WorldWideScience

Sample records for host-microbiome metabolic interaction

  1. Exploring Host-Microbiome Interactions using an in Silico Model of Biomimetic Robots and Engineered Living Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Keith C. Heyde; Warren C. Ruder

    2015-01-01

    The microbiome?s underlying dynamics play an important role in regulating the behavior and health of its host. In order to explore the details of these interactions, we created an in silico model of a living microbiome, engineered with synthetic biology, that interfaces with a biomimetic, robotic host. By analytically modeling and computationally simulating engineered gene networks in these commensal communities, we reproduced complex behaviors in the host. We observed that robot movements de...

  2. Sphagnum physiology in the context of changing climate: emergent influences of genomics, modelling and host-microbiome interactions on understanding ecosystem function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, David J; Timm, Collin M; Walker, Anthony P; Gu, Lianhong; Muchero, Wellington; Schmutz, Jeremy; Shaw, A Jonathan; Tuskan, Gerald A; Warren, Jeffrey M; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2015-09-01

    Peatlands harbour more than one-third of terrestrial carbon leading to the argument that the bryophytes, as major components of peatland ecosystems, store more organic carbon in soils than any other collective plant taxa. Plants of the genus Sphagnum are important components of peatland ecosystems and are potentially vulnerable to changing climatic conditions. However, the response of Sphagnum to rising temperatures, elevated CO2 and shifts in local hydrology have yet to be fully characterized. In this review, we examine Sphagnum biology and ecology and explore the role of this group of keystone species and its associated microbiome in carbon and nitrogen cycling using literature review and model simulations. Several issues are highlighted including the consequences of a variable environment on plant-microbiome interactions, uncertainty associated with CO2 diffusion resistances and the relationship between fixed N and that partitioned to the photosynthetic apparatus. We note that the Sphagnum fallax genome is currently being sequenced and outline potential applications of population-level genomics and corresponding plant photosynthesis and microbial metabolic modelling techniques. We highlight Sphagnum as a model organism to explore ecosystem response to a changing climate and to define the role that Sphagnum can play at the intersection of physiology, genetics and functional genomics. © 2014 The Authors. Plant, Cell & Environment published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Emulating Host-Microbiome Ecosystem of Human Gastrointestinal Tract in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gun-Seok; Park, Min Hee; Shin, Woojung; Zhao, Connie; Sheikh, Sameer; Oh, So Jung; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2017-06-01

    The human gut microbiome performs prodigious physiological functions such as production of microbial metabolites, modulation of nutrient digestion and drug metabolism, control of immune system, and prevention of infection. Paradoxically, gut microbiome can also negatively orchestrate the host responses in diseases or chronic disorders, suggesting that the regulated and balanced host-gut microbiome crosstalk is a salient prerequisite in gastrointestinal physiology. To understand the pathophysiological role of host-microbiome crosstalk, it is critical to recreate in vivo relevant models of the host-gut microbiome ecosystem in human. However, controlling the multi-species microbial communities and their uncontrolled growth has remained a notable technical challenge. Furthermore, conventional two-dimensional (2D) or 3D culture systems do not recapitulate multicellular microarchitectures, mechanical dynamics, and tissue-specific functions. Here, we review recent advances and current pitfalls of in vitro and ex vivo models that display human GI functions. We also discuss how the disruptive technologies such as 3D organoids or a human organ-on-a-chip microphysiological system can contribute to better emulate host-gut microbiome crosstalks in health and disease. Finally, the medical and pharmaceutical significance of the gut microbiome-based personalized interventions is underlined as a future perspective.

  4. The human skin double-stranded DNA virome: topographical and temporal diversity, genetic enrichment, and dynamic associations with the host microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannigan, Geoffrey D; Meisel, Jacquelyn S; Tyldsley, Amanda S; Zheng, Qi; Hodkinson, Brendan P; SanMiguel, Adam J; Minot, Samuel; Bushman, Frederic D; Grice, Elizabeth A

    2015-10-20

    Viruses make up a major component of the human microbiota but are poorly understood in the skin, our primary barrier to the external environment. Viral communities have the potential to modulate states of cutaneous health and disease. Bacteriophages are known to influence the structure and function of microbial communities through predation and genetic exchange. Human viruses are associated with skin cancers and a multitude of cutaneous manifestations. Despite these important roles, little is known regarding the human skin virome and its interactions with the host microbiome. Here we evaluated the human cutaneous double-stranded DNA virome by metagenomic sequencing of DNA from purified virus-like particles (VLPs). In parallel, we employed metagenomic sequencing of the total skin microbiome to assess covariation and infer interactions with the virome. Samples were collected from 16 subjects at eight body sites over 1 month. In addition to the microenviroment, which is known to partition the bacterial and fungal microbiota, natural skin occlusion was strongly associated with skin virome community composition. Viral contigs were enriched for genes indicative of a temperate phage replication style and also maintained genes encoding potential antibiotic resistance and virulence factors. CRISPR spacers identified in the bacterial DNA sequences provided a record of phage predation and suggest a mechanism to explain spatial partitioning of skin phage communities. Finally, we modeled the structure of bacterial and phage communities together to reveal a complex microbial environment with a Corynebacterium hub. These results reveal the previously underappreciated diversity, encoded functions, and viral-microbial dynamic unique to the human skin virome. To date, most cutaneous microbiome studies have focused on bacterial and fungal communities. Skin viral communities and their relationships with their hosts remain poorly understood despite their potential to modulate states

  5. New Players in Immunity to Tuberculosis: The Host Microbiome, Lung Epithelium, and Innate Immune Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nancy; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2018-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a highly contagious infection and devastating chronic disease, causing 10.4 million new infections and 1.8 million deaths every year globally. Efforts to control and eradicate TB are hampered by the rapid emergence of drug resistance and limited efficacy of the only available vaccine, BCG. Immunological events in the airways and lungs are of major importance in determining whether exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) results in successful infection or protective immunity. Several studies have demonstrated that the host microbiota is in constant contact with the immune system, and thus continually directs the nature of immune responses occurring during new infections. However, little is known about its role in the eventual outcome of the mycobacterial infection. In this review, we highlight the changes in microbial composition in the respiratory tract and gut that have been linked to the alteration of immune responses, and to the risk, prevention, and treatment of TB. In addition, we summarize our current understanding of alveolar epithelial cells and the innate immune system, and their interaction with Mtb during early infection. Extensive studies are warranted to fully understand the all-inclusive role of the lung microbiota, its interaction with epithelium and innate immune responses and resulting adaptive immune responses, and in the pathogenesis and/or protection from Mtb infection. Novel interventions aimed at influencing the microbiota, the alveolar immune system and innate immunity will shape future strategies of prevention and treatment for TB. PMID:29692778

  6. Enantiomeric metabolic interactions and stereoselective human methadone metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totah, Rheem A; Allen, Kyle E; Sheffels, Pamela; Whittington, Dale; Kharasch, Evan D

    2007-04-01

    Methadone is administered as a racemate, although opioid activity resides in the R-enantiomer. Methadone disposition is stereoselective, with considerable unexplained variability in clearance and plasma R/S ratios. N-Demethylation of methadone in vitro is predominantly mediated by cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 and somewhat by CYP2C19. This investigation evaluated stereoselectivity, models, and kinetic parameters for methadone N-demethylation by recombinant CYP2B6, CYP3A4, and CYP2C19, and the potential for interactions between enantiomers during racemate metabolism. CYP2B6 metabolism was stereoselective. CYP2C19 was less active, and stereoselectivity was opposite that for CYP2B6. CYP3A4 was not stereoselective. With all three isoforms, enantiomer N-dealkylation rates in the racemate were lower than those of (R)-(6-dimethyamino-4,4-diphenyl-heptan-3-one) hydrochloride (R-methadone) or (S)-(6-dimethyamino-4,4-diphenyl-heptan-3-one) hydrochloride (S-methadone) alone, suggesting an enantiomeric interaction and mutual metabolic inhibition. For CYP2B6, the interaction between enantiomers was stereoselective, with S-methadone as a more potent inhibitor of R-methadone N-demethylation than R-of S-methadone. In contrast, enantiomer interactions were not stereoselective with CYP2C19 or CYP3A4. For all three cytochromes P450, methadone N-demethylation was best described by two-site enzyme models with competitive inhibition. There were minor model differences between cytochromes P450 to account for stereoselectivity of metabolism and enantiomeric interactions. Changes in plasma R/S methadone ratios observed after rifampin or troleandomycin pretreatment in humans in vivo were successfully predicted by CYP2B6- but not CYP3A4-catalyzed methadone N-demethylation. CYP2B6 is a predominant catalyst of stereoselective methadone metabolism in vitro. In vivo, CYP2B6 may be a major determinant of methadone metabolism and disposition, and CYP2B6 activity and stereoselective metabolic

  7. Interaction of pathogens with host cholesterol metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviridov, Dmitri; Bukrinsky, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Pathogens of different taxa, from prions to protozoa, target cellular cholesterol metabolism to advance their own development and to impair host immune responses, but also causing metabolic complications, for example, atherosclerosis. This review describes recent findings of how pathogens do it. A common theme in interaction between pathogens and host cholesterol metabolism is pathogens targeting lipid rafts of the host plasma membrane. Many intracellular pathogens use rafts as an entry gate, taking advantage of the endocytic machinery and high abundance of outward-looking molecules that can be used as receptors. At the same time, disruption of the rafts' functional capacity, achieved by the pathogens through a number of various means, impairs the ability of the host to generate immune response, thus helping pathogen to thrive. Pathogens cannot synthesize cholesterol, and salvaging host cholesterol helps pathogens build advanced cholesterol-containing membranes and assembly platforms. Impact on cholesterol metabolism is not limited to the infected cells; proteins and microRNAs secreted by infected cells affect lipid metabolism systemically. Given an essential role that host cholesterol metabolism plays in pathogen development, targeting this interaction may be a viable strategy to fight infections, as well as metabolic complications of the infections.

  8. Human Metabolism and Interactions of Deployment-Related Chemicals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hodgson, Ernest

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the human-metabolism and metabolic interactions of a subset of deployment-related chemicals, including chlorpyrifos, DEET, permethrin, pyridostigmine bromide, and sulfur mustard metabolites...

  9. Metabolic interactions between cysteamine and epigallocatechin gallate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Valentina; Pietrocola, Federico; Sica, Valentina; Durand, Sylvère; Lachkar, Sylvie; Enot, David; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Chery, Alexis; Esposito, Speranza; Raia, Valeria; Maiuri, Luigi; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Kroemer, Guido

    2017-02-01

    Phase II clinical trials indicate that the combination of cysteamine plus epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is effective against cystic fibrosis in patients bearing the most frequent etiological mutation (CFTRΔF508). Here, we investigated the interaction between both agents on cultured respiratory epithelia cells from normal and CFTRΔF508-mutated donors. We observed that the combination of both agents affected metabolic circuits (and in particular the tricarboxylic acid cycle) in a unique way and that cysteamine plus EGCG reduced cytoplasmic protein acetylation more than each of the 2 components alone. In a cell-free system, protein cross-linking activity of EGCG was suppressed by cysteamine. Finally, EGCG was able to enhance the conversion of cysteamine into taurine in metabolic flux experiments. Altogether, these results indicate that multiple pharmacological interactions occur between cysteamine and EGCG, suggesting that they contribute to the unique synergy of both agents in restoring the function of mutated CFTRΔF508.

  10. Mechanistic links between gut microbial community dynamics, microbial functions and metabolic health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Connie WY; Lam, Yan Y; Holmes, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbes comprise a high density, biologically active community that lies at the interface of an animal with its nutritional environment. Consequently their activity profoundly influences many aspects of the physiology and metabolism of the host animal. A range of microbial structural components and metabolites directly interact with host intestinal cells and tissues to influence nutrient uptake and epithelial health. Endocrine, neuronal and lymphoid cells in the gut also integrate signals from these microbial factors to influence systemic responses. Dysregulation of these host-microbe interactions is now recognised as a major risk factor in the development of metabolic dysfunction. This is a two-way process and understanding the factors that tip host-microbiome homeostasis over to dysbiosis requires greater appreciation of the host feedbacks that contribute to regulation of microbial community composition. To date, numerous studies have employed taxonomic profiling approaches to explore the links between microbial composition and host outcomes (especially obesity and its comorbidities), but inconsistent host-microbe associations have been reported. Available data indicates multiple factors have contributed to discrepancies between studies. These include the high level of functional redundancy in host-microbiome interactions combined with individual variation in microbiome composition; differences in study design, diet composition and host system between studies; and inherent limitations to the resolution of rRNA-based community profiling. Accounting for these factors allows for recognition of the common microbial and host factors driving community composition and development of dysbiosis on high fat diets. New therapeutic intervention options are now emerging. PMID:25469018

  11. Metabolic interrelationships software application: Interactive learning tool for intermediary metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.M. Verhoeven (Adrie); M. Doets (Mathijs); J.M.J. Lamers (Jos); J.F. Koster (Johan)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractWe developed and implemented the software application titled Metabolic Interrelationships as a self-learning and -teaching tool for intermediary metabolism. It is used by undergraduate medical students in an integrated organ systems-based and disease-oriented core curriculum, which

  12. Interactions between epigenetics and metabolism in cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Jihye; Johnson, Jared L.; Hanigan, Christin L.; Locasale, Jason W.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer progression is accompanied by widespread transcriptional changes and metabolic alterations. While it is widely accepted that the origin of cancer can be traced to the mutations that accumulate over time, relatively recent evidence favors a similarly fundamental role for alterations in the epigenome during tumorigenesis. Changes in epigenetics that arise from post-translational modifications of histones and DNA are exploited by cancer cells to upregulate and/or downregulate the expression levels of oncogenes and tumor suppressors, respectively. Although the mechanisms behind these modifications, in particular how they lead to gene silencing and activation, are still being understood, most of the enzymatic machinery of epigenetics require metabolites as substrates or cofactors. As a result, their activities can be influenced by the metabolic state of the cell. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of cancer epigenetics and metabolism and provide examples of where they converge.

  13. Interactions between epigenetics and metabolism in cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihye eYun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer progression is accompanied by widespread transcriptional changes and metabolic alterations. Although it is widely accepted that the origin of cancer can be traced to the mutations that accumulate over time, relatively recent evidence favors a similarly fundamental role for alterations in the epigenome during tumorigenesis. Changes in epigenetics that arise from post-translational modifications of histones and DNA, are exploited by cancer cells to upregulate and/or downregulate the expression levels of oncogenes and tumor suppressors, respectively. Although the mechanisms behind these modifications, in particular how they lead to gene silencing and activation, are still being understood, many enzymes that carry out post-translational modifications that alter epigenetics require metabolites as substrates or cofactors. As a result, their activities can be influenced by the metabolic state of the cell. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of cancer epigenetics and metabolism and provide examples of where they converge.

  14. Exploring NAD+ metabolism in host-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Inês; Varela, Patrícia; Belinha, Ana; Gaifem, Joana; Laforge, Mireille; Vergnes, Baptiste; Estaquier, Jérôme; Silvestre, Ricardo

    2016-03-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is a vital molecule found in all living cells. NAD(+) intracellular levels are dictated by its synthesis, using the de novo and/or salvage pathway, and through its catabolic use as co-enzyme or co-substrate. The regulation of NAD(+) metabolism has proven to be an adequate drug target for several diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative or inflammatory diseases. Increasing interest has been given to NAD(+) metabolism during innate and adaptive immune responses suggesting that its modulation could also be relevant during host-pathogen interactions. While the maintenance of NAD(+) homeostatic levels assures an adequate environment for host cell survival and proliferation, fluctuations in NAD(+) or biosynthetic precursors bioavailability have been described during host-pathogen interactions, which will interfere with pathogen persistence or clearance. Here, we review the double-edged sword of NAD(+) metabolism during host-pathogen interactions emphasizing its potential for treatment of infectious diseases.

  15. Morinda citrifolia Linn. (Noni and Its Potential in Obesity-Related Metabolic Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Carla Inada

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cultural and economic shifts in the early 19th century led to the rapid development of companies that made good profits from technologically-produced commodities. In this way, some habits changed in society, such as the overconsumption of processed and micronutrient-poor foods and devices that gave rise to a sedentary lifestyle. These factors influenced host-microbiome interactions which, in turn, mediated the etiopathogenesis of “new-era” disorders and diseases, which are closely related, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, hypertension, and inflammatory bowel disease, which are characterized by chronic dysregulation of metabolic and immune processes. These pathological conditions require novel and effective therapeutic approaches. Morinda citrifolia (noni is well known as a traditional healing plant due to its medicinal properties. Thus, many studies have been conducted to understand its bioactive compounds and their mechanisms of action. However, in obesity and obesity-related metabolic (dysfunction syndrome, other studies are necessary to better elucidate noni’s mechanisms of action, mainly due to the complexity of the pathophysiology of obesity and its metabolic dysfunction. In this review, we summarize not only the clinical effects, but also important cell signaling pathways in in vivo and in vitro assays of potent bioactive compounds present in the noni plant which have been reported in studies of obesity and obesity-associated metabolic dysfunction.

  16. Dabigatran - Metabolism, Pharmacologic Properties and Drug Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonijevic, Nebojsa M; Zivkovic, Ivana D; Jovanovic, Ljubica M; Matic, Dragan M; Kocica, Mladen J; Mrdovic, Igor B; Kanjuh, Vladimir I; Culafic, Milica D

    2017-01-01

    The superiority of dabigatran has been well proven in the standard dosing regimen in prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) and extended venous thromboembolism (VTE) treatment. Dabigatran, an anticoagulant with a good safety profile, reduces intracranial bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation and decreases major and clinically relevant non-major bleeding in acute VTE treatment. However, several important clinical issues are not fully covered by currently available directions with regard to dabigatran administration. The prominent one is reflected in the fact that dynamic impairment in renal function due to dehydratation may lead to haemorragic complications on the one hand, while on the other hand glomerular hyperfiltration may be a possible cause of dabigatran subdosing, hence reducing the drug's efficacy. Furthermore, limitations of the Cockcroft-Gault formula, considered a standard equation for assessing the renal function, may imply that other calculations are likely to obtain more accurate estimates of the kidney function in specific patient populations. Method and Conclusions: Although not routinely recommended, a possibility of monitoring dabigatran in special clinical settings adds to optimization of its dosage regimens, timely perioperative care and administration of urgently demanded thrombolytic therapy, therefore significantly improving this drug's safety profile. Despite the fact that dabigatran has fewer reported interactions with drugs, food constituents, and dietary supplements, certain interactions still remain, requiring considerable caution, notably in elderly, high bleeding risk patients, patients with decreased renal function and those on complex drug regimens. Additionally, upon approval of idarucizumab, an antidote to dabigatran solution, hitherto being a major safety concern, has been finally reached, which plays a vital role in life-threatening bleeding and emergency

  17. Interactions of polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons with thyroid hormone metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuur, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    This thesis deals with the possible interactions of polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons and/or their metabolites with thyroid hormone metabolism. This chapter summarizes firstly the effects of thyroid hormone on the induction of biotransformation enzymes by PHAHs. Secondly, the results on

  18. Metabolic aspects of Neuronal – Oligodendrocytic - Astrocytic (NOA interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I Amaral

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Whereas astrocytes have been in the limelight on the metabolic glucose interaction scene for a while, oligodendrocytes are still waiting for a place. We would like to call oligodendrocyte interaction with astrocytes and neurons: NOA (neuron – oligodendrocyte – astrocyte interactions. One of the reasons to find out more about oligodendrocyte interaction with neurons and astrocytes is to detect markers of healthy oligodendrocyte metabolism, to be used in diagnosis and treatment assessment in diseases such as Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and multiple sclerosis in which oligodendrocyte function is impaired, possibly due to glutamate toxicity. Glutamate receptors are expressed in oligodendrocytes and also vesicular glutamate release in the white matter has received considerable attention. It is also important to establish if the glial precursor cells recruited to damaged areas are developing oligodendrocyte characteristics or those of astrocytes. Thus, it is important to study astrocytes and oligodendrocytes separately to be able to differentiate between them. This is of particular importance in the white matter where the number of oligodendrocytes is considerable. The present review summarizes the not very extensive information published on glucose metabolism in oligodendrocytes in an attempt to stimulate research into this important field.

  19. Metabolic Interaction of Helicobacter pylori Infection and Gut Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Jong Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available As a barrier, gut commensal microbiota can protect against potential pathogenic microbes in the gastrointestinal tract. Crosstalk between gut microbes and immune cells promotes human intestinal homeostasis. Dysbiosis of gut microbiota has been implicated in the development of many human metabolic disorders like obesity, hepatic steatohepatitis, and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes (T2D. Certain microbes, such as butyrate-producing bacteria, are lower in T2D patients. The transfer of intestinal microbiota from lean donors increases insulin sensitivity in individuals with metabolic syndrome, but the exact pathogenesis remains unclear. H. pylori in the human stomach cause chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancers. H. pylori infection also induces insulin resistance and has been defined as a predisposing factor to T2D development. Gastric and fecal microbiota may have been changed in H. pylori-infected persons and mice to promote gastric inflammation and specific diseases. However, the interaction of H. pylori and gut microbiota in regulating host metabolism also remains unknown. Further studies aim to identify the H. pylori-microbiota-host metabolism axis and to test if H. pylori eradication or modification of gut microbiota can improve the control of human metabolic disorders.

  20. Molecular Interaction of Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue with Energy Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchacki, Karla J; Cawthorn, William P

    2018-01-01

    The last decade has seen a resurgence in the study of bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) across diverse fields such as metabolism, haematopoiesis, skeletal biology and cancer. Herein, we review the most recent developments of BMAT research in both humans and rodents, including the distinct nature of BMAT; the autocrine, paracrine and endocrine interactions between BMAT and various tissues, both in physiological and pathological scenarios; how these interactions might impact energy metabolism; and the most recent technological advances to quantify BMAT. Though still dwarfed by research into white and brown adipose tissues, BMAT is now recognised as endocrine organ and is attracting increasing attention from biomedical researchers around the globe. We are beginning to learn the importance of BMAT both within and beyond the bone, allowing us to better appreciate the role of BMAT in normal physiology and disease.

  1. Ketogenic diet and astrocyte/neuron metabolic interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Vamecq Joseph; Maurois Pierre; Bac Pierre; Delplanque Bernadette; Pages Nicole

    2007-01-01

    The ketogenic diet is an anticonvulsant diet enriched in fat. It provides the body with a minimal protein requirement and a restricted carbohydrate supply, the vast majority of calories (more than 80-90%) being given by fat. Though anticonvulsant activity of ketogenic diet has been well documented by a large number of experimental and clinical studies, underlying mechanisms still remain partially unclear. Astrocyte-neuron interactions, among which metabolic shuttles, may influence synaptic ac...

  2. Impact of the Gut Microbiota on Intestinal Immunity Mediated by Tryptophan Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Xu, Kang; Liu, Hongnan; Liu, Gang; Bai, Miaomiao; Peng, Can; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2018-01-01

    The gut microbiota influences the health of the host, especially with regard to gut immune homeostasis and the intestinal immune response. In addition to serving as a nutrient enhancer, L-tryptophan (Trp) plays crucial roles in the balance between intestinal immune tolerance and gut microbiota maintenance. Recent discoveries have underscored that changes in the microbiota modulate the host immune system by modulating Trp metabolism. Moreover, Trp, endogenous Trp metabolites (kynurenines, serotonin, and melatonin), and bacterial Trp metabolites (indole, indolic acid, skatole, and tryptamine) have profound effects on gut microbial composition, microbial metabolism, the host's immune system, the host-microbiome interface, and host immune system–intestinal microbiota interactions. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates the regulation of intestinal immunity by Trp metabolites (as ligands of AhR), which is beneficial for immune homeostasis. Among Trp metabolites, AhR ligands consist of endogenous metabolites, including kynurenine, kynurenic acid, xanthurenic acid, and cinnabarinic acid, and bacterial metabolites, including indole, indole propionic acid, indole acetic acid, skatole, and tryptamine. Additional factors, such as aging, stress, probiotics, and diseases (spondyloarthritis, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer), which are associated with variability in Trp metabolism, can influence Trp–microbiome–immune system interactions in the gut and also play roles in regulating gut immunity. This review clarifies how the gut microbiota regulates Trp metabolism and identifies the underlying molecular mechanisms of these interactions. Increased mechanistic insight into how the microbiota modulates the intestinal immune system through Trp metabolism may allow for the identification of innovative microbiota-based diagnostics, as well as appropriate nutritional supplementation of Trp to prevent or alleviate intestinal inflammation

  3. Metabolic interaction between toluene, trichloroethylene and n-hexane in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bælum, Jesper; Mølhave, Lars; Hansen, S H

    1998-01-01

    This human experimental study describes the mutual metabolic interaction between toluene, trichloroethylene, and n-hexane.......This human experimental study describes the mutual metabolic interaction between toluene, trichloroethylene, and n-hexane....

  4. Ketogenic diet and astrocyte/neuron metabolic interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamecq Joseph

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The ketogenic diet is an anticonvulsant diet enriched in fat. It provides the body with a minimal protein requirement and a restricted carbohydrate supply, the vast majority of calories (more than 80-90% being given by fat. Though anticonvulsant activity of ketogenic diet has been well documented by a large number of experimental and clinical studies, underlying mechanisms still remain partially unclear. Astrocyte-neuron interactions, among which metabolic shuttles, may influence synaptic activity and hence anticonvulsant protection. The astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttles may be themselves influenced by the availability in energetic substrates such as hydrates of carbon and fats. Historically, ketogenic diet had been designed to mimic changes such as ketosis occurring upon starvation, a physiological state already known to exhibit anticonvulsant protection and sometimes referred to as “water diet”. For this reason, a special attention should be paid to metabolic features shared in common by ketogenic diet and starvation and especially those features that might result in anticonvulsant protection. Compared to feeding by usual mixed diet, starvation and ketogenic diet are both characterised by increased fat, lowered glucose and aminoacid supplies to cells. The resulting impact of these changes in energetic substrates on astrocyte/neuron metabolic shuttles might have anticonvulsant and/or neuroprotective properties. This is the aim of this communication to review some important astrocyte/neuron metabolic interactions (astrocyte/neuron lactate shuttle, glutamateinduced astrocytic glycolysis activation, glutamate/glutamine cycle along with the neurovascular coupling and the extent to which the way of their alteration by starvation and/or ketogenic diet might result in seizure and/or brain protection.

  5. Plant interactions alter the predictions of metabolic scaling theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Lin

    Full Text Available Metabolic scaling theory (MST is an attempt to link physiological processes of individual organisms with macroecology. It predicts a power law relationship with an exponent of -4/3 between mean individual biomass and density during density-dependent mortality (self-thinning. Empirical tests have produced variable results, and the validity of MST is intensely debated. MST focuses on organisms' internal physiological mechanisms but we hypothesize that ecological interactions can be more important in determining plant mass-density relationships induced by density. We employ an individual-based model of plant stand development that includes three elements: a model of individual plant growth based on MST, different modes of local competition (size-symmetric vs. -asymmetric, and different resource levels. Our model is consistent with the observed variation in the slopes of self-thinning trajectories. Slopes were significantly shallower than -4/3 if competition was size-symmetric. We conclude that when the size of survivors is influenced by strong ecological interactions, these can override predictions of MST, whereas when surviving plants are less affected by interactions, individual-level metabolic processes can scale up to the population level. MST, like thermodynamics or biomechanics, sets limits within which organisms can live and function, but there may be stronger limits determined by ecological interactions. In such cases MST will not be predictive.

  6. Digestible and indigestible carbohydrates: interactions with postprandial lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lairon, Denis; Play, Barbara; Jourdheuil-Rahmani, Dominique

    2007-04-01

    The balance between fats and carbohydrates in the human diet is still a matter of very active debate. Indeed, the processing of ordinary mixed meals involves complex processes within the lumen of the upper digestive tract for digestion, in the small intestine mucosa for absorption and resecretion, and in peripheral tissues and in the circulation for final handling. The purpose of this review is to focus on available knowledge on the interactions of digestible or indigestible carbohydrates with lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in the postprandial state. The observations made in humans after test meals are reported and interpreted in the light of recent findings on the cellular and molecular levels regarding possible interplays between carbohydrates and lipid moieties in some metabolic pathways. Digestible carbohydrates, especially readily digestible starches or fructose, have been shown to exacerbate and/or delay postprandial lipemia, whereas some fiber sources can lower it. While interactions between dietary fibers and the process of lipid digestion and absorption have been studied mainly in the last decades, recent studies have shown that dietary carbohydrate moieties (e.g., glucose) can stimulate the intestinal uptake of cholesterol and lipid resecretion. In addition to the well-known glucose/fructose transporters, a number of transport proteins have recently been involved in intestinal lipid processing, whose implications in such interactions are discussed. The potential importance of postprandial insulinemia in these processes is also evaluated in the light of recent findings. The interactions of carbohydrates and lipid moieties in the postprandial state may result from both acute and chronic effects, both at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels.

  7. Genetic dissection in a mouse model reveals interactions between carotenoids and lipid metabolism[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palczewski, Grzegorz; Widjaja-Adhi, M. Airanthi K.; Amengual, Jaume; Golczak, Marcin; von Lintig, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids affect a rich variety of physiological functions in nature and are beneficial for human health. However, knowledge about their biological action and the consequences of their dietary accumulation in mammals is limited. Progress in this research field is limited by the expeditious metabolism of carotenoids in rodents and the confounding production of apocarotenoid signaling molecules. Herein, we established a mouse model lacking the enzymes responsible for carotenoid catabolism and apocarotenoid production, fed on either a β-carotene- or a zeaxanthin-enriched diet. Applying a genome wide microarray analysis, we assessed the effects of the parent carotenoids on the liver transcriptome. Our analysis documented changes in pathways for liver lipid metabolism and mitochondrial respiration. We biochemically defined these effects, and observed that β-carotene accumulation resulted in an elevation of liver triglycerides and liver cholesterol, while zeaxanthin accumulation increased serum cholesterol levels. We further show that carotenoids were predominantly transported within HDL particles in the serum of mice. Finally, we provide evidence that carotenoid accumulation influenced whole-body respiration and energy expenditure. Thus, we observed that accumulation of parent carotenoids interacts with lipid metabolism and that structurally related carotenoids display distinct biological functions in mammals. PMID:27389691

  8. Plant interactions alter the predictions of metabolic scaling theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Yue; Berger, Uta; Grimm, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic scaling theory (MST) is an attempt to link physiological processes of individual organisms with macroecology. It predicts a power law relationship with an exponent of 24/3 between mean individual biomass and density during densitydependent mortality (self-thinning). Empirical tests have...... processes can scale up to the population level. MST, like thermodynamics or biomechanics, sets limits within which organisms can live and function, but there may be stronger limits determined by ecological interactions. In such cases MST will not be predictive....... of plant stand development that includes three elements: a model of individual plant growth based on MST, different modes of local competition (size-symmetric vs. -asymmetric), and different resource levels. Our model is consistent with the observed variation in the slopes of self-thinning trajectories...

  9. Dynamic metabolic exchange governs a marine algal-bacterial interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Einat; Wyche, Thomas P; Kim, Ki Hyun; Petersen, Jörn; Ellebrandt, Claire; Vlamakis, Hera; Barteneva, Natasha; Paulson, Joseph N; Chai, Liraz; Clardy, Jon; Kolter, Roberto

    2016-11-18

    Emiliania huxleyi is a model coccolithophore micro-alga that generates vast blooms in the ocean. Bacteria are not considered among the major factors influencing coccolithophore physiology. Here we show through a laboratory model system that the bacterium Phaeobacter inhibens , a well-studied member of the Roseobacter group, intimately interacts with E. huxleyi. While attached to the algal cell, bacteria initially promote algal growth but ultimately kill their algal host. Both algal growth enhancement and algal death are driven by the bacterially-produced phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid. Bacterial production of indole-3-acetic acid and attachment to algae are significantly increased by tryptophan, which is exuded from the algal cell. Algal death triggered by bacteria involves activation of pathways unique to oxidative stress response and programmed cell death. Our observations suggest that bacteria greatly influence the physiology and metabolism of E. huxleyi. Coccolithophore-bacteria interactions should be further studied in the environment to determine whether they impact micro-algal population dynamics on a global scale.

  10. Using Mixed Reality
to Bring interactivity to Metabolism Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C; M.L.; E. Vega Garzón; Magrini; Galembeck

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Visual literacy is the ability to understand (read and use (write images and to think and learn regarding images (both static and moving. Visual literacy and visualization are key learning components in the biochemistry because that science uses models of molecules to explain how cells work. Many studies have shown that visualization technologies (VT can be useful to develop essential visual literacy. The term “mixed reality” can be defined as the merging of real and virtual worlds to produce new environments and visualizations where physical and digital objects co-exist and interact in real time. The VT taps the brain's inherent ability to process visual information rapidly, identify patterns and sense order in complex situations generally making the complex simpler. OBJECTIVES: Design a Mixed Reality (MR application named VRMET to help the development of visual literacy skills to understand and represent biochemical concepts. MATERIALS AND METHODS: VRMET app was developed using Unity3D, Vuforia Augmented Reality SDK and Google VR SDK for Unity. 3D molecules were obtained from Protein Data Bank and ChemSpider and optimized using Blender. VRMET uses a 3D scaled animal cell model. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: VRMET requires a device with a camera. The user can get the App from the Google Play Store. VRMET has two different scenes: the Augmented reality (AR scene and the Virtual Reality (VR scene. AR Allows visualizing, from various angles, a scale model of an animal cell. VR allows one to realize a biochemical route within the cellular model, visualizing each one of the organelles and observing each of the reactions of glycolysis and the Krebs cycle. CONCLUSIONS: VRMET allows students to visualize the molecular structure of substrates and products, thus perceiving changes in each molecule along the metabolic pathway. It also allows observing where in the cell each metabolic pathway occurs.

  11. Metabolic Effects of Obesity and Its Interaction with Endocrine Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Melissa; Hoenig, Margarethe

    2016-09-01

    Obesity in pet dogs and cats is a significant problem in developed countries, and seems to be increasing in prevalence. Excess body fat has adverse metabolic consequences, including insulin resistance, altered adipokine secretion, changes in metabolic rate, abnormal lipid metabolism, and fat accumulation in visceral organs. Obese cats are predisposed to endocrine and metabolic disorders such as diabetes and hepatic lipidosis. A connection likely also exists between obesity and diabetes mellitus in dogs. No system has been developed to identify obese pets at greatest risk for development of obesity-associated metabolic diseases, and further study in this area is needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Human Metabolism and Interactions of Deployment-Related Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    stimulated by CPO (Fig. 6). Coincidently, α- naphthoflavone inhibited CYP1A2 metabolism of flavonoids /23/ and stimulated CYP3A4 metabolism of...by flavonoids of benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylation by cytochrome P-450 isozymes from rabbit liver microsomes, J. Biol. Chem. 1981; 256: 10897-10901. 17...P450-mediated metabolism of dietary flavonoids , Food Chem. Toxicol. 2002; 40: 609-616. 24. Cameron MD, Wen B, Allen KE, Roberts AG, Schuman JT

  13. Human Metabolism and Interactions of Deployment-Related Chemicals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hodgson, Ernest; Brimfield, Alan A; Goldstein, Joyce E; Rose, Randy L; Wallace, Andrew D

    2008-01-01

    .... The metabolism of chlorpyrifos, DEET, permethrin, pyridostigmine bromide, sulfur mustard, naphthalene and nonane as well as a number of their metabolites and related chemicals was investigated...

  14. Diet-microbiota interactions as moderators of human metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenburg, Justin L; Bäckhed, Gert Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that obesity and associated metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, are intimately linked to diet. However, the gut microbiota has also become a focus for research at the intersection of diet and metabolic health. Mechanisms that link the gut microbiota with obesity...

  15. Road MAPs to engineer host microbiomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyserman, Ben O; Medema, Marnix H; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2017-12-02

    Microbiomes contribute directly or indirectly to host health and fitness. Thus far, investigations into these emergent traits, referred to here as microbiome-associated phenotypes (MAPs), have been primarily qualitative and taxonomy-driven rather than quantitative and trait-based. We present the MAPs-first approach, a theoretical and experimental roadmap that involves quantitative profiling of MAPs across genetically variable hosts and subsequent identification of the underlying mechanisms. We outline strategies for developing 'modular microbiomes'-synthetic microbial consortia that are engineered in concert with the host genotype to confer different but mutually compatible MAPs to a single host or host population. By integrating host and microbial traits, these strategies will facilitate targeted engineering of microbiomes to the benefit of agriculture, human/animal health and biotechnology. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Road MAPs to engineer host microbiomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oyserman, B. O.; Medema, Marnix H; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2018-01-01

    Microbiomes contribute directly or indirectly to host health and fitness. Thus far, investigations into these emergent traits, referred to here as microbiome-associated phenotypes (MAPs), have been primarily qualitative and taxonomy-driven rather than quantitative and trait-based. We present the

  17. Interactions between host metabolism, immune regulation, and the gut microbiota in diet-associated obesity and metabolic dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Daniel

    The increase in the prevalence of obesity and obesity-associated complications such as the metabolic syndrome is becoming a global challenge. Dietary habits and nutrient consumption modulates host homeostasis, which manifests in various diet-induced complications marked by changes in host...... metabolism and immune regulation, which are intricately linked. In addition, diet effectively shapes the gut microbiota composition and activity, which in turn interacts with the host to modulate host metabolism and immune regulation. In the three studies included in this PhD thesis, we have explored...... the impact of specific dietary components on host metabolic function, immune regulation and gut microbiota composition and activity. In the first study, we have characterized the effect of a combined high-fat and gliadin-rich diet, since dietary gliadin has been reported to be associated with intestinal...

  18. Interactions between host genetics and gut microbiome in diabetes and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried Ussar

    2016-09-01

    Major conclusions: Understanding these complex interactions will help in the development of novel treatments for microbiome-related metabolic diseases. This article is part of a special issue on microbiota.

  19. Genotype by energy expenditure interaction with metabolic syndrome traits: the Portuguese healthy family study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M V Santos

    Full Text Available Moderate-to-high levels of physical activity are established as preventive factors in metabolic syndrome development. However, there is variability in the phenotypic expression of metabolic syndrome under distinct physical activity conditions. In the present study we applied a Genotype X Environment interaction method to examine the presence of GxEE interaction in the phenotypic expression of metabolic syndrome. A total of 958 subjects, from 294 families of The Portuguese Healthy Family study, were included in the analysis. Total daily energy expenditure was assessed using a 3 day physical activity diary. Six metabolic syndrome related traits, including waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, glucose, HDL cholesterol, total cholesterol and triglycerides, were measured and adjusted for age and sex. GxEE examination was performed on SOLAR 4.3.1. All metabolic syndrome indicators were significantly heritable. The GxEE interaction model fitted the data better than the polygenic model (p<0.001 for waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, glucose, total cholesterol and triglycerides. For waist circumference, glucose, total cholesterol and triglycerides, the significant GxEE interaction was due to rejection of the variance homogeneity hypothesis. For waist circumference and glucose, GxEE was also significant by the rejection of the genetic correlation hypothesis. The results showed that metabolic syndrome traits expression is significantly influenced by the interaction established between total daily energy expenditure and genotypes. Physical activity may be considered an environmental variable that promotes metabolic differences between individuals that are distinctively active.

  20. Interaction of propionate and carnitine metabolism in isolated rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brass, E.P.; Beyerinck, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Propionate (P) and its metabolic products P-CoA and methylmalonyl-CoA can disrupt normal hepatic metabolism. Carnitine (Cn) has been shown to partially restore cellular function in the presence of P. This effect of Cn may result from removal of propionyl groups as propionylcarnitine (P-Cn). The present study examined the kinetics of P-Cn formation in rat hepatocytes, and the consequence of P-Cn formation on P and Cn metabolism. 14 C-P was converted to CO 2 , glucose and P-Cn in the hepatocyte system. Increasing concentrations of Cn up to 10.0 mM increased P-Cn formation from P without affecting CO 2 or glucose formation. Thus, 10.0 mM Cn increased total P metabolism by 40%. Metabolism of P was associated with a decrease in Cn concentration and an increase in short chain acylcarnitines (SCCn). In the absence of added Cn, 60 min incubation with P decreased Cn from 6.8 to 2.5 μM with a corresponding increase in SCCn. This effect of P to deplete free Cn was not seen to the same degree with butyrate in place of P. Similar increases in the formation of SCCn in the presence of P at the expense of free Cn were seen when the incubation Cn concentration was increased to 50 μM or 150 μM. HPLC methodologies to study specific acylcarnitines demonstrated the accumulation of large amounts of P-Cn in the incubations containing P, accounting for the depletion of free Cn

  1. Hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency virus and metabolic syndrome: interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Donald P

    2009-03-01

    Significant concerns have been raised about the metabolic effects of antiretroviral medication, including the classic triad of dyslipidaemia, insulin resistance (IR) and characteristic alterations in fat distribution (lipoatrophy and lipohypertrophy). Co-infection with hepatitis C appears to exacerbate IR, reduce serum lipids and induce prothrombotic changes in the treated human immunodeficiency virus patient. The effects of co-infection are complex. While combination antiretroviral therapy has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events through promotion of dyslipidaemia, IR and fat redistribution, co-infection exacerbates IR while reducing serum lipids. Co-infection also promotes a prothrombotic state characterized by endothelial dysfunction and platelet activation, which may enhance risk for cardiovascular disease. Consideration must be given to selection of appropriate treatment regimens and timing of therapy in co-infected patients to minimize metabolic derangements and, ultimately, reduce cardiovascular risk.

  2. Metabolic Interaction between Urea Cycle and Citric Acid Cycle Shunt: A Guided Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesi, Rossana; Balestri, Francesco; Ipata, Piero L.

    2018-01-01

    This article is a guided pedagogical approach, devoted to postgraduate students specializing in biochemistry, aimed at presenting all single reactions and overall equations leading to the metabolic interaction between ureagenesis and citric acid cycle to be incorporated into a two-three lecture series about the interaction of urea cycle with other…

  3. Genotype by energy expenditure interaction with metabolic syndrome traits: the Portuguese healthy family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Daniel M V; Katzmarzyk, Peter T; Diego, Vincent P; Souza, Michele C; Chaves, Raquel N; Blangero, John; Maia, José A R

    2013-01-01

    Moderate-to-high levels of physical activity are established as preventive factors in metabolic syndrome development. However, there is variability in the phenotypic expression of metabolic syndrome under distinct physical activity conditions. In the present study we applied a Genotype X Environment interaction method to examine the presence of GxEE interaction in the phenotypic expression of metabolic syndrome. A total of 958 subjects, from 294 families of The Portuguese Healthy Family study, were included in the analysis. Total daily energy expenditure was assessed using a 3 day physical activity diary. Six metabolic syndrome related traits, including waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, glucose, HDL cholesterol, total cholesterol and triglycerides, were measured and adjusted for age and sex. GxEE examination was performed on SOLAR 4.3.1. All metabolic syndrome indicators were significantly heritable. The GxEE interaction model fitted the data better than the polygenic model (pmetabolic syndrome traits expression is significantly influenced by the interaction established between total daily energy expenditure and genotypes. Physical activity may be considered an environmental variable that promotes metabolic differences between individuals that are distinctively active.

  4. Interaction of Salmonella Gallinarum infection and zinc metabolism in chicks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the experiments to be reported was to determine whether or not the response of zinc metabolism to infection in chicks was similar to that reported for mammals and to determine the effect of maintaining serum zinc at normal levels in infected animals on the outcome of infection as determined by mortality. Within 48 hours after administration of the organism serum zinc concentrations declined to ca. half of the control value. The serum zinc concentrations remained depressed throughout the experimental infection (12 days). Isotope studies with 65 Zn indicated that the infection had no effect on absorption. The infection resulted in a sequestering of zinc in the liver, the kidney being relatively inert in this system. Fractionation of liver homogenates by column chromatography with Seph. G-75 revealed that the zinc in the livers of the infected animals eluted in a volume characteristic of metallothionein, while that of the control animals was associated with higher molecular weight proteins. Increasing the serum levels of zinc by injecting 200 μg Zn/100 g body weight twice a day for 5 days had no effect on mortality from the infection. They conclude that zinc metabolism in the chick is affected by infection in a manner similar to that reported for mammals and that the decrease in serum zinc concentration per se has no survival value for the chick in this infection

  5. Interaction of metabolic and respiratory acidosis with α and β-adrenoceptor stimulation in rat myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biais, Matthieu; Jouffroy, Romain; Carillion, Aude; Feldman, Sarah; Jobart-Malfait, Aude; Riou, Bruno; Amour, Julien

    2012-12-01

    The effects of acute respiratory versus metabolic acidosis on the myocardium and their consequences on adrenoceptor stimulation remain poorly described. We compared the effects of metabolic and respiratory acidosis on inotropy and lusitropy in rat myocardium and their effects on the responses to α- and β-adrenoceptor stimulations. The effects of acute respiratory and metabolic acidosis (pH 7.10) and their interactions with α and β-adrenoceptor stimulations were studied in isolated rat left ventricular papillary muscle (n=8 per group). Intracellular pH was measured using confocal microscopy and a pH-sensitive fluorophore in isolated rat cardiomyocytes. Data are mean percentages of baseline±SD. Respiratory acidosis induced more pronounced negative inotropic effects than metabolic acidosis did both in isotonic (45±3 versus 63±6%, Prespiratory or metabolic acidosis. The inotropic response to β-adrenergic stimulation was impaired only in metabolic acidosis (137±12 versus 200±33%, Pacidosis. The lusitropic response to β-adrenergic stimulation was not modified by respiratory or metabolic acidosis. Acute metabolic and respiratory acidosis induce different myocardial effects related to different decreases in intracellular pH. Only metabolic acidosis impairs the positive inotropic effect of β-adrenergic stimulation.

  6. Diet-gene interactions between dietary fat intake and common polymorphisms in determining lipid metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, D.

    2009-07-01

    Current dietary guidelines for fat intake have not taken into consideration the possible genetic differences underlying the individual variability in responsiveness to dietary components. Genetic variability has been identified in humans for all the known lipid metabolism-related genes resulting in a plethora of candidate genes and genetic variants to examine in diet-gene interaction studies focused on fat consumption. Some examples of fat-gene interaction are reviewed. These include: the interaction between total intake and the 14C/T in the hepatic lipase gene promoter in determining high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) metabolism; the interaction between polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and the 5G/A polymorphism in the APOA1 gene plasma HDL-C concentrations; the interaction between PUFA and the L162V polymorphism in the PPARA gene in determining triglycerides and APOC3 concentrations; and the interaction between PUFA intake and the -1131T>C in the APOA5 gene in determining triglyceride metabolism. Although hundreds of diet-gene interaction studies in lipid metabolism have been published, the level of evidence to make specific nutritional recommendations to the population is still low and more research in nutrigenetics has to be undertaken. (Author) 31 refs.

  7. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stams, A.J.; Oude Elferink, S.J.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic...... consortia. Despite the potentially adverse effects, only few inorganic electron acceptors potentially utilizable for anaerobic respiration have been investigated with respect to negative interactions in anaerobic digesters. In this chapter we review competitive and inhibitory interactions between anaerobic...... respiring populations and methanogenic consortia in bioreactors. Due to the few studies in anaerobic digesters, many of our discussions are based upon studies of defined cultures or natural ecosystems...

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTERACTIVE SOFTWARE TO STUDY ENERGETIC METABOLISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuella da Silva Cardoso

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Technology allows the creation of dynamic interfaces and graphics, which enables the construction of different scenarios that simulate biochemical events at cellular and molecular level. Furthermore, games have the ability to amuse and stimulate students and thus keeping them interested and receptive. Therefore, digital games must be explored as teaching aids once they have features that enhance the teaching process. OBJECTIVES: This project aimed to develop an educational software that contributes to the understanding of various events taking place in energetic metabolism. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We developed a downloadable educational game in Java, divided into two levels, each of which tackle issues about the Krebs cycle, the respiratory chain and oxidative phosphorylation. Initially, the names of the components of the metabolic process appear randomly on computer screen and the user must follow clues to place them in the right sequence, until all the biochemical reactions are complete. In next phase, there is a quiz about details and clinical correlates related to the theme of the game. Finally, students have to answer a form in order to verify acceptance and relevance of the game. DISCUSSION AND RESULTS: The game was applied to 40 medical students from UFF. The game’s subject matter and its difficulty were analyzed and more than 40% of students classified both respiratory chain and Krebs cycle as difficult. These findings highlight the need to establish new methods to enhance the teaching and learning processes and decrease the students’ difficulties, which is the game’s purpose. The game was very highly rated by students once they evaluated the game as an excellent educational aid and 92% of students agreed that it complements the content discussed in classroom. Finally, 97,5% of students said they would play again. CONCLUSION: Therefore, educational games could be an excellent tool to optimize learning.

  9. Metabolic network modeling of microbial interactions in natural and engineered environmental systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio ePerez-Garcia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We review approaches to characterize metabolic interactions within microbial communities using Stoichiometric Metabolic Network (SMN models for applications in environmental and industrial biotechnology. SMN models are computational tools used to evaluate the metabolic engineering potential of various organisms. They have successfully been applied to design and optimize the microbial production of antibiotics, alcohols and amino acids by single strains. To date however, such models have been rarely applied to analyze and control the metabolism of more complex microbial communities. This is largely attributed to the diversity of microbial community functions, metabolisms and interactions. Here, we firstly review different types of microbial interaction and describe their relevance for natural and engineered environmental processes. Next, we provide a general description of the essential methods of the SMN modeling workflow including the steps of network reconstruction, simulation through Flux Balance Analysis (FBA, experimental data gathering, and model calibration. Then we broadly describe and compare four approaches to model microbial interactions using metabolic networks, i.e. i lumped networks, ii compartment per guild networks, iii bi-level optimization simulations and iv dynamic-SMN methods. These approaches can be used to integrate and analyze diverse microbial physiology, ecology and molecular community data. All of them (except the lumped approach are suitable for incorporating species abundance data but so far they have been used only to model simple communities of two to eight different species. Interactions based on substrate exchange and competition can be directly modeled using the above approaches. However, interactions based on metabolic feedbacks, such as product inhibition and synthropy require extensions to current models, incorporating gene regulation and compounding accumulation mechanisms. SMN models of microbial

  10. Limitations of a metabolic network-based reverse ecology method for inferring host-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Aie, Kazuki

    2017-05-25

    Host-pathogen interactions are important in a wide range of research fields. Given the importance of metabolic crosstalk between hosts and pathogens, a metabolic network-based reverse ecology method was proposed to infer these interactions. However, the validity of this method remains unclear because of the various explanations presented and the influence of potentially confounding factors that have thus far been neglected. We re-evaluated the importance of the reverse ecology method for evaluating host-pathogen interactions while statistically controlling for confounding effects using oxygen requirement, genome, metabolic network, and phylogeny data. Our data analyses showed that host-pathogen interactions were more strongly influenced by genome size, primary network parameters (e.g., number of edges), oxygen requirement, and phylogeny than the reserve ecology-based measures. These results indicate the limitations of the reverse ecology method; however, they do not discount the importance of adopting reverse ecology approaches altogether. Rather, we highlight the need for developing more suitable methods for inferring host-pathogen interactions and conducting more careful examinations of the relationships between metabolic networks and host-pathogen interactions.

  11. Interactions between Gut Microbiota, Host Genetics and Diet Modulate the Predisposition to Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussar, Siegfried; Griffin, Nicholas W; Bezy, Olivier; Fujisaka, Shiho; Vienberg, Sara; Softic, Samir; Deng, Luxue; Bry, Lynn; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Kahn, C Ronald

    2015-09-01

    Obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome result from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors, including the gut microbiota. To dissect these interactions, we utilized three commonly used inbred strains of mice-obesity/diabetes-prone C57Bl/6J mice, obesity/diabetes-resistant 129S1/SvImJ from Jackson Laboratory, and obesity-prone but diabetes-resistant 129S6/SvEvTac from Taconic-plus three derivative lines generated by breeding these strains in a new, common environment. Analysis of metabolic parameters and gut microbiota in all strains and their environmentally normalized derivatives revealed strong interactions between microbiota, diet, breeding site, and metabolic phenotype. Strain-dependent and strain-independent correlations were found between specific microbiota and phenotypes, some of which could be transferred to germ-free recipient animals by fecal transplantation. Environmental reprogramming of microbiota resulted in 129S6/SvEvTac becoming obesity resistant. Thus, development of obesity/metabolic syndrome is the result of interactions between gut microbiota, host genetics, and diet. In permissive genetic backgrounds, environmental reprograming of microbiota can ameliorate development of metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Viruses Compensate for Microbial Metabolism in Virus-Host Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tianliang; Li, Hongyun; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2017-07-11

    Viruses are believed to be responsible for the mortality of host organisms. However, some recent investigations reveal that viruses may be essential for host survival. To date, it remains unclear whether viruses are beneficial or harmful to their hosts. To reveal the roles of viruses in the virus-host interactions, viromes and microbiomes of sediment samples from three deep-sea hydrothermal vents were explored in this study. To exclude the influence of exogenous DNAs on viromes, the virus particles were purified with nuclease (DNase I and RNase A) treatments and cesium chloride density gradient centrifugation. The metagenomic analysis of viromes without exogenous DNA contamination and microbiomes of vent samples indicated that viruses had compensation effects on the metabolisms of their host microorganisms. Viral genes not only participated in most of the microbial metabolic pathways but also formed branched pathways in microbial metabolisms, including pyrimidine metabolism; alanine, aspartate, and glutamate metabolism; nitrogen metabolism and assimilation pathways of the two-component system; selenocompound metabolism; aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis; and amino sugar and nucleotide sugar metabolism. As is well known, deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems exist in relatively isolated environments which are barely influenced by other ecosystems. The metabolic compensation of hosts mediated by viruses might represent a very important aspect of virus-host interactions. IMPORTANCE Viruses are the most abundant biological entities in the oceans and have very important roles in regulating microbial community structure and biogeochemical cycles. The relationship between virus and host microbes is broadly thought to be that of predator and prey. Viruses can lyse host cells to control microbial population sizes and affect community structures of hosts by killing specific microbes. However, viruses also influence their hosts through manipulation of bacterial metabolism. We found

  13. Visualization of Metabolic Interaction Networks in Microbial Communities Using VisANT 5.0.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R Granger

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of metabolic networks in microbial communities poses an unresolved visualization and interpretation challenge. We address this challenge in the newly expanded version of a software tool for the analysis of biological networks, VisANT 5.0. We focus in particular on facilitating the visual exploration of metabolic interaction between microbes in a community, e.g. as predicted by COMETS (Computation of Microbial Ecosystems in Time and Space, a dynamic stoichiometric modeling framework. Using VisANT's unique metagraph implementation, we show how one can use VisANT 5.0 to explore different time-dependent ecosystem-level metabolic networks. In particular, we analyze the metabolic interaction network between two bacteria previously shown to display an obligate cross-feeding interdependency. In addition, we illustrate how a putative minimal gut microbiome community could be represented in our framework, making it possible to highlight interactions across multiple coexisting species. We envisage that the "symbiotic layout" of VisANT can be employed as a general tool for the analysis of metabolism in complex microbial communities as well as heterogeneous human tissues. VisANT is freely available at: http://visant.bu.edu and COMETS at http://comets.bu.edu.

  14. Visualization of Metabolic Interaction Networks in Microbial Communities Using VisANT 5.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Brian R; Chang, Yi-Chien; Wang, Yan; DeLisi, Charles; Segrè, Daniel; Hu, Zhenjun

    2016-04-01

    The complexity of metabolic networks in microbial communities poses an unresolved visualization and interpretation challenge. We address this challenge in the newly expanded version of a software tool for the analysis of biological networks, VisANT 5.0. We focus in particular on facilitating the visual exploration of metabolic interaction between microbes in a community, e.g. as predicted by COMETS (Computation of Microbial Ecosystems in Time and Space), a dynamic stoichiometric modeling framework. Using VisANT's unique metagraph implementation, we show how one can use VisANT 5.0 to explore different time-dependent ecosystem-level metabolic networks. In particular, we analyze the metabolic interaction network between two bacteria previously shown to display an obligate cross-feeding interdependency. In addition, we illustrate how a putative minimal gut microbiome community could be represented in our framework, making it possible to highlight interactions across multiple coexisting species. We envisage that the "symbiotic layout" of VisANT can be employed as a general tool for the analysis of metabolism in complex microbial communities as well as heterogeneous human tissues. VisANT is freely available at: http://visant.bu.edu and COMETS at http://comets.bu.edu.

  15. GENOME-BASED MODELING AND DESIGN OF METABOLIC INTERACTIONS IN MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishnan Mahadevan

    2012-10-01

    With the advent of genome sequencing, omics technologies, bioinformatics and genome-scale modeling, researchers now have unprecedented capabilities to analyze and engineer the metabolism of microbial communities. The goal of this review is to summarize recent applications of genome-scale metabolic modeling to microbial communities. A brief introduction to lumped community models is used to motivate the need for genome-level descriptions of individual species and their metabolic interactions. The review of genome-scale models begins with static modeling approaches, which are appropriate for communities where the extracellular environment can be assumed to be time invariant or slowly varying. Dynamic extensions of the static modeling approach are described, and then applications of genome-scale models for design of synthetic microbial communities are reviewed. The review concludes with a summary of metagenomic tools for analyzing community metabolism and an outlook for future research.

  16. Interactions between prebiotics, probiotics, polyunsaturated fatty acids and polyphenols: diet or supplementation for metabolic syndrome prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Ilaria; Romanelli, Luca; Palmery, Maura

    2014-05-01

    The metabolic syndrome can be prevented by the Mediterranean diet, characterized by fiber, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and polyphenols. However, the composition of the Mediterranean diet, which can be viewed as a natural multiple supplement, is poorly controlled, and its beneficial effects poorly predictable. The metabolic syndrome is associated with intestinal dysbiosis and the gut microbioma seems to be the main target and player in the interactions occurring between probiotics, prebiotics, omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and polyphenols. From the reviewed evidence, it is reasonable to manage growth and metabolism of gut microflora with specific prebiotics and polyphenols. Even though the healthy properties of functional foods and nutraceuticals still need to be fully elucidated, available data suggest that well-designed supplements, containing the better ratio of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and antioxidants, specific probiotic strains, and selected polyphenols and prebiotics, could be useful in metabolic syndrome prevention and treatment.

  17. Apolipoproteins E and CIII interact to regulate HDL metabolism and coronary heart disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morton, Allyson M; Koch, Manja; Mendivil, Carlos O

    2018-01-01

    cholesterol transport, which may protect against atherosclerosis. ApoCIII on HDL strongly attenuates these metabolic actions of HDL apoE. In the epidemiological study, the relation between HDL apoE concentration and CHD significantly differed depending on whether apoCIII was present. HDL apoE was associated...... significantly with lower risk of CHD only in the HDL subspecies lacking apoCIII. CONCLUSIONS: ApoE and apoCIII on HDL interact to affect metabolism and CHD. ApoE promotes metabolic steps in reverse cholesterol transport and is associated with lower risk of CHD. ApoCIII, when coexisting with apoE on HDL......, abolishes these benefits. Therefore, differences in metabolism of HDL subspecies pertaining to reverse cholesterol transport are reflected in differences in association with CHD. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01399632. FUNDING: This work was supported by NIH grant R01HL095964 to FMS...

  18. Regulation of longevity by FGF21: Interaction between energy metabolism and stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Antero; Kaarniranta, Kai; Kauppinen, Anu

    2017-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a hormone-like member of FGF family which controls metabolic multiorgan crosstalk enhancing energy expenditure through glucose and lipid metabolism. In addition, FGF21 acts as a stress hormone induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress and dysfunctions of mitochondria and autophagy in several tissues. FGF21 also controls stress responses and metabolism by modulating the functions of somatotropic axis and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) pathway. FGF21 is a potent longevity factor coordinating interactions between energy metabolism and stress responses. Recent studies have revealed that FGF21 treatment can alleviate many age-related metabolic disorders, e.g. atherosclerosis, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and some cardiovascular diseases. In addition, transgenic mice overexpressing FGF21 have an extended lifespan. However, chronic metabolic and stress-related disorders involving inflammatory responses can provoke FGF21 resistance and thus disturb healthy aging process. First, we will describe the role of FGF21 in interorgan energy metabolism and explain how its functions as a stress hormone can improve healthspan. Next, we will examine both the induction of FGF21 expression via the integrated stress response and the molecular mechanism through which FGF21 enhances healthy aging. Finally, we postulate that FGF21 resistance, similarly to insulin resistance, jeopardizes human healthspan and accelerates the aging process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Metabonomics Approach to Assessing the Metabolism Variation and Endoexogenous Metabolic Interaction of Ginsenosides in Cold Stress Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihao; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jingcheng; Jia, Zhiying; Liu, Yumin; Xie, Xie; Wang, Chongchong; Jia, Wei

    2016-06-03

    Metabolic profiling technology, a massive information provider, has promoted the understanding of the metabolism of multicomponent medicines and its interactions with endogenous metabolites, which was previously a challenge in clarification. In this study, an untargeted GC/MS-based approach was employed to investigate the urinary metabolite profile in rats with oral administration of ginsenosides and the control group. Significant changes of urinary metabolites contents were observed in the total ginsenosides group, revealing the impact of ginsenosides as indicated by the up- or down-regulation of several pathways involving neurotransmitter-related metabolites, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, fatty acids β-oxidation, and intestinal microflora metabolites. Meanwhile, a targeted UPLC-QQQ/MS-based metabonomic approach was developed to investigate the changes of urinary ginsenoside metabolites during the process of acute cold stress. Metabolic analysis indicated that upstream ginsenosides (rg1, re, and rf) increased significantly, whereas downstream ginsenosides (ck, ppd, and ppt) decreased correspondingly after cold exposure. Finally, the relationships between ginsenosides and significantly changed metabolites were investigated by correlation analysis.

  20. Metabolic investigation of host/pathogen interaction using MS2-infected Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Rishi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA viruses are responsible for a variety of illnesses among people, including but not limited to the common cold, the flu, HIV, and ebola. Developing new drugs and new strategies for treating diseases caused by these viruses can be an expensive and time-consuming process. Mathematical modeling may be used to elucidate host-pathogen interactions and highlight potential targets for drug development, as well providing the basis for optimizing patient treatment strategies. The purpose of this work was to determine whether a genome-scale modeling approach could be used to understand how metabolism is impacted by the host-pathogen interaction during a viral infection. Escherichia coli/MS2 was used as the host-pathogen model system as MS2 is easy to work with, harmless to humans, but shares many features with eukaryotic viruses. In addition, the genome-scale metabolic model of E. coli is the most comprehensive model at this time. Results Employing a metabolic modeling strategy known as "flux balance analysis" coupled with experimental studies, we were able to predict how viral infection would alter bacterial metabolism. Based on our simulations, we predicted that cell growth and biosynthesis of the cell wall would be halted. Furthermore, we predicted a substantial increase in metabolic activity of the pentose phosphate pathway as a means to enhance viral biosynthesis, while a break down in the citric acid cycle was predicted. Also, no changes were predicted in the glycolytic pathway. Conclusions Through our approach, we have developed a technique of modeling virus-infected host metabolism and have investigated the metabolic effects of viral infection. These studies may provide insight into how to design better drugs. They also illustrate the potential of extending such metabolic analysis to higher order organisms, including humans.

