foundation, Rod. Campinas/Mogi, km 118.5, 13086-912 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the microstructural morphologies of a Pb-6.6 wt%Sb alloy on the resulting corrosion resistance in a 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution at different temperatures: environment temperature, 50 C and 70 C. A water-cooled unidirectional solidification system was employed permitting a wide range of microstructures to be analyzed. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) diagrams, potentiodynamic polarization curves and an equivalent circuit analysis were used to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the Pb-Sb alloy samples. It was found that with increasing temperatures the general corrosion resistance of Pb-Sb dendritic alloys decreases, and that independently of the working temperature finer dendritic spacings exhibit better corrosion resistance than coarser ones. (author)

  10. Corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, A.S.; Totlani, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion has always been associated with structures, plants, installations and equipment exposed to aggressive environments. It effects economy, safety and product reliability. Monitoring of component corrosion has thus become an essential requirement for the plant health and safety. Protection methods such as appropriate coatings, cathodic protection and use of inhibitors have become essential design parameters. High temperature corrosion, especially hot corrosion, is still a difficult concept to accommodate in corrosion allowance; there is a lack of harmonized system of performance testing of materials at high temperatures. In order to discuss and deliberate on these aspects, National Association for Corrosion Engineers International organised a National Conference on Corrosion and its Control in Bombay during November 28-30, 1995. This volume contains papers presented at the symposium. Paper relevant to INIS is indexed separately. refs., figs., tabs

  11. Construction of an external electrode for determination of electrochemical corrosion potential in normal operational conditions of an BWR type reactor for hot cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar T, J.A.; Rivera M, H.; Hernandez C, R.

    2001-01-01

    The behavior of the corrosion processes at high temperature requires of external devices that being capable to resist a temperature of 288 Centigrade and a pressure of 80 Kg/cm 2 , to give stable and reproducible results of some variable and resisting physically and chemically the radiation. The external electrode of Ag/AgCl fulfils all the requirements in the determination of the electrochemical corrosion potential under normal operational conditions of a BWR type reactor in hot cells. (Author)

  12. Critical analyses on the localized corrosion behaviour in materials of energetic interests: Inconcel 600 CSM and Deltacogne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borello, A.; Frangini, S.; Masci, D.

    1989-06-01

    Concerning the two commonly observed phenomena of localized corrosion of Inconel 600 in high temperature caustic environments normally encountered in steam generators of PWR nuclear reactors, the aim of this work is to investigate the intergranular and the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of two heats of Alloy 600, having different origin. In fact one heat was produced by Centro Sviluppo Materiali (CSM) in laboratory scale; the other one was manufactured by Deltacogne following conventional industrial practices. The evaluation of intergranular corrosion susceptibility has been performed by means of the modified Huey test and the Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (EPR). The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility was determined by the slow strain rate technique. The results of the present study show that the CSM heat has a better behaviour than the Deltacogne one as for the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. On the contrary, concerning the intergranular corrosion resistance, both used tests point out that the Deltacogne material has a lower susceptibility to this type of localized corrosion. The sensitization areas in the TTS diagram, depend, even for the same heat, on the type of the test used for the evaluation. (author)

  13. Effect of cerium conversion of A3xx.x/SiCp composites surfaces on salt fog corrosion behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Arrabal, R.; Viejo, F.; Carboneras, M.; Coy, A.E. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Merino, S. [Departamento de Tecnologia Industrial, Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio, 28691, Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    A study of the effect of cerium conversion treatment on surface of four composites (A360/SiC/10p, A360/SiC/20p, A380/SiC/10p, A380/SiC/20p) on their salt fog corrosion behaviour was performed. The conversion treatment was carried out using thermal activated full immersion in Ce(III) aqueous solutions. The matrix of A360/SiC/xxp composites is virtually free of Cu while the A380/SiC/xxp matrix contains 1.39-1.44 wt.%Ni and 3.13-3.45 wt.%Cu. Conversion performance was evaluated in neutral salt fog environment according to ASTM B117. The kinetics of the corrosion process were studied on the basis of gravimetric tests. The influence of SiCp proportion and matrix composition was evaluated and the nature of corrosion products was analysed by SEM and low angle XRD before and after accelerated testing to determine the influence of microstructural changes on corrosion behaviour during exposure to the corrosive environment. The Ce(III) precipitates on the cathodic sites, mainly on the intermetallic compounds, decreased both the cathodic current density and the corrosion rate of the composites tested. The presence of Cu in the matrix composition increased the corrosion rate, due to the galvanic couple Al/Cu. (authors)

  14. Hot Corrosion of Yttrium Stabilized Zirconia Coatings Deposited by Air Plasma Spray on a Nickel-Based Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, N. Diaz; Sanchez, O.; Caicedo, J. C.; Aperador, W.; Zambrano, G.

    In this research, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Tafel analysis were utilized to study the hot corrosion performance at 700∘C of air plasma-sprayed (APS) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings with a NiCrAlY bond coat grown by high velocity oxygen fuel spraying (HVOF), deposited on an INCONEL 625 substrate, in contact with corrosive solids salts as vanadium pentoxide V2O5 and sodium sulfate Na2SO4. The EIS data were interpreted based on proposed equivalent electrical circuits using a suitable fitting procedure performed with Echem AnalystTM Software. Phase transformations and microstructural development were examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), with Rietveld refinement for quantitative phase analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to determinate the coating morphology and corrosion products. The XRD analysis indicated that the reaction between sodium vanadate (NaVO3) and yttrium oxide (Y2O3) produces yttrium vanadate (YVO4) and leads to the transformation from tetragonal to monoclinic zirconia phase.

  15. Hot corrosion behavior of nanostructured Gd2O3 doped YSZ thermal barrier coating in presence of Na2SO4 + V2O5 molten salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixiong Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nickel-based superalloy DZ125 was first sprayed with a NiCrAlY bond coat and followed with a nanostructured 2 mol% Gd2O3−4.5 mol% Y2O3-ZrO2 (2GdYSZ topcoat using air plasma spraying (APS. Hot corrosion behavior of the as-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs were investigated in the presence of 50 wt% Na2SO4 + 50 wt% V2O5 as the corrosive molten salt at 900 °C for 100 h. The analysis results indicate that Gd doped YVO4 and m-ZrO2 crystals were formed as corrosion products due to the reaction of the corrosive salts with stabilizers (Y2O3, Gd2O3 of zirconia. Cross-section morphology shows that a thin layer called TGO was formed at the bond coat/topcoat interface. After hot corrosion test, the proportion of m-ZrO2 phase in nanostructured 2GdYSZ coating is lower than that of nano-YSZ coating. The result reveals that nanostructured 2GdYSZ coating exhibits a better hot corrosion resistance than nano-YSZ coating.

  16. Microstructure and hot corrosion behaviors of two Co modified aluminide coatings on a Ni-based superalloy at 700 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Q.X.; Jiang, S.M.; Yu, H.J.; Gong, J.; Sun, C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Microstructures of two Co modified NiAl coatings have been studied. • The addition of Co improves the corrosion resistance in sulfate salts at 700 °C. • For the sulfide and its eutectic of Co are more stable than those of Ni. • In chloride salts coating with medium Co content has best corrosion resistance. - Abstract: Two Co modified aluminide coatings with different Co contents were prepared by pack cementation process and above-the-pack process. The hot corrosion tests of the two coatings were performed in mixed salts of 75 wt.% Na 2 SO 4 + 25 wt.% K 2 SO 4 and 75 wt.% Na 2 SO 4 + 25 wt.% NaCl at 700 °C, with a simple aluminide coating as the reference coating. X-Ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) were used to characterize the coatings and the corrosion scales. Results indicate that the addition of Co improves the hot corrosion resistance of the simple aluminide coating in the mixed sulfate salts, for the sulfide as well as its eutectic of cobalt are more stable, and possess higher melting points than those of nickel. While in the mixed salt containing chloride, the coating with medium Co content possesses the best corrosion resistance, primarily because the nitrides formed in the deposition process deteriorate the corrosion resistance of the coating with highest Co content

  17. Corrosion behavior of ODS steels with several chromium contents in hot nitric acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanno, Takashi; Takeuchi, Masayuki; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Kaito, Takeji

    2017-10-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel cladding tubes have been developed for fast reactors. Tempered martensitic ODS steels with 9 and 11 wt% of chromium (9Cr-, 11Cr-ODS steel) are the candidate material in research being carried out at JAEA. In this work, fundamental immersion tests and electrochemical tests of 9 to 12Cr-ODS steels were systematically conducted in various nitric acid solutions at 95 °C. The corrosion rate decreased exponentially with effective solute chromium concentration (Creff) and nitric acid concentration. Addition of vanadium (V) and ruthenium (Ru) also decreased the corrosion rate. The combination of low Creff and dilute nitric acid could not avoid the active mass dissolution during active domain at the beginning of immersion, and the corrosion rate was high. Higher Creff decreased the partial anodic current during the active domain and assisted the passivation of the surface of the steel. Concentrated nitric acid and addition of Ru and V increased partial cathodic current and shifted the corrosion potential to noble side. These effects should have prevented the active mass dissolution and decreased the corrosion rate.

  18. A computer analysis code of radioactive corrosion product behaviour in primary circuits of LMFBRs (PSYCHE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizawa, Katsuyuki; Seki, Seiichi; Kawasaki, Yuji; Kano, Shigeki; Nihei, Isao

    1986-01-01

    Recently it has become an important subject to reduce exposure to radiation from radioactive corrosion products (CPs) during maintenance and repair works in reactor plants. Metallic sodium is used as cooling material in fast reactor plants, leading to different CP behaviours compared to light water reactors. In the present study, a computer code for analyzing behaviours of CPs in fast reactor plants is developed. The analysis code, called PSYCHE, makes it possible to perform consistent analysis of production, migration and deposition of CPs in primary circuits together with dose rate around piping of apparatus in cooling systems. An analysis model is developed based on test results on CP behaviour in out-pile sodium. The model, called the ''dissolution-deposition model'', can reproduce atom-selective behaviour, transient phenomenon and downstream effect of CPs, which represent mass transfer phenomena in sodium. Verification of this code is carried out on the basis of CP measurements made in ''Joyo''. The calculation vs. measurement ratio is found to be 0.5 - 2 for CP deposition density in piping for cooling systems and 0.7 - 1.3 for dose rate, demonstrating that this code can give reasonable results. Analysis is also made to predict future changes in total amount of deposited CP in ''Joyo''. (Nogami, K.)

  19. Corrosivity of hot flue gases in the fluidized bed combustion of recovered waste wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enestam, S.

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, recovered waste wood has become a fuel of interest due to its green energy benefits and low price compared to virgin wood-based fuels. However, waste wood is often contaminated with paint, plastic, and metal components, producing concentrations of heavy metals such as zinc and lead, chlorine, sodium, and sometimes sulphur that are elevated relative to those in virgin wood. In several cases, boilers burning waste wood have experienced increased fouling and corrosion of furnace walls, superheaters, and economizers, problems associated with chlorine, zinc, lead, and alkali metals in the deposits. The location of the deposits and the corrosion as well as the composition of the deposits vary with the fuel composition, boiler design, combustion parameters, flue gas temperature, and material temperature. Experience gained from the operation of biofuel and waste boilers shows that corrosion damage can be reduced, or even avoided, by the selection of optimum materials or for heat exchanger surfaces, by the use of fuel mixtures or additives that decrease the corrosivity of the combustion environment, by the placement of superheaters in a less corrosive environment, and by adjusting the steam parameters. Finding the right solutions for boilers burning RWW requires a thorough understanding of the whole process, including the fuel fed into the boiler, the combustion atmosphere, the corrosivity of the flue gas and the deposits, and the corrosion resistance of different boiler materials under the prevailing conditions. The objective of this work was to shed more light on the combustion environment in bubbling fluidized bed boilers burning RWW and thus increase knowledge about the corrosivity of zinc- and lead-rich deposits formed during the combustion of RWW, with the final goal of developing a corrosion prediction tool for use in the design of boilers for RWW combustion. With such a tool, it would be possible to optimize boiler design and material selection with

  20. A study on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in hot alkaline-sulfide solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasse, Kevin Robert

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) generally have superior strength and corrosion resistance as compared to most standard austenitic and ferritic stainless grades owing to a balanced microstructure of austenite and ferrite. As a result of having favorable properties, DSS have been selected for the construction of equipment in pulp and paper, chemical processing, nuclear, oil and gas as well as other industries. The use of DSS has been restricted in some cases because of stress corrosion cracking (SCC), which can initiate and grow in either the ferrite or austenite phase depending on the environment. Thorough understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in chloride- and hydrogen sulfide-containing solutions has been useful for material selection in many environments. However, understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in sulfide-containing caustic solutions is limited, which has restricted the capacity to optimize process and equipment design in pulp and paper environments. Process environments may contain different concentrations of hydroxide, sulfide, and chloride, altering corrosion and SCC susceptibility of each phase. Crack initiation and growth behavior will also change depending on the relative phase distribution and properties of austenite and ferrite. The role of microstructure and environment on the SCC of standard grade UNS S32205 and lean grade UNS S32101 in hot alkaline-sulfide solution were evaluated in this work using electrochemical, film characterization, mechanical testing, X-ray diffraction, and microscopy techniques. Microstructural aspects, which included residual stress state, phase distribution, phase ratio, and microhardness, were related to the propensity for SCC crack initiation in different simulated alkaline pulping liquors at 170 °C. Other grades of DSS and reference austenitic and superferritic grades of stainless steel were studied using exposure coupons for comparison to understand compositional effects and individual phase susceptibility

  1. The effect of discontinuities on the corrosion behaviour of copper canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.

    2004-03-01

    Discontinuities may remain in the weld region of copper canisters following the final closure welding and inspection procedures. Although the shell of the copper canister is expected to exhibit excellent corrosion properties in the repository environment, the question remains what impact these discontinuities might have on the long-term performance and service life of the canister. A review of the relevant corrosion literature has been carried out and an expert opinion of the impact of these discontinuities on the canister lifetime has been developed. Since the amount of oxidant in the repository is limited and the maximum wall penetration is expected to be 2 O/Cu(OH) 2 film at a critical electrochemical potential determines where and when pits initiate, not the presence of pit-shaped surface discontinuities. The factors controlling pit growth and death are well understood. There is evidence for a maximum pit radius for copper in chloride solutions, above which the small anodic: cathodic surface area ratio required for the formation of deep pits cannot be sustained. This maximum pit radius is of the order of 0.1-0.5 mm. Surface discontinuities larger than this size are unlikely to propagate as pits, and pits generated from smaller discontinuities will die once they reach this maximum size. Death of propagating pits will be compounded by the decrease in oxygen flux to the canister as the repository environment becomes anoxic. Surface discontinuities could impact the SCC behaviour either through their effect on the local environment or via stress concentration or intensification. There is no evidence that surface discontinuities will affect the initiation of SCC by ennoblement of the corrosion potential or the formation of locally aggressive conditions. Stress concentration at pits could lead to crack initiation under some circumstances, but the stress intensity factor for the resultant cracks, or for pre-existing crack-like discontinuities, will be smaller than the

  2. Corrosion resistance and protection mechanism of hot-dip Zn-Al-Mg alloy coated steel sheet under accelerated corrosion environment; Yoyu Zn-Al-Mg kei gokin mekki koban no sokushin fushoku kankyoka ni okeru taishokusei toi boshoku kiko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, A.; Izutani, H.; Tsujimura, T.; Ando, A.; Kittaka, T. [NKK Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    Corrosion behavior of hot-dip Zn-6%Al 0-3%Mg alloy coated steel sheets in cyclic corrosion test (CCT) has been investigated. The corrosion resistance was improved with increasing Mg content in the coating layer, and the highest corrosion resistance was observed at 3% Mg. In Zn-6%Al-3%Mg alloy coated steel sheet, the formations of zinc carbonate hydroxide and zinc oxide were suppressed for longer duration compared with Zn-0.2%Al and Zn-4.5%Al-0.l%Mg alloy coated steel sheets. As a result, zinc chloride hydroxide existed stable on the surface of the coating layer. From the polarization behaviors in 5% NaCl aqueous solution after CCT, it was found that the corrosion current density of Zn-6%At-3%Mg alloy coated steel sheet was much smaller than those of Zn-0.2%Al and Zn-4.5%Al-0.1%Mg alloy coated steel sheets. As zinc carbonate hydroxide and zinc oxide had poor adhesion to the coating layer and had porous structures, these corrosion products were considered to have little protective action for the coating layer. Therefore, it was concluded that Mg suppressed the formation of such nonprotective corrosion products. resulting in the remarkable improvement of corrosion resistance. (author)

  3. Corrosion Behaviour of Heat - Treated Al-6063/ SiCp Composites Immersed in 5 wt% NaCl Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth ALANEME

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of SiC volume percent and temper conditions (namely, as-cast, solutionized, and artificial age hardening at 180°C and 195°C on the corrosion behaviour of Al (6063 composites and its monolithic alloy immersed in 5wt% NaCl solution has been investigated. Al (6063 - SiC particulate composites containing 6, 12 and 15 volume percent SiC were produced by premixing the SiC particles with borax additive and then adopting two step stir casting. Mass loss and corrosion rate measurements were utilized as criteria for evaluating the corrosion behaviour of the composites. The results show that the corrosion susceptibility of the Al (6063 - SiCp composites was higher than that of the monolithic alloy, and for most cases the corrosion rate of the composites increased with increase in volume percent of SiC. However, it was discovered that the nature of the passive films formed on the composites was sufficiently stable to reduce significantly the corrosion rate of the composites after 13days of immersion. This trend was observed to be consistent for all heat-treatment conditions utilized.

  4. Effects of different dairy ingredients on the rheological behaviour and stability of hot cheese emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelimu, Abulimiti; Felix da Silva, Denise; Geng, Xiaolu

    2017-01-01

    The influence of sodium caseinate (SC), butter milk powder (BMP) and their combinations on particle size, rheological properties, emulsion stability and microstructure of hot cheese emulsions made from mixtures of Cheddar and soft white cheese was studied. All emulsions exhibited shear-thinning f......The influence of sodium caseinate (SC), butter milk powder (BMP) and their combinations on particle size, rheological properties, emulsion stability and microstructure of hot cheese emulsions made from mixtures of Cheddar and soft white cheese was studied. All emulsions exhibited shear......-thinning flow behaviour and increasing SC concentration (1–4%) led to an increase in particle size and a decrease in apparent viscosity. In contrast, increasing BMP concentration caused significant decrease in particle size and slightly reduced the apparent viscosity. Stability against creaming...

  5. Corrosion behaviour of sintered Ti–Ni–Cu–Nb in 0.9% NaCl environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moipone Linda Lethabane

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The uniform and localized corrosion behaviour of sintered Ti–Ni containing niobium and copper additions were studied using potentiodynamic and cyclic polarization measurements in 0.9% sodium chloride. Results indicated that copper and niobium addition did not have significant effects on the uniform corrosion characteristics, but significantly improved the pitting corrosion resistance. Both copper and niobium additions significantly increased the re-passivation potentials, while copper was observed to reduce the pitting hysteresis loop area. Alloys containing 15% copper and 2% niobium additions depicted the most improved pitting corrosion resistance, and increased the re-passivation value from −315.60 mV to a high re-passivation potential of 840.68 mV.

  6. Electrochemical corrosion behaviour of plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings on AM50 magnesium alloy formed in silicate and phosphate based electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, J.; Srinivasan, P. Bala; Blawert, C.; Stoermer, M.; Dietzel, W.

    2009-01-01

    PEO coatings were produced on AM50 magnesium alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation process in silicate and phosphate based electrolytes using a pulsed DC power source. The microstructure and composition of the PEO coatings were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The corrosion resistance of the PEO coatings was evaluated using open circuit potential (OCP) measurements, potentiodynamic polarisation tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 0.1 M NaCl solution. It was found that the electrolyte composition has a significant effect on the coating evolution and on the resulting coating characteristics, such as microstructure, composition, coating thickness, roughness and thus on the corrosion behaviour. The corrosion resistance of the PEO coating formed in silicate electrolyte was found to be superior to that formed in phosphate electrolyte in both the short-term and long-term electrochemical corrosion tests.

  7. Corrosion behaviour of chemical conversion treatments on as-cast Mg-Al alloys: Electrochemical and non-electrochemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocca, E.; Juers, C.; Steinmetz, J.

    2010-01-01

    Magnesium alloys are often used in as-cast conditions. So, the aim of this work is to characterize the corrosion protection of as-cast AZ91D alloys coated with simple chemical conversion (phosphate-permanganate, and cerium-based coatings). With the two coatings, the electrochemical measurements show that the corrosion protection is due to both the inhibition of cathodic and anodic reactions, because of the presence of stable CeO 2 or manganese oxides in basic pH. Nevertheless, the non-electrochemical tests of corrosion are required to bring to light the healing effect of phosphate-permanganate coating compared to Ce-coating and to describe the corrosion behaviour completely. Finally phosphoric and soda pickling associated to phosphate-permanganate conversion treatment or cerium coating are ecologically efficient alternatives to fluoride-based pickling and the chromating treatment.

  8. Corrosion behaviour of chemical conversion treatments on as-cast Mg-Al alloys: Electrochemical and non-electrochemical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocca, E. [Institut Jean Lamour UMR CNRS 7198, Nancy Universite - Corrosion Group, B.P. 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-Les-Nancy (France)], E-mail: emmanuel.rocca@lcsm.uhp-nancy.fr; Juers, C.; Steinmetz, J. [Institut Jean Lamour UMR CNRS 7198, Nancy Universite - Corrosion Group, B.P. 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-Les-Nancy (France)

    2010-06-15

    Magnesium alloys are often used in as-cast conditions. So, the aim of this work is to characterize the corrosion protection of as-cast AZ91D alloys coated with simple chemical conversion (phosphate-permanganate, and cerium-based coatings). With the two coatings, the electrochemical measurements show that the corrosion protection is due to both the inhibition of cathodic and anodic reactions, because of the presence of stable CeO{sub 2} or manganese oxides in basic pH. Nevertheless, the non-electrochemical tests of corrosion are required to bring to light the healing effect of phosphate-permanganate coating compared to Ce-coating and to describe the corrosion behaviour completely. Finally phosphoric and soda pickling associated to phosphate-permanganate conversion treatment or cerium coating are ecologically efficient alternatives to fluoride-based pickling and the chromating treatment.

  9. The Effect of Low-Quantity Cr Addition on the Corrosion Behaviour of Dual-Phase High Carbon Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Handoko

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Industrial application of high carbon low alloy steel with the dual-phase structure of martensite and austenite has increased drastically in recent years. Due to its excellent compression strength and its high abrasion resistance, this grade of steel has used as a high performance cutting tool and in press machinery applications. By increasing the usage of more corrosive media in industrial practice and increasing the demand for reducing the production cost, it is crucial to understand the effect of the small addition of Cr on the corrosion behaviour of this grade of steel. In this study, this effect was investigated using Secondary Electron Microscopy (SEM and in-situ Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM in the sodium chloride solution. Also, the corrosion rate was measured using the Tafel polarisation curve. It has been found that the small addition of Cr increased the stability of retained austenite, thus improving its corrosion resistance and reducing its corrosion rate. This effect has been acquired through in-situ high resolution topography images in which the samples were submerged in a corrosive solution. It has been demonstrated that the corrosion rate was reduced when the stability of austenite enhanced.

  10. Simulation of the hot flow behaviour of a medium carbon microalloyed steel. Part 1. Theoretical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera, J.M.; Prado, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The constitutive equations to model the hot flow behaviour of metallic materials in general, and of microalloyed steels in particular (see part 2 of this work) are established in this work. Special emphasis is done on the dynamic softening mechanisms, i.e., dynamic recovery and recrystallization phenomena. The equations developed are physic-based, not empirical, and the modelling allows an easy implementation in an analysis by numerical methods. The resulting equations are even able to predict the final grain size. (Author) 39 refs

  11. Microstructure formation and corrosion behaviour in HVOF-sprayed Inconel 625 coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, D.; Harris, S.J.; McCartney, D.G.

    2003-01-01

    The nickel-based alloy Inconel 625 was thermally sprayed by two different variants of the high velocity oxy-fuel process. In this study, coatings deposited by a liquid-fuelled gun were compared with those produced by a gas-fuelled system; in general, the former generates higher particle velocities but lower particle temperatures. Investigations into the microstructural evolution of the coatings, using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, are presented along with results on their aqueous corrosion behaviour, obtained from salt spray and potentiodynamic tests. It is inferred from coating microstructures that, during spraying, powder particles generally comprised three separate zones as follows: fully melted regions; partially melted zones; and an unmelted core. However, the relative proportions formed in an individual powder particle depended on its size, trajectory through the gun, the gas dynamics (velocity/temperature) of the thermal spray gun and the type of gun employed. Cr 2 O 3 was the principal oxide phase formed during spraying and the quantity appeared to be directly related to the degree to which particles were melted. The salt spray test provides a sensitive means of determining the presence of interconnected porosity in coatings and those produced with the liquid-fuelled gun exhibited reduced interconnected porosity and increased corrosion resistance compared with deposits obtained from the gas-fuelled system. In addition, potentiodynamic tests revealed that passive current densities are 10-20 times lower in liquid-fuel coatings than in those sprayed with the gas-fuelled gun

  12. Thermal behaviour and corrosion resistance of nano-ZnO/polyurethane film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgawati, E.; Soegijono, B.

    2018-03-01

    Hybrid materials Nano-ZnO/polyurethane film was prepared with different zinc oxide (ZnO) content in polyurethane as a matrix. The film was deposited on low carbon steel plate using high volume low pressure (HVLP) method. To observe thermal behaviour of the film, the sample was investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to see whether any chemical reaction of ZnO in polyurethane occured. TGA and FTIR results showed that the decomposition temperature shifted to a higher point and the chemical reaction of zinc oxide in polyurethane occurred. The surface morphology changed and the corrosion resistance increased with an increase of ZnO content

  13. Effect of heat treatment on the corrosion behaviour of Al-Zn alloys in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Radiah Mohd Kamarudin; Muhamad Daud; Nur Ubaidah Saidin; Zaifol Samsu

    2010-01-01

    A study has been carried out to investigate the effect of heat treatment on the corrosion behaviour of Al-Zn alloys in seawater environment. The microstructure, potential and current capacity of the samples were studied. Open circuit potential (OCP) of 96 hours was measured against saturated calomel electrode (SCE) and estimating current capacity of the alloys were calculated by using protective current generated from the capacity test. For the microstructure study, optical microscope is used to examine the surface morphology before and after test. The results show that the heat treated samples of 2 hours at 550 degree Celsius and variation in alloys composition affected the values of alloys OCP, current capacity and microstructure. (author)

  14. Passivation and corrosion behaviours of cobalt and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metikos-Hukovic, M.; Babic, R.

    2007-01-01

    Passivation and corrosion behaviour of the cobalt and cobalt-base alloy Co30Cr6Mo was studied in a simulated physiological solution containing chloride and bicarbonate ions and with pH of 6.8. The oxido-reduction processes included solid state transformations occurring at the cobalt/electrolyte interface are interpreted using theories of surface electrochemistry. The dissolution of cobalt is significantly suppressed by alloying it with chromium and molybdenum, since the alloy exhibited 'chromium like' passivity. The structural and protective properties of passive oxide films formed spontaneously at the open circuit potential or during the anodic polarization were studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the wide frequency range

  15. Corrosion behaviour of Alloy 800 in high temperature aqueous solutions: Electrochemical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmedo, A.M.; Villegas, M.; Alvarez, M.G.

    1996-01-01

    The anodic behaviour and passivity breakdown of Alloy 800 in aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, sodium sulphate and sodium bicarbonate were studied by electrochemical techniques in the temperature range from 60 C to 280 C. The pitting resistance and pitting morphology of the alloy in chloride plus sulphate and chloride plus bicarbonate mixtures, at 60 C and 280 C, were also examined. Increasing bicarbonate or sulphate additions to chloride solutions shift the characteristic pitting potential of Alloy 800 to higher values, both at low and high temperatures. Changes in pitting morphology were observed in sulphate containing solutions while the morphology of the attack found in bicarbonate containing solutions was similar to that in pure chloride solutions. Finally, no localized or substantial generalized corrosion was detected in pure sulphate or bicarbonate solutions at any temperature. (orig.)

  16. Electrochemical Corrosion Behavior of Carbon Steel and Hot Dip Galvanized Steel in Simulated Concrete Solution with Different pH Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanchen XIE

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hot dip galvanizing technology is now widely used as a method of protection for steel rebars. The corrosion behaviors of Q235 carbon steel and hot galvanized steel in a Ca(OH2 solution with a pH from 10 to 13 was investigated by electrode potential and polarization curves testing. The results indicated that carbon steel and hot galvanized steel were all passivated in a strong alkaline solution. The electrode potential of hot dip galvanized steel was lower than that of carbon steel; thus, hot dip galvanized steel can provide very good anodic protection for carbon steel. However, when the pH value reached 12.5, a polarity reversal occurred under the condition of a certain potential. Hot dip galvanized coating became a cathode, and the corrosion of carbon steel accelerated. The electrochemical behaviors and passivation abilities of hot dip galvanized steel and carbon steel were affected by pH. The higher the pH value was, the more easily they were passivated.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.3.16675

  17. Influence of noble metals alloying additions on the corrosion behaviour of titanium in a fluoride-containing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosalbino, F; Delsante, S; Borzone, G; Scavino, G

    2012-05-01

    Titanium alloys exhibit excellent corrosion resistance in most aqueous media due to the formation of a stable oxide film, and some of these alloys (particularly Ti-6Al-7Nb) have been chosen for surgical and odontological implants for their resistance and biocompatibility. Treatment with fluorides (F(-)) is known to be the main method for preventing plaque formation and dental caries. Toothpastes, mouthwashes, and prophylactic gels can contain from 200 to 20,000 ppm F(-) and can affect the corrosion behaviour of titanium alloy devices present in the oral cavity. In this work, the electrochemical corrosion behaviour of Ti-1M alloys (M = Ag, Au, Pd, Pt) was assessed in artificial saliva of pH = 3.0 containing 910 ppm F(-) (0.05 M NaF) through open circuit potential, E(OC), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The corrosion behaviour of the Ti-6Al-7Nb commercial alloy was also evaluated for comparison. E (OC) measurements show an active behaviour for all the titanium alloys in fluoridated acidified saliva due to the presence of significant concentrations of HF and HF(2) (-) species that dissolve the spontaneous air-formed oxide film giving rise to surface activation. However, an increase in stability of the passive oxide layer and consequently a decrease in surface activation is observed for the Ti-1M alloys. This behaviour is confirmed by EIS measurements. In fact, the Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy exhibits lower impedance values as compared with Ti-1M alloys, the highest values being measured for the Ti-1Au alloy. The experimental results show that the corrosion resistance of the studied Ti-1M alloys is similar to or better than that of Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy currently used as biomaterial, suggesting their potential for dental applications.

  18. Corrosion behaviour of the AlSi6Cu4 alloy and cast AlSi6Cu4-graphite particles composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Holecek

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of the AlSi6Cu4 alloy as a composite matrix and of composites with 8% vol. of graphite particles was investigated. The corrosion experiments were performed over a range of elevated temperatures and were carried out in sea water (3.5%NaCl solution. We have focused our attention to the determination of the mode of corrosion attack and to the determination of the rate ofcorrosion and other corrosion characteristics. Both as-cast and annealed matrix and composite specimens were tested, as well as the99.9% as-cast aluminium for comparison. Corrosion behaviour of the materials was assessed by the corrosion potential (Ec and bypotentiodynamic (polarization curves. As expected, composite is less corrosion resistant than the matrix alloy. In addition to pitting,a severe galvanic corrosion occurs as a result of galvanic couple aluminium/graphite formation. Corrosion potentials imply that examinedmaterials would be sufficiently resistant in non or slightly oxidizing solutions without dissolved oxygen. All studied materials corrode very slowly at potentials negative to corrosion potential, while at potentials positive to corrosion potential the corrosion rate goes up by 1 or 2 orders.

  19. Improved PFB operations: 400-hour turbine test results. [coal combustion products and hot corrosion in gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollbuhler, R. J.; Benford, S. M.; Zellars, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    A pressurized fluidized bed (PFB) coal-burning reactor was used to provide hot effluent gases for operation of a small gas turbine. Preliminary tests determined the optimum operating conditions that would result in minimum bed particle carryover in the combustion gases. Solids were removed from the gases before they could be transported into the test turbine by use of a modified two stage cyclone separator. Design changes and refined operation procedures resulted in a significant decrease in particle carryover, from 2800 to 93 ppm (1.5 to 0.05 grains/std cu ft), with minimal drop in gas temperature and pressure. The achievement of stable burn conditions and low solids loadings made possible a 400 hr test of small superalloy rotor, 15 cm (6 in.) in diameter, operating in the effluent. Blades removed and examined metallographically after 200 hr exhibited accelerated oxidation over most of the blade surface, with subsurface alumina penetration to 20 micron m. After 400 hours, average erosion loss was about 25 micron m (1 mil). Sulfide particles, indicating hot corrosion, were present in depletion zones, and their presence corresponded in general to the areas of adherent solids deposit. Sulfidation appears to be a materials problem equal in importance to erosion.

  20. Hot corrosion of the steel SA213-T22 and SA213-TP347H in 80% V2O5-20%Na2SO4 mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeraya, F.; Martinez-Villafane, A.; Gaona, C.; Romero, M.A.; Malo, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Many hot corrosion problems in industrial and utility boilers are caused by molten salts. The corrosion processes which occur in salts are of an electrochemical nature, and so they can be studied using electrochemical test methods. In this research, electrochemical techniques in molten salt systems have been used for the measurements of molten corrosion processes. Electrochemical test methods are described here for a salt mixture of 80%V 2 O 5 -20%NaSO 4 at 540-680 degree centigrade. To establish better the electrochemical corrosion rate measurements for molten salt systems, information from electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization curves, such as polarization resistance and Tafeol slopes were used in this study to generate corrosion rate data. The salt was contained in a quartz crucible inside a stainless retort. The atmosphere used was air. A thermocouple sheathed with quartz glass was introduced into the molten salt for temperature monitoring and control. Two materials were tested in the molten mixture: SA213-T22 and SA213-TP347H steels. The corrosion rates values obtained using electrochemical methods were around 0.58-7.14 mm/yr (22.9-281 mpy). The corrosion rate increase with time. (Author) 7 refs

  1. The estimation of corrosion behaviour of ZrTi binary alloys for dental applications using electrochemical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mareci, Daniel; Bolat, Georgiana; Chelariu, Romeu; Sutiman, Daniel; Munteanu, Corneliu

    2013-01-01

    Titanium and zirconium are in the same group in the periodic table of elements and are known to have similar physical and chemical properties. Both Ti and Zr usually have their surfaces covered by a thin oxide film spontaneously formed in air. However, the cytotoxicity of ZrO 2 is lower than that of TiO 2 rutile. Treatments with fluoride are known as the main methods to prevent plaque formation and dental caries. The corrosion behaviour of ZrTi alloys with Ti contents of 5, 25 and 45 wt.% and cp-Ti was investigated for dental applications. All samples were tested by linear potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) performed in artificial saliva with different pH levels (5.6 and 3.4) and different fluoride (1000 ppm F − ) and albumin protein (0.6%) contents. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed to observe the surface morphology of the test materials after linear potentiodynamic polarisation. The corrosion current densities for the ZrTi alloys increased with the titanium content. The Zr5Ti and Zr25Ti alloys were susceptible to localised corrosion. The role that Ti plays as an alloying element is that of increasing the resistance of ZrTi alloy to localised corrosion. The presence of 0.6% albumin protein in fluoridated acidified artificial saliva with 1000 ppm F − could protect the cp-Ti and ZrTi alloys from attack by fluoride ions. - Highlights: • Electrochemical and corrosion behaviour of the new ZrTi alloys were investigated. • The passive behaviour for all the ZrTi alloys is observed. • Addition of Ti to Zr improves the corrosion resistance in some fluoridated saliva. • The presence of albumin could prevent the ZrTi alloys from attack by fluoride ions

  2. The estimation of corrosion behaviour of ZrTi binary alloys for dental applications using electrochemical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mareci, Daniel [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, Iasi (Romania); Bolat, Georgiana, E-mail: georgiana20022@yahoo.com [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, Iasi (Romania); Chelariu, Romeu [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Iasi (Romania); Sutiman, Daniel [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, Iasi (Romania); Munteanu, Corneliu [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Faculty of Mechanical, Iasi (Romania)

    2013-08-15

    Titanium and zirconium are in the same group in the periodic table of elements and are known to have similar physical and chemical properties. Both Ti and Zr usually have their surfaces covered by a thin oxide film spontaneously formed in air. However, the cytotoxicity of ZrO{sub 2} is lower than that of TiO{sub 2} rutile. Treatments with fluoride are known as the main methods to prevent plaque formation and dental caries. The corrosion behaviour of ZrTi alloys with Ti contents of 5, 25 and 45 wt.% and cp-Ti was investigated for dental applications. All samples were tested by linear potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) performed in artificial saliva with different pH levels (5.6 and 3.4) and different fluoride (1000 ppm F{sup −}) and albumin protein (0.6%) contents. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed to observe the surface morphology of the test materials after linear potentiodynamic polarisation. The corrosion current densities for the ZrTi alloys increased with the titanium content. The Zr5Ti and Zr25Ti alloys were susceptible to localised corrosion. The role that Ti plays as an alloying element is that of increasing the resistance of ZrTi alloy to localised corrosion. The presence of 0.6% albumin protein in fluoridated acidified artificial saliva with 1000 ppm F{sup −} could protect the cp-Ti and ZrTi alloys from attack by fluoride ions. - Highlights: • Electrochemical and corrosion behaviour of the new ZrTi alloys were investigated. • The passive behaviour for all the ZrTi alloys is observed. • Addition of Ti to Zr improves the corrosion resistance in some fluoridated saliva. • The presence of albumin could prevent the ZrTi alloys from attack by fluoride ions.