  1. From metabolism to ecology: cross-feeding interactions shape the balance between polymicrobial conflict and mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela, Sylvie; Trisos, Christopher H; Brown, Sam P

    2012-11-01

    Polymicrobial interactions are widespread in nature and play a major role in maintaining human health and ecosystems. Whenever one organism uses metabolites produced by another organism as energy or nutrient sources, it is called cross-feeding. The ecological outcomes of cross-feeding interactions are poorly understood and potentially diverse: mutualism, competition, exploitation, or commensalism. A major reason for this uncertainty is the lack of theoretical approaches linking microbial metabolism to microbial ecology. To address this issue, we explore the dynamics of a one-way interspecific cross-feeding interaction in which food can be traded for a service (detoxification). Our results show that diverse ecological interactions (competition, mutualism, exploitation) can emerge from this simple cross-feeding interaction and can be predicted by the metabolic, demographic, and environmental parameters that govern the balance of the costs and benefits of association. In particular, our model predicts stronger mutualism for intermediate by-product toxicity because the resource-service exchange is constrained to the service being neither too vital (high toxicity impairs resource provision) nor dispensable (low toxicity reduces need for service). These results support the idea that bridging microbial ecology and metabolism is a critical step toward a better understanding of the factors governing the emergence and dynamics of polymicrobial interactions.

  2. Copper metabolism and its interactions with dietary iron, zinc, tin and selenium in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, S.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis describes various studies on copper metabolism and its interactions with selected dietary trace elements in rats. The rats were fed purified diets throughout. High intakes of iron or tin reduced copper concentrations in plasma, liver and kidneys. The dietary treatments also

  3. Metabolic drug interactions - the impact of prescribed drug regimens on the medication safety.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fialova, D.; Vrbensky, K.; Topinkova, E.; Vlcek, J.; Soerbye, L.W.; Wagner, C.; Bernabei, R.

    2005-01-01

    Background and objective: Risk/benefit profile of prescribed drug regimens is unkown. Over 60% of commonly used medications interact on metabolic pathways (cytochrom P450 (CYP450), uridyl-glucuronyl tranferasis (UGT I, II) and P-glycoprotein (PGP) transport). Using an up-to-date knowledge on

  4. The interaction between nutrition and metabolism in West African dwarf goats, infected with trypanosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van J.T.P.

    1996-01-01

    In a series of experiments the interaction between nutrition and energy- and nitrogen metabolism of West African Dwarf goats, infected with trypanosomes was studied. Animals were injected with trypanosomes, and feed intake, energy and nitrogen balance and blood metabolites and hormones were measured

  5. Integrative Metabolism: An Interactive Learning Tool for Nutrition, Biochemistry, and Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Gale

    2010-01-01

    Metabolism is a dynamic, simultaneous, and integrative science that cuts across nutrition, biochemistry, and physiology. Teaching this science can be a challenge. The use of a scenario-based, visually appealing, interactive, computer-animated CD may overcome the limitations of learning "one pathway at a time" and engage two- and…

  6. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are More Common in People With Type 1 Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Your Child's Weight Healthy Eating Endocrine System Blood Test: Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) Activity: Endocrine System Growth Disorders Diabetes Center Thyroid Disorders Your Endocrine System Movie: Endocrine ...

  7. Metabolomics Reveals Cryptic Interactive Effects of Species Interactions and Environmental Stress on Nitrogen and Sulfur Metabolism in Seagrass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Castorani, Max C. N.; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2016-01-01

    Eutrophication of estuaries and coastal seas is accelerating, increasing light stress on subtidal marine plants and changing their interactions with other species. To date, we have limited understanding of how such variations in environmental and biological stress modify the impact of interactions...... among foundational species and eventually affect ecosystem health. Here, we used metabolomics to assess the impact of light reductions on interactions between the seagrass Zostera marina, an important habitat-forming marine plant, and the abundant and commercially important blue mussel Mytilus edulis....... Plant performance varied with light availability but was unaffected by the presence of mussels. Metabolomic analysis, on the other hand, revealed an interaction between light availability and presence of M. edulis on seagrass metabolism. Under high light, mussels stimulated seagrass nitrogen and energy...

  8. Physiological and molecular implications of plant polyamine metabolism during biotic interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco Jiménez Bremont

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During ontogeny, plants interact with a wide variety of microorganisms. The association with mutualistic microbes results in benefits for the plant. By contrast, pathogens may cause a remarkable impairment of plant growth and development. Both types of plant-microbe interactions provoke notable changes in the polyamine (PA metabolism of the host and/or the microbe, being each interaction a complex and dynamic process. It has been well documented that the levels of free and conjugated PAs undergo profound changes in plant tissues during the interaction with microorganisms. In general, this is correlated with a precise and coordinated regulation of PA biosynthetic and catabolic enzymes. Interestingly, some evidence suggests that the relative importance of these metabolic pathways may depend on the nature of the microorganism, a concept that stems from the fact that these amines mediate the activation of plant defense mechanisms. This effect is mediated mostly through PA oxidation, even though part of the response is activated by non-oxidized PAs. In the last years, a great deal of effort has been devoted to profile plant gene expression following microorganism recognition. In addition, the phenotypes of transgenic and mutant plants in PA metabolism genes have been assessed. In this review, we integrated the current knowledge on this field and analyze the possible roles of these amines during the interaction of plants with microbes.

  9. Multidirectional vector pathways of vitamin D metabolism as modifiers of its interaction with drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.M. Nikolova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. The comorbid pathology characteristic of the elderly and senile people may lead to polypharmacy. The leading role in the metabolism of drugs is played by the cytochrome (CY P450 system. The use of vitamin D in geriatric patients is of particular importance taking into account their age-specific features of metabolism. The purpose of the review was to analyse the international contemporary information content on the interaction of vitamin D with the system of metabolism of the drugs. Materials and methods. Analysis of American and European scientific sources was performed. Results. More than 11,500 proteins of the CYP system are currently described. In the metabolism of medicines, the following six are involved: CYP1A2, CYP2C19, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, CYP3A4, which provide biotransformation of drugs through oxidation. CYP450 is a hemoprotein that provides binding of the substrate molecules with activation of oxygens, resulting in the formation of oxidation, a more hydrophilic product and water molecule. The insufficiency of hydroxylation capacity of the liver and kidneys can lead to D-hypovitaminosis in the body of patients. CYP11A1, СYР27А1, СYР27В1, СYР24А1 are responsible for vitamin D metabolism. Conducted studies have shown that these cytochromes metabolize a number of other drugs that can act as their inhibitors and inducers. Conclusions. The system of cytochrome P450 influences the formation of vitamin D metabolites. Taking into account the physiological ways of its metabolism, multidirectional results of interaction are formed.

  10. Probiotic modulation of symbiotic gut microbial–host metabolic interactions in a humanized microbiome mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Francois-Pierre J; Wang, Yulan; Sprenger, Norbert; Yap, Ivan K S; Lundstedt, Torbjörn; Lek, Per; Rezzi, Serge; Ramadan, Ziad; van Bladeren, Peter; Fay, Laurent B; Kochhar, Sunil; Lindon, John C; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2008-01-01

    The transgenomic metabolic effects of exposure to either Lactobacillus paracasei or Lactobacillus rhamnosus probiotics have been measured and mapped in humanized extended genome mice (germ-free mice colonized with human baby flora). Statistical analysis of the compartmental fluctuations in diverse metabolic compartments, including biofluids, tissue and cecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in relation to microbial population modulation generated a novel top-down systems biology view of the host response to probiotic intervention. Probiotic exposure exerted microbiome modification and resulted in altered hepatic lipid metabolism coupled with lowered plasma lipoprotein levels and apparent stimulated glycolysis. Probiotic treatments also altered a diverse range of pathways outcomes, including amino-acid metabolism, methylamines and SCFAs. The novel application of hierarchical-principal component analysis allowed visualization of multicompartmental transgenomic metabolic interactions that could also be resolved at the compartment and pathway level. These integrated system investigations demonstrate the potential of metabolic profiling as a top-down systems biology driver for investigating the mechanistic basis of probiotic action and the therapeutic surveillance of the gut microbial activity related to dietary supplementation of probiotics. PMID:18197175

  11. Carbohydrate metabolism during prolonged exercise and recovery: interactions between pyruvate dehydrogenase, fatty acids, and amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourtzakis, Marina; Saltin, B.; Graham, T.

    2006-01-01

    During prolonged exercise, carbohydrate oxidation may result from decreased pyruvate production and increased fatty acid supply and ultimately lead to reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity. Pyruvate also interacts with the amino acids alanine, glutamine, and glutamate, whereby the decline...... amino acid taken up during exercise and recovery. Alanine and glutamine were also associated...... with pyruvate metabolism, and they comprised 68% of total amino-acid release during exercise and recovery. Thus reduced pyruvate production was primarily associated with reduced carbohydrate oxidation, whereas the greatest production of pyruvate was related to glutamate, glutamine, and alanine metabolism...

  12. Obesity and Cancer Metabolism: A Perspective on Interacting Tumor-Intrinsic and Extrinsic Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerstling, Steven S; O'Flanagan, Ciara H; Hursting, Stephen D

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is associated with increased risk and poor prognosis of many types of cancers. Several obesity-related host factors involved in systemic metabolism can influence tumor initiation, progression, and/or response to therapy, and these have been implicated as key contributors to the complex effects of obesity on cancer incidence and outcomes. Such host factors include systemic metabolic regulators including insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1, adipokines, inflammation-related molecules, and steroid hormones, as well as the cellular and structural components of the tumor microenvironment, particularly adipose tissue. These secreted and structural host factors are extrinsic to, and interact with, the intrinsic metabolic characteristics of cancer cells to influence their growth and spread. This review will focus on the interplay of these tumor cell-intrinsic and extrinsic factors in the context of energy balance, with the objective of identifying new intervention targets for preventing obesity-associated cancer.

  13. Plant physiology meets phytopathology: plant primary metabolism and plant-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Susanne; Sinha, Alok K; Roitsch, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Phytopathogen infection leads to changes in secondary metabolism based on the induction of defence programmes as well as to changes in primary metabolism which affect growth and development of the plant. Therefore, pathogen attack causes crop yield losses even in interactions which do not end up with disease or death of the plant. While the regulation of defence responses has been intensively studied for decades, less is known about the effects of pathogen infection on primary metabolism. Recently, interest in this research area has been growing, and aspects of photosynthesis, assimilate partitioning, and source-sink regulation in different types of plant-pathogen interactions have been investigated. Similarly, phytopathological studies take into consideration the physiological status of the infected tissues to elucidate the fine-tuned infection mechanisms. The aim of this review is to give a summary of recent advances in the mutual interrelation between primary metabolism and pathogen infection, as well as to indicate current developments in non-invasive techniques and important strategies of combining modern molecular and physiological techniques with phytopathology for future investigations.

  14. Effects of Metabolic Cage Housing on Rat Behavior and Performance in the Social Interaction Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Alexandra L; Lymn, Kerry A; Howarth, Gordon S

    2016-01-01

    Although the metabolic cage is commonly used for housing nonhuman animals in the laboratory, it has been recognized as constituting a unique stressor. Such an environment would be expected to affect behavioral change in animals housed therein. However, few studies have specifically addressed the nature or magnitude of this change. The current study sought to characterize the behavioral time budget of rats in metabolic cage housing in comparison to that of individually housed animals in standard open-top cages. Rats in metabolic cages spent less time moving, manipulating enrichment, and carrying out rearing behaviors, and there was a corresponding shift toward inactivity. In an applied Social Interaction Test, behavioral scoring implied that metabolic cage housing had an anxiogenic effect. In conclusion, metabolic cage housing produces measurable effects on spontaneous and evoked behavior in rats in the laboratory. These behavioral changes may lead to a negative emotional state in these animals, which could have negative welfare consequences. Further research is needed to quantify the existence and magnitude of such an effect on rat well being.

  15. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lin), which signals cells to increase their anabolic activities. Metabolism is a complicated chemical process, so it's not ... how those enzymes or hormones work. When the metabolism of body chemicals is ... Hyperthyroidism (pronounced: hi-per-THIGH-roy-dih-zum). Hyperthyroidism ...

  16. Interactions between Gut Microbiota, Host Genetics and Diet Modulate the Predisposition to Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ussar, Siegfried; Griffin, Nicholas W.; Bezy, Olivier; Fujisaka, Shiho; Vienberg, Sara; Softic, Samir; Deng, Luxue; Bry, Lynn; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome result from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors, including the gut microbiota. To dissect these interactions, we utilized three commonly-used inbred strains of mice – obesity/diabetes-prone C57Bl/6J mice, obesity/diabetes-resistant 129S1/SvImJ, from Jackson Laboratory and obesity-prone, but diabetes resistant 129S6/SvEvTac from Taconic - plus three derivative lines generated by breeding these strains in a new, common environm...

  17. Reduced endothelial thioredoxin-interacting protein protects arteries from damage induced by metabolic stress in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedarida, Tatiana; Domingues, Alison; Baron, Stephanie; Ferreira, Chrystophe; Vibert, Francoise; Cottart, Charles-Henry; Paul, Jean-Louis; Escriou, Virginie; Bigey, Pascal; Gaussem, Pascale; Leguillier, Teddy; Nivet-Antoine, Valerie

    2018-06-01

    Although thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) is involved in a variety of biologic functions, the contribution of endothelial TXNIP has not been well defined. To investigate the endothelial function of TXNIP, we generated a TXNIP knockout mouse on the Cdh5-cre background (TXNIP fl/fl cdh5 cre ). Control (TXNIP fl/fl ) and TXNIP fl/fl cdh5 cre mice were fed a high protein-low carbohydrate (HP-LC) diet for 3 mo to induce metabolic stress. We found that TXNIP fl/fl and TXNIP fl/fl cdh5 cre mice on an HP-LC diet displayed impaired glucose tolerance and dyslipidemia concretizing the metabolic stress induced. We evaluated the impact of this metabolic stress on mice with reduced endothelial TXNIP expression with regard to arterial structure and function. TXNIP fl/fl cdh5 cre mice on an HP-LC diet exhibited less endothelial dysfunction than littermate mice on an HP-LC diet. These mice were protected from decreased aortic medial cell content, impaired aortic distensibility, and increased plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 secretion. This protective effect came with lower oxidative stress and lower inflammation, with a reduced NLRP3 inflammasome expression, leading to a decrease in cleaved IL-1β. We also show the major role of TXNIP in inflammation with a knockdown model, using a TXNIP-specific, small interfering RNA included in a lipoplex. These findings demonstrate a key role for endothelial TXNIP in arterial impairments induced by metabolic stress, making endothelial TXNIP a potential therapeutic target.-Bedarida, T., Domingues, A., Baron, S., Ferreira, C., Vibert, F., Cottart, C.-H., Paul, J.-L., Escriou, V., Bigey, P., Gaussem, P., Leguillier, T., Nivet-Antoine, V. Reduced endothelial thioredoxin-interacting protein protects arteries from damage induced by metabolic stress in vivo.

  18. Genome-based Modeling and Design of Metabolic Interactions in Microbial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Henson, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Biotechnology research is traditionally focused on individual microbial strains that are perceived to have the necessary metabolic functions, or the capability to have these functions introduced, to achieve a particular task. For many important applications, the development of such omnipotent microbes is an extremely challenging if not impossible task. By contrast, nature employs a radically different strategy based on synergistic combinations of different microbial species that collectively achieve the desired task. These natural communities have evolved to exploit the native metabolic capabilities of each species and are highly adaptive to changes in their environments. However, microbial communities have proven difficult to study due to a lack of suitable experimental and computational tools. With the advent of genome sequencing, omics technologies, bioinformatics and genome-scale modeling, researchers now have unprecedented capabilities to analyze and engineer the metabolism of microbial communities. The goal of this review is to summarize recent applications of genome-scale metabolic modeling to microbial communities. A brief introduction to lumped community models is used to motivate the need for genome-level descriptions of individual species and their metabolic interactions. The review of genome-scale models begins with static modeling approaches, which are appropriate for communities where the extracellular environment can be assumed to be time invariant or slowly varying. Dynamic extensions of the static modeling approach are described, and then applications of genome-scale models for design of synthetic microbial communities are reviewed. The review concludes with a summary of metagenomic tools for analyzing community metabolism and an outlook for future research.

  19. Genome-centric resolution of microbial diversity, metabolism and interactions in anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanwonterghem, Inka; Jensen, Paul D; Rabaey, Korneel; Tyson, Gene W

    2016-09-01

    Our understanding of the complex interconnected processes performed by microbial communities is hindered by our inability to culture the vast majority of microorganisms. Metagenomics provides a way to bypass this cultivation bottleneck and recent advances in this field now allow us to recover a growing number of genomes representing previously uncultured populations from increasingly complex environments. In this study, a temporal genome-centric metagenomic analysis was performed of lab-scale anaerobic digesters that host complex microbial communities fulfilling a series of interlinked metabolic processes to enable the conversion of cellulose to methane. In total, 101 population genomes that were moderate to near-complete were recovered based primarily on differential coverage binning. These populations span 19 phyla, represent mostly novel species and expand the genomic coverage of several rare phyla. Classification into functional guilds based on their metabolic potential revealed metabolic networks with a high level of functional redundancy as well as niche specialization, and allowed us to identify potential roles such as hydrolytic specialists for several rare, uncultured populations. Genome-centric analyses of complex microbial communities across diverse environments provide the key to understanding the phylogenetic and metabolic diversity of these interactive communities. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Investigating host-pathogen behavior and their interaction using genome-scale metabolic network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukhan, Priyanka P; Raghunathan, Anu

    2014-01-01

    Genome Scale Metabolic Modeling methods represent one way to compute whole cell function starting from the genome sequence of an organism and contribute towards understanding and predicting the genotype-phenotype relationship. About 80 models spanning all the kingdoms of life from archaea to eukaryotes have been built till date and used to interrogate cell phenotype under varying conditions. These models have been used to not only understand the flux distribution in evolutionary conserved pathways like glycolysis and the Krebs cycle but also in applications ranging from value added product formation in Escherichia coli to predicting inborn errors of Homo sapiens metabolism. This chapter describes a protocol that delineates the process of genome scale metabolic modeling for analysing host-pathogen behavior and interaction using flux balance analysis (FBA). The steps discussed in the process include (1) reconstruction of a metabolic network from the genome sequence, (2) its representation in a precise mathematical framework, (3) its translation to a model, and (4) the analysis using linear algebra and optimization. The methods for biological interpretations of computed cell phenotypes in the context of individual host and pathogen models and their integration are also discussed.

  1. Responsive eLearning exercises to enhance student interaction with metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, William J; Dreaver-Charles, Kristine

    2018-05-01

    Successful learning of biochemistry requires students to engage with the material. In the past this often involved students writing out pathways by hand, and more recently directing students to online resources such as videos, songs, and animated slide presentations. However, even these latter resources do not really provide students an opportunity to engage with the material in an active fashion. As part of an online introductory metabolism course that was developed at our university, we created a series of twelve online interactive activities using Adobe Captivate 9. These activities targeted glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, the pentose phosphate pathway, glycogen metabolism, the citric acid cycle, and fatty acid oxidation. The interactive exercises consisted of two types. One involved dragging objects such as names of enzymes or allosteric modifiers to their correct drop locations such as a particular point in a metabolic pathway, a specific enzyme, and so forth. A second type involved clicking on objects, locations within a pathway, and so forth, in response to a particular question. In both types of exercises, students received feedback on their decisions in order to enhance learning. The student feedback received on these activities was very positive, and indicated that they found them to increase their confidence in the material and that they had learned the key principles of each pathway. © 2018 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 46(3):223-229, 2018. © 2018 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  2. Developmental programming: interaction between prenatal BPA exposure and postnatal adiposity on metabolic variables in female sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-Lopez, Almudena; Moeller, Jacob; Sreedharan, Rohit; Singer, Kanakadurga; Lumeng, Carey; Ye, Wen; Pease, Anthony; Padmanabhan, Vasantha

    2016-02-01

    Among potential contributors for the increased incidence of metabolic diseases is the developmental exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals such as bisphenol A (BPA). BPA is an estrogenic chemical used in a variety of consumer products. Evidence points to interactions of BPA with the prevailing environment. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of prenatal exposure to BPA on postnatal metabolic outcomes, including insulin resistance, adipose tissue distribution, adipocyte morphometry, and expression of inflammatory markers in adipose tissue as well as to assess whether postnatal overfeeding would exacerbate these effects. Findings indicate that prenatal BPA exposure leads to insulin resistance in adulthood in the first breeder cohort (study 1), but not in the second cohort (study 2), which is suggestive of potential differences in genetic susceptibility. BPA exposure induced adipocyte hypertrophy in the visceral fat depot without an accompanying increase in visceral fat mass or increased CD68, a marker of macrophage infiltration, in the subcutaneous fat depot. Cohens effect size analysis found the ratio of visceral to subcutaneous fat depot in the prenatal BPA-treated overfed group to be higher compared with the control-overfed group. Altogether, these results suggest that exposure to BPA during fetal life at levels found in humans can program metabolic outcomes that lead to insulin resistance, a forerunner of type 2 diabetes, with postnatal obesity failing to manifest any interaction with prenatal BPA relative to insulin resistance and adipocyte hypertrophy. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. MCT expression and lactate influx/efflux in tanycytes involved in glia-neuron metabolic interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Cortés-Campos

    Full Text Available Metabolic interaction via lactate between glial cells and neurons has been proposed as one of the mechanisms involved in hypothalamic glucosensing. We have postulated that hypothalamic glial cells, also known as tanycytes, produce lactate by glycolytic metabolism of glucose. Transfer of lactate to neighboring neurons stimulates ATP synthesis and thus contributes to their activation. Because destruction of third ventricle (III-V tanycytes is sufficient to alter blood glucose levels and food intake in rats, it is hypothesized that tanycytes are involved in the hypothalamic glucose sensing mechanism. Here, we demonstrate the presence and function of monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs in tanycytes. Specifically, MCT1 and MCT4 expression as well as their distribution were analyzed in Sprague Dawley rat brain, and we demonstrate that both transporters are expressed in tanycytes. Using primary tanycyte cultures, kinetic analyses and sensitivity to inhibitors were undertaken to confirm that MCT1 and MCT4 were functional for lactate influx. Additionally, physiological concentrations of glucose induced lactate efflux in cultured tanycytes, which was inhibited by classical MCT inhibitors. Because the expression of both MCT1 and MCT4 has been linked to lactate efflux, we propose that tanycytes participate in glucose sensing based on a metabolic interaction with neurons of the arcuate nucleus, which are stimulated by lactate released from MCT1 and MCT4-expressing tanycytes.

  4. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography-mass spectrometry for anionic metabolic profiling of urine from antibiotic-treated rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Miranda G M; Swann, Jonathan R; Wilson, Ian D; Somsen, Govert W; de Jong, Gerhardus J

    Hydrophilic interaction chromatography-mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS) was used for anionic metabolic profiling of urine from antibiotic-treated rats to study microbial-host co-metabolism. Rats were treated with the antibiotics penicillin G and streptomycin sulfate for four or eight days and compared

  5. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography-mass spectrometry for anionic metabolic profiling of urine from antibiotic-treated rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Miranda G M; Swann, Jonathan R.; Wilson, Ian D.; Somsen, Govert W.; de Jong, Gerhardus J.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophilic interaction chromatography-mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS) was used for anionic metabolic profiling of urine from antibiotic-treated rats to study microbial-host co-metabolism. Rats were treated with the antibiotics penicillin G and streptomycin sulfate for four or eight days and compared

  6. Recent developments in systems biology and metabolic engineering of plant microbe interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms play a crucial role in the sustainability of the various ecosystems. The characterization of various interactions between microorganisms and other biotic factors is a necessary footstep to understand the association and functions of microbial communities. Among the different microbial interactions in an ecosystem, plant-microbe interaction plays an important role to balance the ecosystem. The present review explores plant microbe interactions using gene editing and system biology tools towards the comprehension in improvement of plant traits. Further, system biology tools like FBA, OptKnock and constrain based modeling helps in understanding such interactions as a whole. In addition, various gene editing tools have been summarized and a strategy has been hypothesized for the development of disease free plants. Furthermore, we have tried to summarize the predictions through data retrieved from various types of sources such as high throughput sequencing data (e.g. single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP detection, RNA-seq, proteomics and metabolic models have been reconstructed from such sequences for species communities. It is well known fact that systems biology approaches and modeling of biological networks will enable us to learn the insight of such network and will also help further in understanding these interactions.

  7. Gene-Gene Interactions in the Folate Metabolic Pathway and the Risk of Conotruncal Heart Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J. Lupo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Conotruncal and related heart defects (CTRD are common, complex malformations. Although there are few established risk factors, there is evidence that genetic variation in the folate metabolic pathway influences CTRD risk. This study was undertaken to assess the association between inherited (i.e., case and maternal gene-gene interactions in this pathway and the risk of CTRD. Case-parent triads (n=727, ascertained from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, were genotyped for ten functional variants of nine folate metabolic genes. Analyses of inherited genotypes were consistent with the previously reported association between MTHFR A1298C and CTRD (adjusted P=.02, but provided no evidence that CTRD was associated with inherited gene-gene interactions. Analyses of the maternal genotypes provided evidence of a MTHFR C677T/CBS 844ins68 interaction and CTRD risk (unadjusted P=.02. This association is consistent with the effects of this genotype combination on folate-homocysteine biochemistry but remains to be confirmed in independent study populations.

  8. Metabolic syndrome enhances endoplasmic reticulum, oxidative stress and leukocyte-endothelium interactions in PCOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuls, Celia; Rovira-Llopis, Susana; Martinez de Marañon, Aranzazu; Veses, Silvia; Jover, Ana; Gomez, Marcelino; Rocha, Milagros; Hernandez-Mijares, Antonio; Victor, Victor M

    2017-06-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with insulin resistance, which can lead to metabolic syndrome (MetS). Oxidative stress and leukocyte-endothelium interactions are related to PCOS. Our aim was to evaluate whether the presence of MetS in PCOS patients can influence endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress and leukocyte-endothelium interactions. This was a prospective controlled study conducted in an academic medical center. The study population consisted of 148 PCOS women (116 without/32 with MetS) and 112 control subjects (87 without / 25 with MetS). Metabolic parameters, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, ER stress markers (GRP78, sXBP1, ATF6), leukocyte-endothelium interactions, adhesion molecules (VCAM-1, ICAM-1, E-Selectin), TNF-α and IL-6 were determined. Total ROS, inflammatory parameters and adhesion molecules were enhanced in the presence of MetS (pPCOS+MetS group showed higher levels of IL-6 and ICAM-1 than controls (pPCOS and PCOS+MetS groups vs their respective controls (pPCOS groups (pPCOS+MetS patients exhibited higher GRP78 and ATF6 levels than controls and PCOS patients without MetS (pPCOS women, HOMA-IR was positively correlated with ICAM-1 (r=0.501; pPCOS, all of which are related to vascular complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The metabolic and ecological interactions of oxalate-degrading bacteria in the Mammalian gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Aaron W; Dearing, Denise

    2013-12-06

    Oxalate-degrading bacteria comprise a functional group of microorganisms, commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract of mammals. Oxalate is a plant secondary compound (PSC) widely produced by all major taxa of plants and as a terminal metabolite by the mammalian liver. As a toxin, oxalate can have a significant impact on the health of mammals, including humans. Mammals do not have the enzymes required to metabolize oxalate and rely on their gut microbiota for this function. Thus, significant metabolic interactions between the mammalian host and a complex gut microbiota maintain the balance of oxalate in the body. Over a dozen species of gut bacteria are now known to degrade oxalate. This review focuses on the host-microbe and microbe-microbe interactions that regulate the degradation of oxalate by the gut microbiota. We discuss the pathways of oxalate throughout the body and the mammalian gut as a series of differentiated ecosystems that facilitate oxalate degradation. We also explore the mechanisms and functions of microbial oxalate degradation along with the implications for the ecological and evolutionary interactions within the microbiota and for mammalian hosts. Throughout, we consider questions that remain, as well as recent technological advances that can be employed to answer them.

  10. [Interaction between CYP450 enzymes and metabolism of traditional Chinese medicine as well as enzyme activity assay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tu-lin; Su, Lian-lin; Ji, De; Gu, Wei; Mao, Chun-qin

    2015-09-01

    Drugs are exogenous compounds for human bodies, and will be metabolized by many enzymes after administration. CYP450 enzyme, as a major metabolic enzyme, is an important phase I drug metabolizing enzyme. In human bodies, about 75% of drug metabolism is conducted by CYP450 enzymes, and CYP450 enzymes is the key factor for drug interactions between traditional Chinese medicine( TCM) -TCM, TCM-medicine and other drug combination. In order to make clear the interaction between metabolic enzymes and TCM metabolism, we generally chose the enzymatic activity as an evaluation index. That is to say, the enhancement or reduction of CYP450 enzyme activity was used to infer the inducing or inhibitory effect of active ingredients and extracts of traditional Chinese medicine on enzymes. At present, the common method for measuring metabolic enzyme activity is Cocktail probe drugs, and it is the key to select the suitable probe substrates. This is of great significance for study drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) process in organisms. The study focuses on the interaction between TCMs, active ingredients, herbal extracts, cocktail probe substrates as well as CYP450 enzymes, in order to guide future studies.

  11. Coordinated and interactive expression of genes of lipid metabolism and inflammation in adipose tissue and liver during metabolic overload.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Liang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic metabolic overload results in lipid accumulation and subsequent inflammation in white adipose tissue (WAT, often accompanied by non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. In response to metabolic overload, the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism and inflammatory processes is adapted. However, it still remains unknown how these adaptations in gene expression in expanding WAT and liver are orchestrated and whether they are interrelated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ApoE*3Leiden mice were fed HFD or chow for different periods up to 12 weeks. Gene expression in WAT and liver over time was evaluated by micro-array analysis. WAT hypertrophy and inflammation were analyzed histologically. Bayesian hierarchical cluster analysis of dynamic WAT gene expression identified groups of genes ('clusters' with comparable expression patterns over time. HFD evoked an immediate response of five clusters of 'lipid metabolism' genes in WAT, which did not further change thereafter. At a later time point (>6 weeks, inflammatory clusters were induced. Promoter analysis of clustered genes resulted in specific key regulators which may orchestrate the metabolic and inflammatory responses in WAT. Some master regulators played a dual role in control of metabolism and inflammation. When WAT inflammation developed (>6 weeks, genes of lipid metabolism and inflammation were also affected in corresponding livers. These hepatic gene expression changes and the underlying transcriptional responses in particular, were remarkably similar to those detected in WAT. CONCLUSION: In WAT, metabolic overload induced an immediate, stable response on clusters of lipid metabolism genes and induced inflammatory genes later in time. Both processes may be controlled and interlinked by specific transcriptional regulators. When WAT inflammation began, the hepatic response to HFD resembled that in WAT. In all, WAT and liver respond to metabolic overload by

  12. Case-only study of interactions between metabolic enzymes and smoking in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Chunhong; Jin, Mingjuan; Chen, Kun; Zhang, Yongjing; Zhang, Shuangshuang; Liu, Bing

    2007-01-01

    Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions involved in the metabolism of carcinogens may increase the risk of cancer. Our objective was to measure the interactions between common polymorphisms of P450 (CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2E1), GSTM1 and T1, SULT1A1 and cigarette smoking in colorectal cancer (CRC). A case-only design was conducted in a Chinese population including 207 patients with sporadic CRC. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was performed adjusting for age, gender, alcohol consumption, and cigarette smoking. The interaction odds ratio (COR) for the gene-gene interaction between CYP1B1 1294G and SULT1A1 638A allele was 2.68 (95% CI: 1.16–6.26). The results of the gene-environment analyses revealed that an interaction existed between cigarette smoking and the CYP1B1 1294G allele for CRC (COR = 2.62, 95%CI: 1.01–6.72), the COR for the interaction of CYP1B1 1294G and smoking history > 35 pack-years was 3.47 (95%CI: 1.12–10.80). No other significant gene-gene and gene-environment interactions were observed. Our results showed that the interaction between polymorphisms in CYP1B1 1294G and SULT1A1*2 may play a significant role on CRC in the Chinese population. Also, it is suggested that the association between cigarette smoking and CRC could be differentiated by the CYP1B1 1294G allele

  13. Glucose metabolism and astrocyte-neuron interactions in the neonatal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekke, Eva; Morken, Tora Sund; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Glucose is essentially the sole fuel for the adult brain and the mapping of its metabolism has been extensive in the adult but not in the neonatal brain, which is believed to rely mainly on ketone bodies for energy supply. However, glucose is absolutely indispensable for normal development and recent studies have shed light on glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway and metabolic interactions between astrocytes and neurons in the 7-day-old rat brain. Appropriately (13)C labeled glucose was used to distinguish between glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway during development. Experiments using (13)C labeled acetate provided insight into the GABA-glutamate-glutamine cycle between astrocytes and neurons. It could be shown that in the neonatal brain the part of this cycle that transfers glutamine from astrocytes to neurons is operating efficiently while, in contrast, little glutamate is shuttled from neurons to astrocytes. This lack of glutamate for glutamine synthesis is compensated for by anaplerosis via increased pyruvate carboxylation relative to that in the adult brain. Furthermore, compared to adults, relatively more glucose is prioritized to the pentose phosphate pathway than glycolysis and pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. The reported developmental differences in glucose metabolism and neurotransmitter synthesis may determine the ability of the brain at various ages to resist excitotoxic insults such as hypoxia-ischemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic dissection in a mouse model reveals interactions between carotenoids and lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palczewski, Grzegorz; Widjaja-Adhi, M Airanthi K; Amengual, Jaume; Golczak, Marcin; von Lintig, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Carotenoids affect a rich variety of physiological functions in nature and are beneficial for human health. However, knowledge about their biological action and the consequences of their dietary accumulation in mammals is limited. Progress in this research field is limited by the expeditious metabolism of carotenoids in rodents and the confounding production of apocarotenoid signaling molecules. Herein, we established a mouse model lacking the enzymes responsible for carotenoid catabolism and apocarotenoid production, fed on either a β-carotene- or a zeaxanthin-enriched diet. Applying a genome wide microarray analysis, we assessed the effects of the parent carotenoids on the liver transcriptome. Our analysis documented changes in pathways for liver lipid metabolism and mitochondrial respiration. We biochemically defined these effects, and observed that β-carotene accumulation resulted in an elevation of liver triglycerides and liver cholesterol, while zeaxanthin accumulation increased serum cholesterol levels. We further show that carotenoids were predominantly transported within HDL particles in the serum of mice. Finally, we provide evidence that carotenoid accumulation influenced whole-body respiration and energy expenditure. Thus, we observed that accumulation of parent carotenoids interacts with lipid metabolism and that structurally related carotenoids display distinct biological functions in mammals. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Metabolic syndrome, diabetes and atherosclerosis: Influence of gene-environment interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2009-01-01

    Despite remarkable progress in diagnosis and understanding of risk factors, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world's developed countries. The metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors (visceral obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, and hypertension), is increasingly being recognized as a new risk factor for type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Nevertheless, there is wide variation in both the occurrence of disease and age of onset, even in individuals who display very similar risk profiles. There is now compelling evidence that a complex interplay between genetic determinants and environmental factors (still largely unknown) is the reason for this large inter-individual variation in disease susceptibility. The purpose of the present review is to describe the current status of our knowledge concerning the gene-environment interactions potentially implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. It focuses predominantly on studies of genes (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, alcohol dehydrogenase type 1C, apolipoprotein E, glutathione S-transferases T1 and M1) that are known to be modified by dietary and lifestyle habits (fat diet, intake of alcohol and smoking habit). It also describes the limited current understanding of the role of genetic variants of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and their interactions with environmental toxicants. Additional studies are needed in order to clarify whether inter-individual differences in detoxification of environmental toxicants may have an essential role in the development of CVD and contribute to the emerging field of 'environmental cardiology'. Such knowledge may be particularly relevant for improving cardiovascular risk stratification and conceiving the development of 'personalized intervention program'.

  16. Metabolic syndrome, diabetes and atherosclerosis: Influence of gene-environment interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassi, Maria Grazia, E-mail: andreas@ifc.cnr.it [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, G. Pasquinucci Hospital, Via Aurelia Sud, Massa (Italy)

    2009-07-10

    Despite remarkable progress in diagnosis and understanding of risk factors, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world's developed countries. The metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors (visceral obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, and hypertension), is increasingly being recognized as a new risk factor for type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Nevertheless, there is wide variation in both the occurrence of disease and age of onset, even in individuals who display very similar risk profiles. There is now compelling evidence that a complex interplay between genetic determinants and environmental factors (still largely unknown) is the reason for this large inter-individual variation in disease susceptibility. The purpose of the present review is to describe the current status of our knowledge concerning the gene-environment interactions potentially implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. It focuses predominantly on studies of genes (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, alcohol dehydrogenase type 1C, apolipoprotein E, glutathione S-transferases T1 and M1) that are known to be modified by dietary and lifestyle habits (fat diet, intake of alcohol and smoking habit). It also describes the limited current understanding of the role of genetic variants of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and their interactions with environmental toxicants. Additional studies are needed in order to clarify whether inter-individual differences in detoxification of environmental toxicants may have an essential role in the development of CVD and contribute to the emerging field of 'environmental cardiology'. Such knowledge may be particularly relevant for improving cardiovascular risk stratification and conceiving the development of 'personalized intervention program'.

  17. Gene-diet-interactions in folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism modify colon cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Amy Y; Scherer, Dominique; Poole, Elizabeth; Potter, John D; Curtin, Karen; Makar, Karen; Slattery, Martha L; Caan, Bette J; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2013-04-01

    The importance of folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism (FOCM) in colorectal carcinogenesis is emphasized by observations that high dietary folate intake is associated with decreased risk of colon cancer (CC) and its precursors. Additionally, polymorphisms in FOCM-related genes have been repeatedly associated with risk, supporting a causal relationship between folate and colorectal carcinogenesis. We investigated ten candidate polymorphisms with defined or probable functional impact in eight FOCM-related genes (SHMT1, DHFR, DNMT1, MTHFD1, MTHFR, MTRR, TCN2, and TDG) in 1609 CC cases and 1974 controls for association with CC risk and for interaction with dietary factors. No polymorphism was statistically significantly associated with overall risk of CC. However, statistically significant interactions modifying CC risk were observed for DNMT1 I311V with dietary folate, methionine, vitamin B2 , and vitamin B12 intake and for MTRR I22M with dietary folate, a predefined one-carbon dietary pattern, and vitamin B6 intake. We observed statistically significant gene-diet interactions with five additional polymorphisms. Our results provide evidence that FOCM-related dietary intakes modify the association between CC risk and FOCM allelic variants. These findings add to observations showing that folate-related gene-nutrient interactions play an important role in modifying the risk of CC. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Computational Flux Balance Analysis Predicts that Stimulation of Energy Metabolism in Astrocytes and their Metabolic Interactions with Neurons Depend on Uptake of K+ Rather than Glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNuzzo, Mauro; Giove, Federico; Maraviglia, Bruno; Mangia, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Brain activity involves essential functional and metabolic interactions between neurons and astrocytes. The importance of astrocytic functions to neuronal signaling is supported by many experiments reporting high rates of energy consumption and oxidative metabolism in these glial cells. In the brain, almost all energy is consumed by the Na + /K + ATPase, which hydrolyzes 1 ATP to move 3 Na + outside and 2 K + inside the cells. Astrocytes are commonly thought to be primarily involved in transmitter glutamate cycling, a mechanism that however only accounts for few % of brain energy utilization. In order to examine the participation of astrocytic energy metabolism in brain ion homeostasis, here we attempted to devise a simple stoichiometric relation linking glutamatergic neurotransmission to Na + and K + ionic currents. To this end, we took into account ion pumps and voltage/ligand-gated channels using the stoichiometry derived from available energy budget for neocortical signaling and incorporated this stoichiometric relation into a computational metabolic model of neuron-astrocyte interactions. We aimed at reproducing the experimental observations about rates of metabolic pathways obtained by 13 C-NMR spectroscopy in rodent brain. When simulated data matched experiments as well as biophysical calculations, the stoichiometry for voltage/ligand-gated Na + and K + fluxes generated by neuronal activity was close to a 1:1 relationship, and specifically 63/58 Na + /K + ions per glutamate released. We found that astrocytes are stimulated by the extracellular K + exiting neurons in excess of the 3/2 Na + /K + ratio underlying Na + /K + ATPase-catalyzed reaction. Analysis of correlations between neuronal and astrocytic processes indicated that astrocytic K + uptake, but not astrocytic Na + -coupled glutamate uptake, is instrumental for the establishment of neuron-astrocytic metabolic partnership. Our results emphasize the importance of K + in stimulating the activation of

  19. Diet-gene interactions between dietary fat intake and common polymorphisms in determining lipid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corella, Dolores

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Current dietary guidelines for fat intake have not taken into consideration the possible genetic differences underlying the individual variability in responsiveness to dietary components. Genetic variability has been identified in humans for all the known lipid metabolim-related genes resulting in a plethora of candidate genes and genetic variants to examine in diet-gene interaction studies focused on fat consumption. Some examples of fat-gene interaction are reviewed. These include: the interaction between total intake and the 514C/T in the hepatic lipase gene promoter in determining high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C metabolism; the interaction between polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA and the 75G/A polymorphism in the APOA1 gene plasma HDL-C concentrations; the interaction between PUFA and the L162V polymorphism in the PPARA gene in determining triglycerides and APOC3 concentrations; and the interaction between PUFA intake and the 1131TC in the APOA5 gene in determining triglyceride metabolism. Although hundreds of diet-gene interaction studies in lipid metabolism have been published, the level of evidence to make specific nutritional recommendations to the population is still low and more research in nutrigenetics has to be undertaken.Las recomendaciones dietéticas actuales referentes al consumo de grasas en la dieta han sido realizadas sin tener en cuenta las posibles diferencias genéticas de las personas que podrían ser las responsables de las diferentes respuestas interindividuales que frecuentemente se observan ante la misma dieta. La presencia de variabilidad genética ha sido puesta de manifiesto para todos los genes relacionados con el metabolismo lipídico, por lo que existe un ingente número de genes y de variantes genéticas para ser incluidas en los estudios sobre interacciones dieta-genotipo en el ámbito específico del consumo de grasas y aceites. Se revisarán algunos ejemplos sobre interacciones grasa

  20. Neuron-astrocyte interaction enhance GABAergic synaptic transmission in a manner dependent on key metabolic enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław eKaczor

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain and mechanisms of GABAergic inhibition have been intensely investigated in the past decades. Recent studies provided evidence for an important role of astrocytes in shaping GABAergic currents. One of the most obvious, but yet poorly understood, mechanisms of the cross-talk between GABAergic currents and astrocytes is metabolism including neurotransmitter homeostasis. In particular, how modulation of GABAergic currents by astrocytes depends on key enzymes involved in cellular metabolism remains largely unknown. To address this issue, we have considered two simple models of neuronal cultures: nominally astrocyte-free neuronal culture (NC and neuronal-astrocytic co-cultures (ANCC and miniature Inhibitory Postsynaptic Currents (mIPSCs were recorded in control conditions and in the presence of respective enzyme blockers. We report that enrichment of neuronal culture with astrocytes results in a marked increase in mIPSC frequency. This enhancement of GABAergic activity was accompanied by increased number of GAD65 and vGAT puncta, indicating that at least a part of the frequency enhancement was due to increased number of synaptic contacts. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase (with MSO strongly reduced mIPSC frequency in ANCC but had no effect in NC. Moreover, treatment of ANCC with inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase (BAYU6751 or with selective inhibitor of astrocytic Krebs cycle,fluoroacetate, resulted in a marked reduction of mIPSC frequency in ANCC having no effect in NC. We conclude that GABAergic synaptic transmission strongly depends on neuron-astrocyte interaction in a manner dependent on key metabolic enzymes as well as on the Krebs cycle.

  1. Diet-Gene Interactions and PUFA Metabolism: A Potential Contributor to Health Disparities and Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floyd H. Chilton

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The “modern western” diet (MWD has increased the onset and progression of chronic human diseases as qualitatively and quantitatively maladaptive dietary components give rise to obesity and destructive gene-diet interactions. There has been a three-fold increase in dietary levels of the omega-6 (n-6 18 carbon (C18, polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6, with the addition of cooking oils and processed foods to the MWD. Intense debate has emerged regarding the impact of this increase on human health. Recent studies have uncovered population-related genetic variation in the LCPUFA biosynthetic pathway (especially within the fatty acid desaturase gene (FADS cluster that is associated with levels of circulating and tissue PUFAs and several biomarkers and clinical endpoints of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Importantly, populations of African descent have higher frequencies of variants associated with elevated levels of arachidonic acid (ARA, CVD biomarkers and disease endpoints. Additionally, nutrigenomic interactions between dietary n-6 PUFAs and variants in genes that encode for enzymes that mobilize and metabolize ARA to eicosanoids have been identified. These observations raise important questions of whether gene-PUFA interactions are differentially driving the risk of cardiovascular and other diseases in diverse populations, and contributing to health disparities, especially in African American populations.

  2. Effect of fatty acid interaction on myoglobin oxygen affinity and triglyceride metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jue, Thomas; Simond, Gregory; Wright, Traver J; Shih, Lifan; Chung, Youngran; Sriram, Renuka; Kreutzer, Ulrike; Davis, Randall W

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested myoglobin (Mb) may have other cellular functions in addition to storing and transporting O 2 . Indeed, NMR experiments have shown that the saturated fatty acid (FA) palmitate (PA) can interact with myoglobin (Mb) in its ligated state (MbCO and MbCN) but does not interact with Mb in its deoxygenated state. The observation has led to the hypothesis that Mb can also serve as a fatty acid transporter. The present study further investigates fatty acid interaction with the physiological states of Mb using the more soluble but unsaturated fatty acid, oleic acid (OA). OA binds to MbCO but does not bind to deoxy Mb. OA binding to Mb, however, does not alter its O 2 affinity. Without any Mb, muscle has a significantly lower level of triglyceride (TG). In Mb knock-out (MbKO) mice, both heart and skeletal muscles have lower level of TG relative to the control mice. Training further decreases the relative TG in the MbKO skeletal muscle. Nevertheless, the absence of Mb and lower TG level in muscle does not impair the MbKO mouse performance as evidenced by voluntary wheel running measurements. The results support the hypothesis of a complex physiological role for Mb, especially with respect to fatty acid metabolism.

  3. Glucagon-insulin interaction on fat cell metabolism using c14 glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zewail, M.A.; Nielsen, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Glucagon is known to stimulate the lipolysis in isolated fat cells from young rats, but not in fat cells from old heavy rate (Manganiello 1972). Insulin is known to counteract the lipolytic effect and to stimulate the synthesis of fatty acids from glucose. However, little is known about the interaction between the two hormones on the glucose metabolism. Experiments based on the use of various inhibitors of lipolysis have however, clearly shown that glucagon can also stimulate the entry and overall oxidation of glucose by mechanism which is distinct from its lipolysis stimulating mechanism (M. Blecher et al. 1969). Fat cells from old heavy rats are known to be less responsive to both the lipogenic action of insulin and the lipolytic action of glucagon than fat cells from young lean rats (E.G. Hansen, Nielsen and Gliemann, 1974). The aim of the present study was to see how glucagon affects glucose metabolism in fat cells, and whether this effect was dependent on the lipolytic action of glucagon

  4. Interactions between negative energy balance, metabolic diseases, uterine health and immune response in transition dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Giulia; Irons, Pete C; Webb, Edward C; Chapwanya, Aspinas

    2014-01-30

    The biological cycles of milk production and reproduction determine dairying profitability thus making management decisions dynamic and time-dependent. Diseases also negatively impact on net earnings of a dairy enterprise. Transition cows in particular face the challenge of negative energy balance (NEB) and/or disproportional energy metabolism (fatty liver, ketosis, subacute, acute ruminal acidosis); disturbed mineral utilization (milk fever, sub-clinical hypocalcemia); and perturbed immune function (retained placenta, metritis, mastitis). Consequently NEB and reduced dry matter intake are aggravated. The combined effects of all these challenges are reduced fertility and milk production resulting in diminishing profits. Risk factors such as NEB, inflammation and impairment of the immune response are highly cause-and-effect related. Thus, managing cows during the transition period should be geared toward reducing NEB or feeding specially formulated diets to improve immunity. Given that all cows experience a reduced feed intake and body condition, infection and inflammation of the uterus after calving, there is a need for further research on the immunology of transition dairy cows. Integrative approaches at the molecular, cellular and animal level may unravel the complex interactions between disturbed metabolism and immune function that predispose cows to periparturient diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Interaction between dietary lipids and gut microbiota regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caesar, Robert; Nygren, Heli; Orešič, Matej

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota influences many aspects of host metabolism. We have previously shown that the presence of a gut microbiota remodels lipid composition. Here we investigated how interaction between gut microbiota and dietary lipids regulates lipid composition in the liver and plasma, and gene...... of most lipid classes differed between mice fed lard and fish oil. However, the gut microbiota also affected lipid composition. The gut microbiota increased hepatic levels of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters in mice fed lard, but not in mice fed fish oil. Serum levels of cholesterol and cholesteryl...... esters were not affected by the gut microbiota. Genes encoding enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis were downregulated by the gut microbiota in mice fed lard and were expressed at a low level in mice fed fish oil independent of microbial status. In summary, we show that gut microbiota...

  6. Genes related to antioxidant metabolism are involved in Methylobacterium mesophilicum-soybean interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Welington Luiz; Santos, Daiene Souza; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Salgueiro-Londoño, Jennifer Katherine; Camargo-Neves, Aline Aparecida; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Dourado, Manuella Nóbrega

    2015-10-01

    The genus Methylobacterium is composed of pink-pigmented methylotrophic bacterial species that are widespread in natural environments, such as soils, stream water and plants. When in association with plants, this genus colonizes the host plant epiphytically and/or endophytically. This association is known to promote plant growth, induce plant systemic resistance and inhibit plant infection by phytopathogens. In the present study, we focused on evaluating the colonization of soybean seedling-roots by Methylobacterium mesophilicum strain SR1.6/6. We focused on the identification of the key genes involved in the initial step of soybean colonization by methylotrophic bacteria, which includes the plant exudate recognition and adaptation by planktonic bacteria. Visualization by scanning electron microscopy revealed that M. mesophilicum SR1.6/6 colonizes soybean roots surface effectively at 48 h after inoculation, suggesting a mechanism for root recognition and adaptation before this period. The colonization proceeds by the development of a mature biofilm on roots at 96 h after inoculation. Transcriptomic analysis of the planktonic bacteria (with plant) revealed the expression of several genes involved in membrane transport, thus confirming an initial metabolic activation of bacterial responses when in the presence of plant root exudates. Moreover, antioxidant genes were mostly expressed during the interaction with the plant exudates. Further evaluation of stress- and methylotrophic-related genes expression by qPCR showed that glutathione peroxidase and glutathione synthetase genes were up-regulated during the Methylobacterium-soybean interaction. These findings support that glutathione (GSH) is potentially a key molecule involved in cellular detoxification during plant root colonization. In addition to methylotrophic metabolism, antioxidant genes, mainly glutathione-related genes, play a key role during soybean exudate recognition and adaptation, the first step in

  7. Lifestyle Factors and Metabolic Syndrome among Workers: The Role of Interactions between Smoking and Alcohol to Nutrition and Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jui-Hua; Li, Ren-Hau; Huang, Shu-Ling; Sia, Hon-Ke; Chen, Yu-Ling; Tang, Feng-Cheng

    2015-12-16

    This study aimed to investigate (1) relations of smoking and alcohol to metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components, with nutrition and exercise controlled; and (2) interactions between smoking/alcohol and nutrition/exercise on MetS. This cross-sectional study enrolled 4025 workers. Self-reported lifestyles, anthropometric values, blood pressure (BP), and biochemical determinations were obtained. Among males, smoking significantly increased the risk of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), high triglyceride, abdominal obesity (AO), and MetS. Additionally, smoking showed significant interaction effects with nutrition on high BP, AO, and MetS; after further analysis, nutrition did not decrease above-mentioned risks for smokers. However, there was no significant interaction of smoking with exercise on any metabolic parameter. Alcohol increased the risk of AO, but decreased low HDL-C. It also showed an interaction effect with exercise on AO; after further analysis, exercise decreased AO risk for drinkers. Among females, alcohol significantly decreased the risk of high fasting blood glucose, but did not show significant interaction with nutrition/exercise on any metabolic parameter. In conclusion, in males, smoking retained significant associations with MetS and its components, even considering benefits of nutrition; exercise kept predominance on lipid parameters regardless of smoking status. Alcohol showed inconsistencies on metabolic parameters for both genders.

  8. Lifestyle Factors and Metabolic Syndrome among Workers: The Role of Interactions between Smoking and Alcohol to Nutrition and Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Hua Huang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate (1 relations of smoking and alcohol to metabolic syndrome (MetS and its components, with nutrition and exercise controlled; and (2 interactions between smoking/alcohol and nutrition/exercise on MetS. This cross-sectional study enrolled 4025 workers. Self-reported lifestyles, anthropometric values, blood pressure (BP, and biochemical determinations were obtained. Among males, smoking significantly increased the risk of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, high triglyceride, abdominal obesity (AO, and MetS. Additionally, smoking showed significant interaction effects with nutrition on high BP, AO, and MetS; after further analysis, nutrition did not decrease above-mentioned risks for smokers. However, there was no significant interaction of smoking with exercise on any metabolic parameter. Alcohol increased the risk of AO, but decreased low HDL-C. It also showed an interaction effect with exercise on AO; after further analysis, exercise decreased AO risk for drinkers. Among females, alcohol significantly decreased the risk of high fasting blood glucose, but did not show significant interaction with nutrition/exercise on any metabolic parameter. In conclusion, in males, smoking retained significant associations with MetS and its components, even considering benefits of nutrition; exercise kept predominance on lipid parameters regardless of smoking status. Alcohol showed inconsistencies on metabolic parameters for both genders.

  9. Dietary fat interacts with PCBs to induce changes in lipid metabolism in LDL receptor deficient mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennig, B.; Reiterer, G.; Toborek, M.; Matveev, S.V.; Daugherty, A.; Smart, E. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (United States); Robertson, L.W. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (United States)

    2004-09-15

    From epidemiological studies, there is substantial evidence that cardiovascular diseases are linked to environmental pollution and that exposure to polycyclic and/or polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons can lead to human cardiovascular toxicity. A major route of exposure to PCBs in humans is via oral ingestion of contaminated food products. Therefore, circulating environmental contaminants derived from diets, such as PCBs, are in intimate contact with the vascular endothelium. Endothelial activation and dysfunction is an important factor in the overall regulation of vascular lesion pathology. In addition to endothelial barrier dysfunction, another functional change in atherosclerosis is the activation of the endothelium that is manifested as an increase in the expression of specific cytokines and adhesion molecules. These cytokines and adhesion molecules are proposed to mediate the inflammatory aspects of the disease by regulating the vascular entry of leukocytes. Alterations in lipid profile and lipid metabolism as a result of exposure to PCBs may be important components of endothelial cell dysfunction. Little is known about the interaction of dietary fats and PCBs in the pathology of atherosclerosis. We have reported a significant disruption in endothelial barrier function when cells were exposed to linoleic acid. In the current study we aimed to demonstrate the PCB-fatty acid interaction in vivo and hypothesized that PCB toxicity can be modulated by the type of fat consumed.

  10. Consortium analysis of gene and gene–folate interactions in purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathways with ovarian carcinoma risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelemen, Linda E; Terry, Kathryn L; Goodman, Marc T

    2014-01-01

    SCOPE: We reevaluated previously reported associations between variants in pathways of one-carbon (1-C) (folate) transfer genes and ovarian carcinoma (OC) risk, and in related pathways of purine and pyrimidine metabolism, and assessed interactions with folate intake. METHODS AND RESULTS: Odds rat...

  11. Arsenic metabolism efficiency has a causal role in arsenic toxicity: Mendelian randomization and gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Brandon L; Tong, Lin; Argos, Maria; Gao, Jianjun; Farzana, Jasmine; Roy, Shantanu; Paul-Brutus, Rachelle; Rahaman, Ronald; Rakibuz-Zaman, Muhammad; Parvez, Faruque; Ahmed, Alauddin; Quasem, Iftekhar; Hore, Samar K; Alam, Shafiul; Islam, Tariqul; Harjes, Judith; Sarwar, Golam; Slavkovich, Vesna; Gamble, Mary V; Chen, Yu; Yunus, Mohammad; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Baron, John A; Graziano, Joseph H; Ahsan, Habibul

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic exposure through drinking water is a serious global health issue. Observational studies suggest that individuals who metabolize arsenic efficiently are at lower risk for toxicities such as arsenical skin lesions. Using two single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs) in the 10q24.32 region (near AS3MT) that show independent associations with metabolism efficiency, Mendelian randomization can be used to assess whether the association between metabolism efficiency and skin lesions is likely to be causal. Using data on 2060 arsenic-exposed Bangladeshi individuals, we estimated associations for two 10q24.32 SNPs with relative concentrations of three urinary arsenic species (representing metabolism efficiency): inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylarsonic acid(MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). SNP-based predictions of iAs%, MMA% and DMA% were tested for association with skin lesion status among 2483 cases and 2857 controls. Causal odds ratios for skin lesions were 0.90 (95% confidence interval[CI]: 0.87, 0.95), 1.19 (CI: 1.10, 1.28) and 1.23 (CI: 1.12, 1.36)for a one standard deviation increase in DMA%, MMA% and iAs%,respectively. We demonstrated genotype-arsenic interaction, with metabolism-related variants showing stronger associations with skin lesion risk among individuals with high arsenic exposure (synergy index: 1.37; CI: 1.11, 1.62). We provide strong evidence for a causal relationship between arsenic metabolism efficiency and skin lesion risk. Mendelian randomization can be used to assess the causal role of arsenic exposure and metabolism in a wide array of health conditions.exposure and metabolism in a wide array of health conditions.Developing interventions that increase arsenic metabolism efficiency are likely to reduce the impact of arsenic exposure on health.

  12. Probiotics, prebiotics, and the host microbiome: the science of translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petschow, Bryon; Doré, Joël; Hibberd, Patricia; Dinan, Timothy; Reid, Gregor; Blaser, Martin; Cani, Patrice D; Degnan, Fred H; Foster, Jane; Gibson, Glenn; Hutton, John; Klaenhammer, Todd R; Ley, Ruth; Nieuwdorp, Max; Pot, Bruno; Relman, David; Serazin, Andrew; Sanders, Mary Ellen

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the community structure and function of the human microbiome have implications for the potential role of probiotics and prebiotics in promoting human health. A group of experts recently met to review the latest advances in microbiota/microbiome research and discuss the implications for development of probiotics and prebiotics, primarily as they relate to effects mediated via the intestine. The goals of the meeting were to share recent advances in research on the microbiota, microbiome, probiotics, and prebiotics, and to discuss these findings in the contexts of regulatory barriers, evolving healthcare environments, and potential effects on a variety of health topics, including the development of obesity and diabetes; the long-term consequences of exposure to antibiotics early in life to the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota; lactose intolerance; and the relationship between the GI microbiota and the central nervous system, with implications for depression, cognition, satiety, and mental health for people living in developed and developing countries. This report provides an overview of these discussions. © 2013 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of New York Academy of Sciences.

  13. Targeting P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1/P-selectin interactions as a novel therapy for metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Madhukar S; Miranda-Nieves, David; Chen, Jiaxuan; Haller, Carolyn A; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2017-05-01

    Obesity-induced insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome continue to pose an important public health challenge worldwide as they significantly increase the risk of type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Advances in the pathophysiologic understanding of this process has identified that chronic inflammation plays a pivotal role. In this regard, given that both animal models and human studies have demonstrated that the interaction of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) with P-selectin is not only critical for normal immune response but also is upregulated in the setting of metabolic syndrome, PSGL-1/P-selectin interactions provide a novel target for preventing and treating resultant disease. Current approaches of interfering with PSGL-1/P-selectin interactions include targeted antibodies, recombinant immunoglobulins that competitively bind P-selectin, and synthetic molecular therapies. Experimental models as well as clinical trials assessing the role of these modalities in a variety of diseases have continued to contribute to the understanding of PSGL-1/P-selectin interactions and have demonstrated the difficulty in creating clinically relevant therapeutics. Most recently, however, computational simulations have further enhanced our understanding of the structural features of PSGL-1 and related glycomimetics, which are responsible for high-affinity selectin interactions. Leveraging these insights for the design of next generation agents has thus led to development of a promising synthetic method for generating PSGL-1 glycosulfopeptide mimetics for the treatment of metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Changes of Energy Interactions between Nucleus Function and Mitochondria Functions Causing Transmutation of Chronic Inflammation into Cancer Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponizovskiy, Michail R

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between nucleus and mitochondria functions induce the mechanism of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy according to the first law of thermodynamics in able-bodied cells and changes the mechanisms of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy creating a transition stationary state of ablebodied cells into quasi-stationary pathologic states of acute inflammation transiting then into chronic inflammation and then transmuting into cancer metabolism. The mechanisms' influences of intruding etiologic pathologic agents (microbe, virus, etc.) lead to these changes of energy interactions between nucleus and mitochondria functions causing general acute inflammation, then passing into local chronic inflammation, and reversing into cancer metabolism transmutation. Interactions between biochemical processes and biophysical processes of cellular capacitors' operations create a supplementary mechanism of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy in the norm and in pathology. Discussion of some scientific works eliminates doubts of the authors of these works.

  15. Metabolic interaction between toluene, trichloroethylene and n-hexane in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bælum, Jesper; Mølhave, Lars; Hansen, Steen Honoré

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This human experimental study describes the mutual metabolic interaction between toluene, trichloroethylene, and n-hexane. METHODS: Eight healthy male volunteers were exposed to combinations of toluene (1.5 or 4 mg/min), trichloroethylene (1.5 or 4 mg/min), and n-hexane (0.3 or 1.0 mg......: When the low dose rates were combined, the end exhaled concentrations were at or below the detection limit, while an increase in the dose rate of toluene increased the area under the end exhaled air concentration curve (AUC) of toluene, trichloroethylene, and n-hexane by factors of 44 (16......-117) [geometric mean and 95% confidence interval], 12.8 (4.1-40.0), and 2.2 (1.2-4.1), respectively. Trichloroethylene, in turn, increased the AUC 5.0 (1.9-13.4), 25.8 (8.2-80.8) and 2.9 (1.6-5.4), respectively, whereas the corresponding values for n-hexane were 1.9 (0.7-5.1), 1.5 (0.5-4.6), and 3.2 (1...

  16. Interaction between ractopamine and growth hormone in the metabolism of hypophysectomized female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Sacramento Barros

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ractopamine and growth hormone have been extensively studied due to their ability to generate a better partition of nutrients in the body, providing an increased muscle protein synthesis and lipolysis in adipose tissue. Thus, this article aims to check the effects of interaction between these substances on the metabolism of hypophysectomized female rats, and their individual effects on the body composition of these animals. Thirty Fisher rats were distributed into five treatments, one of them was a normal control group, one was a hypophysectomized control group, and the other three were hypophysectomized animal groups treated with ractopamine (80 mg/kg/day, with growth hormone (4 mg/kg/day, and with a combination of them, all with six replicates in each group. The association between these substances provided a higher percentage of protein and decreased ether extract in the animals’ carcass. Furthermore, it caused an increase in water intake, in urine production, and decreased relative weight of kidneys, liver, and spleen when compared to the control group. The use of growth hormone provided a higher final weight gain and feeding effectiveness, lower heart weight and increased blood glucose level, and the use of ractopamine resulted in a higher lung weight, increased total cholesterol and IGF-1, and decreased peptide C concentration.