  3. Corrosion fatigue initiation and short crack growth behaviour of austenitic stainless steels under light water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, H.P.; Ritter, S.; Leber, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosion fatigue in austenitic stainless steels under light water reactor conditions. ► Identification of major parameters of influence on initiation and short crack growth. ► Critical system conditions for environmental reduction of fatigue initiation life. ► Comparison with the environmental factor (F env ) approach. - Abstract: The corrosion fatigue initiation and short crack growth behaviour of different wrought low-carbon and stabilised austenitic stainless steels was characterised under simulated boiling water reactor and pressurised water reactor primary water conditions by cyclic fatigue tests with sharply notched fracture mechanics specimens. The special emphasis was placed to the behaviour at low corrosion potentials and, in particular, to hydrogen water chemistry conditions. The major parameter effects and critical conjoint threshold conditions, which result in relevant environmental reduction and acceleration of fatigue initiation life and subsequent short crack growth, respectively, are discussed and summarised. The observed corrosion fatigue behaviour is compared with the fatigue evaluation procedures in codes and regulatory guidelines.

  4. General corrosion of Ti in hot water and water saturated bentonite clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattsson, H.; Olefjord, I.

    1984-12-01

    Titanium has been proposed as one of the candidates for canister materials for storing spent nuclear fuel in the Swedish bed-rock. The deposition milieu was simulated on a laboratory scale by embedding titanium in compacted bentonite and the general corrosion rate was investigated. More fundamental studies were also performed where titanium was exposed to water in which special attention was paid to the NaCl content and oxygen content. In reaction cells designed according to high vacuum principles it was possible to reduce the oxygen content to very low values. The exposure time ranged between 1 min. and 6 months. Analysis of the corrosion products was performed mainly with ESCA. In water at 95 degrees C the oxide growth follows a direct logarithmic law: y equals 8.7 + 3.65 ln t. Oxygen and salt do not influence the rate of the oxide growth significantly. The general corrosion rate is approximately the same as the oxide growth rate since the dissolution of Ti into the water-solution is very low. The oxide consists of an outer layer of TiO 2 and a few atomic layers of suboxide close to the oxide/metal interface. Transmission electron microscopy studies of the water-formed oxides indicate that these are amorphous. The oxides formed on Ti exposed in bentonite is 70-100 Aa thick for exposure times ranging between 4 months and 2 years. It is shown, that montmorillonite - the main constituent in bentonite - is absorbed in the TiO 2 formed on these samples. If it is assumed that a logarithmic growth law is valid even for long-term exposure in bentonite, the growth law which will give the highest growth rate is y equals 5.5 ln t. An oxide thickness of 160 Aa is obtained if this law is extrapolated to 100.000 years exposure. (Author)

  5. In-situ hot corrosion testing of candidate materials for exhaust valve spindles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bihlet, Uffe; Hoeg, Harro A.; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2011-01-01

    The two stroke diesel engine has been continually optimized since its invention more than a century ago. One of the ways to increase fuel efficiency further is to increase the compression ratio, and thereby the temperature in the combustion chamber. Because of this, and the composition of the fuel...... used, exhaust valve spindles in marine diesel engines are subjected to high temperatures and stresses as well as molten salt induced corrosion. To investigate candidate materials for future designs which will involve the HIP process, a spindle with Ni superalloy material samples inserted in a HIPd Ni49...

  6. Stress corrosion cracking of zircaloy. The use of laboratory data to predict in-reactor behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.K.; Ocken, H.

    1981-01-01

    Pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) can lead to failure of the Zircaloy tubing used as cladding in water-cooled reactors. Many investigations have shown that the mechanism directly responsible for such fuel rod failures is stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Zircaloy tubing. Laboratory studies have yielded extensive data on the time-to-failure (tsub(f)) behaviour of Zircaloy tubing specimens as a function of such important variables as the applied hoop stress (σ sub(h)), the iodine concentration (I 2 ), the temperature (T) and the fluence (F). These data have been used to predict the response of Zircaloy tubing exposed in-reactor. A typical approach is to fit laboratory data to obtain an empirical equation for tsub(f) in terms of the variables identified above. The question can then be posed as to whether it is appropriate to use such an empirical expression for predicting in-reactor behaviour. This paper describes the approach which has been taken in modelling the SCC process. It first reviews the experimental observations upon which the model is based. A summary of the key features of the model is then presented. The model's capabilities, emphasizing those predictions that are independent of data used to evaluate empirical constants, are briefly discussed. Finally, it is shown how the model can be used to predict important differences between the response of tubing specimens exposed in the laboratory and the response of large quantities of tubing exposed in-reactor

  7. Effect of pH on the corrosion behaviour of SUS321 in the ammonia aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Yoon; Jeong, Y. H.; Baek, J. H.; Choi, B. K.; Lee, M. H.; Choi, B. S.; Yoon, J. H.; Lee, D. J.

    2003-02-01

    The corrosion characteristics of SUS321 for pressure vessel of SMART in pure water, ammonia aqueous solutions of pH 8.5 ∼ 11.5 at 300 .deg. C were evaluated by using static autoclaves. SUS321 specimen in the high temperature ammonia aqueous solution has weight gain or loss by the 4 reactions. And it depends on the refreshing period of the aqueous solution. So additional experiments by recirculating loop system were required to evaluate the corrosion behaviour of SUS321 in the ammonia aqueous solution

  8. Electrochemical noise evaluation of anodized aluminum. Comparative study against corrosion behaviour in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betancourt, N.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work reports the evaluation of aluminum and anodized aluminum by electrochemical noise, as a part of the PATINA/CYTED project of the working group Nº 5. A visual examination is also made. The samples were exposed at several Ibero-American atmospheres up to 2 years of exposure. Different thickness of anodized aluminum were evaluated. The electrochemical potential noise of the 5 μm unexposed sample (pattern showed a different behaviour to that showed by the other anodized specimens. This could be due to a slower sealed of the samples of higher thickness. The same behaviour was observed on the samples exposed at the rural station El Pardo. According to the visual examination, the samples of bare aluminum and those of anodized 5 μm thickness were the most affected by pitting corrosion in the highly polluted atmospheres. A good correlation between corrosion behaviour determined by visual examination and EN was obtained.

    Como parte de las investigaciones de la Red PATINA el grupo de trabajo Nº 5 dedicó su atención al comportamiento del aluminio desnudo y anodizado con diferentes espesores en diferentes atmósferas de Iberoamérica. En el presente trabajo se presenta una evaluación de patrones de aluminio 99,5 % de pureza desnudo y anodizado con espesores de 15 y 25 μm, mediante ruido electroquímico. Los resultados obtenidos se comparan con el comportamiento determinado en diferentes atmósferas durante un período de 2 años. El ruido de voltaje del patrón de 5 μm de espesor presenta un comportamiento diferente al de los restantes espesores, lo que coincide con una mayor susceptibilidad a la corrosión picadura de este primer anodizado. Se reportan también algunas diferencias en el ruido de corriente. Se concluye que mediante la utilización del ruido electroquímico es posible caracterizar el aluminio con respecto a su sensibilidad a la corrosión picadura en condiciones atmosféricas.

  9. Microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance and porcelain shear bond strength comparison between cast and hot pressed CoCrMo alloy for metal-ceramic dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, B; Soares, D; Silva, F S

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance and metal-porcelain bond strength of a CoCrMo dental alloy obtained by two routes, cast and hot pressing. CoCrMo alloy substrates were obtained by casting and hot pressing. Substrates' microstructure was examined by the means of Optical Microscopy (OM) and by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Hardness tests were performed in a microhardness indenter. The electrochemical behavior of substrates was investigated through potentiodynamic tests in a saline solution (8g NaCl/L). Substrates were bonded to dental porcelain and metal-porcelain bond strength was assessed by the means of a shear test performed in a universal test machine (crosshead speed: 0.5 mm/min) until fracture. Fractured surfaces as well as undestroyed interface specimens were examined with Stereomicroscopy and SEM-EDS. Data was analyzed with Shapiro-Wilk test to test the assumption of normality. The t-test (pmicrostructures whereas hot pressed specimens exhibited a typical globular microstructure with a second phase spread through the matrix. The hardness registered for hot pressed substrates was greater than that of cast specimens, 438±24HV/1 and 324±8HV/1, respectively. Hot pressed substrates showed better corrosion properties than cast ones, i.e. higher OCP; higher corrosion potential (E(corr)) and lower current densities (i(corr)). No significant difference was found (p<0.05) in metal-ceramic bond strength between cast (116.5±6.9 MPa) and hot pressed (114.2±11.9 MPa) substrates. The failure type analysis revealed an adhesive failure for all specimens. Hot pressed products arise as an alternative to cast products in dental prosthetics, as they impart enhanced mechanical and electrochemical properties to prostheses without compromising the metal-ceramic bond strength. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Stress corrosion of austenitic steels mono and polycrystals in Mg Cl2 medium: micro fractography and study of behaviour improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambreuil-Paret, A.

    1997-01-01

    The austenitic steels in a hot chlorinated medium present a rupture which is macroscopically fragile, discontinuous and formed with crystallographic facets. The interpretation of these facies crystallographic character is a key for the understanding of the stress corrosion damages. The first aim of this work is then to study into details the micro fractography of 316 L steels mono and polycrystals. Two types of rupture are observed: a very fragile rupture which stresses on the possibility of the interatomic bonds weakening by the corrosive medium Mg Cl 2 and a discontinuous rupture (at the micron scale) on the sliding planes which is in good agreement with the corrosion enhanced plasticity model. The second aim of this work is to search for controlling the stress corrosion by the mean of a pre-strain hardening. Two types of pre-strain hardening have been tested. A pre-strain hardening with a monotonic strain is negative. Indeed, the first cracks starts very early and the cracks propagation velocity is increased. This is explained by the corrosion enhanced plasticity model through the intensifying of the local corrosion-deformation interactions. On the other hand, a cyclic pre-strain hardening is particularly favourable. The first micro strains starts later and the strain on breaking point levels are increased. The delay of the starting of the first strains is explained by a surface distortion structure which is very homogeneous. At last, the dislocations structure created in fatigue at saturation is a planar structure of low energy which reduces the corrosion-deformation interactions, source of micro strains. (O.M.)

  11. Physiological and behavioural responses of young horses to hot iron branding and microchip implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erber, R; Wulf, M; Becker-Birck, M; Kaps, S; Aurich, J E; Möstl, E; Aurich, C

    2012-02-01

    Branding is the traditional and well-established method used to mark horses, but recently microchip transponders for implantation have become available. In this study, behaviour, physiological stress variables and skin temperature in foals were determined in response to hot-iron branding (n=7) and microchip implantation (n=7). Salivary cortisol concentrations increased in response to branding (1.8 ± 0.2 ng/mL) and microchip implantation (1.4 ± 0.1ng/mL), but cortisol release over time did not differ. In response to both manipulations there was a transient increase in heart rate (PBranding and microchip implantation induced a comparable aversive behaviour (branding, score 3.86 ± 0.85; microchip, score 4.00 ± 0.82). Both techniques thus caused similar physiological and behavioural changes indicative of stress. Acutely, implantation of a microchip was as stressful as branding in foals. Branding caused a necrotising skin burn lasting at least 7 days. Moreover branding, but not microchip implantation (P<0.001), was accompanied by a generalized increase in skin temperature which was comparable to low degree post-burn hypermetabolism in humans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Microstructure and hot corrosion behaviors of two Co modified aluminide coatings on a Ni-based superalloy at 700 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Q.X., E-mail: qxfan@imr.ac.cn; Jiang, S.M., E-mail: smjiang@imr.ac.cn; Yu, H.J.; Gong, J.; Sun, C.

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • Microstructures of two Co modified NiAl coatings have been studied. • The addition of Co improves the corrosion resistance in sulfate salts at 700 °C. • For the sulfide and its eutectic of Co are more stable than those of Ni. • In chloride salts coating with medium Co content has best corrosion resistance. - Abstract: Two Co modified aluminide coatings with different Co contents were prepared by pack cementation process and above-the-pack process. The hot corrosion tests of the two coatings were performed in mixed salts of 75 wt.% Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 25 wt.% K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and 75 wt.% Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 25 wt.% NaCl at 700 °C, with a simple aluminide coating as the reference coating. X-Ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) were used to characterize the coatings and the corrosion scales. Results indicate that the addition of Co improves the hot corrosion resistance of the simple aluminide coating in the mixed sulfate salts, for the sulfide as well as its eutectic of cobalt are more stable, and possess higher melting points than those of nickel. While in the mixed salt containing chloride, the coating with medium Co content possesses the best corrosion resistance, primarily because the nitrides formed in the deposition process deteriorate the corrosion resistance of the coating with highest Co content.

  13. The stress-corrosion behaviour in water media containing chlorine of the brazing joint of grids for PWR fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weijie; Li Wenqing.

    1985-01-01

    This paper details the testing results of the stress-corrosion behaviour in the 150 deg C water media containing chlorine for the brazing joints made from three alloy systems, which are Ni-Cr-Si, Ni-Cr-P and Ni-P, including 16 compositions. The test results indicate that, in the Ni-Cr-Si system, Ni-Cr-Si-Ge brazing joint is the best, to resist stress-corrosion, while Ni-Cr-Si-P-Ge-Pd and BNi5 brazing joints are better. In the Ni-Cr-P system, only the Ni-Cr-P-Mo-Zr brazing joint has an excellent resistance to stress-corrosion

  14. Corrosion mechanisms and behaviour of actinides in the 'R7T7' nuclear glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillet, Sylvie

    1987-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of aqueous corrosion of the R7T7 nuclear glass and of the identified corrosion mechanisms in conditions of static lixiviation which are close to that expected during long term storage in a geological environment. More specifically, this work aims at assessing the durability of this glass which has been selected for the vitrification of solutions from pressurized water reactors. The main glass alteration phenomena have been studied. The first part addresses the study of the alteration of the glassy matrix, and aims at identifying corrosion mechanisms in various lixiviation conditions (high temperature, saturation). The second part addresses the action of different materials present in the environment on the glassy matrix by simulating as well as possible a storage case. Based on the obtained results, a mathematical model is developed to predict the glass behaviour on the long term. Finally, the glass confinement power with respect to actinides is studied [fr

  15. Advanced fuels for gas turbines: Fuel system corrosion, hot path deposit formation and emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seljak, Tine; Širok, Brane; Katrašnik, Tomaž

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Technical feasibility analysis of alternative fuels requires a holistic approach. • Fuel, combustion, corrosion and component functionality are strongly related. • Used approach defines design constraints for microturbines using alternative fuels. - Abstract: To further expand the knowledge base on the use of innovative fuels in the micro gas turbines, this paper provides insight into interrelation between specific fuel properties and their impact on combustion and emission formation phenomena in micro gas turbines for stationary power generation as well as their impact on material corrosion and deposit formation. The objective of this study is to identify potential issues that can be related to specific fuel properties and to propose counter measures for achieving stable, durable, efficient and low emission operation of the micro gas turbine while utilizing advanced/innovative fuels. This is done by coupling combustion and emission formation analyses to analyses of material degradation and degradation of component functionality while interpreting them through fuel-specific properties. To ensure sufficiently broad range of fuel properties to demonstrate the applicability of the method, two different fuels with significantly different properties are analysed, i.e. tire pyrolysis oil and liquefied wood. It is shown that extent of required micro gas turbine adaptations strongly correlates with deviations of the fuel properties from those of the baseline fuel. Through the study, these adaptations are supported by in-depth analyses of impacts of fuel properties on different components, parameters and subsystems and their quantification. This holistic approach is further used to propose methodologies and innovative approaches for constraining a design space of micro gas turbine to successfully utilize wide spectra of alternative/innovative fuels.

  16. Corrosion and alteration of materials from the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Feron, D.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Vernaz, E.; Richet, C.

    2010-01-01

    The control of the corrosion phenomenon is of prime importance for the nuclear industry. The efficiency and the safety of facilities can be affected by this phenomenon. The nuclear industry has to face corrosion for a large variety of materials submitted to various environments. Metallic corrosion operates in the hot and aqueous environment of water reactors which represent the most common reactor type in the world. Progresses made in the control of the corrosion of the different components of these reactors allow to improve their safety. Corrosion is present in the facilities of the back-end of the fuel cycle as well (corrosion in acid environment in fuel reprocessing plants, corrosion of waste containers in disposal and storage facilities, etc). The future nuclear systems will widen even more the range of materials to be studied and the situations in which they will be placed (corrosion by liquid metals or by helium impurities). Very often, corrosion looks like a patchwork of particular cases in its description. The encountered corrosion problems and their study are presented in this book according to chapters representing the main sectors of the nuclear industry and classified with respect to their phenomenology. This monograph illustrates the researches in progress and presents some results of particular importance obtained recently. Content: 1 - Introduction: context, stakes and goals; definition of corrosion; a complex science; corrosion in the nuclear industry; 2 - corrosion in water reactors - phenomenology, mechanisms, remedies: A - uniform corrosion: mechanisms, uniform corrosion of fuel cladding, in-situ measurement of generalized corrosion rate by electrochemical methods, uniform corrosion of nickel alloys, characterization of the passive layer and growth mechanisms, the PACTOLE code - an integrating tool, influence of water chemistry on corrosion and contamination, radiolysis impact on uniform corrosion; B - stress corrosion: stress corrosion cracking

  17. Electrochemical Corrosion Behaviour of Alumina-Al 6061 and Silicon Carbide-Al 6061 Metal-Matrix Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, K.E.; Gad, M.M.A.; El-Sayed, A.A.; Moustafa, O.H.

    2001-01-01

    The electrochemical corrosion behaviour of powder metallurgy-processed metal-matrix composites (MMCs)based on Al alloy 6061 reinforced with particulate Al 2 O 3 or Sic has been studied in chloride-containing environment. Also, the corrosion behaviour of the unrein forced Al 6061 produced by the same route investigated. Electrochemical tests were conducted on composites containing 10 and 20 vo l% of both reinforced particulates. Potentiodynamic polarization tests have been carried out in neutral as well as acidic and alkaline de-aerated 10 -3 M Na CI solution. In the neutral environment, the addition of Al 2 O 3 particulates was found to shift both the corrosion potential (E corr ) and the break down potential (E b ) slightly into the positive direction irrespective of the volume fraction added (10 and 20 vo l%). On the other hand , Sic caused a shift of E corr into the active site while the E b value was slightly ennobled. For both composites, the corrosion current values at the break down potentials were almost the same as the unrein forced alloy. In an attempt to further clarify the role of both particulate addition, cathodic polarization runs were conducted in both acidic (ph 3) and alkaline (ph 9)solutions for 20 vo l% of Al 2 O 3 and 20 vo l% Sic composite specimens. This indicated that cathodic current values for Sic composites were higher than those corresponding to the unrein forced alloy 6061, and those for the Al 2 O 3 composites were lower

  18. Corrosion Behaviour of Mg Alloys in Various Basic Media: Application of Waste Encapsulation of Fuel Decanning from UNGG Nuclear Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertin, David; Frizon, Fabien; Blachere, Adrien; Bart, Florence

    The dismantling of UNGG nuclear reactor generates a large volume of fuel decanning. These materials are based on Mg-Zr alloy. The dismantling strategy could be to encapsulate these wastes into an ordinary Portland cement (OPC) or geopolymer (aluminosilicate material) in a form suitable for storage. Studies have been performed on Mg or Mg-Al alloy in basic media but no data are available on Mg-Zr behaviour. The influence of representative pore solution of both OPC and geopolymer with Mg-Zr alloy has been studied on corrosion behaviour. Electrochemical methods have been used to determine the corrosion densities at room temperature. Results show that the corrosion densities of Mg-Zr alloy in OPC solution is one order of magnitude more important than in a geopolymer solution environment and the effect of an inhibiting agent has been undertaken with Mg-Zr alloy. Evaluation of corrosion hydrogen production during the encapsulation of Mg-Zr alloy in both OPC and geopolymer has also been done.

  19. Behaviour of steel corrosion products under neutral-oxidizing water conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynova, O.I.; Petrova, T.I.; Samojlov, Yu.F.; Kharitonova, N.L.

    1985-01-01

    Results of laboratory experiments on studying the solubility of iron and cobalt corrosion products are given. It is established that oxygen dosage doesn't influence practically on the iron corrosion product solubility but cobalt corrosion product solubility decreases, the presence of hydrogen peroxide in an initial solution leads to increase of the iron corrosion product solubility especially at 125 deg C. It is shown that hydrogen peroxide affects unambiguously the cobalt corrosion product solubility: at hydrogen peroxide concentration of about 400 μg/l at 50-275 deg C temperature their solubility is minimum

  20. Corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel, nickel-base alloy and its weldments in aqueous LiBr solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasco-Tamarit, E.; Igual-Munoz, A.; Garcia Anton, J.; Garcia-Garcia, D. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. E.T.S.I.Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, P.O. Box 22012 E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    With the advances in materials production new alloys have been developed, such as High- Alloy Austenitic Stainless Steels and Nickel-base alloys, with high corrosion resistance. These new alloys are finding applications in Lithium Bromide absorption refrigeration systems, because LiBr is a corrosive medium which can cause serious corrosion problems, in spite of its favourable properties as absorbent. The objective of the present work was to study the corrosion resistance of a highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel (UNS N08031) used as base metal, a Nickel-base alloy (UNS N06059) used as its corresponding filler metal, and the weld metal obtained by the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) procedure. The materials have been tested in different LiBr solutions (400 g/l, 700 g/l, 850 g/l and a commercial 850 g/l LiBr heavy brine containing Lithium Chromate as corrosion inhibitor), at 25 deg. C. Open Circuit Potential tests and potentiodynamic anodic polarization curves have been carried out to obtain information about the general electrochemical behaviour of the materials. The polarization curves of all the alloys tested were typical of passivable materials. Pitting corrosion susceptibility has been evaluated by means of cyclic potentiodynamic curves, which provide parameters to analyse re-passivation properties. The galvanic corrosion generated by the electrical contact between the welded and the base material has been estimated from the polarization diagrams according to the Mixed Potential Method. Samples have been etched to study the microstructure by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results demonstrate that the pitting resistance of all these materials increases as the LiBr concentration decreases. In general, the presence of chromate tended to shift the pitting potential to more positive values than those obtained in the 850 g/l LiBr solution. (authors)

  1. Corrosion behaviour of dissimilar welds between martensitic stainless steel and carbon steel from secondary circuit of candu npp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popa, L.; Fulger, M.; Tunaru, M.; Velciu, L.; Lazar, M.

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion damages of welds occur in spite of the fact that the proper base metal and filler metal have been correctly selected, industry codes and standards have been followed and welds have been realized with full weld penetration and have proper shape and contour. It is not unusual to find that, although the base metal or alloy is resistant to corrosion in a particular environment, the welded counterpart is not resistant. In secondary circuit of a Nuclear Power Station there are some components which have dissimilar welds. Our experiments were performed in chloride environmental on two types of samples: non-welded (420 martensitic steel and 52.2k carbon steel) and dissimilar welds (dissimilar metal welds: joints beetween 420 martensitic steel and 52.2k carbon steel). To evaluate corrosion susceptibility of dissimilar welds was used electrochemical method (potentiodynamic method) and metallography microscopy (microstructural analysis). The present paper follows the localized corrosion behaviour of dissimilar welds between austenitic stainless steel and carbon steel in solutions containing chloride ions. We have been evaluated the corrosion rates of samples (welded and non-welded) by electrochemically. (authors)

  2. Electrodeposition, characterization and corrosion behaviour of tin-20 wt.% zinc coatings electroplated from a non-cyanide alkaline bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubent, S.; Mertens, M.L.A.D.; Saurat, M.

    2010-01-01

    Tin-zinc alloy electroplated coatings are recognized as a potential alternative to toxic cadmium as corrosion resistant deposits because they combine the barrier protection of tin with the cathodic protection afforded by zinc. The coatings containing 20 wt.% zinc, balance tin, offer excellent corrosion protection for steel and do not form gross voluminous white corrosion products like pure zinc or high zinc alloy deposits. In this study, the effects of variables of the process (i.e. cathodic current density, pH and temperature) on deposit composition have been evaluated using a Hull cell to obtain 20 wt.% zinc alloy coatings. The tin-20 wt.% zinc deposits, produced with electroplating optimized conditions, were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) and glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES). On the other hand, the corrosion behaviour of tin-zinc alloy electroplated coatings on steel has been investigated using electrochemical methods in a 3 wt.% NaCl solution and the salt spray test. The performance of the deposits was compared with cadmium and zinc-nickel electrodeposited coatings. The results show that the corrosion resistance of tin-20 wt.% zinc alloy coating is superior to that of cadmium and zinc-12 wt.% nickel coatings. Finally, sliding friction tests were conducted.

  3. Effect of Al Hot-Dipping on High-Temperature Corrosion of Carbon Steel in N2/0.1% H2S Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ali Abro

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available High-temperature corrosion of carbon steel in N2/0.1% H2S mixed gas at 600–800 °C for 50–100 h was studied after hot-dipping in the aluminum molten bath. Hot-dipping resulted in the formation of the Al topcoat and the Al-Fe alloy layer firmly adhered on the substrate. The Al-Fe alloy layer consisted primarily of a wide, tongue-like Al5Fe2 layer and narrow Al3Fe layer. When corroded at 800 °C for 100 h, the Al topcoat partially oxidized to the protective but non-adherent α-Al2O3 layer, and the interdiffusion converted the Al-Fe alloy layer to an (Al13Fe4, AlFe3-mixed layer. The interdiffusion also lowered the microhardness of the hot-dipped steel. The α-Al2O3 layer formed on the hot-dipped steel protected the carbon steel against corrosion. Without the Al hot-dipping, the carbon steel failed by forming a thick, fragile, and non-protective FeS scale.

  4. Corrosion and alteration of materials from the nuclear industry; La Corrosion et l'alteration des materiaux du nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Feron, D.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Vernaz, E.; Richet, C.

    2010-07-01

    The control of the corrosion phenomenon is of prime importance for the nuclear industry. The efficiency and the safety of facilities can be affected by this phenomenon. The nuclear industry has to face corrosion for a large variety of materials submitted to various environments. Metallic corrosion operates in the hot and aqueous environment of water reactors which represent the most common reactor type in the world. Progresses made in the control of the corrosion of the different components of these reactors allow to improve their safety. Corrosion is present in the facilities of the back-end of the fuel cycle as well (corrosion in acid environment in fuel reprocessing plants, corrosion of waste containers in disposal and storage facilities, etc). The future nuclear systems will widen even more the range of materials to be studied and the situations in which they will be placed (corrosion by liquid metals or by helium impurities). Very often, corrosion looks like a patchwork of particular cases in its description. The encountered corrosion problems and their study are presented in this book according to chapters representing the main sectors of the nuclear industry and classified with respect to their phenomenology. This monograph illustrates the researches in progress and presents some results of particular importance obtained recently. Content: 1 - Introduction: context, stakes and goals; definition of corrosion; a complex science; corrosion in the nuclear industry; 2 - corrosion in water reactors - phenomenology, mechanisms, remedies: A - uniform corrosion: mechanisms, uniform corrosion of fuel cladding, in-situ measurement of generalized corrosion rate by electrochemical methods, uniform corrosion of nickel alloys, characterization of the passive layer and growth mechanisms, the PACTOLE code - an integrating tool, influence of water chemistry on corrosion and contamination, radiolysis impact on uniform corrosion; B - stress corrosion: stress corrosion cracking

  5. 3D, chemical and electrochemical characterization of blasted TI6Al4V surfaces: Its influence on the corrosion behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco, V.; Escudero, M.L.; Garcia-Alonso, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    The blasting process to increase the roughness of the surface of metallic biomaterials is widely used. As a consequence, one can produce a renewed surface with different topography and chemical composition compared to the original one, which can alter the general corrosion behaviour of the samples. With this idea, the aim of this work is not only the topographical and compositional characterization of blasted surfaces of Ti6Al4V alloy but mainly its influence on the corrosion behaviour of these modified surfaces. The surfaces of Ti6Al4V alloys were blasted with SiO 2 /ZrO 2 and Al 2 O 3 particles of different size in order to obtain different roughnesses. To carry out the microstructural and topographical characterization of the blasted surfaces, the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with an energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), the contact profilometry method and the 3D characterization by means of stereo-Fe-SEM have been used. By means of stereo-Fe-SEM, the roughness and the real surface area of the rough surfaces have been calculated. The microstructural, topographical and compositional results have been correlated with the corrosion behaviour of the samples immersed in Hank's solution and studied by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The blasting process alters topographical and chemically the surface of the samples. These modifications induce to an increase in the capacitance values of the roughened samples due to the prevalence of the effect of electrochemically active areas of Ti6Al4V surface over the effect of the presence of Al 2 O 3 and ZrO 2 particles on the blasted surfaces. However, the general corrosion behaviour of the samples is not drastically changed

  6. Moessbauer study of the composition and corrosion behaviour of electrodeposited and cast brass containing 1-4 m% tin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Suba, M.; Varsanyi-Lakatos, M.; Czako-Nagy, I.; Pchelnikov, A.P.; Losev, V.V.

    1982-01-01

    Moessbauer measurements on electrodeposited and cast brass containing 1-4 m% tin were carried out using conversion electron detector. It was found that the tin formed phases with copper but not with zinc. The identified phases were β, γ, epsilon and eta and their ratio depended on the tin concentration and on the preparation process of the brass. The corrosion behaviour of the samples was also studied. (author)

  7. Effect of Metakaolin and Slag blended Cement on Corrosion Behaviour of Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borade, Anita N.; Kondraivendhan, B.

    2017-06-01

    The present paper is aimed to investigate the influence of Metakaolin (MK) and Portland slag Cement (PSC) on corrosion behaviour of concrete. For this purpose, Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) was replaced by 15% MK by weight and readymade available PSC were used. The standard concrete specimens were prepared for both compressive strength and half- cell potential measurement. For the aforesaid experiments, the specimens were cast with varying water to binder ratios (w/b) such as 0.45, 0.5 and 0.55 and exposed to 0%, 3%, 5% and 7.5% of sodium chloride (NaCl) solution. The specimens were tested at wide range of curing ages namely 7, 28, 56, 90 and 180 days. The effects of MK, w/b ratio, age, and NaCl exposure upon concrete were demonstrated in this investigation along with the comparison of results of both MK and PSC concrete were done. It was also observed that concrete with MK shows improved performance as compared to concrete with PSC.

  8. Corrosion behaviour of laser surface melted magnesium alloy AZ91D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taltavull, C.; Torres, B.; Lopez, A.J.; Rodrigo, P.; Otero, E.; Atrens, A.; Rams, J.

    2014-01-01

    A high power diode laser (HPDL) was used to produce laser surface melting (LSM) treatments on the surface of the Mg alloy AZ91D. Different treatments with different microstructures were produced by varying the laser-beam power and laser-scanning speed. Corrosion evaluation, using hydrogen evolution and electrochemical measurements, led to a relationship between microstructure and corrosion. Most corrosion rates for LSM treated specimens were within the scatter of the as-received AZ91D, whereas some treatments gave higher corrosion rates and some of the samples had corrosion rates lower than the average of the corrosion rate for AZ91D. There were differences in corroded surface morphology. Nevertheless laser treatments introduced surface discontinuities, which masked the effect of the microstructure. Removing these surface defects decreased the corrosion rate for the laser-treated samples. - Highlights: • Corrosion behavior of AZ91D Mg alloys is intimately related with its microstructure. • Laser surface melting treatments allows surface modification of the microstructure. • Different laser parameters can achieve different microstructures. • Controlling laser parameters can produce different corrosion rates and morphologies. • Increase of surface roughness due to laser treatment is relevant to the corrosion rate

  9. Influence of the surface finishing on the corrosion behaviour of AISI 316L stainless steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dundeková, S.; Zatkalíková, V.; Fintová, Stanislava; Hadzima, B.; Škorík, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2015), s. 48-53 ISSN 1335-0803 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0063 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : AISI 316L stainless steel * Corrosion * Immersion test * Corrosion rate Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials http://ojs.mateng.sk/index.php/Mateng/article/view/166/251

  10. Effect of corrosion potential on the corrosion fatigue crack growth behaviour of low-alloy steels in high-temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P.

    2008-01-01

    The low-frequency corrosion fatigue (CF) crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels was characterized under simulated boiling water reactor conditions by cyclic fatigue tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens. The experiments were performed in the temperature range of 240-288 deg. C with different loading parameters at different electrochemical corrosion potentials (ECPs). Modern high-temperature water loops, on-line crack growth monitoring (DCPD) and fractographical analysis by SEM were used to quantify the cracking response. In this paper the effect of ECP on the CF crack growth behaviour is discussed and compared with the crack growth model of General Electric (GE). The ECP mainly affected the transition from fast ('high-sulphur') to slow ('low-sulphur') CF crack growth, which appeared as critical frequencies ν crit = f(ΔK, R, ECP) and ΔK-thresholds ΔK EAC f(ν, R, ECP) in the cycle-based form and as a critical air fatigue crack growth rate da/dt Air,crit in the time-domain form. The critical crack growth rates, frequencies, and ΔK EAC -thresholds were shifted to lower values with increasing ECP. The CF crack growth rates of all materials were conservatively covered by the 'high-sulphur' CF line of the GE-model for all investigated temperatures and frequencies. Under most system conditions, the model seems to reasonably well predict the experimentally observed parameter trends. Only under highly oxidizing conditions (ECP ≥ 0 mV SHE ) and slow strain rates/low loading frequencies the GE-model does not conservatively cover the experimentally gathered crack growth rate data. Based on the GE-model and the observed cracking behaviour a simple time-domain superposition-model could be used to develop improved reference CF crack growth curves for codes

  11. Effect of Shading on Physiological, Biochemical and Behaviour Changes in Crossbred Calves Under Hot Climatic Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teama, F.E.I.; Gad, A.E.; El-Tarabany, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the importance and the effect of shading and non-shading house on physiological changes, body weight (BW), average daily gain (ADG), total antioxidant and thyroid hormones in crossbred calves under hot conditions. Thirty six growing crossbred calves (Friesian x Baladi) aged 8-10 months were divided into two groups (each 18 calves); the first group was maintained in shaded house and the second in house without shade (climatic house). The period of study was 79 days during hot conditions. Performance variables (BW, ADG) were measured and the blood samples were collected to assess some biochemical parameters including antioxidants such as total antioxidant (TA), catalase (CAT), total protein, thyroid hormones (T3, T4) and immunoglobulin factor (IgG). Respiration rates and behaviour parameters (feeding, drinking, standing, lying and agonistic) were also measured during the study. The data indicated that the shaded calves had higher ADG (P<0.05) and final BW than non-shaded ones. Also, a significant improvement in total protein levels and globulins were recorded in shaded house calves as compared to non-shaded ones. The same result was obtained for T3 level whereas non-significant changes were observed for T4 level as well as the level of IgG at different times. The present data indicated that using shaded house will decrease the effect of heat stress on calves which will increase the animal performance through improving BW and ADG as well as some biochemical parameters in addition to T3 hormonal level.

  12. Corrosion behaviour of Mg-Cu and Mg-Mo composites in 3.5% NaCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budruk Abhijeet, S.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Gupta, M.

    2008-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of pure magnesium, Mg-Cu (0.3, 0.6, and 1 vol.%) and Mg-Mo (0.1, 0.3, and 0.6 vol.%) composites has been studied in 3.5% NaCl solution by weight loss and polarisation methods. Corrosion rates determined by weight loss method were considerably higher than that determined by polarisation method. The corrosion rate increased with increasing volume fraction of reinforcement in Mg-Cu and Mg-Mo composites. At the same volume fraction of reinforcement, molybdenum reinforced composite corroded faster than copper reinforced composite. The galvanic current density between Mg-Cu and Mg-Mo couples has been experimentally measured using zero resistance ammeter technique. The experimentally observed galvanic current densities were in close agreement with those obtained using mixed potential theory analysis. SEM observation of corroded samples confirmed microgalvanic activity at the matrix/reinforcement interfaces. The poor corrosion resistance of composites has been attributed to microgalvanic effects between the matrix and reinforcements and inferior quality of surface films

  13. Studies on microstructure, mechanical and pitting corrosion behaviour of similar and dissimilar stainless steel gas tungsten arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Dilkush; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to weld dissimilar alloys of 5mm thick plates i.e., austenitic stainless steel (316L) and duplex stainless steel (2205) and compared with that of similar welds. Welds are made with conventional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process with two different filler wires namely i.e., 309L and 2209. Welds were characterized using optical microscopy to observe the microstructural changes and correlate with mechanical properties using hardness, tensile and impact testing. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were carried out to observe the pitting corrosion behaviour in different regions of the welds. Results of the present study established that change in filler wire composition resulted in microstructural variation in all the welds with different morphology of ferrite and austenite. Welds made with 2209 filler showed plate like widmanstatten austenite (WA) nucleated at grain boundaries. Compared to similar stainless steel welds inferior mechanical properties was observed in dissimilar stainless steel welds. Pitting corrosion resistance is observed to be low for dissimilar stainless steel welds when compared to similar stainless steel welds. Overall study showed that similar duplex stainless steel welds having favorable microstructure and resulted in better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Relatively dissimilar stainless steel welds made with 309L filler obtained optimum combination of mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance when compared to 2209 filler and is recommended for industrial practice.

  14. Effects of microplasma arc AISI 316L welds on the corrosion behaviour of pipelines in LiBr cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez-Tovar, R.; Montañés, M.T.; García-Antón, J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •SECM tests reveal differences in electrochemical activity of base and welded alloys. •The highest electrochemical activity is obtained for the welded alloy. •Microplasma arc welding process hinders passivation in lithium bromide. •Microplasma arc welding increases corrosion rate and susceptibility to pitting. •The galvanic pair between base and welded alloys in LiBr is weak. -- Abstract: The effect of microplasma arc welding (MPAW) on the electrochemical and corrosion behaviour of AISI 316L stainless steel tubes has been studied. Scanning electrochemical measurements were performed in sodium chloride to evaluate the difference in the electrochemical activity of base (non-welded) and welded samples. Oxygen reduction rates increase in AISI 316L due to the heat treatment effect induced by welding, indicating a higher electrochemical activity in the welded samples. Additionally, the use of MPA weldments in lithium bromide (LiBr) absorption machines was also analysed at typical operating temperatures and Reynolds numbers. The welding process increases corrosion rates, hinders passivation and increases the susceptibility to pitting attack in LiBr. However, zero-resistance ammeter and localization index measurements show that the galvanic pair generated between the base and welded alloys is weak, both electrodes being in their passive state. Temperature greatly affects the corrosion process

  15. Effect of Microstructure on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviour of High Nitrogen Stainless Steel Gas Tungsten Arc Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    Present work is aimed to improve stress corrosion cracking resistance of high nitrogen steel and its welds. An attempt to weld high nitrogen steel of 5 mm thick plate using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) with three high strength age hardenable fillers i.e., 11-10 PH filler, PH 13- 8Mo and maraging grade of MDN 250 filler is made. Welds were characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Vickers hardness testing of the welds was carried out to study the mechanical behaviour of welds. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were done to determine pitting corrosion resistance in aerated 3.5% NaCl solution. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) testing was carried out using constant load type machine with applied stress of 50% yield strength and in 45% MgCl2 solution boiling at 155°C. The results of the present investigation established that improvement in resistance to stress corrosion cracking was observed for PH 13- 8Mo GTA welds when compared to 11-10 PH and MDN 250 GTA welds. However, All GTA welds failed in the weld interface region. This may be attributed to relatively lower pitting potential in weld interface which acts as active site and the initiation source of pitting.

  16. Effect of coating mild steel with CNTs on its mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour in acidic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulmalik Abdulrahaman, Mahmud; Kamaldeeen Abubakre, Oladiran; Ambali Abdulkareem, Saka; Oladejo Tijani, Jimoh; Aliyu, Ahmed; Afolabi, Ayo Samuel

    2017-03-01

    The study investigated the mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour of mild steel coated with carbon nanotubes at different coating conditions. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized via the conventional chemical vapour deposition reaction using bimetallic Fe-Ni catalyst supported on kaolin, with acetylene gas as a carbon source. The HRSEM/HRTEM analysis of the purified carbon materials revealed significant reduction in the diameters of the purified MWCNT bundles from 50 nm to 2 nm and was attributed to the ultrasonication assisted dispersion with surfactant (gum arabic) employed in purification process. The network of the dispersed MWCNTs was coated onto the surfaces of mild steel samples, and as the coating temperature and holding time increased, the coating thickness reduced. The mechanical properties (tensile strength, yield strength, hardness value) of the coated steel samples increased with increase in coating temperature and holding time. Comparing the different coating conditions, coated mild steels at the temperature of 950 °C for 90 min holding time exhibited high hardness, yield strength and tensile strength values compared to others. The corrosion current and corrosion rate of the coated mild steel samples decreased with increase in holding time and coating temperature. The lowest corrosion rate was observed on sample coated at 950 °C for 90 min.

  17. Electrochemical and stress corrosion cracking behaviour of titanium in n-propanol and iso-propanol solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trasatti, S.P.; Sivieri, E.

    2004-01-01

    Titanium shows severe localised corrosion in non-aqueous media in the presence of applied stress and crevice. The present work brings a contribution to the behaviour of Ti in non-aqueous media by studying the role of water on the electrochemical properties and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) sensitivity of Ti in n-propanol and iso-propanol solutions. The anodic behaviour of titanium in n-propanol-H 2 O and iso-propanol-H 2 O systems is quite similar to that observed in methanol-H 2 O and ethanol-H 2 O systems. The minimum water content needed for the passive film to be stable is 2% for n-propanol and 0.1% for iso-propanol. In methanol and ethanol it is 20 and 8%, respectively. The minimum water content decreases as the number of carbon atoms increases and the lowest water content in iso-propanol is strictly related to the capability of the alcohol to dehydrate. The possibility of predicting by means of polarisation curves the conditions of occurrence of SCC of titanium has been confirmed by simply analysing when corrosion potential is higher than breakdown potential

  18. Biocompatibility and Corrosion Protection Behaviour of Hydroxyapatite Sol-Gel-Derived Coatings on Ti6Al4V Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hadad, Amir A.; Peón, Eduardo; García-Galván, Federico R.; Barranco, Violeta; Parra, Juan; Jiménez-Morales, Antonia; Galván, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare hydroxyapatite coatings (HAp) by a sol-gel method on Ti6Al4V alloy and to study the bioactivity, biocompatibility and corrosion protection behaviour of these coatings in presence of simulated body fluids (SBFs). Thermogravimetric/Differential Thermal Analyses (TG/DTA) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) have been applied to obtain information about the phase transformations, mass loss, identification of the phases developed, crystallite size and degree of crystallinity of the obtained HAp powders. Fourier Transformer Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) has been utilized for studying the functional groups of the prepared structures. The surface morphology of the resulting HAp coatings was studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The bioactivity was evaluated by soaking the HAp-coatings/Ti6Al4V system in Kokubo’s Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) applying Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) spectrometry. 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and Alamar blue cell viability assays were used to study the biocompatibility. Finally, the corrosion behaviour of HAp-coatings/Ti6Al4V system was researched by means of Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). The obtained results showed that the prepared powders were nanocrystalline HAp with little deviations from that present in the human bone. All the prepared HAp coatings deposited on Ti6Al4V showed well-behaved biocompatibility, good bioactivity and corrosion protection properties. PMID:28772455

  19. Biocompatibility and Corrosion Protection Behaviour of Hydroxyapatite Sol-Gel-Derived Coatings on Ti6Al4V Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir A. El Hadad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to prepare hydroxyapatite coatings (HAp by a sol-gel method on Ti6Al4V alloy and to study the bioactivity, biocompatibility and corrosion protection behaviour of these coatings in presence of simulated body fluids (SBFs. Thermogravimetric/Differential Thermal Analyses (TG/DTA and X-ray Diffraction (XRD have been applied to obtain information about the phase transformations, mass loss, identification of the phases developed, crystallite size and degree of crystallinity of the obtained HAp powders. Fourier Transformer Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR has been utilized for studying the functional groups of the prepared structures. The surface morphology of the resulting HAp coatings was studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The bioactivity was evaluated by soaking the HAp-coatings/Ti6Al4V system in Kokubo’s Simulated Body Fluid (SBF applying Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP spectrometry. 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT and Alamar blue cell viability assays were used to study the biocompatibility. Finally, the corrosion behaviour of HAp-coatings/Ti6Al4V system was researched by means of Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS. The obtained results showed that the prepared powders were nanocrystalline HAp with little deviations from that present in the human bone. All the prepared HAp coatings deposited on Ti6Al4V showed well-behaved biocompatibility, good bioactivity and corrosion protection properties.

  20. Rheological (visco-elastic behaviour) analysis of cyclic olefin copolymers with application to hot embossing for microfabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jena, R K; Chen, X; Yue, C Y; Lam, Y C

    2011-01-01

    Transparent, amorphous cyclic olefin copolymers (COCs) have been frequently used for the fabrication of microfluidic devices using a hot embossing technique for numerous applications. In hot embossing, the polymer is deformed near its glass transition temperature (Tg), i.e. between Tg and Tg + 60 °C where the viscoelastic properties of the material are dominant. The proper characterization of the viscoelastic properties is of interest as this can lead to a better understanding of polymer flow behaviour during microfabrication. Furthermore, the ability to model its rheological behaviour will enable the prediction of the optimal hot embossing processing parameters. We performed small amplitude oscillatory shear experiments on four grades of COCs, TOPAS-8007, TOPAS-5013, TOPAS-6015 and TOPAS-6017, in order to characterize their flow behaviour. The experiments were conducted within the frequency range from 0.01 to 500 Hz at between Tg + 20 and Tg + 60 °C. The flow properties could be represented using a generalized Maxwell viscoelastic constitutive model with Williams–Landel–Ferry-type temperature dependence. Good fit of the experimental data was obtained over a wide range of temperatures. The model could be coupled with ABAQUS finite element software to predict the optimal conditions for fabricating a capillary electrophoresis micro-chip on a TOPAS-5013 substrate by hot embossing

  1. Non-Metallic Inclusions and Hot-Working Behaviour of Advanced High-Strength Medium-Mn Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grajcar A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The work addresses the production of medium-Mn steels with an increased Al content. The special attention is focused on the identification of non-metallic inclusions and their modification using rare earth elements. The conditions of the thermomechanical treatment using the metallurgical Gleeble simulator and the semi-industrial hot rolling line were designed for steels containing 3 and 5% Mn. Hot-working conditions and controlled cooling strategies with the isothermal holding of steel at 400°C were selected. The effect of Mn content on the hot-working behaviour and microstructure of steel was addressed. The force-energetic parameters of hot rolling were determined. The identification of structural constituents was performed using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy methods. The addition of rare earth elements led to the total modification of non-metallic inclusions, i.e., they replaced Mn and Al forming complex oxysulphides. The Mn content in a range between 3 and 5% does not affect the inclusion type and the hot-working behaviour. In contrast, it was found that Mn has a significant effect on a microstructure.

  2. Corrosion behaviour and galvanic coupling of titanium and welded titanium in LiBr solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasco-Tamarit, E.; Igual-Munoz, A.; Garcia Anton, J.; Garcia-Garcia, D.

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion resistance and galvanic coupling of Grade 2 commercially pure titanium in its welded and non-welded condition were systematically analyzed in LiBr solutions. Galvanic corrosion was evaluated through two different methods: anodic polarization (according to the Mixed Potential Theory) and electrochemical noise (using a zero-resistance ammeter). Samples have been etched to study the microstructure. The action of lithium chromate as corrosion inhibitor has been evaluated. Titanium and welded titanium showed extremely low corrosion current densities and elevated pitting potential values (higher than 1 V). The results of both methods, anodic polarization and electrochemical noise, showed that the welded titanium was always the anodic element of the pair titanium-welded titanium, so that its corrosion resistance decreases due to the galvanic effect

  3. Corrosion behaviour of ion implanted aluminium alloy in 0.1 M NaCl electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, J W; Evans, P J [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Sood, D K [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    Aluminum and its alloys are widely used in industry because of their light weight, high strength and good corrosion resistance which is due to the formation of a protective oxide layer. However, under saline conditions such as those encountered in marine environments, this group of metals are vulnerable to localised degradation in the form of pitting corrosion. This type of corrosion involves the adsorption of an anion, such as chlorine, at the oxide solution interface. Ion implantation of metal ions has been shown to improve the corrosion resistance of a variety of materials. This effect occurs : when the implanted species reduces anion adsorption thereby decreasing the corrosion rate. In this paper we report on the pitting behavior of Ti implanted 2011 Al alloy in dilute sodium chloride solution. The Ti implanted surfaces exhibited an increased pitting potential and a reduced oxygen uptake. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Corrosion behaviour of ion implanted aluminium alloy in 0.1 M NaCl electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, J.W.; Evans, P.J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Sood, D.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Aluminum and its alloys are widely used in industry because of their light weight, high strength and good corrosion resistance which is due to the formation of a protective oxide layer. However, under saline conditions such as those encountered in marine environments, this group of metals are vulnerable to localised degradation in the form of pitting corrosion. This type of corrosion involves the adsorption of an anion, such as chlorine, at the oxide solution interface. Ion implantation of metal ions has been shown to improve the corrosion resistance of a variety of materials. This effect occurs : when the implanted species reduces anion adsorption thereby decreasing the corrosion rate. In this paper we report on the pitting behavior of Ti implanted 2011 Al alloy in dilute sodium chloride solution. The Ti implanted surfaces exhibited an increased pitting potential and a reduced oxygen uptake. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Report on the studies on the corrosion behaviour of the constructional materials for the gate cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elayathu, N.S.D.; Balachandra, J.

    1974-01-01

    The gate cooling system of the Trombay R-5 reactor, now under construction, is proposed to be a laminated gate designed to operate with 50 % KBO 2 solution within the temperature limits 30 deg C and 50 deg C. With a view to find suitable constructional materials for the gate, the corrosion behaviour of stainless steel 304 L(ASTM 240-69), lead (ASTM B-29), aluminium (as Boral), neoprene, perspex and carbon steel (ASTM A 302 grade B) has been investigated in 50 % KBO 2 solution at 45 deg C. After definite periods of exposure, their coupons were examined metallographically at different magnifications to assess the nature and extent of sub-surface attack. The results show that out of the materials studied, carbon steel, lead and aluminium are more liable to corrosion in the borate solution and hence their use should be avoided. (M.G.B.)

  6. Corrosion and deposition behaviour of 60Co and 54Mn in the SNR mockup loop for the primary sodium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menken, G.; Reichel, H.

    1976-01-01

    The SNR corrosion mockup loop, simulating the SNR primary system is described. The influence of hydraulic conditions and temperature on the deposition behaviour is studied. γ-spectroscopy measurements at the pipe-work and removable samples allowed to determine the distribution of radioactive corrosion products in the loop and by-pass system. The release rate of Mn 54 could be reduced by a factor of 3 by decreasing the cold trap temperature from 165 0 C to 105 0 C while the Co 60 release rate could be reduced by a factor of 14, respectively. High temperature loop sections (873K) representing 13% of the loop surface absorbed 50-60% of the released Co 60 and only 8 - 18% of the Mn 54. The cold trap absorbed not more than 1% of the Co 60 and 10% of the Mn 54 inventory. (author)

  7. The effect of welding parameters on the corrosion behaviour of friction stir welded AA2024-T351

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jariyaboon, M; Davenport, A.J.; Ambat, Rajan

    2007-01-01

    The effect of welding parameters (rotation speed and travel speed) on the corrosion behaviour of friction stir welds in the high strength aluminium alloy AA2024-T351 was investigated. It was found that rotation speed plays a major role in controlling the location of corrosion attack. Localised...... intergranular attack was observed in the nugget region for low rotation speed welds, whereas for higher rotation speed welds, attack occurred predominantly in the heat-affected zone. The increase in anodic reactivity in the weld zone was due to the sensitisation of the grain boundaries leading to intergranular...... attack. Enhancement of cathodic reactivity was also found in the nugget as a result of the precipitation of S-phase. The results were compared with samples of AA2024-T351 that had been heat treated to simulate the thermal cycle associated with welding, and with samples that had been exposed to high...

  8. Nicotinic acid as a nontoxic corrosion inhibitor for hot dipped Zn and Zn-Al alloy coatings on steels in diluted hydrochloric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju Hong [Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Li Yan [Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071 (China)], E-mail: yanlee@ms.qdio.ac.cn

    2007-11-15

    The inhibition effect of nicotinic acid for corrosion of hot dipped Zn and Zn-Al alloy coatings in diluted hydrochloric acid was investigated using quantum chemistry analysis, weight loss test, electrochemical measurement, and scanning electronic microscope (SEM) analysis. Quantum chemistry calculation results showed that nicotinic acid possessed planar structure with a number of active centers, and the populations of the Mulliken charge, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) were found mainly focused around oxygen and nitrogen atoms, and the cyclic of the benzene as well. The results of weight loss test and electrochemical measurement indicated that inhibition efficiency (IE%) increased with inhibitor concentration, and the highest inhibition efficiency was up to 96.7%. The corrosion inhibition of these coatings was discussed in terms of blocking the electrode reaction by adsorption of the molecules at the active centers on the electrode surface. It was found that the adsorption of nicotinic acid on coating surface followed Langmuir adsorption isotherm with single molecular layer, and nicotinic acid adsorbed on the coating surface probably by chemisorption. Nicotinic acid, therefore, can act as a good nontoxic corrosion inhibitor for hot dipped Zn and Zn-Al alloy coatings in diluted hydrochloric acid solution.

  9. Study of anti corrosive behaviour on A I 6061 samples covered with Ni-P alloys obtained by autocatalytic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, M. E; Barbero, J. A; Bubach, E

    2006-01-01

    There are many ways to keep safe an industrial material from corrosion attack.One is covering the piece with a layer of another material which corrosion resistance is higher to the one of the element to protect.The anticorrosion protection mechanism is achieved by the formation of a physical pore less barrier without any defects.This avoid the arrival of those agents from environment responsible of electrochemical attack.In this paper, corrosion resistance of metallic coatings over nuclear usage aluminum samples is analyzed.Our interest is aimed on nickel I phosphorous alloy coatings (Ni I P) obtained by electroless method (autocatalytic) over Al 6061 alloy samples.A comparative study is carried on with different phosphorous contents but always under 12 %.This job is completed with other nickel coating, Vitro vac 0080 (with no phosphorous content) in order to compare structures and anti corrosive properties.Besides, the comparison between mentioned materials and aluminum samples is made.The study is carried on using superficial characterization of each sample with or without coating through a series of complementary techniques such as chemical, electrochemical (linear sweep voltammetry, cyclic voltammetry, polarization resistance determination) and physical (scanning electronic microscopy, hardness determination) techniques.Finally, variable correlation is made as a function of the phosphorous content in the samples used in the experiences.The coating structure obtained is amorphous.It presents no pore or failure and its hardness shows important values.The electrochemical analysis allows to check that anti corrosive protection capacity of Ni-P alloy increases with the phosphorous content in the coat. Al 6061 by itself demonstrate an electrochemically bad behaviour.Substrate I coating adherence is very good [es

  10. The SKB spent fuel corrosion programme. An evaluation of results from the experimental programme performed in the Studsvik Hot Cell Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, R. [Forsyth Consulting, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1997-12-01

    During the last few years, many of the specimens in the SKB programme on the corrosion of spent fuel have been analysed by the ICP-MS technique, shortly after conclusion of the corrosion tests, or by the analysis of archive samples. Together with the previous results, this has made available a much more extended analytical data base than that available before, and this has been used in a new evaluation which complements those published earlier. Some of the new analytical data is for tests performed on fuel specimens (from two reference fuel rods, one BWR and one PWR) which have been corrosion tested for over ten years. Most of the data refers to 16 fuel/clad specimens from a short BWR fuel rod, which had burnups over a range of 27.0 to 48.8 MWd/kg U. Detailed examination and characterisation of three other fuel specimens from the rod had shown that the specimens with the higher burnups in this series would have a fuel microstructure and alpha activity content and distribution which, theoretically, may promote enhanced corrosion. These specimens had been exposed to over 5 years of corrosion during nine water contact periods. The corrodants used were a simulated bicarbonate groundwater and de-ionised water, and both oxic and nominally anoxic conditions were included in the test matrix. Most of the emphasis in the evaluation has, therefore, been on the possible effects on corrosion behaviour of the linear heat rating and burnup of the fuels. However, examination of the variation with water contact time of the fractional release rates of selected fission products and their total release over the five years of corrosion, have shown that the corrosion rates during the first few weeks of corrosion of the specimens with the higher burnups were lower than those for specimens with slightly lower burnup. Later, the corrosion rates converged for all specimens. This has been interpreted to be due to burnup-related differences in the fuel microstructure, particularly in the

  11. Electrodeposition of polypyrrole onto NiTi and the corrosion behaviour of the coated alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flamini, D.O.; Saidman, S.B.

    2010-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) films were electrodeposited onto nickel--titanium alloy (NiTi) employing sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (Aerosol OT or AOT) solutions. Polarizing anodically NiTi samples recovered by PPy in a monomer-free solution increases adhesion of the coating. Electrochemical techniques, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and element analysis were used in determining the corrosion performance of the coated samples in chloride solution. The polymer improves the corrosion performance at the open circuit potential and at potentials where the bare substrate suffers pitting attack. The improvement in both, adhesion and corrosion performance, is discussed considering substrate/polymer interaction, overoxidation of PPy and the role played by AOT.

  12. Corrosion behaviour of the welded steel 1.4313/CA6-NM

    OpenAIRE

    Lovíšek, Martin; Liptáková, Tatiana; Pešlová, Františka

    2014-01-01

    The stainless steel 1.4313/CA6-NM (EN X3CrNiMo13-4) is used for turbine production. The weld joints are therefore very sensitive localities from mechanical and corrosion point of view. The subject of the work is corrosion studying of the steel welded by TIG method with consequent heat treatment. Corrosion resistance of the weld joints and base material are evaluated through potentiodynamic polarization test measured on the surface after heat treatment and on the surface cleaned by grinding an...

  13. Investigation of Microstructure and Corrosion Propagation Behaviour of Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abidin Kamal Ariff Zainal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Martensitic stainless steels are commonly used for fabricating components. For many applications, an increase in surface hardness and wear resistance can be beneficial to improve performance and extend service life. However, the improvement in hardness of martensitic steels is usually accompanied by a reduction in corrosion strength. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of nitriding on AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel, in terms of microstructure and corrosion propagation behavior. The results indicate that the microstructure and phase composition as well as corrosion resistance were influenced by nitriding temperatures.

  14. Corrosion Behaviour of Sn-based Lead-Free Solders in Acidic Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordarina, J.; Mohd, H. Z.; Ahmad, A. M.; Muhammad, F. M. N.

    2018-03-01

    The corrosion properties of Sn-9(5Al-Zn), Sn-Cu and SAC305 were studied via potentiodynamic polarization method in an acidic solution of 1 M hydrochloric acid (HCl). Sn-9(5Al-Zn) produced different polarization profile compared with Sn-Cu and SAC305. The morphological analysis showed that small, deep grooves shaped of corrosion product formed on top of Sn-9(5Al-Zn) solder while two distinctive structures of closely packed and loosely packed corrosion product formed on top of Sn-Cu and SAC305 solder alloys. Phase analysis revealed the formations of various corrosion products such as SnO and SnO2 mainly dominant on surface of solder alloys after potentiodynamic polarization in 1 M hydrochloric acid (HCl).

  15. Corrosion-electrochemical behaviour and mechanical properties ofaluminium alloy-321, alloyed by barium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganiev, I.; Mukhiddinov, G.N.; Kargapolova, T.V.; Mirsaidov, U.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of present work is studying of influence of barium additionson electrochemical corrosion of casting aluminium-copper alloy Al-321,containing as base alloying components copper, chromium, manganese, titanium,zirconium, cadmium

  16. Pitting corrosion behaviour study of aluminium matrix composites (A3xx.x/SiCp)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, A.; Merino, M. C.; Merino, S.; Lopez, M. D.; Viejo, F.; Carboneras, M.; Arrabal, R.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of the SiCp proportion on the pitting corrosion of A3xx.x/SiC/xxp composites was studies by means of potenciodinamic polarization and double cyclic polarization in saline environment at 25 degree centigrade A360/SiC/xxp matrix does not contain copper, whereas the A380/SiC/xxp matric contains 1,39-1,44 wt %Cu. The kinetic study was carried out by gravimetric measurements. The nature of corrosion products was analysed by low angle XRD and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The corrosion is due to nucleation and growth of Al 2 O 3 -3H 2 O on the material surface. The corrosion increases with the reinforcement proportion, chloride concentration and copper content. (Author) 10 refs

  17. Investigation of Mechanical, Microstructural and Corrosion behaviour of Titanium subjected to Laser Peening with and without Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjith Kumar, G.; Sowmya Joshi, K.; Rajyalakshmi, G.; Kalainathan, S.; Prabhakaran, S.

    2018-02-01

    Present competitive world is looking for Components with high strength and fatigue resistance finding their applications in aerospace, turbine parts and especially bio-medical devices with high bio-compatibility. Advanced surface engineering techniques are required to produce parts of higher complexities and desirable surface qualities. Laser peening stood first in a row of all various surface treatments of metallic component. This paper discusses about the mechanical properties like hardness and roughness then the surface morphology and the corrosion behaviour of the laser peened titanium samples with and without coating.

  18. Hot corrosion of Co-Cr, Co-Cr-Al, and Ni-Cr alloys in the temperature range of 700-750 deg C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, K. T.; Meier, G. H.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of SO3 pressure in the gas phase on the Na2SO4 induced hot corrosion of Co-Cr, Ni-Cr, and Co-Cr-Al alloys was studied in the temperature range 700 to 750 C. The degradation of the Co-Cr and Ni-Cr alloys was found to be associated with the formation of liquid mixed sulfates (CoSO4-Na2SO4 or NiSO4-Na2SO4) which provided a selective dissolution of the Co or Ni and a subsequent sulfidation oxidation mode of attack which prevented the maintenance of a protective Cr2O3 film. A clear mechanism was not developed for the degradation of Co-Cr-Al alloys. A pitting corrosion morphology was induced by a number of different mechanisms.

  19. Investigation of Microstructure and Corrosion Propagation Behaviour of Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel Plates

    OpenAIRE

    Abidin Kamal Ariff Zainal; Ismail Elya Atikah; Zainuddin Azman; Hussain Patthi

    2014-01-01

    Martensitic stainless steels are commonly used for fabricating components. For many applications, an increase in surface hardness and wear resistance can be beneficial to improve performance and extend service life. However, the improvement in hardness of martensitic steels is usually accompanied by a reduction in corrosion strength. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of nitriding on AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel, in terms of microstructure and corrosion propagat...

  20. Irradiation and corrosion behaviour of cadmium aluminate, a burnable poison for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattenbach, K.; Ahlf, J.; Hilgendorff, W.; Zimmermann, H.U.

    1979-01-01

    In quest of a cadmium containing material for use as burnable poison cadmium aluminate seemed promising. Therefore irradiation and corrosion experiments on specimens of cadmium aluminate in a matrix of aluminia were performed. Irradiation at 575 K and fast fluences up to 10 25 m -2 showed the material to have good radiation resistance and low swelling rates. Cadmium pluminate was resistant to corrosion attack in demineralized water of 575K. (orig.) [de

  1. Corrosion behaviour of zinc and aluminium in simulated nuclear accident environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piippo, J.; Laitinen, T.; Sirkiae, P.

    1997-02-01

    The corrosion rates of zinc and aluminium were determined in simulated large pipe break and in severe accident cases. An in situ on fine measurement technique, which is based on the resistance measurement of sample wires, was used. In the large pipe break case the corrosion rates of zinc and aluminium were determined at pH 8 and pH 10 in deaerated and in aerated solutions. Tests were also performed in aerated 0.1 M borate buffer solution at pH 9.2. Temperature range was 130 deg C - 50 deg C. The corrosion of zinc appears to be relatively fast in neutral or mildly alkaline aerated water, while both high pH and deaeration tend to reduce the corrosion rates of zinc. The aeration and pH elevation decrease the corrosion rate of aluminium. The simulation of the severe accident case took place in the pH range 3-11 in chloride containing solutions at 50 deg C temperature. The corrosion rate of aluminium was lower than that of zinc, except for the solution with pH 11, in which the corrosion rate of aluminium was practically identical to that of zinc. Both metals corroded more rapidly in the presence of chlorides in acidic and alkalic conditions than in the absence of chlorides at neutral environment. The solubility of zinc and aluminium and the stability of the corrosion products were estimated using thermodynamical calculations. The experimental results and the thermodynamical calculations were in fair agreement. (8 refs.)

  2. Corrosion behaviour of alloy Ti-35 in boiling nitric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan Cui; Qiu Shaoyu

    2005-01-01

    This report states the corrosion behaviors of alloy Ti-35 in boiling nitric acid solution. The results show that its general corrosion rate is by far superior to high-purity austenitic stainless steel with super-low carbon content, the stress corrosion and crevice corrosion have been not discovered in its samples, and oxide film can be quickly reproduced in scratch. The microstructural analysis on samples shows that there is a thin compact TiO 2 film on the sample surface of alloy Ti-35, and most of the film possess the crystal structure of rutile type, the other has the crystal structure of anatase type. This oxide layer plays a role in hindering corrosion development, so the corrosion resistance of alloy Ti-35 is raised. In contrast with it, the oxide film on the sample surface of austenitic stainless steel is not found. It is evident that alloy Ti-35 can become the prime candidate structural material for dissolver of reprocessing facility of spent fuel and be substituted for high-purity austenitic stainless steel with super-low carbon content which is used now. (authors)

  3. Corrosion behaviour of water waste on the gray cast iron sanitary pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawzy, Y.H.A.H.

    2002-01-01

    The works of Plato (427-347 B.C.) contained the written description of corrosion. Plato defined rust as the earthy component separating out of the metal. (Georgius Agrico La) held to the same opinion some 2000 years later in his great mineralogical work De Natura Fossilium Iron rust (rat. Ferrug or Rubigo) is, so to speak, assertion of metallic iron. Iron can be protected against this defect by various wrapping, such as red lead, white lead, gypsum, bitumen or tar. Gaius Secundus Pliny also mentioned bitumen, pitch, white lead, and gypsum as protecting iron and bronze against corrosion. He reported that Alexander the Great had constructed Ponton Bridge at Zeugmar on the Euphrates with the aid of an iron chain. Link's that were inserted later suffered rust attacks, While the original ones remained immune. The opinion, sometimes expressed today, that modern iron inferior and more corrosion than old iron, was thus current even in ancient times. The concept of the corrosion process derived from the latin corrodere ( to eat away, to destroy ), first appeared in the philosophical transaction in 1667. It was discussed in German from the Frensh on the manufacture of white lead in 1785 and was mentioned in 1836 in the translation of an English paper by Savy on the cathodic protection of iron in sea water. However, almost unit the present day, the term was indiscriminately for corrosion reaction effects, and corrosion damage

  4. Spent fuel UO2 matrix corrosion behaviour studies through alpha-doped UO2 pellets leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muzeau, B.; Jegou, C.; Broudic, V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The option of direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep geological formation raises the need to investigate the long-term behaviour of the UO 2 matrix in aqueous media subjected to α-β-γ radiations. The β-γ emitters account for the most of the activity of spent fuel at the moment it is removed from the reactor, but diminish within a millennial time frame by over three orders of magnitude to less than the long-term activity. The latter persist over much longer time periods and must therefore be taken into account over geological disposal scale. In the present investigation the UO 2 matrix corrosion under alpha radiation is studied as a function of different parameters such as: the alpha activity, the carbonates and hydrogen concentrations,.. In order to study the effect of alpha radiolysis of water on the UO 2 matrix, 238/239 Pu doped UO 2 pellets (0.22 %wt. Pu total) were fabricated with different 238 Pu/ 239 Pu ratio to reproduce the alpha activity of a 47 GWd.t HMi -1 UOX spent fuel at different milestones in time (15, 50, 1500, 10000 and 40000 years). Undoped UO 2 pellets were also available as reference sample. Leaching experiments were conducted in deionized or carbonated water (NaHCO 3 1 mM), under Argon (O 2 2 30% gas mixture. Previous experiments conducted in deionized water under argon atmosphere, have shown a good correlation between alpha activity and uranium release for the 15-, 1500- and 40000-years alpha doped UO 2 batches. Besides, uranium release in the leachate is controlled either by the kinetics, or by the thermodynamics. Provided the solubility limit of uranium is not achieved, uranium concentration increases and is only limited by the kinetics, unless precipitation occurs and the uranium concentration remains constant over time. These controls are highly dependant on the solution chemistry (HCO 3 - , pH, Eh,..), the atmosphere (Ar, Ar/H 2 ,..), and the radiolysis strength. The experimental matrix

  5. Analysis Of Effect Of Mechanical Properties Of Aluminum Alloy Addition Of Zinc Corrosion Resistance Of Carbon Steel A325 Bolts Process Of Hot Dip Galvanizing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ery Diniardi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The world oil industry are common in offshore areas that are included in a corrosive environment so that the low-carbon steel bolts A325 will gradually corroded. Therefore an alternative that can be done to reduce the corrosion rate that is by coating with a Hot dip galvanizing method. The purpose of this study to improve the quality of products from low carbon steel bolts A325 with the addition of Zinc Aluminium alloy on the results of the Hot Dip Galvanizing. Results of testing the hardness of the lowest obtained in quenching time of 30 seconds is 162 037 HVN and the highest hardness obtained on quenching time of 60 seconds is 203 688 HVN. To microstructure shows that the phase Eta which is soft on the surface of the outermost started a little not as much time quenching 30 seconds so that the nature of its decline and violence increased the phase Zeta that are hard are widely spread meet the layer of phase resulting in hardness of the coating while quenching 45 seconds exceed the hardness of quenching time of 30 seconds. Results of analysis of the rate of corrosion that galvanized coating on each test is different and the structure of ferrite and pearlite it looks clear. For quenching time of 30 seconds obvious difference in galvanized layer thicker than quenching time of 45 and 60 seconds. This happens because of the influence of factors zinc layer that coats the base material so that decreased levels of corrosion is comparable to the time Salt Spray Test SST performed.

  6. The effect of some metallurgical factors on the corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steels in 3% NaCl aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sayed, A.A.; Morsy, S.M.; El-Raghy, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of cold work and subsequent heat treatment on the corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steels in 3% NaCl aqueous solutions was studied. Cold work was found to increase the corrosion rate, and heat treatment at 1050 C followed by water-quenching was found reduce to the rate of attack. The increase in the corrosion rate accompanied with a shift in the less noble direction of the steady state potential, an increase in the exchange current density and a decrease in the value of the activation energy. The results indicated that the corrosion potentials are less noble than the critical potentials for pitting, and they are discussed in terms of a simple dissolution process. A correlation is made between the corrosion rate, as expresses in weight loss, and the electrode properties of the corroding material

  7. The Influence of Corrosion Attack on Grey Cast Iron Brittle‑Fracture Behaviour and Its Impact on the Material Life Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Švarc

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is concerned with brittle‑fracture behaviour of grey cast iron attacked by corrosion and its impact on the life cycle of a spare part made of grey cast iron. In a corrosion chamber, outdoor climatic conditions (temperature and relative air humidity were simulated in which degradation processes, induced by material corrosion, degrading mechanical properties of a material and possibly leading to irreversible damage of a machine component, occur in the material of maintenance vehicles that are out of operation for the period of one year. The corrosion degradation of grey cast iron, which the spare parts constituting functional parts of an engine are made of grey cast iron, is described with regard to brittle‑fracture behaviour of the material. For the description of corrosion impact on grey cast iron, an instrumented impact test was employed. A corrosion degradation effect on grey cast iron was identified based on measured values of total energy, macro plastic deformation limit, initiation force of unstable crack propagation and force exerted on unstable crack arrest. In the first part of the experiment, a corrosion test of the material concerned was simulated in a condensation chamber; in the second part of the experiment, research results are provided for the measured quantities describing the material brittle‑fracture behaviour; this part is supplemented with a table of results and figures showing the changes in the values of the measured quantities in relation to test temperatures. In the discussion part, the influence of corrosion on the values of unstable crack initiation and arrest forces is interpreted. In the conclusion, an overview of the most significant research findings concerning the impact of corrosion on the life cycle of grey cast iron material is provided.

  8. Comparative study of the corrosion behaviour of plasma nitrocarburised AISI 4140 steel before and after post-oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heydarzadeh Sohi, M.; Ebrahimi, M.; Honarbakhsh Raouf, A.; Mahboubi, F.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the corrosion behaviour of plasma nitrocarburised AISI 4140 steel before and after post-oxidation was investigated. Plasma nitrocarburising was carried out at 530 o C, 570 o C and 630 o C for 5 h in an atmosphere consisting of 80 vol.% N 2 , 17 vol.% H 2 and 3 vol.% CO 2 . After nitrocarburising, plasma post-oxidation was performed at 450 o C for 1 h in a gas mixture of 50 vol.% O 2 and 50 vol.% H 2 . The microstructure of the treated samples was characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and surface roughness techniques. Dynamic polarization test was also used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of the samples. The results indicated that the compound layer was composed of ε-Fe 2-3 (N, C) and γ'-Fe 4 (N, C) phases. The amount of ε-Fe 2-3 (N, C) phase increased as the treatment temperature rose from 530 o C to 570 o C and decreased at 630 o C. The X-ray diffraction patterns of post-oxidized samples confirmed the formation of the highest amount of magnetite after post-oxidation of samples that had been nitrocarburised at 570 o C as compared with the samples that had been treated at 530 o C and 630 o C. Nitrocarburising at 570 o C followed by post-oxidation also provided the highest corrosion resistance among all treatment conditions.