  17. Ability of crassulacean acid metabolism plants to overcome interacting stresses in tropical environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüttge, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Single stressors such as scarcity of water and extreme temperatures dominate the struggle for life in severely dry desert ecosystems or cold polar regions and at high elevations. In contrast, stress in the tropics typically arises from a dynamic network of interacting stressors, such as availability of water, CO(2), light and nutrients, temperature and salinity. This requires more plastic spatio-temporal responsiveness and versatility in the acquisition and defence of ecological niches. The mode of photosynthesis of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is described and its flexible expression endows plants with powerful strategies for both acclimation and adaptation. Thus, CAM plants are able to inhabit many diverse habitats in the tropics and are not, as commonly thought, successful predominantly in dry, high-insolation habitats. Typical tropical CAM habitats or ecosystems include exposed lava fields, rock outcrops of inselbergs, salinas, savannas, restingas, high-altitude páramos, dry forests and moist forests. Morphotypical and physiotypical plasticity of CAM phenotypes allow a wide ecophysiological amplitude of niche occupation in the tropics. Physiological and biochemical plasticity appear more responsive by having more readily reversible variations in performance than do morphological adaptations. This makes CAM plants particularly fit for the multi-factor stressor networks of tropical forests. Thus, while the physiognomy of semi-deserts outside the tropics is often determined by tall succulent CAM plants, tropical forests house many more CAM plants in terms of quantity (biomass) and quality (species diversity).

  18. Possible drug–drug interaction in dogs and cats resulted from alteration in drug metabolism: A mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuaki Sasaki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacokinetic drug–drug interactions (in particular at metabolism may result in fatal adverse effects in some cases. This basic information, therefore, is needed for drug therapy even in veterinary medicine, as multidrug therapy is not rare in canines and felines. The aim of this review was focused on possible drug–drug interactions in dogs and cats. The interaction includes enzyme induction by phenobarbital, enzyme inhibition by ketoconazole and fluoroquinolones, and down-regulation of enzymes by dexamethasone. A final conclusion based upon the available literatures and author’s experience is given at the end of the review.

  19. Interaction of IFNL3 with insulin resistance, steatosis and lipid metabolism in chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslam, Mohammed; Booth, David R; George, Jacob; Ahlenstiel, Golo

    2013-11-07

    Metabolic changes are inextricably linked to chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Recently polymorphisms in the IFNL3 (IL28B) region have been shown to be strongly associated with spontaneous and treatment induced recovery from hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Further, circumstantial evidence suggests a link between IFNL3 single nucleotide polymorphisms and lipid metabolism, steatosis and insulin resistance in CHC. The emerging picture suggests that the responder genotypes of IFNL3 polymorphisms are associated with a higher serum lipid profile, and less frequent steatosis and insulin resistance. This review analyzes the current data regarding this interaction and its meaning for HCV pathogenesis and disease progression.

  20. The interactive effects of mercury and selenium on metabolic profiles, gene expression and antioxidant enzymes in halophyte Suaeda salsa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Lai, Yongkai; Sun, Hushan; Wang, Yiyan; Zou, Ning

    2016-04-01

    Suaeda salsa is the pioneer halophyte in the Yellow River Delta and was consumed as a popular vegetable. Mercury has become a highly risky contaminant in the sediment of intertidal zones of the Yellow River Delta. In this work, we investigated the interactive effects of mercury and selenium in S. salsa on the basis of metabolic profiling, antioxidant enzyme activities and gene expression quantification. Our results showed that mercury exposure (20 μg L(-1)) inhibited plant growth of S. salsa and induced significant metabolic responses and altered expression levels of INPS, CMO, and MDH in S. salsa samples, together with the increased activities of antioxidant enzymes including SOD and POD. Overall, these results indicated osmotic and oxidative stresses, disturbed protein degradation and energy metabolism change in S. salsa after mercury exposures. Additionally, the addition of selenium could induce both antagonistic and synergistic effects including alleviating protein degradation and aggravating osmotic stress caused by mercury. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Effect of Microbial Interaction on Urea Metabolism in Chinese Liquor Fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Qun; Lin, Jianchun; Cui, Kaixiang; Du, Rubin; Zhu, Yang; Xu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Urea is the primary precursor of the carcinogen ethyl carbamate in fermented foods. Understanding urea metabolism is important for controlling ethyl carbamate production. Using Chinese liquor as a model system, we used metatranscriptome analysis to investigate urea metabolism in spontaneous food

  2. A Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Model With Metabolic Interactions of Chloroform (CHCL3) and Trichloroethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to mixtures is frequent, but biologic pathways such as metabolic inhibition, are poorly understood. CHCl3 and TCE are model volatiles frequently co-occurring; combined exposure results in less than additive hepatotoxicity. Here, we explore the underlying metabolic inte...

  3. Glucokinase regulatory protein genetic variant interacts with omega-3 PUFA to influence insulin resistance and inflammation in metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Perez-Martinez

    Full Text Available Glucokinase Regulatory Protein (GCKR plays a central role regulating both hepatic triglyceride and glucose metabolism. Fatty acids are key metabolic regulators, which interact with genetic factors and influence glucose metabolism and other metabolic traits. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA have been of considerable interest, due to their potential to reduce metabolic syndrome (MetS risk.To examine whether genetic variability at the GCKR gene locus was associated with the degree of insulin resistance, plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP and n-3 PUFA in MetS subjects.Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, HOMA-B, plasma concentrations of C-peptide, CRP, fatty acid composition and the GCKR rs1260326-P446L polymorphism, were determined in a cross-sectional analysis of 379 subjects with MetS participating in the LIPGENE dietary cohort.Among subjects with n-3 PUFA levels below the population median, carriers of the common C/C genotype had higher plasma concentrations of fasting insulin (P = 0.019, C-peptide (P = 0.004, HOMA-IR (P = 0.008 and CRP (P = 0.032 as compared with subjects carrying the minor T-allele (Leu446. In contrast, homozygous C/C carriers with n-3 PUFA levels above the median showed lower plasma concentrations of fasting insulin, peptide C, HOMA-IR and CRP, as compared with individuals with the T-allele.We have demonstrated a significant interaction between the GCKR rs1260326-P446L polymorphism and plasma n-3 PUFA levels modulating insulin resistance and inflammatory markers in MetS subjects. Further studies are needed to confirm this gene-diet interaction in the general population and whether targeted dietary recommendations can prevent MetS in genetically susceptible individuals.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00429195.

  4. Albendazole-praziquantel interaction in healthy volunteers: kinetic disposition, metabolism and enantioselectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Renata Monteiro; Ferreira, Maria Augusta Drago; de Jesus Ponte Carvalho, Teresa Maria; Dumêt Fernandes, Bruno José; Takayanagui, Osvaldo Massaiti; Garcia, Hector Hugo; Coelho, Eduardo Barbosa; Lanchote, Vera Lucia

    2011-01-01

    AIM This study investigated the kinetic disposition, metabolism and enantioselectivity of albendazole (ABZ) and praziquantel (PZQ) administered alone and in combination to healthy volunteers. METHODS A randomized crossover study was carried out in three phases (n = 9), in which some volunteers started in phase 1 (400 mg ABZ), others in phase 2 (1500 mg PZQ), and the remaining volunteers in phase 3 (400 mg ABZ + 1500 mg PZQ). Serial blood samples were collected from 0–48 h after drug administration. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using a monocompartmental model with lag time and were analyzed using the Wilcoxon test; P≤ 0.05. RESULTS The administration of PZQ increased the plasma concentrations of (+)-ASOX (albendazole sulphoxide) by 264% (AUC 0.99 vs. 2.59 µg ml−1 h), (−)-ASOX by 358% (0.14 vs. 0.50 µg ml−1 h) and albendazole sulfone (ASON) by 187% (0.17 vs. 0.32 µg ml−1 h). The administration of ABZ did not change the kinetic disposition of (+)-(S)-PZQ (–)-(R)-4-OHPZQ or (+)-(S)-4-OHPZQ, but increased the plasma concentration of (–)-(R)-PZQ by 64.77% (AUC 0.52 vs. 0.86 µg ml−1 h). CONCLUSIONS The pharmacokinetic interaction between ABZ and PZQ in healthy volunteers was demonstrated by the observation of increased plasma concentrations of ASON, both ASOX enantiomers and (–)-(R)-PZQ. Clinically, the combination of ABZ and PZQ may improve the therapeutic efficacy as a consequence of higher concentration of both active drugs. On the other hand, the magnitude of this elevation may represent an increased risk of side effects, requiring, certainly, reduction of the dosage. However, further studies are necessary to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this combination. PMID:21395645

  5. A top-down systems biology view of microbiome-mammalian metabolic interactions in a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, François-Pierre J; Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel; Wang, Yulan; Legido-Quigley, Cristina; Yap, Ivan K S; Tang, Huiru; Zirah, Séverine; Murphy, Gerard M; Cloarec, Olivier; Lindon, John C; Sprenger, Norbert; Fay, Laurent B; Kochhar, Sunil; van Bladeren, Peter; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2007-01-01

    Symbiotic gut microorganisms (microbiome) interact closely with the mammalian host's metabolism and are important determinants of human health. Here, we decipher the complex metabolic effects of microbial manipulation, by comparing germfree mice colonized by a human baby flora (HBF) or a normal flora to conventional mice. We perform parallel microbiological profiling, metabolic profiling by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance of liver, plasma, urine and ileal flushes, and targeted profiling of bile acids by ultra performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry and short-chain fatty acids in cecum by GC-FID. Top-down multivariate analysis of metabolic profiles reveals a significant association of specific metabotypes with the resident microbiome. We derive a transgenomic graph model showing that HBF flora has a remarkably simple microbiome/metabolome correlation network, impacting directly on the host's ability to metabolize lipids: HBF mice present higher ileal concentrations of tauro-conjugated bile acids, reduced plasma levels of lipoproteins but higher hepatic triglyceride content associated with depletion of glutathione. These data indicate that the microbiome modulates absorption, storage and the energy harvest from the diet at the systems level. PMID:17515922

  6. Metabolic physiology of the invasive clam, Potamocorbula amurensis: the interactive role of temperature, salinity, and food availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathan A; Chen, Xi; Stillman, Jonathon H

    2014-01-01

    In biological systems energy serves as the ultimate commodity, often determining species distributions, abundances, and interactions including the potential impact of invasive species on native communities. The Asian clam Potamocorbula amurensis invaded the San Francisco Estuary (SFE) in 1986 and is implicated in the decline of native fish species through resource competition. Using a combined laboratory/field study we examined how energy expenditure in this clam is influenced by salinity, temperature and food availability. Measures of metabolism were made at whole organism (metabolic rate) and biochemical (pyruvate kinase (PK) and citrate synthase (CS) enzyme activities) levels. We found in the field, over the course of a year, the ratio of PK to CS was typically 1.0 suggesting that aerobic and fermentative metabolism were roughly equivalent, except for particular periods characterized by low salinity, higher temperatures, and intermediate food availabilities. In a 30-day laboratory acclimation experiment, however, neither metabolic rate nor PK:CS ratio was consistently influenced by the same variables, though the potential for fermentative pathways did predominate. We conclude that in field collected animals, the addition of biochemical measures of energetic state provide little additional information to the previously measured whole organism metabolic rate. In addition, much of the variation in the laboratory remained unexplained and additional variables, including reproductive stage or body condition may influence laboratory-based results. Further study of adult clams must consider the role of organismal condition, especially reproductive state, in comparisons of laboratory experiments and field observations.

  7. Do the interactions between glucocorticoids and sex hormones regulate the development of the Metabolic Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marià eAlemany

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome is basically a maturity-onset disease. Typically, its manifestations begin to flourish years after the initial dietary or environmental aggression began. Since most hormonal, metabolic or defense responses are practically immediate, the procrastinated response don't seem justified. Only in childhood, the damages of the metabolic syndrome appear with minimal delay. Sex affects the incidence of the metabolic syndrome, but this is more an effect of timing than absolute gender differences, females holding better than males up to menopause, when the differences between sexes tend to disappear. The metabolic syndrome is related to an immune response, countered by a permanent increase in glucocorticoids, which keep the immune system at bay but also induce insulin resistance, alter the lipid metabolism, favor fat deposition, mobilize protein and decrease androgen synthesis. Androgens limit the operation of glucocorticoids, which is also partly blocked by estrogens, since they decrease inflammation (which enhances glucocorticoid release. These facts suggest that the appearance of the metabolic syndrome symptoms depends on the strength (i.e. levels of androgens and estrogens. The predominance of glucocorticoids and the full manifestation of the syndrome in men are favored by decreased androgen activity. Low androgens can be found in infancy, maturity, advanced age, or because of their inhibition by glucocorticoids (inflammation, stress, medical treatment. Estrogens decrease inflammation and reduce the glucocorticoid response. Low estrogen (infancy, menopause again allow the predominance of glucocorticoids and the manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. It is postulated that the equilibrium between sex hormones and glucocorticoids may be a critical element in the timing of the manifestation of metabolic syndrome-related pathologies.

  8. Regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes in infectious and inflammatory disease: implications for biologics-small molecule drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Pankajini; Taneja, Guncha; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Ghose, Romi

    2017-06-01

    Drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) are primarily down-regulated during infectious and inflammatory diseases, leading to disruption in the metabolism of small molecule drugs (smds), which are increasingly being prescribed therapeutically in combination with biologics for a number of chronic diseases. The biologics may exert pro- or anti-inflammatory effect, which may in turn affect the expression/activity of DMEs. Thus, patients with infectious/inflammatory diseases undergoing biologic/smd treatment can have complex changes in DMEs due to combined effects of the disease and treatment. Areas covered: We will discuss clinical biologics-SMD interaction and regulation of DMEs during infection and inflammatory diseases. Mechanistic studies will be discussed and consequences on biologic-small molecule combination therapy on disease outcome due to changes in drug metabolism will be highlighted. Expert opinion: The involvement of immunomodulatory mediators in biologic-SMDs is well known. Regulatory guidelines recommend appropriate in vitro or in vivo assessments for possible interactions. The role of cytokines in biologic-SMDs has been documented. However, the mechanisms of drug-drug interactions is much more complex, and is probably multi-factorial. Studies aimed at understanding the mechanism by which biologics effect the DMEs during inflammation/infection are clinically important.

  9. Interactions between sleep, stress, and metabolism: From physiological to pathological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Hirotsu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Poor sleep quality due to sleep disorders and sleep loss is highly prevalent in the modern society. Underlying mechanisms show that stress is involved in the relationship between sleep and metabolism through hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA axis activation. Sleep deprivation and sleep disorders are associated with maladaptive changes in the HPA axis, leading to neuroendocrine dysregulation. Excess of glucocorticoids increase glucose and insulin and decrease adiponectin levels. Thus, this review provides overall view of the relationship between sleep, stress, and metabolism from basic physiology to pathological conditions, highlighting effective treatments for metabolic disturbances.

  10. Glucose Metabolism and AMPK Signaling Regulate Dopaminergic Cell Death Induced by Gene (α-Synuclein)-Environment (Paraquat) Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandhan, Annadurai; Lei, Shulei; Levytskyy, Roman; Pappa, Aglaia; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I; Cerny, Ronald L; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Powers, Robert; Franco, Rodrigo

    2017-07-01

    While environmental exposures are not the single cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), their interaction with genetic alterations is thought to contribute to neuronal dopaminergic degeneration. However, the mechanisms involved in dopaminergic cell death induced by gene-environment interactions remain unclear. In this work, we have revealed for the first time the role of central carbon metabolism and metabolic dysfunction in dopaminergic cell death induced by the paraquat (PQ)-α-synuclein interaction. The toxicity of PQ in dopaminergic N27 cells was significantly reduced by glucose deprivation, inhibition of hexokinase with 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), or equimolar substitution of glucose with galactose, which evidenced the contribution of glucose metabolism to PQ-induced cell death. PQ also stimulated an increase in glucose uptake, and in the levels of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) and Na + -glucose transporters isoform 1 (SGLT1) proteins, but only inhibition of GLUT-like transport with STF-31 or ascorbic acid reduced PQ-induced cell death. Importantly, while autophagy protein 5 (ATG5)/unc-51 like autophagy activating kinase 1 (ULK1)-dependent autophagy protected against PQ toxicity, the inhibitory effect of glucose deprivation on cell death progression was largely independent of autophagy or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. PQ selectively induced metabolomic alterations and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in the midbrain and striatum of mice chronically treated with PQ. Inhibition of AMPK signaling led to metabolic dysfunction and an enhanced sensitivity of dopaminergic cells to PQ. In addition, activation of AMPK by PQ was prevented by inhibition of the inducible nitric oxide syntase (iNOS) with 1400W, but PQ had no effect on iNOS levels. Overexpression of wild type or A53T mutant α-synuclein stimulated glucose accumulation and PQ toxicity, and this toxic synergism was reduced by inhibition of glucose metabolism

  11. Directed Evolution Reveals Unexpected Epistatic Interactions That Alter Metabolic Regulation and Enable Anaerobic Xylose Use by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trey K Sato

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The inability of native Saccharomyces cerevisiae to convert xylose from plant biomass into biofuels remains a major challenge for the production of renewable bioenergy. Despite extensive knowledge of the regulatory networks controlling carbon metabolism in yeast, little is known about how to reprogram S. cerevisiae to ferment xylose at rates comparable to glucose. Here we combined genome sequencing, proteomic profiling, and metabolomic analyses to identify and characterize the responsible mutations in a series of evolved strains capable of metabolizing xylose aerobically or anaerobically. We report that rapid xylose conversion by engineered and evolved S. cerevisiae strains depends upon epistatic interactions among genes encoding a xylose reductase (GRE3, a component of MAP Kinase (MAPK signaling (HOG1, a regulator of Protein Kinase A (PKA signaling (IRA2, and a scaffolding protein for mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe-S cluster biogenesis (ISU1. Interestingly, the mutation in IRA2 only impacted anaerobic xylose consumption and required the loss of ISU1 function, indicating a previously unknown connection between PKA signaling, Fe-S cluster biogenesis, and anaerobiosis. Proteomic and metabolomic comparisons revealed that the xylose-metabolizing mutant strains exhibit altered metabolic pathways relative to the parental strain when grown in xylose. Further analyses revealed that interacting mutations in HOG1 and ISU1 unexpectedly elevated mitochondrial respiratory proteins and enabled rapid aerobic respiration of xylose and other non-fermentable carbon substrates. Our findings suggest a surprising connection between Fe-S cluster biogenesis and signaling that facilitates aerobic respiration and anaerobic fermentation of xylose, underscoring how much remains unknown about the eukaryotic signaling systems that regulate carbon metabolism.

  12. Directed Evolution Reveals Unexpected Epistatic Interactions That Alter Metabolic Regulation and Enable Anaerobic Xylose Use by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Trey K; Tremaine, Mary; Parreiras, Lucas S; Hebert, Alexander S; Myers, Kevin S; Higbee, Alan J; Sardi, Maria; McIlwain, Sean J; Ong, Irene M; Breuer, Rebecca J; Avanasi Narasimhan, Ragothaman; McGee, Mick A; Dickinson, Quinn; La Reau, Alex; Xie, Dan; Tian, Mingyuan; Reed, Jennifer L; Zhang, Yaoping; Coon, Joshua J; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Gasch, Audrey P; Landick, Robert

    2016-10-01

    The inability of native Saccharomyces cerevisiae to convert xylose from plant biomass into biofuels remains a major challenge for the production of renewable bioenergy. Despite extensive knowledge of the regulatory networks controlling carbon metabolism in yeast, little is known about how to reprogram S. cerevisiae to ferment xylose at rates comparable to glucose. Here we combined genome sequencing, proteomic profiling, and metabolomic analyses to identify and characterize the responsible mutations in a series of evolved strains capable of metabolizing xylose aerobically or anaerobically. We report that rapid xylose conversion by engineered and evolved S. cerevisiae strains depends upon epistatic interactions among genes encoding a xylose reductase (GRE3), a component of MAP Kinase (MAPK) signaling (HOG1), a regulator of Protein Kinase A (PKA) signaling (IRA2), and a scaffolding protein for mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis (ISU1). Interestingly, the mutation in IRA2 only impacted anaerobic xylose consumption and required the loss of ISU1 function, indicating a previously unknown connection between PKA signaling, Fe-S cluster biogenesis, and anaerobiosis. Proteomic and metabolomic comparisons revealed that the xylose-metabolizing mutant strains exhibit altered metabolic pathways relative to the parental strain when grown in xylose. Further analyses revealed that interacting mutations in HOG1 and ISU1 unexpectedly elevated mitochondrial respiratory proteins and enabled rapid aerobic respiration of xylose and other non-fermentable carbon substrates. Our findings suggest a surprising connection between Fe-S cluster biogenesis and signaling that facilitates aerobic respiration and anaerobic fermentation of xylose, underscoring how much remains unknown about the eukaryotic signaling systems that regulate carbon metabolism.

  13. Metabolic regulation in meagre, Argyrosomus regius (Asso, 1801: Study of gene-diet interactions on lipid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Silva-Brito

    2014-06-01

    stimulates the expression of the fads2. In contrast, Elovl5 is very efficient to convert the desaturated products of ∆6/∆8 and so Elovl5 expression is not enhanced, since the activity of this enzyme is already higher. These findings may explain the differences in the expression of two genes, between hepatic fads2 and elovl5. Furthermore, increased hepatic fads2 expression between FO-S and VO-S treatments was 114 fold. Such induction was much greater than observed in Salmo salad (Zheng et al., 2005. However, Salmo salad has separate and distinct genes for ∆6 and ∆5 desaturases (Zheng et al., 2005 and, due to genome duplication, it has two genes with ∆6 activity (Monroig et al., 2010. Moreover, lipid peroxidation in liver increases with the number of fatty acid (FA double bonds (Haggag, Elsanhoty & Ramadan, 2014. D'Aquino et al. (1991 observed that rats fed diets with fish oil had increased lipid peroxidation. Our results indicate that, in FO-S, selenium may have protected FA from peroxidation, thus dietary HUFA seemed to have been sufficient to maintain the phospholipid turnover and induction of FA metabolism genes did not occur. In FO-NS diet membranes were not protected efficiently from lipid peroxidation, and therefore a higher expression of FA metabolism genes was necessary to offset the damage, consequently, biosynthesis of HUFA was more stimulated. ROS-induced oxidative stress has been associated with expression and protein levels of transcription factors (Okuno et al., 2012. A reduction of ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species has been observed in fish fed VO with selenium, when compared to VO without selenium (data not presented. It is plausible to infer that a stimulation of expression and level of protein SREBP-1 by a reduction of ROS. SREBP-1 play a role on the regulation of genes involved in biosynthesis of HUFA, as fads2 and elovl5 (Jump, Tripathy & Depner, 2013. In conclusion, our results showed that vegetable oils have an effect on expression level of genes

  14. Critical issues in benzene toxicity and metabolism: the effect of interactions with other organic chemicals on risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medinsky, M A; Schlosser, P M; Bond, J A

    1994-11-01

    Benzene, an important industrial solvent, is also present in unleaded gasoline and cigarette smoke. The hematotoxic effects of benzene are well documented and include aplastic anemia and pancytopenia. Some individuals exposed repeatedly to cytotoxic concentrations of benzene develop acute myeloblastic anemia. It has been hypothesized that metabolism of benzene is required for its toxicity, although administration of no single benzene metabolite duplicates the toxicity of benzene. Several investigators have demonstrated that a combination of metabolites (hydroquinone and phenol, for example) is necessary to duplicate the hematotoxic effect of benzene. Enzymes implicated in the metabolic activation of benzene and its metabolites include the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and myeloperoxidase. Since benzene and its hydroxylated metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol) are substrates for the same cytochrome P450 enzymes, competitive interactions among the metabolites are possible. In vivo data on metabolite formation by mice exposed to various benzene concentrations are consistent with competitive inhibition of phenol oxidation by benzene. Other organic molecules that are substrates for cytochrome P450 can inhibit the metabolism of benzene. For example, toluene has been shown to inhibit the oxidation of benzene in a noncompetitive manner. Enzyme inducers, such as ethanol, can alter the target tissue dosimetry of benzene metabolites by inducing enzymes responsible for oxidation reactions involved in benzene metabolism. The dosimetry of benzene and its metabolites in the target tissue, bone marrow, depends on the balance of activation processes, such as enzymatic oxidation, and deactivation processes, like conjugation and excretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Plant-endophytes interaction influences the secondary metabolism in Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench: an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggini, Valentina; De Leo, Marinella; Mengoni, Alessio; Gallo, Eugenia Rosaria; Miceli, Elisangela; Reidel, Rose Vanessa Bandeira; Biffi, Sauro; Pistelli, Luisa; Fani, Renato; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Bogani, Patrizia

    2017-12-05

    The influence of the interaction(s) between the medicinal plant Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench and its endophytic communities on the production of alkamides is investigated. To mimic the in vivo conditions, we have set up an infection model of axenic in vitro E. purpurea plants inoculated with a pool of bacterial strains isolated from the E. purpurea stems and leaves. Here we show different alkamide levels between control (not-inoculated) and inoculated plants, suggesting that the alkamide biosynthesis may be modulated by the bacterial infection. Then, we have analysed the branched-chain amino acids (BCCA) decarboxylase gene (GenBank Accession #LT593930; the enzymatic source for the amine moiety formation of the alkamides) expression patterns. The expression profile shows a higher expression level in the inoculated E. purpurea tissues than in the control ones. These results suggest that the plant-endophyte interaction can influence plant secondary metabolism affecting the therapeutic properties of E. purpurea.

  16. Effect of Microbial Interaction on Urea Metabolism in Chinese Liquor Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qun; Lin, Jianchun; Cui, Kaixiang; Du, Rubin; Zhu, Yang; Xu, Yan

    2017-12-20

    Urea is the primary precursor of the carcinogen ethyl carbamate in fermented foods. Understanding urea metabolism is important for controlling ethyl carbamate production. Using Chinese liquor as a model system, we used metatranscriptome analysis to investigate urea metabolism in spontaneous food fermentation processes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was dominant in gene transcription for urea biosynthesis and degradation. Lysinibacillus sphaericus was dominant for urea degradation. S. cerevisiae degraded 18% and L. sphaericus degraded 13% of urea in their corresponding single cultures, whereas they degraded 56% of urea in coculture after 12 h. Compared to single cultures, transcription of CAR1, DAL2, and argA, which are related to urea biosynthesis, decreased by 51, 36, and 69% in coculture, respectively. Transcription of DUR1 and ureA, which are related to urea degradation, increased by 227 and 70%, respectively. Thus, coexistence of the two strains promoted degradation of urea via transcriptional regulation of genes related to urea metabolism.

  17. The effects of maternal and post-weaning diet interaction on glucose metabolism and gut microbiota in male mice offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jia; Xiao, Xinhua; Zhang, Qian; Yu, Miao; Xu, Jianping; Qi, Cuijuan; Wang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Substantial studies demonstrated that maternal nutrition can significantly determine the susceptibility to developing some metabolic diseases in offspring. However, investigations into the later-life effects of these diets on gut microbiota in the offspring are limited. Our objective was to explore the effects of maternal and post-weaning diet interaction on offspring's gut microbiota and glucose metabolism in later life. The male offspring of dams fed on either a high-fat (HF) diet or control (C) diet and then weaned to either a HF or C diet, generating four groups: C–C, HF–C, C–HF and HF–HF (n=8 in each group). The C–C offspring had lower body weight than C–HF group at 16 weeks of age (Pblood glucose (BG) levels of the male offspring from the C and HF dams weaned HF diet were significantly higher at 30 min, 60 min and 120 min (Pglucose administration compared with those of the C–C group. The C–HF group had higher BG at 30 min than HF–HF group (Pcurve (AUC) in C–HF and HF–HF groups was also significantly larger than C–C group (Pglucose response to a glucose load (Pglucose metabolism and alterations of gut microbiota in later life. Our study is novel in focusing on the effects of maternal and post-weaning diet interaction on offspring gut microbiota and glucose metabolism in later life. PMID:27129301

  18. Glucose and Intermediary Metabolism and Astrocyte-Neuron Interactions Following Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia in Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekke, Eva; Berger, Hester Rijkje; Widerøe, Marius; Sonnewald, Ursula; Morken, Tora Sund

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) and the delayed injury cascade that follows involve excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and mitochondrial failure. The susceptibility to excitotoxicity of the neonatal brain may be related to the capacity of astrocytes for glutamate uptake. Furthermore, the neonatal brain is vulnerable to oxidative stress, and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) may be of particular importance for limiting this kind of injury. Also, in the neonatal brain, neurons depend upon de novo synthesis of neurotransmitters via pyruvate carboxylase in astrocytes to increase neurotransmitter pools during normal brain development. Several recent publications describing intermediary brain metabolism following neonatal HI have yielded interesting results: (1) Following HI there is a prolonged depression of mitochondrial metabolism in agreement with emerging evidence of mitochondria as vulnerable targets in the delayed injury cascade. (2) Astrocytes, like neurons, are metabolically impaired following HI, and the degree of astrocytic malfunction may be an indicator of the outcome following hypoxic and hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. (3) Glutamate transfer from neurons to astrocytes is not increased following neonatal HI, which may imply that astrocytes fail to upregulate glutamate uptake in response to the massive glutamate release during HI, thus contributing to excitotoxicity. (4) In the neonatal brain, the activity of the PPP is reduced following HI, which may add to the susceptibility of the neonatal brain to oxidative stress. The present review aims to discuss the metabolic temporal alterations observed in the neonatal brain following HI.

  19. Probiotic modulation of symbiotic gut microbial-host metabolic interactions in a humanized microbiome mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, F.P.J.; Wang, Y.; Sprenger, N.; Yap, K.S.; Rezzi, S.; Ramadan, Z.; Peré-Trepat, E.; Rochat, F.; Cherbut, C.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Fay, L.B.; Kochhar, S.; LindOn, J.C.; Holmes, E.; Nicholson, J.K.

    2008-01-01

    The transgenomic metabolic effects of exposure to either Lactobacillus paracasei or Lactobacillus rhamnosus probiotics have been measured and mapped in humanized extended genome mice (germ-free mice colonized with human baby flora). Statistical analysis of the compartmental fluctuations in diverse

  20. Costly neighbours: Heterospecific competitive interactions increase metabolic rates in dominant species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janča, M.; Gvoždík, Lumír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 5177 (2017), č. článku 5177. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-07140S Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : interference competition * intraspecific variation * terrestrial salamander * energy metabolism * natural selection * newts Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  1. Reducing the metabolic cost of walking with an ankle exoskeleton: interaction between actuation timing and power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, Samuel; Malcolm, Philippe; Collins, Steven Hartley; De Clercq, Dirk

    2017-04-27

    Powered ankle-foot exoskeletons can reduce the metabolic cost of human walking to below normal levels, but optimal assistance properties remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to test the effects of different assistance timing and power characteristics in an experiment with a tethered ankle-foot exoskeleton. Ten healthy female subjects walked on a treadmill with bilateral ankle-foot exoskeletons in 10 different assistance conditions. Artificial pneumatic muscles assisted plantarflexion during ankle push-off using one of four actuation onset timings (36, 42, 48 and 54% of the stride) and three power levels (average positive exoskeleton power over a stride, summed for both legs, of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.5 W∙kg -1 ). We compared metabolic rate, kinematics and electromyography (EMG) between conditions. Optimal assistance was achieved with an onset of 42% stride and average power of 0.4 W∙kg -1 , leading to 21% reduction in metabolic cost compared to walking with the exoskeleton deactivated and 12% reduction compared to normal walking without the exoskeleton. With suboptimal timing or power, the exoskeleton still reduced metabolic cost, but substantially less so. The relationship between timing, power and metabolic rate was well-characterized by a two-dimensional quadratic function. The assistive mechanisms leading to these improvements included reducing muscular activity in the ankle plantarflexors and assisting leg swing initiation. These results emphasize the importance of optimizing exoskeleton actuation properties when assisting or augmenting human locomotion. Our optimal assistance onset timing and average power levels could be used for other exoskeletons to improve assistance and resulting benefits.

  2. Effect of genetic variants and traits related to glucose metabolism and their interaction with obesity on breast and colorectal cancer risk among postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Su Yon; Sobel, Eric M; Papp, Jeanette C; Zhang, Zuo-Feng

    2017-04-26

    Impaired glucose metabolism-related genetic variants and traits likely interact with obesity and related lifestyle factors, influencing postmenopausal breast and colorectal cancer (CRC), but their interconnected pathways are not fully understood. By stratifying via obesity and lifestyles, we partitioned the total effect of glucose metabolism genetic variants on cancer risk into two putative mechanisms: 1) indirect (risk-associated glucose metabolism genetic variants mediated by glucose metabolism traits) and 2) direct (risk-associated glucose metabolism genetic variants through pathways other than glucose metabolism traits) effects. Using 16 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with glucose metabolism and data from 5379 postmenopausal women in the Women's Health Initiative Harmonized and Imputed Genome-Wide Association Studies, we retrospectively assessed the indirect and direct effects of glucose metabolism-traits (fasting glucose, insulin, and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]) using two quantitative tests. Several SNPs were associated with breast cancer and CRC risk, and these SNP-cancer associations differed between non-obese and obese women. In both strata, the direct effect of cancer risk associated with the SNP accounted for the majority of the total effect for most SNPs, with roughly 10% of cancer risk due to the SNP that was from an indirect effect mediated by glucose metabolism traits. No apparent differences in the indirect (glucose metabolism-mediated) effects were seen between non-obese and obese women. It is notable that among obese women, 50% of cancer risk was mediated via glucose metabolism trait, owing to two SNPs: in breast cancer, in relation to GCKR through glucose, and in CRC, in relation to DGKB/TMEM195 through HOMA-IR. Our findings suggest that glucose metabolism genetic variants interact with obesity, resulting in altered cancer risk through pathways other than those mediated by glucose metabolism traits.

  3. Interactions of Lipid Genetic Risk Scores with Estimates of Metabolic Health in a Danish Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Johanne M; Allin, Kristine H; Sandholt, Camilla H

    2015-01-01

    Background—There are several well-established lifestyle factors influencing dyslipidemia and currently; 157 genetic susceptibility loci have been reported to be associated with serum lipid levels at genome-wide statistical significance. However, the interplay between lifestyle risk factors...... and these susceptibility loci has not been fully elucidated. We tested whether genetic risk scores (GRS) of lipid-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms associate with fasting serum lipid traits and whether the effects are modulated by lifestyle factors or estimates of metabolic health. Methods and Results—The single......-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, or triglyceride, 4 weighted GRS were constructed. In a cross-sectional design, we investigated whether the effect of these weighted GRSs on lipid levels were modulated by diet, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and smoking or the individual metabolic health...

  4. Neuron-astrocyte interaction enhance GABAergic synaptic transmission in a manner dependent on key metabolic enzymes.

    OpenAIRE

    Przemysław eKaczor; Dariusz eRakus; Jerzy Władysław Mozrzymas; Jerzy Władysław Mozrzymas

    2015-01-01

    GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain and mechanisms of GABAergic inhibition have been intensely investigated in the past decades. Recent studies provided evidence for an important role of astrocytes in shaping GABAergic currents. One of the most obvious, but yet poorly understood, mechanisms of the cross-talk between GABAergic currents and astrocytes is metabolism including neurotransmitter homeostasis. In particular, how modulation of GABAergic currents by astrocy...

  5. Establishment and metabolic analysis of a model microbial community for understanding trophic and electron accepting interactions of subsurface anaerobic environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zamin K

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Communities of microorganisms control the rates of key biogeochemical cycles, and are important for biotechnology, bioremediation, and industrial microbiological processes. For this reason, we constructed a model microbial community comprised of three species dependent on trophic interactions. The three species microbial community was comprised of Clostridium cellulolyticum, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, and Geobacter sulfurreducens and was grown under continuous culture conditions. Cellobiose served as the carbon and energy source for C. cellulolyticum, whereas D. vulgaris and G. sulfurreducens derived carbon and energy from the metabolic products of cellobiose fermentation and were provided with sulfate and fumarate respectively as electron acceptors. Results qPCR monitoring of the culture revealed C. cellulolyticum to be dominant as expected and confirmed the presence of D. vulgaris and G. sulfurreducens. Proposed metabolic modeling of carbon and electron flow of the three-species community indicated that the growth of C. cellulolyticum and D. vulgaris were electron donor limited whereas G. sulfurreducens was electron acceptor limited. Conclusions The results demonstrate that C. cellulolyticum, D. vulgaris, and G. sulfurreducens can be grown in coculture in a continuous culture system in which D. vulgaris and G. sulfurreducens are dependent upon the metabolic byproducts of C. cellulolyticum for nutrients. This represents a step towards developing a tractable model ecosystem comprised of members representing the functional groups of a trophic network.

  6. Interaction of Pubertal Development and Metabolic Control in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Plamper

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In T1DM, delayed pubertal development and reduced final height are associated with inadequate metabolic control. Objective. To assess whether T1DM affects pubertal growth spurt and whether metabolic control during puberty is gender-related. Methods. Using a large multicentre database, longitudinal data from 1294 patients were analysed. Inclusion criteria: complete records of height and HbA1c from the age of seven to 16 years. Exclusion criteria: other significant chronic diseases and medications, T1DM duration less than three months, and initial BMI 97th percentile. Results. Growth velocity (GV was impaired with a significant reduction of peak GV by 1.2 cm in boys. HbA1c increase during male puberty was lower except for a period of 1.5 years. The highest HbA1c increase in boys coincided with maximum growth spurt. In girls, the highest HbA1c increase was observed during late puberty. Even though there is impaired GV, both sexes reach a height at 16 years of age which corresponds to the background population height. Conclusion. Worsening of metabolic control is sex-discordant and associated with gender-specific alterations of GV. However, the vast majority of boys and girls with T1DM seems to reach normal height at the age of 16 years.

  7. Complex interactions between dietary and genetic factors impact lycopene metabolism and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Nancy E.; Erdman, John W.; Clinton, Steven K.

    2013-01-01

    Intake of lycopene, a red, tetraterpene carotenoid found in tomatoes is epidemiologically associated with a decreased risk of chronic disease processes, and lycopene has demonstrated bioactivity in numerous in vitro and animal models. However, our understanding of absorption, tissue distribution, and biological impact in humans remains very limited. Lycopene absorption is strongly impacted by dietary composition, especially the amount of fat. Concentrations of circulating lycopene in lipoproteins may be further influenced by a number of variations in genes related to lipid absorption and metabolism. Lycopene is not uniformly distributed among tissues, with adipose, liver, and blood being the major body pools, while the testes, adrenals, and liver have the greatest concentrations compared to other organs. Tissue concentrations of lycopene are likely dictated by expression of and genetic variation in lipoprotein receptors, cholesterol transporters, and carotenoid metabolizing enzymes, thus impacting lycopene accumulation at target sites of action. The novel application of genetic evaluation in concert with lycopene tracers will allow determination of which genes and polymorphisms define individual lycopene metabolic phenotypes, response to dietary variables, and ultimately determine biological and clinical outcomes. A better understanding of the relationship between diet, genetics, and lycopene distribution will provide necessary information to interpret epidemiological findings more accurately and to design effective, personalized clinical nutritional interventions addressing hypotheses regarding health outcomes. PMID:23845854

  8. Complex metabolic interactions between benzo(a)pyrene and tributyltin in presence of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane in South American catfish Rhamdia quelen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Heloísa H P; Babin, Mathieu; Garcia, Juan Ramon Esquivel; Filipak Neto, Francisco; Randi, Marco A F; Oliveira Ribeiro, Ciro A; Pelletier, Émilien

    2013-10-01

    In an attempt to explore complex metabolic interactions between toxicants present in polluted freshwater, hepatic metabolism of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and tributyltin (TBT) in fish was investigated when these compounds were administrated alone, mixed together and along with dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT). Ten Rhamdia quelen per group were treated with a single intra-peritoneal (IP) dose (5-day experiment) or three successive doses (15-day experiment) either containing BaP (0.3; 3 or 30mgkg(-1)) or TBT (0.03; 0.3 or 3mgkg(-1)) or a combination of BaP+TBT, BaP+DDT, TBT+DDT and BaP+TBT+DDT under their respective lower doses, with DDT dose kept at 0.03mgkg(-1). Tetrahydroxy-benzo(a)pyrene (BaP-tetrol-I), and dibutyltin (DBT) and monobutyltin (MBT) were analyzed to assess BaP and TBT hepatic metabolism, respectively. A significant difference in BaP-tetrol-I concentration was observed in liver and bile between the lowest and the highest doses of BaP in both 5 and 15-day experiments. In the 15-day experiment, the presence of TBT with BaP reduced the amount of BaP-tetrol-I in bile compared to the BaP alone. The time of exposure and the number of doses affected BaP-tetrol-I concentration in the bile of fish exposed to BaP 0.3mgkg(-1) and BaP+DDT. TBT and its metabolites concentrations showed a dose-dependent increase in the liver in both experiments and in the bile in the 5-day experiment. TBT at its lowest dose was completely metabolized into DBT and MBT in the liver in the 15-day experiment. No TBT metabolites were detected in the bile of fish exposed to the mixtures in the 5-day experiment, except for a small MBT amount found in BaP+TBT+DDT. This study strengthens the hypothesis of a metabolic interaction between BaP and TBT in fish and suggests DDT as an important third player when present in the mixture. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Interactions between urinary 4-tert-octylphenol levels and metabolism enzyme gene variants on idiopathic male infertility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Qin

    Full Text Available Octylphenol (OP and Trichlorophenol (TCP act as endocrine disruptors and have effects on male reproductive function. We studied the interactions between 4-tert-Octylphenol (4-t-OP, 4-n- Octylphenol (4-n-OP, 2,3,4-Trichlorophenol (2,3,4-TCP, 2,4,5-Trichlorophenol (2,4,5-TCP urinary exposure levels and polymorphisms in selected xenobiotic metabolism enzyme genes among 589 idiopathic male infertile patients and 396 controls in a Han-Chinese population. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS was used to measure alkylphenols and chlorophenols in urine. Polymorphisms were genotyped using the SNPstream platform and the Taqman method. Among four phenols that were detected, we found that only exposure to 4-t-OP increased the risk of male infertility (P(trend = 1.70×10(-7. The strongest interaction was between 4-t-OP and rs4918758 in CYP2C9 (P(inter = 6.05×10(-7. It presented a significant monotonic increase in risk estimates for male infertility with increasing 4-t-OP exposure levels among men with TC/CC genotype (low level compared with non-exposed, odds ratio (OR = 2.26, 95% confidence intervals (CI = 1.06, 4.83; high level compared with non-exposed, OR = 9.22, 95% CI = 2.78, 30.59, but no associations observed among men with TT genotype. We also found interactions between 4-t-OP and rs4986894 in CYP2C19, and between rs1048943 in CYP1A1, on male infertile risk (P(inter = 8.09×10(-7, P(inter = 3.73×10(-4, respectively.We observed notable interactions between 4-t-OP exposure and metabolism enzyme gene polymorphisms on idiopathic infertility in Han-Chinese men.

  10. Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Xenobiotic Nuclear Receptor Interactions Regulate Energy Metabolism, Behavior, and Inflammation in Non-alcoholic-Steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlang, Banrida; Prough, Russell A; Falkner, K Cameron; Hardesty, Josiah E; Song, Ming; Clair, Heather B; Clark, Barbara J; States, J Christopher; Arteel, Gavin E; Cave, Matthew C

    2016-02-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are environmental pollutants associated with non-alcoholic-steatohepatitis (NASH), diabetes, and obesity. We previously demonstrated that the PCB mixture, Aroclor 1260, induced steatohepatitis and activated nuclear receptors in a diet-induced obesity mouse model. This study aims to evaluate PCB interactions with the pregnane-xenobiotic receptor (Pxr: Nr1i2) and constitutive androstane receptor (Car: Nr1i3) in NASH. Wild type C57Bl/6 (WT), Pxr(-/-) and Car(-/-) mice were fed the high fat diet (42% milk fat) and exposed to a single dose of Aroclor 1260 (20 mg/kg) in this 12-week study. Metabolic phenotyping and analysis of serum, liver, and adipose was performed. Steatohepatitis was pathologically similar in all Aroclor-exposed groups, while Pxr(-/-) mice displayed higher basal pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Pxr repressed Car expression as evident by increased basal Car/Cyp2b10 expression in Pxr(-/-) mice. Both Pxr(-/-) and Car(-/-) mice showed decreased basal respiratory exchange rate (RER) consistent with preferential lipid metabolism. Aroclor increased RER and carbohydrate metabolism, associated with increased light cycle activity in both knockouts, and decreased food consumption in the Car(-/-) mice. Aroclor exposure improved insulin sensitivity in WT mice but not glucose tolerance. The Aroclor-exposed, Pxr(-/-) mice displayed increased gluconeogenic gene expression. Lipid-oxidative gene expression was higher in WT and Pxr(-/-) mice although RER was not changed, suggesting PCB-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, Pxr and Car regulated inflammation, behavior, and energy metabolism in PCB-mediated NASH. Future studies should address the 'off-target' effects of PCBs in steatohepatitis. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. Low-dose aspartame consumption differentially affects gut microbiota-host metabolic interactions in the diet-induced obese rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie S A Palmnäs

    Full Text Available Aspartame consumption is implicated in the development of obesity and metabolic disease despite the intention of limiting caloric intake. The mechanisms responsible for this association remain unclear, but may involve circulating metabolites and the gut microbiota. Aims were to examine the impact of chronic low-dose aspartame consumption on anthropometric, metabolic and microbial parameters in a diet-induced obese model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into a standard chow diet (CH, 12% kcal fat or high fat (HF, 60% kcal fat and further into ad libitum water control (W or low-dose aspartame (A, 5-7 mg/kg/d in drinking water treatments for 8 week (n = 10-12 animals/treatment. Animals on aspartame consumed fewer calories, gained less weight and had a more favorable body composition when challenged with HF compared to animals consuming water. Despite this, aspartame elevated fasting glucose levels and an insulin tolerance test showed aspartame to impair insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in both CH and HF, independently of body composition. Fecal analysis of gut bacterial composition showed aspartame to increase total bacteria, the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium leptum. An interaction between HF and aspartame was also observed for Roseburia ssp wherein HF-A was higher than HF-W (P<0.05. Within HF, aspartame attenuated the typical HF-induced increase in the Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio. Serum metabolomics analysis revealed aspartame to be rapidly metabolized and to be associated with elevations in the short chain fatty acid propionate, a bacterial end product and highly gluconeogenic substrate, potentially explaining its negative affects on insulin tolerance. How aspartame influences gut microbial composition and the implications of these changes on the development of metabolic disease require further investigation.

  12. Low-dose aspartame consumption differentially affects gut microbiota-host metabolic interactions in the diet-induced obese rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmnäs, Marie S A; Cowan, Theresa E; Bomhof, Marc R; Su, Juliet; Reimer, Raylene A; Vogel, Hans J; Hittel, Dustin S; Shearer, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Aspartame consumption is implicated in the development of obesity and metabolic disease despite the intention of limiting caloric intake. The mechanisms responsible for this association remain unclear, but may involve circulating metabolites and the gut microbiota. Aims were to examine the impact of chronic low-dose aspartame consumption on anthropometric, metabolic and microbial parameters in a diet-induced obese model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into a standard chow diet (CH, 12% kcal fat) or high fat (HF, 60% kcal fat) and further into ad libitum water control (W) or low-dose aspartame (A, 5-7 mg/kg/d in drinking water) treatments for 8 week (n = 10-12 animals/treatment). Animals on aspartame consumed fewer calories, gained less weight and had a more favorable body composition when challenged with HF compared to animals consuming water. Despite this, aspartame elevated fasting glucose levels and an insulin tolerance test showed aspartame to impair insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in both CH and HF, independently of body composition. Fecal analysis of gut bacterial composition showed aspartame to increase total bacteria, the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium leptum. An interaction between HF and aspartame was also observed for Roseburia ssp wherein HF-A was higher than HF-W (Paspartame attenuated the typical HF-induced increase in the Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio. Serum metabolomics analysis revealed aspartame to be rapidly metabolized and to be associated with elevations in the short chain fatty acid propionate, a bacterial end product and highly gluconeogenic substrate, potentially explaining its negative affects on insulin tolerance. How aspartame influences gut microbial composition and the implications of these changes on the development of metabolic disease require further investigation.

  13. Interaction between leucine and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition in modulating insulin sensitivity and lipid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu L

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lizhi Fu,1 Fenfen Li,1 Antje Bruckbauer,2 Qiang Cao,1 Xin Cui,1 Rui Wu,1 Hang Shi,1 Bingzhong Xue,1 Michael B Zemel21Department of Biology, Center for Obesity Reversal, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, 2NuSirt Biopharma Inc., Nashville, TN, USA Purpose: Leucine activates SIRT1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK signaling and markedly potentiates the effects of other sirtuin and AMPK activators on insulin signaling and lipid metabolism. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition increases nitric oxide–cGMP signaling, which in turn exhibits a positive feedback loop with both SIRT1 and AMPK, thus amplifying peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator α (PGC1α-mediated effects. Methods: We evaluated potential synergy between leucine and PDE5i on insulin sensitivity and lipid metabolism in vitro and in diet-induced obese (DIO mice. Results: Leucine (0.5 mM exhibited significant synergy with subtherapeutic doses (0.1–10 nM of PDE5-inhibitors (sildenafil and icariin on fat oxidation, nitric oxide production, and mitochondrial biogenesis in hepatocytes, adipocytes, and myotubes. Effects on insulin sensitivity, glycemic control, and lipid metabolism were then assessed in DIO-mice. DIO-mice exhibited fasting and postprandial hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis, which were not affected by the addition of leucine (24 g/kg diet. However, the combination of leucine and a subtherapeutic dose of icariin (25 mg/kg diet for 6 weeks reduced fasting glucose (38%, P<0.002, insulin (37%, P<0.05, area under the glucose tolerance curve (20%, P<0.01, and fully restored glucose response to exogenous insulin challenge. The combination also inhibited hepatic lipogenesis, stimulated hepatic and muscle fatty acid oxidation, suppressed hepatic inflammation, and reversed high-fat diet-induced steatosis. Conclusion: These robust improvements in insulin sensitivity, glycemic control, and lipid metabolism indicate therapeutic potential for

  14. Metabolomic profiling identifies potential pathways involved in the interaction of iron homeostasis with glucose metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Stechemesser

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Elevated serum ferritin has been linked to type 2 diabetes (T2D and adverse health outcomes in subjects with the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS. As the mechanisms underlying the negative impact of excess iron have so far remained elusive, we aimed to identify potential links between iron homeostasis and metabolic pathways. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, data were obtained from 163 patients, allocated to one of three groups: (1 lean, healthy controls (n = 53, (2 MetS without hyperferritinemia (n = 54 and (3 MetS with hyperferritinemia (n = 56. An additional phlebotomy study included 29 patients with biopsy-proven iron overload before and after iron removal. A detailed clinical and biochemical characterization was obtained and metabolomic profiling was performed via a targeted metabolomics approach. Results: Subjects with MetS and elevated ferritin had higher fasting glucose (p < 0.001, HbA1c (p = 0.035 and 1 h glucose in oral glucose tolerance test (p = 0.002 compared to MetS subjects without iron overload, whereas other clinical and biochemical features of the MetS were not different. The metabolomic study revealed significant differences between MetS with high and low ferritin in the serum concentrations of sarcosine, citrulline and particularly long-chain phosphatidylcholines. Methionine, glutamate, and long-chain phosphatidylcholines were significantly different before and after phlebotomy (p < 0.05 for all metabolites. Conclusions: Our data suggest that high serum ferritin concentrations are linked to impaired glucose homeostasis in subjects with the MetS. Iron excess is associated to distinct changes in the serum concentrations of phosphatidylcholine subsets. A pathway involving sarcosine and citrulline also may be involved in iron-induced impairment of glucose metabolism. Author Video: Author Video Watch what authors say about their articles Keywords: Metabolomics, Hyperferritinemia, Iron overload, Metabolic

  15. MetExploreViz: web component for interactive metabolic network visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazalviel, Maxime; Frainay, Clément; Poupin, Nathalie; Vinson, Florence; Merlet, Benjamin; Gloaguen, Yoann; Cottret, Ludovic; Jourdan, Fabien

    2017-09-15

    MetExploreViz is an open source web component that can be easily embedded in any web site. It provides features dedicated to the visualization of metabolic networks and pathways and thus offers a flexible solution to analyze omics data in a biochemical context. Documentation and link to GIT code repository (GPL 3.0 license)are available at this URL: http://metexplore.toulouse.inra.fr/metexploreViz/doc /. Tutorial is available at this URL. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Aldosterone and parathyroid hormone interactions as mediators of metabolic and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomaschitz, A.; Ritz, E.; Pieske, B.; Rus-Machan, J.; Kienreich, K.; Verheyen, N.; Gaksch, M.; Grubler, M.; Fahrleitner-Pammer, A.; Mrak, P.; Toplak, H.; Kraigher-Krainer, E.; Marz, W.; Pilz, S.

    2014-01-01

    Inappropriate aldosterone and parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion is strongly linked with development and progression of cardiovascular (CV) disease. Accumulating evidence suggests a bidirectional interplay between parathyroid hormone and aldosterone. This interaction may lead to a disproportionally

  17. Genetic Determinants of Cardio-Metabolic Risk: A Proposed Model for Phenotype Association and Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackett, Piers R; Sanghera, Dharambir K

    2012-01-01

    This review provides a translational and unifying summary of metabolic syndrome genetics and highlights evidence that genetic studies are starting to unravel and untangle origins of the complex and challenging cluster of disease phenotypes. The associated genes effectively express in the brain, liver, kidney, arterial endothelium, adipocytes, myocytes and β cells. Progression of syndrome traits has been associated with ectopic lipid accumulation in the arterial wall, visceral adipocytes, myocytes, and liver. Thus it follows that the genetics of dyslipidemia, obesity, and non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD) disease are central in triggering progression of the syndrome to overt expression of disease traits, and have become a key focus of interest for early detection and for designing prevention and treatments. To support the “birds’ eye view” approach we provide a road-map depicting commonality and interrelationships between the traits and their genetic and environmental determinants based on known risk factors, metabolic pathways, pharmacological targets, treatment responses, gene networks, pleiotropy, and association with circadian rhythm. Although only a small portion of the known heritability is accounted for and there is insufficient support for clinical application of gene-based prediction models, there is direction and encouraging progress in a rapidly moving field that is beginning to show clinical relevance. PMID:23351585

  18. Regulation of energy metabolism during social interactions in rainbow trout: a role for AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, K M; Craig, P M; Dhillon, R S; Lau, G Y; Richards, J G

    2017-11-01

    Rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ) confined in pairs form social hierarchies in which subordinate fish typically experience fasting and high circulating cortisol levels, resulting in low growth rates. The present study investigated the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in mediating metabolic adjustments associated with social status in rainbow trout. After 3 days of social interaction, liver AMPK activity was significantly higher in subordinate than dominant or sham (fish handled in the same fashion as paired fish but held individually) trout. Elevated liver AMPK activity in subordinate fish likely reflected a significantly higher ratio of phosphorylated AMPK (phospho-AMPK) to total AMPK protein, which was accompanied by significantly higher AMPKα 1 relative mRNA abundance. Liver ATP and creatine phosphate concentrations in subordinate fish also were elevated, perhaps as a result of AMPK activity. Sham fish that were fasted for 3 days exhibited effects parallel to those of subordinate fish, suggesting that low food intake was an important trigger of elevated AMPK activity in subordinate fish. Effects on white muscle appeared to be influenced by the physical activity associated with social interaction. Overall, muscle AMPK activity was significantly higher in dominant and subordinate than sham fish. The ratio of phospho-AMPK to total AMPK protein in muscle was highest in subordinate fish, while muscle AMPKα 1 relative mRNA abundance was elevated by social dominance. Muscle ATP and creatine phosphate concentrations were high in dominant and subordinate fish at 6 h of interaction and decreased significantly thereafter. Collectively, the findings of the present study support a role for AMPK in mediating liver and white muscle metabolic adjustments associated with social hierarchy formation in rainbow trout. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Blood lead levels, iron metabolism gene polymorphisms and homocysteine: a gene-environment interaction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Lee, Mee-Ri; Lim, Youn-Hee; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2017-12-01

    Homocysteine has been causally associated with various adverse health outcomes. Evidence supporting the relationship between lead and homocysteine levels has been accumulating, but most prior studies have not focused on the interaction with genetic polymorphisms. From a community-based prospective cohort, we analysed 386 participants (aged 41-71 years) with information regarding blood lead and plasma homocysteine levels. Blood lead levels were measured between 2001 and 2003, and plasma homocysteine levels were measured in 2007. Interactions of lead levels with 42 genotyped single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five genes ( TF , HFE , CBS , BHMT and MTR ) were assessed via a 2-degree of freedom (df) joint test and a 1-df interaction test. In secondary analyses using imputation, we further assessed 58 imputed SNPs in the TF and MTHFR genes. Blood lead concentrations were positively associated with plasma homocysteine levels (p=0.0276). Six SNPs in the TF and MTR genes were screened using the 2-df joint test, and among them, three SNPs in the TF gene showed interactions with lead with respect to homocysteine levels through the 1-df interaction test (plead levels. Blood lead levels were positively associated with plasma homocysteine levels measured 4-6 years later, and three SNPs in the TF gene modified the association. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter johnsonii C6, an Environmental Isolate Engaging in Interspecific Metabolic Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaas, Rolf Sommer; Mordhorst, Hanne; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter johnsonii C6 originates from creosote-polluted groundwater and performs ecological and evolutionary interactions with Pseudomonas putida in biofilms. The draft genome of A. johnsonii C6 is 3.7 Mbp and was shaped by mobile genetic elements. It reveals genes facilitating the biodegrad......Acinetobacter johnsonii C6 originates from creosote-polluted groundwater and performs ecological and evolutionary interactions with Pseudomonas putida in biofilms. The draft genome of A. johnsonii C6 is 3.7 Mbp and was shaped by mobile genetic elements. It reveals genes facilitating...

  1. Interactions of calcium homeostasis, acetylcholine metabolism, behavior and 3, 4-diaminopyridine during aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, G.E.; Peterson, C.

    1986-01-01

    Acetylcholine synthesis declines with aging in both whole brain and in various brain regions. Since neither enzyme activities nor acetylcholine concentrations, accurately reflect the dynamics of the cholinergic system, in vivo acetylcholine formation was measured. Incorporation of U-C 14-glucose of 2 H 4 choline into whole brain acetylcholine decreases from 100% (3 months) in two strains of mice. The diminished synthesis is apparently not due to a lack of precursor availability because U- C 14-glucose and 2 H 4 choline entry into the brain is similar at all ages. It is shown that altered brain calcium homeostasis during aging may underlie the deficits in acetylcholine metabolism, as well as those in behavior. Diminished calcium uptake during aging parallels the decline in the calcium dependent release of acetylcholine

  2. Metabolic interaction between n-hexane and toluene in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perbellini, L.; Brugnone, F.; Leone, R.; Fracasso, M.E.; Venturini, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    Metabolic interference between n-hexane and toluene was studied both in vivo and in vitro. In in vivo experiments the urinary excretion of n-hexane and toluene metabolites was tested in rats treated with the two solvents separately or in combination. The same experimental program was repeated in rats pretreated with phenobarbital (PB). The urinary excretion of n-hexane metabolites in rats treated with the two solvents showed a significantly decreased excretion of all n-hexane metabolites in comparison with those treated with n-hexane alone. In rats pretreated with PB the excretion of n-hexane metabolites was significantly higher compared with that of unpretreated rats; the combined administration of the two solvents showed in this case, too, that n-hexane metabolite excretion was less than that found in rats treated with n-hexane alone. The biotransformation of toluene to o-cresol and hippuric acid studied in the urine of rats treated with or without n-hexane and pretreated or not with PB did not show any difference. The in vitro metabolic interference was studied by measuring the disappearance of solvents from rat's incubated liver microsomes. The inhibition constant of toluene on n-hexane biotransformation was 7.5 ..mu..M and that of n-hexane on toluene was 30 ..mu..M. The data show that a mutual non-competitive interference exists in vitro between n-hexane and toluene. The interference of toluene on n-hexane biotransformation was detectable also in vivo experiments, while n-hexane did not modify the biotransformation of toluene.

  3. Interactions between vertebrate hemoglobins and red cell proteins: Possible roles in regulating cellular metabolism and rheology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Roy E.

    2007-01-01

    , chicken and human cdB3 peptides on O2 binding properties of fish, bird and mammalian Hbs are consistent with such a role in endothermic, but not in ectothermic, vertebrates3. Measurements of the interaction between Hbs and anionic domains of Band 3, other membrane proteins and intracellular proteins (band...

  4. In vivo imaging and tracking of host-microbiota interactions via metabolic labeling of gut anaerobic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geva-Zatorsky, Naama; Alvarez, David; Hudak, Jason E.; Reading, Nicola C.; Erturk-Hasdemir, Deniz; Dasgupta, Suryasarathi; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Kasper, Dennis L.

    2015-01-01

    The intestine is densely populated by anaerobic commensal bacteria. These microorganisms shape immune system development, but our understanding of host–commensal interactions is hampered by a lack of tools for studying the anaerobic intestinal environment. We applied metabolic oligosaccharide engineering and bioorthogonal click-chemistry to label various commensal anaerobes, including Bacteroides fragilis, a common and immunologically important commensal. We studied the dissemination of B. fragilis following acute peritonitis, and characterized the interactions of the intact microbe and its polysaccharide components in myeloid and B cell lineages. The distribution and colonization of labeled B. fragilis along the intestine can be assessed, as well as niche competition following coadministration of multiple species of the microbiota. Nine additional anaerobic commensals (both gram-negative and gram-positive) from three phyla common in the gut—Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria—and five families and one aerobic pathogen (Staphylococcus aureus) were also fluorescently labeled. This strategy permits visualization of the anaerobic microbial niche by various methods, including intravital two-photon microscopy and non-invasive whole-body imaging, and an approach to study microbial colonization and host–microbe interactions in real-time. PMID:26280120

  5. Robustness in Regulatory Interaction Networks. A Generic Approach with Applications at Different Levels: Physiologic, Metabolic and Genetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demongeot, Jacques; Ben Amor, Hedi; Elena, Adrien; Gillois, Pierre; Noual, Mathilde; Sené, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    Regulatory interaction networks are often studied on their dynamical side (existence of attractors, study of their stability). We focus here also on their robustness, that is their ability to offer the same spatiotemporal patterns and to resist to external perturbations such as losses of nodes or edges in the networks interactions architecture, changes in their environmental boundary conditions as well as changes in the update schedule (or updating mode) of the states of their elements (e.g., if these elements are genes, their synchronous coexpression mode versus their sequential expression). We define the generic notions of boundary, core, and critical vertex or edge of the underlying interaction graph of the regulatory network, whose disappearance causes dramatic changes in the number and nature of attractors (e.g., passage from a bistable behaviour to a unique periodic regime) or in the range of their basins of stability. The dynamic transition of states will be presented in the framework of threshold Boolean automata rules. A panorama of applications at different levels will be given: brain and plant morphogenesis, bulbar cardio-respiratory regulation, glycolytic/oxidative metabolic coupling, and eventually cell cycle and feather morphogenesis genetic control. PMID:20057955

  6. Robustness in Regulatory Interaction Networks. A Generic Approach with Applications at Different Levels: Physiologic, Metabolic and Genetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Sené

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory interaction networks are often studied on their dynamical side (existence of attractors, study of their stability. We focus here also on their robustness, that is their ability to offer the same spatiotemporal patterns and to resist to external perturbations such as losses of nodes or edges in the networks interactions architecture, changes in their environmental boundary conditions as well as changes in the update schedule (or updating mode of the states of their elements (e.g., if these elements are genes, their synchronous coexpression mode versus their sequential expression. We define the generic notions of boundary, core, and critical vertex or edge of the underlying interaction graph of the regulatory network, whose disappearance causes dramatic changes in the number and nature of attractors (e.g., passage from a bistable behaviour to a unique periodic regime or in the range of their basins of stability. The dynamic transition of states will be presented in the framework of threshold Boolean automata rules. A panorama of applications at different levels will be given: brain and plant morphogenesis, bulbar cardio-respiratory regulation, glycolytic/oxidative metabolic coupling, and eventually cell cycle and feather morphogenesis genetic control.