  9. Fe and Fe-P Foam for Biodegradable Bone Replacement Material: Morphology, Corrosion Behaviour, and Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Hrubovčáková

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron and iron-phosphorus open-cell foams were manufactured by a replica method based on a powder metallurgical approach to serve as a temporary biodegradable bone replacement material. Iron foams alloyed with phosphorus were prepared with the aim of enhancing the mechanical properties and manipulating the corrosion rate. Two different types of Fe-P foams containing 0.5 wt.% of P were prepared: Fe-P(I foams from a phosphated carbonyl iron powder and Fe-P(II foams from a mixture of carbonyl iron and commercial Fe3P. The microstructure of foams was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties and the corrosion behaviour were studied by compression tests and potentiodynamic polarization in Hank’s solution and a physiological saline solution. The results showed that the manufactured foams exhibited an open, interconnected, microstructure similar to that of a cancellous bone. The presence of phosphorus improved the mechanical properties of the foams and decreased the corrosion rate as compared to pure iron foams.

  10. Erosion-corrosion behaviour of Ni-based superalloy Superni-75 in the real service environment of the boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidhu, T.S.; Prakash, S.; Agrawal, R.D.; Bhagat, R. [Shaheed Bhagat Singh College of Engineering & Technology, Ferozepur (India)

    2009-04-15

    The super-heater and re-heater tubes of the boilers used in thermal power plants are subjected to unacceptable levels of surface degradation by the combined effect of erosion-corrosion mechanism, resulting in the tube wall thinning and premature failure. The nickel-based superalloys can be used as boiler tube materials to increase the service life of the boilers, especially for the new generation ultra-supercritical boilers. The aim of the present investigation is to evaluate the erosion-corrosion behaviour of Ni-based superalloy Superni-75 in the real service environment of the coal-fired boiler of a thermal power plant. The cyclic experimental study was performed for 1000 h in the platen superheater zone of the coal-fired boiler where the temperature was around 900{sup o}C. The corrosion products have been characterized with respect to surface morphology, phase composition and element concentration using the combined techniques of X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive analysis (SEM/EDAX) and electron probe micro analyser (EPMA). The Superni-75 performed well in the coal-fired boiler environment, which has been attributed mainly to the formation of a thick band of chromium in scale due to selective oxidation of the chromium.

  11. Investigation of transient behaviour of combi boiler type appliances for domestic hot water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmaca, Ayşe Uğurcan; Erek, Aytunç; Altay, Hürrem Murat

    2015-01-01

    Combi boiler type appliances heating both space and water demanded for use and consuming natural gas as the energy source are one of the most common branches of the household goods. This study touches mainly on two types of combi boiler concepts to investigate only domestic hot water (DHW) heating function since highly efficient condensing appliances have been manufactured in terms of space heating. First concept has the normal working configuration of the heat exchangers of a standard combi boiler; whereas, the second has the opposite operation order of the heat exchangers. 1D transient energy equations have been constructed with the help of the laws of thermodynamics in order to model the heat exchangers in a standard combi boiler. After obtaining a general mathematical model for the standard combi boiler, the energy equations have been discretised with finite difference scheme, and solved numerically in Matlab ® . Subsequently, numerical results are validated experimentally in different working modes of a standard appliance. As the last step, similar results are obtained for the second proposed concept using the related equations of the standard combi model to compare both concepts on a numerical basis. - Highlights: • 1D theoretical model of a combi boiler was constructed and verified experimentally. • Preliminary estimations will be obtained from the model about the laboratory tests. • Number of the laboratory tests will be decreased thanks to the theoretical model. • The model was used to compare the transient behaviour of two kinds of combi boilers. • The second combi boiler alternative to standard one has a higher comfort potential

  12. Effect of Fe, Ni, and Cr on the corrosion behaviour of hyper-eutectic Al-Si automotive alloy under different pH conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Salim Kaiser

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Effect of Fe, Ni and Cr on the corrosion behaviour of hyper-eutectic Al-Si automotive alloy was studied. The test of corrosion behaviour at different environmental pH 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 13 was performed using conventional gravimetric measurements and complemented by resistivity, optical micrograph, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray analyser (EDX investigations. The highest corrosion rate was observed at pH 13 followed by pH 1, while in the pH range of 3.0 to 11, there is a high protection of surface due to formation of stable surface oxide film. The highest corrosion rate at pH 13 is due to presence of sodium hydroxide in the solution in which the surface oxide film is soluble. At pH 1, however, high corrosion rate can be attributed to dissolution of Al due to the surface attack by aggressive chloride ions. Presence of Fe, Ni and Cr in hyper-eutectic Al-Si automotive alloy has significant effect on the corrosion rate at both environmental pH values. Resistivity of alloy surfaces initially decreases at pH 1 and pH 13 due to formation of thin films. The SEM images of corroded samples immersed in pH 1 solution clearly show pores due to uniform degradation of the alloy. In pH 13 solution, however, the corrosion layer looks more packed and impermeable.

  13. Initiation of Stress Corrosion Cracking of 26Cr-1Mo Ferritic Stainless Steels in Hot Chloride Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, H. S.; Hehemann, R. F.

    1987-01-01

    Elongation measurements of 26Cr-1Mo ferritic stainless steels undergoing stress corrosion in boiling LiCl solution allow the induction period to be distinguished from the propagation period of cracks by the deviation of elongation from the logarithmic creep law. Localised corrosion cells are activated exclusively at slip steps by loading and developed into corrosion trenches. No cracks have developed from the corrosion trenches until the induction period is exceeded. The induction period is regarded as a time for localised corrosion cells to achieve a critical degree of occlusion for crack initiation. The repassivation rate of exposed metal by creep or emergence of slip steps decreases as the load increases and is very sensitive to the microstructural changes that affect slip tep height. The greater susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of either prestrained or grain coarsened 26Cr-1Mo alloy compared with that of mill annealed material results from a significant reduction of repassivation rate associated with the increased slip step height. The angular titanium carbonitrides particles dispersed in Ti-stabilized 26Cr-1Mo alloy have a detrimental effect on the resistance to stress corrosion cracking

  14. Studies on Fusion Welding of High Nitrogen Stainless Steel: Microstructure, Mechanical and corrosion Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    An attempt has been made in the present investigation to weld high nitrogen steel of 5mm thick plates using various process i.e., shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and autogenous electron beam welding (EBW) process. Present work is aimed at studying the microstructural changes and its effects on mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Microstructure is characterized by optical, scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction technique. Vickers hardness, tensile properties, impact toughness and face bend ductility testing of the welds was carried out. Pitting corrosion resistance of welds was determined using potentio-dynamic polarization testing in 3.5%NaCl solution. Results of the present investigation established that SMA welds made using Cr-Mn-N electrode were observed to have a austenite dendritic grain structure in the weld metal and is having poor mechanical properties but good corrosion resistance. GTA welds made using 18Ni (MDN 250) filler wire were observed to have a reverted austenite in martensite matrix of the weld metal and formation of unmixed zone at the fusion boundary which resulted in better mechanical properties and poor corrosion resistance. Fine grains and uniform distribution of delta ferrite in the austenite matrix and narrow width of weld zone are observed in autogeneous electron beam welds. A good combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance was achieved for electron beam welds of high nitrogen steel when compared to SMA and GTA welds.

  15. Urban and marine corrosion: Comparative behaviour between field and laboratory conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iribarren Laco, J.I.; Liesa Mestres, F.; Bilurbina Alter, L. [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica E.T.S.E.I.B. Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Cadena Villota, F. [Departamento de Materiales, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Quito (Ecuador)

    2004-09-01

    A detailed study of the corrosion phenomena of carbon steel has been investigated in this work by means of the comparison of field and laboratory tests. Two areas of the metropolitan area of Barcelona (Spain) were selected to carry out the field tests, whereas two different solutions of sodium chloride and sodium hydrogen sulfite were used to simulate the field conditions by means of cyclic laboratory tests. The corrosion rate has been evaluated from the weight loss of the specimens and the morphology surface has been visualized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Corrosion products and contaminants have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, respectively. The penetration results can be adjusted to the Passano equation and the corrosivity degree can be assigned in accordance with ISO standards. A correlation between field and laboratory tests has been found, by comparing the specimens with the same degree of corrosion, showing the validity of the accelerated laboratory tests in order to simulate the field conditions. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Corrosion Behaviour of Nickel Plated Low Carbon Steel in Tomato Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluleke OLUWOLE

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This research work investigated the corrosion resistance of nickel plated low carbon steel in tomato fluid. It simulated the effect of continuous use of the material in a tomato environment where corrosion products are left in place. Low carbon steel samples were nickel electroplated at 4V for 20, 25, 30 and 35 mins using Watts solution.The plated samples were then subjected to tomato fluid environment for for 30 days. The electrode potentials mV (SCE were measured every day. Weight loss was determined at intervals of 5 days for the duration of the exposure period. The result showed corrosion attack on the nickel- plated steel, the severity decreasing with the increasing weight of nickel coating on substrate. The result showed that thinly plated low carbon steel generally did not have any advantage over unplated steel. The pH of the tomato solution which initially was acidic was observed to progress to neutrality after 4 days and then became alkaline at the end of the thirty days test (because of corrosion product contamination of the tomatocontributing to the reduced corrosion rates in the plated samples after 10 days. Un-plated steel was found to be unsuitable for the fabrication of tomato processing machinery without some form of surface treatment - thick nickel plating is suitable as a protective coating in this environment.

  17. Corrosion behaviour and in vitro/in vivo biocompatibility of surface-modified AZ31 alloy; Comportamiento frente a la corrosion y biocompatibilidad in vitrolin vivo de la aleacion AZ31 modificada superficialmente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carboneras, M.; Iglesias, C.; Perez-Maceda, B. T.; Valle, J. A. de; Garcia-Alonso, M. C.; Alobera, M. A.; Clemente, C.; Rubio, J. C.; Escudero, M. I.; Lozano, R. M.

    2011-07-01

    The present work evaluates the corrosion behaviour and the in vitro/in vivo biocompatibility of the AZ31 magnesium alloy, which fulfills the mechanical requirements of bone. The corrosion kinetic of as-received AZ31 alloy was not compatible with the cell growth. To improve its performance, the AZ31 alloy was surface modified by a chemical conversion treatment in hydrofluoric acid. The magnesium fluoride layer generated by the surface treatment of AZ31 alloy enhances its corrosion behaviour, allowing the in vitro growth of osteoblastic cells over the surface and the in vivo formation of a highly compact layer of new bone tissue. These results lead to consider the magnesium fluoride coating as necessary for potential use of the AZ31 alloy as biodegradable and absorbable implant for bone repair. (Author) 18 refs.

  18. Boron effect on fabrication properties and service behaviour of complex corrosion-resistant steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gol'dshtejn, Ya.E.; Piskunova, A.I.; Shmatko, M.N.

    1978-01-01

    In order to determine the optimum boron admixtures for the improvement of the technological plasticity without the considerable reduction in the corrosion resistance of the complex alloy Cr-Ni-Mo steels, industrial heats of the 03KH16N15M3, 03KH17N14M3 and other steels, containing 0.0005-0.003% boron, have been researched. The plasticity, corrosion resistance and microstructure of certain steels have been determined. It is shown that small additions of boron enhance the technological plasticity during the ingot rolling. In order to prevent a sharp reduction in the corrosion resistance, the boron content should be confined to 0.0015% and the quenching temperature raised to 1,120-1,150 deg C. The positive effect of the quenching temperature increase is accounted for by the solution of the excess phases and by the reduction of the dislocation density in the near-the-boundary zones

  19. Modelling the behaviour of corrosion products in the primary heat transfer circuits of pressurised water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodliffe, R.S.; Polley, M.V.; Thornton, E.W.

    1985-05-01

    The redistribution of corrosion products from the primary circuit surfaces of a water reactor can result in increased flow resistance, poorer heat transfer performance, fuel failure and radioactive contamination of circuit surfaces. The environment is generally sufficiently well controlled to ensure that the first three effects are not limiting. The last effect is of particular importance since radioactive corrosion products are major contributors to shutdown fields and since it is necessary to ensure that the radiation exposure of personnel is as low as reasonably achievable. This review focusses attention on the principles which must form the basis for any mechanistic model describing the formation, transport and deposition of radioactive corrosion products. It is relevant to all water reactors in which the primary heat transfer medium is predominantly single-phase water and in which steam is generated in a secondary circuit, i.e. including CANDU pressurised heavy water reactors, Sovient VVERs, etc. (author)

  20. Investigations of the corrosion behaviour of the Si-containing stainless steel 1.4361 with combined surface analysis, electrochemistry and radionuclide technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maar-Stumm, M.

    1990-03-01

    The present work aimed at detailed information on the corrosion behaviour and particularly the corrosion mechanism of the steel 1.4361 in concentrated nitric acid by use of a combination of electrochemical methods, radionuclide technique and surface analysis. For comparison steel samples corroded by other methods were investigated by surface analysis, too. At the beginning of the corrosion in nitric acid Fe and Ni are dissolved preferentially. Cr and Si are enriched in the surface region. A primary corrosion layer is formed which is equivalent to the oxidic overlayer of atmospherically oxidized samples. It consists of the oxides of chromium and iron mixed up with glass-like SiO 2 . Ni does not contribute to the formation of the oxidic overlayer. On top of this primary corrosion layer there is an isolating gel-like SiO 2 -layer with a thickness depending on strength and duration of the corrosive attack. Its mechanical stability decreases with increasing layer thickness. At the boundary to the primary corrosion layer this gel-like SiO 2 -layer is closed, mechanically stable and conducting. Samples corroded under the standardized conditions of the Huey-test show a similar structure of the overlayer with the exception that the primary corrosion layer consists only of glass-like SiO 2 . The combination of several methods revealed detailed information about mass loss and structure of the overlayer at different electrode potentials. (orig./MM) [de

  1. Thermal behaviour properties and corrosion resistance of organoclay/polyurethane film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, O.; Soegijono, B.

    2018-03-01

    Organoclay/polyurethane film composite was prepared by adding organoclay with different content (1, 3, and 5 wt.%) in polyurethane as a matrix. TGA and DSC showed decomposition temperature shifted to a lower point as organoclay content change. FT-IR spectra showed chemical bonding of organoclay and polyurethane as a matrix, which means that the bonding between filler and matrix occured and the composite was stronger but less bonding occur in composite with 5 wt.% organoclay. The corrosion resistance overall increased with the increasing organoclay content. Composite with 5 wt.% organoclay had more thermal stability and corrosion resistance may probably due to exfoliation of organoclay.

  2. Corrosion behaviour of high manganese austenitic stainless steels: positive and negative aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja, V.S.

    1999-01-01

    Stainless steel 304 has found use as a most versatile engineering material in many industrial applications. Recently, the Indian industries have developed high Mn stainless steels with low C and Ni contents and simultaneously introduced N and Cu in the system. Composition of some of the alloys which are prevalent in the market are given. Individually, the effect of Ni, C, Mn, N and Cu on various forms of corrosion is reasonably understood. However, it will be worthwhile to review the response of these alloys, containing all these elements, towards various forms of corrosion. The objective of this paper is preciously to do this

  3. Corrosion Behaviour of a Silane Protective Coating for NdFeB Magnets in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Calabrese

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of coated and uncoated Ni/Cu/Ni rare earth magnets was assessed at increasing steps with a multilayering silanization procedure. Magnets’ durability was analyzed in Fusayama synthetic saliva solution in order to evaluate their application in dental field. Corrosion performance was evaluated by using polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in synthetic saliva solution up to 72 hours of continuous immersion. The results show that the addition of silane layers significantly improved anticorrosion properties. The coating and aging effects, in synthetic saliva solution, on magnetic field were evaluated by means of cyclic force-displacement curves.

  4. Corrosion fatigue behaviour of aluminium 5083-H111 welded using gas metal arc welding method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutombo, K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium and its alloys are widely used as engineering materials on account of their low density, high strength-to-weight ratios, excellent formability and good corrosion resistance in many environments. Pure aluminium has a density of only 2.70 g...

  5. Stray current vs anodic polarization in reinforced mortar: a comparative study on steel corrosion behaviour in both regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Zhipei; Koleva, D.A.; van Breugel, K.

    2015-01-01

    Stray current arising from direct current electrified traction systems and then circulat-ing in reinforced concrete structures may initiate corrosion or even accelerate existing corrosion processes on embedded reinforcement. Therefore, stray-current induced corrosion of nearby reinforced concrete

  6. Hot corrosion of the ceramic composite coating Ni{sub 3}Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MgO plasma sprayed on 316L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirazi, Amir Khodaparast; Kiahosseini, Seyed Rahim [Islamic Azad Univ., Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Engineering

    2017-08-15

    Ni{sub 3}Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MgO three-layered coatings with thicknesses of 50, 100, and 150 μm for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MgO and 100 μm for the other layers were deposited on 316L stainless steel using plasma spraying. X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, furnace hot corrosion testing in the presence of a mixture of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} corrosive salts and scanning electron microscopy were used to determine the structural, morphological and hot corrosion resistance of samples. Results revealed that the crystalline grains of MgO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating were very small. Weight loss due to hot corrosion decreased from approximately 4.267 g for 316L stainless steel without coating to 2.058 g. The samples with 150 μm outer coating showed improved resistance with the increase in outer layer thickness. Scanning electron microscopy of the coated surface revealed that the coating's resistance to hot corrosion is related to the thickness and the grain size of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MgO coatings.

  7. Effects of hot-iron disbudding, using regional anaesthesia with and without carprofen, on cortisol and behaviour of calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilwell, G; Lima, M S; Carvalho, R C; Broom, D M

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess cortisol and behaviour changes in calves hot-iron disbudded after different analgesic protocols. We assessed the response of 27 calves at 1, 3, 6 and 24 h after disbudding with regional anaesthesia (DA), regional anaesthesia plus carprofen (DAC), disbudded only (D) or sham-disbudded (ND). At 1h cortisol was higher in D compared with all other groups. At 3h DA showed higher cortisol than ND but did not differ from baseline. At 15 min and 1h pain-related behaviours were more frequent in the D group than in all other groups. Group D (3 h) and DA (3 and 6 h) showed more ear flicks and head rubs compared with DAC and ND. We concluded that head rubbing, head shaking and ear flicking are useful behaviours for evaluating pain after hot-iron disbudding. Disbudding causes severe pain in calves and only the association of regional anaesthesia with carprofen assures good welfare for 24 h. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Contribution to the study of corrosion in cementitious media for the phenomenological modelling of the long-term behaviour of reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'hostis, V.

    2010-12-01

    Many of the facilities and structures involved in the nuclear industry call for reinforced concrete (RC) in their construction. The corrosion of rebars is the main ageing pathology that those RC structures will meet during their service life (leading to concrete cracking and structural bearing capacity decrease). Concrete carbonation and chloride ingress in concrete are both at the origin of the active corrosion state. Passive corrosion has also to be considered in a context of very long lifetime (waste management). It is of primary importance to dispose of accurate and validated tools in order to predict where and how damages will appear. In 2002, the Commissariat a l Energie atomique decided to develop an intensive research programme dedicated to predicting the long-term behaviour of RC structures affected by steel corrosion (CIMETAL Project). This document aims at synthesize the main outputs coming from the project and exposes the scientific strategy was drawn and applied in order to predict the long-term behaviour of RCs that were mainly exposed to carbonation conditions. That strategy includes experiments for the characterisation of 'short-term' and 'long-term' corrosion layouts and processes, as well as modelling stages, with a view not only to predicting the behaviour of RC, but also to pointing out phenomena that are further verified experimentally. (author)

  9. Numerical simulation of the dynamic recrystallization behaviour in hot precision forging helical gears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In hot precision forging helical gears, the dynamic recrystallization phenomena will occur, which affect the microstructure of the formed part and in turn decide their mechanical properties. To investigate the effect of deformation temperature on the dynamic recrystallization in hot precision forging helical gears, a three dimensional (3D finite element (FE model was created by coupling the thermo-mechanical model with the microstructure evolution model developed based on the hot compressive experimental data of 20CrMnTiH steel. The hot precision forging process was simulated and the effect laws of the deformation temperature on the microstructure evolution the formed part were investigated. The results show that the dynamic recrystallization volume fraction and the average grain sizes increased with the increasing deformation temperature and the higher deformation temperature is beneficial to dynamic recrystallization and grain refinement.

  10. Corrosion properties of cladding materials from Zr1Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloc, K.; Kosler, S.

    1975-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour was observed of the Zr1Nb alloy in hot water and superheated steam and the effects of impurity content, of the purity of the corrosion environment and of the heat treatment of the alloy were studied on the alloy corrosion resistance. Also studied were the absorption of hydrogen by the alloy and its behaviour in reactor situations. It was ascertained that the alloy has a good corrosion resistance up to a temperature of 350 degC. The corrosion resistance is reduced by the presence of nitrogen above 50 to 70 ppm and of carbon above 50 to 90 ppm. A graphic representation is given of the dependence of corrosion resistance on the temperature of annealing, the nitrogen content of the alloy and the time of the action of hot water or steam, as well as the dependence of the hydrogen content in the alloy on the peripheral tension of the cladding in hot water both in non-active environment and at irradiation with a neutron flux of approximately 10 20 n/cm 2 . (J.B.)

  11. Comparison of electrochemical corrosion behaviour of MgO and ZrO2 coatings on AM50 magnesium alloy formed by plasma electrolytic oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, J.; Srinivasan, P. Bala; Blawert, C.; Dietzel, W.

    2009-01-01

    Two types of PEO coatings were produced on AM50 magnesium alloy using pulsed DC plasma electrolytic oxidation process in an alkaline phosphate and acidic fluozirconate electrolytes, respectively. The phase composition and microstructure of these PEO coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The corrosion behaviour of the coated samples was evaluated by open circuit potential (OCP) measurements, potentiodynamic polarization tests, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in neutral 0.1 M NaCl solution. The results showed that PEO coating prepared from alkaline phosphate electrolyte consisted of only MgO and on the other hand the one formed in acidic fluozirconate solution was mainly composed of ZrO 2 , MgF 2 . Electrochemical corrosion tests indicated that the phase composition of PEO coating has a significant effect on the deterioration process of coated magnesium alloy in this corrosive environment. The PEO coating that was composed of only MgO suffered from localized corrosion in the 50 h exposure studies, whereas the PEO coating with ZrO 2 compounds showed a much superior stability during the corrosion tests and provided an efficient corrosion protection. The results showed that the preparation of PEO coating with higher chemical stability compounds offers an opportunity to produce layers that could provide better corrosion protection to magnesium alloys.

  12. The effect of O{sub 2} content on the corrosion behaviour of X65 and 5Cr in water-containing supercritical CO{sub 2} environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Yong, E-mail: leo.huayong@gmail.com; Barker, Richard; Neville, Anne

    2015-11-30

    Highlights: • Corrosion behaviour was evaluated in water-containing SC-CO{sub 2} with different O{sub 2} levels. • Corrosion was observed when no free water was present. • Localized corrosion was a fundamental consideration in water-containing CO{sub 2} systems. • O{sub 2} content plays a key role in influencing the critical water content. - Abstract: The general and localized corrosion behaviour of X65 carbon steel and 5Cr low alloy steel were evaluated in a water-saturated supercritical CO{sub 2} environment in the presence of varying concentrations of O{sub 2}. Experiments were performed at a temperature of 35 °C and a pressure of 80 bar to simulate the conditions encountered during CO{sub 2} transport and injection. Results indicated that increasing O{sub 2} concentration from 0 to 1000 ppm caused a progressive reduction in the general corrosion rate, but served to increase the extent of localized corrosion observed on both materials. Pitting (or localized attack) rates for X65 ranged between 0.9 and 1.7 mm/year, while for 5Cr rose from 0.3 to 1.4 mm/year as O{sub 2} concentration was increased from 0 to 1000 ppm. General corrosion rates were over an order of magnitude lower than the pitting rates measured. Increasing O{sub 2} content in the presence of X65 and 5Cr suppressed the growth of iron carbonate (FeCO{sub 3}) on the steel surface and resulted in the formation of a corrosion product consisting mainly of iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). 5Cr was shown to offer more resistance to pitting corrosion in comparison to X65 steel over the conditions tested. At concentrations of O{sub 2} above 500 ppm 5Cr produced general corrosion rates less than 0.04 mm/year, which were half that recorded for X65. The improved corrosion resistance of 5Cr was believed to be at least partially attributed to the formation of a Cr-rich film on the steel surface which was shown using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to contain chromium oxide (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and chromium

  13. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and corrosion behaviour of Al2O3-Ni nano composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciubotariu, Alina-Crina; Benea, Lidia; Lakatos-Varsanyi, Magda; Dragan, Viorel

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the results on the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and corrosion properties of electrodeposited nanostructured Al 2 O 3 -Ni composite coatings are presented. The nanocomposite coatings were obtained by codeposition of alumina nanoparticles (13 nm) with nickel during plating process. The coating thickness was 50 μm on steel support and an average of nano Al 2 O 3 particles inside of coatings at 15 vol.% was present. The structure of the coatings was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It has been found that the codeposition of Al 2 O 3 particles with nickel disturbs the nickel coating's regular surface structure. The electrochemical behavior of the coatings in the corrosive solutions was investigated by polarization potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods. As electrochemical test solutions 0.5 M sodium chloride and 0.5 M potassium sulphate were used in a three electrode open cell. The corrosion potential is shifted to more negative values for nanostructured coatings in 0.5 M sodium chloride. The polarization resistance in 0.5 M sodium chloride decreases in 24 h, but after that increases slowly. In 0.5 M potassium sulphate solution the polarization resistance decreases after 2 h and after 30 h of immersion the polarization resistance is higher than that of the beginning value. The corrosion rate calculated by polarization potentiodynamic curves obtained after 30 min from immersion in solution is smaller for nanostructured coatings in 0.5 M potassium sulphate (4.74 μm/year) and a little bit bigger in 0.5 M sodium chloride (5.03 μm/year)

  14. Effect of Welding Process on Microstructure, Mechanical and Pitting Corrosion Behaviour of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    An attempt has been made to weld 2205 Duplex stainless steel of 6mm thick plate using conventional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and activated gas tungsten arc welding (A- GTAW) process using silica powder as activated flux. Present work is aimed at studying the effect of welding process on depth of penetration, width of weld zone of 2205 duplex stainless steel. It also aims to observe the microstructural changes and its effect on mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance of 2205 duplex stainless steel welds. Metallography is done to observe the microstructural changes of the welds using image analyzer attached to the optical microscopy. Hardness studies, tensile and ductility bend tests were evaluated for mechanical properties. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were carried out using a basic GillAC electro-chemical system in 3.5% NaCl solution to observe the pitting corrosion behaviour. Results of the present investigation established that increased depth of penetration and reduction of weld width in a single pass by activated GTAW with the application of SiO2 flux was observed when compared with conventional GTAW process. It may be attributed to the arc constriction effect. Microstructure of the weld zones for both the welds is observed to be having combination of austenite and delta ferrite. Grain boundary austenite (GBA) with Widmanstatten-type austenite (WA) of plate-like feature was nucleated from the grain boundaries in the weld zone of A-GTAW process. Mechanical properties are relatively low in activated GTAW process and are attributed to changes in microstructural morphology of austenite. Improved pitting corrosion resistance was observed for the welds made with A-GTAW process.

  15. Influence of 8-aminoquinoline on the corrosion behaviour of copper in 0.1 M NaCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cubillos, M.; Sancy, M.; Pavez, J.; Vargas, E.; Urzua, R.; Henriquez-Roman, J.; Tribollet, B.; Zagal, J.H.; Paez, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of copper in aerated 0.1 M NaCl solution in presence of 8-aminoquinoline (8-AQ), using open circuit potential (OCP) measurements, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM), was studied. The measurements revealed that the effect of 8-AQ is dependent on its concentration. For concentrations up to 10 -3 M, the organic compound displaces the corrosion potential following no trend and also reduces the anodic current. In contrast, for concentrations higher than 10 -3 , 8-AQ reduces markedly both, the anodic and cathodic currents and consequently, the corrosion current density of copper. After 9 days of exposure in chloride solution, containing the organic compound, potentiodynamic polarization analyses showed a significant reduction in the anodic response and a less significant reduction in the cathodic response, which is associated with a film formed at the copper surface of about 10 μm in thickness and visually observed by a colour change of the copper surface. In order to elucidate the most likely interaction between the 8-AQ molecule and the different molecular structures probably present on copper surfaces in chloride solutions, some results obtained from theoretical calculations are presented. The following molecular structures were considered: CuCl molecule, CuCl 2 - complex, and little copper clusters defect representation built as five atoms on C 4v symmetry. Thus, based on the geometric, energetic, frontier orbital, and Total Electronic Density analysis done for the optimized states found for the systems investigated, we suggest that the most probable interaction of 8-AQ proceeds above CuCl units and free copper sites.

  16. Role of Metal Cations on the corrosion behaviour of 8090-T851 in a pH 2.0 solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murthy, K.S.N.; Ambat, Rajan; Dwarakadasa, E.S.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of cations such as Cu2+, Al3+ and Li+ on the corrosion behaviour of 8090-T851(Al-Li) alloy in a pH 2.0 HCl solution was investigated by weight loss and polarisation techniques. Weight loss experiments showed that the effect of cation is a strong function of its nature...

  17. Corrosion behaviour of porous chromium carbide/oxide based ceramics in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Z.; Xin, T.; Chen, W.; Zheng, W.; Guzonas, D.

    2011-01-01

    Porous chromium carbide with a high density of open pores was fabricated by a reactive sintering method. Chromium oxide ceramics were obtained by re-oxidizing the porous chromium carbides formed. Some samples were added with yttria at 5 wt. %, prior to reactive sintering to form porous structures. Corrosion tests in SCW were performed at temperatures ranging from 375 o C to 625 o C with a fixed pressure at around 25∼30 MPa. The results show that chromium carbide is stable in SCW environments at temperatures up to 425 o C, above which disintegration of carbides through oxidation occurs. Porous chromium oxide samples show better corrosion resistance than porous chromium carbide, but disintegrate in SCW at around 625 o C. Among all the samples tested, chromium oxide ceramics with added yttria exhibited much better corrosion resistance compared with the pure chromium carbide/oxides. No evidence of weight change or disintegration of porous chromium oxides with 5 wt % added yttria was observed after exposure at 625 o C in SCW for 600 hours. (author)

  18. Electrochemical evaluation of corrosion and tribocorrosion behaviour of amorphous and nanocrystalline cobalt–tungsten electrodeposited coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fathollahzade, N.; Raeissi, K., E-mail: k_raeissi@cc.iut.ac.ir

    2014-11-14

    Amorphous and nanocrystalline Co–W coatings were electrodeposited on copper substrates from a citrate–ammonia bath. The coatings showed nodular surface morphologies, but a microcrack network was detected in the amorphous coating. However, a better corrosion resistance was achieved for the amorphous coating. During sliding under open circuit potential (OCP) condition, the potential of amorphous coating gradually became more active probably due to the widening of wear scar, and thus expansion of active area. The amorphous coatings showed a higher volume loss at OCP probably due to its lower microhardness. In anodic sliding, a sharp increase in current density was observed due to mass transport and depassivation effects. In all sliding conditions, the proportion of mass transport was higher than wear accelerated corrosion, which implied that the dissolution reaction of the coatings was mainly a mass-transport controlled process. The results also showed that the effect of sliding on degradation is more intense for the nanocrystalline coating. For both coatings, the formation of the superficial microcracks in the vicinity of wear scars indicating on a surface fatigue wear mechanism. - Highlights: • Mass-transport effect had higher proportion in tribocorrosion of Co–W coatings. • The major electrochemical-wear degradation was for the nanocrystalline coating. • The higher proportion of wear accelerated corrosion was for the amorphous coating. • Superficial microcracks were formed near scars due to the coatings brittleness.

  19. The corrosion behaviour of stainless steels in natural seawater: results of an european collaborative project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scotto, V.; Mollica, A. [Institut de Recherches de la Siderurgie Francaise (IRSID), 78 - Saint-Germain-en-Laye (France); Feron, D. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Direction des Technologies Avancees; Rogne, T.; Steinsmo, U. [Stiftelsen for Industriell og Teknisk Forskning (SINTEF), Trondheim (Norway); Compere, C.; Festy, D.; Audouard, J.P.; Taxen, C.; Thierry, D.

    1996-12-31

    One of the goals of the European collaborative Project `Marine Bio-film on Stainless steels: effects, monitoring and prevention`, started in 1992 and partially funded by the European Communities in the framework of the Marine Science and Technologies Program, was to give some conclusive and general remarks regarding the possible link, outlined in literature, between aerobic bio-film settlement and both the increased risk of localized corrosion onset and the propagation rate of ongoing localized corrosion on Stainless Steels. For this purpose several SS types of European production (austenitic and duplex), in form of tubes and plates, with and without artificial crevices preformed on their surfaces, have been exposed to flowing and quite seawater (flow rate from 0 to 1.5 m/s), at different marine stations (respectively located in the Mediterranean Sea, in the Eastern Atlantic, in the North and Baltic Seas) and the tests were repeated during each season of the year when seawater temperatures ranged from 6 up to 28 deg C. During each exposure, the SS free corrosion potentials were recorded. (authors).

  20. Influence of aging at 180C on the corrosion behaviour of a ternary Al-Li-Zr alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan; Prasad, R.K.; Dwarakadasa, E.S.

    1994-01-01

    decreased for samples aged up to 6 h at 180 °C whereas Icorr increased for samples aged for longer times. Values of OCP and pitting potential initially shifted in the noble direction and then towards more active values. This change in OCP was observed on samples that had been aged for 20 h while in the case...... of pitting potential an aging time of only 6 h was required. The overall change in passive current density was small, although at longer aging times (> 40h) it showed an increase. As the amount of lithium depletion increased, OCP and pitting potential shifted in the active direction while passive current......The influence of aging at 180 °C on the corrosion behaviour of an Al-1.5%Li-0.1%Zr alloy has been studied using weight loss, open circuit potential (OCP) measurements and potentiodynamic polarization measurements in 3.5% NaCl solution. Corrosion rates obtained from weight loss and Icorr values...

  1. Rhyolitic glasses as natural analogues of nuclear waste glasses: behaviour of an Icelandic glass upon natural aqueous corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magonthier, M.-C.; Petit, J.-C.; Dran, J.-C.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed study of the altered rims present in narrow fissures of a 52 ka-old Icelandic obsidian reveals the behaviour of transition and heavy elements, as well as the mechanism and kinetics of alteration, during glass/solution interaction. These complex altered rims are alkali depleted and consist of alternating layers of Fe-rich aluminosilicate and aluminium thihydroxide. The elemental partitioning observed on this naturally corroded obsidian is supported by laboratory experiments performed on the same glass, the elemental accumulation being explained by the formation of a hydrosilicate. A good correlation exists between the thickness of the altered rims and that calculated from the amounts of Fe and Ti accumulated locally. Thus, immobile elements can be used reliably as indices of the extent of alteration because only near-equilibrium conditions occur. The good agreement between the experimental hydration rate of obsidians and the progress of natural corrosion, leads to the assumption that ion diffusion is the long-term controlling mechanism of corrosion. Such an assumption is supported by the particular distribution of the immobile elements which is due to ion diffusion and coprecipitation processes (self-organization genesis). These observations have implications for nuclear waste disposal topics and support the validity of obsidians as analogues of nuclear waste glasses with respect to some local environmental constraints induced by waste packaging and disposal. (author)

  2. Corrosion behaviour of a stream generator tube material in simulated steam generator feedwater containing chlorides and sulphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojinov, M.; Kinnunen, P.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Sirkiae, P.; Yliniemi, K. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland); Buddas, T.; Halin, M.; Tompuri, K. [Fortum Power and Heat Oy, Loviisa Power Plant (Finland)

    2002-07-01

    The goal of the present work has been to assess the effect of relatively high concentrations of anionic impurities (Cl{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) on the corrosion behaviour of Ti-stabilised stainless steel SG tubes in simulated steam generator feed-water. The main observations of this work can be summarised as follows: Sulphate ions seem to be more aggressive than chloride ions towards the primary passive film on 08X18H10T stainless steel. The results may indicate that it is more important to have a low concentration of sulphate ions than of chloride ions in secondary side water when the effects of chemical conditions on tube degradation are considered. The presence of chloride ions seems to weaken the detrimental effect of sulphate ions on the stability of oxide films growing on 08X18H10T stainless steel. No localised corrosion features of 08X18H10T stainless steel were detected in the voltammetric and impedance measurements in solutions containing up to 5000 ppb sulphates, chlorides or both of the anions. (authors)

  3. Corrosion behaviour of a stream generator tube material in simulated steam generator feedwater containing chlorides and sulphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojinov, M.; Kinnunen, P.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Sirkiae, P.; Yliniemi, K.; Buddas, T.; Halin, M.; Tompuri, K.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the present work has been to assess the effect of relatively high concentrations of anionic impurities (Cl - , SO 4 2- ) on the corrosion behaviour of Ti-stabilised stainless steel SG tubes in simulated steam generator feed-water. The main observations of this work can be summarised as follows: Sulphate ions seem to be more aggressive than chloride ions towards the primary passive film on 08X18H10T stainless steel. The results may indicate that it is more important to have a low concentration of sulphate ions than of chloride ions in secondary side water when the effects of chemical conditions on tube degradation are considered. The presence of chloride ions seems to weaken the detrimental effect of sulphate ions on the stability of oxide films growing on 08X18H10T stainless steel. No localised corrosion features of 08X18H10T stainless steel were detected in the voltammetric and impedance measurements in solutions containing up to 5000 ppb sulphates, chlorides or both of the anions. (authors)

  4. Sliding wear and corrosion behaviour of alloyed austempered ductile iron subjected to novel two step austempering treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethuram, D.; Srisailam, Shravani; Rao Ponangi, Babu

    2018-04-01

    Austempered Ductile Iron(ADI) is an exciting alloy of iron which offers the design engineers the best combination high strength-to-weight ratio, low cost design flexibility, good toughness, wear resistance along with fatigue strength. The two step austempering procedure helps in simultaneously improving the tensile strength as-well as the ductility to more than that of the conventional austempering process. Extensive literature survey reveals that it’s mechanical and wear behaviour are dependent on heat treatment and alloy additions. Current work focuses on characterizing the two-step ADI samples (TSADI) developed by novel heat treatment process for resistance to corrosion and wear. The samples of Ductile Iron were austempered by the two-Step Austempering process at temperatures 300°C to 450°C in the steps of 50°C.Temperaturesare gradually increased at the rate of 14°C/Hour. In acidic medium (H2SO4), the austempered samples showed better corrosive resistance compared to conventional ductile iron. It has been observed from the wear studies that TSADI sample at 350°C is showing better wear resistance compared to ductile iron. The results are discussed in terms of fractographs, process variables and microstructural features of TSADI samples.

  5. Influence of Ti, C and N concentration on the intergranular corrosion behaviour of AISI 316Ti and 321 stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Coy, A.E.; Viejo, F.; Carboneras, M.; Arrabal, R.

    2007-01-01

    Intergranular corrosion behaviour of 316Ti and 321 austenitic stainless steels has been evaluated in relation to the influence exerted by modification of Ti, C and N concentrations. For this evaluation, electrochemical measurements - double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) - were performed to produce time-temperature-sensitization (TTS) diagrams for tested materials. Transmission (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to determine the composition and nature of precipitates. The addition of Ti promotes better intergranular corrosion resistance in stainless steels. The precipitation of titanium carbides reduces the formation of chromium-rich carbides, which occurs at lower concentrations. Also, the reduction of carbon content to below 0.03 wt.% improves sensitization resistance more than does Ti content. The presence of Mo in AISI 316Ti stainless steel reduces chromium-rich carbide precipitation; the reason is that Mo increases the stability of titanium carbides and tends to replace chromium in the formation of carbides and intermetallic compounds, thus reducing the risks of chromium-depletion

  6. Characterization and corrosion behaviour of CoNi alloys obtained by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olvera, S. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Departamento de Ingeniería en Metalurgia y Materiales, México, D. F. (Mexico); Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Sánchez-Marcos, J. [Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Palomares, F.J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM-CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Salas, E. [Spline Spanish CRG Beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facilities, ESRF, BP 220-38043, Grenoble Cedex (France); Arce, E.M. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Departamento de Ingeniería en Metalurgia y Materiales, México, D. F. (Mexico); Herrasti, P., E-mail: pilar.herrasti@uam.es [Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    CoNi alloys including Co{sub 30}Ni{sub 70}, Co{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} and Co{sub 70}Ni{sub 30} were prepared via mechanical alloying using Co and Ni powders. The crystallinity and short-range order were studied using X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that the milling process increases the number of vacancies, especially around the Co atoms, while the milling time decreases the crystalline size and enhances the crystallinity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterise the chemical composition of the samples surface. The magnetic properties were analysed using zero-field cooling, field cooling and a magnetic hysteresis loops. The magnetic saturation moment is approximately 1.05 μ{sub B}/atom; this value decreases with the mechanical alloying time, and it is proportional to the cobalt concentration. The polarization and impedance curves in different media (NaCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH) showed similar corrosion resistance values. The corrosion resistance increased in the order NaCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH. A good passivation layer was formed in NaOH due to the cobalt and nickel oxides on the particle surfaces. - Highlights: • Ni{sub x}Co{sub 100-x} alloys were synthesized by mechanical alloying • Milling time decrease size and enhances crystallinity. • Oxygen is not present in a significant percentage in bulk but is detected on the surface. • Magnetic saturation moment is 1.05 mB/atom and decrease with mechanical allowing time • Corrosion resistance is higher in NaOH than in NaCl or HCl solutions.

  7. Characterization and corrosion behaviour of CoNi alloys obtained by mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olvera, S.; Sánchez-Marcos, J.; Palomares, F.J.; Salas, E.; Arce, E.M.; Herrasti, P.

    2014-01-01

    CoNi alloys including Co 30 Ni 70 , Co 50 Ni 50 and Co 70 Ni 30 were prepared via mechanical alloying using Co and Ni powders. The crystallinity and short-range order were studied using X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that the milling process increases the number of vacancies, especially around the Co atoms, while the milling time decreases the crystalline size and enhances the crystallinity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterise the chemical composition of the samples surface. The magnetic properties were analysed using zero-field cooling, field cooling and a magnetic hysteresis loops. The magnetic saturation moment is approximately 1.05 μ B /atom; this value decreases with the mechanical alloying time, and it is proportional to the cobalt concentration. The polarization and impedance curves in different media (NaCl, H 2 SO 4 and NaOH) showed similar corrosion resistance values. The corrosion resistance increased in the order NaCl, H 2 SO 4 and NaOH. A good passivation layer was formed in NaOH due to the cobalt and nickel oxides on the particle surfaces. - Highlights: • Ni x Co 100-x alloys were synthesized by mechanical alloying • Milling time decrease size and enhances crystallinity. • Oxygen is not present in a significant percentage in bulk but is detected on the surface. • Magnetic saturation moment is 1.05 mB/atom and decrease with mechanical allowing time • Corrosion resistance is higher in NaOH than in NaCl or HCl solutions

  8. Effects of sulphide ion on the corrosion behaviour of X52 steel in a carbon dioxide environment at temperature 40 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatah, M.C.; Ismail, M.C.; Ari-Wahjoedi, B.; Kurnia, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We study the effect of sulphide ion on the corrosion behaviour of X52 steel. → Increasing sulphide ion concentration will increase the corrosion rate of X52 steel. → Increasing sulphide ion concentration will increase cathodic reaction. → Less protective film, also contribute to the increasing the corrosion rate. - Abstract: The electrochemical behaviour of X52 steel in the presence of sulphide at 40 deg. C in a CO 2 environment was investigated using the methods of linear polarization resistance (LPR), potentiodynamic sweep, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). In addition, the surface of X52 steel was also studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the corrosion rate of X52 steel increased with increasing concentration of sulphide ion. Potentiodynamic curve showed that there were changes in cathodic branch due to the change in the nature of cathodic reaction in the presence of sulphide ion. EIS analysis showed the higher sulphide ion concentration, the higher adsorbed species on the steel surface that contributed in the cathodic reaction. Furthermore, SEM results showed crevices on the scale which indicated pitting tendency in sulphide ion solutions. The less protective film, probably mackinawite, also contributed to the increase of corrosion rate in the presence of sulphide ion.

  9. Evaluation of structural behaviour and corrosion resistant of austenitic AISI 304 and duplex AISI 2304 stainless steel reinforcements embedded in ordinary Portland cement mortars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, E.; Cobo, A.; Bastidas, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical and structural behaviour of two stainless steels reinforcements, with grades austenitic EN 1.4301 (AISI 304) and duplex EN 1.4362 (AISI 2304) have been studied, and compared with the conventional carbon steel B500SD rebar. The study was conducted at three levels: at rebar level, at section level and at structural element level. The different mechanical properties of stainless steel directly influence the behaviour at section level and structural element level. The study of the corrosion behaviour of the two stainless steels has been performed by electrochemical measurements, monitoring the corrosion potential and the lineal polarization resistance (LPR), of reinforcements embedded in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) mortar specimens contaminated with different amount of chloride over one year time exposure. Both stainless steels specimens embedded in OPC mortar remain in the passive state for all the chloride concentration range studied after one year exposure. (Author) 26 refs.

  10. “In-vitro” corrosion behaviour of the magnesium alloy with Al and Zn (AZ31) protected with a biodegradable polycaprolactone coating loaded with hydroxyapatite and cephalexin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zomorodian, A.; Santos, C.; Carmezim, M.J.; Silva, T.Moura e; Fernandes, J.C.S.; Montemor, M.F.

    2015-01-01

    Mg alloys are very susceptible to corrosion in physiological media. This behaviour limits its widespread use in biomedical applications as bioresorbable implants, but it can be controlled by applying protective coatings. On one hand, coatings must delay and control the degradation process of the bare alloy and, on the other hand, they must be functional and biocompatible. In this study a biocompatible polycaprolactone (PCL) coating was functionalised with nano hydroxyapatite (HA) particles for enhanced biocompatibility and with an antibiotic, cephalexin, for anti-bacterial purposes and applied on the AZ31 alloy. The chemical composition and the surface morphology of the coated samples, before and after the corrosion tests, were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) and Raman. The results showed that the presence of additives induced the formation of agglomerates and defects in the coating that resulted in the formation of pores during immersion in Hanks' solution. The corrosion resistance of the coated samples was studied in Hank's solution by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results evidenced that all the coatings can provide corrosion protection of the bare alloy. However, in the presence of the additives, corrosion protection decreased. The wetting behaviour of the coating was evaluated by the static contact angle method and it was found that the presence of both hydroxyapatite and cephalexin increased the hydrophilic behaviour of the surface. The results showed that it is possible to tailor a composite coating that can store an antibiotic and nano hydroxyapatite particles, while allowing to control the in-vitro corrosion degradation of the bioresorbable Mg alloy AZ31.

  11. Tribological and corrosion behaviour of electroless Ni-B coating possessing a blackberry like structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülbül, Ferhat; Altun, Hikmet; Küçük, Özkan; Ezirmik, Vefa

    2012-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the tribological and corrosion properties of the electroless Ni-B coating deposited on AISI 304 stainless steels. The microstructure of the coating was characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS). XRD analysis revealed that the prepared coating possessed an amorphous character. SEM-EDS investigation also indicated that a non-stoichiometric Ni-B coating was deposited with a columnar growth mechanism on the stainless steel substrate and the morphology of the growth surface was blackberry-like. The hardness and tribological properties were characterized by microhardness and a pin-on-disc wear test. The electroless Ni-B coated sample had a higher degree of hardness, a lower friction coefficient and a lower wear rate than the uncoated substrate. The electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization method was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of the coating. The electroless Ni-B coating offered cathodic protection on the substrate by acting as a sacrificial anode although it was electrochemically more reactive than the stainless steel substrate.

  12. Laser cladding of nickel base alloy on SS316L for improved wear and corrosion behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awasthi, Reena; Kushwaha, R.P.; Chandra, Kamlesh; Viswanadham, C.S.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G.K.; Limaye, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    Laser cladding by an Nd:YAG laser was employed to deposit Ni base alloy (Ni-Mo-Cr-Si) on stainless steel-316 L substrate. The resulting defect-free clad with minimum dilution of the substrate was characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Vickers microhardness test. Dry sliding wear of the cladding and the substrate was evaluated using a ball-on-plate reciprocating wear tester against different counter bodies (WC and 52100 Cr steel). The reciprocating sliding wear resistance of the coating was evaluated as a function of the normal load, keeping the sliding amplitude and sliding speed constant. Wear mechanisms were analyzed by observation of wear track morphology using SEM-EDS. The electrochemical corrosion behavior of clad layer was studied in reducing environment (HCl) to estimate the general corrosion resistance of the laser clad layer in comparison with the substrate SS-316L. The clad layer showed higher wear resistance under reducing condition than that of the substrate material stainless steel 316L. (author)

  13. Effect of refining techniques on stress corrosion cracking behaviour of Inconel X-750

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, B.; Moore, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    High-strength age-hardenable nickel-base superalloy Inconel X-750, is susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) when used in the triple heat-treated condition. In this research, the slow strain-rate technique has been employed to evaluate the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of alloy X-750 under simulated nuclear pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions, using an automated autoclave system at 8 x 10 6 N m -2 pressure and 289 0 C temperature. The alloys produced via electroslag refining (ESR) or vacuum arc refining (VAR) processing routes containing 0.004% and 0.011% sulphur, respectively, were solution annealed at either 1075 or 1240 0 C for 2 h and water quenched followed by ageing in the 704 to 871 0 C temperature range for up to 200 h, followed by air cooling or furnace cooling. The scanning electron microscopy performed on fractured surfaces revealed that Inconel X-750 processed through the ESR route, solution annealed at 1240 0 C for 2 h and water quenched, aged at 871 0 C for 200 h and furnace cooled provided the best combination of strength, ductility and resistance to SCC. A less sensitized area adjacent to the grain boundary was responsible for the improvement in properties and the alloy X-750 is recommended for PWR applications in the above conditions of processing and heat treatment. (author)

  14. Corrosion behaviour of Zircaloy 4 fuel cans for high burnup in EdF PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blat, M.; Kerrec, O.; Bourgoin, J.; Vrignaud, E.; Amanrich, H.

    1994-01-01

    Uniform corrosion of fuel cladding could be a limitation for burn-up enhancement. First, the oxide thickness measured on fuel cladding for high burn-up has been compared to the prediction of the EDF code, CYRANO 2E. A comparative metallurgical characterization has been also performed on samples which were oxidized in pile and in autoclave. Then, laboratories studies have been launched for a better understanding of the corrosion mechanisms. A reflection was proposed on the two main theoretical concepts proposed for these mechanisms. Their kinetics could be controlled by transfers in liquid medium (electrolyte) or in solid medium (compact oxide). For the first topic, a nanoscopic characterization of the oxide is in progress, using Atomic Force Microscope. The first results are presented. In the second case, an electrochemical approach (impedance spectroscopy and voltametry) is developed in our laboratories. The obtained results could give some new keys in order to understand the influence of some parameters (alloys composition, coolant chemistry,...). (authors). 7 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs

  15. Corrosion behaviour of dissimilar welds between ferritic-martensitic stainless steel and austenitic stainless steel from secondary circuit of CANDU NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popa, L.; Fulger, M.; Tunaru, M.; Velciu, L.; Lazar, M.

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion damages of welds occur in spite of the fact that the proper base metal and filler metal have been correctly selected, industry codes and standards have been followed and welds have been realized with full weld penetration and have proper shape and contour. In secondary circuit of a Nuclear Power Station there are some components which have dissimilar welds. The principal criteria for selecting a stainless steel usually is resistance to corrosion, and white most consideration is given to the corrosion resistance of the base metal, additional consideration should be given to the weld metal and to the base metal immediately adjacent to the weld zone. Our experiments were performed in chloride environmental on two types of samples: non-welded (410 or W 1.4006 ferritic-martensitic steel and 304L or W 1.4307 austenitic stainless steel) and dissimilar welds (dissimilar metal welds: joints between 410 ferritic-martensitic and 304L austenitic stainless steel). To evaluate corrosion susceptibility of dissimilar welds was used electrochemical method (potentiodynamic method) and optic microscopy (microstructural analysis). The present paper follows the localized corrosion behaviour of dissimilar welds between austenitic stainless steel and ferritic-martensitic steel in solutions containing chloride ions. It was evaluated the corrosion rates of samples (welded and non-welded) by electrochemical methods. (authors)

  16. Hot Corrosion Behavior of Ti-48Al and Ti-48Al-2Cr Intermetallic Alloys Produced by Electric Current Activated Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garip, Y.; Ozdemir, O.

    2018-06-01

    In this study, Ti-48Al and Ti-48Al-2Cr (at. pct) intermetallic alloys were produced by electric current activated sintering (ECAS). In order to characterize the phase formation and microstructures of these alloys, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis were used. The XRD result shows that the intermetallic alloys are composed of γ-TiAl and α 2-Ti3Al phases. The microstructure is dense with a low amount of porosity. The hot corrosion behavior of intermetallic alloys was carried out in a salt mixture of 25 wt pct K2SO4 and 75 wt pct Na2SO4 at 700 °C for 180 hours. The morphology of corroded surfaces was observed by SEM-EDS and XRD. Corrosion phases were identified as TiO2 and Al2O3. Well-adhering oxide scale was detected on the corroded sample surface at the end of 180 hours, and no spallation was observed. In addition, a parabolic curve was obtained at the weight change rate vs time.

  17. Hot Corrosion Behavior of Ti-48Al and Ti-48Al-2Cr Intermetallic Alloys Produced by Electric Current Activated Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garip, Y.; Ozdemir, O.

    2018-03-01

    In this study, Ti-48Al and Ti-48Al-2Cr (at. pct) intermetallic alloys were produced by electric current activated sintering (ECAS). In order to characterize the phase formation and microstructures of these alloys, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis were used. The XRD result shows that the intermetallic alloys are composed of γ-TiAl and α 2-Ti3Al phases. The microstructure is dense with a low amount of porosity. The hot corrosion behavior of intermetallic alloys was carried out in a salt mixture of 25 wt pct K2SO4 and 75 wt pct Na2SO4 at 700 °C for 180 hours. The morphology of corroded surfaces was observed by SEM-EDS and XRD. Corrosion phases were identified as TiO2 and Al2O3. Well-adhering oxide scale was detected on the corroded sample surface at the end of 180 hours, and no spallation was observed. In addition, a parabolic curve was obtained at the weight change rate vs time.

  18. Measurement and evaluation of radioactive corrosion product behaviour in primary sodium circuits of JOYO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, K.; Iizawa, K.; Takahashi, K.; Zulquarnain, M.A.; Suzuki, S.; Kinjo, K.

    1992-01-01

    In the experimental fast reactor JOYO, the radioactive corrosion product (CP) measurement has been conducted in the primary sodium circuits during each annual inspection. The measured data has been analyzed by the computer code 'PSYCHE', which has been developed by PNC. Main results obtained from the measurements and/or calculations are as follows; (1) The dominant CP nuclide is 54 Mn followed by 60 Co and 58 Co. (2) Average surface gamma dose rate around the primary piping system at the 8th annual inspection is 0.96 mSv/h. The increasing rate of this value is 0.25 (mSv/h)/EFPY. (3) The calculated deposition densities of 54 Mn and 60 Co agree with measured ones within factor of 0.7 ∼ 1.7. (author)

  19. Effect of ultrafine grain on tensile behaviour and corrosion resistance of the duplex stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang; Limin, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel was obtained by cold rolling and annealing. The tensile properties were investigated at room temperature. Comparing with coarse grained stainless steel, ultrafine grained sample showed higher strength and plasticity. In addition, grain size changed deformation orientation. The strain induced α'-martensite was observed in coarse grained 2205 duplex stainless steel with large strain. However, the grain refinement inhibited the transformation of α'-martensite;nevertheless, more deformation twins improved the strength and plasticity of ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel. In addition, the grain refinement improved corrosion resistance of the 2205 duplex stainless steel in sodium chloride solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of hot-iron branding on heart rate, breathing rate and behaviour of anaesthetised Steller sea lions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, K A; Mellish, J E; Weary, D M

    2011-10-01

    This study assessed the heart rate, breathing rate and behavioural responses of 12 juvenile Steller sea lions during hot-iron branding under isoflurane anaesthesia. Physiological and behavioural measures were recorded in four periods: baseline (five minutes), sham branding (one minute), branding (approximately 2.7 minutes) and postbranding (five minutes). No difference in heart rate was noted from baseline to sham branding, but heart rate increased from mean (sem) 78.3 (2.4) bpm in the baseline period to 85.6 (2.5) bpm in the branding period. Heart rate remained elevated in the postbranding period, averaging 84.7 (2.5) bpm. Breathing rate averaged 2.5 (1.0) breaths/minute in the baseline and sham branding periods increased to 8.9 (1.0) breaths/minute during branding, but returned to baseline by the postbranding period. Behaviourally, half of the sea lions exhibited trembling and head and shoulder movements during branding.

  1. Fission and corrosion product behaviour in liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    It is intended that this review will be useful not only to scientists but also to those concerned with design, day-to-day operation of plant, with liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs), safety and decommissioning. Because of this, the review has been widened to include not only the mass transfer behaviour of the various radionuclides in experimental and operating systems, but also the monitoring of the various species, the methods of measurement and the development of methods to control the build-up of the more important long half-life species in operating plants. The information used in the review has been taken from open literature sources to provide an up-to-date presentation of the behaviour of the various isotopes in LMFBRs. 172 refs, 14 figs, 22 tabs

  2. Passive behaviour of alloy corrosion-resistant steel Cr10Mo1 in simulating concrete pore solutions with different pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ai, Zhiyong; Jiang, Jinyang; Sun, Wei; Song, Dan; Ma, Han; Zhang, Jianchun; Wang, Danqian

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new alloy corrosion-resistant steel Cr10Mo1 is developed for reinforcing rebar of concrete in severe environments. • The effects of pH on the passive behaviour of Cr10Mo1 steel compared with plain carbon steel were studied systematically by electrochemical techniques and surface analysis. • The mechanism for self-reinforcing passivity against carbonation of the corrosion-resistant steel is revealed. - Abstract: The passive behaviour of new alloy corrosion-resistant steel Cr10Mo1 and plain carbon steel (as a comparison) in simulating concrete pore solutions of different pH (ranging from 13.5 to 9.0) under open circuit potential conditions, was evaluated by various electrochemical techniques: potentiodynamic polarization, capacitance measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The chemical composition and structure of passive films were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The electrochemical responses of passive films show that Cr10Mo1 steel has an increasing passivity with pH decreasing while carbon steel dose conversely, revealing carbonation does no negative effect on passivation of the corrosion-resistant steel. SIMS reveals that the passive film on the corrosion-resistant steel presents a bilayer structure: an outer layer mainly consisting of Fe oxides and hydroxides, and an inner layer enriched in Cr species, while only a Fe-concentrated layer for carbon steel. According to the XPS analysis results, as the pH decreases, more stable and protective Cr oxides are enriched in the film on Cr10Mo1 steel while Fe oxides gradually decompose. Higher content of Cr oxides in the film layer provides Cr10Mo1 corrosion-resistant steel more excellent passivity at lower pH.

  3. Passive behaviour of alloy corrosion-resistant steel Cr10Mo1 in simulating concrete pore solutions with different pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, Zhiyong, E-mail: 230139452@seu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Construction Materials, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Jiang, Jinyang, E-mail: jiangjinyang16@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Construction Materials, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Sun, Wei, E-mail: sunwei@seu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Construction Materials, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Song, Dan, E-mail: songdancharls@hhu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Construction Materials, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); College of Mechanics and Materials, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098, Jiangsu (China); Ma, Han, E-mail: mahan-iris@shasteel.cn [Research Institute of Jiangsu Shasteel Iron and Steel, Zhangjiagang 215625, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Jianchun, E-mail: Zhangjc-iris@shasteel.cn [Research Institute of Jiangsu Shasteel Iron and Steel, Zhangjiagang 215625, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Danqian, E-mail: wonderbaba@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Construction Materials, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A new alloy corrosion-resistant steel Cr10Mo1 is developed for reinforcing rebar of concrete in severe environments. • The effects of pH on the passive behaviour of Cr10Mo1 steel compared with plain carbon steel were studied systematically by electrochemical techniques and surface analysis. • The mechanism for self-reinforcing passivity against carbonation of the corrosion-resistant steel is revealed. - Abstract: The passive behaviour of new alloy corrosion-resistant steel Cr10Mo1 and plain carbon steel (as a comparison) in simulating concrete pore solutions of different pH (ranging from 13.5 to 9.0) under open circuit potential conditions, was evaluated by various electrochemical techniques: potentiodynamic polarization, capacitance measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The chemical composition and structure of passive films were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The electrochemical responses of passive films show that Cr10Mo1 steel has an increasing passivity with pH decreasing while carbon steel dose conversely, revealing carbonation does no negative effect on passivation of the corrosion-resistant steel. SIMS reveals that the passive film on the corrosion-resistant steel presents a bilayer structure: an outer layer mainly consisting of Fe oxides and hydroxides, and an inner layer enriched in Cr species, while only a Fe-concentrated layer for carbon steel. According to the XPS analysis results, as the pH decreases, more stable and protective Cr oxides are enriched in the film on Cr10Mo1 steel while Fe oxides gradually decompose. Higher content of Cr oxides in the film layer provides Cr10Mo1 corrosion-resistant steel more excellent passivity at lower pH.

  4. The detailed analysis of the spray time effects of the aluminium coating using self-generated atmospheric plasma spray system on the microstructure and corrosion behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Khandanjou

    Full Text Available In the present paper our aim is to investigate the effect of the spray time of the aluminium coated layers on the microstructure and corrosion behaviour. For this purpose we use the self-generated atmospheric plasma spray system for coating of aluminium on the carbon steel substrate. The different thicknesses of coating are created. To evaluate this effect we use the several analyses such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, Micro hardness analysis by Vickers method, Adhesion strength analysis and electrochemical polarization test. The results are very interesting and show that due to low porosity, thicker layers are more homogeneous. The nanoparticles are observed in the thicker layers. The micro hardness tests show that the thicker layers have the better micro hardness value. Next, the adhesion strength tests illustrate that the highest adhesion strength are for longer spray times. On the other hand, the corrosion resistance behaviour of the coating is investigated by electrochemical polarization test. It is shown that the corrosion resistance increases by increasing the thickness due to low percentage of porosity. Keywords: Plasma spray, Thickness, Aluminium, Micro hardness, Corrosion resistance

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of Inconel 600 in aqueous solutions at elevated temperature. Pt. II. Effects of chloride and sulphate ions on the electrochemical behaviour of Inconel 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashour, E.A.; Schneider, F.; Mummert, K.

    1997-01-01

    For pt.I see ibid., p.151-6, 1997. The influencing effects of temperature, potential and electrolyte composition on the electrochemical behaviour of Inconel 600 in aqueous solutions are presented. Considering these effects the connection between the data have been obtained from chemo-mechanical fracture investigation on CT-samples in Part I of this paper and pitting corrosion are discussed. The results have shown that chloride ions depassivate the surfaces of cracks locally and hinder the formation of a new protective oxide layer on the fracture surfaces. Furthermore, chloride promotes the dissolution of metal and initiates the cracking, respectively. The resulting crevice corrosion promotes an increase of hydrogen absorption by the metal. The increase of the hydrogen content of the metal influences the mechanical fracture behaviour. Contrary, sulphate ions inhibit the initiation of corrosion mainly due to a hinderance of chloride ions adsorption on active sites of the fracture surfaces. The initiation of localized corrosion in the crevice region may be stimulated by chromate ions formed by oxidation of chromium from the oxide layer or the base metal in oxygen containing solutions. (orig.)

  6. Zn(Ta1-xNbx2O6 nanomaterials: Synthesis, characterization and corrosion behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birdeanu Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Zn(Ta1-xNbx2O6 pseudo-binary oxide nanocrystalline materials (where x = 1; 0.5; 0.1; 0.05 and 0 were obtained through the solid-state method and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. In addition, their morphology and topography have been determined by field emission-scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. There is a significant dependence between the rugosity and the uniformity of crystals. The evenly crystals organized in multilayers have the lowest value of rugosity and the non uniform fractal type architectures have the highest value of rugosity. The compounds’ anti-corrosion features were evaluated after deposition on carbon steel (OL in 0.1 M Na2SO4 media by open circuit potential measurement and potentiodynamic polarization technique with Tafel representation. The inhibition efficiency of pseudo-binary oxides deposited on carbon steel electrode was in the range 42.3-52.7 % promising for their further multiple layer deposition with porphyrins in order to improve anticorrosion properties. Due to the high band gap (3.80 - 4.30 eV provided by increasing the tantalum content, four of these pseudo-binary oxides might find applications in photovoltaic cells.

  7. The mechanism of cathodic electrodeposition of epoxy coatings and the corrosion behaviour of the electrodeposited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VESNA B. MISKOVIC-STANKOVIC

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The model of organic film growth on a cathode during electrodeposition process proposes the current density-time and film thickness-time relationships and enables the evaluation of the rate contants for the electrochemical reaction of OH– ion evolution and for the chemical reaction of organic film deposition. The dependences of film thickness and rate constants on the applied voltage, bath temperature and resin concentration in the electrodeposition bath have also been obtained. The deposition parameters have a great effect on the cathodic electrodeposition process and on the protective properties of the obtained electrodeposited coatings. From the time dependences of the pore resistance, coating capacitance and relative permittivity, obtained from impedance measurements, the effect of applied voltage, bath temperature and resin concentration on the protective properties of electrodeposited coatings has been shown. Using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, gravimetric liquid sorption experiments, differential scanning calorimetry and optical miscroscopy, the corrosion stability of epoxy coatings was investigated. A mechanism for the penetration of electrolyte through an organic coating has been suggested and the shape and dimensions of the conducting macropores have been determined. It was shown that conduction through a coating depends only on the conduction through the macropores, although the quantity of electrolyte in the micropores of the polymer net is about one order of magnitude greater than that inside the conducting macropores.

  8. Corrosion behaviour of selected high-level waste packaging materials under gamma irradiation and in-situ disposal conditions in rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailos, E.; Schwarzkopf, W.; Koester, R.

    1988-07-01

    Corrosion studies performed until now on a number of materials have shown that unalloyed steels, Hastelloy C4 and Ti 99.8-Pd are the most promising materials for a long-term resistant packaging to be used in high-level waste (HLW) canister disposal in rock salt formations. To characterize their corrosion behaviour in more detail, additional studies have been performed. The influence has been examined which is exerted by the gamma dose rate (1 Gy/h to 100 Gy/h) on the corrosion of three preselected steels and Hastelloy C4 at 90 0 C in a salt brine (Q-brine) rich in MgCl 2 , i.e., conditions relevant to accident scenarios in a repository. In addition, in-situ corrosion experiments have been carried out in the Asse salt mine at elevated temperatures (120 0 C to 210 0 C) in the absence and in the presence of a gamma radiation field of 3 x 10 2 Gy/h, within the framework of the German/US Brine Migration Test. Under the test conditions the gamma radiation did not exert a significant influence on the corrosion of the steels investigated, whereas Hastelloy C4, exposed to dose rates of 10 Gy/h and 100 Gy/h, underwent pitting and crevice corrosion (20 μm/a at the maximum).The low amounts of migrated salt brine (140 ml after 900 days) in the in-situ- experiment did not produce noticeable corrosion of the materials. (orig./RB) [de

  9. Corrosion behaviour and surface analysis of a Co-Cr and two Ni-Cr dental alloys before and after simulated porcelain firing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jing; Yu, Wei-Qiang; Zhang, Fu-Qiang; Smales, Roger J; Zhang, Yi-Lin; Lu, Chun-Hui

    2011-02-01

    This study evaluated the corrosion behaviour and surface properties of a commercial cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy and two nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloys [beryllium (Be)-free and Be-containing] before and after a simulated porcelain-firing process. Before porcelain firing, the microstructure, surface composition and hardness, electrochemical corrosion properties, and metal-ion release of as-cast alloy specimens were examined. After firing, similar alloy specimens were examined for the same properties. In both as-cast and fired conditions, the Co-Cr alloy (Wirobond C) showed significantly more resistance to corrosion than the two Ni-Cr alloys. After firing, the corrosion rate of the Be-free Ni-Cr alloy (Stellite N9) increased significantly, which corresponded to a reduction in the levels of Cr, molybdenum (Mo), and Ni in the surface oxides and to a reduction in the thickness of the surface oxide film. The corrosion properties of the Co-Cr alloy and the Be-containing Ni-Cr alloy (ChangPing) were not significantly affected by the firing process. Porcelain firing also changed the microstructure and microhardness values of the alloys, and there were increases in the release of Co and Ni ions, especially for Ni from the Be-free Ni-Cr alloy. Thus, the corrosion rate of the Be-free Ni-Cr alloy increased significantly after porcelain firing, whereas the firing process had little effect on the corrosion susceptibility of the Co-Cr alloy and the Be-containing Ni-Cr alloy. © 2011 Eur J Oral Sci.

  10. Influence of tool pin profile on microstructure and corrosion behaviour of AA2219 Al–Cu alloy friction stir weld nuggets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Venkata Rao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the problems of fusion welding of aluminium alloys, the friction stir welding (FSW is recognized as an alternative joining method to improve the mechanical and corrosion properties. Tool profile is one of the important variables which affect the performance of the FS weld. In the present work, the effect of tool profile on the weld nugget microstructure and pitting corrosion of AA2219 aluminium–copper alloy was studied. FSW of AA2219 alloy was carried out using five profiles, namely conical, square, triangle, pentagon and hexagon. The temperature measurements were made in the region adjacent to the rotating pin. It was observed that the peak temperature is more in hexagonal tool pin compared to the welds produced with other tool pin profiles. It is observed that the extensive deformation experienced at the nugget zone and the evolved microstructure strongly influences the hardness and corrosion properties of the joint during FSW. It was found that the microstructure changes like grain size, misorientation and precipitate dissolution during FSW influence the hardness and corrosion behaviour. Pitting corrosion resistance of friction stir welds of AA2219 was found to be better for hexagon profile tool compared to other profiles, which was attributed to material flow and strengthening precipitate morphology in nugget zone. Higher amount of heat generation in FS welds made with hexagonal profile tool may be the reason for greater dissolution of strengthening precipitates in nugget zone.

  11. The effects of zirconium and beryllium on microstructure evolution, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour of as-cast AZ63 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafari, Hassan; Amiryavari, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Alloying elements are able to strongly modify the microstructure characteristics of Mg–Al–Zn alloys which dominate mechanical and corrosion properties of the alloys. In this research, the individual effects of Zr and Be additions on the microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of as-cast AZ63 alloy were explored. The results revealed that the addition of Zr leads to microstructure refinement in as-cast AZ63 alloy, resulting in improved tensile and hardness properties. 0.0001 and 0.001 wt% Be containing cast AZ63 alloy exhibited microstructure coarsening, while morphological alteration from sixford symmetrical to irregular shape grain was observed for the alloy containing 0.01 and 0.1 wt% Be. No specific Be compound was detected. In addition, mechanical properties of AZ63 alloy containing Zr was improved due to the microstructure modification, while Be containing alloy responded reverse behaviour. The corrosion resistance of AZ63 alloy was improved after the addition of Zr and Be due to the grain refinement and passivation effects, respectively. However, when the Zr content exceeds 0.5 wt%, the formation of Al 2 Zr affected the corrosion resistance. In other words, AZ63–0.5Zr alloy provided the lowest corrosion rate.

  12. Features investigation of corrosion-electrochemical behaviour of Al-alloys for engineering an effective protection of the water-distillings setups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fokin, M.N.; Lomakina, S.V.; Tselykh, O.G.; Shatova, T.S.; Trubetskaya, L.F.

    1993-01-01

    The problem of aluminium alloy application in distilling setups is studied. Investigation into the features of corrosion and electrochemical behaviour of aluminium alloys under sea water distillation allows one to reveal the main control factors and to propose optimal alloy compositions capable of providing the safe setup operation on their base. Preliminary treatment in tungsten and molybdenum isopolycompound solutions is proposed which reduces sedimentation which in its turn is very important for distilling setups

  13. Aerosol release from a hot sodium pool and behaviour in inert gas atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauter, H.; Schuetz, W.

    1986-01-01

    In the KfK-NALA program, experiments were carried out on the subject of aerosol release from a contaminated sodium pool into inert gas atmosphere under various conditions. Besides the determination of retention factors for fuel and fission products, the sodium aerosol system was investigated and characterized, concerning aerosol generation (evaporation rate), particle size, mass concentration, and deposition behaviour. Pool temperatures were varied between 700 and 1000 K at different geometrical and convective conditions. Technical scale experiments with a 531-cm 2 pool surface area were performed at natural convection in a 2.2-m 3 heated vessel, as well as additional small scale experiments at forced convection and 38.5-cm 2 pool surface area. A best-fit formula is given for the specific evaporation rate into a 400 K argon atmosphere. Approximately, the very convenient relation (dm/dt) (kg/m 2 /h) = 0.1 p (mm Hg) was found. The sodium aerosol diameter lay between 0.6 μm, less than 1 sec after production, and 2.5 μm at maximum concentration. The deposition behaviour was characterized by very small quantities ( 80%) on the bottom cover of the vessel. In the model theoretic studies with the PARDISEKO code, calculations were performed of the mass concentration, particle diameter and deposition behaviour. Agreement with the experimental values could not be achieved until a modulus was introduced to allow for turbulent deposition. (author)

  14. The corrosion behaviour of austenitic and duplex stainless steels in artificial saliva with the addition of fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocijan, Aleksandra; Merl, Darja Kek; Jenko, Monika

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The corrosion behaviour of AISI 316L and 2205 DSS in orthodontics. → The increased passive range for DSS 2205 compared to AISI 316L in artificial saliva. → Higher R p values of DSS compared to AISI 316L in artificial saliva. → The main constituent of the passive layers on DSS at the OCP in saliva was Cr-oxide. → DSS 2205 is suitable for orthodontic applications in artificial saliva. - Abstract: The evolution of the passive films on 2205 duplex stainless steel (2205 DSS) and AISI 316L stainless steel in artificial saliva, and with the addition of fluoride, was studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic measurements. The extent of the passive range increased for the 2205 DSS compared to the AISI 316L in both solutions. The formation of the passive film was studied by EIS at the open-circuit potential (OCP). The passive layers were studied at the OCP by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The passive films on both materials predominantly contained Cr-oxides, whereas the Fe species were markedly depleted.