  7. Maternal exposure to di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate exposure deregulates blood pressure, adiposity, cholesterol metabolism and social interaction in mouse offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuan-I; Chiang, Chin-Wei; Lin, Hui-Ching; Zhao, Jin-Feng; Li, Cheng-Ta; Shyue, Song-Kun; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan

    2016-05-01

    Long-term exposure to di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is highly associated with carcinogenicity, fetotoxicity, psychological disorders and metabolic diseases, but the detrimental effects and mechanisms are not fully understood. We investigated the effect of exposing mouse mothers to DEHP, and the underlying mechanism, on blood pressure, obesity and cholesterol metabolism as well as psychological and learning behaviors in offspring. Tail-cuff plethysmography was used for blood pressure measurement; Western blot used was for phosphorylation and expression of protein; hematoxylin and eosin staining, Nissl staining and Golgi staining were used for histological examination. The serum levels of cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose were measured by blood biochemical analysis. Hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride levels were assessed by colorimetric assay kits. Offspring behaviors were evaluated by open-field activity, elevated plus maze, social preference test and Morris water maze. Maternal DEHP exposure deregulated the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and upregulated angiotensin type 1 receptor in offspring, which led to increased blood pressure. It led to obesity in offspring by increasing the size of adipocytes in white adipose tissue and number of adipocytes in brown adipose tissue. It increased the serum level of cholesterol in offspring by decreasing the hepatic capacity for cholesterol clearance. The impaired social interaction ability induced by maternal DEHP exposure might be due to abnormal neuronal development. Collectively, our findings provide new evidence that maternal exposure to DEHP has a lasting effect on the physiological functions of the vascular system, adipose tissue and nerve system in offspring.

  8. The modulation of the symbiont/host interaction between Wolbachia pipientis and Aedes fluviatilis embryos by glycogen metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana da Rocha Fernandes

    Full Text Available Wolbachia pipientis, a maternally transmitted bacterium that colonizes arthropods, may affect the general aspects of insect physiology, particularly reproduction. Wolbachia is a natural endosymbiont of Aedes fluviatilis, whose effects in embryogenesis and reproduction have not been addressed so far. In this context, we investigated the correlation between glucose metabolism and morphological alterations during A. fluviatilis embryo development in Wolbachia-positive (W+ and Wolbachia-negative (W- mosquito strains. While both strains do not display significant morphological and larval hatching differences, larger differences were observed in hexokinase activity and glycogen contents during early and mid-stages of embryogenesis, respectively. To investigate if glycogen would be required for parasite-host interaction, we reduced Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3 levels in adult females and their eggs by RNAi. GSK-3 knock-down leads to embryonic lethality, lower levels of glycogen and total protein and Wolbachia reduction. Therefore, our results suggest that the relationship between A. fluviatilis and Wolbachia may be modulated by glycogen metabolism.

  9. Roostocks/Scion/Nitrogen Interactions Affect Secondary Metabolism in the Grape Berry

    OpenAIRE

    Habran, Aude; Commisso, Mauro; Helwi, Pierre; Hilbert, Ghislaine; Negri, Stefano; Ollat, Nathalie; Gom?s, Eric; van Leeuwen, Cornelis; Guzzo, Flavia; Delrot, Serge

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT : The present work investigates the interactions between soil content, rootstock and scion by focusing on the effects of roostocks and nitrogen supply on grape berry content. Scions of Cabernet Sauvignon (CS) and Pinot Noir (PN) varieties were grafted either on Riparia Gloire de Montpellier (RGM) or 110 Richter (110R) rootstock. The 4 rooststock/scion combinations were fertilized with 3 different levels of nitrogen after fruit set. Both in 2013 and 2014, N supply increased N uptake ...

  10. The Western Diet–Microbiome-Host Interaction and Its Role in Metabolic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit K. Zinöcker

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The dietary pattern that characterizes the Western diet is strongly associated with obesity and related metabolic diseases, but biological mechanisms supporting these associations remain largely unknown. We argue that the Western diet promotes inflammation that arises from both structural and behavioral changes in the resident microbiome. The environment created in the gut by ultra-processed foods, a hallmark of the Western diet, is an evolutionarily unique selection ground for microbes that can promote diverse forms of inflammatory disease. Recognizing the importance of the microbiome in the development of diet-related disease has implications for future research, public dietary advice as well as food production practices. Research into food patterns suggests that whole foods are a common denominator of diets associated with a low level of diet-related disease. Hence, by studying how ultra-processing changes the properties of whole foods and how these foods affect the gut microbiome, more useful dietary guidelines can be made. Innovations in food production should be focusing on enabling health in the super-organism of man and microbe, and stronger regulation of potentially hazardous components of food products is warranted.

  11. Interaction between valproic acid and aspirin in epileptic children: serum protein binding and metabolic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, J M; Abbott, F S; Farrell, K; Ferguson, S; Sheppard, I; Godolphin, W

    1982-05-01

    In five of six epileptic children who were taking 18 to 49 mg/kg/day valproic acid (VPA), the steady-state serum free fractions of VPA rose from 12% to 43% when antipyretic doses of aspirin were also taken. Mean total VPA half-life (t1/2) rose from 10.4 +/- 2.7 to 12.9 +/- 1.8 hr and mean free VPA t1/2 rose from 6.7 +/- to 2.1 to 8.9 +2- 3.0 hr when salicylate was present in the serum. The in vitro albumin binding association constant (ka) for VPA was decreased by salicylate, but the in vivo ka value was not affected. The 12-hr (trough) concentrations of both free and total VPA were higher in the presence of serum salicylate in five of six patients. Renal excretion of unchanged VPA decreased in five of six patients, but the VPA carboxyl conjugate metabolite-excretion patterns were not consistently affected. Salicylate appeared to displace VPA from serum albumin in vivo, but the increased VPA t1/2 and changes in VPA elimination patterns suggest that serum salicylate also altered VPA metabolism.

  12. Assessing SNP-SNP interactions among DNA repair, modification and metabolism related pathway genes in breast cancer susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Sapkota

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWASs have identified low-penetrance common variants (i.e., single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs associated with breast cancer susceptibility. Although GWASs are primarily focused on single-locus effects, gene-gene interactions (i.e., epistasis are also assumed to contribute to the genetic risks for complex diseases including breast cancer. While it has been hypothesized that moderately ranked (P value based weak single-locus effects in GWASs could potentially harbor valuable information for evaluating epistasis, we lack systematic efforts to investigate SNPs showing consistent associations with weak statistical significance across independent discovery and replication stages. The objectives of this study were i to select SNPs showing single-locus effects with weak statistical significance for breast cancer in a GWAS and/or candidate-gene studies; ii to replicate these SNPs in an independent set of breast cancer cases and controls; and iii to explore their potential SNP-SNP interactions contributing to breast cancer susceptibility. A total of 17 SNPs related to DNA repair, modification and metabolism pathway genes were selected since these pathways offer a priori knowledge for potential epistatic interactions and an overall role in breast carcinogenesis. The study design included predominantly Caucasian women (2,795 cases and 4,505 controls from Alberta, Canada. We observed two two-way SNP-SNP interactions (APEX1-rs1130409 and RPAP1-rs2297381; MLH1-rs1799977 and MDM2-rs769412 in logistic regression that conferred elevated risks for breast cancer (P(interaction<7.3 × 10(-3. Logic regression identified an interaction involving four SNPs (MBD2-rs4041245, MLH1-rs1799977, MDM2-rs769412, BRCA2-rs1799943 (P(permutation = 2.4 × 10(-3. SNPs involved in SNP-SNP interactions also showed single-locus effects with weak statistical significance, while BRCA2-rs1799943 showed stronger statistical significance (P

  13. Na+/K+-ATPase interaction with methylglyoxal as reactive metabolic side product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svrckova, Marika; Zatloukalova, Martina; Dvorakova, Petra; Coufalova, Dominika; Novak, David; Hernychova, Lenka; Vacek, Jan

    2017-07-01

    Proteins are subject to oxidative modification and the formation of adducts with a broad spectrum of reactive species via enzymatic and non-enzymatic mechanisms. Here we report that in vitro non-enzymatic methylglyoxal (MGO) binding causes the inhibition and formation of MGO advanced glycation end-products (MAGEs) in Na + /K + -ATPase (NKA). Concretely, MGO adducts with NKA amino acid residues (mainly Arg) and N ε -(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) formation were found. MGO is not only an inhibitor for solubilized NKA (IC 50 =91±16μM), but also for reconstituted NKA in the lipid bilayer environment, which was clearly demonstrated using a DPPC/DPPE liposome model in the presence or absence of the NKA-selective inhibitor ouabain. High-resolution mass spectrometric analysis of a tryptic digest of NKA isolated from pig (Sus scrofa) kidney indicates that the intracellular α-subunit is naturally (post-translationally) modified by MGO in vivo. In contrast to this, the β-subunit could only be modified by MGO artificially, and the transmembrane part of the protein did not undergo MGO binding under the experimental setup used. As with bovine serum albumin, serving as the water-soluble model, we also demonstrated a high binding capacity of MGO to water-poorly soluble NKA using a multi-spectral methodology based on electroanalytical, immunochemical and fluorimetric tools. In addition, a partial suppression of the MGO-mediated inhibitory effect could be observed in the presence of aminoguanidine (pimagedine), a glycation suppressor and MGO-scavenger. All the results here were obtained with the X-ray structure of NKA in the E1 conformation (3WGV) and could be used in the further interpretation of the functionality of this key enzyme in the presence of highly-reactive metabolic side-products, glycation agents and generally under oxidative stress conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Interactive effects of seawater acidification and elevated temperature on biomineralization and amino acid metabolism in the mussel Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiguo; Liu, Chuang; Huang, Jingliang; Liu, Yangjia; Zheng, Guilan; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-11-01

    Seawater acidification and warming resulting from anthropogenic production of carbon dioxide are increasing threats to marine ecosystems. Previous studies have documented the effects of either seawater acidification or warming on marine calcifiers; however, the combined effects of these stressors are poorly understood. In our study, we examined the interactive effects of elevated carbon dioxide partial pressure (P(CO2)) and temperature on biomineralization and amino acid content in an ecologically and economically important mussel, Mytilus edulis. Adult M. edulis were reared at different combinations of P(CO2) (pH 8.1 and 7.8) and temperature (19, 22 and 25°C) for 2 months. The results indicated that elevated P(CO2) significantly decreased the net calcification rate, the calcium content and the Ca/Mg ratio of the shells, induced the differential expression of biomineralization-related genes, modified shell ultrastructure and altered amino acid content, implying significant effects of seawater acidification on biomineralization and amino acid metabolism. Notably, elevated temperature enhanced the effects of seawater acidification on these parameters. The shell breaking force significantly decreased under elevated P(CO2), but the effect was not exacerbated by elevated temperature. The results suggest that the interactive effects of seawater acidification and elevated temperature on mussels are likely to have ecological and functional implications. This study is therefore helpful for better understanding the underlying effects of changing marine environments on mussels and other marine calcifiers. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Association and Interaction Effect of AGTR1 and AGTR2 Gene Polymorphisms with Dietary Pattern on Metabolic Risk Factors of Cardiovascular Disease in Malaysian Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Yap, Roseline Wai Kuan; Shidoji, Yoshihiro; Yap, Wai Sum; Masaki, Motofumi

    2017-01-01

    Gene-diet interaction using a multifactorial approach is preferred to study the multiple risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study examined the association and gene-diet interaction effects of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) gene (rs5186), and type 2 receptor (AGTR2) gene (rs1403543) polymorphisms on metabolic risk factors of CVD in Malaysian adults. CVD parameters (BMI, blood pressure, glycated hemoglobin, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides, low-density lipoprote...

  16. Roostocks/scion/ nitrogen interactions affect secondary metabolism in the grape berry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aude Habran

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT : The present work investigates the interactions between soil content, rootstock and scion by focusing on the effects of roostocks and nitrogen supply on grape berry content. Scions of Cabernet Sauvignon (CS and Pinot Noir (PN varieties were grafted either on Riparia Gloire de Montpellier (RGM or 110 Richter (110R rootstock. The 4 rooststock/scion combinations were fertilized with 3 different levels of nitrogen after fruit set. Both in 2013 and 2014, N supply increased N uptake by the plants, and N content both in vegetative and reproductory organs. Rootstock, variety and year affected berry weight at harvest, while nitrogen did not affect significantly this parameter. Grafting on RGM consistently increased berry weight compared to 110R. PN consistently produced bigger berries than CS. CS berries were heavier in 2014 than in 2013, but the year effect was less marked for PN berries. The berries were collected between veraison and maturity, separated in skin and pulp, and their content was analyzed by conventional analytical procedures and untargeted metabolomics. For anthocyanins, the relative quantitation was fairly comparable with both LC-MS determination and HPLC-DAD, which is a fully quantitative technique. The data show complex responses of the metabolite content (sugars, organic acids, amino acids, anthocyanins, flavonols, flavan-3-ols/procyanidins, stilbenes, hydroxycinnamic and hydroxybenzoic acids. that depend on the rootstock, the scion, the vintage, the nitrogen level, the berry compartment. This opens a wide range of possibilities to adjust the content of these compounds through the choice of the roostock, variety and nitrogen fertilization.

  17. Roostocks/Scion/Nitrogen Interactions Affect Secondary Metabolism in the Grape Berry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habran, Aude; Commisso, Mauro; Helwi, Pierre; Hilbert, Ghislaine; Negri, Stefano; Ollat, Nathalie; Gomès, Eric; van Leeuwen, Cornelis; Guzzo, Flavia; Delrot, Serge

    2016-01-01

    The present work investigates the interactions between soil content, rootstock, and scion by focusing on the effects of roostocks and nitrogen supply on grape berry content. Scions of Cabernet Sauvignon (CS) and Pinot Noir (PN) varieties were grafted either on Riparia Gloire de Montpellier (RGM) or 110 Richter (110R) rootstock. The 4 rooststock/scion combinations were fertilized with 3 different levels of nitrogen after fruit set. Both in 2013 and 2014, N supply increased N uptake by the plants, and N content both in vegetative and reproductory organs. Rootstock, variety and year affected berry weight at harvest, while nitrogen did not affect significantly this parameter. Grafting on RGM consistently increased berry weight compared to 110R. PN consistently produced bigger berries than CS. CS berries were heavier in 2014 than in 2013, but the year effect was less marked for PN berries. The berries were collected between veraison and maturity, separated in skin and pulp, and their content was analyzed by conventional analytical procedures and untargeted metabolomics. For anthocyanins, the relative quantitation was fairly comparable with both LC-MS determination and HPLC-DAD, which is a fully quantitative technique. The data show complex responses of the metabolite content (sugars, organic acids, amino acids, anthocyanins, flavonols, flavan-3-ols/procyanidins, stilbenes, hydroxycinnamic, and hydroxybenzoic acids) that depend on the rootstock, the scion, the vintage, the nitrogen level, the berry compartment. This opens a wide range of possibilities to adjust the content of these compounds through the choice of the roostock, variety and nitrogen fertilization.

  18. Interactive effects of dietary arginine and Eimeria acervulina infection on broiler growth performance and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochell, S J; Helmbrecht, A; Parsons, C M; Dilger, R N

    2017-03-01

    The influence of dietary Arg concentration and Eimeria acervulina infection on broiler growth performance and plasma carotenoid, nitric oxide (NO), amino acid, and urea concentrations was evaluated. Male Ross × Ross 308 broilers (384 total) were fed a common diet for 10 d post-hatch and provided experimental diets formulated to contain 1.23 (HA) or 0.74% (LA) standardized ileal digestible Arg from 10 to 28 d. At 21 d, one-half of the broilers were switched to the opposite diet to create 4 dietary regimens where birds were fed the LA diet throughout, the LA diet replaced by the HA diet at 21 d, the HA diet throughout, or the HA diet replaced by the LA diet at 21 d. Broilers were orally inoculated 0 (uninfected) or 3.5 × 105 sporulated E. acervulina oocysts at 15 d, resulting in a factorial arrangement of 4 dietary regimens × 2 infection states (8 replicates/treatment). Overall (10 to 28 d) BW gain and G:F were greatest (P Eimeria acervulina infection decreased (P  0.05) of E. acervulina on BW gain or G:F of broilers from 21 to 28 d. Plasma Arg, Lys, and Orn levels at 21 d indicated that the LA diet caused an imbalance in the Lys and Arg status of broilers, and E. acervulina infection increased (P < 0.01) the plasma concentration of these 3 amino acids. Diet × infection interactions (P < 0.05) were observed on 21 d for plasma carotenoids and NO, whereby infection decreased plasma carotenoids and increased plasma NO, but dietary Arg concentration only influenced these measures for uninfected birds. Thus, production of NO during E. acervulina infection was not impaired by dietary Arg limitation. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  19. Role of thioproline on seed germination: interaction ROS-ABA and effects on antioxidative metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba-Espin, Gregorio; Nicolas, Eduardo; Almansa, Maria Soledad; Cantero-Navarro, Elena; Albacete, Alfonso; Hernández, José Antonio; Díaz-Vivancos, Pedro

    2012-10-01

    In this work we investigate the effect of the imbibition of pea seeds with different thioproline (TP) concentrations on the germination percentage and the early growth of the seedlings. The interaction between TP and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) treatments is also analysed in order to test if any synergy in germination and growth occurs. Although the imbibition of pea seeds in the presence of TP did not significantly improve the germination percentage, TP and/or H₂O₂ pre-treatments increased seedlings growth. This increase in seedling growth was reduced by abscisic acid (ABA) addition. Imbibition of pea seeds in the presence of ABA also reduced the endogenous H₂O₂ contents of pea seedlings in control and TP-treated seeds. The incubation of pea seeds with TP and/or H₂O₂ in presence or absence of ABA decreased the activity of H₂O₂-scavenging enzymes. The increase of the endogenous H₂O₂ contents observed in TP and/or H₂O₂ treatments in absence of ABA could be correlated with the decrease in these activities. Finally, the hormone profile of pea seedlings was investigated. The results show that the increase in seedling growth is correlated with a decrease in ABA in samples pre-treated with H₂O₂ and TP + H₂O₂. Nevertheless, no significant differences in endogenous ABA concentration were observed with the TP pre-treatment. This paper suggests a relationship between endogenous H₂O₂ contents and plant growth, so reinforcing the intricate crosstalk between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and plant hormones in seed germination signalling and early seedling development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of interaction between Melanocortin-4 receptor polymorphism and dietary factors on the risk of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koochakpoor, Gelareh; Daneshpour, Maryam S; Mirmiran, Parvin; Hosseini, Seyed Ahmad; Hosseini-Esfahani, Firoozeh; Sedaghatikhayat, Bahareh; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2016-01-01

    Controversial data is available on the effect of the Melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) gene variation on metabolic syndrome (MetS) and ineffectiveness of diet in managing MetS. Effects of the interaction between MC4R polymorphism and dietary factors on MetS were investigated in this study. Subjects of this nested case-control study were selected from among participants of Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. Each case (n = 815) was pair matched randomly with a control by age (±5 years) and sex from among those who had not developed ≥1 MetS components at the time that the corresponding case developed MetS. Dietary patterns were determined using factor analysis on 25 foods groups using a valid and reliable, 168-item semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). MC4R rs12970134 were genotyped by Tetra-Primer ARMS-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Adjusted conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the interactions of SNP with quartiles of dietary factors in relation to MetS. MetS was defined by the modified National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment panel III. Two dietary patterns were extracted. The healthy dietary pattern was loaded heavily on vegetables, legumes, low fat dairy, whole grains, liquid oils and fruits; the western dietary pattern consisted of a high intake of soft drinks, fast foods, sweets, solid oils, red meats, salty snacks, refined grains, high fat dairy, tea and coffee, eggs and poultry. Among A allele carriers, being in the highest quartiles of western dietary pattern score and saturated fatty acid intake had an increased risk of MetS, compared to those in the lowest quartile (P trend = 0.007). Saturated fatty acid intake could modulate the association of A allele carriers of MC4R with MetS (P interaction = 0.03). A significant interaction was observed between rs12970134 with total fat and iron intake on the risk of abdominal obesity (P interaction < 0.05). Our findings suggest an interaction between rs

  1. Interactive Roles of DNA Helicases and Translocases with the Single-Stranded DNA Binding Protein RPA in Nucleic Acid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awate, Sanket; Brosh, Robert M

    2017-06-08

    Helicases and translocases use the energy of nucleoside triphosphate binding and hydrolysis to unwind/resolve structured nucleic acids or move along a single-stranded or double-stranded polynucleotide chain, respectively. These molecular motors facilitate a variety of transactions including replication, DNA repair, recombination, and transcription. A key partner of eukaryotic DNA helicases/translocases is the single-stranded DNA binding protein Replication Protein A (RPA). Biochemical, genetic, and cell biological assays have demonstrated that RPA interacts with these human molecular motors physically and functionally, and their association is enriched in cells undergoing replication stress. The roles of DNA helicases/translocases are orchestrated with RPA in pathways of nucleic acid metabolism. RPA stimulates helicase-catalyzed DNA unwinding, enlists translocases to sites of action, and modulates their activities in DNA repair, fork remodeling, checkpoint activation, and telomere maintenance. The dynamic interplay between DNA helicases/translocases and RPA is just beginning to be understood at the molecular and cellular levels, and there is still much to be learned, which may inform potential therapeutic strategies.

  2. Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry: An Attractive and Prospective Method for the Quantitative Bioanalysis in Drug Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Han, Jie; Sun, Shi-an; Chen, Kai; Tang, Dao-quan

    2016-01-01

    During the development, dosage optimization and safety evaluation of a drug, rapid and precise monitoring of administered drug and/or its metabolites in biological samples including blood, plasma, serum, tissues and saliva are vital. As drug biotransformation produces more hydrophilic metabolites for the enhancement of drug elimination, which is often a challenge for traditional reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) separation. Because hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) is capable of retaining polar compounds and readily compatible with mass spectrometry (MS), HILIC has been used as a complementary separation technique to RPLC for analysis of polar metabolites, especially polar drugs and their metabolites. This review covers core aspects of HILIC-MS/MS method and overall profile of its application in analysis of drug and/or its metabolites. The emphasis of this paper has been placed on the applications of HILIC-MS/MS method in quantitative bioanalysis of drugs alone or along with their metabolites in drug metabolism studies in recent years. As a fundamental and critical step of bioanalytical method, conventional sample preparation techniques of biological matrices for the HILIC-MS/MS analysis of drugs and/or their metabolites are also briefly featured.

  3. GAIP interacting protein C-terminus regulates autophagy and exosome biogenesis of pancreatic cancer through metabolic pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santanu Bhattacharya

    Full Text Available GAIP interacting protein C terminus (GIPC is known to play an important role in a variety of physiological and disease states. In the present study, we have identified a novel role for GIPC as a master regulator of autophagy and the exocytotic pathways in cancer. We show that depletion of GIPC-induced autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells, as evident from the upregulation of the autophagy marker LC3II. We further report that GIPC regulates cellular trafficking pathways by modulating the secretion, biogenesis, and molecular composition of exosomes. We also identified the involvement of GIPC on metabolic stress pathways regulating autophagy and microvesicular shedding, and observed that GIPC status determines the loading of cellular cargo in the exosome. Furthermore, we have shown the overexpression of the drug resistance gene ABCG2 in exosomes from GIPC-depleted pancreatic cancer cells. We also demonstrated that depletion of GIPC from cancer cells sensitized them to gemcitabine treatment, an avenue that can be explored as a potential therapeutic strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer.

  4. FTO rs9939609 Does Not Interact with Physical Exercise but Influences Basal Insulin Metabolism in Brazilian Overweight and Obese Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle Araujo do Nascimento

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The rs9939609 SNP (T > A in FTO gene is associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. The present study aimed at verifying whether this SNP influenced biochemical outcomes of children and adolescents who are overweight/obese submitted to a program of physical exercise and also if there was influence on basal levels of these biochemical variables. Methods. The sample was composed by 432 children and adolescents grouped in three ways (obese, overweight, and normal weight; of these, 135 children and adoloescents who are obese and overweight were submitted to a physical exercise program for 12 weeks. All were genotyped by TaqMan SNP genotyping assay. Results. The children and adolescents who are overweight/obese and carriers of AA genotype had higher levels of insulin (p=0.03 and HOMA (p=0.007 and lower levels of glucose (p=0.003, but the SNP did not modulate the response to physical exercise. Conclusions. In our study, the rs9939609 AA genotype was associated with parameters related to insulin metabolism but did not interact with physical exercise.

  5. Interactions between the metabolism of L-leucine and D-glucose in the pancreatic. beta. -cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gylfe, E; Sehlin, J [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Histology

    1976-01-01

    ..beta..-cell-rich pancreatic islets microdissected from obese-hyperglycemic mice were used to study interactions between the metabolism of L-leucine and D-glucose. L-leucine reduced the islet content of aspartic acid whereas D-glucose, when added to L-leucine-incubated islets, increased the contents of aspartic acid and ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid (GABA). D-glucose also increased the incorporation of L-leucine carbon into aspartic acid, GABA and glutamic acid, suggesting stimulation of a malate shuttle mechanism. When expressed per mole of the individual amino acids, the incorporation of L-leucine carbon into GABA was 2.5 - 4 times higher than into glutamic acid indicating intracellular compartmentation of the latter amino acid. Both L-leucine and D-leucine stimulated /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from /sup 14/C-labelled D-glucose. L-leucine did not affect /sup 3/H/sub 2/O production from tritiated D-glucose. The present data do not indicate a role of other amino acids or D-glucose in L-leucine-stimulated insulin release.

  6. Metabolism and interactions of pesticides in human and animal in vitro hepatic models

    OpenAIRE

    Abass, K. M. (Khaled M.)

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Risk assessment of chemicals needs reliable scientific information and one source of information is the characterization of the metabolic fate and toxicokinetics of a chemical. Metabolism is often the most important factor contributing to toxicokinetics. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes are a superfamily of microsomal proteins playing a pivotal role in xenobiotic metabolism. In the present study, pesticides were used as representative xenobiotics since exposure to pesticides is ...

  7. Response to ‘comment on recent modeling studies of astrocyte–neuron metabolic interactions': much ado about nothing

    OpenAIRE

    Mangia, Silvia; DiNuzzo, Mauro; Giove, Federico; Carruthers, Anthony; Simpson, Ian A; Vannucci, Susan J

    2011-01-01

    For many years, a tenet of cerebral metabolism held that glucose was the obligate energy substrate of the mammalian brain and that neuronal oxidative metabolism represented the majority of this glucose utilization. In 1994, Pellerin and Magistretti formulated the astrocyte–neuron lactate shuttle (ANLS) hypothesis, in which astrocytes, not neurons, metabolized glucose, with subsequent transport of the glycolytically derived lactate to fuel the energy needs of the neuron during neurotransmissio...

  8. Cytochrome P450s: mechanisms and biological implications in drug metabolism and its interaction with oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Sinha, Krishnendu; Sil, Parames C

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome monooxygenases P450 enzymes (CYPs) are terminal oxidases, belonging to the multi-gene family of heme-thiolate enzymes and located in multiple sites of ER, cytosol and mitochondria. CYPs act as catalysts in drugs metabolism. This review highlights the mitochondrial and microsomal CYPs metabolic functions, CYPs mediated ROS generation and its feedback, bioactivation of drugs and related hypersensitivity, metabolic disposition as well as the therapeutic approaches. CYPs mediated drugs bioactivation may trigger oxidative stress and cause pathophysiology. Almost all drugs show some adverse reactions at high doses or accidental overdoses. Drugs lead to hypersensitivity reactions while metabolic predisposition to drug hypersensitivity exaggerates it. Mostly different intermediate bioactive products of CYPs mediated drug metabolism is the principal issue in this respect. On the other hand, CYPs are the main source of ROS. Their generation and feedback are of major concern of this review. Besides drug metabolism, CYPs also contribute significantly to carcinogen metabolism. Ultimately other enzymes in drug metabolism and antioxidant therapy are indispensible. Importance of this field: In a global sense, understanding of exact mechanism can facilitate pharmaceutical industries' challenge of developing drugs without toxicity. Ultimate message: This review would accentuate the recent advances in molecular mechanism of CYPs mediated drug metabolism and complex cross-talks between various restorative novel strategies evolved by CYPs to sustain the redox balance and limit the source of oxidative stress.

  9. Differential interaction of hGDH1 and hGDH2 with manganese: Implications for metabolism and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimovasili, Christina; Aschner, Michael; Plaitakis, Andreas; Zaganas, Ioannis

    2015-09-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element that serves as co-factor for many important mammalian enzymes. In humans, the importance of this cation is highlighted by the fact that low levels of Mn cause developmental and metabolic abnormalities and, on the other hand, chronic exposure to excessive amounts of Mn is characterized by neurotoxicity, possibly mediated by perturbation of astrocytic mitochondrial energy metabolism. Here we sought to study the effect of Mn on the two human glutamate dehydrogenases (hGDH1 and hGDH2, respectively), key mitochondrial enzymes involved in numerous cellular processes, including mitochondrial metabolism, glutamate homeostasis and neurotransmission, and cell signaling. Our studies showed that, compared to magnesium (Mg) and calcium (Ca), Mn exerted a significant inhibitory effect on both human isoenzymes with hGDH2 being more sensitive than hGDH1, especially under conditions of low ADP levels. Specifically, in the presence of 0.25 mM ADP, the Mn IC50 was 1.14 ± 0.02 mM and 1.54 ± 0.08 mM for hGDH2 and for hGDH1, respectively (p = 0.0001). Increasing Mn levels potentiated this differential effect, with 3 mM Mn inhibiting hGDH2 by 96.5% and hGDH1 by 70.2%. At 1 mM ADP, the Mn IC50 was 1.84 ± 0.02 mM and 2.04 ± 0.07 mM (p = 0.01) for hGDH2 and hGDH1, respectively, with 3 mM Mn inhibiting hGDH2 by 93.6% and hGDH1 by 70.9%. These results were due to the sigmoidal inhibitory curve of Mn that was more pronounced for hGDH2 than for hGDH1. Indeed, at 0.25 mM, the Hill coefficient value was higher for hGDH2 (3.42 ± 0.20) than for hGDH1 (1.94 ± 0.25; p = 0.0002) indicating that interaction of Mn with hGDH2 was substantially more co-operative than for hGDH1. These findings, showing an enhanced sensitivity of the hGDH2 isoenzyme to Mn, especially at low ADP levels, might be of pathophysiological relevance under conditions of Mn neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  10. Fungi, bacteria and soil pH: the oxalate-carbonate pathway as a model for metabolic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gaëtan; Guggiari, Matteo; Bravo, Daniel; Zopfi, Jakob; Cailleau, Guillaume; Aragno, Michel; Job, Daniel; Verrecchia, Eric; Junier, Pilar

    2012-11-01

    The oxalate-carbonate pathway involves the oxidation of calcium oxalate to low-magnesium calcite and represents a potential long-term terrestrial sink for atmospheric CO(2). In this pathway, bacterial oxalate degradation is associated with a strong local alkalinization and subsequent carbonate precipitation. In order to test whether this process occurs in soil, the role of bacteria, fungi and calcium oxalate amendments was studied using microcosms. In a model system with sterile soil amended with laboratory cultures of oxalotrophic bacteria and fungi, the addition of calcium oxalate induced a distinct pH shift and led to the final precipitation of calcite. However, the simultaneous presence of bacteria and fungi was essential to drive this pH shift. Growth of both oxalotrophic bacteria and fungi was confirmed by qPCR on the frc (oxalotrophic bacteria) and 16S rRNA genes, and the quantification of ergosterol (active fungal biomass) respectively. The experiment was replicated in microcosms with non-sterilized soil. In this case, the bacterial and fungal contribution to oxalate degradation was evaluated by treatments with specific biocides (cycloheximide and bronopol). Results showed that the autochthonous microflora oxidized calcium oxalate and induced a significant soil alkalinization. Moreover, data confirmed the results from the model soil showing that bacteria are essentially responsible for the pH shift, but require the presence of fungi for their oxalotrophic activity. The combined results highlight that the interaction between bacteria and fungi is essential to drive metabolic processes in complex environments such as soil. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Metabolic interactions between low doses of benzo[a]pyrene and tributyltin in arctic charr (salvelinus alpinus): a long-term in vivo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padros, Jaime; Pelletier, Emilien; Ribeiro, Ciro Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    We have previously reported that short-term, single exposure to a high dose of tributyltin (TBT), a widely used antifouling biocide, inhibited both the in vivo metabolism and metabolic activation of the carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in fish; (BaP), in turn, stimulated TBT metabolism. Here, we provide further mechanistic evidence of mutual metabolic interactions between BaP and TBT in response to long-term, repeated exposures to low doses. Juvenile Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) received 10 separate ip injections (a single injection every 6 days) of BaP (3 mg/kg), TBT (0.3 mg/kg), or both in combination; control fish received corn oil vehicle only. Two days after the 2nd (Day 8), 6 th (Day 32), and 10th dose (Day 56), blood, bile, and liver samples were collected and analyzed for a suite of biomarkers. HPLC/fluorescence analysis indicated that TBT cotreatment inhibited the formation of (+)-anti-BaP diol-epoxide adducts with plasma albumin (53%, Day 8), hepatic DNA (27%, Day 32), or both albumin and globin (50 and 58%, Day 56) compared to BaP alone. This antagonistic interaction was associated with a time-dependent modulation (inhibition at Day 8, enhancement at Day 32) of both cytochrome P450 (P450)1A-mediated ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity and biliary BaP metabolite formation. TBT cotreatment also inhibited (39%) the BaP-mediated induction of hepatic glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity observed at Day 8. Treatment with TBT alone increased EROD activity (60%) at Day 32, but decreased both GST activity (70 and 37%) and glutathione content (24% and 16%) at Days 32 and 56, respectively. GC/MS analysis revealed that, at Day 56, BaP cotreatment increased (200%) the levels of biliary butyltin compounds, including mono- and dibutyltin metabolites. This potentiative interaction was associated with a protective effect of BaP cotreatment against the TBT-mediated decreases in GST activity and glutathione content. The

  12. A study for association and interaction analysis to metabolic syndrome and the ESR1 gene on cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in a Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fangfang; Zhou, Linuo; Tang, Zihui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association and interaction of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and estrogen receptor alpha 1 (ESR1) gene polymorphisms on cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN). A large-scale, population-based study was conducted to analyze the interaction of MetS and ESR1 gene polymorphisms to CAN, including a total of 1977 Chinese subjects. The most common studied single nucleotide polymorphism of ESR1 gene-rs9340799, was genotyped. Multiple logistic regression (MLR) was performed to evaluate the interaction effect of environmental variables and gene polymorphisms. Interaction on an additive scale can be calculated by using the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI), the proportion attributable to interaction (AP), and the synergy index (S). After controlling potential confounders, MLR showed that significant association between MetS and CAN (p interaction was estimated by using RETI = 0.396 (95 % CI 0.262 to 0.598), AP = 0.216 (95 % CI -0.784 to 1.216) and S = 1.906 (95 % CI 0.905 to 4.015). The present findings suggest that MetS is significantly associated with CAN and provide evidence for the hypothesis that MetS and ESR1 gene polymorphism (rs9340799) have interactive effects on CAN. ClinicalTrials gov Identifier NCT02461342.

  13. Differential metabolic responses of Beauveria bassiana cultured in pupae extracts, root exudates and its interactions with insect and plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Feifei; Wang, Qian; Yin, Chunlin; Ge, Yinglu; Hu, Fenglin; Huang, Bo; Zhou, Hong; Bao, Guanhu; Wang, Bin; Lu, Ruili; Li, Zengzhi

    2015-09-01

    Beauveria bassiana is a kind of world-wide entomopathogenic fungus and can also colonize plant rhizosphere. Previous researches showed differential expression of genes when entomopathogenic fungi are cultured in insect or plant materials. However, so far there is no report on metabolic alterations of B. bassiana in the environments of insect or plant. The purpose of this paper is to address this problem. Herein, we first provide the metabolomic analysis of B. bassiana cultured in insect pupae extracts (derived from Euproctis pseudoconspersa and Bombyx mori, EPP and BMP), plant root exudates (derived from asparagus and carrot, ARE and CRE), distilled water and minimal media (MM), respectively. Principal components analysis (PCA) shows that mycelia cultured in pupae extracts and root exudates are evidently separated and individually separated from MM, which indicates that fungus accommodates to insect and plant environments by different metabolic regulation mechanisms. Subsequently, orthogonal projection on latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) identifies differential metabolites in fungus under three environments relative to MM. Hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) is performed to cluster compounds based on biochemical relationships, showing that sphingolipids are increased in BMP but are decreased in EPP. This observation further implies that sphingolipid metabolism may be involved in the adaptation of fungus to different hosts. In the meantime, sphingolipids are significantly decreased in root exudates but they are not decreased in distilled water, suggesting that some components of the root exudates can suppress sphingolipid to down-regulate sphingolipid metabolism. Pathway analysis finds that fatty acid metabolism is maintained at high level but non-ribosomal peptides (NRP) synthesis is unaffected in mycelia cultured in pupae extracts. In contrast, fatty acid metabolism is not changed but NRP synthesis is high in mycelia cultured in root exudates

  14. The EGF repeat-specific O-GlcNAc-transferase Eogt interacts with notch signaling and pyrimidine metabolism pathways in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reto Müller

    Full Text Available The O-GlcNAc transferase Eogt modifies EGF repeats in proteins that transit the secretory pathway, including Dumpy and Notch. In this paper, we show that the Notch ligands Delta and Serrate are also substrates of Eogt, that mutation of a putative UDP-GlcNAc binding DXD motif greatly reduces enzyme activity, and that Eogt and the cytoplasmic O-GlcNAc transferase Ogt have distinct substrates in Drosophila larvae. Loss of Eogt is larval lethal and disrupts Dumpy functions, but does not obviously perturb Notch signaling. To identify novel genetic interactions with eogt, we investigated dominant modification of wing blister formation caused by knock-down of eogt. Unexpectedly, heterozygosity for several members of the canonical Notch signaling pathway suppressed wing blister formation. And importantly, extensive genetic interactions with mutants in pyrimidine metabolism were identified. Removal of pyrimidine synthesis alleles suppressed wing blister formation, while removal of uracil catabolism alleles was synthetic lethal with eogt knock-down. Therefore, Eogt may regulate protein functions by O-GlcNAc modification of their EGF repeats, and cellular metabolism by affecting pyrimidine synthesis and catabolism. We propose that eogt knock-down in the wing leads to metabolic and signaling perturbations that increase cytosolic uracil levels, thereby causing wing blister formation.

  15. Carnobacterium species: Effect of metabolic activity and interaction with Brochothrix thermosphacta on sensory characteristics of modified atmosphere packed shrimp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Birgit Groth; Leisner, J.J.; Dalgaard, Paw

    2006-01-01

    of Carnobacterium divergens, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, and Carnobacterium mobile. Metabolic activity was studied in cooked and peeled modified atmosphere packed (MAP) shrimp at 5 degrees C as carnobacteria has been anticipated to contribute to spoilage of shrimp products. C. divergens and C. maltaromaticum...... caused sensory spoilage of shrimps and generated ammonia, tyramine, and various alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones. The effects of Carnobacterium species on the growth and metabolism of Brochothrix thermosphacta were also evaluated, but metabiosis between the two groups of bacteria was not observed. C...

  16. Interaction between udenafil and tamsulosin in rats: non-competitive inhibition of tamsulosin metabolism by udenafil via hepatic CYP3A1/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, HE; Bae, SK; Yoo, M; Lee, DC; Kim, YG; Lee, MG

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Orthostatic hypotension has been observed when PDE 5 (cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase type 5) inhibitors are co-administered with α-adrenoceptor antagonists. Here we assessed the pharmacokinetic and haemodynamic interactions between udenafil and tamsulosin in rats, as both drugs are metabolized via rat hepatic cytochrome P450 3A1/2. Experimental approach: Interactions between the two drugs were evaluated in rats after simultaneous 1 or 15 min i.v. infusion or after p.o. administration of udenafil (30 mg·kg−1) and/or tamsulosin (1 mg·kg−1). In vitro metabolism of tamsulosin with udenafil was measured to obtain the inhibition constant (Ki) and [I]/Ki ratio of udenafil. Key results: The total area under the plasma concentration–time curve from time zero to time infinity (AUC)s (or AUC0–4h) of tamsulosin were significantly greater after 15 min of i.v. infusion or after oral administration with udenafil, compared with tamsulosin alone. The hepatic first-pass metabolism of tamsulosin was inhibited by udenafil, and the inhibition in vitro was in a non-competitive mode. The arterial systolic blood pressure was significantly lower at 5, 10 and 60 min after oral co-administration of the drugs. Conclusions and implications: The significantly greater AUC of tamsulosin after i.v. and p.o. administration of both drugs may be attributable to non-competitive inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A1/2-mediated hepatic tamsulosin metabolism by udenafil. The inhibition was also observed in human liver S9 fractions, suggesting that a reassessment of the oral dosage of tamsulosin is necessary when udenafil and tamsulosin are co-administered to patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:19254278

  17. Drug-drug interaction and doping, part 1: an in vitro study on the effect of non-prohibited drugs on the phase I metabolic profile of toremifene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarino, Monica; de la Torre, Xavier; Fiacco, Ilaria; Palermo, Amelia; Botrè, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    The present study was designed to provide preliminary information on the potential impact of metabolic drug-drug interaction on the effectiveness of doping control strategies currently followed by the anti-doping laboratories to detect the intake of banned agents. In vitro assays based on the use of human liver microsomes and recombinant CYP isoforms were designed and performed to characterize the phase I metabolic profile of the prohibited agent toremifene, selected as a prototype drug of the class of selective oestrogen receptor modulators, both in the absence and in the presence of medicaments (fluconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole, miconazole, cimetidine, ranitidine, fluoxetine, paroxetine, nefazodone) not included in the World Anti-Doping Agency list of prohibited substances and methods and frequently administered to athletes. The results show that the in vitro model developed in this study was adequate to simulate the in vivo metabolism of toremifene, confirming the results obtained in previous studies. Furthermore, our data also show that ketoconazole, itraconazole, miconazole and nefazodone cause a marked modification in the production of the metabolic products (i.e. hydroxylated and carboxylated metabolites) normally selected by the anti-doping laboratories as target analytes to detect toremifene intake; moderate variations were registered in the presence of fluconazole, paroxetine and fluoxetine; while no significant modifications were measured in the presence of ranitidine and cimetidine. This evidence imposes that the potential effect of drug-drug interactions is duly taken into account in anti-doping analysis, also for a broader significance of the analytical results. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Reconstruction of the yeast protein-protein interaction network involved in nutrient sensing and global metabolic regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nandy, Subir Kumar; Jouhten, Paula; Nielsen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    proteins. Despite the value of BioGRID for studying protein-protein interactions, there is a need for manual curation of these interactions in order to remove false positives. RESULTS: Here we describe an annotated reconstruction of the protein-protein interactions around four key nutrient......) and for all the interactions between them (edges). The annotated information is readily available utilizing the functionalities of network modelling tools such as Cytoscape and CellDesigner. CONCLUSIONS: The reported fully annotated interaction model serves as a platform for integrated systems biology studies...

  19. Genetic polymorphisms and possible gene-gene interactions in metabolic and DNA repair genes: Effects on DNA damage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Naccarati, Alessio; Souček, P.; Štětina, R.; Haufroid, V.; Kumar, R.; Vodičková, Ludmila; Trtková, K.; Dušinská, M.; Hemminki, K.; Vodička, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 593, 1-2 (2006), s. 22-31 ISSN 0027-5107 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/03/0437 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : Single-strand breaks * Genetic polymorphisms * Metabolism Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.111, year: 2006

  20. Final Report for Project "A high-throughput pipeline for mapping inter-species interactions and metabolic synergy relevant to next-generation biofuel production"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segre, Daniel [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Marx, Christopher J. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Northen, Trent [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2018-01-03

    The goal of our project was to implement a pipeline for the systematic, computationally-driven study and optimization of microbial interactions and their effect on lignocellulose degradation and biofuel production. We specifically sought to design and construct artificial microbial consortia that could collectively degrade lignocellulose from plant biomass, and produce precursors of energy-rich biofuels. This project fits into the bigger picture goal of helping identify a sustainable strategy for the production of energy-rich biofuels that would satisfy the existing energy constraints and demand of our society. Based on the observation that complex natural microbial communities tend to be metabolically efficient and ecologically robust, we pursued the study of a microbial system in which the desired engineering function is achieved through division of labor across multiple microbial species. Our approach was aimed at bypassing the complexity of natural communities by establishing a rational approach to design small synthetic microbial consortia. Towards this goal, we combined multiple approaches, including computer modeling of ecosystem-level microbial metabolism, mass spectrometry of metabolites, genetic engineering, and experimental evolution. The microbial production of biofuels from lignocellulose is a complex, multi-step process. Microbial consortia are an ideal approach to consolidated bioprocessing: a community of microorganisms performs a wide variety of functions more efficiently and is more resilient to environmental perturbations than a microbial monoculture. Each organism we chose for this project addresses a specific challenge: lignin degradation (Pseudomonas putida); (hemi)cellulose degradation (Cellulomonas fimi); lignin degradation product demethoxylation (Methylobacterium spp); generation of biofuel lipid precursors (Yarrowia lipolytica). These organisms are genetically tractable, aerobic, and have been used in biotechnological applications

  1. Pan-pathway based interaction profiling of FDA-approved nucleoside and nucleobase analogs with enzymes of the human nucleotide metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeblad, Louise; Welin, Martin; Flodin, Susanne; Gräslund, Susanne; Wang, Liya; Balzarini, Jan; Eriksson, Staffan; Nordlund, Pär

    2012-01-01

    To identify interactions a nucleoside analog library (NAL) consisting of 45 FDA-approved nucleoside analogs was screened against 23 enzymes of the human nucleotide metabolism using a thermal shift assay. The method was validated with deoxycytidine kinase; eight interactions known from the literature were detected and five additional interactions were revealed after the addition of ATP, the second substrate. The NAL screening gave relatively few significant hits, supporting a low rate of "off target effects." However, unexpected ligands were identified for two catabolic enzymes guanine deaminase (GDA) and uridine phosphorylase 1 (UPP1). An acyclic guanosine prodrug analog, valaciclovir, was shown to stabilize GDA to the same degree as the natural substrate, guanine, with a ΔT(agg) around 7°C. Aciclovir, penciclovir, ganciclovir, thioguanine and mercaptopurine were also identified as ligands for GDA. The crystal structure of GDA with valaciclovir bound in the active site was determined, revealing the binding of the long unbranched chain of valaciclovir in the active site of the enzyme. Several ligands were identified for UPP1: vidarabine, an antiviral nucleoside analog, as well as trifluridine, idoxuridine, floxuridine, zidovudine, telbivudine, fluorouracil and thioguanine caused concentration-dependent stabilization of UPP1. A kinetic study of UPP1 with vidarabine revealed that vidarabine was a mixed-type competitive inhibitor with the natural substrate uridine. The unexpected ligands identified for UPP1 and GDA imply further metabolic consequences for these nucleoside analogs, which could also serve as a starting point for future drug design.

  2. Untangling metabolic and spatial interactions of stress tolerance in plants. 2. Accelerated method for measuring and predicting stress tolerance. Can we unravel the mysteries of the interactions between photosynthesis and respiration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biel, Karl Y; Nishio, John N

    2010-09-01

    A simple method using the O(2) electrode that allows examination of the response of respiration and photosynthesis in leaf slices or algae to anoxia and high light under different temperatures useful for the examination of the interactions among photosynthesis, photorespiration, and respiration is described. The method provides a quantifiable assessment of stress tolerance that also permits us to examine fundamental biochemically and genetically related responses involved in stress tolerance and the cooperation among organelles. Additionally, we demonstrated a role for compounds, such as NO(-)(3) and oxaloacetate, as protective agents against photoinhibition, and we examined the role of dark adaptation in the activation of photosynthesis and NO(-)(3)-dependent O(2) oxygen evolution. A physiological and ecological role of a dark period (night) in stress tolerance is presented. Utilizing the method to follow changes in such metabolic activities as protein synthesis, protein conformation states, enzymes activity, carbon metabolism, and gene expression at different points during the treatments will be educational.

  3. Critical issues in benzene toxicity and metabolism: the effect of interactions with other organic chemicals on risk assessment.

    OpenAIRE

    Medinsky, M A; Schlosser, P M; Bond, J A

    1994-01-01

    Benzene, an important industrial solvent, is also present in unleaded gasoline and cigarette smoke. The hematotoxic effects of benzene are well documented and include aplastic anemia and pancytopenia. Some individuals exposed repeatedly to cytotoxic concentrations of benzene develop acute myeloblastic anemia. It has been hypothesized that metabolism of benzene is required for its toxicity, although administration of no single benzene metabolite duplicates the toxicity of benzene. Several inve...

  4. Sex-specific metabolic interactions between liver and adipose tissue in MCD diet-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Sou Hyun; Kim, Sang-Nam; Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jeong-Dong; Oh, Ji Youn; Jung, Young-Suk

    2016-07-26

    Higher susceptibility to metabolic disease in male exemplifies the importance of sexual dimorphism in pathogenesis. We hypothesized that the higher incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in males involves sex-specific metabolic interactions between liver and adipose tissue. In the present study, we used a methionine-choline deficient (MCD) diet-induced fatty liver mouse model to investigate sex differences in the metabolic response of the liver and adipose tissue. After 2 weeks on an MCD-diet, fatty liver was induced in a sex-specific manner, affecting male mice more severely than females. The MCD-diet increased lipolytic enzymes in the gonadal white adipose tissue (gWAT) of male mice, whereas it increased expression of uncoupling protein 1 and other brown adipocyte markers in the gWAT of female mice. Moreover, gWAT from female mice demonstrated higher levels of oxygen consumption and mitochondrial content compared to gWAT from male mice. FGF21 expression was increased in liver tissue by the MCD diet, and the degree of upregulation was significantly higher in the livers of female mice. The endocrine effect of FGF21 was responsible, in part, for the sex-specific browning of gonadal white adipose tissue. Collectively, these data demonstrated that distinctively female-specific browning of white adipose tissue aids in protecting female mice against MCD diet-induced fatty liver disease.

  5. Metabolic fingerprinting of gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata liver to track interactions between dietary factors and seasonal temperature variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomé S. Silva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Farmed gilthead seabream is sometimes affected by a metabolic syndrome, known as the “winter disease”, which has a significant economic impact in the Mediterranean region. It is caused, among other factors, by the thermal variations that occur during colder months and there are signs that an improved nutritional status can mitigate the effects of this thermal stress. For this reason, a trial was undertaken where we assessed the effect of two different diets on gilthead seabream physiology and nutritional state, through metabolic fingerprinting of hepatic tissue. For this trial, four groups of 25 adult gilthead seabream were reared for 8 months, being fed either with a control diet (CTRL, low-cost commercial formulation or with a diet called “Winter Feed” (WF, high-cost improved formulation. Fish were sampled at two time-points (at the end of winter and at the end of spring, with liver tissue being taken for FT-IR spectroscopy. Results have shown that seasonal temperature variations constitute a metabolic challenge for gilthead seabream, with hepatic carbohydrate stores being consumed over the course of the inter-sampling period. Regarding the WF diet, results point towards a positive effect in terms of performance and improved nutritional status. This diet seems to have a mitigating effect on the deleterious impact of thermal shifts, confirming the hypothesis that nutritional factors can affect the capacity of gilthead seabream to cope with seasonal thermal variations and possibly contribute to prevent the onset of “winter disease”.

  6. Interaction Between the Central and Peripheral Effects of Insulin in Controlling Hepatic Glucose Metabolism in the Conscious Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnanan, Christopher J.; Kraft, Guillaume; Smith, Marta S.; Farmer, Ben; Neal, Doss; Williams, Phillip E.; Lautz, Margaret; Farmer, Tiffany; Donahue, E. Patrick; Cherrington, Alan D.; Edgerton, Dale S.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of hypothalamic insulin action to the regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism in the presence of a normal liver/brain insulin ratio (3:1) is unknown. Thus, we assessed the role of central insulin action in the response of the liver to normal physiologic hyperinsulinemia over 4 h. Using a pancreatic clamp, hepatic portal vein insulin delivery was increased three- or eightfold in the conscious dog. Insulin action was studied in the presence or absence of intracerebroventricularly mediated blockade of hypothalamic insulin action. Euglycemia was maintained, and glucagon was clamped at basal. Both the molecular and metabolic aspects of insulin action were assessed. Blockade of hypothalamic insulin signaling did not alter the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic gluconeogenic gene transcription but blunted the induction of glucokinase gene transcription and completely blocked the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β gene transcription. Thus, central and peripheral insulin action combined to control some, but not other, hepatic enzyme programs. Nevertheless, inhibition of hypothalamic insulin action did not alter the effects of the hormone on hepatic glucose flux (production or uptake). These data indicate that brain insulin action is not a determinant of the rapid (<4 h) inhibition of hepatic glucose metabolism caused by normal physiologic hyperinsulinemia in this large animal model. PMID:23011594

  7. Enhancements of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) metabolism and carcinogenic risk via NNK/arsenic interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.-L.; Chang, Louis W.; Wu, J.-P.; Ueng, Y.-F.; Tsai, M.-H.; Hsieh, Dennis Paul Hsientang; Lin Pinpin

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicated an enhancement of cigarette smoke-induced carcinogenicity, including hepatocellular carcinoma, by arsenic. We believe that arsenic will enhance the expression of hepatic CYP2A enzyme and NNK metabolism (a cigarette smoke component), thus its metabolites, and carcinogenic DNA adducts. Male ICR mice were exposed to NNK (0.5 mg/mouse) and sodium arsenite (0, 10, or 20 mg/kg) daily via gavaging for 10 days and their urine was collected at day 10 for NNK metabolite analysis. Liver samples were also obtained for CYP2A enzyme and DNA adducts evaluations. Both the cyp2a4/5 mRNA levels and the CYP2A enzyme activity were significantly elevated in arsenic-treated mice liver. Furthermore, urinary NNK metabolites in NNK/arsenic co-treated mice also increased compared to those treated with NNK alone. Concomitantly, DNA adducts (N 7 -methylguanine and O 6 -methylguanine) were significantly elevated in the livers of mice co-treated with NNK and arsenic. Our findings provide clear evidence that arsenic increased NNK metabolism by up-regulation of CYP2A expression and activity leading to an increased NNK metabolism and DNA adducts (N 7 -methylguanine and O 6 -methylguanine). These findings suggest that in the presence of arsenic, NNK could induce greater DNA adducts formation in hepatic tissues resulting in higher carcinogenic potential

  8. Evolution of metabolic divergence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during long-term infection facilitates a proto-cooperative interspecies interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenlund Michelsen, Charlotte; Khademi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2016-01-01

    The effect of polymicrobial interactions on pathogen physiology and how it can act either to limit pathogen colonization or to potentiate pathogen expansion and virulence are not well understood. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are opportunistic pathogens commonly found together......1 and DK2-P2M24-2003, which comprised several virulence factors and signaling 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinoline (HAQ) molecules. Strikingly, a further modulation of the HAQ profile was observed in DK2-P2M24-2003 during interaction with S. aureus, resulting in an area with thickened colony morphology...... host-adapted strain, DK2-P2M24-2003, and S. aureus. In this study, characterization by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectral (MS) molecular networking revealed a significant metabolic divergence between P. aeruginosa PAO...

  9. Regulators of nonsulfur purple phototrophic bacteria and the interactive control of CO2 assimilation, nitrogen fixation, hydrogen metabolism and energy generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbs, James M; Tabita, F Robert

    2004-06-01

    For the metabolically diverse nonsulfur purple phototrophic bacteria, maintaining redox homeostasis requires balancing the activities of energy supplying and energy-utilizing pathways, often in the face of drastic changes in environmental conditions. These organisms, members of the class Alphaproteobacteria, primarily use CO2 as an electron sink to achieve redox homeostasis. After noting the consequences of inactivating the capacity for CO2 reduction through the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) pathway, it was shown that the molecular control of many additional important biological processes catalyzed by nonsulfur purple bacteria is linked to expression of the CBB genes. Several regulator proteins are involved, with the two component Reg/Prr regulatory system playing a major role in maintaining redox poise in these organisms. Reg/Prr was shown to be a global regulator involved in the coordinate control of a number of metabolic processes including CO2 assimilation, nitrogen fixation, hydrogen metabolism and energy-generation pathways. Accumulating evidence suggests that the Reg/Prr system senses the oxidation/reduction state of the cell by monitoring a signal associated with electron transport. The response regulator RegA/PrrA activates or represses gene expression through direct interaction with target gene promoters where it often works in concert with other regulators that can be either global or specific. For the key CO2 reduction pathway, which clearly triggers whether other redox balancing mechanisms are employed, the ability to activate or inactivate the specific regulator CbbR is of paramount importance. From these studies, it is apparent that a detailed understanding of how diverse regulatory elements integrate and control metabolism will eventually be achieved.

  10. Interaction with diurnal and circadian regulation results in dynamic metabolic and transcriptional changes during cold acclimation in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Espinoza

    Full Text Available In plants, there is a large overlap between cold and circadian regulated genes and in Arabidopsis, we have shown that cold (4°C affects the expression of clock oscillator genes. However, a broader insight into the significance of diurnal and/or circadian regulation of cold responses, particularly for metabolic pathways, and their physiological relevance is lacking. Here, we performed an integrated analysis of transcripts and primary metabolites using microarrays and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. As expected, expression of diurnally regulated genes was massively affected during cold acclimation. Our data indicate that disruption of clock function at the transcriptional level extends to metabolic regulation. About 80% of metabolites that showed diurnal cycles maintained these during cold treatment. In particular, maltose content showed a massive night-specific increase in the cold. However, under free-running conditions, maltose was the only metabolite that maintained any oscillations in the cold. Furthermore, although starch accumulates during cold acclimation we show it is still degraded at night, indicating significance beyond the previously demonstrated role of maltose and starch breakdown in the initial phase of cold acclimation. Levels of some conventional cold induced metabolites, such as γ-aminobutyric acid, galactinol, raffinose and putrescine, exhibited diurnal and circadian oscillations and transcripts encoding their biosynthetic enzymes often also cycled and preceded their cold-induction, in agreement with transcriptional regulation. However, the accumulation of other cold-responsive metabolites, for instance homoserine, methionine and maltose, did not have consistent transcriptional regulation, implying that metabolic reconfiguration involves complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. These data demonstrate the importance of understanding cold acclimation in the correct day-night context, and are further

  11. Cellular metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, C.E.; Walters, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: chromatin structure; the use of circular synthetic polydeoxynucleotides as substrates for the study of DNA repair enzymes; human cellular kinetic response following exposure to DNA-interactive compounds; histone phosphorylation and chromatin structure in cell proliferation; photoaddition products induced in chromatin by uv light; pollutants and genetic information transfer; altered RNA metabolism as a function of cadmium accumulation and intracellular distribution in cultured cells; and thymidylate chromophore destruction by water free radicals

  12. Association and Interaction Effect of AGTR1 and AGTR2 Gene Polymorphisms with Dietary Pattern on Metabolic Risk Factors of Cardiovascular Disease in Malaysian Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Roseline Wai Kuan; Shidoji, Yoshihiro; Yap, Wai Sum; Masaki, Motofumi

    2017-08-09

    Gene-diet interaction using a multifactorial approach is preferred to study the multiple risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study examined the association and gene-diet interaction effects of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor ( AGTR1 ) gene (rs5186), and type 2 receptor ( AGTR2 ) gene (rs1403543) polymorphisms on metabolic risk factors of CVD in Malaysian adults. CVD parameters (BMI, blood pressure, glycated hemoglobin, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and TC/HDL-C ratio), and constructed dietary patterns "vegetables, fruits, and soy diet" (VFSD), and "rice, egg, and fish diet" (REFD) were obtained from previous studies. Genotyping analysis was performed by real-time PCR using Taqman probes. The subjects were 507 adults (151 Malays; 179 Chinese; and 177 Indians). Significant genetic associations were obtained on blood lipids for rs5186 in Malays and Chinese, and rs1403543 in Chinese females. The significant gene-diet interaction effects after adjusting for potential confounders were: rs5186 × VFSD on blood pressure in Malays ( p = 0.016), and in Chinese on blood lipids for rs5186 × REFD ( p = 0.009-0.023), and rs1403543 × VFSD in female subjects ( p = 0.001-0.011). Malays and Chinese showed higher risk for blood pressure and/or lipids involving rs5186 and rs1403543 SNPs together with gene-diet interactions, but not Indians.

  13. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions ...

  14. Proteomic analysis of ACTN4-interacting proteins reveals it's a putative involvement in mRNA metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khotin, Mikhail; Turoverova, Lidia; Aksenova, Vasilisa; Barlev, Nikolai; Borutinskaite, Veronika Viktorija; Vener, Alexander; Bajenova, Olga; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Pinaev, George P.; Tentler, Dmitri

    2010-01-01

    Alpha-actinin 4 (ACTN4) is an actin-binding protein. In the cytoplasm, ACTN4 participates in structural organisation of the cytoskeleton via cross-linking of actin filaments. Nuclear localisation of ACTN4 has also been reported, but no clear role in the nucleus has been established. In this report, we describe the identification of proteins associated with ACTN4 in the nucleus. A combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE) and MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry revealed a large number of ACTN4-bound proteins that are involved in various aspects of mRNA processing and transport. The association of ACTN4 with different ribonucleoproteins suggests that a major function of nuclear ACTN4 may be regulation of mRNA metabolism and signaling.

  15. Interactive effects of UV-B irradiation and triadimefon on nodulation and nitrogen metabolism in Vigna radiata plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajendiran, K.; Ramanujam, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Supply of aqueous solution of triadimefon (20 mg/cubic dm) to unstressed green gram plants increased the contents of soluble proteins, amino acids, nitrate and nitrite, and the activity of nitrate reductase in the leaves and nitrate reductase in nodules. The nitrogenase activity in nodules and roots was also increased. Number and fresh mass of nodules and their nitrate and nitrite contents were also higher than those of the controls. In contrast, the UV-B stress (12.2 kJ/square m/d) suppressed nodulation and nitrogen metabolism in leaves and roots in comparison with plants under natural UV-B (10 kJ/square m/d). Triadimefon-treated plants did not show such severe inhibitions after exposure to elevated UV-B. Thus, triadimefon increased their tolerance to UV-B stress

  16. Effects of circadian clock genes and health-related behavior on metabolic syndrome in a Taiwanese population: Evidence from association and interaction analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Lin

    Full Text Available Increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MetS has been associated with the circadian clock genes. In this study, we assessed whether 29 circadian clock-related genes (including ADCYAP1, ARNTL, ARNTL2, BHLHE40, CLOCK, CRY1, CRY2, CSNK1D, CSNK1E, GSK3B, HCRTR2, KLF10, NFIL3, NPAS2, NR1D1, NR1D2, PER1, PER2, PER3, REV1, RORA, RORB, RORC, SENP3, SERPINE1, TIMELESS, TIPIN, VIP, and VIPR2 are associated with MetS and its individual components independently and/or through complex interactions in a Taiwanese population. We also analyzed the interactions between environmental factors and these genes in influencing MetS and its individual components. A total of 3,000 Taiwanese subjects from the Taiwan Biobank were assessed in this study. Metabolic traits such as waist circumference, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and fasting glucose were measured. Our data showed a nominal association of MetS with several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in five key circadian clock genes including ARNTL, GSK3B, PER3, RORA, and RORB; but none of these SNPs persisted significantly after performing Bonferroni correction. Moreover, we identified the effect of GSK3B rs2199503 on high fasting glucose (P = 0.0002. Additionally, we found interactions among the ARNTL rs10832020, GSK3B rs2199503, PER3 rs10746473, RORA rs8034880, and RORB rs972902 SNPs influenced MetS (P < 0.001 ~ P = 0.002. Finally, we investigated the influence of interactions between ARNTL rs10832020, GSK3B rs2199503, PER3 rs10746473, and RORB rs972902 with environmental factors such as alcohol consumption, smoking status, and physical activity on MetS and its individual components (P < 0.001 ~ P = 0.002. Our study indicates that circadian clock genes such as ARNTL, GSK3B, PER3, RORA, and RORB genes may contribute to the risk of MetS independently as well as through gene-gene and gene-environment interactions.