  15. The corrosion behaviour of austenitic and duplex stainless steels in artificial saliva with the addition of fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocijan, Aleksandra, E-mail: Aleksandra.Kocijan@imt.s [Institute of Metals and Technology, Lepi pot 11, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Merl, Darja Kek [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jenko, Monika [Institute of Metals and Technology, Lepi pot 11, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2011-02-15

    Research highlights: The corrosion behaviour of AISI 316L and 2205 DSS in orthodontics. The increased passive range for DSS 2205 compared to AISI 316L in artificial saliva. Higher R{sub p} values of DSS compared to AISI 316L in artificial saliva. The main constituent of the passive layers on DSS at the OCP in saliva was Cr-oxide. DSS 2205 is suitable for orthodontic applications in artificial saliva. - Abstract: The evolution of the passive films on 2205 duplex stainless steel (2205 DSS) and AISI 316L stainless steel in artificial saliva, and with the addition of fluoride, was studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic measurements. The extent of the passive range increased for the 2205 DSS compared to the AISI 316L in both solutions. The formation of the passive film was studied by EIS at the open-circuit potential (OCP). The passive layers were studied at the OCP by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The passive films on both materials predominantly contained Cr-oxides, whereas the Fe species were markedly depleted.

  16. Contribution to the study of the electrochemical behaviour of titanium and of its industrial shores in sulphuric environment. Characteristics of their resistance to pitting corrosion in neutral and acid halogenous environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, Jacques-Alain

    1975-01-01

    After a presentation of the general metallurgical, physical, and corrosion resistance characteristics of titanium and of its alloys, this research thesis presents the experimental means, discusses the influence of experimental conditions on the assessment of the electrochemical behaviour of titanium and of its alloys. It reports an investigation of the cathodic behaviour of non-alloyed titanium and notably the hydrogen release kinetics in a concentrated acid environment. It discusses the influence of alloy composition on their cathodic behaviour, addresses the anodic behaviour of titanium and of its alloys in sulphuric environment, and the pitting corrosion of titanium and of its alloys in an acid and neutral halogenous environment [fr

  17. Influence of the oxyanion nature of the electrolyte on the corrosion/passivation behaviour of nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trompette, J.L.; Massot, L.; Vergnes, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Influence of oxyanion nature on the passivation of nickel. •Constitutive atoms of oxyanion incorporated into the passive film. •Evidence of direct bonding between N and Ni surface. -- Abstract: The electrochemical behaviour of nickel in the presence of various electrolyte solutions at 0.1 mol/L concentration exhibits a distinction according to the oxyanion nature of the investigated anions. Passivity is achieved with oxyanions whereas it fails with anions not containing oxygen. SIMS and XPS measurements performed from isotopic and non isotopic KNO 3 electrolytes indicate that the oxygen and nitrogen atoms from nitrate oxyanions are incorporated into the passive film during anodic polarization and with evidence of a direct bonding between nitrogen and nickel surface

  18. Study on radioactive corrosion products behaviour in primary circuits of JOYO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizawa, Katsuyuki; Suzuki, Soju; Tamura, Masaaki; Seki, Seiichi; Hikichi, Takayoshi

    1987-01-01

    Radioactive CP deposition and distribution, and the resulting radiation fields along the JOYO primary circuit piping have been measured. The measurement results have been compared with calculations for estimating radioactive CP behaviour and the resulting radiation fields in an LMFBR primary circuit using a computer code which is named PSYCHE. The deposited radioactivity of CPs calculated by using PSYCHE agreed well with the measured results within a factor of 0.5-2. The gamma dose rate distribution calculated from the PSYCHE results reproduced measured values within a factor of 0.6-2 over the piping system, using the JOANDARC modification of the QAD-CG code. Using these verified codes, a prediction of radiation levels for future plant operation, and an evaluation of methods for the reduction of radioactive CPs have been conducted. (orig./DG)

  19. Contribution of modulated DSc to study the thermal behaviour of PET films drawn in hot water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zumalian, Abubaker

    2003-01-01

    PET films uni-axially drawn in hot water are studied by means of conventional DSc and modulated DSc. The glass transition is studied by modulated DSc which allows access to the values of the glass transition temperature T g and the variations of δ C p = C p 1-C p g (difference between thermal capacity in the liquid-like and glassy states at T = T g ). Variations of T g with the water content (which act as plasticizer) and with the drawing (which rigidifies the amorphous phase) are discussed in regard to the structure engaged in these materials. The variations of δ C p are also interpreted with the help of a three phase model and a strong-fragile glass former liquid concept. We show that the fragility of the medium increases by the conjugated effects of deformation and water as soon as a strain induced crystalline phase is obtained, and it decreases drastically when the rigid amorphous phase occurs. (author)

  20. Influence of bismuth on the age-hardening and corrosion behaviour of low-antimony lead alloys in lead/acid battery systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, L.T. [CSIRO, Div. of Mineral Products, Port Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Huynh, T.D. [CSIRO, Div. of Mineral Products, Port Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Haigh, N.P. [CSIRO, Div. of Mineral Products, Port Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Douglas, J.D. [CSIRO, Div. of Mineral Products, Port Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Rand, D.A.J. [CSIRO, Div. of Mineral Products, Port Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Lakshmi, C.S. [Pasminco Research Centre, Boolaroo, NSW (Australia); Hollingsworth, P.A. [Pasminco Research Centre, Boolaroo, NSW (Australia); See, J.B. [Pasminco Research Centre, Boolaroo, NSW (Australia); Manders, J. [Pasminco Ltd., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Rice, D.M. [Pasminco Ltd., Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    1995-01-01

    The effects of bismuth additions in the range 0.006-0.086 wt.% on the metallurgical and electrochemical properties of Pb-1.5 wt.% Sb alloy are investigated. The self-discharge behaviour of batteries produced with grids of the doped alloys is also evaluated. Addition of bismuth is found to exert no significant effects on the age-hardening behaviour, general microstructure or grain size of the alloy. It does, however, influence the morphology of the eutectic in the inter-dendritic regions. The latter changes from a mainly lamellar to an irregular type with increasing bismuth content. The corrosion rate of the grid decreases with increase of the bismuth content. Attack occurs preferentially in the inter-dendritic regions where there is an enrichment of both antimony and bismuth. Electron-probe microanalysis shows that the corrosion zone consists of a tri-layered structure, namely: a dense, continuous, inner layer (PbO{sub 1.1}); a central layer (PbO{sub 1.8}.PbSO{sub 4}); a porous outer layer n(PbO{sub 1.8}).PbSO{sub 4}, with n=2-8. In the latter, the value of n increases in the direction of corrosive penetration into the grid. Data from atomic absorption spectrometric analysis reveal that bismuth, after oxidative leaching from the grid substrate, is retained mainly in the corrosion layer. A key observation is that bismuth (i.e., up to {approx}0.09 wt.%) does not affect the self-discharge behaviour of batteries. (orig.)

  1. Influence of Silver nanoparticles addition on the phase transformation, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour of Cu–Al–Ni shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saud, Safaa N.; Hamzah, E., E-mail: esah@fkm.utm.my; Abubakar, T.; Bakhsheshi-Rad, H.R.; Farahany, S.; Abdolahi, A.; Taheri, M.M.

    2014-11-05

    Highlights: • Thermal analysis showed four different phase β, α, NiAl and γ2 during solidification. • The martensite appeared in the microstructure as a plate and needle like shape. • Shape recovery ratio of 80% was obtained after Ag nanoparticles addition. • Effect of Ag nanoparticles on the corrosion behaviour of Cu–Al–Ni SMA was investigated. - Abstract: Incorporation of silver nanoparticles into Cu-based shape memory alloys is recommended to enhance their phase transformation behaviour. However, this incorporation can affect their transformation temperatures, mechanical, microstructural and corrosion characteristics. Four different phase reactions β, α, NiAl and γ{sub 2} were detected on a derivative curve during the solidification by-computer-aided cooling curve thermal analysis. The highest fraction solid (82%) was calculated for the parent phase (β) based on the Newtonian baseline method. The microstructural changes and mechanical properties were investigated using field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction tensile test and shape memory effect test. It was found that the addition of Ag can control the phase morphology and orientations along with the formation of the Ag-rich precipitates, and thus the tensile strength, elongation, fracture stress–strain, yield strength and shape memory effect are improved. Remarkably, the shape recovery ratio reached approximately 80% of the original shape. The corrosion behaviour of the Cu–Al–Ni shape memory alloy were investigated using electrochemical tests in NaCl solution and their results showed that the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}) of Cu–Al–Ni SMA is shifted towards the nobler direction from −307.4 to −277.1 m V{sub SCE} with the addition of 0.25 wt.% Ag.

  2. Applications of electricity and corrosion. Precautions for use of metals and stainless and refractory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, J.M.

    1993-09-01

    The development of applications of electricity poses highly diversified problems with materials where the resistance to corrosion prevails. Corrosion occurs under various conditions, which sometimes look harmless, and it covers diverse phenomenons linked to the nature of materials and to the physical and chemical context. However, in spite of the diversity of the processes used (electrical boilers, mechanical steam compression, heat pumps, Joule effect,) the knowledge required to approach the corrosion problems corresponds to a limited number of generic situations with regard not only to the phenomenons proper (general corrosion of copper, pitting and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steels, refractory alloys oxidation,) but also to chemical conditions which favour the corrosion (natural waters, acidic condensates, hot gases). This report is a short guide to anti-corrosion. With the aid of questions asked during the past few years, it aims to provide engineers in charge of the development of applications of electricity with a few recommendations upon the precautions for use of metallic materials. We analyze in turn the problems met with wet air and drying mists, chloride-containing neutral waters, alkaline waters and caustic media, acidic waters and concentrated acids, and, last, hot gases. We lay stress upon the behaviour of materials deemed to withstand corrosion under aqueous conditions (stainless steels and alloys, copper,titanium) and corrosion at high temperatures (refractory alloys). (author). 11 figs., 43 refs., 11 tabs

  3. Carbon steel corrosion under anaerobic-aerobic cycling conditions in near-neutral pH saline solutions - Part 1: Long term corrosion behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherar, B.W.A.; Keech, P.G.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Anaerobic-aerobic cycling on pipeline steel forms two distinct surface morphologies. → Seventy-five percentage of the surface was covered by a black, compact layer ∼4.5 μm thick. → A tubercle, ∼3 to 4 mm in cross section, covered the remaining 25% of surface. → The tubercle cross section showed a single large pit ∼275 μm deep. - Abstract: The influence of anaerobic-aerobic cycling on pipeline steel corrosion was investigated in near-neutral carbonate/sulphate/chloride solution (pH 9) over 238 days. The corrosion rate increased and decreased as exposure conditions were switched between redox conditions. Two distinct corrosion morphologies were observed. The majority of the surface corroded uniformly to produce a black magnetite/maghemite layer approximately 4.5 μm thick. The remaining surface was covered with an orange tubercle, approximately 3-4 mm in cross section. Analysis of the tubercle cross section revealed a single large pit approximately 275 μm deep. Repeated anaerobic-aerobic cycling localized the corrosion process within this tubercle-covered pit.

  4. On the corrosion behaviour of stainless steel, nickel-chromium and zirconium-alloys in pore water of Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitz, E.; Graefen, H.

    1991-12-01

    On the basis of an extensive review of literature and available experience, an evaluation was made of the corrosion of a metallic matrix for radioactive nuclides embedded in porous, water containing Portland cement. As a metallic matrix, austenitic high-alloy steel, nickel-base alloys and zirconium alloys are discussed. Pore waters in Portland cement have low aggressivity. However, through contact with formation water, chloride and sulphate enrichment can occur. Although corrosion is principally possible on the basis of purely thermodynamic considerations, it can be assumed that local corrosion (pitting, stress corrosion cracking, intergranular corrosion) is highly improbable under the given boundary conditions. This is valid for all three groups of alloys and means that only low release rates of corrosion products are to be expected. As a result of the discussion on radiolysis-induced corrosion, additional corrosion activity can be excluded. Final conclusions concerning the stimulation of corrosion processes by microbial action cannot be drawn and, therefore, additional experiments are proposed. The release rates of radioactive products are controlled by a very low dissolution rate of the materials in the passive state. All three groups of alloys show this type of general dissolution. From a survey of literature data it can be concluded that release rates greater than 250 mg/m 2 per day are not exceeded. Since these data were mainly obtained by electrochemical methods, it is proposed that quantitative analytical investigations of the corrosion products in pore water be made. On the whole the release rates determined are far below corrosion rates which are generally technically relevant. (author) 13 figs., 9 tabs., 61 refs

  5. Corrosion behaviour of sensitized and unsensitized Alloy 900 (UNS 1.4462) in concentrated aqueous lithium bromide solutions at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiva-Garcia, R.; Munoz-Portero, M.J.; Garcia-Anton, J.

    2010-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels can undergo microstructural changes if they are heated improperly. When that happens, duplex stainless steels are sensitized and intermetallic phases appear. The high Chromium and Molybdenum content promotes the formation of secondary phases as a consequence of the heat treatment. These secondary phases, which are rich in alloying elements, such as Cr and Mo, deplete these elements from the neighbouring phases, leading to a reduction in corrosion resistance. In order to study the influence of the secondary phases on the corrosion parameters, samples of duplex stainless steel, Alloy 900 (UNS 1.4462), have been heated in argon atmosphere at 825 deg. C for 1 h. The corrosion behaviour of sensitized and unsensitized Alloy 900 has been analyzed in a concentrated aqueous lithium bromide (LiBr) solution of 992 g/L by means of cyclic potentiodynamic curves. Secondary phase presence reduces the pitting potential value of Alloy 900. Besides, the pitting potential decreases with temperature. On the other hand, the corrosion potential and open circuit potential values increase with temperature and sensitization.

  6. Assessment of the influence of surface finishing and weld joints on the corrosion/oxidation behaviour of stainless steels in lead bismuth eutectic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Munoz, F.J., E-mail: fco.javier@ciemat.es [Structural Materials Division, CIEMAT, Building 30, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Soler-Crespo, L.; Gomez-Briceno, D. [Structural Materials Division, CIEMAT, Building 30, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to gain some insight into the influence of the surface finishing in the oxidation/corrosion behaviour of 316L and T91 steels in lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). Specimens of both materials with different surface states were prepared (as-received, grinded, grinded and polished, and electrolitically polished) and oxidation tests were carried out at 775 and 825 K from 100 to 2000 h for two different oxygen concentrations and for H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O molar ratios of 3 and 0.03. The general conclusion for these tests is that the effect of surface finishing on the corrosion/protection processes is not significant under the tested conditions. In addition the behaviour of weld joints, T91-T91 Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) and T91-316L have been also studied under similar conditions. The conclusions are that, whereas T91-T91 welded joint shows the same corrosion properties as the parent materials for the conditions tested, AISI 316L-T91 welded joint, present an important dissolution over seam area that it associated to the electrode 309S used for the fabrication process.

  7. Assessment of the influence of surface finishing and weld joints on the corrosion/oxidation behaviour of stainless steels in lead bismuth eutectic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Muñoz, F. J.; Soler-Crespo, L.; Gómez-Briceño, D.

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to gain some insight into the influence of the surface finishing in the oxidation/corrosion behaviour of 316L and T91 steels in lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). Specimens of both materials with different surface states were prepared (as-received, grinded, grinded and polished, and electrolitically polished) and oxidation tests were carried out at 775 and 825 K from 100 to 2000 h for two different oxygen concentrations and for H 2/H 2O molar ratios of 3 and 0.03. The general conclusion for these tests is that the effect of surface finishing on the corrosion/protection processes is not significant under the tested conditions. In addition the behaviour of weld joints, T91-T91 Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) and T91-316L have been also studied under similar conditions. The conclusions are that, whereas T91-T91 welded joint shows the same corrosion properties as the parent materials for the conditions tested, AISI 316L-T91 welded joint, present an important dissolution over seam area that it associated to the electrode 309S used for the fabrication process.

  8. Assessment of the influence of surface finishing and weld joints on the corrosion/oxidation behaviour of stainless steels in lead bismuth eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Munoz, F.J.; Soler-Crespo, L.; Gomez-Briceno, D.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to gain some insight into the influence of the surface finishing in the oxidation/corrosion behaviour of 316L and T91 steels in lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). Specimens of both materials with different surface states were prepared (as-received, grinded, grinded and polished, and electrolitically polished) and oxidation tests were carried out at 775 and 825 K from 100 to 2000 h for two different oxygen concentrations and for H 2 /H 2 O molar ratios of 3 and 0.03. The general conclusion for these tests is that the effect of surface finishing on the corrosion/protection processes is not significant under the tested conditions. In addition the behaviour of weld joints, T91-T91 Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) and T91-316L have been also studied under similar conditions. The conclusions are that, whereas T91-T91 welded joint shows the same corrosion properties as the parent materials for the conditions tested, AISI 316L-T91 welded joint, present an important dissolution over seam area that it associated to the electrode 309S used for the fabrication process.

  9. The corrosion and biological behaviour of titanium alloys in the presence of human lymphoid cells and MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yumei; Zhao Yimin; Chai Feng; Hildebrand, Hartmut F; Hornez, Jean-Christophe; Li, Chang Liang; Traisnel, Michel

    2009-01-01

    Corrosion behaviour of biomedical alloys is generally determined in mineral electrolytes: unbuffered NaCl 0.9% (pH 7.4) or artificial saliva (pH 6.8). The assays with exclusive utilization of these electrolytes are of low relevance for the biological condition, to which the alloys will be exposed once implanted in the human organism. As an approach to the biological situation regarding the interaction of proteins, electrolytes and metals, we added the RPMI cell culture medium containing foetal calf serum as a biological electrolyte (pH 7.0). The analysis of corrosion behaviour was also performed in the presence of human lymphoid cells (CEM). The rest potential (E r ) and the global polarization were determined on cp-Ti, micro-arc oxidized cp-Ti (MAO-Ti), four different Ti-alloys (Ti6Al4V, Ti12Zr, Ti(AlMoZr), Ti(NbTaZr)) and 316L stainless steel. The 316L exhibited an appropriate E r and a good passive current density (I p ), but a high corrosion potential (E c ) and a very low breakdown potential (E b ) in all electrolytes. All Ti-alloys exhibited a much better electrochemical behaviour: better E r and E c and very high E b . No significant differences of the above parameters existed between the Ti-alloys, except for Zr-containing alloys that showed better corrosion behaviour. A remarkable difference, however, was stated with respect to the electrolytes. NaCl 0.9% induced strong variations between the Ti-alloys. More homogeneous results were obtained with artificial saliva and RPMI medium, which induced a favourable E c and an increased I p . The presence of cells further decreased these values. The unbuffered NaCl solution seems to be less appropriate for the analysis of corrosion of metals. Additional in vitro biological assessments with CEM cell suspensions and MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts confirmed the advantages of the Ti(AlMoZr) and Ti(NbTaZr) alloys with an improved cell proliferation and vitality rate.

  10. The corrosion and biological behaviour of titanium alloys in the presence of human lymphoid cells and MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Mei; Chai, Feng; Hornez, Jean-Christophe; Li, Chang Liang; Zhao, Yi Min; Traisnel, Michel; Hildebrand, Hartmut F

    2009-02-01

    Corrosion behaviour of biomedical alloys is generally determined in mineral electrolytes: unbuffered NaCl 0.9% (pH 7.4) or artificial saliva (pH 6.8). The assays with exclusive utilization of these electrolytes are of low relevance for the biological condition, to which the alloys will be exposed once implanted in the human organism. As an approach to the biological situation regarding the interaction of proteins, electrolytes and metals, we added the RPMI cell culture medium containing foetal calf serum as a biological electrolyte (pH 7.0). The analysis of corrosion behaviour was also performed in the presence of human lymphoid cells (CEM). The rest potential (Er) and the global polarization were determined on cp-Ti, micro-arc oxidized cp-Ti (MAO-Ti), four different Ti-alloys (Ti6Al4V, Ti12Zr, Ti(AlMoZr), Ti(NbTaZr)) and 316L stainless steel. The 316L exhibited an appropriate Er and a good passive current density (Ip), but a high corrosion potential (Ec) and a very low breakdown potential (Eb) in all electrolytes. All Ti-alloys exhibited a much better electrochemical behaviour: better Er and Ec and very high Eb. No significant differences of the above parameters existed between the Ti-alloys, except for Zr-containing alloys that showed better corrosion behaviour. A remarkable difference, however, was stated with respect to the electrolytes. NaCl 0.9% induced strong variations between the Ti-alloys. More homogeneous results were obtained with artificial saliva and RPMI medium, which induced a favourable Ec and an increased Ip. The presence of cells further decreased these values. The unbuffered NaCl solution seems to be less appropriate for the analysis of corrosion of metals. Additional in vitro biological assessments with CEM cell suspensions and MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts confirmed the advantages of the Ti(AlMoZr) and Ti(NbTaZr) alloys with an improved cell proliferation and vitality rate.

  11. Corrosion behaviour of nanometre sized cerium oxide and titanium oxide incorporated aluminium in NaCl solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, P. Muhamed; Edwin, Leela

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosion resistant aluminium incorporated with nano oxides of cerium and titanium. ► 0.2% nano CeO 2 and 0.05% nano TiO 2 showed increased corrosion resistance. ► Nano TiO 2 concentration influenced the optimum performance of the material. ► Comparison of Micro and nano CeO 2 and TiO 2 aluminium showed the latter is best. - Abstract: The study highlights the development of an aluminium matrix composite by incorporating mixture of nanometre sized cerium oxide and titanium oxide in pure aluminium and its corrosion resistance in marine environment. The mixed nanometre sized oxides incorporated aluminium exhibited improved microstructure and excellent corrosion resistance. Corrosion resistance depends on the concentration of nanometre sized titanium oxide. Electrochemical characteristics improved several folds in nanometre sized mixed oxides incorporated aluminium than micrometre sized oxides incorporated aluminium.

  12. Too Hot to Sleep? Sleep Behaviour and Surface Body Temperature of Wahlberg’s Epauletted Fruit Bat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Colleen T.; Awuah, Adwoa; Jordaan, Maryna; Magagula, Londiwe; Mkhize, Truth; Paine, Christine; Raymond-Bourret, Esmaella; Hart, Lorinda A.

    2015-01-01

    The significance of sleep and factors that affect it have been well documented, however, in light of global climate change the effect of temperature on sleep patterns has only recently gained attention. Unlike many mammals, bats (order: Chiroptera) are nocturnal and little is known about their sleep and the effects of ambient temperature (Ta) on their sleep. Consequently we investigated seasonal temperature effects on sleep behaviour and surface body temperature of free-ranging Wahlberg’s epauletted fruit bat, Epomophorus wahlbergi, at a tree roost. Sleep behaviours of E. wahlbergi were recorded, including: sleep duration and sleep incidences (i.e. one eye open and both eyes closed). Sleep differed significantly across all the individuals in terms of sleep duration and sleep incidences. Individuals generally spent more time awake than sleeping. The percentage of each day bats spent asleep was significantly higher during winter (27.6%), compared with summer (15.6%). In summer, 20.7% of the sleeping bats used one eye open sleep, and this is possibly the first evidence of one-eye-sleep in non-marine mammals. Sleep duration decreased with extreme heat as bats spent significantly more time trying to cool by licking their fur, spreading their wings and panting. Skin temperatures of E. wahlbergi were significantly higher when Ta was ≥35°C and no bats slept at these high temperatures. Consequently extremely hot days negatively impact roosting fruit bats, as they were forced to be awake to cool themselves. This has implications for these bats given predicted climate change scenarios. PMID:25775371

  13. Characterization of cylinder liners produced with hypereutectic Al-Si alloys and investigation of corrosion behaviour in synthetic automotive condensed solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Hamilta de Oliveira

    2006-01-01

    In the present study four hypereutectic Al-Si alloys, three produced by spray forming and one by casting, were characterized for microhardness, roughness, microstructure, texture and corrosion resistance in a synthetic automotive condensed solution (SACS). Two of the spray formed alloys tested were obtained from cylinder liners and the other was laboratory made. Spray forming involves alloy atomization and droplets deposition on a substrate, previous to the solidification of all of the droplets. This process favours the production of materials with a fine microstructure free of macrosegregation that is related to improved hot workability. The microstructure characterization of the four alloys revealed the presence of porosities in the laboratory made alloy. All the three alloys produced by spray forming showed a homogeneous distribution of primary precipitates. The microstructure of one of the alloys showed eutectic microstructure, indicating that this alloy was fabricated by casting. In the cylinder liners, the surface roughness was measured and the microhardness of all the alloys was also evaluated. Furthermore, the laboratory made alloy was hot and cold rolled. Texture determinations were carried out to investigate the correlation between the alloy type and their fabrication process. The texture investigation indicated that the fine distribution of primary silicon phase in the alloy hindered the development of texture typical of aluminium alloys deformation, even after severe mechanical work, such as those used in the conversion of pre-formed in cylinder liners. The surface roughness results indicated typical characteristics of the surface finishing used, honing or chemical etching. The microhardness results were dependent on the fabrication process used, with higher microhardness associated to the eutectic alloy comparatively to the spray formed ones. All hypereutectic alloys were tested for corrosion resistance using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in

  14. Analysis of the corrosion products formed on Ti and a Ti-Pd alloy during exposure in hot water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olefjord, I.; Mattsson, H.

    1982-01-01

    This is a preliminary report dealing with the surface analysis of reaction products formed on Ti and a Ti-Pd alloy during their exposure in hot water. The compositions of the aqueous media were varied with respect to the dissolved oxygen and the content of chloride ions. The temperature was 60 0 C and the exposure times were 10 min. and 6 months. Work is in progress in which samples are exposed at 80 0 C and 95 0 C in the aqueous solutions. Surface analysis was also performed on a sample which had been exposed in water-saturated bentonite. It appears from te ESCA spectra that the oxide products formed on the surface consist of TiO 2 . The results also indicate that the thickness of the film formed at 60 0 C in water is in the range 50 A to 100 A. This is somewhat more than that obtained after exposure in water at room temperature. Exposure for 6 months increases the thickness of the oxide two to three times compared to that obtained during the short exposure at 60 0 C. The analyses of the samples that had been embedded in bentonite indicate that the surface reaction products are thinner than those found on the surface after exposure in an open vessel

  15. Hot deformation of polycrystalline uranium dioxide: from microscopic mechanisms to macroscopic behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dherbey, Francine

    2000-01-01

    The improvement of nuclear fuels performances in PWR requires in particular an enhancement of creep ability of uranium dioxide in order to minimise rupture risks of the cladding material during interactions between pellets and cladding. The aim of this study is to investigate the link between the ceramic macroscopic thermo-mechanical behaviour and the changes in the fuel microstructure during deformation. Stoichiometric UO 2 pellets with various grains sizes from 9 pm to 36 μm have been deformed by compression at intermediate temperatures, i.e. near T M /2, and quenched under stress. The damage is characterised by the presence of cavities at low stresses and cracks at high stresses, both along grain boundaries parallel to the compression axis. Inside grains, dislocations organise themselves into cellular substructures in which sub-boundaries are made of dislocation hexagonal networks. In these conditions, uranium dioxide deformation is described by grain boundary sliding, which is the main origin of material damage, partially accommodated by dislocational creep inside grains. A steady-state creep model is proposed on a physical basis. It accounts for the almost similar contributions of two mechanisms which are grain boundaries sliding and intragranular creep, and takes into account the grain boundary roughness. In contrast with phenomenological descriptions used up to now, this picture leads to a unique creep law on the whole range of stresses explored here, from 10 MPa to 80 MPa. The creep rate controlling mechanism seems to be the migration of sub-boundaries. The deformation at constant strain rate is controlled by the same mechanisms as creep. (author) [fr

  16. Examples illustrating the effects of high-temperature corrosion and protective coatings on the creep-to-rupture behaviour of materials resistant to very high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachova, E.; Hougardy, H.P.; Granacher, J.

    1989-01-01

    Assessing the creep stress, it is assumed in general that the sub-surface effects in a specimen correspond to those at the surface. Particularly in very high temperature environments, however, oxidation is an additional effect to be taken into account, and there are other operational stresses to be reckoned with, as e.g. hot gas corrosion of gas turbine blades. The reduction of the effective cross section due to corrosion for instance of the material affected by long-term creep leads to an increase in stresses and thus shortens the period up to rupture. Protective coatings will prevent or at least delay corrosion. The paper reports the performance of various protective coatings. Pt-Al coatings have have been found to remain intact even on specimens with the longest testing periods up to rupture, to an extent that there was no oxidation at the grain boundaries proceeding from the surface to the sub-surface material. The same applies to the plasma-sprayed coatings, although in some cases pores had developed in the coating. The chromium alitizations were used up irregularly over the surface of some specimens tested at 1000deg C. Chromizing layers have been found to be more strongly damaged than the other coatings tested under comparable conditions. (orig./RHM) [de

  17. Influence of retrogression and re-aging treatment on corrosion behaviour of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Yan-Ping; Pan, Qing-Lin; Li, Wen-Bin; Liu, Xiao-Yan; He, Yun-Bin

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Compared with T6 temper, the alloy under RRA temper is less susceptibility to IGC, EXCO and SCC, which indicating that the susceptibility of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy to IGC, EXCO and SCC can be decreased by the RRA process. → The exfoliation corrosion susceptibility of the alloy was investigated by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and the relationship between exfoliation corrosion susceptibility and impedance spectroscopy was established. The appearance of two time constants indicates the onset of the delamination. Hence, the corrosion susceptibility of the alloy can be stated by comparing with the instant of the two time constants. → Simulated EIS parameters are able to quantitatively determine the degree of the exfoliation susceptibility by equivalent circuit analysis. For instance, the polarization resistance of the porous layer (R po ) for the RRA sample is higher than that of the T6 sample, which permits to conclude that the RRA treatment can increase the electrochemical corrosion resistance of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy. -- Abstract: Influence of retrogression and re-aging treatment on the microstructure, strength, exfoliation corrosion, inter-granular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy has been investigated by means of optical microscope (OM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results show that retrogression and re-aging treatment can increase the size and the distribution discontinuity of the grain boundary precipitates, and lead to the increase of the corrosion resistance without the loss of strength and ductility. In addition, the analysis of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy shows that retrogression and re-aging treatment can enhance the resistance to exfoliation corrosion.

  18. Hot corrosion behavior of YSZ, Gd2Zr2O7 and YSZ/Gd2Zr2O7 thermal barrier coatings exposed to molten sulfate and vanadate salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgurluk, Yasin; Doleker, Kadir Mert; Karaoglanli, Abdullah Cahit

    2018-04-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are mostly used in critical components of aircraft gas turbine engines. Hot corrosion is among the main deteriorating factors in TBCs which results from the effect of molten salt on the coating-gas interface. This type of corrosion is observed as a result of contamination accumulated during combustion processes. Fuels used in aviation industry generally contain impurities such as vanadium oxide (V2O5) and sodium sulfate (Na2SO4). These impurities damage turbines' inlet at elevated temperatures because of chemical reaction. Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is a conventional top coating material for TBCs while Gd2Zr2O7 is a new promising top coating material for TBCs. In this study, CoNiCrAlY metallic bond coat was deposited on Inconel 718 nickel based superalloy substrate material with a thickness about 100 μm using cold gas dynamic spray (CGDS) method. Production of TBCs were done with deposition of YSZ, Gd2Zr2O7, YSZ/Gd2Zr2O7 ceramic top coating materials using EB-PVD method, having a total thickness of 300 μm. Hot corrosion behavior of YSZ, Gd2Zr2O7, YSZ/Gd2Zr2O7 TBC systems were exposed to 45 wt.% Na2SO4 and 55 wt.% V2O5 molten salt mixtures at 1000 °C temperature. TBC samples were investigated and compared using scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The hot corrosion failure mechanisms of YSZ, Gd2Zr2O7 and YSZ/Gd2Zr2O7 TBCs in the molten salts were evaluated.

  19. Corrigendum to 'On the influence of microstructure on the fracture behaviour of hot extruded ferritic ODS steels' [J. Nucl. Mater. 497 (2017) 60-75

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, A.; Viehrig, H. W.; Altstadt, E.; Heintze, C.; Hoffmann, J.

    2018-02-01

    ODS steels are known to show inferior fracture properties as compared to ferritic martensitic non-ODS steels. Hot extruded 13Cr ODS steel however, showed excellent fracture toughness at a temperature range from room temperature to 400 °C. In this work, the factors which resulted in superior and anisotropic fracture behaviour were investigated by comparing different orientations of two hot extruded materials using scanning electron, electron backscatter and transmission electron microscopy. Fracture behaviour of the two materials was compared using unloading compliance fracture toughness tests. Anisotropic fracture toughness was predominantly influenced by grain morphology. Superior fracture toughness in 13Cr ODS-KIT was predominantly influenced by factors such as smaller void inducing particle size and higher sub-micron particle-matrix interfacial strength.

  20. Evaluation of the protection behaviour of reinforcement steel against corrosion induced by chlorides in reinforced mortar specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crivelaro, Marcos

    2002-01-01

    In this work various treatments for protecting reinforcing steels against corrosion induced by chlorides have been evaluated. Additives to mortars and surface treatments given to reinforcing steels were evaluated as corrosion protection measures. In the preliminary tests the corrosion resistance of a CA 50 steel treated by immersion in nearly 50 different solutions, was determined. The solutions were prepared with tannins (from various sources) and/or benzotriazole, and during immersion, a surface film formed on the steel. The corrosion resistance of the coated steels was evaluated in a saturated Ca(OH) 2 solution with 5% (wt) NaCl. Preliminary tests were also carried out with mortars reinforced with uncoated steel to which tannin or lignin was added. Two organic coatings, a monocomponent and a bicomponent type, formulated specially for this investigation, with both tannin and benzotriazole, were also tested in the preliminary tests to select the coating with better corrosion protection property. The bicomponent type (epoxy coating) showed better performance than the monocomponent type coating, and the former was therefore chosen to investigate the corrosion performance on CA 50 steel inside mortar specimens. From the preliminary tests, two solutions with tannin from two sources, Black Wattle (Acacia mearnsii) and Brazilian tea (Ilex paraguariensis St. Hill), to which benzotriazole and phosphoric acid were added, were chosen. Mortar specimens reinforced with CA50 steel treated by immersion in these two solutions were prepared. Also, epoxy coated CA50 steel was tested as reinforcement inside mortar specimens. Mortars reinforced with uncoated CA50 steel were also prepared and corrosion tested for comparison. The effect of tannin and lignin as separate additives to the mortar on the corrosion resistance of uncoated steel was also studied. The reinforced mortar specimens were tested with various cycles of immersion for 2 days in 3.5% (wt) NaCl followed by with air

  1. Study of the properties of plasma deposited layers of nickel-chrome-aluminium-yttrium coatings resistant to oxidation and hot corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailo R. Mrdak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the properties of Ni22Cr10Al1Y layers in order to obtain optimal structural - mechanical properties with the optimization of depositing parameters. Powder was deposited by the atmospheric plasma spray (APS process with the current intensity of 600, 700 and 800A, with a corresponding plasma gun power supply of 22KW, 34KW and 28KW. The evaluation of the Ni22Cr10Al1Y coating layers was made on the basis of their microhardness, tensile strength and microstructure performance. The best performance was obtained in the layers deposited with 800A and the 34KW plasma gun power supply. The coating with the best characteristics was tested to oxidation in the furnace for heat treatment without a protective atmosphere at 1100°C for one hour. The examination of the morphology of Ni22Cr10Al1Y powder particles was carried out on the SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope as well as the EDS analysis of the best layers. The microstructure of the deposited coating layers was examined with a light microscope. The microstructure analysis was performed according to the TURBOMECA standard. The mechanical properties of layers were evaluated by the method HV0.3 for microhardness and by tensile testing for bond strength. The research has shown that plasma gun power supply significantly affects the mechanical properties and microstructure of coatings that are of crucial importance for the protection of components exposed to high temperature oxidation and hot corrosion.