  17. Interactions between genetic variants of folate metabolism genes and lifestyle affect plasma homocysteine concentrations in the Boston Puerto Rican Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results of studies investigating relationships between lifestyle factors and elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy), an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, are conflicting. The objective of this study was to investigate genetic and lifestyle factors and their interactions on plasma Hcy c...

  18. Oxidative metabolism of monensin in rat liver microsomes and interactions with tiamulin and other chemotherapeutic agents: evidence for the involvement of cytochrome P-450 3A subfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebbia, C; Ceppa, L; Dacasto, M; Carletti, M; Nachtmann, C

    1999-09-01

    Monensin (MON) is an ionophore antibiotic widely used in veterinary practice as a coccidiostatic or a growth promoter. The aims of this study were to characterize the P-450 isoenzyme(s) involved in the biotransformation of the ionophore and to investigate how this process may be affected by tiamulin and other chemotherapeutic agents known to produce toxic interactions with MON when administered concurrently in vivo. In liver microsomes from untreated rats (UT) or from rats pretreated, respectively, with ethanol (ETOH), beta-naphthoflavone (betaNAF), phenobarbital (PB), pregnenolone 16alpha-carbonitrile (PCN), or dexamethasone (DEX), the rate of MON O-demethylation was the following: DEX > PCN > PB > UT = ETOH > betaNAF; similar results were obtained by measuring total MON metabolism. In addition, the extent of triacetyloleandomycin-mediated P-450 complexes was greatly reduced by the prior addition of 100 microM MON. In DEX-treated microsomes, MON O-demethylation was found to fit monophasic Michaelis-Menten kinetics (K(M) = 67.6 +/- 0.01 microM; V(max) = 4.75 +/- 0.76 nmol/min/mg protein). Tiamulin markedly inhibited this activity in an apparent competitive manner, with a calculated K(i) (Dixon plot) of 8.2 microM and an IC(50) of about 25 microM. At the latter concentration, only ketoconazole or metyrapone, which can bind P-450 3A, inhibited MON O-demethylase to a greater extent than tiamulin, whereas alpha-naphthoflavone, chloramphenicol, or sulphametasine was less effective. These results suggest that P-450 3A plays an important role in the oxidative metabolism of MON and that compounds capable of binding or inhibiting this isoenzyme could be expected to give rise to toxic interactions with the ionophore.

  19. Rutin as a Mediator of Lipid Metabolism and Cellular Signaling Pathways Interactions in Fibroblasts Altered by UVA and UVB Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Gęgotek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Rutin is a natural nutraceutical that is a promising compound for the prevention of UV-induced metabolic changes in skin cells. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of rutin on redox and endocannabinoid systems, as well as proinflammatory and proapoptotic processes, in UV-irradiated fibroblasts. Methods. Fibroblasts exposed to UVA and UVB radiation were treated with rutin. The activities and levels of oxidants/antioxidants and endocannabinoid system components, as well as lipid, DNA, and protein oxidation products, and the proinflammatory and pro/antiapoptotic proteins expression were measured. Results. Rutin reduced UV-induced proinflammatory response and ROS generation and enhanced the activity/levels of antioxidants (SOD, GSH-Px, vitamin E, GSH, and Trx. Rutin also normalized UV-induced Nrf2 expression. Its biological activity prevented changes in the levels of the lipid mediators: MDA, 4-HNE, and endocannabinoids, as well as the endocannabinoid receptors CB1/2, VR1, and GPR55 expression. Furthermore, rutin prevented the protein modifications (tyrosine derivatives formation in particular and decreased the levels of the proapoptotic markers—caspase-3 and cytochrome c. Conclusion. Rutin prevents UV-induced inflammation and redox imbalance at protein and transcriptional level which favors lipid, protein, and DNA protection. In consequence rutin regulates endocannabinoid system and apoptotic balance.

  20. Metabolic interactions between acetaminophen (paracetamol) and two flavonoids, luteolin and quercetin, through in-vitro inhibition studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Kwara, Awewura; Greenblatt, David J

    2017-12-01

    Excessive exposure to acetaminophen (APAP, paracetamol) can cause liver injury through formation of a reactive metabolite that depletes hepatic glutathione and causes hepatocellular oxidative stress and damage. Generation of this metabolite is mediated by Cytochrome-P450 (CYP) isoforms, mainly CYP2E1. A number of naturally occurring flavonoids can mitigate APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in experimental animal models. Our objective was to determine the mechanism of these protective effects and to evaluate possible human applicability. Two flavonoids, luteolin and quercetin, were evaluated as potential inhibitors of eight human CYP isoforms, of six UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms and of APAP glucuronidation and sulfation. The experimental model was based on in-vitro metabolism by human liver microsomes, using isoform-specific substrates. Luteolin and quercetin inhibited human CYP isoforms to varying degrees, with greatest potency towards CYP1A2 and CYP2C8. However, 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC 50 values) were generally in the micromolar range. UGT isoforms were minimally inhibited. Both luteolin and quercetin inhibited APAP sulfation but not glucuronidation. Inhibition of human CYP activity by luteolin and quercetin occurred with IC 50 values exceeding customary in-vivo human exposure with tolerable supplemental doses of these compounds. The findings indicate that luteolin and quercetin are not likely to be of clinical value for preventing or treating APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  1. Macrophage Interaction with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Yeast Cells Modulates Fungal Metabolism and Generates a Response to Oxidative Stress.

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    Juliana Alves Parente-Rocha

    Full Text Available Macrophages are key players during Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection. However, the relative contribution of the fungal response to counteracting macrophage activity remains poorly understood. In this work, we evaluated the P. brasiliensis proteomic response to macrophage internalization. A total of 308 differentially expressed proteins were detected in P. brasiliensis during infection. The positively regulated proteins included those involved in alternative carbon metabolism, such as enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis, beta-oxidation of fatty acids and amino acids catabolism. The down-regulated proteins during P. brasiliensis internalization in macrophages included those related to glycolysis and protein synthesis. Proteins involved in the oxidative stress response in P. brasiliensis yeast cells were also up-regulated during macrophage infection, including superoxide dismutases (SOD, thioredoxins (THX and cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP. Antisense knockdown mutants evaluated the importance of CCP during macrophage infection. The results suggested that CCP is involved in a complex system of protection against oxidative stress and that gene silencing of this component of the antioxidant system diminished the survival of P. brasiliensis in macrophages and in a murine model of infection.

  2. Metabolic Interactions of Purine Derivatives with Human ABC Transporter ABCG2: Genetic Testing to Assess Gout Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Aw, Wanping; Kaneko, Kiyoko

    2013-11-04

    In mammals, excess purine nucleosides are removed from the body by breakdown in the liver and excretion from the kidneys. Uric acid is the end product of purine metabolism in humans. Two-thirds of uric acid in the human body is normally excreted through the kidney, whereas one-third undergoes uricolysis (decomposition of uric acid) in the gut. Elevated serum uric acid levels result in gout and could be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Recent studies have shown that human ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 plays a role of renal excretion of uric acid. Two non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), i.e., 421C>A (major) and 376C>T (minor), in the ABCG2 gene result in impaired transport activity, owing to ubiquitination-mediated proteosomal degradation and truncation of ABCG2, respectively. These genetic polymorphisms are associated with hyperuricemia and gout. Allele frequencies of those SNPs are significantly higher in Asian populations than they are in African and Caucasian populations. A rapid and isothermal genotyping method has been developed to detect the SNP 421C>A, where one drop of peripheral blood is sufficient for the detection. Development of simple genotyping methods would serve to improve prevention and early therapeutic intervention for high-risk individuals in personalized healthcare.

  3. Metabolic Interactions of Purine Derivatives with Human ABC Transporter ABCG2: Genetic Testing to Assess Gout Risk

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    Kiyoko Kaneko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, excess purine nucleosides are removed from the body by breakdown in the liver and excretion from the kidneys. Uric acid is the end product of purine metabolism in humans. Two-thirds of uric acid in the human body is normally excreted through the kidney, whereas one-third undergoes uricolysis (decomposition of uric acid in the gut. Elevated serum uric acid levels result in gout and could be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Recent studies have shown that human ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 plays a role of renal excretion of uric acid. Two non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, i.e., 421C>A (major and 376C>T (minor, in the ABCG2 gene result in impaired transport activity, owing to ubiquitination-mediated proteosomal degradation and truncation of ABCG2, respectively. These genetic polymorphisms are associated with hyperuricemia and gout. Allele frequencies of those SNPs are significantly higher in Asian populations than they are in African and Caucasian populations. A rapid and isothermal genotyping method has been developed to detect the SNP 421C>A, where one drop of peripheral blood is sufficient for the detection. Development of simple genotyping methods would serve to improve prevention and early therapeutic intervention for high-risk individuals in personalized healthcare.

  4. Metabolic Phase I (CYPs) and Phase II (GSTs) Gene Polymorphisms and Their Interaction with Environmental Factors in Nasopharyngeal Cancer from the Ethnic Population of Northeast India.

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    Singh, Seram Anil; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2017-09-26

    Multiple genetic and environmental factors and their interaction are believed to contribute in the pathogenesis of Nasopharyngeal Cancer (NPC). We investigate the role of Metabolic Phase I (CYPs) and Phase II (GSTs) gene polymorphisms, gene-gene and gene-environmental interaction in modulating the susceptibility to NPC in Northeast India. To determine the association of metabolic gene polymorphisms and environmental habits, 123 cases and 189 controls blood/swab samples were used for PCR and confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Analysis for GSTM1 and GSTT1 gene polymorphism was done by multiplex PCR. The T3801C in the 3'- flanking region of CYP1A1 gene was detected by PCR-RFLP method. The Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). The GSTM1 null genotype alone (OR = 2.76) was significantly associated with NPC risk (P < 0.0001). The combinations of GSTM1 null and GSTT1 null genotypes also higher, 3.77 fold (P < 0.0001), risk of NPC, while GSTM1 null genotype along with CYP1A1 T3801C TC + CC genotype had 3.22 (P = 0.001) fold risk. The most remarkable risk was seen among individual carrying GSTM1 null, GSTT1 null genotypes and CYP1A1 T3801C TC + CC genotypes (OR = 5.71, P = 0.001). Further; analyses demonstrate an enhanced risk of NPC in smoked meat (OR = 5.56, P < 0.0001) and fermented fish consumers (OR = 5.73, P < 0.0001) carrying GSTM1 null genotype. An elevated risk of NPC was noted in smokers (OR = 12.67, P < 0.0001) and chewers (OR = 5.68, P < 0.0001) with GSTM1 null genotype. However, smokers had the highest risk of NPC among individuals carrying GSTT1 null genotype (OR = 4.46, P = 0.001) or CYP1A1 T3801C TC + CC genotype (OR = 7.13, P < 0.0001). The association of null genotypes and mutations of metabolic neutralizing genes along with the environmental habits (tobacco smokers and chewers, smoke meat, fermented fishes) can be used as a possible biomarker for

  5. Generation of a multi-locus chicken introgression line to study the effects of genetic interactions on metabolic phenotypes in chickens

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    Weronica eEk

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Most biological traits are regulated by a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. By intercrossing divergent lines, it is possible to identify individual and interacting QTL involved in the genetic architecture of these traits. When the loci have been mapped, alternative strategies are needed for fine-mapping and studying the individual and interactive effects of the QTL in detail. We have previously identified, replicated and fine-mapped a four-locus QTL network that determines nearly half of the eight-fold difference in body-weight at 56 days of age between two divergently selected chicken lines. Here, we describe, to our knowledge, the first generation of a three-locus QTL introgression line in chickens to further study the effect of three of the interacting loci in this network on metabolic phenotypes. Recurrent marker assisted backcrossing was used to simultaneously transfer QTL alleles from the low-weight selected line into the high-weight selected line. Three generations of backcrossing and one generation of intercrossing resulted in an introgression line where all three introgressed QTL and several unlinked and linked control-loci were segregating at nearly expected allele frequencies. We show that marker-based sexing is an efficient method for sexing breeding populations and how intensive selection can be applied using artificial insemination to generate large half-sib families. Based on our empirical observations, we provide recommendations for future introgression-line breeding experiments. In the future, use of this confirmed introgression line will facilitate detailed studies of the effects of genetic interactions on complex traits.

  6. Drosophila melanogaster as a High-Throughput Model for Host-Microbiota Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinder, Mark; Daisley, Brendan A; Dube, Josh S; Reid, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    Microbiota research often assumes that differences in abundance and identity of microorganisms have unique influences on host physiology. To test this concept mechanistically, germ-free mice are colonized with microbial communities to assess causation. Due to the cost, infrastructure challenges, and time-consuming nature of germ-free mouse models, an alternative approach is needed to investigate host-microbial interactions. Drosophila melanogaster (fruit flies) can be used as a high throughput in vivo screening model of host-microbiome interactions as they are affordable, convenient, and replicable. D. melanogaster were essential in discovering components of the innate immune response to pathogens. However, axenic D. melanogaster can easily be generated for microbiome studies without the need for ethical considerations. The simplified microbiota structure enables researchers to evaluate permutations of how each microbial species within the microbiota contribute to host phenotypes of interest. This enables the possibility of thorough strain-level analysis of host and microbial properties relevant to physiological outcomes. Moreover, a wide range of mutant D. melanogaster strains can be affordably obtained from public stock centers. Given this, D. melanogaster can be used to identify candidate mechanisms of host-microbe symbioses relevant to pathogen exclusion, innate immunity modulation, diet, xenobiotics, and probiotic/prebiotic properties in a high throughput manner. This perspective comments on the most promising areas of microbiota research that could immediately benefit from using the D. melanogaster model.

  7. Disease-toxicant interactions in manganese exposed Huntington disease mice: early changes in striatal neuron morphology and dopamine metabolism.

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    Jennifer L Madison

    Full Text Available YAC128 Huntington's disease (HD transgenic mice accumulate less manganese (Mn in the striatum relative to wild-type (WT littermates. We hypothesized that Mn and mutant Huntingtin (HTT would exhibit gene-environment interactions at the level of neurochemistry and neuronal morphology. Twelve-week-old WT and YAC128 mice were exposed to MnCl(2-4H(2O (50 mg/kg on days 0, 3 and 6. Striatal medium spiny neuron (MSN morphology, as well as levels of dopamine (DA and its metabolites (which are known to be sensitive to Mn-exposure, were analyzed at 13 weeks (7 days from initial exposure and 16 weeks (28 days from initial exposure. No genotype-dependent differences in MSN morphology were apparent at 13 weeks. But at 16 weeks, a genotype effect was observed in YAC128 mice, manifested by an absence of the wild-type age-dependent increase in dendritic length and branching complexity. In addition, genotype-exposure interaction effects were observed for dendritic complexity measures as a function of distance from the soma, where only YAC128 mice were sensitive to Mn exposure. Furthermore, striatal DA levels were unaltered at 13 weeks by genotype or Mn exposure, but at 16 weeks, both Mn exposure and the HD genotype were associated with quantitatively similar reductions in DA and its metabolites. Interestingly, Mn exposure of YAC128 mice did not further decrease DA or its metabolites versus YAC128 vehicle exposed or Mn exposed WT mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate Mn-HD disease-toxicant interactions at the onset of striatal dendritic neuropathology in YAC128 mice. Our results identify the earliest pathological change in striatum of YAC128 mice as being between 13 to 16 weeks. Finally, we show that mutant HTT suppresses some Mn-dependent changes, such as decreased DA levels, while it exacerbates others, such as dendritic pathology.

  8. Interactive effects of naphthalene treatment and the onset of vitellogenesis on energy metabolism in liver and gonad, and plasma steroid hormones of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tintos, Adrián; Gesto, Manuel; Alvarez, Rosa; Míguez, Jesús M; Soengas, José L

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess in female fish the possible interaction between treatment with a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) like naphthalene and the onset of vitellogenesis. In a first experiment, female rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) at stages 2-3 (previtellogenesis) or 4 (early vitellogenesis) were intraperitoneally injected (2 microl g(-1)) with vegetable oil alone (control) or containing naphthalene (50 mg kg(-1)) to be sampled 3 h later. A second experiment was similarly designed but using fish intraperitoneally implanted (10 microl g(-1)) with slow-release coconut oil implants alone (control) or containing 50 mg naphthalene kg(-1) body mass that were sampled 3 days after injection. On each sampling time, plasma levels of cortisol and 17beta-estradiol, and several metabolic parameters in plasma, liver and gonad were assessed. In controls, early vitellogenic fish compared with previtellogenic fish displayed changes that in some cases are confirmatory of previous studies whereas in other cases provide new information in plasma (increased amino acid levels), liver (decreased capacity for exporting glucose and reduced amino acid levels) and gonad (decreased amino acid levels). Naphthalene treatment produced in previtellogenic fish decreased 17beta-estradiol levels in plasma, increased plasma glucose or decreased liver gluconeogenic capacity whereas no major effects were noticed on parameters involved in lipid, amino acid and lactate metabolism. Differential effects of naphthalene treatment were noticed in early vitellogenic fish such as decreased 17beta-estradiol and glucose levels in plasma, increased hexokinase and glucokinase and lack of changes in fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase activities in liver, and a lower decrease of amino acid levels in gonad. Those alterations produced by naphthalene treatment resulted in a decreased capacity for covering the energy demand of vitellogenesis in liver and gonad that could contribute to a delay and

  9. Two complementary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods to study the excretion and metabolic interaction of edaravone and taurine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dao-quan; Zheng, Xiao-xiao; Li, Yin-jie; Bian, Ting-ting; Yu, Yan-yan; Du, Qian; Yang, Dong-zhi; Jiang, Shui-shi

    2014-11-01

    In this study, two independent and complementary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods were respectively developed and validated for the determination of edaravone or taurine in rat urine, feces and bile after intravenous administration, using 3-methyl-l-p-tolyl-5-pyrazolone and sulfanilic acid as the internal standards (IS). Edaravone was separated on an Agilent Eclipse Plus C18 column (100×2.1 mm, 3.5 μm) using methanol and water (containing 5 mM ammonium formate and 0.02% formic acid) as mobile phase, while taurine was performed on a Waters Atlantis HILIC Silica column (150×2.1 mm, 3 μm) using acetonitrile and water (containing 5mM ammonium formate and 0.2% formic acid) as mobile phase. The mass analysis was performed in a Triple Quadrupole mass spectrometer via multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) with negative ionization mode. The optimized mass transition ion pairs (m/z) for quantification were 173.1→92.2 and 187.2→106.0 for edaravone and its IS, 124.1→80.0 and 172.0→80.0 for taurine and its IS, respectively. The validated methods have been successfully applied to the excretion and metabolism interaction study of edaravone and taurine in rats after independent intravenous administration and co-administration with a single dose. The results demonstrated that there were no significant alternations on the metabolism and cumulative excretion rate of edaravone and taurine, implying that the proposed combination therapy was pharmacologically viable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The transcriptional regulatory network of Corynebacterium jeikeium K411 and its interaction with metabolic routes contributing to human body odor formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzantny, Helena; Schröder, Jasmin; Strotmeier, Jasmin; Fredrich, Eugenie; Brune, Iris; Tauch, Andreas

    2012-06-15

    Lipophilic corynebacteria are involved in the generation of volatile odorous products in the process of human body odor formation by degrading skin lipids and specific odor precursors. Therefore, these bacteria represent appropriate model systems for the cosmetic industry to examine axillary malodor formation on the molecular level. To understand the transcriptional control of metabolic pathways involved in this process, the transcriptional regulatory network of the lipophilic axilla isolate Corynebacterium jeikeium K411 was reconstructed from the complete genome sequence. This bioinformatic approach detected a gene-regulatory repertoire of 83 candidate proteins, including 56 DNA-binding transcriptional regulators, nine two-component systems, nine sigma factors, and nine regulators with diverse physiological functions. Furthermore, a cross-genome comparison among selected corynebacterial species of the taxonomic cluster 3 revealed a common gene-regulatory repertoire of 44 transcriptional regulators, including the MarR-like regulator Jk0257, which is exclusively encoded in the genomes of this taxonomical subline. The current network reconstruction comprises 48 transcriptional regulators and 674 gene-regulatory interactions that were assigned to five interconnected functional modules. Most genes involved in lipid degradation are under the combined control of the global cAMP-sensing transcriptional regulator GlxR and the LuxR-family regulator RamA, probably reflecting the essential role of lipid degradation in C. jeikeium. This study provides the first genome-scale in silico analysis of the transcriptional regulation of metabolism in a lipophilic bacterium involved in the formation of human body odor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Novel Interactions between Gut Microbiome and Host Drug-Processing Genes Modify the Hepatic Metabolism of the Environmental Chemicals Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Cindy Yanfei; Lee, Soowan; Cade, Sara; Kuo, Li-Jung; Schultz, Irvin R.; Bhatt, Deepak K.; Prasad, Bhagwat; Bammler, Theo K.; Cui, Julia Yue

    2017-09-01

    The gut microbiome is a novel frontier in xenobiotic metabolism. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), especially BDE-47 and BDE-99, are among the most abundant and persistent environmental contaminants that produce a variety of toxicities. Little is known about how the gut microbiome affects the hepatic metabolism of PBDEs and the PBDE-mediated regulation of drug-processing genes (DPGs) in vivo. The goal of this study was to determine the role of gut microbiome in modulating the hepatic biotransformation of PBDEs. Nine-week-old male C57BL/6J conventional (CV) or germ free (GF) mice were treated with vehicle, BDE-47 or BDE-99 (100 μmol/kg) for four days. Following BDE-47 treatment, GF mice had higher level of 5-OH-BDE-47 but lower levels of 4 other metabolites in liver than CV mice; whereas following BDE-99 treatment, GF mice had lower levels of 4 minor metabolites in liver than CV mice. RNA- Seq demonstrated that the hepatic expression of DPGs was regulated by both PBDEs and enterotypes. Under basal condition, the lack of gut microbiome up-regulated the Cyp2c subfamily but down-regulated the Cyp3a subfamily. Following PBDE exposure, certain DPGs were differentially regulated by PBDEs in a gut microbiome-dependent manner. Interestingly, the lack of gut microbiome augmented PBDE-mediated up- regulation of many DPGs, such as Cyp1a2 and Cyp3a11 in mouse liver, which was further confirmed by targeted metabolomics. The lack of gut microbiome also augmented the Cyp3a enzyme activity in liver. In conclusion, our study has unveiled a novel interaction between gut microbiome and the hepatic biotransformation of PBDEs.

  12. The Gene-Lifestyle Interaction on Leptin Sensitivity and Lipid Metabolism in Adults: A Population Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luglio, Harry Freitag; Sulistyoningrum, Dian Caturini; Huriyati, Emy; Lee, Yi Yi; Wan Muda, Wan Abdul Manan

    2017-07-07

    Obesity has been associated with leptin resistance and this might be caused by genetic factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the gene-lifestyle interaction between -866G/A UCP2 (uncoupling protein 2) gene polymorphism, dietary intake and leptin in a population based study. This is a cross sectional study conducted in adults living at urban area of Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Data of adiposity, lifestyle, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, leptin and UCP2 gene polymorphism were obtained in 380 men and female adults. UCP2 gene polymorphism was not significantly associated with adiposity, leptin, triglyceride, HDL cholesterol, dietary intake and physical activity (all p > 0.05). Leptin was lower in overweight subjects with AA + GA genotypes than those with GG genotype counterparts ( p = 0.029). In subjects with AA + GA genotypes there was a negative correlation between leptin concentration ( r = -0.324; p correlation was not seen in GG genotype ( r = -0.111; p = 0.188). In summary, we showed how genetic variation in -866G/A UCP2 affected individual response to leptin production. AA + GA genotype had a better leptin sensitivity shown by its response in dietary intake and body mass index (BMI) and this explained the protective effect of A allele to obesity.

  13. The Gene-Lifestyle Interaction on Leptin Sensitivity and Lipid Metabolism in Adults: A Population Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Freitag Luglio

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity has been associated with leptin resistance and this might be caused by genetic factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the gene-lifestyle interaction between −866G/A UCP2 (uncoupling protein 2 gene polymorphism, dietary intake and leptin in a population based study. Methods: This is a cross sectional study conducted in adults living at urban area of Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Data of adiposity, lifestyle, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol, leptin and UCP2 gene polymorphism were obtained in 380 men and female adults. Results: UCP2 gene polymorphism was not significantly associated with adiposity, leptin, triglyceride, HDL cholesterol, dietary intake and physical activity (all p > 0.05. Leptin was lower in overweight subjects with AA + GA genotypes than those with GG genotype counterparts (p = 0.029. In subjects with AA + GA genotypes there was a negative correlation between leptin concentration (r = −0.324; p < 0.0001 and total energy intake and this correlation was not seen in GG genotype (r = −0.111; p = 0.188. Conclusions: In summary, we showed how genetic variation in −866G/A UCP2 affected individual response to leptin production. AA + GA genotype had a better leptin sensitivity shown by its response in dietary intake and body mass index (BMI and this explained the protective effect of A allele to obesity.

  14. Evaluation of a Potential Metabolism-Mediated Drug-Drug Interaction Between Atomoxetine and Bupropion in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, Ioana; Popa, Adina; Neag, Maria; Muntean, Dana; Bocsan, Corina; Buzoianu, Anca; Vlase, Laurian; Gheldiu, Ana-Maria; Briciu, Corina

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of bupropion on the pharmacokinetic profile of atomoxetine and its main active metabolite (glucuronidated form), 4-hydroxyatomoxetine-O-glucuronide, in healthy volunteers. An open-label, non-randomized, two-period, sequential clinical trial was conducted as follows: during Period I (Reference), each volunteer received a single oral dose of 25 mg atomoxetine, whilst during Period II (Test), a combination of 25 mg atomoxetine and 300 mg bupropion was administered to all volunteers, after a pretreatment regimen with bupropion for 7 days. Next, after determining atomoxetine and 4-hydroxyatomoxetine-O-glucuronide plasma concentrations, their pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using a noncompartmental method and subsequently compared to determine any statistically significant differences between the two periods. Bupropion intake influenced all the pharmacokinetic parameters of both atomoxetine and its metabolite. For atomoxetine, Cmax increased from 226±96.1 to 386±137 ng/mL and more importantly, AUC0-∞ was significantly increasedfrom 1580±1040 to 8060±4160 ng*h/mL, while the mean t1/2 was prolonged after bupropion pretreatment. For 4-hydroxyatomoxetine-O-glucuronide, Cmax and AUC0-∞  were decreased from 707±269 to 212±145 ng/mL and from 5750±1240 to 3860±1220 ng*h/mL, respectively. These results demonstrated that the effect of bupropion on CYP2D6 activity was responsible for an increased systemic exposure to atomoxetine (5.1-fold) and also for a decreased exposure to its main metabolite (1.5-fold). Additional studies are required in order to evaluate the clinical relevance of this pharmacokinetic drug interaction.This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  15. Glucagon-like peptide 1 interacts with ghrelin and leptin to regulate glucose metabolism and food intake through vagal afferent neuron signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronveaux, Charlotte C; Tomé, Daniel; Raybould, Helen E

    2015-04-01

    Emerging evidence has suggested a possible physiologic role for peripheral glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in regulating glucose metabolism and food intake. The likely site of action of GLP-1 is on vagal afferent neurons (VANs). The vagal afferent pathway is the major neural pathway by which information about ingested nutrients reaches the central nervous system and influences feeding behavior. Peripheral GLP-1 acts on VANs to inhibit food intake. The mechanism of the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is unlike other gut-derived receptors; GLP-1Rs change their cellular localization according to feeding status rather than their protein concentrations. It is possible that several gut peptides are involved in mediating GLP-1R translocation. The mechanism of peripheral GLP-1R translocation still needs to be elucidated. We review data supporting the role of peripheral GLP-1 acting on VANs in influencing glucose homeostasis and feeding behavior. We highlight evidence demonstrating that GLP-1 interacts with ghrelin and leptin to induce satiation. Our aim was to understand the mechanism of peripheral GLP-1 in the development of noninvasive antiobesity treatments. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  16. Metabolic profiling of two maize (Zea mays L.) inbred lines inoculated with the nitrogen fixing plant-interacting bacteria Herbaspirillum seropedicae and Azospirillum brasilense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusamarello-Santos, Liziane Cristina; Gilard, Françoise; Brulé, Lenaïg; Quilleré, Isabelle; Gourion, Benjamin; Ratet, Pascal; Maltempi de Souza, Emanuel; Lea, Peter J.; Hirel, Bertrand

    2017-01-01

    Maize roots can be colonized by free-living atmospheric nitrogen (N2)-fixing bacteria (diazotrophs). However, the agronomic potential of non-symbiotic N2-fixation in such an economically important species as maize, has still not been fully exploited. A preliminary approach to improve our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the establishment of such N2-fixing associations has been developed, using two maize inbred lines exhibiting different physiological characteristics. The bacterial-plant interaction has been characterized by means of a metabolomic approach. Two established model strains of Nif+ diazotrophic bacteria, Herbaspirillum seropedicae and Azospirillum brasilense and their Nif- couterparts defficient in nitrogenase activity, were used to evaluate the impact of the bacterial inoculation and of N2 fixation on the root and leaf metabolic profiles. The two N2-fixing bacteria have been used to inoculate two genetically distant maize lines (FV252 and FV2), already characterized for their contrasting physiological properties. Using a well-controlled gnotobiotic experimental system that allows inoculation of maize plants with the two diazotrophs in a N-free medium, we demonstrated that both maize lines were efficiently colonized by the two bacterial species. We also showed that in the early stages of plant development, both bacterial strains were able to reduce acetylene, suggesting that they contain functional nitrogenase activity and are able to efficiently fix atmospheric N2 (Fix+). The metabolomic approach allowed the identification of metabolites in the two maize lines that were representative of the N2 fixing plant-bacterial interaction, these included mannitol and to a lesser extend trehalose and isocitrate. Whilst other metabolites such as asparagine, although only exhibiting a small increase in maize roots following bacterial infection, were specific for the two Fix+ bacterial strains, in comparison to their Fix- counterparts. Moreover, a number

  17. Metabolic profiling of two maize (Zea mays L. inbred lines inoculated with the nitrogen fixing plant-interacting bacteria Herbaspirillum seropedicae and Azospirillum brasilense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liziane Cristina Brusamarello-Santos

    Full Text Available Maize roots can be colonized by free-living atmospheric nitrogen (N2-fixing bacteria (diazotrophs. However, the agronomic potential of non-symbiotic N2-fixation in such an economically important species as maize, has still not been fully exploited. A preliminary approach to improve our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the establishment of such N2-fixing associations has been developed, using two maize inbred lines exhibiting different physiological characteristics. The bacterial-plant interaction has been characterized by means of a metabolomic approach. Two established model strains of Nif+ diazotrophic bacteria, Herbaspirillum seropedicae and Azospirillum brasilense and their Nif- couterparts defficient in nitrogenase activity, were used to evaluate the impact of the bacterial inoculation and of N2 fixation on the root and leaf metabolic profiles. The two N2-fixing bacteria have been used to inoculate two genetically distant maize lines (FV252 and FV2, already characterized for their contrasting physiological properties. Using a well-controlled gnotobiotic experimental system that allows inoculation of maize plants with the two diazotrophs in a N-free medium, we demonstrated that both maize lines were efficiently colonized by the two bacterial species. We also showed that in the early stages of plant development, both bacterial strains were able to reduce acetylene, suggesting that they contain functional nitrogenase activity and are able to efficiently fix atmospheric N2 (Fix+. The metabolomic approach allowed the identification of metabolites in the two maize lines that were representative of the N2 fixing plant-bacterial interaction, these included mannitol and to a lesser extend trehalose and isocitrate. Whilst other metabolites such as asparagine, although only exhibiting a small increase in maize roots following bacterial infection, were specific for the two Fix+ bacterial strains, in comparison to their Fix- counterparts

  18. Metabolic profiling of two maize (Zea mays L.) inbred lines inoculated with the nitrogen fixing plant-interacting bacteria Herbaspirillum seropedicae and Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusamarello-Santos, Liziane Cristina; Gilard, Françoise; Brulé, Lenaïg; Quilleré, Isabelle; Gourion, Benjamin; Ratet, Pascal; Maltempi de Souza, Emanuel; Lea, Peter J; Hirel, Bertrand

    2017-01-01

    Maize roots can be colonized by free-living atmospheric nitrogen (N2)-fixing bacteria (diazotrophs). However, the agronomic potential of non-symbiotic N2-fixation in such an economically important species as maize, has still not been fully exploited. A preliminary approach to improve our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the establishment of such N2-fixing associations has been developed, using two maize inbred lines exhibiting different physiological characteristics. The bacterial-plant interaction has been characterized by means of a metabolomic approach. Two established model strains of Nif+ diazotrophic bacteria, Herbaspirillum seropedicae and Azospirillum brasilense and their Nif- couterparts defficient in nitrogenase activity, were used to evaluate the impact of the bacterial inoculation and of N2 fixation on the root and leaf metabolic profiles. The two N2-fixing bacteria have been used to inoculate two genetically distant maize lines (FV252 and FV2), already characterized for their contrasting physiological properties. Using a well-controlled gnotobiotic experimental system that allows inoculation of maize plants with the two diazotrophs in a N-free medium, we demonstrated that both maize lines were efficiently colonized by the two bacterial species. We also showed that in the early stages of plant development, both bacterial strains were able to reduce acetylene, suggesting that they contain functional nitrogenase activity and are able to efficiently fix atmospheric N2 (Fix+). The metabolomic approach allowed the identification of metabolites in the two maize lines that were representative of the N2 fixing plant-bacterial interaction, these included mannitol and to a lesser extend trehalose and isocitrate. Whilst other metabolites such as asparagine, although only exhibiting a small increase in maize roots following bacterial infection, were specific for the two Fix+ bacterial strains, in comparison to their Fix- counterparts. Moreover, a number

  19. Interactions Between Agricultural Chemicals and the Soil Microflora and Their Effects on {sup 14}C-Parathion Metabolism in Cranberry Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferris, I. G.; Lichtenstein, E. P. [Department of Entomology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    1981-05-15

    Full text: The fate of {sup 14}C-parathion in a loam and ''cranberry soil'' was investigated utilizing a closed system to enable monitoring of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolution, and to obtain a total {sup 14}C balance. Soils were treated with {sup 14}C-parathion at rates equivalent to about 3 ppm and incubated at 23 ± 2°C. After 3 weeks of soil incubation differences in the persistence of {sup 14}C-parathion were evident: 76% of applied radiocarbon remained as unchanged parathion in loam soil compared with only 4% in a cranberry soil; conversely, {sup 14}C-degradation products amounted to 26% and 91% of applied radiocarbon, respectively. Interactions were found to occur between fungicides and the biodegradation of {sup 14}C-(ring)-parathion in cranberry soil. Captafol (Difolatan® inhibited the metabolism of {sup 14}C-parathion. The inhibition was a linear function of the applied captafol concentration with a no effect concentration of 1 ppm. On the other hand, 100 ppm of Manzate®(maneb) or Benlate® (benomyl) altered the pathway of {sup 14}C-parathion degradation in favour of bound {sup 14}C-residues. In soil-free medium inoculated with cranberry soil microorganisms {sup 14}C-(ring)- parathion was degraded within 4 days principally to volatile {sup 14}C-compounds (presumably {sup 14}CO{sub 2}). On the -contrary, no degradation of {sup 14}C-parathion occurred in an inoculated medium that also contained a 100-ppm benomyl suspension, apparently benomyl inhibited the hydrolysis/oxidation of {sup 14}C-parathion. Soil amendments of 100 ppm nitrogen (N) as (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, or to a lesser extent KNO{sub 3}, inhibited the metabolism of {sup 14}C-( ring)-parathion to {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. In summary, some agricultural chemicals have an effect on parathiondegrading microorganisms resulting in an increase in bound {sup 14}C-residues and an increased persistence of toxic parathion residues.

  20. Inhibitory effects of drugs on the metabolic activity of mouse and human aldehyde oxidases and influence on drug-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Naoki; Sanoh, Seigo; Okuda, Katsuhiro; Kotake, Yaichiro; Sugahara, Go; Yanagi, Ami; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Tayama, Yoshitaka; Sugihara, Kazumi; Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Kurosaki, Mami; Terao, Mineko; Garattini, Enrico; Ohta, Shigeru

    2018-04-17

    As aldehyde oxidase (AOX) plays an emerging role in drug metabolism, understanding its significance for drug-drug interactions (DDI) is important. Therefore, we tested 10 compounds for species-specific and substrate-dependent differences in the inhibitory effect of AOX activity using genetically engineered HEK293 cells over-expressing human AOX1, mouse AOX1 or mouse AOX3. The IC 50 values of 10 potential inhibitors of the three AOX enzymes were determined using phthalazine and O 6 -benzylguanine as substrates. 17β-Estradiol, menadione, norharmane and raloxifene exhibited marked differences in inhibitory effects between the human and mouse AOX isoforms when the phthalazine substrate was used. Some of the compounds tested exhibited substrate-dependent differences in their inhibitory effects. Docking simulations with human AOX1 and mouse AOX3 were conducted for six representative inhibitors. The rank order of the minimum binding energy reflected the order of the corresponding IC 50 values. We also evaluated the potential DDI between an AOX substrate (O 6 -benzylguanine) and an inhibitor (hydralazine) using chimeric mice with humanized livers. Pretreatment of hydralazine increased the maximum plasma concentration (C max ) and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC 0-24 ) of O 6 -benzylguanine compared to single administration. Our in vitro data indicate species-specific and substrate-dependent differences in the inhibitory effects on AOX activity. Our in vivo data demonstrate the existence of a DDI which may be of relevance in the clinical context. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. In vitro interactions of malachite green and leucomalachite green with hepatic drug-metabolizing enzyme systems in the rainbow trout (Onchorhyncus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebbia, Carlo; Girolami, Flavia; Carletti, Monica; Gasco, Laura; Zoccarato, Ivo; Giuliano Albo, Alessandra

    2017-10-05

    Malachite green (MG) has been widely used in aquaculture to treat a number of microbial and parasitic diseases. It is currently banned in the EU because of the high cytotoxicity and carcinogenic activity, which is also shared by leucomalachite green (LMG), a reduced MG metabolite that can persist in fish tissues for months. There is scant information about the ability of either compound to interact with drug metabolizing enzymes in fish. Therefore we evaluated the in vitro effects of MG and LMG (25, 50 and 100μM) on some DMEs and glutathione (GSH) content in rainbow trout liver subfractions. LMG did not affect any of the examined parameters. In contrast, MG proved to deplete GSH and to depress to a various extent the activities of NAD(P)H cytochrome c reductase, 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase, 1-naphthol uridindiphosphoglucuronyl-transferase and maximally those of 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) accepting 1-chloro2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as substrate. The inhibition mechanisms of EROD and GST were investigated by means of non-linear Michaelis-Menten kinetics and Lineweaver-Burk plots using 0.175-8μM MG. The calculated IC 50 for EROD was 7.1μM, and the inhibition appeared to be competitive (K i 2.78±0.24μM). In the case of GST, the calculated IC 50 was 0.53μM. The inhibition was best described as competitive toward GSH (Ki 0.39±0.02μM) and of mixed-type toward CDNB (Ki 0.64±0.06μM). Our findings indicate that, contrary to LMG, MG behaves as a relatively strong inhibitor of certain liver DMEs and can reversibly bind GSH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Relative contributions of the major human CYP450 to the metabolism of icotinib and its implication in prediction of drug-drug interaction between icotinib and CYP3A4 inhibitors/inducers using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Liu, Dongyang; Zheng, Xin; Zhao, Qian; Jiang, Ji; Hu, Pei

    2015-06-01

    Icotinib is an anticancer drug, but relative contributions of CYP450 have not been identified. This study was carried out to identify the contribution percentage of CYP450 to icotinib and use the results to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, which can help to predict drug-drug interaction (DDI). Human liver microsome (HLM) and supersome using relative activity factor (RAF) were employed to determine the relative contributions of the major human P450 to the net hepatic metabolism of icotinib. These values were introduced to develop a PBPK model using SimCYP. The model was validated by the observed data in a Phase I clinical trial in Chinese healthy subjects. Finally, the model was used to simulate the DDI with ketoconazole or rifampin. Final contribution of CYP450 isoforms determined by HLM showed that CYP3A4 provided major contributions to the metabolism of icotinib. The percentage contributions of the P450 to the net hepatic metabolism of icotinib were determined by HLM inhibition assay and RAF. The AUC ratio under concomitant use of ketoconazole and rifampin was 3.22 and 0.55, respectively. Percentage of contribution of CYP450 to icotinib metabolism was calculated by RAF. The model has been proven to fit the observed data and is used in predicting icotinib-ketoconazole/rifampin interaction.

  3. Discovery of a novel target for the dysglycemic chromogranin A fragment pancreastatin: interaction with the chaperone GRP78 to influence metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilima Biswas

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: The chromogranin A-derived peptide pancreastatin (PST is a dysglycemic, counter-regulatory peptide for insulin action, especially in liver. Although previous evidence for a PST binding protein has been reported, such a receptor has not been identified or sequenced. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used ligand affinity to purify the PST target, with biotinylated human PST (hCHGA273-301-amide as "bait" and mouse liver homogenate as "prey", and identified GRP78 (a.k.a. "78 kDa Glucose Regulated Protein", HSPA5, BIP as a major interacting partner of PST. GRP78 belongs to the family of heat shock proteins (chaperones, involved in several cellular processes including protein folding and glucose metabolism. We analyzed expression of GRP78 in the absence of PST in a mouse knockout model lacking its precursor CHGA: hepatic transcriptome data revealed global over-expression of not only GRP78 but also other heat shock transcripts (of the "adaptive UPR" in CHGA(-/- mice compared to wild-type (+/+. By contrast, we found a global decline in expression of hepatic pro-apoptotic transcripts in CHGA(-/- mice. GRP78's ATPase enzymatic activity was dose-dependently inhibited by PST (IC50∼5.2 µM. PST also inhibited the up-regulation of GRP78 expression during UPR activation (by tunicamycin in hepatocytes. PST inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes, and increased hepatic expression of G6Pase (the final step in gluconeogenesis/glycogenolysis. In hepatocytes not only PST but also other GRP78-ATPase inhibitors (VER-155008 or ADP increased G6Pase expression. GRP78 over-expression inhibited G6Pase expression in hepatocytes, with partial restoration by GRP78-ATPase inhibitors PST, VER-155008, or ADP. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that an unexpected major hepatic target of PST is the adaptive UPR chaperone GRP78. PST not only binds to GRP78 (in pH-dependent fashion, but also inhibits GRP78's ATPase enzymatic activity, and impairs its biosynthetic

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Digby F.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism underpins the physiology and pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, although experimental mycobacteriology has provided key insights into the metabolic pathways that are essential for survival and pathogenesis, determining the metabolic status of bacilli during different stages of infection and in different cellular compartments remains challenging. Recent advances—in particular, the development of systems biology tools such as metabolomics—have enabled key insights into the biochemical state of M. tuberculosis in experimental models of infection. In addition, their use to elucidate mechanisms of action of new and existing antituberculosis drugs is critical for the development of improved interventions to counter tuberculosis. This review provides a broad summary of mycobacterial metabolism, highlighting the adaptation of M. tuberculosis as specialist human pathogen, and discusses recent insights into the strategies used by the host and infecting bacillus to influence the outcomes of the host–pathogen interaction through modulation of metabolic functions. PMID:25502746

  5. Astrocytes and energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prebil, Mateja; Jensen, Jørgen; Zorec, Robert; Kreft, Marko

    2011-05-01

    Astrocytes are glial cells, which play a significant role in a number of processes, including the brain energy metabolism. Their anatomical position between blood vessels and neurons make them an interface for effective glucose uptake from blood. After entering astrocytes, glucose can be involved in different metabolic pathways, e.g. in glycogen production. Glycogen in the brain is localized mainly in astrocytes and is an important energy source in hypoxic conditions and normal brain functioning. The portion of glucose metabolized into glycogen molecules in astrocytes is as high as 40%. It is thought that the release of gliotransmitters (such as glutamate, neuroactive peptides and ATP) into the extracellular space by regulated exocytosis supports a significant part of communication between astrocytes and neurons. On the other hand, neurotransmitter action on astrocytes has a significant role in brain energy metabolism. Therefore, understanding the astrocytes energy metabolism may help understanding neuron-astrocyte interactions.

  6. Tumor Macroenvironment and Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Zhoughbi, Wael; Huang, Jianfeng; Paramasivan, Ganapathy S.; Till, Holger; Pichler, Martin; Guertl-Lackner, Barbara; Hoefler, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    In this review we introduce the concept of the tumor macroenvironment and explore it in the context of metabolism. Tumor cells interact with the tumor microenvironment including immune cells. Blood and lymph vessels are the critical components that deliver nutrients to the tumor and also connect the tumor to the macroenvironment. Several factors are then released from the tumor itself but potentially also from the tumor microenvironment, influencing the metabolism of distant tissues and organ...

  7. Gnotobiology and translational microbiome research and housing mice with a charasteristized and complex microbiota in individually ventilated cages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundberg, Randi; Toft, Martin Fitzner; Hansen, Axel Kornerup

    species and host metabolism, physiology and immunology. Though established more than 60 years ago, germ-free rodents are still, and now more than ever, important models for studying the effect of different microbial communities and the mechanisms involved in the host-microbiome crosstalk. The rising era...... interacts with the host and develops the immune system. We need to fully understand best practices for obtaining the desired result; ranging from procurement and storage of the microbial transplant, the transplantation process, to the characteristics of the recipient animal, the surrounding environment...

  8. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These conditions ... agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  9. Interaction between Marine-Derived n-3 Long Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Uric Acid on Glucose Metabolism and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kelei; Wu, Kejian; Zhao, Yimin; Huang, Tao; Lou, Dajun; Yu, Xiaomei; Li, Duo

    2015-08-26

    The present case-control study explored the interaction between marine-derived n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC PUFAs) and uric acid (UA) on glucose metabolism and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Two hundred and eleven healthy subjects in control group and 268 T2DM subjects in case group were included. Plasma phospholipid (PL) fatty acids and biochemical parameters were detected by standard methods. Plasma PL C22:6n-3 was significantly lower in case group than in control group, and was negatively correlated with fasting glucose (r = -0.177, p < 0.001). Higher plasma PL C22:6n-3 was associated with lower risk of T2DM, and the OR was 0.32 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.12 to 0.80; p = 0.016) for per unit increase of C22:6n-3. UA was significantly lower in case group than in control group. UA was positively correlated with fasting glucose in healthy subjects, but this correlation became negative in T2DM subjects. A significant interaction was observed between C22:6n-3 and UA on fasting glucose (p for interaction = 0.005): the lowering effect of C22:6n-3 was only significant in subjects with a lower level of UA. In conclusion, C22:6n-3 interacts with UA to modulate glucose metabolism.

  10. Metabolic fates and effects of nitrite in brown trout under normoxic and hypoxic conditions: blood and tissue nitrite metabolism and interactions with branchial NOS, Na+/K+-ATPase and hsp70 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo; Gerber, Lucie; Hansen, Marie Niemann

    2015-01-01

    were higher in hypoxia than normoxia, suggesting increased NOS activity. Nitrite exposure strongly elevated nitrite concentrations in plasma, erythrocytes, heart tissue and white muscle, which was associated with an extensive metabolism of nitrite to nitrate and to iron-nitrosylated and S......Nitrite secures essential nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in hypoxia at low endogenous concentrations, whereas it becomes toxic at high concentrations. We exposed brown trout to normoxic and hypoxic water in the absence and presence of added ambient nitrite to decipher the cellular metabolism...... and effects of nitrite at basal and elevated concentrations under different oxygen regimes. We also tested hypotheses concerning the influence of nitrite on branchial nitric oxide synthase (NOS), Na+/K+-ATPase (nka) and heat shock protein (hsp70) mRNA expression. Basal plasma and erythrocyte nitrite levels...

  11. SpirPro: A Spirulina proteome database and web-based tools for the analysis of protein-protein interactions at the metabolic level in Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis C1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senachak, Jittisak; Cheevadhanarak, Supapon; Hongsthong, Apiradee

    2015-07-29

    Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis is the only cyanobacterium that in addition to being studied at the molecular level and subjected to gene manipulation, can also be mass cultivated in outdoor ponds for commercial use as a food supplement. Thus, encountering environmental changes, including temperature stresses, is common during the mass production of Spirulina. The use of cyanobacteria as an experimental platform, especially for photosynthetic gene manipulation in plants and bacteria, is becoming increasingly important. Understanding the mechanisms and protein-protein interaction networks that underlie low- and high-temperature responses is relevant to Spirulina mass production. To accomplish this goal, high-throughput techniques such as OMICs analyses are used. Thus, large datasets must be collected, managed and subjected to information extraction. Therefore, databases including (i) proteomic analysis and protein-protein interaction (PPI) data and (ii) domain/motif visualization tools are required for potential use in temperature response models for plant chloroplasts and photosynthetic bacteria. A web-based repository was developed including an embedded database, SpirPro, and tools for network visualization. Proteome data were analyzed integrated with protein-protein interactions and/or metabolic pathways from KEGG. The repository provides various information, ranging from raw data (2D-gel images) to associated results, such as data from interaction and/or pathway analyses. This integration allows in silico analyses of protein-protein interactions affected at the metabolic level and, particularly, analyses of interactions between and within the affected metabolic pathways under temperature stresses for comparative proteomic analysis. The developed tool, which is coded in HTML with CSS/JavaScript and depicted in Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG), is designed for interactive analysis and exploration of the constructed network. SpirPro is publicly available on the web

  12. Mediterranean dietary pattern and VEGF +405 G/C gene polymorphisms in patients with metabolic syndrome: An aspect of gene-nutrient interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiluian, Ghazaleh; Abbasalizad Farhangi, Mahdieh; Jahangiry, Leila

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between Mediterranean dietary pattern, anthropometric and metabolic biomarkers and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) +405 G/C gene polymorphism in patient with metabolic syndrome (Mets). In this study 150 patients with Mets and 50 healthy subjects were enrolled. Dietary intakes were evaluated with a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and Mediterranean dietary quality index (Med-DQI) was assessed. Anthropometric assessments and blood pressure measurement were performed. Biochemical assays including fasting serum glucose (FSG), matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), liver enzymes and lipid profiles were also assessed. Polymorphism of +405 G/C VEGF gene was determined utilizing polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragments length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Serum high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) was significantly lower and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC) concentrations and FSG were significantly higher in metabolic syndrome patients compared with control group (P consumption of "cholesterol" had significantly upper serum TG; also high consumption of "fish" and "vegetables-fruits" was associated with a significantly lower serum LDL concentrations. In metabolic syndrome patients with CC genotype, mean score of "saturated fatty acid" subgroup was significantly higher compared with other genotypes; whereas, in healthy individuals, mean score of "fruit-vegetable" subgroup in individuals of CC and GG genotype was significantly higher (P<0.05). Our findings indicated a significant relationship between Mediterranean dietary quality index and both anthropometric and metabolic risk factors. We also indicated a higher "saturated fatty acid" intake in CC genotype among metabolic syndrome patients.

  13. Interactive effects of high stocking density and food deprivation on carbohydrate metabolism in several tissues of gilthead sea bream Sparus auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Guzmán, José M; Láiz-Carrión, Raúl; Míguez, Jesús M; Martín Del Río, María P; Mancera, Juan M; Soengas, José L

    2005-09-01

    The influence of high stocking density (HSD) and food deprivation was assessed on carbohydrate metabolism of several tissues of gilthead sea bream Sparus auratus for 14 days. Fish were randomly assigned to one of four treatments: (1) fed fish under normal stocking density (NSD) (4 kg m(-3)); (2) fed fish under HSD (70 kg m(-3)); (3) food-deprived fish under NSD; and (4) food-deprived fish under HSD. After 14 days, samples were taken from the plasma, liver, gills, kidney and brain for the assessment of plasma cortisol, levels of metabolites and the activity of several enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism. HSD conditions alone elicited important changes in energy metabolism of several tissues that in some cases were confirmatory (5-fold increase in plama cortisol, 20% increase in plasma glucose, 60% decrease in liver glycogen and 20% increase in gluconeogenic potential in the liver) whereas in others provided new information regarding metabolic adjustments to cope with HSD in the liver (100% increase in glucose phosphorylating capacity), gills (30% decrease in capacity for phosphorylating glucose), kidney (80% increase in the capacity of phosphorylating glucose) and brain (2.5-fold increase in ATP levels). On the other hand, food deprivation alone resulted in increased plasma cortisol, and metabolic changes in the liver (enhanced gluconeogenic and glycogenolytic potential of 13% and 18%, respectively) and brain (10% increase in glycolytic capacity), confirmatory of previous studies, whereas new information regarding metabolic adjustments during food deprivation was obtained in the gills and kidney (decreased lactate levels in both tissues of 45% and 55%, respectively). Furthermore, the results obtained provided, for the first time in fish, information indicating that food deprivation increased the sensitivity of gilthead sea bream to the stress induced by HSD compared with the fed controls, as demonstrated by increased plasma cortisol levels (50% increase vs

  14. Interaction between prenatal pesticide exposure and a common polymorphism in the PON1 gene on DNA methylation in genes associated with cardio-metabolic disease risk-an exploratory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Declerck, Ken; Remy, Sylvie; Wohlfahrt-Veje, Christine

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prenatal environmental conditions may influence disease risk in later life. We previously found a gene-environment interaction between the paraoxonase 1 (PON1) Q192R genotype and prenatal pesticide exposure leading to an adverse cardio-metabolic risk profile at school age. However...... was observed in prenatally pesticide exposed children carrying the PON1 192R-allele. Differentially methylated genes were enriched in several neuroendocrine signaling pathways including dopamine-DARPP32 feedback (appetite, reward pathways), corticotrophin releasing hormone signaling, nNOS, neuregulin signaling...

  15. Metabolic Environments and Genomic Features Associated with Pathogenic and Mutualistic Interactions between Bacteria and Plants is accepted for publication in MPMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Park, Byung H [ORNL; Syed, Mustafa H [ORNL; Klotz, Martin G [University of North Carolina, Charlotte; Uberbacher, Edward C [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Most bacterial symbionts of plants are phenotypically characterized by their parasitic or matualistic relationship with the host; however, the genomic characteristics that likely discriminate mutualistic symbionts from pathogens of plants are poorly understood. This study comparatively analyzed the genomes of 54 plant-symbiontic bacteria, 27 mutualists and 27 pathogens, to discover genomic determinants of their parasitic and mutualistic nature in terms of protein family domains, KEGG orthologous groups, metabolic pathways and families of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes). We further used all bacteria with sequenced genomesl, published microarrays and transcriptomics experimental datasets, and literature to validate and to explore results of the comparison. The analysis revealed that genomes of mutualists are larger in size and higher in GC content and encode greater molecular, functional and metabolic diversity than the investigated genomes of pathogens. This enriched molecular and functional enzyme diversity included constructive biosynthetic signatures of CAZymes and metabolic pathways in genomes of mutualists compared with catabolic signatures dominant in the genomes of pathogens. Another discriminative characteristic of mutualists is the co-occurence of gene clusters required for the expression and function of nitrogenase and RuBisCO. Analysis of previously published experimental data indicate that nitrogen-fixing mutualists may employ Rubisco to fix CO2 not in the canonical Calvin-Benson-Basham cycle but in a novel metabolic pathway, here called Rubisco-based glycolysis , to increase efficiency of sugar utilization during the symbiosis with plants. An important discriminative characteristic of plant pathogenic bacteria is two groups of genes likely encoding effector proteins involved in host invasion and a genomic locus encoding a putative secretion system that includes a DUF1525 domain protein conserved in pathogens of plants and of other organisms. The

  16. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Metabolic Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Also known as What Is Metabolic syndrome ... metabolic risk factors to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. Metabolic Risk Factors A Large Waistline Having a large ...

  17. Interactive effects of glutamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid on growth performance and skeletal muscle amino acid metabolism of 22-42-day-old broilers exposed to hot environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hong; Bai, Xi; Shah, Assar Ali; Dai, Sifa; Wang, Like; Hua, Jinling; Che, Chuanyan; He, Shaojun; Wen, Aiyou; Jiang, Jinpeng

    2016-06-01

    The present experiment was conducted to investigate the interactive effects between dietary glutamine (Gln, 0 and 5 g/kg) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, 0 and 100 mg/kg) on growth performance and amino acid (AA) metabolism of broilers under hot environment. A total of 360 22-day-old Arbor Acres male chickens were randomly assigned to five treatment groups under thermoneutral chamber (PC, 23 °C) and cyclic heat stress (HS, 30-34 °C cycling) conditions. Compared with the PC group, cyclic HS decreased ( P muscle at 28, 35, and 42 days, while it increased ( P muscle, the Gln supplementation increased ( P muscle Gln concentrations, glutaminase activities, GS activities at 28 and 35 days, and DWG, GABA concentrations, and GABA-T activities at 28, 35, and 42 days in broilers under cyclic HS. In conclusion, the present results indicated that the interactions of exogenous Gln and GABA could offer a potential nutritional strategy to prevent HS-related depression in skeletal muscle Gln and GABA metabolism of broilers.

  18. Influence of IL1B, IL6 and IL10 gene variants and plasma fatty acid interaction on metabolic syndrome risk in a cross-sectional population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maintinguer Norde, Marina; Oki, Erica; Ferreira Carioca, Antonio Augusto; Teixeira Damasceno, Nágila Raquel; Fisberg, Regina Mara; Lobo Marchioni, Dirce Maria; Rogero, Marcelo Macedo

    2018-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of interrelated risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease, with underlying inflammatory pathophysiology. Genetic variations and diet are well-known risk factor for MetS, but the interaction between these two factors is less explored. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of interaction between SNP of inflammatory genes (encoding interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β and IL-10) and plasma fatty acids on the odds of MetS, in a population-based cross-sectional study. Among participants of the Health Survey - São Paulo, 301 adults (19-59 y) from whom a blood sample was collected were included. Individuals with and without MetS were compared according to their plasma inflammatory biomarkers, fatty acid profile, and genotype frequency of the IL1B (rs16944, rs1143623, rs1143627, rs1143634 and rs1143643), IL6 (rs1800795, rs1800796 and rs1800797) and IL10 (rs1554286, rs1800871, rs1800872, rs1800890 and rs3024490) genes SNP. The influence of gene-fatty acids interaction on MetS risk was investigated. IL6 gene SNP rs1800795 G allele was associated with higher odds for MetS (OR = 1.88; p = 0.017). Gene-fatty acid interaction was found between the IL1B gene SNP rs116944 and stearic acid (p inter = 0.043), and between rs1143634 and EPA (p inter = 0.017). For the IL10 gene SNP rs1800896, an interaction was found for arachidonic acid (p inter = 0.007) and estimated D5D activity (p inter = 0.019). The IL6 gene SNP rs1800795 G allele is associated with increased odds for MetS. Plasma fatty acid profile interacts with the IL1B and IL10 gene variants to modulate the odds for MetS. This and other interactions of risk factors can account for the unexplained heritability of MetS, and their elucidation can lead to new strategies for genome-customized prevention of MetS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  19. Modelling and analysis of central metabolism operating regulatory interactions in salt stress conditions in a L-carnitine overproducing E. coli strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Santos

    Full Text Available Based on experimental data from E. coli cultures, we have devised a mathematical model in the GMA-power law formalism that describes the central and L-carnitine metabolism in and between two steady states, non-osmotic and hyperosmotic (0.3 M NaCl. A key feature of this model is the introduction of type of kinetic order, the osmotic stress kinetic orders (g(OSn, derived from the power law general formalism, which represent the effect of osmotic stress in each metabolic process of the model.By considering the values of the g(OSn linked to each metabolic process we found that osmotic stress has a positive and determinant influence on the increase in flux in energetic metabolism (glycolysis; L-carnitine biosynthesis production; the transformation/excretion of Acetyl-CoA into acetate and ethanol; the input flux of peptone into the cell; the anabolic use of pyruvate and biomass decomposition. In contrast, we found that although the osmotic stress has an inhibitory effect on the transformation flux from the glycolytic end products (pyruvate to Acetyl-CoA, this inhibition is counteracted by other effects (the increase in pyruvate concentration to the extent that the whole flux increases. In the same vein, the down regulation exerted by osmotic stress on fumarate uptake and its oxidation and the production and export of lactate and pyruvate are reversed by other factors up to the point that the first increased and the second remained unchanged.The model analysis shows that in osmotic conditions the energy and fermentation pathways undergo substantial rearrangement. This is illustrated by the observation that the increase in the fermentation fluxes is not connected with fluxes towards the tricaboxylic acid intermediates and the synthesis of biomass. The osmotic stress associated with these fluxes reflects these changes. All these observations support that the responses to salt stress observed in E. coli might be conserved in halophiles.Flux evolution

  20. Vitamin D, sub-inflammation and insulin resistance. A window on a potential role for the interaction between bone and glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbossa, Stefania Giuliana; Folli, Franco

    2017-06-01

    Vitamin D is a key hormone involved in the regulation of calcium/phosphorous balance and recently it has been implicated in the pathogenesis of sub-inflammation, insulin resistance and obesity. The two main forms of vitamin D are cholecalciferol (Vitamin D3) and ergocalciferol (Vitamin D2): the active form (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D) is the result of two hydroxylations that take place in liver, kidney, pancreas and immune cells. Vitamin D increases the production of some anti-inflammatory cytokines and reduces the release of some pro-inflammatory cytokines. Low levels of Vitamin D are also associated with an up-regulation of TLRs expression and a pro-inflammatory state. Regardless of the effect on inflammation, Vitamin D seems to directly increase insulin sensitivity and secretion, through different mechanisms. Considering the importance of low grade chronic inflammation in metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes, many authors hypothesized the involvement of this nutrient/hormone in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Vitamin D status could alter the balance between pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines and thus affect insulin action, lipid metabolism and adipose tissue function and structure. Numerous studies have shown that Vitamin D concentrations are inversely associated with pro-inflammatory markers, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and obesity. Interestingly, some longitudinal trials suggested also an inverse association between vitamin D status and incident type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, vitamin D supplementation in humans showed controversial effects: with some studies demonstrating improvements in insulin sensitivity, glucose and lipid metabolism while others showing no beneficial effect on glycemic control and on inflammation. In conclusion, although the evidences of a significant role of Vitamin D on inflammation, insulin resistance and insulin secretion in the pathogenesis of obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, its potential

  1. [Metabolic acidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regolisti, Giuseppe; Fani, Filippo; Antoniotti, Riccardo; Castellano, Giuseppe; Cremaschi, Elena; Greco, Paolo; Parenti, Elisabetta; Morabito, Santo; Sabatino, Alice; Fiaccadori, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is frequently observed in clinical practice, especially among critically ill patients and/or in the course of renal failure. Complex mechanisms are involved, in most cases identifiable by medical history, pathophysiology-based diagnostic reasoning and measure of some key acid-base parameters that are easily available or calculable. On this basis the bedside differential diagnosis of metabolic acidosis should be started from the identification of the two main subtypes of metabolic acidosis: the high anion gap metabolic acidosis and the normal anion gap (or hyperchloremic) metabolic acidosis. Metabolic acidosis, especially in its acute forms with elevated anion gap such as is the case of lactic acidosis, diabetic and acute intoxications, may significantly affect metabolic body homeostasis and patients hemodynamic status, setting the stage for true medical emergencies. The therapeutic approach should be first aimed at early correction of concurrent clinical problems (e.g. fluids and hemodynamic optimization in case of shock, mechanical ventilation in case of concomitant respiratory failure, hemodialysis for acute intoxications etc.), in parallel to the formulation of a diagnosis. In case of severe acidosis, the administration of alkalizing agents should be carefully evaluated, taking into account the risk of side effects, as well as the potential need of renal replacement therapy.