  2. Spent fuel UO{sub 2} matrix corrosion behaviour studies through alpha-doped UO{sub 2} pellets leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzeau, B.; Jegou, C.; Broudic, V. [CEA-Valrho DEN/DTCD/SECM Laboratoire des Materiaux et Procedes Actifs BP 17171 F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The option of direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep geological formation raises the need to investigate the long-term behaviour of the UO{sub 2} matrix in aqueous media subjected to {alpha}-{beta}-{gamma} radiations. The {beta}-{gamma} emitters account for the most of the activity of spent fuel at the moment it is removed from the reactor, but diminish within a millennial time frame by over three orders of magnitude to less than the long-term activity. The latter persist over much longer time periods and must therefore be taken into account over geological disposal scale. In the present investigation the UO{sub 2} matrix corrosion under alpha radiation is studied as a function of different parameters such as: the alpha activity, the carbonates and hydrogen concentrations,.. In order to study the effect of alpha radiolysis of water on the UO{sub 2} matrix, {sup 238/239}Pu doped UO{sub 2} pellets (0.22 %wt. Pu total) were fabricated with different {sup 238}Pu/{sup 239}Pu ratio to reproduce the alpha activity of a 47 GWd.t{sub HMi}{sup -1} UOX spent fuel at different milestones in time (15, 50, 1500, 10000 and 40000 years). Undoped UO{sub 2} pellets were also available as reference sample. Leaching experiments were conducted in deionized or carbonated water (NaHCO{sub 3} 1 mM), under Argon (O{sub 2} < 0.1 ppm), or Ar/H{sub 2} 30% gas mixture. Previous experiments conducted in deionized water under argon atmosphere, have shown a good correlation between alpha activity and uranium release for the 15-, 1500- and 40000-years alpha doped UO{sub 2} batches. Besides, uranium release in the leachate is controlled either by the kinetics, or by the thermodynamics. Provided the solubility limit of uranium is not achieved, uranium concentration increases and is only limited by the kinetics, unless precipitation occurs and the uranium concentration remains constant over time. These controls are highly dependant on the solution chemistry

  3. A randomised controlled trial of a cognitive behavioural intervention for men who have hot flushes following prostate cancer treatment (MANCAN: trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousaf Omar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This randomised controlled trial (RCT aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a guided self-help cognitive behavioural intervention to alleviate problematic hot flushes (HF and night sweats (NS in men who are undergoing prostate cancer treatment. The trial and the self-help materials have been adapted from a previous RCT, which showed that a cognitive behavioural intervention reduced the self-reported problem-rating of hot flushes in women with menopausal symptoms, and in women undergoing breast cancer treatment. We hypothesize that guided self-help will be more effective than usual care in reducing HF/NS problem-rating at post treatment assessment. Methods/Design Seventy men who are undergoing treatment for prostate cancer and who have been experiencing more than ten HF/NS weekly for over a month are recruited into the trial from urology clinics in London. They are randomly allocated to either a four-week self-help cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT treatment or to their usual care (control group. The treatment includes information and discussion about hot flushes and night sweats in the context of prostate cancer, monitoring and modifying precipitants, relaxation and paced respiration, stress management, cognitive therapy for unhelpful thoughts and beliefs, managing sleep and night sweats, and advice on maintaining these changes. Prior to randomisation, men attend a clinical interview, undergo 24-48-hour sternal skin conductance monitoring, and complete pre-treatment questionnaires (e.g., problem-rating and frequency of hot flushes and night sweats; quality of life; mood; hot flush beliefs and behaviours. Post-treatment measures (sternal skin conductance and the above questionnaires are collected four-six weeks later, and again at a six-month follow-up. Discussion MANCAN is the first randomised controlled trial of cognitive behavioural therapy for HF/NS for men that measures both self-reported and physiologically indexed

  4. Effects of interface roughness on the annealing behaviour of laminated Ti-Al composite deformed by hot rolling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Y.; Fan, G.H.; Yu, Tianbo

    2015-01-01

    A laminated Ti-Al composite has been fabricated by hot compaction and hot rolling of alternate layers of commercial purity Ti and Al sheets with a thickness of 200 μm. The hot compaction temperature was 500˚C and in a following step the composite has been reduced 50% in thickness by hot rolling....... The fully consolidated composite has been annealed at 300˚C and 500˚C for different length of time. As a result of the differences in crystal structure and mechanical properties between Ti and Al protrusions and retrusions formed at the interface. A heterogeneous interface has thereby been created...

  5. Temperature and radiolytic corrosion effects on the chlorine behaviour in nuclear graphite: consequences for the disposable of irradiated graphite from UNGG reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaudey, C.E.

    2010-10-01

    This work concerns the dismantling of the UNGG reactor which have produced around 23 000 t of graphite wastes that ave to be disposed of according to the French law of June 206. These wastes contain two long-lived radionuclides ( 14 C and 36 Cl) which are the main long term dose contributors. In order to get information about their inventory and their long term behaviour in case of water ingress into the repository, it is necessary to determine their location and speciation in the irradiated graphite after the reactor shutdown. This work concerns the study of 36 Cl. The main objective is to reproduce its behaviour during reactor operation. For that purpose, we have studied the effects of temperature and radiolytic corrosion independently. Our results show a rapid release of around 20% 36 Cl during the first hours of reactor operation whereas a much slower release occurs afterwards. We have put in evidence two types of chlorine corresponding to two different chemical forms (of different thermal stabilities) or to two locations (of different accessibilities). We have also shown that the radiolytic corrosion seems to enhance chlorine release, whatever the irradiation dose. Moreover, the major chemical form of chlorine is inorganic. (author)

  6. Evaluation of corrosion behaviour of tantalum coating obtained by low pressure chemical vapor deposition using electrochemical polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, A.; Bouteville, A.; de Baynast, H.; Laveissière, B.

    2002-06-01

    antalum coatings are elaborated on titanium substrates through Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition from tantalum pentachloride-hydrogen gaseous phase at a deposition temperature of 800 °C and a total pressure of 3.3 mbar. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of this tantalum coating in corrosive solution. Optical Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy observations reveal that deposits are of 1.7 μm in thickness and conformal. The corrosion resistance of tantalum coated titanium substrates is quantified through standard potentiodynamic polarization method. Even for tantalum coatings exhibiting some defects as pores, the corrosion current density is as low as 0.25 mA/cm^2.in very agressive solutions like kroll reagent (HN03/HF).

  7. Effect of PWHT on Microstructure, Mechanical and Corrosion Behaviour of Gas Tungsten Arc Welds of IN718 Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilkush; Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    The present work aims to improve corrosion resistance and mechanical behavior of the welds with suitable post weld heat treatment i.e. direct aging and solutionizing treatments (980STA, 1080STA). Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) has been performed on Inconel 718 (IN718) nickel based super alloy plates with 3mm thickness. The structural –property relationship of the post weld heat treated samples is judged by correlating the microstructural changes with observed mechanical behavior and pitting corrosion resistance of the welds As-recevied, direct aging (DA), 980STA,1080STA were studied. Welds were characterized for microstructure changes with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM).Vickers micro- hardness tester was used to measure the hardness of the weldments. Potential-dynamic polarization testing was carried out to study the pitting corrosion resistance in 3.5%NaCl (Sodium chloride) solution at 30°C.Results of the present study established that post weld heat treatments resulted in promoting the element segregation diffusion and resolve them from brittle laves particles in the matrix. Increased precipitation of strengthening phases lead to a significant increase in fusion zone hardness of 1080STA post weld heat treated condition compared to as welded, direct aged, 980STA conditions. Due to significant changes in the microstructural behavior of 1080STA condition resulted in superior pitting corrosion resistance than 980STA, direct aged and as- recevied conditions of IN718 GTA welds

  8. Corrosion behaviour of AZ91D and AM50 magnesium alloys with Nd and Gd additions in humid environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrabal, R., E-mail: raularrabal@quim.ucm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Matykina, E.; Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Paucar, K. [Gabinete de Corrosion, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica y Textil, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Cod. Postal 25, Lima (Peru); Mohedano, M.; Casajus, P. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg alloys with additions of Nd and Gd were exposed to high humidity atmosphere. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The increase of Nd or Gd diminished the effect of micro-galvanic couples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corrosion resistance of the AM50 alloy improved with the addition of Nd or Gd by 43%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nd and Gd had no significant effect on the corrosion resistance of the AZ91D alloy. - Abstract: AM50 and AZ91D alloys modified with rare earths (RE) were evaluated under atmospheric conditions. Nd and Gd additions resulted in formation of Al{sub 2}RE and Al-Mn-RE compounds and reduction of the fraction of {beta}-phase. According to surface potential maps, RE-containing intermetallics were more noble than the {beta}-phase, but less than Al-Mn inclusions. As a result, the action of micro-galvanic couples depended on the added amount of RE and the initial alloy microstructure. Nd or Gd additions improved the corrosion resistance of the AM50 alloy by up to 43%, but had no significant effect on the corrosion resistance of the AZ91D alloy.

  9. Corrosion behaviour of AZ91D and AM50 magnesium alloys with Nd and Gd additions in humid environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrabal, R.; Matykina, E.; Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Paucar, K.; Mohedano, M.; Casajús, P.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mg alloys with additions of Nd and Gd were exposed to high humidity atmosphere. ► The increase of Nd or Gd diminished the effect of micro-galvanic couples. ► Corrosion resistance of the AM50 alloy improved with the addition of Nd or Gd by 43%. ► Nd and Gd had no significant effect on the corrosion resistance of the AZ91D alloy. - Abstract: AM50 and AZ91D alloys modified with rare earths (RE) were evaluated under atmospheric conditions. Nd and Gd additions resulted in formation of Al 2 RE and Al–Mn–RE compounds and reduction of the fraction of β-phase. According to surface potential maps, RE-containing intermetallics were more noble than the β-phase, but less than Al–Mn inclusions. As a result, the action of micro-galvanic couples depended on the added amount of RE and the initial alloy microstructure. Nd or Gd additions improved the corrosion resistance of the AM50 alloy by up to 43%, but had no significant effect on the corrosion resistance of the AZ91D alloy.

  10. Corrosion behaviour of zinc and aluminum magnesium alloys by scanning reference electrode technique (SRET) and electrochemical noise (EN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klassen, R.D.; Roberge, P.R.; Lafront, A.-M.; Oteyaka, M.O.; Ghali, E.

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion characteristics of five permanent mould magnesium alloys were studied. Two contained aluminum (AZ91D and AZ91E) and three contained zinc as the primary alloying element (ZA104 (Zn 10%, Al 4%), ZAC and ZACS). ZAC contained a small amount of calcium and ZACS contained small amounts of calcium and strontium. Two techniques were used in this study, namely 1) scanning reference electrode technique (SRET) and 2) electrochemical noise (EN). The test solution for each case was 5% NaCl saturated with Mg(OH)2 at room temperature. According to the EN measurements, the corrosion rate of AZ91D was the lowest followed by AZ91E, ZACS, ZAC and ZA104. The EN measurements showed that both the frequency and magnitude of current transients were much higher for the zinc based alloys than for the aluminum based alloys. The SRET measurements illustrated that localized corrosion occurred more frequently on the ZA104 sample than on the AZ91D sample. It seemed that increasing the level of zinc and lowering the level of aluminum relative to the levels in AZ91D does not improve corrosion resistance. (author)

  11. Stress corrosion cracking of nuclear reactor pressure vessel and piping steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speidel, M.O.; Magdowski, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents an extensive investigation of stress corrosion cracking of nuclear reactor pressure vessel and piping steels exposed to hot water. Experimental fracture mechanics results are compared with data from the literature and other laboratories. Thus a comprehensive overview of the present knowledge concerning stress corrosion crack growth rates is provided. Several sets of data confirm that 'fast' stress corrosion cracks with growth rates between 10 -8 and 10 -7 m/s and threshold stress intensities around 20 MN m -3/2 can occur under certain conditions. However, it appears possible that specific environmental, mechanical and metallurgical conditions which may prevail in reactors can result in significantly lower stress corrosion crack growth rates. The presently known stress corrosion crack growth rate versus stress intensity curves are discussed with emphasis on their usefulness in establishing safety margins against stress corrosion cracking of components in service. Further substantial research efforts would be helpful to provide a data base which permits well founded predictions as to how stress corrosion cracking in pressure vessels and piping can be reliably excluded or tolerated. It is emphasized, however, that the nucleation of stress corrosion cracks (as opposed to their growth) is difficult and may contribute substantially to the stress corrosion free service behaviour of the overwhelming majority of pressure vessels and pipes. (author)

  12. Stochastic theory of fatigue corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haiyun

    1999-10-01

    A stochastic theory of corrosion has been constructed. The stochastic equations are described giving the transportation corrosion rate and fluctuation corrosion coefficient. In addition the pit diameter distribution function, the average pit diameter and the most probable pit diameter including other related empirical formula have been derived. In order to clarify the effect of stress range on the initiation and growth behaviour of pitting corrosion, round smooth specimen were tested under cyclic loading in 3.5% NaCl solution.

  13. Electrochemical corrosion behaviour of lead-free Sn-8.5 Zn-X Ag-0.1 Al-0.5 Ga solder in 3.5% NaCl solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Udit Surya; Lin, K.-L.

    2005-01-01

    The electrochemical corrosion behaviour of Pb-free Sn-8.5 Zn-X Ag-0.1 Al-0.5 Ga solder in 3.5% NaCl solution was investigated by using potentiodynamic polarization methods, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The results obtained from polarization studies showed that an increase in the Ag content from 0.1 to 1.5 wt% decreased the corrosion current density (I corr ) and shifted the corrosion potential (E corr ) towards more noble values. These changes were also reflected in the linear polarization resistance (LPR), corrosion rate, anodic Tafel slope (b A ) and the cathodic Tafel slope (b c ) values, respectively. Passivation behaviour was noted in the Sn-Zn-X Ag-Al-Ga solders with Ag content > 0.1 wt%. The oxides and hydroxides of zinc were responsible for the formation of passive film. Presence of Ag atoms in the oxide layer also improved the passivation behaviour of solders to a certain extent. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that two different oxygen species were formed on the surface films, one was assigned to OH - in Zn(OH) 2 and the other to O 2 - in ZnO. XPS depth profile results revealed that the two species had different depth distribution in the films. SEM and EDX analyses confirmed SnCl 2 as the major corrosion product formed after the electrochemical experiments

  14. Analysis of corrosive environmental factors of seabed sediment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Seabed sediment; corrosion; environmental factors. 1. Introduction. The corrosion ... plays an important role in the corrosion behaviour of steel in sediment. Figure 2b shows the change in oxidation-reduction po- tential, Eh with distance from ...

  15. Dictionary corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This dictionary has 13000 entries in both languages. Keywords and extensive accompanying information simplify the choice of word for the user. The following topics are covered: Theoretical principles of corrosion; Corrosion of the metals and alloys most frequently used in engineering. Types of corrosion - (chemical-, electro-chemical, biological corrosion); forms of corrosion (superficial, pitting, selective, intercrystalline and stress corrosion; vibrational corrosion cracking); erosion and cavitation. Methods of corrosion control (material selection, temporary corrosion protection media, paint and plastics coatings, electro-chemical coatings, corrosion prevention by treatment of the corrosive media); Corrosion testing methods. (orig./HP) [de

  16. The influence of surface microstructure and chemical composition on corrosion behaviour in fuel-grade bio-ethanol of low-alloy steel modified by plasma nitro-carburizing and post-oxidizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniatti, Rosiana; Bandeira, Aline L.; Crespi, Ângela E.; Aguzzoli, Cesar; Baumvol, Israel J. R.; Figueroa, Carlos A.

    2013-09-01

    The interaction of bio-ethanol on steel surfaces modified by plasma-assisted diffusion technologies is studied for the first time. The influence of surface microstructure and chemical composition on corrosion behaviour of AISI 4140 low-alloy steel in fuel-grade bio-ethanol was investigated. The steel surfaces were modified by plasma nitro-carburizing followed plasma oxidizing. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray dispersive spectroscopy, and glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy were used to characterize the modified surface before and after immersion tests in bio-ethanol up to 77 days. The main corrosion mechanism is pit formation. The pit density and pit size were measured in order to quantify the corrosion resistance which was found to depend more strongly on microstructure and morphology of the oxide layer than on its thickness. The best corrosion protection was observed for samples post-oxidized at 480 °C and 90 min.

  17. The influence of surface microstructure and chemical composition on corrosion behaviour in fuel-grade bio-ethanol of low-alloy steel modified by plasma nitro-carburizing and post-oxidizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boniatti, Rosiana; Bandeira, Aline L.; Crespi, Ângela E.; Aguzzoli, Cesar; Baumvol, Israel J.R.; Figueroa, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of bio-ethanol on steel surfaces modified by plasma-assisted diffusion technologies is studied for the first time. The influence of surface microstructure and chemical composition on corrosion behaviour of AISI 4140 low-alloy steel in fuel-grade bio-ethanol was investigated. The steel surfaces were modified by plasma nitro-carburizing followed plasma oxidizing. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray dispersive spectroscopy, and glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy were used to characterize the modified surface before and after immersion tests in bio-ethanol up to 77 days. The main corrosion mechanism is pit formation. The pit density and pit size were measured in order to quantify the corrosion resistance which was found to depend more strongly on microstructure and morphology of the oxide layer than on its thickness. The best corrosion protection was observed for samples post-oxidized at 480 °C and 90 min.

  18. A study of corrosion behavior of Ni-22Cr-13Mo-3W alloy under hygroscopic salt deposits on hot surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badwe, Sunil; Raja, K.S.; Misra, M.

    2006-01-01

    Alloy 22, a nickel base Ni-22Cr-13Mo-3W alloy has an excellent corrosion resistance in oxidizing and reducing environments. Most of the corrosion studies on Alloy 22 have been conducted using conventional chemical or electrochemical methods. In the present investigation, the specimen was directly heated instead of heating the electrolyte, thereby simulating the nuclear waste package container temperature profile. Corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 and evaporation conditions of water diffusing on the container were evaluated using the newly devised heated electrode corrosion test (HECT) method in simulated acidified water (SAW) and simulated concentrated water (SCW) environments. In this method, the concentration of the environment varied with test duration. The corrosion rate of Alloy 22 was not affected by the continuous increase in ionic strength of the SAW (pH 3) environment. Passivation kinetics was faster with increase in concentration of the electrolytes. The major difference between the conventional test and HECT was the aging characteristics of the passive film of Alloy 22. The heated electrode corrosion test can be used for evaluating materials for construction of heat transfer equipments such as evaporators

  19. Stress corrosion cracking behaviour of low alloy steels in high temperature water: Description and results from modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirbonod, B.

    2001-01-01

    The initiation and growth of a crack by stress and corrosion in the low alloy steels used for the pressure vessels of Boiling Water Reactors may affect the availability and safety of the plant. This paper presents a new model for stress corrosion cracking of the low alloy steels in high temperature water. The model, based on observations, assumes the crack growth mechanism to be based on an anodic dissolution and cleavage. The main results deal with the position of the dissolution cell found at the crack tip, and with the identification of the parameters sensitive to crack growth, among which are the electrolyte composition and the cleavage length. The model is conservative, in qualitative agreement with measurements conducted at PSI, and may be extended to other metal-environment systems. (author)

  20. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and corrosion behaviour of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ni nano composite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciubotariu, Alina-Crina [Dunarea de Jos, University of Galati, Metallurgy and Materials Science Faculty, Competences Center Interfaces-Tribocorrosion-Electrochemical Systems, CC-ITES, 47 Domneasca Street, 80008 Galati (Romania)], E-mail: Alina.Ciubotariu@ugal.ro; Benea, Lidia [Dunarea de Jos, University of Galati, Metallurgy and Materials Science Faculty, Competences Center Interfaces-Tribocorrosion-Electrochemical Systems, CC-ITES, 47 Domneasca Street, 80008 Galati (Romania); Lakatos-Varsanyi, Magda [Bay Zoltan Foundation, Institute for Materials Science and Technology, Budapest H-1116 (Hungary); Dragan, Viorel [Dunarea de Jos, University of Galati, Metallurgy and Materials Science Faculty, Competences Center Interfaces-Tribocorrosion-Electrochemical Systems, CC-ITES, 47 Domneasca Street, 80008 Galati (Romania)

    2008-05-20

    In this paper, the results on the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and corrosion properties of electrodeposited nanostructured Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ni composite coatings are presented. The nanocomposite coatings were obtained by codeposition of alumina nanoparticles (13 nm) with nickel during plating process. The coating thickness was 50 {mu}m on steel support and an average of nano Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles inside of coatings at 15 vol.% was present. The structure of the coatings was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It has been found that the codeposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles with nickel disturbs the nickel coating's regular surface structure. The electrochemical behavior of the coatings in the corrosive solutions was investigated by polarization potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods. As electrochemical test solutions 0.5 M sodium chloride and 0.5 M potassium sulphate were used in a three electrode open cell. The corrosion potential is shifted to more negative values for nanostructured coatings in 0.5 M sodium chloride. The polarization resistance in 0.5 M sodium chloride decreases in 24 h, but after that increases slowly. In 0.5 M potassium sulphate solution the polarization resistance decreases after 2 h and after 30 h of immersion the polarization resistance is higher than that of the beginning value. The corrosion rate calculated by polarization potentiodynamic curves obtained after 30 min from immersion in solution is smaller for nanostructured coatings in 0.5 M potassium sulphate (4.74 {mu}m/year) and a little bit bigger in 0.5 M sodium chloride (5.03 {mu}m/year)

  1. Corrosion behaviour of groundnut shell ash and silicon carbide hybrid reinforced Al-Mg-Si alloy matrix composites in 3.5% NaCl and 0.3M H2SO4 solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Kanayo ALANEME

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of Al-Mg-Si alloy based composites reinforced with groundnut shell ash (GSA and silicon carbide (SiC was investigated. The aim is to assess the corrosion properties of Al-Mg-Si alloy based hybrid reinforced composites developed using different mix ratios of GSA (a cheaply processed agro waste derivative which served as partial replacement for SiC and SiC as reinforcing materials. GSA and SiC mixed in weight ratios 0:1, 1:3, 1:1, 3:1, and 1:0 were utilized to prepare 6 and 10 wt% of the reinforcing phase with Al‐Mg‐Si alloy as matrix using two‐step stir casting method. Mass loss and corrosion rate measurement was used to study the corrosion behaviour of the produced composites in 3.5% NaCl and 0.3M H2SO4 solutions. The results show that the Al-Mg-Si alloy based composites containing 6 and 10 wt% GSA and SiC in varied weight ratios were resistant to corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution. The composites were however more susceptible to corrosion in 0.3M H2SO4 solution (in comparison with the 3.5% NaCl solution. It was noted that the Al-Mg-Si/6 wt% GSA-SiC hybrid composite grades containing GSA and SiC in weight ratio 1:3 and 3:1 respectively exhibited superior corrosion resistance in the 0.3M H2SO4 solution compared to other composites produced for this series. In the case of the Al-Mg-Si/10 wt% GSA-SiC hybrid composite grades, the corrosion resistance was relatively superior for the composites containing a greater weight ratio of GSA (75% and 100% in 0.3M H2SO4 solution.

  2. Influence of chloride ion concentration on the electrochemical corrosion behaviour of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AM50 magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, J.; Srinivasan, P. Bala; Blawert, C.; Dietzel, W.

    2010-01-01

    The electrochemical degradation of a silicate- and a phosphate-based plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coated AM50 magnesium alloy obtained using a pulsed DC power supply was investigated using potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in NaCl solutions of different chloride ion concentrations viz., 0.01 M, 0.1 M, 0.5 M and 1 M. The surface of the PEO coated specimens after 50 h of immersion/EIS testing was examined by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the corrosion deterioration of PEO coated magnesium alloy in NaCl solutions was significantly influenced by chloride ion concentration. The silicate-based coating was found to offer a superior corrosion resistance to the magnesium substrate than the phosphate-based coatings in lower chloride ion concentration NaCl solutions (0.01 M and 0.1 M NaCl). On the other hand both these PEO coatings were found to be highly susceptible to localized damage, and could not provide an effective corrosion protection to Mg alloy substrate in solutions containing higher chloride concentrations (0.5 M and 1 M). The extent of localized damage was observed to be more with increase in chloride concentration in both the cases.

  3. Effect of Dissolved Oxygen and Immersion Time on the Corrosion Behaviour of Mild Steel in Bicarbonate/Chloride Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaius Debi Eyu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical behavior of mild steel in bicarbonate solution at different dissolved oxygen (DO concentrations and immersion times has been studied under dynamic conditions using electrochemical techniques. The results show that both DO and immersion times influence the morphology of the corrosion products. In comparative tests, the corrosion rate was systematically found to be lower in solutions with lower DO, lower HCO3− concentrations and longer immersion time. The SEM analyses reveal that the iron dissolution rate was more severe in solutions containing higher DO. The decrease in corrosion rate can be attributed to the formation of a passive layer containing mainly α -FeO (OH and ( γ -Fe2O3/Fe3O4 as confirmed by the X-ray diffractometry (XRD and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. Passivation of mild steel is evident in electrochemical test at ≈ −600 mVSCE at pH ≥ 8 in dearated ( ≤ 0.8 ppm DO chloride bicarbonate solution under dynamic conditions.

  4. Electrochemical corrosion behaviour of Mg-Al alloys with thermal spray Al/SiCp composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, A.; Feliu Jr, S.; Merino, M. C.; Mohedano, M.; Casajus, P.; Arrabal, R.

    2010-01-01

    The corrosion protection of Mg-Al alloys by flame thermal spraying of Al/SiCp composite coatings was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The volume fraction of SiC particles (SiCp) varied between 5 and 30%. The as-sprayed Al/SiCp composite coatings revealed a high number of micro-channels, largely in the vicinity of the SiC particles, that facilitated the penetration of the electrolyte and the subsequent galvanic corrosion of the magnesium substrates. The application of a cold-pressing post-treatment reduced the degree of porosity of the coatings and improved the bonding at the coating/substrate and Al/SiC interfaces. This resulted in improved corrosion resistance of the coated specimens. The effectiveness of the coatings slightly decreased with the addition of 5-30 vol.% SiCp compared with the un reinforced thermal spray aluminium coatings. (Author) 31 refs.

  5. Corrosion fatigue crack growth behaviour of low-alloy RPV steels at different temperatures and loading frequencies under BWR/NWC environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P.

    2004-01-01

    The strain-induced corrosion cracking or low-frequency corrosion fatigue (LFCF) crack growth behaviour of different reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels and of a RPV weld filler/weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) material were characterized under simulated transient boiling water reactor/normal water chemistry conditions by cyclic fatigue tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens. The experiments were performed in oxygenated high-temperature water at temperatures of either 288, 250, 200, or 150 deg. C. Modern high-temperature water loops, on-line crack growth monitoring (DCPD) and fractographic analysis by SEM were used to quantify the cracking response. Under low-flow and highly oxidising conditions (ECP > 0 mV SHE , O 2 = 0.4 ppm) the cycle-based LFCF crack growth rates (CGR) Δa/ΔN increased with decreasing loading frequency and increasing temperature with a maximum/plateau at/above 250 deg. C. Sustained environmentally-assisted crack growth could be maintained down to low frequencies of 10 -5 Hz. The LFCF CGR of low- and high-sulphur steels and of the weld filler/HAZ material were comparable over a wide range of loading conditions and conservatively covered by the 'high-sulphur line' of the General Electric-model. The 'ASME XI wet fatigue CGR curves' could be significantly exceeded in all materials by cyclic fatigue loading at low frequencies ( -2 Hz) at high and low load ratios R. (authors)

  6. Corrosion behaviour of steel rebars embedded in a concrete designed for the construction of an intermediate-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulz F.M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The National Atomic Energy Commission of the Argentine Republic is developing a nuclear waste disposal management programme that contemplates the design and construction of a facility for the final disposal of intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The repository is based on the use of multiple, independent and redundant barriers. The major components are made in reinforced concrete so, the durability of these structures is an important aspect for the facility integrity. This work presents an investigation performed on an instrumented reinforced concrete prototype specifically designed for this purpose, to study the behaviour of an intermediate level radioactive waste disposal facility from the rebar corrosion point of view. The information obtained will be used for the final design of the facility in order to guarantee a service life more or equal than the foreseen durability for this type of facilities.

  7. High temperature corrosion studies on friction-welded dissimilar metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arivazhagan, N.; Singh, Surendra; Prakash, Satya; Reddy, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the behaviour of weldment at elevated temperatures and especially their corrosion behaviour has become an object of scientific investigation recently. Investigation has been carried out on friction-welded AISI 4140 and AISI 304 under molten salt of Na 2 SO 4 + V 2 O 5 (60%) environment at 500 and 550 deg. C under cyclic condition. The influences of welding parameters on the hot corrosion have been discussed. The resulting oxide scales in the weldment have been characterized systematically using surface analytical techniques. Scale thickness on low alloy steel side was found to be more and was prone to spalling. Weld region has been found to be more prone to degradation than base metals due to inter diffusion of element across the interface and the formation of intermetallic compound

  8. High temperature corrosion studies on friction-welded dissimilar metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arivazhagan, N. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India)]. E-mail: arivadmt@iitr.ernet.in; Singh, Surendra [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Prakash, Satya [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Reddy, G.M. [Defense Metallurgical and Research Laboratory, Hyderabad (India)

    2006-07-25

    Understanding the behaviour of weldment at elevated temperatures and especially their corrosion behaviour has become an object of scientific investigation recently. Investigation has been carried out on friction-welded AISI 4140 and AISI 304 under molten salt of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + V{sub 2}O{sub 5} (60%) environment at 500 and 550 deg. C under cyclic condition. The influences of welding parameters on the hot corrosion have been discussed. The resulting oxide scales in the weldment have been characterized systematically using surface analytical techniques. Scale thickness on low alloy steel side was found to be more and was prone to spalling. Weld region has been found to be more prone to degradation than base metals due to inter diffusion of element across the interface and the formation of intermetallic compound.

  9. Corrosion of fuel assembly materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noe, M.; Frejaville, G.; Beslu, P.

    1985-08-01

    Corrosion of zircaloy-4 is reviewed in relation with previsions of improvement in PWRs performance: higher fuel burnup; increase coolant temperature, implying nucleate boiling on the hot clad surfaces; increase duration of the cycle due to load-follow operation. Actual knowledge on corrosion rates, based partly on laboratory tests, is insufficient to insure that external clad corrosion will not constitute a limitation to these improvements. Therefore, additional testing within representative conditions is felt necessary [fr

  10. Corrosion protection and control using nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, R

    2012-01-01

    This book covers the use of nanomaterials to prevent corrosion. The first section deals with the fundamentals of corrosion prevention using nanomaterials. Part two includes a series of case studies and applications of nanomaterials for corrosion control.$bCorrosion is an expensive and potentially dangerous problem in many industries. The potential application of different nanostructured materials in corrosion protection, prevention and control is a subject of increasing interest. Corrosion protection and control using nanomaterials explores the potential use of nanotechnology in corrosion control. The book is divided into two parts. Part one looks at the fundamentals of corrosion behaviour and the manufacture of nanocrystalline materials. Chapters discuss the impact of nanotechnology in reducing corrosion cost, and investigate the influence of various factors including thermodynamics, kinetics and grain size on the corrosion behaviour of nanocrystalline materials. There are also chapters on electrodeposition ...

  11. Corrosion of Metal-Matrix Composites with Aluminium Alloy Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bobic

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of MMCs with aluminium alloy matrix was presented. The corrosion characteristics of boron-, graphite-, silicon carbide-, alumina- and mica- reinforced aluminium MMCs were reviewed. The reinforcing phase influence on MMCs corrosion rate as well as on various corrosion forms (galvanic, pitting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatique, tribocorrosion was discussed. Some corrosion protection methods of aluminium based MMCs were described

  12. Hot corrosion of the steel SA213-T22 and SA213-TP347H in 80% V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-20%Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} mixture; Corrosion por depositos salinos de los aceros SA213-T22 y SA213-TP347H en presencia de una mezcal 80%V{sub 2} O{sub 5}-20%Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeraya, F; Martinez-Villafane, A; Gaona, C; Romero, M A; Malo, J M

    1998-06-01

    Many hot corrosion problems in industrial and utility boilers are caused by molten salts. The corrosion processes which occur in salts are of an electrochemical nature, and so they can be studied using electrochemical test methods. In this research, electrochemical techniques in molten salt systems have been used for the measurements of molten corrosion processes. Electrochemical test methods are described here for a salt mixture of 80%V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-20%NaSO{sub 4} at 540-680 degree centigree. To establish better the electrochemical corrosion rate measurements for molten salt systems, information from electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization curves, such as polarization resistance and Tafeol slopes were used in this study to generate corrosion rate data. The salt was contained in a quartz crucible inside a stainless retort. The atmosphere used was air. A thermocouple sheathed with quartz glass was introduced into the molten salt for temperature monitoring and control. Two materials were tested in the molten mixture: SA213-T22 and SA213-TP347H steels. The corrosion rates values obtained using electrochemical methods were around 0.58-7.14 mm/yr (22.9-281 mpy). The corrosion rate increase with time. (Author) 7 refs.

  13. Effect of Tempering Temperature and Time on the Corrosion Behaviour of 304 and 316 Austenitic Stainless Steels in Oxalic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Ayo S. Afolabi; Johannes H. Potgieter; Ambali S. Abdulkareem; Nonhlanhla Fungura

    2011-01-01

    The effect of different tempering temperatures and heat treatment times on the corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels in oxalic acid was studied in this work using conventional weight loss and electrochemical measurements. Typical 304 and 316 stainless steel samples were tempered at 150oC, 250oC and 350oC after being austenized at 1050oC for 10 minutes. These samples were then immersed in 1.0M oxalic acid and their weight losses were measured at every five days for 30 days. The r...

  14. The oxidation and corrosion of ODS alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation and hot corrosion of high temperature oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are reviewed. The environmental resistance of such alloys are classified by oxide growth rate, oxide volatility, oxide spalling, and hot corrosion limitations. Also discussed are environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. It is concluded that ODS NiCrAl and FeCrAl alloys are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant and can probably be used uncoated.

  15. INFLUENCE OF PLASMA NITRIDING ON THE CORROSION BEHAVIOUR AND ADHESION OF DLC COATINGS DEPOSITED ON AISI 420 STAINLESS STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge N. Pecina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work the corrosion behavior and adhesion of two DLC (“Diamond Like Carbon” films (“Soft” and “Hard” were studied. Both coatings were deposited by PACVD (“Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition” on plasma-nitrided and non-nitrided AISI 420 stainless steel. Raman spectroscopy was conducted and surface hardness was measured. The microstructure by OM and SEM, was observed. Adhesion tests were performed with C. Rockwell indentation test. Salt Spray and immersion were performed in HCl. The “Soft” coating was 20 μm thick, the “Hard” film was about 2.5 μm. The hardness was of 500 HV in the “Soft” DLC and 1400 HV in the “Hard” DLC. Both coatings presented low friction coefficient and good adhesion when they were deposited on nitrided steel. Also presented good resistance to atmospheric corrosion. HCl DLC degradation slowed rapidly introduced uncoated samples.

  16. Evaluation of structural behaviour and corrosion resistant of austenitic AISI 304 and duplex AISI 2304 stainless steel reinforcements embedded in ordinary Portland cement mortars; Evaluacion del comportamiento estructural y de resistencia a la corrosion de armaduras de acero inoxidable austenitico AISI 304 y duplex AISI 2304 embebidas en morteros de cemento Portland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, E.; Cobo, A.; Bastidas, D. M.

    2012-07-01

    The mechanical and structural behaviour of two stainless steels reinforcements, with grades austenitic EN 1.4301 (AISI 304) and duplex EN 1.4362 (AISI 2304) have been studied, and compared with the conventional carbon steel B500SD rebar. The study was conducted at three levels: at rebar level, at section level and at structural element level. The different mechanical properties of stainless steel directly influence the behaviour at section level and structural element level. The study of the corrosion behaviour of the two stainless steels has been performed by electrochemical measurements, monitoring the corrosion potential and the lineal polarization resistance (LPR), of reinforcements embedded in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) mortar specimens contaminated with different amount of chloride over one year time exposure. Both stainless steels specimens embedded in OPC mortar remain in the passive state for all the chloride concentration range studied after one year exposure. (Author) 26 refs.

  17. An Assessment of the Ductile Fracture Behaviour of Hot Isostatically Pressed and Forged 304L Stainless Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Adam; Smith, R. J.; Sherry, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Type 300 austenitic stainless steel manufactured by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) has recently been shown to exhibit subtly different fracture behavior from that of equivalent graded forged steel, whereby the oxygen remaining in the component after HIP manifests itself in the austenite matrix as nonmetallic oxide inclusions. These inclusions facilitate fracture by acting as nucleation sites for the initiation, growth, and coalescence of microvoids in the plastically deforming austenite matrix....

  18. Field experience on weld assemblies behaviour toward flow-accelerated corrosion in French nuclear power plants (NPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calonne-Chatelee, V.; Thebault, Y.; De Bouvier, O.; Dejoux, L.; Trevin, S.; Pavageau, E.-M.