  2. Drug Metabolism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 3. Drug Metabolism: A Fascinating Link Between Chemistry and Biology. Nikhil Taxak Prasad V Bharatam. General Article Volume 19 Issue 3 March 2014 pp 259-282 ...

  3. Drug Metabolism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    behind metabolic reactions, importance, and consequences with several ... required for drug action. ... lism, which is catalyzed by enzymes present in the above-men- ... catalyze the transfer of one atom of oxygen to a substrate produc-.

  4. Metabolic Myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2016-12-01

    Metabolic myopathies are genetic disorders that impair intermediary metabolism in skeletal muscle. Impairments in glycolysis/glycogenolysis (glycogen-storage disease), fatty acid transport and oxidation (fatty acid oxidation defects), and the mitochondrial respiratory chain (mitochondrial myopathies) represent the majority of known defects. The purpose of this review is to develop a diagnostic and treatment algorithm for the metabolic myopathies. The metabolic myopathies can present in the neonatal and infant period as part of more systemic involvement with hypotonia, hypoglycemia, and encephalopathy; however, most cases present in childhood or in adulthood with exercise intolerance (often with rhabdomyolysis) and weakness. The glycogen-storage diseases present during brief bouts of high-intensity exercise, whereas fatty acid oxidation defects and mitochondrial myopathies present during a long-duration/low-intensity endurance-type activity or during fasting or another metabolically stressful event (eg, surgery, fever). The clinical examination is often normal between acute events, and evaluation involves exercise testing, blood testing (creatine kinase, acylcarnitine profile, lactate, amino acids), urine organic acids (ketones, dicarboxylic acids, 3-methylglutaconic acid), muscle biopsy (histology, ultrastructure, enzyme testing), MRI/spectroscopy, and targeted or untargeted genetic testing. Accurate and early identification of metabolic myopathies can lead to therapeutic interventions with lifestyle and nutritional modification, cofactor treatment, and rapid treatment of rhabdomyolysis.

  5. Animal metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walburg, H.E.

    1977-01-01

    Studies on placental transport included the following: clearance of tritiated water as a baseline measurement for transport of materials across perfused placentas; transport of organic and inorganic mercury across the perfused placenta of the guinea pig in late gestation; and transport of cadmium across the perfused placenta of the guinea pig in late gestation. Studies on cadmium absorption and metabolism included the following: intestinal absorption and retention of cadmium in neonatal rats; uptake and distribution of an oral dose of cadmium in postweanling male and female, iron-deficient and normal rats; postnatal viability and growth in rat pups after oral cadmium administration during gestation; and the effect of calcium and phosphorus on the absorption and toxicity of cadmium. Studies on gastrointestinal absorption and mineral metabolism included: uptake and distribution of orally administered plutonium complex compounds in male mice; gastrointestinal absorption of 144 Ce in the newborn mouse, rat, and pig; and gastrointestinal absorption of 95 Nb by rats of different ages. Studies on iodine metabolism included the following: influence of thyroid status and thiocyanate on iodine metabolism in the bovine; effects of simulated fallout radiation on iodine metabolism in dairy cattle; and effects of feeding iodine binding agents on iodine metabolism in the calf

  6. In vitro interaction of a novel neutrophil growth factor with human liver microsomal cytochromes P450 and the contribution of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases to its metabolism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Siller, M.; Anzenbacher, P.; Anzenbacherová, E.; Doležal, Karel; Strnad, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 11 (2011), s. 934-944 ISSN 0049-8254 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/08/1649 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : DRUG-DRUG INTERACTION S * SUBSTRATE-SPECIFICITY * R-ROSCOVITINE * GLUCURONIDATION * CELLS Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.791, year: 2011

  7. Mediator binds to boundaries of chromosomal interaction domains and to proteins involved in DNA looping, RNA metabolism, chromatin remodeling, and actin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chereji, Razvan V; Bharatula, Vasudha; Elfving, Nils; Blomberg, Jeanette; Larsson, Miriam; Morozov, Alexandre V; Broach, James R; Björklund, Stefan

    2017-09-06

    Mediator is a multi-unit molecular complex that plays a key role in transferring signals from transcriptional regulators to RNA polymerase II in eukaryotes. We have combined biochemical purification of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mediator from chromatin with chromatin immunoprecipitation in order to reveal Mediator occupancy on DNA genome-wide, and to identify proteins interacting specifically with Mediator on the chromatin template. Tandem mass spectrometry of proteins in immunoprecipitates of mediator complexes revealed specific interactions between Mediator and the RSC, Arp2/Arp3, CPF, CF 1A and Lsm complexes in chromatin. These factors are primarily involved in chromatin remodeling, actin assembly, mRNA 3'-end processing, gene looping and mRNA decay, but they have also been shown to enter the nucleus and participate in Pol II transcription. Moreover, we have found that Mediator, in addition to binding Pol II promoters, occupies chromosomal interacting domain (CID) boundaries and that Mediator in chromatin associates with proteins that have been shown to interact with CID boundaries, such as Sth1, Ssu72 and histone H4. This suggests that Mediator plays a significant role in higher-order genome organization. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Interaction between polymorphisms in aspirin metabolic pathways, regular aspirin use and colorectal cancer risk: A case-control study in unselected white European populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Sheth

    Full Text Available Regular aspirin use is associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer (CRC. Variation in aspirin's chemoprevention efficacy has been attributed to the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. We conducted a meta-analysis using two large population-based case-control datasets, the UK-Leeds Colorectal Cancer Study Group and the NIH-Colon Cancer Family Registry, having a combined total of 3325 cases and 2262 controls. The aim was to assess 42 candidate SNPs in 15 genes whose association with colorectal cancer risk was putatively modified by aspirin use, in the literature. Log odds ratios (ORs and standard errors were estimated for each dataset separately using logistic regression adjusting for age, sex and study site, and dataset-specific results were combined using random effects meta-analysis. Meta-analysis showed association between SNPs rs6983267, rs11694911 and rs2302615 with CRC risk reduction (All P<0.05. Association for SNP rs6983267 in the CCAT2 gene only was noteworthy after multiple test correction (P = 0.001. Site-specific analysis showed association between SNPs rs1799853 and rs2302615 with reduced colon cancer risk only (P = 0.01 and P = 0.004, respectively, however neither reached significance threshold following multiple test correction. Meta-analysis of SNPs rs2070959 and rs1105879 in UGT1A6 gene showed interaction between aspirin use and CRC risk (Pinteraction = 0.01 and 0.02, respectively; stratification by aspirin use showed an association for decreased CRC risk for aspirin users having a wild-type genotype (rs2070959 OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.68-0.86; rs1105879 OR = 0.77 95% CI = 0.69-0.86 compared to variant allele cariers. The direction of the interaction however is in contrast to that published in studies on colorectal adenomas. Both SNPs showed potential site-specific interaction with aspirin use and colon cancer risk only (Pinteraction = 0.006 and 0.008, respectively, with the direction of association similar to

  9. [Metabolic myopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazian, Óscar; Rivas-Chacón, Rafael

    2013-09-06

    To review the metabolic myopathies manifested only by crisis of myalgias, cramps and rigidity of the muscles with decreased voluntary contractions and normal inter crisis neurologic examination in children and adolescents. These metabolic myopathies are autosomic recessive inherited enzymatic deficiencies of the carbohydrates and lipids metabolisms. The end result is a reduction of intra muscle adenosine triphosphate, mainly through mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, with decrease of available energy for muscle contraction. The one secondary to carbohydrates intra muscle metabolism disorders are triggered by high intensity brief (fatty acids metabolism disorders are triggered by low intensity prolonged (> 10 min) exercises. The conditions in the first group in order of decreasing frequency are the deficiencies of myophosforilase (GSD V), muscle phosphofructokinase (GSD VII), phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (GSD X) and beta enolase (GSD XIII). The conditions in the second group in order of decreasing frequency are the deficiencies of carnitine palmitoyl transferase II and very long chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase. The differential characteristics of patients in each group and within each group will allow to make the initial presumptive clinical diagnosis in the majority and then to order only the necessary tests to achieve the final diagnosis. Treatment during the crisis includes hydration, glucose and alkalinization of urine if myoglobin in blood and urine are elevated. Prevention includes avoiding exercise which may induce the crisis and fasting. The prognosis is good with the exception of rare cases of acute renal failure due to hipermyoglobinemia because of severe rabdomyolisis.

  10. Metabolic Pathway of Icotinib In Vitro: The Differential Roles of CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and CYP1A2 on Potential Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, TianHong; Zhang, KeRong; Ma, Li; Li, Zheng; Wang, Juan; Zhang, YunXia; Lu, Chuang; Zhu, Mingshe; Zhuang, XiaoMei

    2018-04-01

    Icotinib is the first self-developed small molecule drug in China for targeted therapy of non-small cell lung cancer. To date, systematic studies on the pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction of icotinib were limited. By identifying metabolite generated in human liver microsomes and revealing the contributions of major cytochromes P450 (CYPs) in the formation of major metabolites, the aim of the present work was to understand the mechanisms underlying pharmacokinetic and pharmacological variability in clinic. A liquid chromatography/UV/high-resolution mass spectrometer method was developed to characterize the icotinib metabolites. The formation of 6 major metabolites was studied in recombinant CYP isozymes and human liver microsomes with specific inhibitors to identify the CYPs responsible for icotinib metabolism. The metabolic pathways observed in vitro are consistent with those observed in human. Results demonstrated that the metabolites are predominantly catalyzed by CYP3A4 (77%∼87%), with a moderate contribution from CYP3A5 (5%∼15%) and CYP1A2 (3.7%∼7.5%). The contribution of CYP2C8, 2C9, 2C19, and 2D6 is insignificant. Based on our observations, to minimize drug-drug interaction risk in clinic, coprescription of icotinib with strong CYP3A inhibitors or inducers must be weighed. CYP1A2, a highly inducible enzyme in the smoking population, may also represent a determinant of pharmacokinetic and pharmacological variability of icotinib, especially in lung cancer patients with smoking history. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Analysis of the interaction between transcription factor 7-like 2 genetic variants with nopal and wholegrain fibre intake: effects on anthropometric and metabolic characteristics in type 2 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ortiz, M M; Garay-Sevilla, M E; Tejero, M E; Perez-Luque, E L

    2016-09-01

    The transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) genetic variants have shown differential effect on low-fat and high-fat diet in obese subjects. Nopal is a Mexican variety of cactus that is a traditional food and has been used in the treatment of diabetes. Its hypoglycaemic effect may be because of its soluble fibre (mucopolysaccharide) content. This study analysed the effects of the rs7903146 and rs12255372 TCF7L2 variants on anthropometric, metabolic and hormonal parameters in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who consumed fibre from either nopal tortilla or wholegrain bread for 8 weeks. We followed-up seventy-four patients who consumed an individualised isoenergetic diet that included nopal tortilla (Diet 1) and sixty-three patients with a diet that included wholegrain bread (Diet 2). Anthropometric, metabolic and hormonal measures were collected at baseline and final intervention. The size effect and carry-over effect were estimated. To assess the interaction of genotype and diets, we used a general linear model repeated-measures analysis. Minor allele frequency of rs7903146T was 0·27 and for rs12255372T it was 0·13. At 8 weeks after Diet 1 intake, weight, BMI, waist and hip circumference decreased (P=0·00015) in rs7903146CC and rs12255372GG genotypes. In particular, patients carrying of the rs7903146CC and consuming Diet 1 showed a reduction in waist circumference of more than 2·5 cm compared with Diet 2 (P<0·001). No significant interaction between rs7903146 or rs12255372 and diet was seen in this study. In conclusion, in the carriers of the rs7903146CC and rs12255372GG wild types, significant changes in all anthropometric measures were observed, and had better response to both diets.

  12. Interaction between polymorphisms in aspirin metabolic pathways, regular aspirin use and colorectal cancer risk: A case-control study in unselected white European populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Harsh; Northwood, Emma; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Scherer, Dominique; Elliott, Faye; Barrett, Jennifer H; Forman, David; Wolf, C Roland; Smith, Gillian; Jackson, Michael S; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Haile, Robert; Casey, Graham; Jenkins, Mark; Win, Aung Ko; Hopper, John L; Marchand, Loic Le; Lindor, Noralane M; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Potter, John D; Burn, John; Bishop, D Timothy

    2018-01-01

    Regular aspirin use is associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Variation in aspirin's chemoprevention efficacy has been attributed to the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We conducted a meta-analysis using two large population-based case-control datasets, the UK-Leeds Colorectal Cancer Study Group and the NIH-Colon Cancer Family Registry, having a combined total of 3325 cases and 2262 controls. The aim was to assess 42 candidate SNPs in 15 genes whose association with colorectal cancer risk was putatively modified by aspirin use, in the literature. Log odds ratios (ORs) and standard errors were estimated for each dataset separately using logistic regression adjusting for age, sex and study site, and dataset-specific results were combined using random effects meta-analysis. Meta-analysis showed association between SNPs rs6983267, rs11694911 and rs2302615 with CRC risk reduction (All Paspirin use and CRC risk (Pinteraction = 0.01 and 0.02, respectively); stratification by aspirin use showed an association for decreased CRC risk for aspirin users having a wild-type genotype (rs2070959 OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.68-0.86; rs1105879 OR = 0.77 95% CI = 0.69-0.86) compared to variant allele cariers. The direction of the interaction however is in contrast to that published in studies on colorectal adenomas. Both SNPs showed potential site-specific interaction with aspirin use and colon cancer risk only (Pinteraction = 0.006 and 0.008, respectively), with the direction of association similar to that observed for CRC. Additionally, they showed interaction between any non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (including aspirin) use and CRC risk (Pinteraction = 0.01 for both). All gene x environment (GxE) interactions however were not significant after multiple test correction. Candidate gene investigation indicated no evidence of GxE interaction between genetic variants in genes involved in aspirin pathways, regular aspirin use and colorectal cancer

  13. The effect of a high-protein, high-sodium diet on calcium and bone metabolism in postmenopausal women and its interaction with vitamin D receptor genotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrington, M.; Bennett, T.; Jakobsen, Jette

    2004-01-01

    The influence of a high-Na, high-protein (calciuric) diet on Ca and bone metabolism was investigated in postmenopausal women (aged 5067 years) who were stratified by vitamin D receptor (VDR) genotype. In a crossover trial, twenty-four women were randomly assigned to a diet high in protein (90 g....../d) and Na (180 mmol/d) or a diet adequate in protein (70 g/d) and low in Na (65 mmol/d) for 4 weeks, followed by crossover to the alternative dietary regimen for a further 4 weeks. Dietary Ca intake was maintained at usual intakes (about 20 mmol (800 mg)/d). Urinary Na, K, Ca, N and type I collagen cross...... samples collected at the end of each dietary period. The calciuric diet significantly (Pdiet, but had no effect on circulating 25(OH)D-3, 1,25(OH)(2)D-3, PTH, osteocalcin or B-Alkphase in the total group (n 24). There were...

  14. Nutrigenetics of the lipoprotein metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that lipid metabolism is a cornerstone in the development of the commonest important chronic diseases worldwide, such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, or metabolic syndrome. In this regard, the area of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism is one of the areas in which the understanding of the development and progression of those metabolic disorders has been studied in greater depth. Thus, growing evidence has demonstrated that while universal recommendations might be appropriate for the general population, in this area there is great variability among individuals, related to a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Moreover, the interaction between genetic and dietary components has helped in understanding this variability. Therefore, with further study into the interaction between the most important genetic markers or single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and diet, it may be possible to understand the variability in lipid metabolism, which could lead to an increase in the use of personalized nutrition as the best support to combat metabolic disorders. This review discusses some of the evidence in which candidate SNPs can affect the key players of lipid metabolism and how their phenotypic manifestations can be modified by dietary intake. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Evaluations of in vitro metabolism, drug-drug interactions mediated by reversible and time-dependent inhibition of CYPs, and plasma protein binding of MMB4 DMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S Peter; Lusiak, Bozena D; Burback, Brian L; Johnson, Jerry D

    2013-01-01

    1,1'-Methylenebis[4-[(hydroxyimino)methyl]-pyridinium] (MMB4) dimethanesulfonate (DMS) is a bisquaternary pyridinium aldoxime that reactivates acetylcholinesterase inhibited by organophosphorus nerve agent. Drug metabolism and plasma protein binding for MMB4 DMS were examined using various techniques and a wide range of species. When (14)C-MMB4 DMS was incubated in liver microsomes, 4-pyridine aldoxime (4-PA) and an additional metabolite were detected in all species tested. Identity of the additional metabolite was postulated to be isonicotinic acid (INA) based on liquid chromatography with a tandem mass spectrometry analysis, which was confirmed by comparison with authentic INA. Formation of INA was dependent on species, with the highest level found in monkey liver microsomes. The MMB4 DMS exhibited reversible inhibition in a concentration-dependent manner toward cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2), CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 in human liver microsomes showing the highest inhibition for CYP2D6. Human recombinant CYPs were used to evaluate inhibitory curves more adequately and determine detailed kinetic constants for reversible inhibition and potential time-dependent inhibition (TDI). The MMB4 DMS exhibited reversible inhibition toward human-recombinant CYP2D6 with an inhibition constant (K i) value of 66.6 µmol/L. Based on the k inact/K I values, MMB4 DMS was found to exhibit the most potent TDI toward CYP2D6. The MMB4 DMS at 5 different concentrations was incubated in plasma for 5 hours using an equilibrium dialysis device. For all species tested, there were no concentration-dependent changes in plasma protein binding, ranging from 10% to 17%. These results suggest that MMB4 was not extensively bound to plasma protein, and there were no overt species-related differences in the extent of MMB4 bound to plasma protein.

  16. Metabolic changes in malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, P W

    2005-10-01

    This paper is concerned with malnutrition caused by inadequate intake of all the major nutrients rather than deficiency diseases relating to a single micronutrient. Three common situations are recognised: young children in third world countries with protein-energy malnutrition; adults in the same countries who are chronically adapted to subsisting on marginally inadequate diets; and patients who become malnourished as a result of chronic diseases. In all these situations infectious diseases are often also present, and this complicates the interpretation of biochemical and physiological observations. The metabolic response to starvation is primarily concerned with maintaining a supply of water-soluble substrates to supply energy to the brain. Thus there is an initial rise in metabolic rate, reflecting gluconeogenic activity. As fasting progresses, gluconeogenesis is suppressed to minimise muscle protein breakdown and ketones become the main fuel for the brain. With chronic underfeeding the basal metabolic rate per cell appears to fall, but the mechanistic basis for this is not clear. The main adaptation to chronic energy deficiency is slow growth and low adult body size, although the reduction in energy requirement achieved by this is partially offset by the preservation of the more metabolically active organs at the expense of muscle, which has a lower metabolic rate. The interaction between malnutrition and the metabolic response to trauma has been studied using an animal model. The rise in energy expenditure and urinary nitrogen excretion following surgery were significantly attenuated in malnourished rats, suggesting that malnutrition impairs the ability of the body to mobilise substrates to support inflammatory and reparative processes. However, the healing process in wounded muscle remained unimpaired in malnutrition, suggesting that this process has a high biological priority.

  17. Artificial neural network-based exploration of gene-nutrient interactions in folate and xenobiotic metabolic pathways that modulate susceptibility to breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Ramaiah, M Janaki; Pavithrakumari, Manickam; Jayapriya, Jaganathan; Hussain, Tajamul; Alrokayan, Salman A; Gottumukkala, Suryanarayana Raju; Digumarti, Raghunadharao; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-04-15

    In the current study, an artificial neural network (ANN)-based breast cancer prediction model was developed from the data of folate and xenobiotic pathway genetic polymorphisms along with the nutritional and demographic variables to investigate how micronutrients modulate susceptibility to breast cancer. The developed ANN model explained 94.2% variability in breast cancer prediction. Fixed effect models of folate (400 μg/day) and B12 (6 μg/day) showed 33.3% and 11.3% risk reduction, respectively. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis showed the following interactions in responders to folate: RFC1 G80A × MTHFR C677T (primary), COMT H108L × CYP1A1 m2 (secondary), MTR A2756G (tertiary). The interactions among responders to B12 were RFC1G80A × cSHMT C1420T and CYP1A1 m2 × CYP1A1 m4. ANN simulations revealed that increased folate might restore ER and PR expression and reduce the promoter CpG island methylation of extra cellular superoxide dismutase and BRCA1. Dietary intake of folate appears to confer protection against breast cancer through its modulating effects on ER and PR expression and methylation of EC-SOD and BRCA1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Nucleotide Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Willemoës, M.; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic pathways are connected through their utilization of nucleotides as supplier of energy, allosteric effectors, and their role in activation of intermediates. Therefore, any attempt to exploit a given living organism in a biotechnological process will have an impact on nucleotide metabolis...

  19. Tumor macroenvironment and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zoughbi, Wael; Al-Zhoughbi, Wael; Huang, Jianfeng; Paramasivan, Ganapathy S; Till, Holger; Pichler, Martin; Guertl-Lackner, Barbara; Hoefler, Gerald

    2014-04-01

    In this review we introduce the concept of the tumor macroenvironment and explore it in the context of metabolism. Tumor cells interact with the tumor microenvironment including immune cells. Blood and lymph vessels are the critical components that deliver nutrients to the tumor and also connect the tumor to the macroenvironment. Several factors are then released from the tumor itself but potentially also from the tumor microenvironment, influencing the metabolism of distant tissues and organs. Amino acids, and distinct lipid and lipoprotein species can be essential for further tumor growth. The role of glucose in tumor metabolism has been studied extensively. Cancer-associated cachexia is the most important tumor-associated systemic syndrome and not only affects the quality of life of patients with various malignancies but is estimated to be the cause of death in 15%-20% of all cancer patients. On the other hand, systemic metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes are known to influence tumor development. Furthermore, the clinical implications of the tumor macroenvironment are explored in the context of the patient's outcome with special consideration for pediatric tumors. Finally, ways to target the tumor macroenvironment that will provide new approaches for therapeutic concepts are described. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Significant inhibitory impact of dibenzyl trisulfide and extracts of Petiveria alliacea on the activities of major drug-metabolizing enzymes in vitro: An assessment of the potential for medicinal plant-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, J; Picking, D; Lamm, A; McKenzie, J; Hartley, S; Watson, C; Williams, L; Lowe, H; Delgoda, R

    2016-06-01

    Dibenzyl trisulfide (DTS) is the major active ingredient expressed in Petiveria alliacea L., a shrub widely used for a range of conditions, such as, arthritis, asthma and cancer. Given its use alone and concomitantly with prescription medicines, we undertook to investigate its impact on the activities of important drug metabolizing enzymes, the cytochromes P450 (CYP), a key family of enzymes involved in many adverse drug reactions. DTS and seven standardized extracts from the plant were assessed for their impact on the activities of CYPs 1A2, 2C19, 2C9, 2D6 and 3A4 on a fluorometric assay. DTS revealed significant impact against the activities of CYPs 1A2, 2C19 and 3A4 with IC50 values of 1.9, 4.0 and 3.2μM, respectively, which are equivalent to known standard inhibitors of these enzymes (furafylline, and tranylcypromine), and the most potent interaction with CYP1A2 displayed irreversible enzyme kinetics. The root extract, drawn with 96% ethanol (containing 2.4% DTS), displayed IC50 values of 5.6, 3.9 and 4.2μg/mL respectively, against the same isoforms, CYPs 1A2, 2C19 and 3A4. These investigations identify DTS as a valuable CYP inhibitor and P. alliacea as a candidate plant worthy of clinical trials to confirm the conclusions that extracts yielding high DTS may lead to clinically relevant drug interactions, whilst extracts yielding low levels of DTS, such as aqueous extracts, are unlikely to cause adverse herb-drug interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cross-talk interactions of exogenous nitric oxide and sucrose modulates phenylpropanoid metabolism in yellow lupine embryo axes infected with Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morkunas, Iwona; Formela, Magda; Floryszak-Wieczorek, Jolanta; Marczak, Łukasz; Narożna, Dorota; Nowak, Witold; Bednarski, Waldemar

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the study was to examine cross-talk of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) and sucrose in the mechanisms of synthesis and accumulation of isoflavonoids in embryo axes of Lupinus luteus L. cv. Juno. It was verified whether the interaction of these molecules can modulate the defense response of axes to infection and development of the pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lupini. Sucrose alone strongly stimulated a high level of genistein glucoside in axes pretreated with exogenous nitric oxide (SNP or GSNO) and non-pretreated axes. As a result of amplification of the signal coming from sucrose and GSNO, high isoflavonoids accumulation was observed (+Sn+GSNO). It needs to be stressed that infection in tissues pretreated with SNP/GSNO and cultured on the medium with sucrose (+Si+SNP/+Si+GSNO) very strongly enhances the accumulation of free isoflavone aglycones. In +Si+SNP axes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity was high up to 72h. As early as at 12h in +Si+SNP axes an increase was recorded in gene expression level of the specific isoflavonoid synthesis pathway. At 24h in +Si+SNP axes a very high total antioxidant capacity dependent on the pool of fast antioxidants was noted. Post-infection generation of semiquinone radicals was lower in axes with a high level of sucrose than with a deficit. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Metabolic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pareek, Manan; Schauer, Philip R; Kaplan, Lee M

    2018-01-01

    The alarming rise in the worldwide prevalence of obesity is paralleled by an increasing burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metabolic surgery is the most effective means of obtaining substantial and durable weight loss in individuals with obesity. Randomized trials have recently shown...... the superiority of surgery over medical treatment alone in achieving improved glycemic control, as well as a reduction in cardiovascular risk factors. The mechanisms seem to extend beyond the magnitude of weight loss alone and include improvements in incretin profiles, insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity....... Moreover, observational data suggest that the reduction in cardiovascular risk factors translates to better patient outcomes. This review describes commonly used metabolic surgical procedures and their current indications and summarizes the evidence related to weight loss and glycemic outcomes. It further...

  3. Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil Ikinci

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome is a combination of risk factors including common etiopathogenesis. These risk factors play different roles in occurence of atherosclerotic diseases, type 2 diabetes, and cancers. Although a compromise can not be achieved on differential diagnosis for MS, the existence of any three criterias enable to diagnose MS. These are abdominal obesity, dislipidemia (hypertrigliceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and reduced high density lipoprotein hypertension, and elevated fasting blood glucose. According to the results of Metabolic Syndrome Research (METSAR, the overall prevalence of MS in Turkey is 34%; in females 40%, and in males it is 28%. As a result of “Western” diet, and increased frequency of obesity, MS is observed in children and in adolescents both in the world and in Turkey. Resulting in chronic diseases, it is thought that the syndrome can be prevented by healthy lifestyle behaviours. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 535-540

  4. Genes for carbon metabolism and the ToxA virulence factor in Pseudomonas aeruginosa are regulated through molecular interactions of PtxR and PtxS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelali Daddaoua

    Full Text Available Homologs of the transcriptional regulator PtxS are omnipresent in Pseudomonas, whereas PtxR homologues are exclusively found in human pathogenic Pseudomonas species. In all Pseudomonas sp., PtxS with 2-ketogluconate is the regulator of the gluconate degradation pathway and controls expression from its own promoter and also from the P(gad and P(kgu for the catabolic operons. There is evidence that PtxS and PtxR play a central role in the regulation of exotoxin A expression, a relevant primary virulence factor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We show using DNaseI-footprint analysis that in P. aeruginosa PtxR binds to the -35 region of the P(toxA promoter in front of the exotoxin A gene, whereas PtxS does not bind to this promoter. Bioinformatic and DNaseI-footprint analysis identified a PtxR binding site in the P(kgu and P(gad promoters that overlaps the -35 region, while the PtxS operator site is located 50 bp downstream from the PtxR site. In vitro, PtxS recognises PtxR with nanomolar affinity, but this interaction does not occur in the presence of 2-ketogluconate, the specific effector of PtxS. DNAaseI footprint assays of P(kgu and P(gad promoters with PtxS and PtxR showed a strong region of hyper-reactivity between both regulator binding sites, indicative of DNA distortion when both proteins are bound; however in the presence of 2-ketogluconate no protection was observed. We conclude that PtxS modulates PtxR activity in response to 2-ketogluconate by complex formation in solution in the case of the P(toxA promoter, or via the formation of a DNA loop as in the regulation of gluconate catabolic genes. Data suggest two different mechanisms of control exerted by the same regulator.

  5. Dietary modulation of erythrocyte insulin receptor interaction and the regulation of adipose tissue pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme activity in growing rats; a mechanism of action of dietary fiber in metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogunwole, J.O.A.

    1984-01-01

    The metabolic effects of graded cellulose (a dietary fiber) intake were studied at minimal (10%) and maximal (20%) protein levels in male weanling Sprague Dawley rats. The hypothesis was tested that the hypoglycemic effect of high fiber diets is partly mediated through increased tissue sensitivity to insulin at the cell receptor level. Erythrocyte insulin receptor interaction (IRI) and percent insulin stimulation of adipose tissue pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity (PDS) were used as indices of tissue sensitivity to insulin. IRI was determined by a standardized radioceptor assay PDS by the rate of oxidation of 1-/sup 14/C-pyruvate to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ in epidymal fat pads and serum insulin levels by radioimmunoassay. In both protein groups, the addition of fiber in the diet resulted in a significant (P < 0.05) increase in food intake (FI) for calorie compensation. Fiber and protein intake had a significant (P < 0.01) effect on IRI and both basal (PDB) and PDS activities of PDH. At all fiber levels, specific percent /sup 125/I-insulin binding (SIB) was higher in the 20% protein groups while in the fiber-free group, a higher SIB was observed in the 10% protein group.

  6. Robust method for investigating nitrogen metabolism of 15N labeled amino acids using AccQ•Tag ultra performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry: application to a parasitic plant-plant interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, Zachary; Cerveau, Delphine; Marnet, Nathalie; Bouchereau, Alain; Delavault, Philippe; Simier, Philippe; Pouvreau, Jean-Bernard

    2014-01-21

    An AccQ•Tag ultra performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (AccQ•Tag-UPLC-PDA-ESI-MS) method is presented here for the fast, robust, and sensitive quantification of (15)N isotopologue enrichment of amino acids in biological samples, as for example in the special biotic interaction between the cultivated specie Brassica napus (rapeseed) and the parasitic weed Phelipanche ramosa (broomrape). This method was developed and validated using amino acid standard solutions containing (15)N amino acid isotopologues and/or biological unlabeled extracts. Apparatus optimization, limits of detection and quantification, quantification reproducibility, and calculation method of (15)N isotopologue enrichment are presented. Using this method, we could demonstrate that young parasite tubercles assimilate inorganic nitrogen as (15)N-ammonium when supplied directly through batch incubation but not when supplied by translocation from host root phloem, contrary to (15)N2-glutamine. (15)N2-glutamine mobility from host roots to parasite tubercles followed by its low metabolism in tubercles suggests that the host-derived glutamine acts as an important nitrogen containing storage compound in the young tubercle of Phelipanche ramosa.

  7. Circadian physiology of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Satchidananda

    2016-11-25

    A majority of mammalian genes exhibit daily fluctuations in expression levels, making circadian expression rhythms the largest known regulatory network in normal physiology. Cell-autonomous circadian clocks interact with daily light-dark and feeding-fasting cycles to generate approximately 24-hour oscillations in the function of thousands of genes. Circadian expression of secreted molecules and signaling components transmits timing information between cells and tissues. Such intra- and intercellular daily rhythms optimize physiology both by managing energy use and by temporally segregating incompatible processes. Experimental animal models and epidemiological data indicate that chronic circadian rhythm disruption increases the risk of metabolic diseases. Conversely, time-restricted feeding, which imposes daily cycles of feeding and fasting without caloric reduction, sustains robust diurnal rhythms and can alleviate metabolic diseases. These findings highlight an integrative role of circadian rhythms in physiology and offer a new perspective for treating chronic diseases in which metabolic disruption is a hallmark. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Biochemical Hypermedia: Galactose Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Sugai

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Animations of biochemical processes and virtual laboratory environments lead to true molecular simulations. The use of interactive software’s in education can improve cognitive capacity, better learning and, mainly, it makes information acquisition easier. Material and Methods: This work presents the development of a biochemical hypermedia to understanding of the galactose metabolism. It was developed with the help of concept maps, ISIS Draw, ADOBE Photoshop and FLASH MX Program. Results and Discussion: A step by step animation process shows the enzymatic reactions of galactose conversion to glucose-1-phosphate (to glycogen synthesis, glucose-6-phosphate (glycolysis intermediary, UDP-galactose (substrate to mucopolysaccharides synthesis and collagen’s glycosylation. There are navigation guide that allow scrolling the mouse over the names of the components of enzymatic reactions of via the metabolism of galactose. Thus, explanatory text box, chemical structures and animation of the actions of enzymes appear to navigator. Upon completion of the module, the user’s response to the proposed exercise can be checked immediately through text box with interactive content of the answer. Conclusion: This hypermedia was presented for undergraduate students (UFSC who revealed that it was extremely effective in promoting the understanding of the theme.

  9. Influences of the colonic microbiome on the mucous gel layer in ulcerative colitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lennon, Gráinne

    2014-04-01

    The colonic mucus gel layer (MGL) is a critical component of the innate immune system acting as a physical barrier to microbes, luminal insults, and toxins. Mucins are the major component of the MGL. Selected microbes have the potential to interact with, bind to, and metabolize mucins. The tolerance of the host to the presence of these microbes is critical to maintaining MGL homeostasis. In disease states such as ulcerative colitis (UC), both the mucosa associated microbes and the constituent MGL mucins have been shown to be altered. Evidence is accumulating that implicates the potential for mucin degrading bacteria to negatively impact the MGL and its stasis. These effects appear more pronounced in UC.   This review is focused on the host-microbiome interactions within the setting of the MGL. Special focus is given to the mucolytic potential of microbes and their interactions in the setting of the colitic colon.

  10. Griffeen Valley Nursing Home, Esker Road, Lucan, Co. Dublin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lennon, Gráinne

    2014-04-01

    The colonic mucus gel layer (MGL) is a critical component of the innate immune system acting as a physical barrier to microbes, luminal insults, and toxins. Mucins are the major component of the MGL. Selected microbes have the potential to interact with, bind to, and metabolize mucins. The tolerance of the host to the presence of these microbes is critical to maintaining MGL homeostasis. In disease states such as ulcerative colitis (UC), both the mucosa associated microbes and the constituent MGL mucins have been shown to be altered. Evidence is accumulating that implicates the potential for mucin degrading bacteria to negatively impact the MGL and its stasis. These effects appear more pronounced in UC.   This review is focused on the host-microbiome interactions within the setting of the MGL. Special focus is given to the mucolytic potential of microbes and their interactions in the setting of the colitic colon.

  11. Evolution of metabolic network organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonchev Danail

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparison of metabolic networks across species is a key to understanding how evolutionary pressures shape these networks. By selecting taxa representative of different lineages or lifestyles and using a comprehensive set of descriptors of the structure and complexity of their metabolic networks, one can highlight both qualitative and quantitative differences in the metabolic organization of species subject to distinct evolutionary paths or environmental constraints. Results We used a novel representation of metabolic networks, termed network of interacting pathways or NIP, to focus on the modular, high-level organization of the metabolic capabilities of the cell. Using machine learning techniques we identified the most relevant aspects of cellular organization that change under evolutionary pressures. We considered the transitions from prokarya to eukarya (with a focus on the transitions among the archaea, bacteria and eukarya, from unicellular to multicellular eukarya, from free living to host-associated bacteria, from anaerobic to aerobic, as well as the acquisition of cell motility or growth in an environment of various levels of salinity or temperature. Intuitively, we expect organisms with more complex lifestyles to have more complex and robust metabolic networks. Here we demonstrate for the first time that such organisms are not only characterized by larger, denser networks of metabolic pathways but also have more efficiently organized cross communications, as revealed by subtle changes in network topology. These changes are unevenly distributed among metabolic pathways, with specific categories of pathways being promoted to more central locations as an answer to environmental constraints. Conclusions Combining methods from graph theory and machine learning, we have shown here that evolutionary pressures not only affects gene and protein sequences, but also specific details of the complex wiring of functional modules

  12. ER Stress and Lipid Metabolism in Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth S. Zha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is a rapidly emerging field of interest in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. Recent studies have shown that chronic activation of ER stress is closely linked to dysregulation of lipid metabolism in several metabolically important cells including hepatocytes, macrophages, β-cells, and adipocytes. Adipocytes are one of the major cell types involved in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. Recent advances in dissecting the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of adipogenesis and lipid metabolism indicate that activation of ER stress plays a central role in regulating adipocyte function. In this paper, we discuss the current understanding of the potential role of ER stress in lipid metabolism in adipocytes. In addition, we touch upon the interaction of ER stress and autophagy as well as inflammation. Inhibition of ER stress has the potential of decreasing the pathology in adipose tissue that is seen with energy overbalance.

  13. Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Carbohydrate metabolism disorders are a group of metabolic disorders. Normally your enzymes break carbohydrates down into glucose (a type of sugar). If ...

  14. Comprehensive metabolic panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic panel - comprehensive; Chem-20; SMA20; Sequential multi-channel analysis with computer-20; SMAC20; Metabolic panel 20 ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) - blood. In: ... Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. St Louis, MO: ...

  15. Haloacetonitriles: metabolism and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, John C; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal; Ahmed, Ahmed E

    2009-01-01

    bioactivation process, depending on the particular HAN and the enzyme involved. HANs can inhibit CYP2E1-mediated metabolism, an effect which may be dependent on a covalent interaction with the enzyme. In addition, HAN compounds inhibit GST-mediated conjugation, but this effect is reversible upon dialysis, indicating that the interaction does not represent covalent binding. No subchronic studies of HAN toxicity are available in the literature. However, studies show that HANs produce developmental toxicity in experimental animals. The nature of developmental toxicity is affected by the type of administration vehicle, which renders interpretation of results more difficult. Skin tumors have been found following dermal application of HANs, but oral studies for carcinogenicity are negative. Pulmonary adenomas were increased following oral administration of HANs, but the A/J strain of mice employed has a characteristically high background rate of such tumors. HANs interact with DNA to produce unscheduled DNA repair, SCE and reverse mutations in Salmonella. HANs did not induce micronuclei or cause alterations in sperm head morphology in mice, but did induce micronuclei in newts. Thus, there is concern for the potential carcinogenicity of HANs. It would be valuable to delineate any relationship between the apparent threshold for micronuclei formation in newts and the potential mechanism of toxicity involving HAN-induced oxidative stress. Dose-response studies in rodents may provide useful information on toxicity mechanisms and dose selection for longer term toxicity studies. Additional studies are warranted before drawing firm conclusions on the hazards of HAN exposure. Moreover, additional studies on HAN-DNA and HAN-protein interaction mechanisms, are needed. Such studies can better characterize the role of metabolism in toxicity of individual HANs, and delineate the role of oxidative stress, both of which enhance the capacity to predict risk. Most needed, now, are new subchronic (and

  16. MetaFluxNet: the management of metabolic reaction information and quantitative metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Yup; Yun, Hongsoek; Park, Sunwon; Lee, Sang Yup

    2003-11-01

    MetaFluxNet is a program package for managing information on the metabolic reaction network and for quantitatively analyzing metabolic fluxes in an interactive and customized way. It allows users to interpret and examine metabolic behavior in response to genetic and/or environmental modifications. As a result, quantitative in silico simulations of metabolic pathways can be carried out to understand the metabolic status and to design the metabolic engineering strategies. The main features of the program include a well-developed model construction environment, user-friendly interface for metabolic flux analysis (MFA), comparative MFA of strains having different genotypes under various environmental conditions, and automated pathway layout creation. http://mbel.kaist.ac.kr/ A manual for MetaFluxNet is available as PDF file.

  17. System wide cofactor turnovers can propagate metabolic stability between pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Y.; Guan, Y.H.; Villadsen, John

    2016-01-01

    . Furthermore, we elaborated the criteria to tell if a multi-enzyme over-all reaction path is of in vivo nature or not at the metabolic level. As new findings, we discovered that there are interactions between the enzyme feedback inhibition and the CI turnover, and such interactions may well lead to metabolic...

  18. Control of leptin by metabolic state and its regulatory interactions with pituitary growth hormone and hepatic growth hormone receptors and insulin like growth factors in the tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douros, Jonathan D; Baltzegar, David A; Mankiewicz, Jamie; Taylor, Jordan; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Lerner, Darren T; Seale, Andre P; Grau, E Gordon; Breves, Jason P; Borski, Russell J

    2017-01-01

    Leptin is an important cytokine for regulating energy homeostasis, however, relatively little is known about its function and control in teleost fishes or other ectotherms, particularly with regard to interactions with the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) growth regulatory axis. Here we assessed the regulation of LepA, the dominant paralog in tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) and other teleosts under altered nutritional state, and evaluated how LepA might alter pituitary growth hormone (GH) and hepatic insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) that are known to be disparately regulated by metabolic state. Circulating LepA, and lepa and lepr gene expression increased after 3-weeks fasting and declined to control levels 10days following refeeding. This pattern of leptin regulation by metabolic state is similar to that previously observed for pituitary GH and opposite that of hepatic GHR and/or IGF dynamics in tilapia and other fishes. We therefore evaluated if LepA might differentially regulate pituitary GH, and hepatic GH receptors (GHRs) and IGFs. Recombinant tilapia LepA (rtLepA) increased hepatic gene expression of igf-1, igf-2, ghr-1, and ghr-2 from isolated hepatocytes following 24h incubation. Intraperitoneal rtLepA injection, on the other hand, stimulated hepatic igf-1, but had little effect on hepatic igf-2, ghr1, or ghr2 mRNA abundance. LepA suppressed GH accumulation and gh mRNA in pituitaries in vitro, but had no effect on GH release. We next sought to test if abolition of pituitary GH via hypophysectomy (Hx) affects the expression of hepatic lepa and lepr. Hypophysectomy significantly increases hepatic lepa mRNA abundance, while GH replacement in Hx fish restores lepa mRNA levels to that of sham controls. Leptin receptor (lepr) mRNA was unchanged by Hx. In in vitro hepatocyte incubations, GH inhibits lepa and lepr mRNA expression at low concentrations, while higher concentration stimulates lepa expression. Taken together, these findings

  19. Watershed Land Use and Seasonal Variation Constrain the Influence of Riparian Canopy Cover on Stream Ecosystem Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    While watershed and local scale controls on stream metabolism have been independently investigated, little is known about how controls exerted at these different scales interact to determine stream metabolic rates, or how these interactions vary across seasons. To address this ...

  20. Relationship Between Organophosphate Toxicity and Choline Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-06

    Results from studies on the actions of the organophosphates on the central nervus system have suggested that these compounds, through an action on...Grganophosphates alter the disposition and metabolism of choline and choline-containing compounds in the nervous system , the relationshi ý of these changes to...mechanisms regulating the metabolism of choline, as well as the specific interactions of the organophospha:es with biochemical systems , may differ

  1. Part I---Evaluating Effects of Oligomer Formation on Cytochrome P450 2C9 Electron Transfer and Drug Metabolism, Part II---Utilizing Molecular Modeling Techniques to Study the Src-Interacting Proteins Actin Filament Associated Protein of 110 kDa (AFAP-110) and Cortactin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, John Edward, Jr.

    The dissertation has been divided into two parts to accurately reflect the two distinct areas of interest pursued during my matriculation in the School of Pharmacy at West Virginia University. In Part I, I discuss research probing the nature of electron transfer in the Cytochrome P450 family of proteins, a group of proteins well-known for their role in drug metabolism. In Part II, I focus on in silico and in vitro work developed in concert to probe protein structure and protein-protein interactions involved in actin filament reorganization and cellular motility. Part I. Cytochrome P450s (P450s) are an important class of enzymes known to metabolize a variety of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds. P450s are most commonly found in liver and intestinal endothelial cells and are responsible for the metabolism of approximately 75% of pharmaceutical drugs on the market. CYP2C9---one of the six major P450 isoforms---is responsible for ˜20% of drug metabolism. Elucidation of the factors that affect in vitro drug metabolism is crucial to the accurate prediction of in vivo drug metabolism kinetics. Currently, the two major techniques for studying in vitro drug metabolism are solution-based. However, it is known that the results of solution-based studies can vary from in vivo drug metabolism. One reason suggested to account for this variation is the state of P450 oligomer formation in solution compared to the in vivo environment, where P450s are membrane-bound. To understand the details of how oligomer formation affects in vitro drug metabolism, it is imperative that techniques be developed which will allow for the unequivocal control of oligomer formation without altering other experimental parameters. Our long term goal of this research is to develop methods to more accurately predict in vivo drug metabolism from in vitro data. This section of the dissertation will discuss the development of a platform consisting of a doped silicon surface containing a large array of gold

  2. Sequential interactions of silver-silica nanocomposite (Ag-SiO2 NC) with cell wall, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a multiple antibiotic-resistant bacterium

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anas, A.; Jiya, J.; Rameez, M.J.; Anand, P.B.; Anantharaman, M.R.; Nair, S.

    The study was carried out to understand the effect of silver–silica nanocomposite (Ag-SiO sub(2)NC) on the cell wall integrity, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a multiple drug-resistant bacterium. Bacterial sensitivity...

  3. Sequential interactions of silver-silica nanocomposite (Ag-SiO2NC) with cell wall, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a multiple antibiotic-resistant bacterium

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anas, A.; Jiya, J.; Rameez, M.J.; Anand, P.B.; Anantharaman, M.R.; Nair, S.

    The study was carried out to understand the effect of silver-silica nanocomposite (Ag-SiO sub(2)NC) on the cell wall integrity, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a multiple drug-resistant bacterium Bacterial sensitivity...

  4. Metabolism and disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grodzicker, Terri; Stewart, David J; Stillman, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    ...), cellular, organ system (cardiovascular, bone), and organismal (timing and life span) scales. Diseases impacted by metabolic imbalance or dysregulation that were covered in detail included diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cancer...

  5. Metabolic Engineering X Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, Evan [American Institute of Chemical Engineers

    2015-05-07

    The International Metabolic Engineering Society (IMES) and the Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), both technological communities of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), hosted the Metabolic Engineering X Conference (ME-X) on June 15-19, 2014 at the Westin Bayshore in Vancouver, British Columbia. It attracted 395 metabolic engineers from academia, industry and government from around the globe.

  6. Altered metabolism in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Locasale Jason W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer cells have different metabolic requirements from their normal counterparts. Understanding the consequences of this differential metabolism requires a detailed understanding of glucose metabolism and its relation to energy production in cancer cells. A recent study in BMC Systems Biology by Vasquez et al. developed a mathematical model to assess some features of this altered metabolism. Here, we take a broader look at the regulation of energy metabolism in cancer cells, considering their anabolic as well as catabolic needs. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1752-0509/4/58/

  7. Engineering Cellular Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds...... of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation....

  8. Drug discovery strategies in the field of tumor energy metabolism: Limitations by metabolic flexibility and metabolic resistance to chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoedo, N D; Obre, E; Rossignol, R

    2017-08-01

    The search for new drugs capable of blocking the metabolic vulnerabilities of human tumors has now entered the clinical evaluation stage, but several projects already failed in phase I or phase II. In particular, very promising in vitro studies could not be translated in vivo at preclinical stage and beyond. This was the case for most glycolysis inhibitors that demonstrated systemic toxicity. A more recent example is the inhibition of glutamine catabolism in lung adenocarcinoma that failed in vivo despite a strong addiction of several cancer cell lines to glutamine in vitro. Such contradictory findings raised several questions concerning the optimization of drug discovery strategies in the field of cancer metabolism. For instance, the cell culture models in 2D or 3D might already show strong limitations to mimic the tumor micro- and macro-environment. The microenvironment of tumors is composed of cancer cells of variegated metabolic profiles, supporting local metabolic exchanges and symbiosis, but also of immune cells and stroma that further interact with and reshape cancer cell metabolism. The macroenvironment includes the different tissues of the organism, capable of exchanging signals and fueling the tumor 'a distance'. Moreover, most metabolic targets were identified from their increased expression in tumor transcriptomic studies, or from targeted analyses looking at the metabolic impact of particular oncogenes or tumor suppressors on selected metabolic pathways. Still, very few targets were identified from in vivo analyses of tumor metabolism in patients because such studies are difficult and adequate imaging methods are only currently being developed for that purpose. For instance, perfusion of patients with [ 13 C]-glucose allows deciphering the metabolomics of tumors and opens a new area in the search for effective targets. Metabolic imaging with positron emission tomography and other techniques that do not involve [ 13 C] can also be used to evaluate tumor

  9. translin is required for metabolic regulation of sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami, Kazuma; Yurgel, Maria E.; Stahl, Bethany A.; Masek, Pavel; Mehta, Aradhana; Heidker, Rebecca; Bollinger, Wesley; Gingras, Robert M.; Kim, Young-Joon; Ja, William W.; Suter, Beat; DiAngelo, Justin R.; Keene, Alex C.

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of sleep or feeding has enormous health consequences. In humans, acute sleep loss is associated with increased appetite and insulin insensitivity, while chronically sleep-deprived individuals are more likely to develop obesity, metabolic syndrome, type II diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Conversely, metabolic state potently modulates sleep and circadian behavior; yet, the molecular basis for sleep-metabolism interactions remains poorly understood. Here, we describe the iden...

  10. Polycystic ovary syndrome and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aus Tariq

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous disorder, where the main clinical features include menstrual irregularities, sub-fertility, hyperandrogenism, and hirsutism. The prevalence of PCOS depends on ethnicity, environmental and genetic factors, as well as the criteria used to define it. On the other hand, metabolic syndrome is a constellation of metabolic disorders which include mainly abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, impaired glucose metabolism, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. These associated disorders directly increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DMT2), coronary heart disease (CHD), cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and endometrial cancer. Many patients with PCOS have features of metabolic syndrome such as visceral obesity, hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance. These place patients with PCOS under high risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), Type 2 diabetes (DMT2) and gynecological cancer, in particular, endometrial cancer. Metabolic syndrome is also increased in infertile women with PCOS. The aim of this review is to provide clear and up to date information about PCOS and its relationship with metabolic syndrome, and the possible interaction between different metabolic disorders.

  11. Regulation of Metabolic Activity by p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Flöter

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells is controlled by the activation of multiple oncogenic signalling pathways in order to promote macromolecule biosynthesis during rapid proliferation. Cancer cells also need to adapt their metabolism to survive and multiply under the metabolically compromised conditions provided by the tumour microenvironment. The tumour suppressor p53 interacts with the metabolic network at multiple nodes, mostly to reduce anabolic metabolism and promote preservation of cellular energy under conditions of nutrient restriction. Inactivation of this tumour suppressor by deletion or mutation is a frequent event in human cancer. While loss of p53 function lifts an important barrier to cancer development by deleting cell cycle and apoptosis checkpoints, it also removes a crucial regulatory mechanism and can render cancer cells highly sensitive to metabolic perturbation. In this review, we will summarise the major concepts of metabolic regulation by p53 and explore how this knowledge can be used to selectively target p53 deficient cancer cells in the context of the tumour microenvironment.

  12. Understanding Regulation of Metabolism through Feasibility Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikerel, Emrah; Berkhout, Jan; Hu, Fengyuan; Teusink, Bas; Reinders, Marcel J. T.; de Ridder, Dick

    2012-01-01

    Understanding cellular regulation of metabolism is a major challenge in systems biology. Thus far, the main assumption was that enzyme levels are key regulators in metabolic networks. However, regulation analysis recently showed that metabolism is rarely controlled via enzyme levels only, but through non-obvious combinations of hierarchical (gene and enzyme levels) and metabolic regulation (mass action and allosteric interaction). Quantitative analyses relating changes in metabolic fluxes to changes in transcript or protein levels have revealed a remarkable lack of understanding of the regulation of these networks. We study metabolic regulation via feasibility analysis (FA). Inspired by the constraint-based approach of Flux Balance Analysis, FA incorporates a model describing kinetic interactions between molecules. We enlarge the portfolio of objectives for the cell by defining three main physiologically relevant objectives for the cell: function, robustness and temporal responsiveness. We postulate that the cell assumes one or a combination of these objectives and search for enzyme levels necessary to achieve this. We call the subspace of feasible enzyme levels the feasible enzyme space. Once this space is constructed, we can study how different objectives may (if possible) be combined, or evaluate the conditions at which the cells are faced with a trade-off among those. We apply FA to the experimental scenario of long-term carbon limited chemostat cultivation of yeast cells, studying how metabolism evolves optimally. Cells employ a mixed strategy composed of increasing enzyme levels for glucose uptake and hexokinase and decreasing levels of the remaining enzymes. This trade-off renders the cells specialized in this low-carbon flux state to compete for the available glucose and get rid of over-overcapacity. Overall, we show that FA is a powerful tool for systems biologists to study regulation of metabolism, interpret experimental data and evaluate hypotheses. PMID

  13. Adherence to two methods of education and metabolic control in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Education in diabetes optimizes metabolic control, prevents acute and chronic complications, and improves quality of life. Our main objective was to evaluate if a better metabolic control is achieved in diabetic patients undergoing a program of intensive interactive care than in those with traditional care and ...

  14. Metabolic costs of hybridization in newts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gvoždík, Lumír

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 61, 3-4 (2012), s. 197-201 ISSN 0139-7893 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP506/10/2170; GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : oxygen consumption * energetic metabolism * hybrids * Triturus * amphibians * mitonuclear interactions * reproductive barriers Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.494, year: 2012

  15. Global network reorganization during dynamic adaptations of Bacillus subtilis metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buescher, Joerg Martin; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Jules, Matthieu

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation of cells to environmental changes requires dynamic interactions between metabolic and regulatory networks, but studies typically address only one or a few layers of regulation. For nutritional shifts between two preferred carbon sources of Bacillus subtilis, we combined statistical...

  16. [Menopause and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirelles, Ricardo M R

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease increases considerably after the menopause. One reason for the increased cardiovascular risk seems to be determined by metabolic syndrome, in which all components (visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and glucose metabolism disorder) are associated with higher incidence of coronary artery disease. After menopause, metabolic syndrome is more prevalent than in premenopausal women, and may plays an important role in the occurrence of myocardial infarction and other atherosclerotic and cardiovascular morbidities. Obesity, an essential component of the metabolic syndrome, is also associated with increased incidence of breast, endometrial, bowel, esophagus, and kidney cancer. The treatment of metabolic syndrome is based on the change in lifestyle and, when necessary, the use of medication directed to its components. In the presence of symptoms of the climacteric syndrome, hormonal therapy, when indicated, will also contribute to the improvement of the metabolic syndrome.

  17. Metabolic syndrome and menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Jouyandeh, Zahra; Nayebzadeh, Farnaz; Qorbani, Mostafa; Asadi, Mojgan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome is defined as an assemblage of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and menopause is associated with an increase in metabolic syndrome prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among postmenopausal women in Tehran, Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study in menopause clinic in Tehran, 118 postmenopausal women were investigated. We used the adult treatment panel 3 (ATP3) criteria t...

  18. Prisoner's dilemma in cancer metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Kareva

    Full Text Available As tumors outgrow their blood supply and become oxygen deprived, they switch to less energetically efficient but oxygen-independent anaerobic glucose metabolism. However, cancer cells maintain glycolytic phenotype even in the areas of ample oxygen supply (Warburg effect. It has been hypothesized that the competitive advantage that glycolytic cells get over aerobic cells is achieved through secretion of lactic acid, which is a by-product of glycolysis. It creates acidic microenvironment around the tumor that can be toxic to normal somatic cells. This interaction can be seen as a prisoner's dilemma: from the point of view of metabolic payoffs, it is better for cells to cooperate and become better competitors but neither cell has an incentive to unilaterally change its metabolic strategy. In this paper a novel mathematical technique, which allows reducing an otherwise infinitely dimensional system to low dimensionality, is used to demonstrate that changing the environment can take the cells out of this equilibrium and that it is cooperation that can in fact lead to the cell population committing evolutionary suicide.

  19. Genetic determinants of HDL metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossoli, A; Gomaraschi, M; Franceschini, G; Calabresi, L

    2014-01-01

    Plasma high density lipoproteins (HDL) comprise a highly heterogeneous family of lipoprotein particles, with subclasses that can be separated and identified according to density, size, surface charge as well as shape and protein composition. There is evidence that these subclasses may differ in their functional properties. The individual plasma HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) level is generally taken as a snapshot of the steady-state concentration of all circulating HDL subclasses together, but this is insufficient to capture the structural and functional variation in HDL particles. HDL are continuously remodeled and metabolized in plasma and interstitial fluids, through the interaction with a large number of factors, including structural proteins, membrane transporters, enzymes, transfer proteins and receptors. Genetic variation in these factors can lead to essential changes in plasma HDL levels, and to remarkable changes in HDL particle density, size, surface charge, shape, and composition in lipids and apolipoproteins. This review discusses the impact of rare mutations and common variants in genes encoding factors involved in HDL remodeling and metabolism on plasma HDL-C levels and particle distribution. The study of the effects of human genetic variation in major players in HDL metabolism provides important clues on how individual factors modulate the formation, maturation, remodeling and catabolism of HDL.

  20. [Metabolic functions and sport].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riviere, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Current epidemiological studies emphasize the increased of metabolic diseases of the adults, such as obesity, type-2 diabetes and metabolic syndromes. Even more worrying is the rising prevalence of obesity in children. It is due more to sedentariness, caused more by inactivity (television, video, games, etc.) than by overeating. Many studies have shown that regular physical activities benefit various bodily functions including metabolism. After dealing with the major benefits of physical exercise on some adult metabolic disorders, we focus on the prime role played by physical activity in combating the public health problem of childhood obesity.

  1. Mathematical modelling of metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gombert, Andreas Karoly; Nielsen, Jens

    2000-01-01

    Mathematical models of the cellular metabolism have a special interest within biotechnology. Many different kinds of commercially important products are derived from the cell factory, and metabolic engineering can be applied to improve existing production processes, as well as to make new processes...... availability of genomic information and powerful analytical techniques, mathematical models also serve as a tool for understanding the cellular metabolism and physiology....... available. Both stoichiometric and kinetic models have been used to investigate the metabolism, which has resulted in defining the optimal fermentation conditions, as well as in directing the genetic changes to be introduced in order to obtain a good producer strain or cell line. With the increasing...

  2. Fluoroacetylcarnitine: metabolism and metabolic effects in mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bremer, J; Davis, E J

    1973-01-01

    The metabolism and metabolic effects of fluoroacetylcarnitine have been investigated. Carnitineacetyltransferase transfers the fluoro-acetyl group of fluoroacetylcarnitine nearly as rapidly to CoA as the acetyl group of acetylcarnitine. Fluorocitrate is then formed by citrate synthase, but this second reaction is relatively slow. The fluorocitrate formed intramitochondrially inhibits the metabolism of citrate. In heart and skeletal muscle mitochondria the accumulated citrate inhibits citrate synthesis and the ..beta..-oxidation of fatty acids. Free acetate is formed, presumably because accumulated acetyl-CoA is hydrolyzed. In liver mitochondria the accumulation of citrate leads to a relatively increased rate of ketogenesis. Increased ketogenesis is obtained also upon the addition of citrate to the reaction mixture.

  3. Fatty acid metabolism: target for metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Wakil, Salih J.; Abu-Elheiga, Lutfi A.

    2009-01-01

    Fatty acids are a major energy source and important constituents of membrane lipids, and they serve as cellular signaling molecules that play an important role in the etiology of the metabolic syndrome. Acetyl-CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 (ACC1 and ACC2) catalyze the synthesis of malonyl-CoA, the substrate for fatty acid synthesis and the regulator of fatty acid oxidation. They are highly regulated and play important roles in the energy metabolism of fatty acids in animals, including humans. They...

  4. Metabolic in Vivo Labeling Highlights Differences of Metabolically Active Microbes from the Mucosal Gastrointestinal Microbiome between High-Fat and Normal Chow Diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oberbach, Andreas; Haange, Sven Bastiaan; Schlichting, Nadine; Heinrich, Marco; Lehmann, Stefanie; Till, Holger; Hugenholtz, Floor; Kullnick, Yvonne; Smidt, Hauke; Frank, Karin; Seifert, Jana; Jehmlich, Nico; Bergen, Von Martin

    2017-01-01

    The gastrointestinal microbiota in the gut interacts metabolically and immunologically with the host tissue in the contact zone of the mucus layer. For understanding the details of these interactions and especially their dynamics it is crucial to identify the metabolically active subset of the

  5. Metabolic pathways for the whole community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Niels W; Konwar, Kishori M; Hawley, Alyse K; Altman, Tomer; Karp, Peter D; Hallam, Steven J

    2014-07-22

    A convergence of high-throughput sequencing and computational power is transforming biology into information science. Despite these technological advances, converting bits and bytes of sequence information into meaningful insights remains a challenging enterprise. Biological systems operate on multiple hierarchical levels from genomes to biomes. Holistic understanding of biological systems requires agile software tools that permit comparative analyses across multiple information levels (DNA, RNA, protein, and metabolites) to identify emergent properties, diagnose system states, or predict responses to environmental change. Here we adopt the MetaPathways annotation and analysis pipeline and Pathway Tools to construct environmental pathway/genome databases (ePGDBs) that describe microbial community metabolism using MetaCyc, a highly curated database of metabolic pathways and components covering all domains of life. We evaluate Pathway Tools' performance on three datasets with different complexity and coding potential, including simulated metagenomes, a symbiotic system, and the Hawaii Ocean Time-series. We define accuracy and sensitivity relationships between read length, coverage and pathway recovery and evaluate the impact of taxonomic pruning on ePGDB construction and interpretation. Resulting ePGDBs provide interactive metabolic maps, predict emergent metabolic pathways associated with biosynthesis and energy production and differentiate between genomic potential and phenotypic expression across defined environmental gradients. This multi-tiered analysis provides the user community with specific operating guidelines, performance metrics and prediction hazards for more reliable ePGDB construction and interpretation. Moreover, it demonstrates the power of Pathway Tools in predicting metabolic interactions in natural and engineered ecosystems.