    2007-01-01

    After the Mihama accident (2004), EDF re-examined its existing inspection strategy of Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) for the secondary loop of NPPs. Welds, which are still not taken into account by the predictive software BRT-CICERO, have been identified as a weak point. An inventory of the welds' inspections and a program of metallurgical examinations on field components have been established. The chromium content, hydrodynamic effects and dissimilar metal welds have been studied. These examinations showed that the welds' degradation was really due to FAC. It appears that the chromium contents, of the weld and of the base metal, is an important parameter. Moreover, the presence of a weld penetration and dissimilar metal welds seem to have a consequence on the damage of the weld assembly. These parameters will be investigated in an R and D program on the CIROCO loop. Meanwhile, all these results have been taken into account by the maintenance program. (author)

  19. Corrosion behaviour of ductile cast irons partially modified with silicon in 0.03 M NaCl; Comportamiento frente a la corrosion de fundiciones con grafito laminar y esferoidal parcialmente modificadas con silicio en NaCl 0,03 M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenas, M. A.; Niklas, A.; Conde, A.; Mendez, S.; Sertucha, J.; Damborenea, J. J. de

    2014-07-01

    NaCl. The increasing demand of ductile cast irons with extensive technological applications leads to enlarge the corrosion resistance of this group of metallic materials. In this sense, the use of different chemical compositions on such cast irons becomes one of the most interesting aspects among the different ways to improve their behaviour against corrosion due to the extra opportunity for increasing the mechanical properties. Additionally such improvements have to be made without any increase of processing costs to keep the interesting competitiveness of developed cast irons. In the present work the preliminary results obtained from corrosion tests made on a group of cast irons with different chemical compositions are presented. Among ductile cast irons, silicon content has been varied in order to investigate the effect of this element on corrosion resistance of the alloys. The obtained results show a slight improvement of this property for the alloys with high silicon content with respect to the conventional ones though such effect was found in the first time period of the corrosion tests. Interestingly this improvement was found for alloys that exhibit better tensile properties than the conventional ductile irons. Thus an important way for developing new ductile cast irons with improved corrosion properties by alloying has been opened. (Author)

  20. Contribution to the electrochemical study of corrosion in low-conductivity environments. Application to the study of the behaviour of austenitic stainless steels in concentrated solutions of acetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chechirlian, Serge

    1989-01-01

    As the use of conventional electrochemical methods to study metal and alloy corrosion in concentrated solutions of acetic acid is challenged by difficulties due the low conductivity of these environments, the first part of this research thesis proposes a critical, theoretical and experimental study of these difficulties. It notably evokes the use of electrochemical impedance techniques, the different compensation devices and means of correction of the ohmic voltage drop, and artefacts used during high frequency impedance measurements in lesser conductive solutions. The second part addresses the characterization of the corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steels in a concentrated acetic acid at 25 and 95 degrees C. Electrochemical techniques are coupled with analytical methods (solution analysis, sample surface analysis after corrosion tests). The roles of molybdenum as alloying element, of dissolved oxygen, of impurities (sulfites) or of formic acid additions are studied and discussed [fr

  1. Stress corrosion of austenitic steels mono and polycrystals in Mg Cl{sub 2} medium: micro fractography and study of behaviour improvements; Corrosion sous contrainte de mono et polycristaux d`aciers inoxydables austenitiques en milieu MgCI{sub 2}: analyse microfractographique et recherche d`ameliorations du comportement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambreuil-Paret, A

    1997-09-19

    The austenitic steels in a hot chlorinated medium present a rupture which is macroscopically fragile, discontinuous and formed with crystallographic facets. The interpretation of these facies crystallographic character is a key for the understanding of the stress corrosion damages. The first aim of this work is then to study into details the micro fractography of 316 L steels mono and polycrystals. Two types of rupture are observed: a very fragile rupture which stresses on the possibility of the interatomic bonds weakening by the corrosive medium Mg Cl{sub 2} and a discontinuous rupture (at the micron scale) on the sliding planes which is in good agreement with the corrosion enhanced plasticity model. The second aim of this work is to search for controlling the stress corrosion by the mean of a pre-strain hardening. Two types of pre-strain hardening have been tested. A pre-strain hardening with a monotonic strain is negative. Indeed, the first cracks starts very early and the cracks propagation velocity is increased. This is explained by the corrosion enhanced plasticity model through the intensifying of the local corrosion-deformation interactions. On the other hand, a cyclic pre-strain hardening is particularly favourable. The first micro strains starts later and the strain on breaking point levels are increased. The delay of the starting of the first strains is explained by a surface distortion structure which is very homogeneous. At last, the dislocations structure created in fatigue at saturation is a planar structure of low energy which reduces the corrosion-deformation interactions, source of micro strains. (O.M.) 139 refs.

  2. Shrinkage behaviour and related corrosion performance of low-pH cementitious materials based on OPC or CAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Calvo, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Prior to using low-pH cementitious materials in underground repositories for high level waste, the characteristics determining their long-term durability must be analysed in depth. In this sense, different shrinkage tests have been made on mortar and concrete specimens using low-pH cement formulations based on ordinary portland cement (OPC or calcium aluminate cement (CAC, with high mineral admixtures contents. They showed similar autogenous shrinkage than samples without mineral admixtures but higher drying shrinkage when materials based on OPC with high silica fume contents were considered. Besides, as the use of reinforced concrete could be required in underground repositories, the susceptibility of reinforcement to corrosion when using low-pH cementitious materials based on OPC was analyzed, considering carbon steel and galvanized steel. In the formers corrosion was detected due to the low pore solution pH but any problem was detected when galvanized reinforcement were used.Previo al empleo de materiales con cementos de bajo pH en almacenamientos geológicos profundos (AGP de residuos radiactivos de alta actividad, características relacionadas con su durabilidad a largo plazo deben ser verificadas. Así, su estabilidad volumétrica se ha analizado en morteros y hormigones de bajo pH basados en OPC o CAC, con elevados contenidos de adiciones minerales. Estos presentaron retracciones autógenas similares a las medidas en materiales convencionales, pero retracciones por secado mayores en los basados en OPC y altos contenidos de humo de sílice. Dado que en zonas de los AGP podría emplearse hormigón armado, también se evaluó la susceptibilidad a la corrosión de aceros al carbono y aceros galvanizados en materiales de bajo pH basados en OPC. Se detectó un inicio temprano de corrosión en los primeros debido al bajo pH presente en el fluido de los poros de estos materiales, sin detectarse problemas al emplear aceros galvanizados.

  3. Simulation of the hot flow behaviour of a medium carbon microalloyed steel. Part 2. Dynamic recrystallization: onset and kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera, J.M.; Al Omar, A.; Prado, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    According to the part 1 of this work, in this second part the dynamic recrystallization of a commercial medium carbon microalloyed steel is characterized from the point of view of its onset and kinetics. For this purpose uniaxial hot compression tests were carried out over a range of five orders of magnitude in strain rate and 300 degree centigree of temperature. Experimental results are compared with those reported in the literature and the possible effect of dynamic precipitation is also analyzed. It is verified that the kinetics of dynamics recrystallization can balefully be described by the classical Avrami equation. (Author) 42 refs

  4. INTERWELD - European project to determine irradiation induced material changes in the heat affected zones of austenitic stainless steel welds that influence the stress corrosion behaviour in high-temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, A.; Schaaf, Bob van der; Castano, M.L.; Ohms, C.; Gavillet, D.; Dyck, S. van

    2003-01-01

    PWR and BWR RPV internals have experienced stress corrosion cracking in service. The objective of the INTERWELD project is to determine the radiation induced material changes that promote stress corrosion cracking in the heat affected zone of austenitic stainless steel welds. To achieve this goal, welds in austenitic stainless steel types AISI 304/347 have been fabricated, respectively. Stress-relief annealing was applied optionally. The pre-characterisation of both the as-welded and stress relieved material conditions comprises the examination of the weld residual stresses by the ring-core-technique and neutron diffraction, the degree of sensitisation by EPR, and the stress corrosion behaviour by SSRT testing in high-temperature water. The weldments will be irratiated to 2 neutron fluence levels and a postirradiation examination will determine micromechanical, microchemical and microstructural changes in the materials. In detail, the evolution of the residual stress levels and the stress corrosion behaviour after irradiation will be determined. Neutron diffraction will be utilized for the first time with respect to neutron irradiated material. In this paper, the current state of the project will be described and discussed. (orig.)

  5. An Incremental Physically-Based Model of P91 Steel Flow Behaviour for the Numerical Analysis of Hot-Working Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Murillo-Marrodán

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at modelling the flow behaviour of P91 steel at high temperature and a wide range of strain rates for constant and also variable strain-rate deformation conditions, such as those in real hot-working processes. For this purpose, an incremental physically-based model is proposed for the P91 steel flow behavior. This formulation considers the effects of dynamic recovery (DRV and dynamic recrystallization (DRX on the mechanical properties of the material, using only the flow stress, strain rate and temperature as state variables and not the accumulated strain. Therefore, it reproduces accurately the flow stress, work hardening and work softening not only under constant, but also under transient deformation conditions. To accomplish this study, the material is characterised experimentally by means of uniaxial compression tests, conducted at a temperature range of 900–1270 °C and at strain rates in the range of 0.005–10 s−1. Finally, the proposed model is implemented in commercial finite element (FE software to provide evidence of the performance of the proposed formulation. The experimental compression tests are simulated using the novel model and the well-known Hansel–Spittel formulation. In conclusion, the incremental physically-based model shows accurate results when work softening is present, especially under variable strain-rate deformation conditions. Hence, the present formulation is appropriate for the simulation of the hot-working processes typically conducted at industrial scale.

  6. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviour of Dissimilar Welding of AISI 310S Austenitic Stainless Steel to 2304 Duplex Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago AmaroVicente

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the weld metal chemistry on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC susceptibility of dissimilar weldments between 310S austenitic stainless steel and 2304 duplex steels was investigated by constant load tests and microstructural examination. Two filler metals (E309L and E2209 were used to produce fusion zones of different chemical compositions. The SCC results showed that the heat affected zone (HAZ on the 2304 base metal side of the weldments was the most susceptible region to SCC for both filler metals tested. The SCC results also showed that the weldments with 2209 duplex steel filler metal presented the best SCC resistance when compared to the weldments with E309L filler metal. The lower SCC resistance of the dissimilar joint with 309L austenitic steel filler metal may be attributed to (1 the presence of brittle chi/sigma phase in the HAZ on the 2304 base metal, which produced SC cracks in this region and (2 the presence of a semi-continuous delta-ferrite network in the fusion zone which favored the nucleation and propagation of SC cracks from the fusion zone to HAZ of the 2304 stainless steel. Thus, the SC cracks from the fusion zone associated with the SC cracks of 2304 HAZ decreased considerably the time-of-fracture on this region, where the fracture occurred. Although the dissimilar weldment with E2209 filler metal also presented SC cracks in the HAZ on the 2304 side, it did not present the delta ferrite network in the fusion zone due to its chemical composition. Fractography analyses showed that the mixed fracture mode was predominant for both filler metals used.

  7. A study on the behaviour of corrosion-erosion at the Bearing metals by cavitation(1) (for the influence of pH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Uh Hoh; Lee, Jin Yeol

    1991-01-01

    Recently, due to increased occurrence of cavitation-erosion at slide bearing metals with the tendency of high speed and large output at internal combustion engine, there is a need to study the role of corrosive environments on cavitation-erosion. Therefore, this paper were investigate on the behaviour of cavitation-erosion under the change of pH environments at slide bearing metals with using piezoelectric vibratory apparatus. The main results obtained were as follows: 1. The weight loss and its rate showed to be increased according to the order of pH 2 > pH 12 > pH 7 > pH 4 environments, and also retarded extremely at pH 4 environment 2. The resistance of material on cavitation-erosion was excellent at pH 4 environment, and also was improved considerably its resistance with increasing of the space between specimen and horn tip. 3. It was showed that the incubation periods shortened with the tendency of pH 2 > pH 12 > pH 4 > pH 7 environment, and enlarged greatly at pH 7 environment. 4. The pitted holes of damaged surface under pH 4 environment showed dense aspects by comparison with pH 7 environment

  8. The influence of small SO2 additions on the corrosion behaviour of NiCrAl alloys at 1000-1100deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserfuhr, C.H.; Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.; Nickel, H.

    1990-06-01

    The corrosion behaviour of NiCrAl alloys in air containing small amounts of SO 2 has been investigated. The alloys containing 9-20 wt.% chromium and 6-10 wt% aluminium were oxidized in air and in air containing 1 vol% SO 2 . In addition to long term tests, the initial stages of oxidation were examined using various surface analysis techniques. The results have shown that small SO 2 additions to the test atmosphere cause a much higher oxidation rate, especially for cast alloys of low chromium and high aluminium contents. The mechanism of the deleterious effect of SO 2 on the oxidation rate was studied in two ways: measurement of the gas-metal reaction kinetics using gas chromatographical analysis of the test gas, investigation of trace amounts of sulphur in the alloy. On the basis of the results obtained, it can be shown that the high oxidation rates caused by the presence of SO 2 in the test atmosphere can be significantly reduced by increasing the chromium content of the alloy, by adding yttrium to the alloy, and by ensuring a fine-grained microstructure. (orig.) [de

  9. The influence of ppb levels of chloride impurities on the stress corrosion crack growth behaviour of low-alloy steels under simulated boiling water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, H.P.; Ritter, S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Chloride effects on SCC crack growth in RPV steels under boiling water reactor conditions. • ppb-levels of chloride may result in fast SCC in normal water chemistry environment. • Much higher chloride tolerance for SCC in hydrogen water chemistry environment. • Potential long-term (memory) effects after severe and prolonged temporary chloride transients. - Abstract: The effect of chloride on the stress corrosion crack (SCC) growth behaviour in low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels was evaluated under simulated boiling water reactor conditions. In normal water chemistry environment, ppb-levels of chloride may result in fast SCC after rather short incubation periods of few hours. After moderate and short-term chloride transients, the SCC crack growth rates return to the same very low high-purity water values within few 100 h. Potential long-term (memory) effects on SCC crack growth cannot be excluded after severe and prolonged chloride transients. The chloride tolerance for SCC in hydrogen water chemistry environment is much higher.

  10. A quantitative sensitivity analysis on the behaviour of common thermal indices under hot and windy conditions in Doha, Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Dominik; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Human thermal perception is best described through thermal indices. The most popular thermal indices applied in human bioclimatology are the perceived temperature (PT), the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI), and the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET). They are analysed focusing on their sensitivity to single meteorological input parameters under the hot and windy meteorological conditions observed in Doha, Qatar. It can be noted, that the results for the three indices are distributed quite differently. Furthermore, they respond quite differently to modifications in the input conditions. All of them show particular limitations and shortcomings that have to be considered and discussed. While the results for PT are unevenly distributed, UTCI shows limitations concerning the input data accepted. PET seems to respond insufficiently to changes in vapour pressure. The indices should therefore be improved to be valid for several kinds of climates.

  11. An explanation for anomalous thermal conductivity behaviour in nanofluids as measured using the hot-wire technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marín, E; Bedoya, A; Alvarado, S; Calderón, A; Ivanov, R; Gordillo-Delgado, F

    2014-01-01

    Several efforts have been made to explain thermal conductivity enhancements in fluids due to the addition of nanoparticles. However, until now, there has been no general consensus on this issue. In this work a simple experiment is described that demonstrates a possible cause of misinterpretation of the experimental data of thermal conductivity obtained when using the hot-wire technique (HWT) in these systems. It has been demonstrated that the thermal conductivity of a two-layer sample of two non-miscible phase systems determined by means of the HWT must be modelled using a series thermal resistance model with consideration of the interfacial layers between different phases. This result sheds light on the thermal conductivity enhancement in nanofluids with respect to the values corresponding to the base fluid, suggesting that this increase can be explained using the above-mentioned model and not by application of empirical formulae for effective media, as done before. (paper)

  12. Thermohydraulic behaviour of the hot channel in a PWR type reactor under loss-of-coolant accident conditions (LOCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, J.R.

    1978-12-01

    An analysis is done of the core behavior for a 1861 MW(th) pressurized water reactor with two coolant loops, during the blowdown phase of a double-ended cold leg rupture, between the main feedwater pump, and the pressure vessel. The analysis is done through a detailed thermohydraulic study of the hot pin channel with RELAP4/MOD 5 code, including the Evaluatin Model options. The problem is solved separately for two values of discharge coefficient (C sub(D)= 1,0 and 0,4). The results show that the maximum clad temperature is lower than the limit value for licensing purposes. Concerning clad material oxidation, the maximum value obtained is also under the limit of acceptance. (author) [pt

  13. Investigation of in-pile formed corrosion films on zircaloy fuel-rod claddings by impedance spectroscopy and galvanostatic anodization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebhardt, O.

    1993-01-01

    Hot-cell investigations have been executed to study the corrosion behaviour of irradiated Zircaloy fuel-rod claddings by impedance spectroscopy and galvanostatic anodization. The thickness of the compact oxide at the metal/oxide interface and the thickness of the minimum barrier oxide have been determined at different positions along the claddings. As shown by analysis, both quantities first increase and then decrease with increasing thickness of the total oxide. (author) 6 figs., 33 refs

  14. Hybrid Coatings Enriched with Tetraethoxysilane for Corrosion Mitigation of Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel in Chloride Contaminated Simulated Concrete Pore Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Rita B.; Callone, Emanuela; Silva, Carlos J. R.; Pereira, Elsa V.; Dirè, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid sol-gel coatings, named U(X):TEOS, based on ureasilicate matrices (U(X)) enriched with tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), were synthesized. The influence of TEOS addition was studied on both the structure of the hybrid sol-gel films as well as on the electrochemical properties. The effect of TEOS on the structure of the hybrid sol-gel films was investigated by solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The dielectric properties of the different materials were investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The corrosion behavior of the hybrid coatings on HDGS was studied in chloride-contaminated simulated concrete pore solutions (SCPS) by polarization resistance measurements. The roughness of the HDGS coated with hybrids was also characterized by atomic force microscopy. The structural characterization of the hybrid materials proved the effective reaction between Jeffamine® and 3-isocyanate propyltriethoxysilane (ICPTES) and indicated that the addition of TEOS does not seem to affect the organic structure or to increase the degree of condensation of the hybrid materials. Despite the apparent lack of influence on the hybrids architecture, the polarization resistance measurements confirmed that TEOS addition improves the corrosion resistance of the hybrid coatings (U(X):TEOS) in chloride-contaminated SCPS when compared to samples prepared without any TEOS (U(X)). This behavior could be related to the decrease in roughness of the hybrid coatings (due TEOS addition) and to the different metal coating interaction resulting from the increase of the inorganic component in the hybrid matrix. PMID:28772667

  15. Corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600

  16. The effect of mucin, fibrinogen and IgG on the corrosion behaviour of Ni-Ti alloy and stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Zhang; Yaomu, Xiao; Chufeng, Liu; Conghua, Liu

    2017-06-01

    In this study, Ni-Ti alloy and stainless steal were exposed to artificial saliva containing fibrinogen, IgG or mucin, and the resultant corrosion behavior was studied. The purpose was to determine the mechanisms by which different types of protein contribute to corrosion. The effect of different proteins on the electrochemical resistance of Ni-Ti and SS was tested by potentiodynamic polarization, and the repair capacity of passivation film was tested by cyclic polarization measurements. The dissolved corrosion products were determined by ICP-OES, and the surface was analyzed by SEM and AFM. The results showed fibrinogen, IgG or mucin could have different influences on the susceptibility to corrosion of the same alloy. Adding protein lead to the decrease of corrosion resistance of SS, whereas protein could slow down the corrosion process of Ni-Ti. For Ni-Ti, adding mucin could enhance the corrosion stability and repair capacity of passivation film. The susceptibility to pitting corrosion of Ni-Ti and stainless steal in fibrinogen AS is not as high as mucin and IgG AS. There are different patterns of deposition formation on the metal surface by different types of protein, which is associated with their effects on the corrosion process of the alloys.

  17. Pitting corrosion behaviour study of aluminium matrix composites (A3xx.x/SiCp); Estudio del comportamiento a la corrosion por picadura de materiales compuestos de matriz de aluminio (A3xx.x/SiCp)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, A.; Merino, M. C.; Merino, S.; Lopez, M. D.; Viejo, F.; Carboneras, M.; Arrabal, R.

    2004-07-01

    The influence of the SiCp proportion on the pitting corrosion of A3xx.x/SiC/xxp composites was studies by means of potenciodinamic polarization and double cyclic polarization in saline environment at 25 degree centigree A360/SiC/xxp matrix does not contain copper, whereas the A380/SiC/xxp matric contains 1,39-1,44 wt %Cu. The kinetic study was carried out by gravimetric measurements. The nature of corrosion products was analysed by low angle XRD and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The corrosion is due to nucleation and growth of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-3H{sub 2}O on the material surface. The corrosion increases with the reinforcement proportion, chloride concentration and copper content. (Author) 10 refs.

  18. Corrosion engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontana, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book emphasizes the engineering approach to handling corrosion. It presents corrosion data by corrosives or environments rather than by materials. It discusses the corrosion engineering of noble metals, ''exotic'' metals, non-metallics, coatings, mechanical properties, and corrosion testing, as well as modern concepts. New sections have been added on fracture mechanics, laser alloying, nuclear waste isolation, solar energy, geothermal energy, and the Statue of Liberty. Special isocorrosion charts, developed by the author, are introduced as a quick way to look at candidates for a particular corrosive.

  19. Aspects of high temperature corrosion of boiler tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiegel, M.; Bendick, W. [Salzgitter-Mannesmann-Forschung GmbH, Duisburg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The development of new boiler steels for power generation has to consider significant creep strength as well as oxidation and corrosion resistance. High temperature corrosion of boiler materials concerns steam oxidation as well as fireside corrosion of parts, in contact with the flue gas. It will be shown that depending on the quality of the fuel, especially chlorine and sulphur are responsible for most of the fireside corrosion problems. Corrosion mechanisms will be presented for flue gas induced corrosion (HCl) and deposit induced corrosion (chlorides and sulfates). Especially for the 700 C technology, deposit induced corrosion issues have to be considered and the mechanisms of corrosion by molten sulfates 'Hot Corrosion' will be explained. Finally, an overview will be given on the selection of suitable materials in order to minimise corrosion relates failures. (orig.)

  20. Effect of forging process on microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of biodegradable Mg-1Ca alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harandi, Shervin Eslami; Hasbullah Idris, Mohd; Jafari, Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Forging temperature demonstrates more pronounced effect compared to forging speed. → Precipitation of Mg 2 Ca phase at grain boundaries accelerates corrosion rate. → Forging process doesn't provide the corrosion resistance required for bone healing. -- Abstract: The performance of Mg-1Ca alloy, a biodegradable metallic material, may be improved by hot working in order that it may be of use in bone implant applications. In this study, Mg-1Ca cast alloy was preheated to different temperatures before undergoing forging process with various forging speeds. Macro- and microstructure of the samples were examined by stereo and scanning electron microscopes (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. To determine the mechanical properties of the alloy, hardness value and plastic deformation ability of the samples were measured. To investigate the corrosion behaviour of the alloy, immersion and electrochemical tests were performed on the samples in simulated body fluid and the corrosion products were characterized by SEM/EDS. The results showed that increasing forging temperature decreased grain size led to improved hardness value and plastic deformation ability of the alloy, whereas no significant effect was observed by changing forging speed. Moreover, forging at higher temperatures led to an increase in the amount of Mg 2 Ca phase at grain boundaries resulted in higher corrosion rates. It can be concluded that although forging process improved the mechanical properties of the alloy, it does not satisfy the corrosion resistance criteria required for bone healing.

  1. Corrosion behaviour in saline environments of single-layer titanium and aluminium coatings, and of Ti/Al alternated multi-layers elaborated by a multi-beam PVD technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merati, Abdenacer

    1994-01-01

    This research thesis reports the characterization of anti-corrosion titanium and aluminium coatings deposited on a 35CD4 steel under the form of mono-metallic layers or alternated Ti/Al multi-layers, and obtained by a multibeam PVD technique. The influence of different parameters is studied: single-layer thickness (5, 15 or 30 micro-metres), multi-layer distribution (5 to 6) and substrate (smooth or threaded). Layer nature and microstructure are studied by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), as well as corrosion toughness in aqueous saline environments. Coated threaded samples have been studied after tightening tests. It appears that titanium layers are denser and more uniform than aluminium layers, and that multi-layer coatings provide a better protection than single-layer coatings. The best behaviour is obtained when titanium is in contact with steel, and aluminium is the outer layer in contact with the corroding environment [fr

  2. Corrosion-resistant coating development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinton, D.P.; Kupp, D.M.; Martin, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    SiC-based heat exchangers have been identified as the prime candidate material for use as heat exchangers in advanced combined cycle power plants. Unfortunately, hot corrosion of the SiC-based materials created by alkali metal salts present in the combustion gases dictates the need for corrosion-resistant coatings. The well-documented corrosion resistance of CS-50 combined with its low (and tailorable) coefficient of thermal expansion and low modulus makes CS-50 an ideal candidate for this application. Coatings produced by gelcasting and traditional particulate processing have been evaluated.

  3. Relaxation and corrosion resistance of alloy 800 used for steam generator tubes of ship borne boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrieu, J.M.; Cortial, F.; Maillard, J.L.; Vernot-Loier, C.; Lebeau, M.

    1994-01-01

    The INCO ''INCOLOY 800'' trademark groups the Fe-Cr-Ni alloys containing 30 to 35% nickel, 19 to 23% chromium, 0,15 to 0,60% aluminium, 0,15 to 0,60% titanium and less than 0,10% carbon contents, used as construction materials for condenser and heat exchanger tubes. In parallel with water chemistry control and studies aimed at reducing the residual stresses resulting from tube expansion, studies have been conducted to a better understanding of this alloy, its metallurgy and its corrosion behaviour under accurately defined fabrication and heat treatment conditions. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a behaviour study of INDRET alloy 800 concerning isothermal relaxation and effects of the said relaxation heat treatments on alloy microstructure studied with a transmission electron-chemical method to determine the sensitiveness to intergranular corrosion, and by electrochemistry in pressurized hot water. (authors). 4 figs., 5 tabs., 7 refs

  4. EUROCORR 2007 - The European corrosion congress - Progress by corrosion control. Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This book of abstracts contains lectures, workshops and posters which were held on the European Corrosion Congress 2007 in Freiburg (Germany). The main topics of the sessions and posters are: 1. Corrosion and scale inhibition; 2. Corrosion by hot gases and combustion products; 3. Nuclear corrosion; 4. Environment sensitive fracture; 5. Surface Science; 6. Physico-chemical methods of corrosion testing; 7. Marine corrosion; 8. Microbial corrosion; 9. Corrosion of steel in concrete; 10. Corrosion in oil and gas production; 11. Coatings; 12. Corrosion in the refinery industry; 13. Cathodic protection; 14. Automotive Corrosion; 15. Corrosion of polymer materials. The main topics of the workshops are: 1. High temperature corrosion in the chemical, refinery and petrochemical industries; 2. Bio-Tribocorrosion; 3. Stress corrosion cracking in nuclear power plants; 4. Corrosion monitoring in nuclear systems; 5. Cathodic protection for marine and offshore environments; 6. Self-healing properties of new surface treatments; 7. Bio-Tribocorrosion - Cost 533/Eureka-ENIWEP-Meeting; 8. Drinking water systems; 9. Heat exchangers for seawater cooling

  5. Corrosion behaviour of reinforcements in a carbonaceous concrete: influence of the chemistry of the interstitial solution and of a transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huet, B.

    2005-10-01

    The phenomenon of steel reinforcements corrosion in a carbonaceous concrete is a many-sided process, little understood and of a great economical importance. The aim of this work is to identify, in condition of concrete carbonation, the corrosion mechanisms of reinforcements in order to anticipate the long term damage of the buildings. An analytical and experimental study has been carried out and has revealed two hypotheses. These ones consist to characterize the control of the corrosion velocity, either by the anodic reaction or by addition of an oxidant. The corrosion experiments in solution which represents the interstitial solution of a carbonaceous cement paste show that the evolution of the metal/medium interface is very sensitive to the species introduced in the medium during the carbonation process. The change of the ionic strength and of the sulfate and alkali metals concentrations are the main factors influencing the localization of the reactional areas, the nature of the phases formed at the interface as well as the corrosion velocities and their change with time. The evolution of the water saturation degree of the coating is the preponderant factor on the corrosion velocity. The analytical calculations and the experimental results show that for fixed hydrous conditions, the corrosion velocity in stationary conditions is negligible. The taking into account of transient conditions of transport as well as humidification and drying cycles is required for the long term anticipation of the damage of reinforced concrete buildings. (O.M.)

  6. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Neutron Absorber Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedd Lister; Ron Mizia; Arnold Erickson; Tammy Trowbridge

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of crevice-corrosion tests for six alloys in solutions representative of ionic compositions inside the Yucca Mountain waste package should a breech occur. The alloys in these tests are Neutronit A978a (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B4 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B5 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B6 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy2 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), and Alloy 22 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled)

  7. Cymbopogon citratus and NaNO2 Behaviours in 3.5% NaCl-Immersed Steel-Reinforced Concrete: Implications for Eco-Friendly Corrosion Inhibitor Applications for Steel in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Olusegun Okeniyi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies behaviours of Cymbopogon citratus leaf-extract and NaNO2, used as equal-mass admixture models, in 3.5% NaCl-immersed steel-reinforced concrete by nondestructive electrochemical methods and by compressive-strength improvement/reduction effects. Corrosion-rate, corrosion-current, and corrosion-potential constitute electrochemical test-techniques while compressive-strength effect investigations followed ASTM C29 and ASTM C33, in experiments using positive-controls for the electrochemical and compressive-strength studies. Analyses of the different electrochemical test-results mostly portrayed agreements on reinforcing-steel anticorrosion effects by the concentrations of natural plant and of chemical admixtures in the saline/marine simulating-environment and in the distilled H2O (electrochemical positive control of steel-reinforced concrete immersions. These indicated that little amount (0.0833% cement for concrete-mixing of Cymbopogon citratus leaf-extract was required for optimal inhibition efficiency, η = 99.35%, on reinforcing-steel corrosion, in the study. Results of compressive-strength change factor also indicated that the 0.0833% Cymbopogon citratus concentration outperformed NaNO2 admixture concentrations also in compressive-strength improvement effects on the NaCl-immersed steel-reinforced concrete. These established implications, from the study, on the suitability of the eco-friendly Cymbopogon citratus leaf-extract for replacing the also highly effective NaNO2 inhibitor of steel-in-concrete corrosion in concrete designed for the saline/marine service-environment.

  8. Long term corrosion of iron at the water logged site Nydam in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Henning; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Gregory, David

    2005-01-01

    Long term corrosion of iron at the water logged site Nydam in Denmark; studies of enviroment, archaeological artefacts, and modern analogues, Prediction of long term corrosion behaviour in nuclear waste systems.......Long term corrosion of iron at the water logged site Nydam in Denmark; studies of enviroment, archaeological artefacts, and modern analogues, Prediction of long term corrosion behaviour in nuclear waste systems....

  9. Corrosion behaviour of sintered NdFeB coated with Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} multilayers by magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao Shoudong; Yang Hengxiu; Huang Feng; Xie Tingting [Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 519 Zhuangshi Road, Ningbo 315201 (China); Song Zhenlun, E-mail: songzhenlun@nimte.ac.cn [Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 519 Zhuangshi Road, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2011-02-15

    Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} multilayers were deposited on sintered NdFeB magnets to improve the corrosion resistance. The amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were used to periodically interrupt the columnar growth of the Al layers. The structure of the multilayers was investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). It was found that the columnar structure was effectively inhibited in the multilayers. Subsequent corrosion testing by potentiodynamic polarization in 3.5 wt.% NaCl and neutral salt spray test (NSS) revealed that the Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} multilayers had much better corrosion resistance than the Al single layer. Furthermore, for multilayers with similar thickness, the corrosion resistance was improved as the period decreased.

  10. The electrochemical synthesis and corrosion behaviour of TiO2/poly(indole-co-aniline multilayer coating: Experimental and theoretical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serap Toprak Döşlü

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to protect stainless steel against corrosion via poly (indole-co-aniline with the help of titanium dioxide pre-coating. Different monomer ratios (1:1 and 1:9 were applied in order to determine the suitable chain composition to synthesize the copolymer in lithium perchlorate containing acetonitrile. The structures, morphologies, electrochemical properties and corrosion resistances of the mono and multi-layer coatings were investigated by Fourier-transform infrared spectra, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and anodic polarization. Furthermore the geometric structure and electronic properties of indole, aniline, and indole-co-aniline (dimmer molecules have been investigated by quantum calculations. The results indicated that corrosion protection of copolymers was increased via titanium dioxide pre-coating. The 1:1 copolymer coating showed better corrosion prevention than 1:9 coating. The correlation was determined between experimental and theoretical parameters.

  11. Service behaviour of high speed steel rolling rolls used in hot strip mills; Comportamiento en servicio de los aceros rapidos utilizados en la fabricacion de los cilindros de trabajo de los trenes de bandas en caliente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziadi, A.; Belzunce, F. J.; Rodriguez, C.; Fernandez, I.

    2005-07-01

    Work rolls used in hot strip mills may be able to carry out severe actions: very high thermal stresses and wear, along with mechanical stresses due to normal rolling loads, which develop in the presence of cracks, produced by the former actions. The microstructure and the mechanical behaviour (strength and toughness) of high speed steels, which recently have been introduced in this applications, were studied in this work in comparison with high chromium cast irons. (Author) 7 refs.

  12. Corrosion behaviour of metallic and non-metallic materials in various media in the Anhydrite and Gypsum Mine Felsenau/AG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laske, D.; Wiedemann, K.H.

    1983-10-01

    The final underground disposal of radioactive wastes necessitates container materials with a good long-term resistance against corrosion from both external agents and the solidification matrix inside. For low- and medium-level active waste, repositories in anhydrite sites, among others, are under consideration. Sheet and plate samples from 14 metallic and 8 non-metallic materials have been tested for 5 years in a tunnel in the Anhydrite and Gypsum Mine Felsenau/AG for their corrosion resistance in the tunnel atmosphere, anhydrite powder, gypsum powder, gypsum, and cement. From the metallic materials tested, only chromium-nickel steel is corrosion resistant to all the media present. Zinc plated and tin plated iron sheet as well as aluminium and aluminium alloys are corrosion resistant only in the atmosphere of the tunnel, and lead plated iron sheet is resistant also in cement. Aluminium is dissolved in cement. Uncovered iron sheet undergoes severe corrosion. The non-metallic coatings tested (lacquer, stove lacquer, or synthetic resins) partially flake off already after one year's testing and are therefore not appropriate for iron sheet corrosion protection. No influence of the different media has been observed after 5 years on the 8 plastic materials tested (6 without, and 2 with glass fiber reinforcement). (author)

  13. Hot Flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hot flashes Overview Hot flashes are sudden feelings of warmth, which are usually most intense over the face, neck and chest. Your skin might redden, as if you're blushing. Hot flashes can also cause sweating, and if you ...

  14. HOT 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Sara Stefansen

    2016-01-01

    HOT samler og formidler 21 literacykyndiges bud på, hvad der er hot, og hvad der bør være hot inden for literacy – og deres begrundelser for disse bud.......HOT samler og formidler 21 literacykyndiges bud på, hvad der er hot, og hvad der bør være hot inden for literacy – og deres begrundelser for disse bud....

  15. Microstructure and bio-corrosion behaviour of Mg-5Zn-0.5Ca -xSr alloys as potential biodegradable implant materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li; Zhou, Jiaxing; Sun, Zhenzhou; Yang, Meng; Ma, Liqun

    2018-04-01

    Magnesium alloys are widely studied as biomedical implants owing to their biodegradability. In this work, novel Mg-5Zn-0.5Ca-xSr (x = 0, 0.14, 0.36, 0.50, 0.70 wt%) alloys were prepared as biomedical materials. The influence of strontium (Sr) addition on the microstructure, corrosion properties and corrosion morphology of the as-cast Mg-5Zn-0.5Ca-xSr alloys is investigated by a variety of techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and electrochemical measurements. The Sr-free alloy is composed of three phases, namely, α-Mg, CaMg2 and Ca2Mg6Zn3, while the alloys with the Sr addition consist of α-Mg, CaMg2 and Ca2Mg6Zn3 and Mg17Sr2. Corrosion experiments in Hank’s solution show that the addition of a small amount of Sr can improve the corrosion resistance of the Mg-5Zn-0.5Ca alloy. The corrosion products include Mg(OH)2, Zn(OH)2, Ca(OH)2, and HA (Ca5(PO4)3(OH)). Mg-5Zn-0.5Ca-0.36Sr alloy has the minimum weight loss rate (0.68 mm/a), minimal hydrogen evolution (0.08 ml/cm2/d) and minimum corrosion current density (7.4 μA/cm2), indicating that this alloy shows the best corrosion resistance.

  16. High temperature corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.; Ennis, P.J.

    1988-08-01

    This paper covers three main topics: 1. high temperature oxidation of metals and alloys, 2. corrosion in sulfur containing environments and 3. structural changes caused by corrosion. The following 21 subjects are discussed: Influence of implanted yttrium and lanthanum on the oxidation behaviour of beta-NiA1; influence of reactive elements on the adherence and protective properties of alumina scales; problems related to the application of very fine markers in studying the mechanism of thin scale formation; oxidation behaviour of chromia forming Co-Cr-Al alloys with or without reactive element additions; growth and properties of chromia-scales on high-temperature alloys; quantification of the depletion zone in high temperature alloys after oxidation in process gas; effects of HC1 and of N2 in the oxidation of Fe-20Cr; investigation under nuclear safety aspects of Zircaloy-4 oxidation kinetics at high temperatures in air; on the sulfide corrosion of metallic materials; high temperature sulfide corrosion of Mn, Nb and Nb-Si alloys; corrosion behaviour or NiCrAl-based alloys in air and air-SO2 gas mixtures; sulfidation of cobalt at high temperatures; preoxidation for sulfidation protection; fireside corrosion and application of additives in electric utility boilers; transport properties of scales with complex defect structures; observations of whiskers and pyramids during high temperature corrosion of iron in SO2; corrosion and creep of alloy 800H under simulated coal gasification conditions; microstructural changes of HK 40 cast alloy caused by exploitation in tubes in steam reformer installation; microstructural changes during exposure in corrosive environments and their effect on mechanical properties; coatings against carburization; mathematical modeling of carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation in Ni-Cr-based alloys. (MM)

  17. Corrosion behaviour of material no. 1. 4539 and nickel based alloys in gas waters. Korrosionsverhalten des Werkstoffs 1. 4539 und von Nickelbasis-Legierungen in Gaswaessern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolle, D [Didier Saeurebau GmbH, Koenigswinter (Germany); Buehler, H E [Didier-Werke AG, Anlagentechnik, Wiesbaden (Germany); Kalfa, H

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory tests with synthetic gas waters containing the gases ammonia, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulphide and hydrogen cyanide were carried out in order to examine the influence of medium components on the corrosion of material No. 1.4539 and nickel based alloys Hastelloy C-4, C-22 and C-276. Hydrogen sulfide was identified as the decisive component for corrosion. For stainless steel corrosion rates of about 2 mm.a[sup -1] were already found at 50deg C in a critical pH-range with sulfide concentrations > 2%. As cyanide stimulates corrosion by dissolving sulfide surface layers by complexation of the iron ions, an increased material loss rate per unit area was found in the critical range with increasing cyanide concentration. The much more stable nickel based alloys only revealed