  6. Connexins, diabetes and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelin, Romain; Allagnat, Florent; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine; Meda, Paolo

    2009-02-01

    Diabetes and the related metabolic syndrome are multi system disorders that result from improper interactions between various cell types. Even though the underlying mechanism remains to be fully understood, it is most likely that both the long and the short distance range cell interactions, which normally ensure the physiologic functioning of the pancreas, and its relationships with the insulin-targeted organs, are altered. This review focuses on the short-range type of interactions that depend on the contact between adjacent cells and, specifically, on the interactions that are dependent on connexins. The widespread distribution of these membrane proteins, their multiple modes of action, and their interactions with conditions/molecules associated to both the pathogenesis and the treatment of the 2 main forms of diabetes and the metabolic syndrome, make connexins an essential part of the chain of events that leads to metabolic diseases. Here, we review the present state of knowledge about the molecular and cell biology of the connexin genes and proteins, their general mechanisms of action, the roles specific connexin species play in the endocrine pancreas and the major insulin-targeted organs, under physiological and patho-physiological conditions.

  7. A place for host-microbe symbiosis in the comparative physiologist's toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Kevin D; Carey, Hannah V

    2016-11-15

    Although scientists have long appreciated that metazoans evolved in a microbial world, we are just beginning to appreciate the profound impact that host-associated microbes have on diverse aspects of animal biology. The enormous growth in our understanding of host-microbe symbioses is rapidly expanding the study of animal physiology, both technically and conceptually. Microbes associate functionally with various body surfaces of their hosts, although most reside in the gastrointestinal tract. Gut microbes convert dietary and host-derived substrates to metabolites such as short-chain fatty acids, thereby providing energy and nutrients to the host. Bacterial metabolites incorporated into the host metabolome can activate receptors on a variety of cell types and, in doing so, alter host physiology (including metabolism, organ function, biological rhythms, neural activity and behavior). Given that host-microbe interactions affect diverse aspects of host physiology, it is likely that they influence animal ecology and, if they confer fitness benefits, the evolutionary trajectory of a species. Multiple variables - including sampling regime, environmental parameters, host metadata and analytical methods - can influence experimental outcomes in host-microbiome studies, making careful experimental design and execution crucial to ensure reproducible and informative studies in the laboratory and field. Integration of microbiomes into comparative physiology and ecophysiological investigations can reveal the potential impacts of the microbiota on physiological responses to changing environments, and is likely to bring valuable insights to the study of host-microbiome interactions among a broad range of metazoans, including humans. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Investigation of metabolic encephalopathy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cycle defects is the X-linked recessive disorder, ornithine ... life, or if the child is fed the compounds that they are unable .... as learning difficulties, drowsiness and avoidance of ... Table 2. Laboratory investigation of suspected metabolic encephalopathy. Laboratory .... Clinical approach to treatable inborn metabolic diseases:.

  9. Metabolic regulation of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Timo; Strehl, Cindy; Buttgereit, Frank

    2017-05-01

    Immune cells constantly patrol the body via the bloodstream and migrate into multiple tissues where they face variable and sometimes demanding environmental conditions. Nutrient and oxygen availability can vary during homeostasis, and especially during the course of an immune response, creating a demand for immune cells that are highly metabolically dynamic. As an evolutionary response, immune cells have developed different metabolic programmes to supply them with cellular energy and biomolecules, enabling them to cope with changing and challenging metabolic conditions. In the past 5 years, it has become clear that cellular metabolism affects immune cell function and differentiation, and that disease-specific metabolic configurations might provide an explanation for the dysfunctional immune responses seen in rheumatic diseases. This Review outlines the metabolic challenges faced by immune cells in states of homeostasis and inflammation, as well as the variety of metabolic configurations utilized by immune cells during differentiation and activation. Changes in cellular metabolism that contribute towards the dysfunctional immune responses seen in rheumatic diseases are also briefly discussed.

  10. Metabolic syndrome and menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouyandeh Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome is defined as an assemblage of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and menopause is associated with an increase in metabolic syndrome prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among postmenopausal women in Tehran, Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study in menopause clinic in Tehran, 118 postmenopausal women were investigated. We used the adult treatment panel 3 (ATP3 criteria to classify subjects as having metabolic syndrome. Results Total prevalence of metabolic syndrome among our subjects was 30.1%. Waist circumference, HDL-cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, diastolic blood pressure ,Systolic blood pressure, and triglyceride were significantly higher among women with metabolic syndrome (P-value Conclusions Our study shows that postmenopausal status is associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome. Therefore, to prevent cardiovascular disease there is a need to evaluate metabolic syndrome and its components from the time of the menopause.

  11. Metabolic anatomy of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, N.E.; Posner, J.B.; Sidtis, J.J.; Moeller, J.R.; Strother, S.C.; Dhawan, V.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Eleven patients with acquired cerebellar degeneration (10 of whom had paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration [PCD]) were evaluated using neuropsychological tests and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography to (1) quantify motor, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities; (2) determine if characteristic alterations in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlc) are associated with PCD; and (3) correlate behavioral and metabolic measures of disease severity. Eighteen volunteer subjects served as normal controls. Although some PCD neuropsychological test scores were abnormal, these results could not, in general, be dissociated from the effects of dysarthria and ataxia. rCMRGlc was reduced in patients with PCD (versus normal control subjects) in all regions except the brainstem. Analysis of patient and control rCMRGlc data using a mathematical model of regional metabolic interactions revealed two metabolic pattern descriptors, SSF1 and SSF2, which distinguished patients with PCD from normal control subjects; SSF2, which described a metabolic coupling between cerebellum, cuneus, and posterior temporal, lateral frontal, and paracentral cortex, correlated with quantitative indices of cerebellar dysfunction. Our inability to document substantial intellectual impairment in 7 of 10 patients with PCD contrasts with the 50% incidence of dementia in PCD reported by previous investigators. Widespread reductions in PCD rCMRGlc may result from the loss of cerebellar efferents to thalamus and forebrain structures, a reverse cerebellar diaschisis

  12. Deepening, and repairing, the metabolic rift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Mindi; McMichael, Philip

    2010-01-01

    This paper critically assesses the metabolic rift as a social, ecological, and historical concept describing the disruption of natural cycles and processes and ruptures in material human-nature relations under capitalism. As a social concept, the metabolic rift presumes that metabolism is understood in relation to the labour process. This conception, however, privileges the organisation of labour to the exclusion of the practice of labour, which we argue challenges its utility for analysing contemporary socio-environmental crises. As an ecological concept, the metabolic rift is based on outmoded understandings of (agro) ecosystems and inadequately describes relations and interactions between labour and ecological processes. Historically, the metabolic rift is integral to debates about the definitions and relations of capitalism, industrialism, and modernity as historical concepts. At the same time, it gives rise to an epistemic rift, insofar as the separation of the natural and social worlds comes to be expressed in social thought and critical theory, which have one-sidedly focused on the social. We argue that a reunification of the social and the ecological, in historical practice and in historical thought, is the key to repairing the metabolic rift, both conceptually and practically. The food sovereignty movement in this respect is exemplary.

  13. The compositional and evolutionary logic of metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braakman, Rogier; Smith, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Metabolism is built on a foundation of organic chemistry, and employs structures and interactions at many scales. Despite these sources of complexity, metabolism also displays striking and robust regularities in the forms of modularity and hierarchy, which may be described compactly in terms of relatively few principles of composition. These regularities render metabolic architecture comprehensible as a system, and also suggests the order in which layers of that system came into existence. In addition metabolism also serves as a foundational layer in other hierarchies, up to at least the levels of cellular integration including bioenergetics and molecular replication, and trophic ecology. The recapitulation of patterns first seen in metabolism, in these higher levels, motivates us to interpret metabolism as a source of causation or constraint on many forms of organization in the biosphere. Many of the forms of modularity and hierarchy exhibited by metabolism are readily interpreted as stages in the emergence of catalytic control by living systems over organic chemistry, sometimes recapitulating or incorporating geochemical mechanisms. We identify as modules, either subsets of chemicals and reactions, or subsets of functions, that are re-used in many contexts with a conserved internal structure. At the small molecule substrate level, module boundaries are often associated with the most complex reaction mechanisms, catalyzed by highly conserved enzymes. Cofactors form a biosynthetically and functionally distinctive control layer over the small-molecule substrate. The most complex members among the cofactors are often associated with the reactions at module boundaries in the substrate networks, while simpler cofactors participate in widely generalized reactions. The highly tuned chemical structures of cofactors (sometimes exploiting distinctive properties of the elements of the periodic table) thereby act as ‘keys’ that incorporate classes of organic reactions

  14. Integrative Analysis of Metabolic Models – from Structure to Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Anja, E-mail: hartmann@ipk-gatersleben.de [Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), Gatersleben (Germany); Schreiber, Falk [Monash University, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany)

    2015-01-26

    The characterization of biological systems with respect to their behavior and functionality based on versatile biochemical interactions is a major challenge. To understand these complex mechanisms at systems level modeling approaches are investigated. Different modeling formalisms allow metabolic models to be analyzed depending on the question to be solved, the biochemical knowledge and the availability of experimental data. Here, we describe a method for an integrative analysis of the structure and dynamics represented by qualitative and quantitative metabolic models. Using various formalisms, the metabolic model is analyzed from different perspectives. Determined structural and dynamic properties are visualized in the context of the metabolic model. Interaction techniques allow the exploration and visual analysis thereby leading to a broader understanding of the behavior and functionality of the underlying biological system. The System Biology Metabolic Model Framework (SBM{sup 2} – Framework) implements the developed method and, as an example, is applied for the integrative analysis of the crop plant potato.

  15. Drug metabolism in birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huo Ping; Fouts, James R.

    1979-01-01

    Papers published over 100 years since the beginning of the scientific study of drug metabolism in birds were reviewed. Birds were found to be able to accomplish more than 20 general biotransformation reactions in both functionalization and conjugation. Chickens were the primary subject of study but over 30 species of birds were used. Large species differences in drug metabolism exist between birds and mammals as well as between various birds, these differences were mostly quantitative. Qualitative differences were rare. On the whole, drug metabolism studies in birds have been neglected as compared with similar studies on insects and mammals. The uniqueness of birds and the advantages of using birds in drug metabolism studies are discussed. Possible future studies of drug metabolism in birds are recommended.

  16. Metabolic imaging using SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taki, Junichi; Matsunari, Ichiro

    2007-01-01

    In normal condition, the heart obtains more than two-thirds of its energy from the oxidative metabolism of long chain fatty acids, although a wide variety of substrates such as glucose, lactate, ketone bodies and amino acids are also utilised. In ischaemic myocardium, on the other hand, oxidative metabolism of free fatty acid is suppressed and anaerobic glucose metabolism plays a major role in residual oxidative metabolism. Therefore, metabolic imaging can be an important technique for the assessment of various cardiac diseases and conditions. In SPECT, several iodinated fatty acid traces have been introduced and studied. Of these, 123 I-labelled 15-(p-iodophenyl)3-R, S-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) has been the most commonly used tracer in clinical studies, especially in some of the European countries and Japan. In this review article, several fatty acid tracers for SPECT are characterised, and the mechanism of uptake and clinical utility of BMIPP are discussed in detail. (orig.)

  17. Metabolic Engineering VII Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Korpics

    2012-12-04

    The aims of this Metabolic Engineering conference are to provide a forum for academic and industrial researchers in the field; to bring together the different scientific disciplines that contribute to the design, analysis and optimization of metabolic pathways; and to explore the role of Metabolic Engineering in the areas of health and sustainability. Presentations, both written and oral, panel discussions, and workshops will focus on both applications and techniques used for pathway engineering. Various applications including bioenergy, industrial chemicals and materials, drug targets, health, agriculture, and nutrition will be discussed. Workshops focused on technology development for mathematical and experimental techniques important for metabolic engineering applications will be held for more in depth discussion. This 2008 meeting will celebrate our conference tradition of high quality and relevance to both industrial and academic participants, with topics ranging from the frontiers of fundamental science to the practical aspects of metabolic engineering.

  18. Metabolic imaging using PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    There is growing evidence that myocardial metabolism plays a key role not only in ischaemic heart disease but also in a variety of diseases which involve myocardium globally, such as heart failure and diabetes mellitus. Understanding myocardial metabolism in such diseases helps to elucidate the pathophysiology and assists in making therapeutic decisions. As well as providing information on regional changes, PET can deliver quantitative information about both regional and global changes in metabolism. This capability of quantitative measurement is one of the major advantages of PET along with physiological positron tracers, especially relevant in evaluating diseases which involve the whole myocardium. This review discusses major PET tracers for metabolic imaging and their clinical applications and contributions to research regarding ischaemic heart disease and other diseases such as heart failure and diabetic heart disease. Future applications of positron metabolic tracers for the detection of vulnerable plaque are also highlighted briefly. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of the metabolic fate of munitions material (TNT & RDX) in plant systems and initial assessment of material interaction with plant genetic material (DNA). Initial assessment of plant DNA adducts as biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, S.D.; Clauss, T.W.; Fellows, R.J.; Cataldo, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    Genetic damage to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has long been suspected of being a fundamental event leading to cancer. A variety of causal factors can result in DNA damage including photodimerization of base pairs, ionizing radiation, specific reaction of DNA with environmental pollutants, and nonspecific oxidative damage caused by the action of highly reactive oxidizing agents produced by metabolism. Because organisms depend on an unadulterated DNA template for reproduction, DNA repair mechanisms are an important defense for maintaining genomic integrity. The objective of this exploratory project was to evaluate the potential for TNT to form DNA adducts in plants. These adducts, if they exist in sufficient quantities, could be potential biomarkers of munitions exposure. The ultimate goal is to develop a simple analytical assay for the determination of blomarkers that is indicative of munitions contamination. DNA repair exists in dynamic equilibrium with DNA damage. Repair mechanisms are capable of keeping DNA damage at remarkably low concentrations provided that the repair capacity is not overwhelmed.

  20. Monitoring Healthy Metabolic Trajectories with Nutritional Metabonomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano Collino

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabonomics is a well established analytical approach for the analysis of physiological regulatory processes via the metabolic profiling of biofluids and tissues in living organisms. Its potential is fully exploited in the field of “nutrimetabonomics” that aims at assessing the metabolic effects of active ingredients and foods in individuals. Yet, one of the greatest challenges in nutrition research is to decipher the critical interactions between mammalian organisms and environmental factors, including the gut microbiota. “Nutrimetabonomics” is today foreseen as a powerful approach for future nutritional programs tailored at health maintenance and disease prevention.

  1. Monitoring Healthy Metabolic Trajectories with Nutritional Metabonomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collino, Sebastiano; Martin, François-Pierre J.; Kochhar, Sunil; Rezzi, Serge

    2009-01-01

    Metabonomics is a well established analytical approach for the analysis of physiological regulatory processes via the metabolic profiling of biofluids and tissues in living organisms. Its potential is fully exploited in the field of “nutrimetabonomics” that aims at assessing the metabolic effects of active ingredients and foods in individuals. Yet, one of the greatest challenges in nutrition research is to decipher the critical interactions between mammalian organisms and environmental factors, including the gut microbiota. “Nutrimetabonomics” is today foreseen as a powerful approach for future nutritional programs tailored at health maintenance and disease prevention. PMID:22253970

  2. Grapefruit and drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Since the late 1980s, grapefruit juice has been known to affect the metabolism of certain drugs. Several serious adverse effects involving drug interactions with grapefruit juice have been published in detail. The components of grapefruit juice vary considerably depending on the variety, maturity and origin of the fruit, local climatic conditions, and the manufacturing process. No single component accounts for all observed interactions. Other grapefruit products are also occasionally implicated, including preserves, lyophylised grapefruit juice, powdered whole grapefruit, grapefruit seed extract, and zest. Clinical reports of drug interactions with grapefruit juice are supported by pharmacokinetic studies, each usually involving about 10 healthy volunteers, in which the probable clinical consequences were extrapolated from the observed plasma concentrations. Grapefruit juice inhibits CYP3A4, the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme most often involved in drug metabolism. This increases plasma concentrations of the drugs concerned, creating a risk of overdose and dose-dependent adverse effects. Grapefruit juice also inhibits several other cytochrome P450 isoenzymes, but they are less frequently implicated in interactions with clinical consequences. Drugs interacting with grapefruit and inducing serious clinical consequences (confirmed or very probable) include: immunosuppressants, some statins, benzodiazepines, most calcium channel blockers, indinavir and carbamazepine. There are large inter-individual differences in enzyme efficiency. Along with the variable composition of grapefruit juice, this makes it difficult to predict the magnitude and clinical consequences of drug interactions with grapefruit juice in a given patient. There is increasing evidence that transporter proteins such as organic anion transporters and P-glycoprotein are involved in interactions between drugs and grapefruit juice. In practice, numerous drugs interact with grapefruit juice. Although only a few

  3. Constraint based modeling of metabolism allows finding metabolic cancer hallmarks and identifying personalized therapeutic windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordel, Sergio

    2018-04-13

    In order to choose optimal personalized anticancer treatments, transcriptomic data should be analyzed within the frame of biological networks. The best known human biological network (in terms of the interactions between its different components) is metabolism. Cancer cells have been known to have specific metabolic features for a long time and currently there is a growing interest in characterizing new cancer specific metabolic hallmarks. In this article it is presented a method to find personalized therapeutic windows using RNA-seq data and Genome Scale Metabolic Models. This method is implemented in the python library, pyTARG. Our predictions showed that the most anticancer selective (affecting 27 out of 34 considered cancer cell lines and only 1 out of 6 healthy mesenchymal stem cell lines) single metabolic reactions are those involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Excluding cholesterol biosynthesis, all the considered cell lines can be selectively affected by targeting different combinations (from 1 to 5 reactions) of only 18 metabolic reactions, which suggests that a small subset of drugs or siRNAs combined in patient specific manners could be at the core of metabolism based personalized treatments.

  4. Metabolic disorders in menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Stachowiak

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders occurring in menopause, including dyslipidemia, disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (impaired glucose tolerance – IGT, type 2 diabetes mellitus – T2DM or components of metabolic syndrome, constitute risk factors for cardiovascular disease in women. A key role could be played here by hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and visceral obesity, all contributing to dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, alter coagulation and atherosclerosis observed during the menopausal period. Undiagnosed and untreated, metabolic disorders may adversely affect the length and quality of women’s life. Prevention and treatment preceded by early diagnosis should be the main goal for the physicians involved in menopausal care. This article represents a short review of the current knowledge concerning metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome or thyroid diseases in menopause, including the role of a tailored menopausal hormone therapy (HT. According to current data, HT is not recommend as a preventive strategy for metabolic disorders in menopause. Nevertheless, as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic diseases after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered (after balancing benefits/risks and excluding women with absolute contraindications to this therapy. Life-style modifications, with moderate physical activity and healthy diet at the forefront, should be still the first choice recommendation for all patients with menopausal metabolic abnormalities.

  5. Metabolic and Transcriptional Reprogramming in Developing Soybean (Glycine max Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Grene

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Soybean (Glycine max seeds are an important source of seed storage compounds, including protein, oil, and sugar used for food, feed, chemical, and biofuel production. We assessed detailed temporal transcriptional and metabolic changes in developing soybean embryos to gain a systems biology view of developmental and metabolic changes and to identify potential targets for metabolic engineering. Two major developmental and metabolic transitions were captured enabling identification of potential metabolic engineering targets specific to seed filling and to desiccation. The first transition involved a switch between different types of metabolism in dividing and elongating cells. The second transition involved the onset of maturation and desiccation tolerance during seed filling and a switch from photoheterotrophic to heterotrophic metabolism. Clustering analyses of metabolite and transcript data revealed clusters of functionally related metabolites and transcripts active in these different developmental and metabolic programs. The gene clusters provide a resource to generate predictions about the associations and interactions of unknown regulators with their targets based on “guilt-by-association” relationships. The inferred regulators also represent potential targets for future metabolic engineering of relevant pathways and steps in central carbon and nitrogen metabolism in soybean embryos and drought and desiccation tolerance in plants.

  6. VRML metabolic network visualizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojdestvenski, Igor

    2003-03-01

    A successful date collection visualization should satisfy a set of many requirements: unification of diverse data formats, support for serendipity research, support of hierarchical structures, algorithmizability, vast information density, Internet-readiness, and other. Recently, virtual reality has made significant progress in engineering, architectural design, entertainment and communication. We experiment with the possibility of using the immersive abstract three-dimensional visualizations of the metabolic networks. We present the trial Metabolic Network Visualizer software, which produces graphical representation of a metabolic network as a VRML world from a formal description written in a simple SGML-type scripting language.

  7. Human Body Exergy Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Mady, Carlos Eduardo Keutenedjian

    2013-01-01

    The exergy analysis of the human body is a tool that can provide indicators of health and life quality. To perform the exergy balance it is necessary to calculate the metabolism on an exergy basis, or metabolic exergy, although there is not yet consensus in its calculation procedure. Hence, the aim of this work is to provide a general method to evaluate this physical quantity for human body based on indirect calorimetry data. To calculate the metabolism on an exergy basis it is necessary to d...

  8. What is Nutrition & Metabolism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feinman Richard D

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A new Open Access journal, Nutrition & Metabolism (N&M will publish articles that integrate nutrition with biochemistry and molecular biology. The open access process is chosen to provide rapid and accessible dissemination of new results and perspectives in a field that is of great current interest. Manuscripts in all areas of nutritional biochemistry will be considered but three areas of particular interest are lipoprotein metabolism, amino acids as metabolic signals, and the effect of macronutrient composition of diet on health. The need for the journal is identified in the epidemic of obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemias and related diseases, and a sudden increase in popular diets, as well as renewed interest in intermediary metabolism.

  9. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyi Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc. is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well.

  10. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this process. One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup urine disease. Amino acids are "building blocks" that join together to form ...

  11. The metabolic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begon, F.; Gaci, M.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, the authors recall the principles of the metabolic radiotherapy and present these main applications in the treatment of thyroid cancers, hyperthyroidism, polycythemia, arthritis, bone metastases, adrenergic neoplasms. They also present the radioimmunotherapy

  12. Engineering of metabolic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, James C.

    2004-03-16

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.

  13. Gut Microbiota, Obesity and Metabolic Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of obesity and related disorders such as metabolic syndrome and diabetes has vastly increased throughout the world. Recent insights have generated an entirely new perspective suggesting that our microbiota might be involved in the development of these disorders. This represents an area of scientific need, opportunity and challenge. The insights gleaned should help to address several pressing global health problems. CONTENT: Our bowels have two major roles: the digestion and absorption of nutrients and the maintenance of a barrier against the external environment. They fulfill these functions in the context of, and with the help from, tens of trillions of resident microbes, known as the gut microbiota. Studies have demonstrated that obesity and metabolic syndrome may be associated with profound microbiotal changes, and the induction of a metabolic syndrome phenotype through fecal transplants corroborates the important role of the microbiota in this disease. Dietary composition and caloric intake appear to swiftly regulate intestinal microbial composition and function. SUMMARY: The interaction of the intestinal microbial world with its host, and its mutual regulation, will become one of the important topics of biomedical research and will provide us with further insights at the interface of microbiota, metabolism, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. A better understanding of the interaction between certain diets and the human gut microbiome should help to develop new guidelines for feeding humans at various time points in their life, help to improve global human health, and establish ways to prevent or treat various food-related diseases. KEYWORDS: gut microbiota, obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes.

  14. Oxidative metabolism in muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, M; Binzoni, T; Quaresima, V

    1997-01-01

    Oxidative metabolism is the dominant source of energy for skeletal muscle. Near-infrared spectroscopy allows the non-invasive measurement of local oxygenation, blood flow and oxygen consumption. Although several muscle studies have been made using various near-infrared optical techniques, it is still difficult to interpret the local muscle metabolism properly. The main findings of near-infrared spectroscopy muscle studies in human physiology and clinical medicine are summarized. The advantage...

  15. Ca-48 metabolism studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Merwe, D.G.

    1987-03-01

    Calcium metabolism has been studied in depth physiologically and is a relatively well-understood element in biochemistry and medicine. There is still only restricted knowledge of the metabolic fate of calcium in normal and abnormal paediatric subjects. The latter is partially owing to inadequate techniques for tracing and modelling calcium pathways in children. The advent of radioactive tracers has unquestionably enhanced medical research and improved the quality of many metabolic studies. The present study was aimed at the development, promotion and justification of a new tracer technique using the stable isotope, calcium-48. The obvious advantages of such a technique are its harmlessness tothe subject, its applicability to both short- and long-term studies as well as its usefulness to the study for which it was originally motivated, viz research defining the actual relationship between a calcium-deficient diet and the occurrence of rickets in rural Black children in South Africa. Exploratory instrumental analyses were performed specifically with serum samples. This proved successful enough to develop a less specific pre-concentration technique which improved the sensitivity and reduces the cost of doing calcium-48 metabolism studies. The results of a simple metabolic study are presented whereby the scope of the technique is demonstrated in a real situation. The possibilities and limitations of double-isotope metabolic studies are discussed, particularly with regard to strontium as the second tracer

  16. Sleep and metabolism: role of hypothalamic neuronal circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, Asya; Schaich Borg, Jana; de Lecea, Luis

    2010-10-01

    Sleep and metabolism are intertwined physiologically and behaviorally, but the neural systems underlying their coordination are still poorly understood. The hypothalamus is likely to play a major role in the regulation sleep, metabolism, and their interaction. And increasing evidence suggests that hypocretin cells in the lateral hypothalamus may provide particularly important contributions. Here we review: 1) direct interactions between biological arousal and metabolic systems in the hypothalamus, and 2) indirect interactions between these two systems mediated by stress or reward, emphasizing the role of hypocretins. An increased understanding of the mechanisms underlying these interactions may provide novel approaches for the treatment of patients with sleep disorders and obesity, as well as suggest new therapeutic strategies for symptoms of aging, stress, or addiction. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. BCAA Metabolism and NH3 Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, M E; Hutson, S M

    2016-01-01

    The branched chain amino acids (BCAA) are essential amino acids required not only for growth and development, but also as nutrient signals and as nitrogen donors to neurotransmitter synthesis and glutamate/glutamine cycling. Transamination and oxidative decarboxylation of the BCAAs are catalysed by the branched-chain aminotransferase proteins (BCATm, mitochondrial and BCATc, cytosolic) and the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (BCKDC), respectively. These proteins show tissue, cell compartmentation, and protein-protein interactions, which call for substrate shuttling or channelling and nitrogen transfer for oxidation to occur. Efficient regulation of these pathways is mediated through the redox environment and phosphorylation in response to dietary and hormonal stimuli. The wide distribution of these proteins allows for effective BCAA utilisation. We discuss how BCAT, BCKDC, and glutamate dehydrogenase operate in supramolecular complexes, allowing for efficient channelling of substrates. The role of BCAAs in brain metabolism is highlighted in rodent and human brain, where differential expression of BCATm indicates differences in nitrogen metabolism between species. Finally, we introduce a new role for BCAT, where a change in function is triggered by oxidation of its redox-active switch. Our understanding of how BCAA metabolism and nitrogen transfer is regulated is important as many studies now point to BCAA metabolic dysregulation in metabolic and neurodegenerative conditions.

  18. Sodium signaling and astrocyte energy metabolism

    KAUST Repository

    Chatton, Jean-Yves; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Barros, L. Felipe

    2016-01-01

    The Na+ gradient across the plasma membrane is constantly exploited by astrocytes as a secondary energy source to regulate the intracellular and extracellular milieu, and discard waste products. One of the most prominent roles of astrocytes in the brain is the Na+-dependent clearance of glutamate released by neurons during synaptic transmission. The intracellular Na+ load collectively generated by these processes converges at the Na,K-ATPase pump, responsible for Na+ extrusion from the cell, which is achieved at the expense of cellular ATP. These processes represent pivotal mechanisms enabling astrocytes to increase the local availability of metabolic substrates in response to neuronal activity. This review presents basic principles linking the intracellular handling of Na+ following activity-related transmembrane fluxes in astrocytes and the energy metabolic pathways involved. We propose a role of Na+ as an energy currency and as a mediator of metabolic signals in the context of neuron-glia interactions. We further discuss the possible impact of the astrocytic syncytium for the distribution and coordination of the metabolic response, and the compartmentation of these processes in cellular microdomains and subcellular organelles. Finally, we illustrate future avenues of investigation into signaling mechanisms aimed at bridging the gap between Na+ and the metabolic machinery. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Sodium signaling and astrocyte energy metabolism

    KAUST Repository

    Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2016-03-31

    The Na+ gradient across the plasma membrane is constantly exploited by astrocytes as a secondary energy source to regulate the intracellular and extracellular milieu, and discard waste products. One of the most prominent roles of astrocytes in the brain is the Na+-dependent clearance of glutamate released by neurons during synaptic transmission. The intracellular Na+ load collectively generated by these processes converges at the Na,K-ATPase pump, responsible for Na+ extrusion from the cell, which is achieved at the expense of cellular ATP. These processes represent pivotal mechanisms enabling astrocytes to increase the local availability of metabolic substrates in response to neuronal activity. This review presents basic principles linking the intracellular handling of Na+ following activity-related transmembrane fluxes in astrocytes and the energy metabolic pathways involved. We propose a role of Na+ as an energy currency and as a mediator of metabolic signals in the context of neuron-glia interactions. We further discuss the possible impact of the astrocytic syncytium for the distribution and coordination of the metabolic response, and the compartmentation of these processes in cellular microdomains and subcellular organelles. Finally, we illustrate future avenues of investigation into signaling mechanisms aimed at bridging the gap between Na+ and the metabolic machinery. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Modular co-evolution of metabolic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhong-Hao

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The architecture of biological networks has been reported to exhibit high level of modularity, and to some extent, topological modules of networks overlap with known functional modules. However, how the modular topology of the molecular network affects the evolution of its member proteins remains unclear. Results In this work, the functional and evolutionary modularity of Homo sapiens (H. sapiens metabolic network were investigated from a topological point of view. Network decomposition shows that the metabolic network is organized in a highly modular core-periphery way, in which the core modules are tightly linked together and perform basic metabolism functions, whereas the periphery modules only interact with few modules and accomplish relatively independent and specialized functions. Moreover, over half of the modules exhibit co-evolutionary feature and belong to specific evolutionary ages. Peripheral modules tend to evolve more cohesively and faster than core modules do. Conclusion The correlation between functional, evolutionary and topological modularity suggests that the evolutionary history and functional requirements of metabolic systems have been imprinted in the architecture of metabolic networks. Such systems level analysis could demonstrate how the evolution of genes may be placed in a genome-scale network context, giving a novel perspective on molecular evolution.

  1. Understanding specificity in metabolic pathways-Structural biology of human nucleotide metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welin, Martin; Nordlund, Paer

    2010-01-01

    Interactions are the foundation of life at the molecular level. In the plethora of activities in the cell, the evolution of enzyme specificity requires the balancing of appropriate substrate affinity with a negative selection, in order to minimize interactions with other potential substrates in the cell. To understand the structural basis for enzyme specificity, the comparison of structural and biochemical data between enzymes within pathways using similar substrates and effectors is valuable. Nucleotide metabolism is one of the largest metabolic pathways in the human cell and is of outstanding therapeutic importance since it activates and catabolises nucleoside based anti-proliferative drugs and serves as a direct target for anti-proliferative drugs. In recent years the structural coverage of the enzymes involved in human nucleotide metabolism has been dramatically improved and is approaching completion. An important factor has been the contribution from the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) at Karolinska Institutet, which recently has solved 33 novel structures of enzymes and enzyme domains in human nucleotide metabolism pathways and homologs thereof. In this review we will discuss some of the principles for substrate specificity of enzymes in human nucleotide metabolism illustrated by a selected set of enzyme families where a detailed understanding of the structural determinants for specificity is now emerging.

  2. Glutathione Metabolism and Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Smeyne, Michelle; Smeyne, Richard Jay

    2013-01-01

    It has been established that oxidative stress, defined as the condition when the sum of free radicals in a cell exceeds the antioxidant capacity of the cell, contributes to the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. Glutathione is a ubiquitous thiol tripeptide that acts alone, or in concert with enzymes within cells to reduce superoxide radicals, hydroxyl radicals and peroxynitrites. In this review, we examine the synthesis, metabolism and functional interactions of glutathione, and discuss how...

  3. Fetal programming of the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Marciniak

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal development is currently recognized as a critical period in the etiology of human diseases. This is particularly so when an unfavorable environment interacts with a genetic predisposition. The fetal programming concept suggests that maternal nutritional imbalance and metabolic disturbances may have a persistent and intergenerational effect on the health of offspring and on the risk of diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Metabolic Syndrome in Schizophrenia: A Non‑systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Nascimento

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The link between mental illness and metabolic disturbances has been recognized since the beginning of the last century. The debate concerning medical morbidity in schizophrenia intensified during the last twenty years, especially after the introduction of atypical antipsychotics. Aims: To highlight some features of the metabolic syndrome in this population, specifically epidemiological data, underlying mechanisms and antipsychotic therapy. Methods: Non‑systematic review of literature. Results and Conclusions: Despite the different criteria used for the definition of metabolic syndrome, it is clear today that the schizophrenic population has the highest rate of metabolic syndrome. Additionally, the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in this population demonstrates a geographical distribution similar to the general population. Although it hasn’t been recognized for years, schizophrenic patients’ vulnerability to develop metabolic disturbances isn’t entirely related to antipsychotic therapy. Actually, it results from an interaction of multiple factors, including hereditary, genetic, biochemical and environmental ones (which include antipsychotic therapy. Moreover, they are not exclusively explained by weight gain. Metabolic disturbances are one of the main concerns related to general psychopharmacology. The differences between typical and atypical antipsychotics in terms of metabolic syndrome are not completely established. However, clozapine and olanzapine are recognized to have the worst metabolic profile, amongst all atypical antipsychotics.

  5. Metabolic Syndrome in Schizophrenia: A Non‑systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Nascimento

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The link between mental illness and metabolic disturbances has been recognized since the beginning of the last century. The debate concerning medical morbidity in schizophrenia intensified during the last twenty years, especially after the introduction of atypical antipsychotics. Aims: To highlight some features of the metabolic syndrome in this population, specifically epidemiological data, underlying mechanisms and antipsychotic therapy. Methods: Non‑systematic review of literature. Results and Conclusions: Despite the different criteria used for the definition of metabolic syndrome, it is clear today that the schizophrenic population has the highest rate of metabolic syndrome. Additionally, the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in this population demonstrates a geographical distribution similar to the general population. Although it hasn’t been recognized for years, schizophrenic patients’ vulnerability to develop metabolic disturbances isn’t entirely related to antipsychotic therapy. Actually, it results from an interaction of multiple factors, including hereditary, genetic, biochemical and environmental ones (which include antipsychotic therapy. Moreover, they are not exclusively explained by weight gain. Metabolic disturbances are one of the main concerns related to general psychopharmacology. The differences between typical and atypical antipsychotics in terms of metabolic syndrome are not completely established. However, clozapine and olanzapine are recognized to have the worst metabolic profile, amongst all atypical antipsychotics.

  6. A workflow for mathematical modeling of subcellular metabolic pathways in leaf metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eNägele

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade genome sequencing has experienced a rapid technological development resulting in numerous sequencing projects and applications in life science. In plant molecular biology, the availability of sequence data on whole genomes has enabled the reconstruction of metabolic networks. Enzymatic reactions are predicted by the sequence information. Pathways arise due to the participation of chemical compounds as substrates and products in these reactions. Although several of these comprehensive networks have been reconstructed for the genetic model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the integration of experimental data is still challenging. Particularly the analysis of subcellular organization of plant cells limits the understanding of regulatory instances in these metabolic networks in vivo. In this study, we develop an approach for the functional integration of experimental high-throughput data into such large-scale networks. We present a subcellular metabolic network model comprising 524 metabolic intermediates and 548 metabolic interactions derived from a total of 2769 reactions. We demonstrate how to link the metabolite covariance matrix of different Arabidopsis thaliana accessions with the subcellular metabolic network model for the inverse calculation of the biochemical Jacobian, finally resulting in the calculation of a matrix which satisfies a Lyaponov equation involving a covariance matrix. In this way, differential strategies of metabolite compartmentation and involved reactions were identified in the accessions when exposed to low temperature.

  7. Vertigo and metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maruska D' Aparecida; Bittar, Roseli Saraiva Moreira

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic disorders are accepted by many authors as being responsible for balance disorders. Because of the importance of metabolic disorders in the field of labyrinthine dysfunction, we decided to assess the prevalence of carbohydrates, lipids and thyroid hormones disorders in our patients with vestibular diseases. The study evaluates the metabolic profile of 325 patients with vertigo who sought the Otolaryngology Department of the University of São Paulo in the Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade de São Paulo. The laboratory tests ordered according to the classical research protocol were: low-density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction, TSH, T3, T4 and fasting blood sugar level. The metabolic disorders found and the ones that were observed in the general population were compared. The high level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the altered levels of thyroid hormones, the higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus were the most significant changes found in the group of study. The higher amount of metabolic disorders in patients with vertigo disease reinforces the hypothesis of its influence on the etiopathogenesis of cochleovestibular symptoms.

  8. Metabolic surgery: quo vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Leví, Ana M; Rubio Herrera, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The impact of bariatric surgery beyond its effect on weight loss has entailed a change in the way of regarding it. The term metabolic surgery has become more popular to designate those interventions that aim at resolving diseases that have been traditionally considered as of exclusive medical management, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Recommendations for metabolic surgery have been largely addressed and discussed in worldwide meetings, but no definitive consensus has been reached yet. Rates of diabetes remission after metabolic surgery have been one of the most debated hot topics, with heterogeneity being a current concern. This review aims to identify and clarify controversies regarding metabolic surgery, by focusing on a critical analysis of T2D remission rates achieved with different bariatric procedures, and using different criteria for its definition. Indications for metabolic surgery for patients with T2D who are not morbidly obese are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. 2011 Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism, & Function Gordon Research Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher Benning

    2011-02-04

    This is the second Gordon Research Conference on 'Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism & Function'. It covers current topics in lipid structure, metabolism and function in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms including seed plants, algae, mosses and ferns. Work in photosynthetic bacteria is considered as well as it serves the understanding of specific aspects of lipid metabolism in plants. Breakthroughs are discussed in research on plant lipids as diverse as glycerolipids, sphingolipids, lipids of the cell surface, isoprenoids, fatty acids and their derivatives. The program covers nine concepts at the forefront of research under which afore mentioned plant lipid classes are discussed. The goal is to integrate areas such as lipid signaling, basic lipid metabolism, membrane function, lipid analysis, and lipid engineering to achieve a high level of stimulating interaction among diverse researchers with interests in plant lipids. One Emphasis is on the dynamics and regulation of lipid metabolism during plant cell development and in response to environmental factors.

  10. A Cellular Perspective on Brain Energy Metabolism and Functional Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2015-05-01

    The energy demands of the brain are high: they account for at least 20% of the body\\'s energy consumption. Evolutionary studies indicate that the emergence of higher cognitive functions in humans is associated with an increased glucose utilization and expression of energy metabolism genes. Functional brain imaging techniques such as fMRI and PET, which are widely used in human neuroscience studies, detect signals that monitor energy delivery and use in register with neuronal activity. Recent technological advances in metabolic studies with cellular resolution have afforded decisive insights into the understanding of the cellular and molecular bases of the coupling between neuronal activity and energy metabolism and pointat a key role of neuron-astrocyte metabolic interactions. This article reviews some of the most salient features emerging from recent studies and aims at providing an integration of brain energy metabolism across resolution scales. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.

  11. [Features of the periodontal pathology at patients with metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolaeva, L A; Shishkin, A N; Sheveleva, N A; Penkovoi, E A; Sheveleva, M A; Sokolovich, N A; Khabarova, O V; Mihailova, E S

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to familiarize readers on the relationship between metabolic syndrome and periodontitis, as well as common pathogenetic processes underlying these diseases. The data of modern researches, devoted to the correlation of lesions of periodontal and systemic diseases associated with metabolic syndrome. In the article analyzed also the data of the original study of the interaction of periodontitis and metabolic syndrome, which also used special methods of examination like Doppler ultrasound microcirculatory vasculature of the periodontal tissues and ultrasound densitometry. The possible methods of diagnostics of a condition of periodontal tissues in patients with metabolic syndrome are considered. Conclusions about the relationship of each component of metabolic syndrome with periodontitis are made.

  12. Interaction of single nucleotide polymorphisms in ADRB2, ADRB3, TNF, IL6, IGF1R, LIPC, LEPR, and GHRL with physical activity on the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus and changes in characteristics of the metabolic syndrome: The Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Lakka, Timo A; Laaksonen, David E; Mager, Ursula; Salopuro, Titta; Kubaszek, Agata; Todorova, Boryana; Laukkanen, Olli; Lindström, Jaana; Eriksson, Johan G; Hämäläinen, Helena; Aunola, Sirkka; Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Tuomilehto, Jaako; Laakso, Markku; Uusitupa, Matti

    2008-03-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ADRB2, ADRB3, TNF, IL6, IGF1R, LIPC, LEPR, and GHRL genes were associated with the conversion from impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (DPS). In this study, we determined whether polymorphisms in these genes modified the effect of changes in physical activity (PA) on the risk of T2D in the DPS. Moreover, we assessed whether the polymorphisms modified the effect of changes in PA on changes in measures of body fat, serum lipids, and blood pressure during the first year of the follow-up of the DPS. Overweight subjects with IGT (n = 487) were followed for an average of 4.1 years, and PA was assessed annually with a questionnaire. The interactions of the polymorphisms with changes in total and moderate-to-vigorous PA on the conversion to T2D during the 4.1-year follow-up were assessed using Cox regression with adjustments for the other components of the intervention (dietary changes, weight reduction). Univariate analysis of variance was used to assess interactions on changes in continuous variables during the first year of the follow-up. No interaction between the polymorphisms and PA on the conversion to T2D was found. The Leu72Met (rs696217) polymorphism in GHRL modified the effect of moderate-to-vigorous PA on changes in weight and waist circumference, the -501A/C (rs26802) polymorphism in GHRL modified the effect of total and moderate-to-vigorous PA on change in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and the Lys109Arg (rs1137100) polymorphism in LEPR modified the effect of total PA on change in blood pressure. In conclusion, genetic variation may modify the magnitude of the beneficial effects of PA on characteristics of the metabolic syndrome in persons with IGT.

  13. Metabolism of phencyclidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoag, M.K.P.

    1987-01-01

    Phencyclidine (PCP) is a drug of abuse which may produce, in some users, a persistent schizophreniform psychosis. The possibility that long term effects of PCP are mediated by metabolic activation of the parent compound to reactive species is consistent with the demonstration of metabolism-dependent covalent binding of radiolabeled PCP in vivo and in vitro to macromolecules in rodent lung, liver, and kidney. Formation of the electrophilic iminium ion metabolite of PCP is believed to be critical for covalent binding since binding was inhibited by cyanide ion at concentrations which did not inhibit metabolism of PCP but did trap the iminium ion to form the corresponding alpha-aminonitrile. The present studies were designed to characterize further the biological fate of PCP by identifying possible macromolecular targets of the reactive metabolite(s)

  14. Instrumental interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Luciani , Annie

    2007-01-01

    International audience; The expression instrumental interaction as been introduced by Claude Cadoz to identify a human-object interaction during which a human manipulates a physical object - an instrument - in order to perform a manual task. Classical examples of instrumental interaction are all the professional manual tasks: playing violin, cutting fabrics by hand, moulding a paste, etc.... Instrumental interaction differs from other types of interaction (called symbolic or iconic interactio...

  15. Urea metabolism in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Claus-Peter

    2011-03-01

    Urea is a plant metabolite derived either from root uptake or from catabolism of arginine by arginase. In agriculture, urea is intensively used as a nitrogen fertilizer. Urea nitrogen enters the plant either directly, or in the form of ammonium or nitrate after urea degradation by soil microbes. In recent years various molecular players of plant urea metabolism have been investigated: active and passive urea transporters, the nickel metalloenzyme urease catalyzing the hydrolysis of urea, and three urease accessory proteins involved in the complex activation of urease. The degradation of ureides derived from purine breakdown has long been discussed as a possible additional metabolic source for urea, but an enzymatic route for the complete hydrolysis of ureides without a urea intermediate has recently been described for Arabidopsis thaliana. This review focuses on the proteins involved in plant urea metabolism and the metabolic sources of urea but also addresses open questions regarding plant urea metabolism in a physiological and agricultural context. The contribution of plant urea uptake and metabolism to fertilizer urea usage in crop production is still not investigated although globally more than half of all nitrogen fertilizer is applied to crops in the form of urea. Nitrogen use efficiency in crop production is generally well below 50% resulting in economical losses and creating ecological problems like groundwater pollution and emission of nitric oxides that can damage the ozone layer and function as greenhouse gasses. Biotechnological approaches to improve fertilizer urea usage bear the potential to increase crop nitrogen use efficiency. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing

  17. Epigenetics and a new look on metabolic syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuneš, Jaroslav; Vaněčková, Ivana; Mikulášková, Barbora; Behuliak, Michal; Maletínská, L.; Zicha, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 5 (2015), s. 611-620 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-25396A; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-08679S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : metabolic syndrome * epigenetic s * transgenerational inheritance * gene-environmental interactions * obesity * hypertension Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.643, year: 2015

  18. Epigenetics and a new look on metabolic syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuneš, Jaroslav; Vaněčková, I.; Mikulášková, Barbora; Behuliak, M.; Maletínská, Lenka; Zicha, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 5 (2015), s. 611-620 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-08679S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : metabolic syndrome * epigenetic s * transgenerational inheritance * gene-environmental interactions * obesity * hypertension Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.643, year: 2015 http://www.biomed.cas.cz/physiolres/pdf/64/64_611.pdf

  19. Hypothyroidism in metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Kota

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Metabolic syndrome (MetS and hypothyroidism are well established forerunners of atherogenic cardiovascular disease. Considerable overlap occurs in the pathogenic mechanisms of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease by metabolic syndrome and hypothyroidism. Insulin resistance has been studied as the basic pathogenic mechanism in metabolic syndrome. [1] This cross sectional study intended to assess thyroid function in patients with metabolic syndrome and to investigate the association between hypothyroidism and metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients with metabolic syndrome who fulfilled the National Cholesterol Education Program- Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP-ATP III criteria [ 3 out of 5 criteria positive namely blood pressure ≥ 130/85 mm hg or on antihypertensive medications, fasting plasma glucose > 100 mg/dl or on anti-diabetic medications, fasting triglycerides > 150 mg/dl, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C 102 cms in men and 88 cms in women] were included in the study group. [2] Fifty patients who had no features of metabolic syndrome (0 out of 5 criteria for metabolic syndrome were included in the control group. Patients with liver disorders, renal disorders, congestive cardiac failure, pregnant women, patients on oral contraceptive pills, statins and other medications that alter thyroid functions and lipid levels and those who are under treatment for any thyroid related disorder were excluded from the study. Acutely ill patients were excluded taking into account sick euthyroid syndrome. Patients were subjected to anthropometry, evaluation of vital parameters, lipid and thyroid profile along with other routine laboratory parameters. Students t-test, Chi square test and linear regression, multiple logistic regression models were used for statistical analysis. P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Of the 100 patients in study group, 55 were females (55% and 45 were males (45%. Of the 50

  20. Metabolic complications in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sycova-Mila, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, a lot of space and time is devoted to the therapy of oncologic diseases itself. To reach the good therapy results, complex care of the oncologic patient is needed. Management of complications linked with the disease itself and management of complications emerged after administration of chemotherapy, radiotherapy or targeted therapy, plays a significant role. In addition to infectious, hematological, neurological, cardiac or other complications, metabolic complications are relatively extensive and serious. One of the most frequent metabolic complications in oncology is tumor lysis syndrome, hyperuricemia, hypercalcaemia and syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. (author)

  1. Prokaryote metabolism activity

    OpenAIRE

    Biederman, Lori

    2017-01-01

    I wrote this activity to emphasize that prokaryotic organisms can carry out 6 different types of metabolisms (as presented in Freeman’s Biological Science textbook) and this contrasts to eukaryotes, which can only use 2 metabolism pathways (photoautotroph and heterotroph).    For in class materials I remove the  red box (upper right corner) and print slides 3-10, place them back-to-back and laminate them.  The students get a key (slide 2) and a two-sided organism sheet...

  2. Interplay of drug metabolizing enzymes with cellular transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmdorfer, Michaela; Maier-Salamon, Alexandra; Riha, Juliane; Brenner, Stefan; Höferl, Martina; Jäger, Walter

    2014-11-01

    Many endogenous and xenobiotic substances and their metabolites are substrates for drug metabolizing enzymes and cellular transporters. These proteins may not only contribute to bioavailability of molecules but also to uptake into organs and, consequently, to overall elimination. The coordinated action of uptake transporters, metabolizing enzymes, and efflux pumps, therefore, is a precondition for detoxification and elimination of drugs. As the understanding of the underlying mechanisms is important to predict alterations in drug disposal, adverse drug reactions and, finally, drug-drug interactions, this review illustrates the interplay between selected uptake/efflux transporters and phase I/II metabolizing enzymes.

  3. Metabolic Plasticity of Stem Cells and Macrophages in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Krstic

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In addition to providing essential molecules for the overall function of cells, metabolism plays an important role in cell fate and can be affected by microenvironmental stimuli as well as cellular interactions. As a specific niche, tumor microenvironment (TME, consisting of different cell types including stromal/stem cells and immune cells, is characterized by distinct metabolic properties. This review will be focused on the metabolic plasticity of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC and macrophages in TME, as well as on how the metabolic state of cancer stem cells (CSC, as key drivers of oncogenesis, affects their generation and persistence. Namely, heterogenic metabolic phenotypes of these cell populations, which include various levels of dependence on glycolysis or oxidative phosphorylation are closely linked to their complex roles in cancer progression. Besides well-known extrinsic factors, such as cytokines and growth factors, the differentiation and activation states of CSC, MSC, and macrophages are coordinated by metabolic reprogramming in TME. The significance of mutual metabolic interaction between tumor stroma and cancer cells in the immune evasion and persistence of CSC is currently under investigation.

  4. Kisspeptin and Metabolism: The Brain and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Dudek

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Apart from the well-established role of kisspeptin (Kp in the regulation of reproductive functions, recent data described its action in the control of metabolism. Of particular interest for the review is the population of Kp neurons localized in the arcuate nucleus (ARC of the hypothalamus, the site of the brain where reproductive and metabolic cross talk occurs. However, within the hypothalamus Kp does not work alone, but rather interacts with other neuropeptides, e.g., neurokinin B, dynorphin A, proopiomelanocortin, the cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript, agouti-related peptide, and neuropeptide Y. Beyond the brain, Kp is expressed in peripheral tissues involved in metabolic functions. In this review, we will mainly focus on the local action of this peptide in peripheral organs such as the pancreas, liver, and the adipose tissue. We will concentrate on dysregulation of the Kp system in cases of metabolic imbalance, e.g., obesity and diabetes. Importantly, these patients besides metabolic health problems often suffer from disruptions of the reproductive system, manifested by abnormalities in menstrual cycles, premature child birth, miscarriages in women, decreased testosterone levels and spermatogenesis in men, hypogonadism, and infertility. We will review the evidence from animal models and clinical data indicating that Kp could serve as a promising agent with clinical applications in regulation of reproductive problems in individuals with obesity and diabetes. Finally, emerging data indicate a role of Kp in regulation of insulin secretion, potentially leading to development of further therapeutic uses of this peptide to treat metabolic problems in patients with these lifestyle diseases.

  5. Kisspeptin and Metabolism: The Brain and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Monika; Ziarniak, Kamil; Sliwowska, Joanna H

    2018-01-01

    Apart from the well-established role of kisspeptin (Kp) in the regulation of reproductive functions, recent data described its action in the control of metabolism. Of particular interest for the review is the population of Kp neurons localized in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus, the site of the brain where reproductive and metabolic cross talk occurs. However, within the hypothalamus Kp does not work alone, but rather interacts with other neuropeptides, e.g., neurokinin B, dynorphin A, proopiomelanocortin, the cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript, agouti-related peptide, and neuropeptide Y. Beyond the brain, Kp is expressed in peripheral tissues involved in metabolic functions. In this review, we will mainly focus on the local action of this peptide in peripheral organs such as the pancreas, liver, and the adipose tissue. We will concentrate on dysregulation of the Kp system in cases of metabolic imbalance, e.g., obesity and diabetes. Importantly, these patients besides metabolic health problems often suffer from disruptions of the reproductive system, manifested by abnormalities in menstrual cycles, premature child birth, miscarriages in women, decreased testosterone levels and spermatogenesis in men, hypogonadism, and infertility. We will review the evidence from animal models and clinical data indicating that Kp could serve as a promising agent with clinical applications in regulation of reproductive problems in individuals with obesity and diabetes. Finally, emerging data indicate a role of Kp in regulation of insulin secretion, potentially leading to development of further therapeutic uses of this peptide to treat metabolic problems in patients with these lifestyle diseases.

  6. Primary Metabolic Pathways and Metabolic Flux Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, John

    2015-01-01

    his chapter introduces the metabolic flux analysis (MFA) or stoichiometry-based MFA, and describes the quantitative basis for MFA. It discusses the catabolic pathways in which free energy is produced to drive the cell-building anabolic pathways. An overview of these primary pathways provides...... the reader who is primarily trained in the engineering sciences with atleast a preliminary introduction to biochemistry and also shows how carbon is drained off the catabolic pathways to provide precursors for cell mass building and sometimes for important industrial products. The primary pathways...... to be examined in the following are: glycolysis, primarily by the EMP pathway, but other glycolytic pathways is also mentioned; fermentative pathways in which the redox generated in the glycolytic reactions are consumed; reactions in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which produce biomass precursors and redox...

  7. Sleep and Metabolism: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep and its disorders are increasingly becoming important in our sleep deprived society. Sleep is intricately connected to various hormonal and metabolic processes in the body and is important in maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Research shows that sleep deprivation and sleep disorders may have profound metabolic and cardiovascular implications. Sleep deprivation, sleep disordered breathing, and circadian misalignment are believed to cause metabolic dysregulation through myriad pathways involving sympathetic overstimulation, hormonal imbalance, and subclinical inflammation. This paper reviews sleep and metabolism, and how sleep deprivation and sleep disorders may be altering human metabolism.

  8. [Drug-Drug Interactions with Consideration of Pharmacogenetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Shogo

    2018-01-01

     Elderly patients often suffer from a variety of diseases and therefore may be prescribed several kinds of drugs. Interactions between these drugs may cause problems in some patients. Guidelines for drug interactions were released on July 8, 2014 "Drug Interaction Guideline for Drug Development and Labeling Recommendations (Final Draft)". These guidelines include the theoretical basis for evaluating the mechanisms of drug interaction, the possible extent of drug interactions, and take into consideration special populations (e.g., infants, children, elderly patients, patients with hepatic or renal dysfunction, and subjects with minor deficient alleles for drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters). In this symposium article, I discuss this last special population: altered drug metabolism and drug interactions in subjects with minor alleles of genes encoding deficient drug metabolizing enzymes. I further discuss a drug label for eliglustat (Cerdelga) with instructions for patients with ultra-rapid, extensive, intermediate, and poor metabolizer phenotypes that arise from different CYP2D6 gene alleles.

  9. Neonatal nutrition and metabolism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thureen, Patti J; Hay, William W

    2006-01-01

    ..., the volume highlights the important longterm effects of fetal and neonatal growth on health in later life. In addition, there are very practical chapters on methods and techniques for assessing nutritional status, body composition, and evaluating metabolic function. Written by an authoritative, international team of cont...

  10. Insect flight muscle metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, D.J. van der; Beenakkers, A.M.Th.; Marrewijk, W.J.A. van

    1984-01-01

    The flight of an insect is of a very complicated and extremely energy-demanding nature. Wingbeat frequency may differ between various species but values up to 1000 Hz have been measured. Consequently metabolic activity may be very high during flight and the transition from rest to flight is

  11. Sleep and metabolic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Lisa L; Guyon, Aurore; Spiegel, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Evidence for the role of sleep on metabolic and endocrine function has been reported more than four decades ago. In the past 30 years, the prevalence of obesity and diabetes has greatly increased in industrialized countries, and self-imposed sleep curtailment, now very common, is starting to be recognized as a contributing factor, alongside with increased caloric intake and decreased physical activity. Furthermore, obstructive sleep apnea, a chronic condition characterized by recurrent upper airway obstruction leading to intermittent hypoxemia and sleep fragmentation, has also become highly prevalent as a consequence of the epidemic of obesity and has been shown to contribute, in a vicious circle, to the metabolic disturbances observed in obese patients. In this article, we summarize the current data supporting the role of sleep in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and the hormones involved in the regulation of appetite. We also review the results of the epidemiologic and laboratory studies that investigated the impact of sleep duration and quality on the risk of developing diabetes and obesity, as well as the mechanisms underlying this increased risk. Finally, we discuss how obstructive sleep apnea affects glucose metabolism and the beneficial impact of its treatment, the continuous positive airway pressure. In conclusion, the data available in the literature highlight the importance of getting enough good sleep for metabolic health.

  12. Synthetic Metabolic Pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    topics, lists of the necessary materials and reagents, step-by-step, readily reproducible laboratory protocols, and tips on troubleshooting and avoiding known pitfalls. Authoritative and practical, Synthetic Metabolic Pathways: Methods and Protocols aims to ensure successful results in the further study...

  13. Metabolism of femoxetine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, H.; Lund, J.

    1981-01-01

    The metabolism of femoxetine, a serotonin uptake inhibitor, has been investigated in rats, dogs, monkeys, and human subjects using two 14 C-femoxetine compounds with labelling in different positions. The metabolic pathways were oxidations (and glucuronidation) and demethylation, both reactions most probably taking place in the liver. Nearly all femoxetine was metabolised, and the same metabolites were found in urine from all four species. Only a small percentage of the radioactivity excreted in the urine was not identified. Rat and dog excreted more N-oxide than monkey and man, while most of the radioactivity (60-100%) in these two species was excreted as two hydroxy metabolites. The metabolic pattern in monkey and man was very similar. About 50% was excreted in these two species as one metabolite, formed by demethylation of a methoxy group. A demethylation of a N-CH 3 group formed an active metabolite, norfemoxetine. The excretion of this metabolite in urine from man varied from 0 to 18% of the dose between individuals. Most of the radioactivity was excreted with the faeces in rat and dog, while monkey and man excreted most of the radioactivity in urine. This difference in excretion route might be explained by the difference in the metabolic pattern. No dose dependency was observed in any of the three animal species investigated. (author)

  14. Metabolic Diseases of Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here and still get the great care and treatment I received in Michigan.” MDA Is Here to Help You T he Muscular Dystrophy Association offers a vast array of services to help you and your family deal with metabolic diseases of muscle. The staff at your local MDA office is ...

  15. Dysregulated metabolism contributes to oncogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschey, Matthew D.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Diehl, Anna Mae E.; Drew, Janice E.; Frezza, Christian; Green, Michelle F.; Jones, Lee W.; Ko, Young H.; Le, Anne; Lea, Michael A.; Locasale, Jason W.; Longo, Valter D.; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; McDonnell, Eoin; Mehrmohamadi, Mahya; Michelotti, Gregory; Muralidhar, Vinayak; Murphy, Michael P.; Pedersen, Peter L.; Poore, Brad; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.; Sivanand, Sharanya; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Wellen, Kathryn E.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a disease characterized by unrestrained cellular proliferation. In order to sustain growth, cancer cells undergo a complex metabolic rearrangement characterized by changes in metabolic pathways involved in energy production and biosynthetic processes. The relevance of the metabolic transformation of cancer cells has been recently included in the updated version of the review “Hallmarks of Cancer”, where the dysregulation of cellular metabolism was included as an emerging hallmark. While several lines of evidence suggest that metabolic rewiring is orchestrated by the concerted action of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, in some circumstances altered metabolism can play a primary role in oncogenesis. Recently, mutations of cytosolic and mitochondrial enzymes involved in key metabolic pathways have been associated with hereditary and sporadic forms of cancer. Together, these results suggest that aberrant metabolism, once seen just as an epiphenomenon of oncogenic reprogramming, plays a key role in oncogenesis with the power to control both genetic and epigenetic events in cells. In this review, we discuss the relationship between metabolism and cancer, as part of a larger effort to identify a broad-spectrum of therapeutic approaches. We focus on major alterations in nutrient metabolism and the emerging link between metabolism and epigenetics. Finally, we discuss potential strategies to manipulate metabolism in cancer and tradeoffs that should be considered. More research on the suite of metabolic alterations in cancer holds the potential to discover novel approaches to treat it. PMID:26454069

  16. Cerebral ketone body metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A A M

    2005-01-01

    Ketone bodies (KBs) are an important source of energy for the brain. During the neonatal period, they are also precursors for the synthesis of lipids (especially cholesterol) and amino acids. The rate of cerebral KB metabolism depends primarily on the concentration in blood; high concentrations occur during fasting and on a high-fat diet. Cerebral KB metabolism is also regulated by the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which depends on the abundance of monocarboxylic acid transporters (MCT1). The BBB's permeability to KBs increases with fasting in humans. In rats, permeability increases during the suckling period, but human neonates have not been studied. Monocarboxylic acid transporters are also present in the plasma membranes of neurons and glia but their role in regulating KB metabolism is uncertain. Finally, the rate of cerebral KB metabolism depends on the activities of the relevant enzymes in brain. The activities vary with age in rats, but reliable results are not available for humans. Cerebral KB metabolism in humans differs from that in the rat in several respects. During fasting, for example, KBs supply more of the brain's energy in humans than in the rat. Conversely, KBs are probably used more extensively in the brain of suckling rats than in human neonates. These differences complicate the interpretation of rodent studies. Most patients with inborn errors of ketogenesis develop normally, suggesting that the only essential role for KBs is as an alternative fuel during illness or prolonged fasting. On the other hand, in HMG-CoA lyase deficiency, imaging generally shows asymptomatic white-matter abnormalities. The ability of KBs to act as an alternative fuel explains the effectiveness of the ketogenic diet in GLUT1 deficiency, but its effectiveness in epilepsy remains unexplained.

  17. A Metabolic Race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M.S. Costa et al.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome describes a set of metabolic risk factors that manifest in an individual and some aspects contribute to its appearance: genetic, overweight and the absence of physical activity. So, a board game was created to simulate the environment and routine experienced by UFF students that could contribute  to the development of Metabolic Syndrome. Players move along a simplified map of Niterói city, where places as Antônio Pedro Hospital (HUAP are pointed out. OBJECTIVES: This project aimed to develop an educational game to consolidate Metabolic Syndrome biochemical events. MATERIAL E METHODS: Each group receives a board, pins, dice, question, challenge and diagnostics cards. One student performs the family doctor function, responsable for delivering cards, reading activities and providing diagnosis to players when game is over.The scoring system is based on 3 criteria for Metabolic Syndrome diagnosis: glycemia, abdominal obesity and HDL cholesterol. At the end of game, it is possible to calculate the rates of each player and provide proportional diagnosis. The winner is the healthiest that first arrives at HUAP. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The game was applied to 50 students and only 10% classified the subject-matter as difficult. This finding highlight the need to establish new methods to enhance the teaching and learning process and decrease the students’ dificulties. Students evaluated the game as an important educational support and 85% of them agreed it complements  and consolidate the content discussed in classroom. Finally, the game was very highly rated by students according to their perception about their own performance while playing.  In addition, 95 % students pointed they would play again and 98% said they think games are able to optimize learning. CONCLUSIONS: It was possible not only to approximate biochemical phenomena to the students’ daily life, but also to solidify the theoretical concepts in a dynamic and fun

  18. Metabolic Phenotyping of Diet and Dietary Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brignardello, J; Holmes, E; Garcia-Perez, I

    Nutrition provides the building blocks for growth, repair, and maintenance of the body and is key to maintaining health. Exposure to fast foods, mass production of dietary components, and wider importation of goods have challenged the balance between diet and health in recent decades, and both scientists and clinicians struggle to characterize the relationship between this changing dietary landscape and human metabolism with its consequent impact on health. Metabolic phenotyping of foods, using high-density data-generating technologies to profile the biochemical composition of foods, meals, and human samples (pre- and postfood intake), can be used to map the complex interaction between the diet and human metabolism and also to assess food quality and safety. Here, we outline some of the techniques currently used for metabolic phenotyping and describe key applications in the food sciences, ending with a broad outlook at some of the newer technologies in the field with a view to exploring their potential to address some of the critical challenges in nutritional science. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Mediator Complex and Lipid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Xiaoli; Zhao, Xiaoping; Yang, Fajun

    2013-03-01

    The precise control of gene expression is essential for all biological processes. In addition to DNA-binding transcription factors, numerous transcription cofactors contribute another layer of regulation of gene transcription in eukaryotic cells. One of such transcription cofactors is the highly conserved Mediator complex, which has multiple subunits and is involved in various biological processes through directly interacting with relevant transcription factors. Although the current understanding on the biological functions of Mediator remains incomplete, research in the past decade has revealed an important role of Mediator in regulating lipid metabolism. Such function of Mediator is dependent on specific transcription factors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) and sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), which represent the master regulators of lipid metabolism. The medical significance of these findings is apparent, as aberrant lipid metabolism is intimately linked to major human diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Here, we briefly review the functions and molecular mechanisms of Mediator in regulation of lipid metabolism.

  20. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanda, R.

    1981-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental evidences to form a basis for Lagrangian Quantum field theory for Weak Interactions are discussed. In this context, gauge invariance aspects of such interactions are showed. (L.C.) [pt

  1. Potentiation of intraocular absorption and drug metabolism of N-acetylcarnosine lubricant eye drops: drug interaction with sight threatening lipid peroxides in the treatment for age-related eye diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    Cataract is the dominant cause of blindness worldwide. Studies of the morphological structure and biophysical changes of the lens in human senile cataracts have demonstrated the disappearance of normal fiber structure in the opaque region of the lens and the disintegration of the lens fiber plasma membrane in the lens tissue. Morphological and biochemical techniques have revealed the regions in human cataractous lenses in which the plasma membrane derangement occurs as the primary light scattering centers which cause the observed lens opacity. Human cataract formation is mostly considered to be a multifactorial disease; however, oxidative stress might be one of the leading causes for both nuclear and cortical cataract. Phospholipid molecules modified with oxygen, accumulating in the lipid bilayer, change its geometry and impair lipid-lipid and protein-lipid interactions in lenticular fiber membranes. Electron microscopy data of human lenses at various stages of age-related cataract document that these disruptions were globules, vacuoles, multilamellar membranes, and clusters of highly undulating membranes. The opaque shades of cortical cataracts represent cohorts of locally affected fibres segregated from unaffected neighbouring fibres by plasma membranes. Other potential scattering centers found throughout the mature cataract nucleus included variations in staining density between adjacent cells, enlarged extracellular spaces between undulating membrane pairs, and protein-like deposits in the extracellular space. These affected parts had membranes with a fine globular aspect and in cross-section proved to be filled with medium to large globular elements. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) is a pathogenetic and causative factor of cataract. Increased concentrations of primary molecular LPO products (diene conjugates, lipid hydroperoxides, fatty acid oxy-derivatives) and end fluorescent LPO products were detected in the lipid moieties of the aqueous humor samples and human

  2. Beneficial effect of CETP gene polymorphism in combination with a Mediterranean diet influencing lipid metabolism in metabolic syndrome patients: CORDIOPREV study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) gene has been implicated in high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C) metabolism. However, little is known about the impact of this gene on metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients and its interaction with diet. Here, we evaluate whether the consumption of a Mediterran...

  3. Can you boost your metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000893.htm Can you boost your metabolism? To use the sharing ... boosting metabolism than tactics that work. Some myths can backfire. If you think you are burning more ...

  4. Human drug metabolism: an introduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coleman, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    ... metabolism and its impact on patient welfare. After underlining the relationship between efficacy, toxicity and drug concentration, the book then considers how metabolizing systems operate and how they impact upon drug concentration...

  5. Intermolecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, I.G.; Rodimova, O.B.; AN SSSR, Tomsk. Inst. Optiki Atmosfery)

    1978-01-01

    The present state of the intermolecular interaction theory is described. The general physical picture of the molecular interactions is given, the relative contributions of interactions of different types are analyzed (electrostatic, resonance, induction, dispersion, relativistic, magnetostatic and exchange), and the main ones in each range of separations are picked out. The methods of the potential curve calculations are considered, specific for definite separations between the interacting systems. The special attention is paid to the analysis of approximations used in different theoretical calculation methods

  6. Thyroid hormone metabolism in poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darras V.M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone (TH receptors preferentially bind 3.5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3. Therefore the metabolism of thyroxine (T4 secreted by the thyroid gland in peripheral tissues, resulting in the production and degradation of receptor-active T3, plays a major role in thyroid function. The most important metabolic pathway for THs is deiodination. Another important pathway is sulfation, which is a reversible pathway that has been shown to interact with TH deiodination efficiency. The enzymes catalysing TH deiodination consist of three types. Type 1 deiodinase (D1 catalyses both outer ring (ORD and inner ring deiodinalion (IRD. Type II deiodinase (D2 only catalyses ORD while type III (D3 only catalyses IRD. The three chicken deiodinase cDNAs have been cloned recently. These enzymes all belong to the family of selenoproteins. Ontogenetic studies show that the availability of deiodinases is regulated in a tissue specific and developmental stage dependent way. Characteristic for the chicken is the presence of very high levels off, inactivating D3 enzyme in the embryonic liver. Hepatic D3 is subject to acute regulation in a number of situations. Both growth hormone and glucocorticoid injection rapidly decrease hepatic D3 levels, hereby increasing plasma T3 without affecting hepatic D1 levels. The inhibition of D3 seems to be regulated mainly at the level of D3 gene transcription. The effect of growth hormone on D3 expression persists throughout life, while glucocorticoids start to inhibit hepatic D1 expression in posthatch chickens. Food restriction in growing chickens increases hepatic D3 levels. This contributes to the decrease in plasma T3 necessary to reduce energy loss. Refeeding restores hepatic D3 and plasma T3 to control levels within a few hours. It can be concluded that the tissue and time dependent regulation of the balance between TH activating and inactivating enzymes plays an essential role in the control of local T3 availability and hence in

  7. Metabolic flexibility as an adaptation to energy resources and requirements in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Reuben L; Soeters, Maarten R; Wüst, Rob C I; Houtkooper, Riekelt H

    2018-04-24

    The ability to efficiently adapt metabolism by substrate sensing, trafficking, storage and utilization, dependent on availability and requirement is known as metabolic flexibility. In this review, we discuss the breadth and depth of metabolic flexibility and its impact on health and disease. Metabolic flexibility is essential to maintain energy homeostasis in times of either caloric excess or caloric restriction, and in times of either low or high energy demand, such as during exercise. The liver, adipose tissue and muscle govern systemic metabolic flexibility and manage nutrient sensing, uptake, transport, storage and expenditure by communication via endocrine cues. At a molecular level, metabolic flexibility relies on the configuration of metabolic pathways which is regulated by key metabolic enzymes and transcription factors, many of which interact closely with the mitochondria. Disrupted metabolic flexibility, or metabolic inflexibility, however, is associated with many pathological conditions including metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cancer. Multiple factors like dietary composition and feeding frequency, exercise training, and use of pharmacological compounds influence metabolic flexibility and will be discussed here. Lastly, we outline important advances in metabolic flexibility research and discuss medical horizons and translational aspects.

  8. Sleep and Metabolism: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Sunil; Kavuru, Mani

    2010-01-01

    Sleep and its disorders are increasingly becoming important in our sleep deprived society. Sleep is intricately connected to various hormonal and metabolic processes in the body and is important in maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Research shows that sleep deprivation and sleep disorders may have profound metabolic and cardiovascular implications. Sleep deprivation, sleep disordered breathing, and circadian misalignment are believed to cause metabolic dysregulation through myriad pathways i...

  9. Energy Metabolism in the Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Rui, Liangyou

    2014-01-01

    The liver is an essential metabolic organ, and its metabolic activity is tightly controlled by insulin and other metabolic hormones. Glucose is metabolized into pyruvate through glycolysis in the cytoplasm, and pyruvate is completely oxidized to generate ATP through the TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria. In the fed state, glycolytic products are used to synthesize fatty acids through de novo lipogenesis. Long-chain fatty acids are incorporated into triacylglycerol, p...

  10. A mapping of drug space from the viewpoint of small molecule metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Corey Adams

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Small molecule drugs target many core metabolic enzymes in humans and pathogens, often mimicking endogenous ligands. The effects may be therapeutic or toxic, but are frequently unexpected. A large-scale mapping of the intersection between drugs and metabolism is needed to better guide drug discovery. To map the intersection between drugs and metabolism, we have grouped drugs and metabolites by their associated targets and enzymes using ligand-based set signatures created to quantify their degree of similarity in chemical space. The results reveal the chemical space that has been explored for metabolic targets, where successful drugs have been found, and what novel territory remains. To aid other researchers in their drug discovery efforts, we have created an online resource of interactive maps linking drugs to metabolism. These maps predict the "effect space" comprising likely target enzymes for each of the 246 MDDR drug classes in humans. The online resource also provides species-specific interactive drug-metabolism maps for each of the 385 model organisms and pathogens in the BioCyc database collection. Chemical similarity links between drugs and metabolites predict potential toxicity, suggest routes of metabolism, and reveal drug polypharmacology. The metabolic maps enable interactive navigation of the vast biological data on potential metabolic drug targets and the drug chemistry currently available to prosecute those targets. Thus, this work provides a large-scale approach to ligand-based prediction of drug action in small molecule metabolism.

  11. A mapping of drug space from the viewpoint of small molecule metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, James Corey; Keiser, Michael J; Basuino, Li; Chambers, Henry F; Lee, Deok-Sun; Wiest, Olaf G; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2009-08-01

    Small molecule drugs target many core metabolic enzymes in humans and pathogens, often mimicking endogenous ligands. The effects may be therapeutic or toxic, but are frequently unexpected. A large-scale mapping of the intersection between drugs and metabolism is needed to better guide drug discovery. To map the intersection between drugs and metabolism, we have grouped drugs and metabolites by their associated targets and enzymes using ligand-based set signatures created to quantify their degree of similarity in chemical space. The results reveal the chemical space that has been explored for metabolic targets, where successful drugs have been found, and what novel territory remains. To aid other researchers in their drug discovery efforts, we have created an online resource of interactive maps linking drugs to metabolism. These maps predict the "effect space" comprising likely target enzymes for each of the 246 MDDR drug classes in humans. The online resource also provides species-specific interactive drug-metabolism maps for each of the 385 model organisms and pathogens in the BioCyc database collection. Chemical similarity links between drugs and metabolites predict potential toxicity, suggest routes of metabolism, and reveal drug polypharmacology. The metabolic maps enable interactive navigation of the vast biological data on potential metabolic drug targets and the drug chemistry currently available to prosecute those targets. Thus, this work provides a large-scale approach to ligand-based prediction of drug action in small molecule metabolism.

  12. DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH DIAZEPAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Bojanić

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Diazepam is a benzodiazepine derivative with anxyolitic, anticonvulsant, hypnotic, sedative, skeletal muscle relaxant, antitremor, and amnestic activity. It is metabolized in the liver by the cytochrome P (CYP 450 enzyme system. Diazepam is N-demethylated by CYP3A4 and CYP2C19 to the active metabolite N-desmethyldiazepam, and is hydroxylated by CYP3A4 to the active metabolite temazepam. N-desmethyl-diazepam and temazepam are both further metabolized to oxazepam. Concomitant intake of inhibitors or inducers of the CYP isozymes involved in the biotransformation of diazepam may alter plasma concentrations of this drug, although this effect is unlikely to be associated with clinically relevant interactions.The goal of this article was to review the current literature on clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug interactions with diazepam.A search of MEDLINE and EMBASE was conducted for original research and review articles published in English between January 1971. and May 2011. Among the search terms were drug interactions, diazepam, pharmacokinetics, drug metabolism, and cytochrome P450. Only articles published in peer-reviewed journals were included, and meeting abstracts were excluded. The reference lists of relevant articles were hand-searched for additional publications.Diazepam is substantially sorbed by the plastics in flexible containers, volume control set chambers, and tubings of intravenous administration sets. Manufacturers recommend not mixing with any other drug or solution in syringe or solution, although diazepam is compatible in syringe with cimetidine and ranitidine, and in Y-site with cisatracurium, dobutamine, fentanyl, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, nafcillin, quinidine gluconate, remifentanil, and sufentanil. Diazepam is compatible with: dextrose 5% in water, Ringers injection, Ringers injection lactated and sodium chloride 0.9%. Emulsified diazepam is compatible with Intralipid and Nutralipid.Diazepam has low potential

  13. Pulmonary metabolism of foreign compounds: Its role in metabolic activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    The lung has the potential of metabolizing many foreign chemicals to a vast array of metabolites with different pharmacological and toxicological properties. Because many chemicals require metabolic activation in order to exert their toxicity, the cellular distribution of the drug-metabolizing enzymes in a heterogeneous tissue, such as the lung, and the balance of metabolic activation and deactivation pathways in any particular cell are key factors in determining the cellular specificity of many pulmonary toxins. Environmental factors such as air pollution, cigarette smoking, and diet markedly affect the pulmonary metabolism of some chemicals and, thereby, possibly affect their toxicity

  14. Human drug metabolism: an introduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coleman, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    ..., both under drug pressure and during inhibition. Factors affecting drug metabolism, such as genetic polymorphisms, age and diet are discussed and how metabolism can lead to toxicity is explained. The book concludes with the role of drug metabolism in the commercial development of therapeutic agents as well as the pharmacology of some illicit drugs.

  15. Sleep-Dependent Modulation of Metabolic Rate in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Bethany A; Slocumb, Melissa E; Chaitin, Hersh; DiAngelo, Justin R; Keene, Alex C

    2017-08-01

    Dysregulation of sleep is associated with metabolic diseases, and metabolic rate (MR) is acutely regulated by sleep-wake behavior. In humans and rodent models, sleep loss is associated with obesity, reduced metabolic rate, and negative energy balance, yet little is known about the neural mechanisms governing interactions between sleep and metabolism. We have developed a system to simultaneously measure sleep and MR in individual Drosophila, allowing for interrogation of neural systems governing interactions between sleep and metabolic rate. Like mammals, MR in flies is reduced during sleep and increased during sleep deprivation suggesting sleep-dependent regulation of MR is conserved across phyla. The reduction of MR during sleep is not simply a consequence of inactivity because MR is reduced ~30 minutes following the onset of sleep, raising the possibility that CO2 production provides a metric to distinguish different sleep states in the fruit fly. To examine the relationship between sleep and metabolism, we determined basal and sleep-dependent changes in MR is reduced in starved flies, suggesting that starvation inhibits normal sleep-associated effects on metabolic rate. Further, translin mutant flies that fail to suppress sleep during starvation demonstrate a lower basal metabolic rate, but this rate was further reduced in response to starvation, revealing that regulation of starvation-induced changes in MR and sleep duration are genetically distinct. Therefore, this system provides the unique ability to simultaneously measure sleep and oxidative metabolism, providing novel insight into the physiological changes associated with sleep and wakefulness in the fruit fly. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Microglia energy metabolism in metabolic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsbeek, Martin J T; Mulder, Laurie; Yi, Chun-Xia

    2016-12-15

    Microglia are the resident macrophages of the CNS, and are in charge of maintaining a healthy microenvironment to ensure neuronal survival. Microglia carry out a non-stop patrol of the CNS, make contact with neurons and look for abnormalities, all of which requires a vast amount of energy. This non-signaling energy demand increases after activation by pathogens, neuronal damage or other kinds of stimulation. Of the three major energy substrates - glucose, fatty acids and glutamine - glucose is crucial for microglia survival and several glucose transporters are expressed to supply sufficient glucose influx. Fatty acids are another source of energy for microglia and have also been shown to strongly influence microglial immune activity. Glutamine, although possibly suitable for use as an energy substrate by microglia, has been shown to have neurotoxic effects when overloaded. Microglial fuel metabolism might be associated with microglial reactivity under different pathophysiological conditions and a microglial fuel switch may thus be the underlying cause of hypothalamic dysregulation, which is associated with obesity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    This chapter attempts to describe and compare some of the more important nucleon-nucleon interactions that have been used in nuclear structure calculations, and to relate them where possible to the real nucleon-nucleon interaction. Explains that different interactions have been used depending on whether one is fitting to total binding energies and densities with a Hartree Fock (HF) calculation or fitting to spectra and spectroscopic data in a shell model calculation. Examines both types of calculation after two preliminary sections concerned with notation and with the philosophy underlying the use of model spaces and effective interactions. Discusses Skyrme interactions, finite range interactions, small model space, large model space, and the Sussex potential matrix elements. Focuses on the more empirical approaches in which a simple form is chosen for the effective interaction in a given model space and the parameters are deduced from fitting many-body data

  18. Metabolic syndrome in hyperprolactinemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marianne; Glintborg, Dorte

    2018-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a conglomerate of clinical findings that convey into increased morbidity and mortality from type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and cardiovascular disease. Hyperprolactinemia (hyperPRL) is associated with components of MetS, especially during pregnancy. Endogenous levels...... in patients with T2D. HyperPRL is a biomarker for decreased dopaminergic tonus in the hypothalamic-pituitary circuit. Patients with a prolactinoma, patients with schizophrenia and/or T2D often have disturbances in this balance and the finding of lower prolactin (PRL) levels in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS......) may indicate increased dopaminergic tonus. Recent studies supported that PRL levels within or above reference range may be differently related to MetS. In healthy study populations and in PCOS, PRL levels were inversely associated with metabolic risk markers. Ongoing research on PRL fragments...

  19. Calcium metabolism in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Calcium is one of the most important plasma constituents in mammals and birds. It provides structural strength and support (bones and eggshell) and plays vital roles in many of the biochemical reactions in the body. The control of calcium metabolism in birds is highly efficient and closely regulated in a number of tissues, primarily parathyroid gland, intestine, kidney, and bone. The hormones with the greatest involvement in calcium regulation in birds are parathyroid hormone, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (calcitriol), and estrogen, with calcitonin playing a minor and uncertain role. The special characteristics of calcium metabolism in birds, mainly associated with egg production, are discussed, along with common clinical disorders secondary to derangements in calcium homeostasis.

  20. 2009 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism & Molecular Biology GRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furlow, Julie Maupin- [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2009-07-26

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses; and industrial applications. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  1. Anthelmintic metabolism in parasitic helminths: proteomic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Peter M; MacKintosh, Neil; Morphew, Russell M

    2012-08-01

    Anthelmintics are the cornerstone of parasitic helminth control. Surprisingly, understanding of the biochemical pathways used by parasitic helminths to detoxify anthelmintics is fragmented, despite the increasing global threat of anthelmintic resistance within the ruminant and equine industries. Reductionist biochemistry has likely over-estimated the enzymatic role of glutathione transferases in anthelmintic metabolism and neglected the potential role of the cytochrome P-450 superfamily (CYPs). Proteomic technologies offers the opportunity to support genomics, reverse genetics and pharmacokinetics, and provide an integrated insight into both the cellular mechanisms underpinning response to anthelmintics and also the identification of biomarker panels for monitoring the development of anthelmintic resistance. To date, there have been limited attempts to include proteomics in anthelmintic metabolism studies. Optimisations of membrane, post-translational modification and interaction proteomic technologies in helminths are needed to especially study Phase I CYPs and Phase III ABC transporter pumps for anthelmintics and their metabolites.

  2. 2011 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism, & Molecular Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keneth Stedman

    2011-08-05

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  3. Biodegrader metabolic expansion during polyaromatic hydrocarbons rhizoremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rugh, C.L.; Susilawati, E.; Kravchenko, A.N. [Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciences, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Thomas, J.C. [Dept. of Natural Sciences, Univ. of Michigan-Dearborn, Dearborn, MI (United States)

    2005-04-01

    Root-microbe interactions are considered to be the primary process of polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) phytoremediation, since bacterial degradation has been shown to be the dominant pathway for environmental PAH dissipation. However, the precise mechanisms driving PAH rhizostimulation symbiosis remain largely unresolved. In this study, we assessed PAH degrading bacterial abundance in contaminated soils planted with 18 different native Michigan plant species. Phenanthrene metabolism assays suggested that each plant species differentially influenced the relative abundance of PAH biodegraders, though they generally were observed to increase heterotrophic and biodegradative cell numbers relative to unplanted soils. Further study of > 1800 phenanthrene degrading isolates indicated that most of the tested plant species stimulated biodegradation of a broader range of PAH compounds relative to the unplanted soil bacterial consortia. These observations suggest that a principal contribution of planted systems for PAH bioremediation may be via expanded metabolic range of the rhizosphere bacterial community. (orig.)

  4. Spectrum of metabolic myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, Corrado

    2015-04-01

    Metabolic myopathies are disorders of utilization of carbohydrates or fat in muscles. The acute nature of energy failure is manifested either by a metabolic crisis with weakness, sometimes associated with respiratory failure, or by myoglobinuria. A typical disorder where permanent weakness occurs is glycogenosis type II (GSDII or Pompe disease) both in infantile and late-onset forms, where respiratory insufficiency is manifested by a large number of cases. In GSDII the pathogenetic mechanism is still poorly understood, and has to be attributed more to structural muscle alterations, possibly in correlation to macro-autophagy, rather than to energetic failure. This review is focused on recent advances about GSDII and its treatment, and the most recent notions about the management and treatment of other metabolic myopathies will be briefly reviewed, including glycogenosis type V (McArdle disease), glycogenosis type III (debrancher enzyme deficiency or Cori disease), CPT-II deficiency, and ETF-dehydrogenase deficiency (also known as riboflavin-responsive multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency or RR-MADD). The discovery of the genetic defect in ETF dehydrogenase confirms the etiology of this syndrome. Other metabolic myopathies with massive lipid storage and weakness are carnitine deficiency, neutral lipid storage-myopathy (NLSD-M), besides RR-MADD. Enzyme replacement therapy is presented with critical consideration and for each of the lipid storage disorders, representative cases and their response to therapy is included. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Wenyi Xu; Fengzhong Wang; Zhongsheng Yu; Fengjiao Xin

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the proce...

  6. Metabolism of anxiolytics and hypnotics: benzodiazepines, buspirone, zoplicone, and zolpidem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, G; Lefko-Singh, K; Teboul, E

    1999-08-01

    1. The benzodiazepines are among the most frequently prescribed of all drugs and have been used for their anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, and sedative/hypnotic properties. Since absorption rates, volumes of distribution, and elimination rates differ greatly among the benzodiazepine derivatives, each benzodiazepine has a unique plasma concentration curve. Although the time to peak plasma levels provides a rough guide, it is not equivalent to the time to clinical onset of effect. The importance of alpha and beta half-lives in the actions of benzodiazepines is discussed. 2. The role of cytochrome P450 isozymes in the metabolism of benzodiazepines and in potential pharmacokinetic interactions between the benzodiazepines and other coadministered drugs is discussed. 3. Buspirone, an anxiolytic with minimal sedative effects, undergoes extensive metabolism, with hydroxylation and dealkylation being the major pathways. Pharmacokinetic interactions of buspirone with other coadministered drugs seem to be minimal. 4. Zopiclone and zolpidem are used primarily as hypnotics. Both are extensively metabolized; N-demethylation, N-oxidation, and decarboxylation of zopiclone occur, and zolpidem undergoes oxidation of methyl groups and hydroxylation of a position on the imidazolepyridine ring system. Zopiclone has a chiral centre, and demonstrates stereoselective pharmacokinetics. Metabolic drug-drug interactions have been reported with zopiclone and erythromycin, trimipramine, and carbamazepine. Reports to date indicate minimal interactions of zolpidem with coadministered drugs; however, it has been reported to affect the Cmax and clearance of chlorpromazepine and to decrease metabolism of the antiviral agent ritonavin. Since CYP3A4 has been reported to play an important role in metabolism of zolpidem, possible interactions with drugs which are substrates and/or inhibitors of that CYP isozyme should be considered.

  7. Maternal cardiac metabolism in pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Laura X.; Arany, Zolt

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy causes dramatic physiological changes in the expectant mother. The placenta, mostly foetal in origin, invades maternal uterine tissue early in pregnancy and unleashes a barrage of hormones and other factors. This foetal ‘invasion’ profoundly reprogrammes maternal physiology, affecting nearly every organ, including the heart and its metabolism. We briefly review here maternal systemic metabolic changes during pregnancy and cardiac metabolism in general. We then discuss changes in cardiac haemodynamic during pregnancy and review what is known about maternal cardiac metabolism during pregnancy. Lastly, we discuss cardiac diseases during pregnancy, including peripartum cardiomyopathy, and the potential contribution of aberrant cardiac metabolism to disease aetiology. PMID:24448314

  8. Imaging metabolic heterogeneity in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Debanti; Pratx, Guillem

    2016-01-06

    As our knowledge of cancer metabolism has increased, it has become apparent that cancer metabolic processes are extremely heterogeneous. The reasons behind this heterogeneity include genetic diversity, the existence of multiple and redundant metabolic pathways, altered microenvironmental conditions, and so on. As a result, methods in the clinic and beyond have been developed in order to image and study tumor metabolism in the in vivo and in vitro regimes. Both regimes provide unique advantages and challenges, and may be used to provide a picture of tumor metabolic heterogeneity that is spatially and temporally comprehensive. Taken together, these methods may hold the key to appropriate cancer diagnoses and treatments in the future.

  9. Yeast metabolic engineering--targeting sterol metabolism and terpenoid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wriessnegger, Tamara; Pichler, Harald

    2013-07-01

    Terpenoids comprise various structures conferring versatile functions to eukaryotes, for example in the form of prenyl-anchors they attach proteins to membranes. The physiology of eukaryotic membranes is fine-tuned by another terpenoid class, namely sterols. Evidence is accumulating that numerous membrane proteins require specific sterol structural features for function. Moreover, sterols are intermediates in the synthesis of steroids serving as hormones in higher eukaryotes. Like steroids many compounds of the terpenoid family do not contribute to membrane architecture, but serve as signalling, protective or attractant/repellent molecules. Particularly plants have developed a plenitude of terpenoid biosynthetic routes branching off early in the sterol biosynthesis pathway and, thereby, forming one of the largest groups of naturally occurring organic compounds. Many of these aromatic and volatile molecules are interesting for industrial application ranging from foods to pharmaceuticals. Combining the fortunate situation that sterol biosynthesis is highly conserved in eukaryotes with the amenability of yeasts to genetic and metabolic engineering, basically all naturally occurring terpenoids might be produced involving yeasts. Such engineered yeasts are useful for the study of biological functions and molecular interactions of terpenoids as well as for the large-scale production of high-value compounds, which are unavailable in sufficient amounts from natural sources due to their low abundance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Tumor Metabolism of Malignant Gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru, Peng; Williams, Terence M.; Chakravarti, Arnab; Guo, Deliang, E-mail: deliang.guo@osumc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center & Arthur G James Cancer Hospital, Columbus, OH 43012 (United States)

    2013-11-08

    Constitutively activated oncogenic signaling via genetic mutations such as in the EGFR/PI3K/Akt and Ras/RAF/MEK pathways has been recognized as a major driver for tumorigenesis in most cancers. Recent insights into tumor metabolism have further revealed that oncogenic signaling pathways directly promote metabolic reprogramming to upregulate biosynthesis of lipids, carbohydrates, protein, DNA and RNA, leading to enhanced growth of human tumors. Therefore, targeting cell metabolism has become a novel direction for drug development in oncology. In malignant gliomas, metabolism pathways of glucose, glutamine and lipid are significantly reprogrammed. Moreover, molecular mechanisms causing these metabolic changes are just starting to be unraveled. In this review, we will summarize recent studies revealing critical gene alterations that lead to metabolic changes in malignant gliomas, and also discuss promising therapeutic strategies via targeting the key players in metabolic regulation.

  11. Tumor Metabolism of Malignant Gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ru, Peng; Williams, Terence M.; Chakravarti, Arnab; Guo, Deliang

    2013-01-01

    Constitutively activated oncogenic signaling via genetic mutations such as in the EGFR/PI3K/Akt and Ras/RAF/MEK pathways has been recognized as a major driver for tumorigenesis in most cancers. Recent insights into tumor metabolism have further revealed that oncogenic signaling pathways directly promote metabolic reprogramming to upregulate biosynthesis of lipids, carbohydrates, protein, DNA and RNA, leading to enhanced growth of human tumors. Therefore, targeting cell metabolism has become a novel direction for drug development in oncology. In malignant gliomas, metabolism pathways of glucose, glutamine and lipid are significantly reprogrammed. Moreover, molecular mechanisms causing these metabolic changes are just starting to be unraveled. In this review, we will summarize recent studies revealing critical gene alterations that lead to metabolic changes in malignant gliomas, and also discuss promising therapeutic strategies via targeting the key players in metabolic regulation

  12. Interconnectivity of human cellular metabolism and disease prevalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Deok-Sun

    2010-01-01

    Fluctuations of metabolic reaction fluxes may cause abnormal concentrations of toxic or essential metabolites, possibly leading to metabolic diseases. The mutual binding of enzymatic proteins and ones involving common metabolites enforces distinct coupled reactions, by which local perturbations may spread through the cellular network. Such network effects at the molecular interaction level in human cellular metabolism can reappear in the patterns of disease occurrence. Here we construct the enzyme-reaction network and the metabolite-reaction network, capturing the flux coupling of metabolic reactions caused by the interacting enzymes and the shared metabolites, respectively. Diseases potentially caused by the failure of individual metabolic reactions can be identified by using the known disease–gene association, which allows us to derive the probability of an inactivated reaction causing diseases from the disease records at the population level. We find that the greater the number of proteins that catalyze a reaction, the higher the mean prevalence of its associated diseases. Moreover, the number of connected reactions and the mean size of the avalanches in the networks constructed are also shown to be positively correlated with the disease prevalence. These findings illuminate the impact of the cellular network topology on disease development, suggesting that the global organization of the molecular interaction network should be understood to assist in disease diagnosis, treatment, and drug discovery

  13. Interconnectivity of human cellular metabolism and disease prevalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Deok-Sun

    2010-12-01

    Fluctuations of metabolic reaction fluxes may cause abnormal concentrations of toxic or essential metabolites, possibly leading to metabolic diseases. The mutual binding of enzymatic proteins and ones involving common metabolites enforces distinct coupled reactions, by which local perturbations may spread through the cellular network. Such network effects at the molecular interaction level in human cellular metabolism can reappear in the patterns of disease occurrence. Here we construct the enzyme-reaction network and the metabolite-reaction network, capturing the flux coupling of metabolic reactions caused by the interacting enzymes and the shared metabolites, respectively. Diseases potentially caused by the failure of individual metabolic reactions can be identified by using the known disease-gene association, which allows us to derive the probability of an inactivated reaction causing diseases from the disease records at the population level. We find that the greater the number of proteins that catalyze a reaction, the higher the mean prevalence of its associated diseases. Moreover, the number of connected reactions and the mean size of the avalanches in the networks constructed are also shown to be positively correlated with the disease prevalence. These findings illuminate the impact of the cellular network topology on disease development, suggesting that the global organization of the molecular interaction network should be understood to assist in disease diagnosis, treatment, and drug discovery.

  14. Transcellular lipoxygenase metabolism between monocytes and platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigby, T.D.; Meslier, N. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1989-09-15

    We have examined the effects of co-culture and in vitro co-stimulation on lipoxygenase metabolism in monocytes and platelets. Monocytes were obtained from the peripheral blood of normal volunteers by discontinuous gradient centrifugation and adherence to tissue culture plastic. Platelets were obtained from the platelet-rich plasma of the same donor. When 10(9) platelets and 2.5 x 10(6) monocytes were co-stimulated with 1 microM A23187, these preparations released greater quantities of 12(S)-hydroxy-10-trans-5,8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid, 5(S),12-(S)dihydroxy-6,10-trans-8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid, and leukotriene C4, 5(S)-hydroxy-6(R)-S-glutathionyl-7,9-trans-11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic (LTC4) when compared with monocytes alone. Release of arachidonic acid, 5-HETE, delta 6-trans-LTB4, and delta 6-trans-12-epi-LTB4 from monocytes was decreased in the presence of platelets. A dose-response curve was constructed and revealed that the above changes became evident when the platelet number exceeded 10(7). Dual radiolabeling experiments with 3H- and 14C-arachidonic acid revealed that monocytes provided arachidonic acid, 5-HETE, and LTA4 for further metabolism by the platelet. Monocytes did not metabolize platelet intermediates detectably. In addition, as much as 1.2 microM 12(S)-hydroxy-10-trans-5,8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid and 12(S)-hydroperoxy-10-trans-5,8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid had no effect on monocyte lipoxygenase metabolism. Platelets were capable of converting LTA4 to LTC4, but conversion of LTA4 to LTB4 was not detected. We conclude that the monocyte and platelet lipoxygenase pathways undergo a transcellular lipoxygenase interaction that differs from the interaction of the neutrophil and platelet lipoxygenase pathways. In this interaction monocytes provide intermediate substrates for further metabolic conversion by platelets in an unidirectional manner.

  15. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogava, S.; Savada, S.; Nakagava, M.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of the use of weak interaction laws to study models of elementary particles is discussed. The most typical examples of weak interaction is beta-decay of nucleons and muons. Beta-interaction is presented by quark currents in the form of universal interaction of the V-A type. Universality of weak interactions is well confirmed using as examples e- and μ-channels of pion decay. Hypothesis on partial preservation of axial current is applicable to the analysis of processes with pion participation. In the framework of the model with four flavours lepton decays of hadrons are considered. Weak interaction without lepton participation are also considered. Properties of neutral currents are described briefly

  16. In silico analysis of human metabolism: Reconstruction, contextualization and application of genome-scale models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Jun; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    The arising prevalence of metabolic diseases calls for a holistic approach for analysis of the underlying nature of abnormalities in cellular functions. Through mathematic representation and topological analysis of cellular metabolism, GEnome scale metabolic Models (GEMs) provide a promising fram...... that correctly describe interactions between cells or tissues, and we therefore discuss how GEMs can be integrated with blood circulation models. Finally, we end the review with proposing some possible future research directions....

  17. Floor interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Krogh, Peter; Ludvigsen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Within architecture, there is a long tradition of careful design of floors. The design has been concerned with both decorating floors and designing floors to carry information. Ubiquitous computing technology offers new opportunities for designing interactive floors. This paper presents three...... different interactive floor concepts. Through an urban perspective it draws upon the experiences of floors in architecture, and provides a set of design issues for designing interactive floors....

  18. Playful Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The video Playful Interaction describes a future architectural office, and envisions ideas and concepts for playful interactions between people, materials and appliances in a pervasive and augmented working environment. The video both describes existing developments, technologies and designs...... as well as ideas not yet implemented such as playful modes of interaction with an augmented ball. Playful Interaction has been used as a hybrid of a vision video and a video prototype (1). Externally the video has been used to visualising our new ideas, and internally the video has also worked to inspire...

  19. Biosynthesis and metabolic fate of phenylalanine in conifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Belén Pascual

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The amino acid phenylalanine (Phe is a critical metabolic node that plays an essential role in the interconnection between primary and secondary metabolism in plants. Phe is used as a protein building block but it is also as a precursor for numerous plant compounds that are crucial for plant reproduction, growth, development and defense against different types of stresses. The metabolism of Phe plays a central role in the channeling of carbon from photosynthesis to the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. The study of this metabolic pathway is particularly relevant in trees, which divert large amounts of carbon into the biosynthesis of Phe-derived compounds, particularly lignin, an important constituent of wood. The trunks of trees are metabolic sinks that consume a considerable percentage of carbon and energy from photosynthesis, and carbon is finally immobilized in wood. This paper reviews recent advances in the biosynthesis and metabolic utilization of Phe in conifer trees. Two alternative routes have been identified: the ancient phenylpyruvate pathway that is present in microorganisms, and the arogenate pathway that possibly evolved later during plant evolution. Additionally, an efficient nitrogen recycling mechanism is required to maintain sustained growth during xylem formation. The relevance of phenylalanine metabolic pathways in wood formation, the biotic interactions and ultraviolet protection is discussed. The genetic manipulation and transcriptional regulation of the pathways are also outlined.

  20. Biosynthesis and Metabolic Fate of Phenylalanine in Conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, María B; El-Azaz, Jorge; de la Torre, Fernando N; Cañas, Rafael A; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2016-01-01

    The amino acid phenylalanine (Phe) is a critical metabolic node that plays an essential role in the interconnection between primary and secondary metabolism in plants. Phe is used as a protein building block but it is also as a precursor for numerous plant compounds that are crucial for plant reproduction, growth, development, and defense against different types of stresses. The metabolism of Phe plays a central role in the channeling of carbon from photosynthesis to the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. The study of this metabolic pathway is particularly relevant in trees, which divert large amounts of carbon into the biosynthesis of Phe-derived compounds, particularly lignin, an important constituent of wood. The trunks of trees are metabolic sinks that consume a considerable percentage of carbon and energy from photosynthesis, and carbon is finally immobilized in wood. This paper reviews recent advances in the biosynthesis and metabolic utilization of Phe in conifer trees. Two alternative routes have been identified: the ancient phenylpyruvate pathway that is present in microorganisms, and the arogenate pathway that possibly evolved later during plant evolution. Additionally, an efficient nitrogen recycling mechanism is required to maintain sustained growth during xylem formation. The relevance of phenylalanine metabolic pathways in wood formation, the biotic interactions, and ultraviolet protection is discussed. The genetic manipulation and transcriptional regulation of the pathways are also outlined.

  1. Skeletal muscle proteomic signature and metabolic impairment in pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malenfant, Simon; Potus, François; Fournier, Frédéric; Breuils-Bonnet, Sandra; Pflieger, Aude; Bourassa, Sylvie; Tremblay, Ève; Nehmé, Benjamin; Droit, Arnaud; Bonnet, Sébastien; Provencher, Steeve

    2015-05-01

    Exercise limitation comes from a close interaction between cardiovascular and skeletal muscle impairments. To better understand the implication of possible peripheral oxidative metabolism dysfunction, we studied the proteomic signature of skeletal muscle in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Eight idiopathic PAH patients and eight matched healthy sedentary subjects were evaluated for exercise capacity, skeletal muscle proteomic profile, metabolism, and mitochondrial function. Skeletal muscle proteins were extracted, and fractioned peptides were tagged using an iTRAQ protocol. Proteomic analyses have documented a total of 9 downregulated proteins in PAH skeletal muscles and 10 upregulated proteins compared to healthy subjects. Most of the downregulated proteins were related to mitochondrial structure and function. Focusing on skeletal muscle metabolism and mitochondrial health, PAH patients presented a decreased expression of oxidative enzymes (pyruvate dehydrogenase, p metabolism in PAH skeletal muscles. We provide evidences that impaired mitochondrial and metabolic functions found in the lungs and the right ventricle are also present in skeletal muscles of patients. • Proteomic and metabolic analysis show abnormal oxidative metabolism in PAH skeletal muscle. • EM of PAH patients reveals abnormal mitochondrial structure and distribution. • Abnormal mitochondrial health and function contribute to exercise impairments of PAH. • PAH may be considered a vascular affliction of heart and lungs with major impact on peripheral muscles.

  2. Bile Acid Signaling in Metabolic Disease and Drug Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiangang

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid–activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein–coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver. PMID:25073467

  3. Possible stimuli for strength and power adaptation : acute metabolic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crewther, Blair; Cronin, John; Keogh, Justin

    2006-01-01

    The metabolic response to resistance exercise, in particular lactic acid or lactate, has a marked influence upon the muscular environment, which may enhance the training stimulus (e.g. motor unit activation, hormones or muscle damage) and thereby contribute to strength and power adaptation. Hypertrophy schemes have resulted in greater lactate responses (%) than neuronal and dynamic power schemes, suggesting possible metabolic-mediated changes in muscle growth. Factors such as age, sex, training experience and nutrition may also influence the lactate responses to resistance exercise and thereafter, muscular adaptation. Although the importance of the mechanical and hormonal stimulus to strength and power adaptation is well recognised, the contribution of the metabolic stimulus is largely unknown. Relatively few studies for example, have examined metabolic change across neuronal and dynamic power schemes, and not withstanding the fact that those mechanisms underpinning muscular adaptation, in relation to the metabolic stimulus, remain highly speculative. Inconsistent findings and methodological limitations within research (e.g. programme design, sampling period, number of samples) make interpretation further difficult. We contend that strength and power research needs to investigate those metabolic mechanisms likely to contribute to weight-training adaptation. Further research is also needed to examine the metabolic responses to different loading schemes, as well as interactions across age, sex and training status, so our understanding of how to optimise strength and power development is improved.

  4. Sirtuins as regulators of the yeast metabolic network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eRalser

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that the metabolic network is an integral regulator of cellularphysiology. Dynamic changes in metabolite concentrations, metabolic flux, or networktopology act as reporters of biological or environmental signals, and are required for the cellto trigger an appropriate biological reaction. Changes in the metabolic network are recognizedby specific sensory macromolecules and translated into a transcriptional or translationalresponse. The protein family of sirtuins, discovered more than 30 years ago as regulators ofsilent chromatin, seems to fulfill the role of a metabolic sensor during aging and conditions ofcaloric restriction. NAD+/NADH interconverting metabolic enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase, as well as enzymes involved inNAD(H, synthesis provide or deprive NAD+ in close proximity to Sir2. This influence sirtuinactivity, and facilitates a dynamic response of the metabolic network to changes inmetabolism with effects on physiology and aging. The molecular network downstream Sir2,however, is complex. In just two orders, Sir2’s metabolism-related interactions span half ofthe yeast proteome, and are connected with virtually every physiological process. Thus,although it is fundamental to analyze single molecular mechanisms, it is at the same timecrucial to consider this genome-scale complexity when correlating single molecular eventswith phenotypes such as aging, cell growth, or stress resistance.

  5. Advances in drug metabolism and pharmacogenetics research in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Peter I; Somogyi, Andrew A; Miners, John O

    2017-02-01

    Metabolism facilitates the elimination, detoxification and excretion in urine or bile (as biotransformation products) of a myriad of structurally diverse drugs and other chemicals. The metabolism of drugs, non-drug xenobiotics and many endogenous compounds is catalyzed by families of drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs). These include the hemoprotein-containing cytochromes P450, which function predominantly as monooxygenases, and conjugation enzymes that transfer a sugar, sulfate, acetate or glutathione moiety to substrates containing a suitable acceptor functional group. Drug and chemical metabolism, especially the enzymes that catalyse these reactions, has been the research focus of several groups in Australia for over four decades. In this review, we highlight the role of recent and current drug metabolism research in Australia, including elucidation of the structure and function of enzymes from the various DME families, factors that modulate enzyme activity in humans (e.g. drug-drug interactions, gene expression and genetic polymorphism) and the application of in vitro approaches for the prediction of drug metabolism parameters in humans, along with the broader pharmacological/clinical pharmacological and toxicological significance of drug metabolism and DMEs and their relevance to drug discovery and development, and to clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Melphalan metabolism in cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seagrave, J.C.; Valdez, J.G.; Tobey, R.A.; Gurley, L.R.

    1985-06-01

    Procedures are presented for the adaptation of reversed-phase-HPLC methods to accomplish separation and isolation of the cancer therapeutic drug melphalan (L-phenylalanine mustard) and its metabolic products from whole cells. Five major degradation products of melphalan were observed following its hydrolysis in phosphate buffer in vitro. The two most polar of these products (or modifications of them) were also found in the cytosol of Chinese hamster CHO cells. The amounts of these two polar products (shown not to be mono- or dihydroxymelphalan) were significantly changed by the pretreatment of cells with ZnC1 2 , one being increased in amount while the other was reduced to an insignificant level. In ZnC1 2 -treated cells, there was also an increased binding of melphalan (or its derivatives) to one protein fraction resolved by gel filtration-HPLC. These observations suggest that changes in polar melphalan products, and perhaps their interaction with a protein, may by involved in the reduction of melphalan cytotoxicity observed in ZnC1 2 -treated cells. While ZnC1 2 is also known to increase the level of glutathione in cells, no significant amounts of glutathione-melphalan derivatives of the type formed non-enzymatically in vitro could be detected in ZnC1 2 -treated or untreated cells. Formation of derivatives of melphalan with glutathione catabolic products in ZnC1 2 -treated cells has not yet been eliminated, however. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  7. Uncovering transcriptional regulation of metabolism by using metabolic network topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Nielsen, Jens

    2005-01-01

    in the metabolic network that follow a common transcriptional response. Thus, the algorithm enables identification of so-called reporter metabolites (metabolites around which the most significant transcriptional changes occur) and a set of connected genes with significant and coordinated response to genetic......Cellular response to genetic and environmental perturbations is often reflected and/or mediated through changes in the metabolism, because the latter plays a key role in providing Gibbs free energy and precursors for biosynthesis. Such metabolic changes are often exerted through transcriptional...... therefore developed an algorithm that is based on hypothesis-driven data analysis to uncover the transcriptional regulatory architecture of metabolic networks. By using information on the metabolic network topology from genome-scale metabolic reconstruction, we show that it is possible to reveal patterns...

  8. Macrolide drug interactions: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, M P; Graci, D M; Amsden, G W

    2000-04-01

    To describe the current drug interaction profiles for the commonly used macrolides in the US and Europe, and to comment on the clinical impact of these interactions. A MEDLINE search (1975-1998) was performed to identify all pertinent studies, review articles, and case reports. When appropriate information was not available in the literature, data were obtained from the product manufacturers. All available data were reviewed to provide an unbiased account of possible drug interactions. Data for some of the interactions were not available from the literature, but were available from abstracts or company-supplied materials. Although the data were not always explicit, the best attempt was made to deliver pertinent information that clinical practitioners would need to formulate practice opinions. When more in-depth information was supplied in the form of a review or study report, a thorough explanation of pertinent methodology was supplied. Several clinically significant drug interactions have been identified since the approval of erythromycin. These interactions usually were related to the inhibition of the cytochrome P450 enzyme systems, which are responsible for the metabolism of many drugs. The decreased metabolism by the macrolides has in some instances resulted in potentially severe adverse events. The development and marketing of newer macrolides are hoped to improve the drug interaction profile associated with this class. However, this has produced variable success. Some of the newer macrolides demonstrated an interaction profile similar to that of erythromycin; others have improved profiles. The most success in avoiding drug interactions related to the inhibition of cytochrome P450 has been through the development of the azalide subclass, of which azithromycin is the first and only to be marketed. Azithromycin has not been demonstrated to inhibit the cytochrome P450 system in studies using a human liver microsome model, and to date has produced none of the

  9. Human Metabolism and Interactions of Deployment-Related Chemicals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hodgson, Ernest

    2001-01-01

    ... isoforms of these enzymes HPLC analytical methods have been brought on line for chlorpyrifos, DEET, permethrin and methods for pyridostigmine bromide and sulfur mustard metabolites are being tested...

  10. Minimal metabolic pathway structure is consistent with associated biomolecular interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordbar, Aarash; Nagarajan, Harish; Lewis, Nathan E.

    2014-01-01

    Pathways are a universal paradigm for functionally describing cellular processes. Even though advances in high-throughput data generation have transformed biology, the core of our biological understanding, and hence data interpretation, is still predicated on human-defined pathways. Here, we......, effectively doubling the known regulatory roles for Nac and MntR. This study suggests an underlying and fundamental principle in the evolutionary selection of pathway structures; namely, that pathways may be minimal, independent, and segregated....

  11. Strontium metabolism and mechanism of interaction with mineralized tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadkins, C.L.; Fu Peng, C

    1981-01-01

    This paper examines the administration of strontium to birds and mammals which results in limited incorporation into skeletal tissue, depressed intestinal calcium absorption, and development of rachitic bone lesions. Comparison of radiostrontium and radiocalcium incorporation by intact animals reveals discrimination against strontium in favor of calcium. Comparison of the Sr 85 - Ca 2+ and Ca 45 - Ca 2+ exchange reveals discrimination against strontium in favor of calcium. Thus, this system manifests product specificity, strontium inhibition, strontium exchange, and discrimination observed with intact animals

  12. Human Metabolism and Interactions of Deployment-Related Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    Tstruments, Westbury, NY) in 50 mM potassium phosphate buffer ( pHi ~ and 𔃻% phosphoric acid. A gradient system was initiated at 20V0? pump B and 7.5...fipronil, imidacloprid , and permethrin (isomeric mix 78% trans- was made using 10 pmol 3AS with and without addition of 20 pmol b5. 20% cis) were...of 6(3-, 2(3-, 15(3-OHTST, I I -KTST, 1 IP-OHAD, and 4-OHAD. Preincubation of pooled HLM with DEET, chlorpyrifos-oxon, phorate, imidacloprid , and delta

  13. Metabolic interactions in methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stams, A J M; Plugge, C M; de Bok, F A M; van Houten, B H G W; Lens, P; Dijkman, H; Weijma, J

    2005-01-01

    In environments where the amount of electron acceptors is insufficient for complete breakdown of organic matter, methane is formed as the major reduced end product. In such methanogenic environments organic acids are degraded by syntrophic consortia of acetogenic bacteria and methanogenic archaea. Hydrogen consumption by methanogens is essential for acetogenic bacteria to convert organic acids to acetate and hydrogen. Several syntrophic cocultures growing on propionate and butyrate have been described. These syntrophic fatty acid-degrading consortia are affected by the presence of sulfate. When sulfate is present sulfate-reducing bacteria compete with methanogenic archaea for hydrogen and acetate, and with acetogenic bacteria for propionate and butyrate. Sulfate-reducing bacteria easily outcompete methanogens for hydrogen, but the presence of acetate as carbon source may influence the outcome of the competition. By contrast, acetoclastic methanogens can compete reasonably well with acetate-degrading sulfate reducers. Sulfate-reducing bacteria grow much faster on propionate and butyrate than syntrophic consortia.

  14. Creatine and the Liver: Metabolism and Possible Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelos, R P; Stefanello, S T; Mauriz, J L; Gonzalez-Gallego, J; Soares, F A A

    2016-01-01

    The process of creatine synthesis occurs in two steps, catalyzed by L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT) and guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase (GAMT), which take place mainly in kidney and liver, respectively. This molecule plays an important energy/pH buffer function in tissues, and to guarantee the maintenance of its total body pool, the lost creatine must be replaced from diet or de novo synthesis. Creatine administration is known to decrease the consumption of Sadenosyl methionine and also reduce the homocysteine production in liver, diminishing fat accumulation and resulting in beneficial effects in fatty liver and non-alcoholic liver disease. Different studies have shown that creatine supplementation could supply brain energy, presenting neuroprotective effects against the encephalopathy induced by hyperammonemia in acute liver failure. Creatine is also taken by many athletes for its ergogenic properties. However, little is known about the adverse effects of creatine supplementation, which are barely described in the literature, with reports of mainly hypothetical effects arising from a small number of scientific publications. Antioxidant effects have been found in several studies, although one of the theories regarding the potential for toxicity from creatine supplementation is that it can increase oxidative stress and potentially form carcinogenic compounds.

  15. Metabolic Interactions between Bacteria and Fungi in Commensal Oral Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Lof, Marloes; Janus, Marleen M.; Krom, Bastiaan P.

    2017-01-01

    Oral health is more than just the absence of disease. The key to oral health is a diverse microbiome in an ecological balance. The oral microbiota is one of the most complex and diverse microbial communities in the human body. To maintain oral health, balance between the human host and the intrinsic microorganisms is essential. The healthy oral cavity is represented by a great microbial diversity, including both bacteria and fungi. The bacterial microbiome is very well studied. In contrast, f...

  16. Metabolic interactions in methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stams, A.J.M.; Plugge, C.M.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Houten, van B.H.G.W.; Lens, P.N.L.; Dijkman, H.; Weijma, J.

    2005-01-01

    In environments where the amount of electron acceptors is insufficient for complete breakdown of organic matter, methane is formed as the major reduced end product. In such methanogenic environments organic acids are degraded by syntrophic consortia of acetogenic bacteria and methanogenic archaea.

  17. Inter-regional comparison of land-use effects on stream metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melody J. Bernot; Daniel J. Sobota; Robert O. Hall; Patrick J. Mulholland; Walter K. Dodds; Jackson R. Webster; Jennifer L. Tank; Linda R. Ashkenas; Lee W. Cooper; Clifford N. Dahm; Stanley V. Gregory; Nancy B. Grimm; Stephen K. Hamilton; Sherri L. Johnson; William H. McDowell; Judith L. Meyer; Bruce Peterson; Geoffrey C. Poole; H. Maurice Valett; Clay Arango; Jake J. Beaulieu; Amy J. Burgin; Chelsea Crenshaw; Ashley M. Helton; Laura Johnson; Jeff Merriam; B.R. Niederlehner; Jonathan M. O' Brien; Jody D. Potter; Richard W. Sheibley; Suzanne M. Thomas; Kym. Wilson

    2010-01-01

    Rates of whole-system metabolism (production and respiration) are fundamental indicators of ecosystem structure and function. Although first-order, proximal controls are well understood, assessments of the interactions between proximal controls and distal controls, such as land use and geographic region, are lacking. Thus, the influence of land use on stream metabolism...

  18. Metabolite exchange between microbiome members produces compounds that influence Drosophila behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Caleb N; Trautman, Eric P; Crawford, Jason M; Stabb, Eric V; Handelsman, Jo; Broderick, Nichole A

    2017-01-01

    Animals host multi-species microbial communities (microbiomes) whose properties may result from inter-species interactions; however, current understanding of host-microbiome interactions derives mostly from studies in which elucidation of microbe-microbe interactions is difficult. In exploring how Drosophila melanogaster acquires its microbiome, we found that a microbial community influences Drosophila olfactory and egg-laying behaviors differently than individual members. Drosophila prefers a Saccharomyces-Acetobacter co-culture to the same microorganisms grown individually and then mixed, a response mainly due to the conserved olfactory receptor, Or42b. Acetobacter metabolism of Saccharomyces-derived ethanol was necessary, and acetate and its metabolic derivatives were sufficient, for co-culture preference. Preference correlated with three emergent co-culture properties: ethanol catabolism, a distinct volatile profile, and yeast population decline. Egg-laying preference provided a context-dependent fitness benefit to larvae. We describe a molecular mechanism by which a microbial community affects animal behavior. Our results support a model whereby emergent metabolites signal a beneficial multispecies microbiome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18855.001 PMID:28068220

  19. Hi-Jack: a novel computational framework for pathway-based inference of host–pathogen interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Kleftogiannis, Dimitrios A.; Wong, Limsoon; Archer, John A.C.; Kalnis, Panos

    2015-01-01

    also describe host-pathogen interaction principles that can be used in the future for subsequent studies. Our case study on Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) revealed pathways in human-e.g. carbohydrate metabolism, lipids metabolism and pathways related

  20. Aesthetic interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Krogh, Peter

    2004-01-01

    , as it promotes aesthetics of use, rather than aesthetics of appearance. We coin this approach in the perspective of aesthetic interaction. Finally we make the point that aesthetics is not re-defining everything known about interactive systems. We provide a framework placing this perspective among other...

  1. Interactive benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson, Lartey; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss individual learning by interactive benchmarking using stochastic frontier models. The interactions allow the user to tailor the performance evaluation to preferences and explore alternative improvement strategies by selecting and searching the different frontiers using directional...... in the suggested benchmarking tool. The study investigates how different characteristics on dairy farms influences the technical efficiency....

  2. Explicit Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löwgren, Jonas; Eriksen, Mette Agger; Linde, Per

    2006-01-01

    We report an ongoing study of palpable computing to support surgical rehabilitation, in the general field of interaction design for ubiquitous computing. Through explorative design, fieldwork and participatory design techniques, we explore the design principle of explicit interaction as an interp...

  3. Metal metabolism and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Larsen, R.P.; Whelton, B.D.; Moretti, E.S.; Peterson, D.P.; Oldham, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    This research focuses on the role of pregnancy and lactation in susceptibility to the toxic effects of cadmium and lead. Responses under investigation include lead-induced changes in pathways for vitamin D and calcium metabolism and cadmium-induced alterations in kidney function and skeletal structure. The second area focuses on the gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium and other actinide elements. Studies currently being conducted in nonhuman primates to develop a procedure to determine GI absorption values of uranium and plutonium that does not require sacrifice of the animal. 6 refs

  4. Connecting Myokines and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rexford S. Ahima

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is the largest organ of the body in non-obese individuals and is now considered to be an endocrine organ. Hormones (myokines secreted by skeletal muscle mediate communications between muscle and liver, adipose tissue, brain, and other organs. Myokines affect muscle mass and myofiber switching, and have profound effects on glucose and lipid metabolism and inflammation, thus contributing to energy homeostasis and the pathogenesis of obesity, diabetes, and other diseases. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the biology of myokines and provide an assessment of their potential as therapeutic targets.

  5. Treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arati; Stone, Neil J

    2004-03-01

    The metabolic syndrome is intended to identify patients who have increased risk of diabetes and/or a cardiac event due to the deleterious effects of weight gain, sedentary lifestyle, and/or an atherogenic diet. The National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III definition uses easily measured clinical findings of increased abdominal circumference, elevated triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, elevated fasting blood glucose and/or elevated blood pressure. Three of these five are required for diagnosis. The authors also note that other definitions of metabolic syndrome focus more on insulin resistance and its key role in this syndrome. This review focuses on how treatment might affect each of the five components. Abdominal obesity can be treated with a variety of lower calorie diets along with regular exercise. Indeed, all of the five components of the metabolic syndrome are improved by even modest amounts of weight loss achieved with diet and exercise. For those with impaired fasting glucose tolerance, there is good evidence that a high fiber, low saturated fat diet with increased daily exercise can reduce the incidence of diabetes by almost 60%. Of note, subjects who exercise the most, gain the most benefit. Metformin has also been shown to be helpful in these subjects. Thiazolidinedione drugs may prove useful, but further studies are needed. Although intensified therapeutic lifestyle change will help the abnormal lipid profile, some patients may require drug therapy. This review also discusses the use of statins, fibrates, and niacin. Likewise, while hypertension in the metabolic syndrome benefits from therapeutic lifestyle change, physicians should also consider angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor drugs or angiotensin receptor blockers, due to their effects on preventing complications of diabetes, such as progression of diabetic nephropathy and due to their effects on regression of left ventricular hypertrophy. Aspirin

  6. Therapeutic potential of Mediator complex subunits in metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Amol; Ansari, Suraiya A

    2018-01-01

    The multisubunit Mediator is an evolutionary conserved transcriptional coregulatory complex in eukaryotes. It is needed for the transcriptional regulation of gene expression in general as well as in a gene specific manner. Mediator complex subunits interact with different transcription factors as well as components of RNA Pol II transcription initiation complex and in doing so act as a bridge between gene specific transcription factors and general Pol II transcription machinery. Specific interaction of various Mediator subunits with nuclear receptors (NRs) and other transcription factors involved in metabolism has been reported in different studies. Evidences indicate that ligand-activated NRs recruit Mediator complex for RNA Pol II-dependent gene transcription. These NRs have been explored as therapeutic targets in different metabolic diseases; however, they show side-effects as targets due to their overlapping involvement in different signaling pathways. Here we discuss the interaction of various Mediator subunits with transcription factors involved in metabolism and whether specific interaction of these transcription factors with Mediator subunits could be potentially utilized as therapeutic strategy in a variety of metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  7. The Role of the Immune System in Metabolic Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmora, Niv; Bashiardes, Stavros; Levy, Maayan; Elinav, Eran

    2017-03-07

    In addition to the immune system's traditional roles of conferring anti-infectious and anti-neoplastic protection, it has been recently implicated in the regulation of systemic metabolic homeostasis. This cross-talk between the immune and the metabolic systems is pivotal in promoting "metabolic health" throughout the life of an organism and plays fundamental roles in its adaptation to ever-changing environmental makeups and nutritional availability. Perturbations in this intricate immune-metabolic cross-talk contribute to the tendency to develop altered metabolic states that may culminate in metabolic disorders such as malnutrition, obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and other features of the metabolic syndrome. Regulators of immune-metabolic interactions include host genetics, nutritional status, and the intestinal microbiome. In this Perspective, we highlight current understanding of immune-metabolism interactions, illustrate differences among individuals and between populations in this respect, and point toward future avenues of research possibly enabling immune harnessing as means of personalized treatment for common metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Metabolic and redox barriers in the skin exposed to drugs and xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkina, Liudmila

    2016-01-01

    Growing exposure of human skin to environmental and occupational hazards, to numerous skin care/beauty products, and to topical drugs led to a biomedical concern regarding sustainability of cutaneous chemical defence that is essential for protection against intoxication. Since skin is the largest extra-hepatic drug/xenobiotic metabolising organ where redox-dependent metabolic pathways prevail, in this review, publications on metabolic processes leading to redox imbalance (oxidative stress) and its autocrine/endocrine impact to cutaneous drug/xenobiotic metabolism were scrutinised. Chemical and photo-chemical skin barriers contain metabolic and redox compartments: their protective and homeostatic functions. The review will examine the striking similarity of adaptive responses to exogenous chemical/photo-chemical stressors and endogenous toxins in cutaneous metabolic and redox system; the role(s) of xenobiotics/drugs and phase II enzymes in the endogenous antioxidant defence and maintenance of redox balance; redox regulation of interactions between metabolic and inflammatory responses in skin cells; skin diseases sharing metabolic and redox problems (contact dermatitis, lupus erythematosus, and vitiligo) Due to exceptional the redox dependence of cutaneous metabolic pathways and interaction of redox active metabolites/exogenous antioxidants with drug/xenobiotic metabolism, metabolic tests of topical xenobiotics/drugs should be combined with appropriate redox analyses and performed on 3D human skin models.

  9. Kinesthetic Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogtmann, Maiken Hillerup; Fritsch, Jonas; Kortbek, Karen Johanne

    2008-01-01

    Within the Human-Computer Interaction community there is a growing interest in designing for the whole body in interaction design. The attempts aimed at addressing the body have very different outcomes spanning from theoretical arguments for understanding the body in the design process, to more...... practical examples of designing for bodily potential. This paper presents Kinesthetic Interaction as a unifying concept for describing the body in motion as a foundation for designing interactive systems. Based on the theoretical foundation for Kinesthetic Interaction, a conceptual framework is introduced...... to reveal bodily potential in relation to three design themes – kinesthetic development, kinesthetic means and kinesthetic disorder; and seven design parameters – engagement, sociality, movability, explicit motivation, implicit motivation, expressive meaning and kinesthetic empathy. The framework is a tool...

  10. Metabolic syndrome, diet and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sousa, Sunita M C; Norman, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with a range of metabolic complications including insulin resistance (IR), obesity, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. These compound risks result in a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and possibly increased cardiovascular (CV) disease. As the cardiometabolic risk of PCOS is shared amongst the different diagnostic systems, all women with PCOS should undergo metabolic surveillance though the precise approach differs between guidelines. Lifestyle interventions consisting of increased physical activity and caloric restriction have been shown to improve both metabolic and reproductive outcomes. Pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery may be considered in resistant metabolic disease. Issues requiring further research include the natural history of PCOS-associated metabolic disease, absolute CV risk and comparative efficacy of lifestyle interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Metabolic Reprogramming in Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Guimaraes Coelho

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Among all the adaptations of cancer cells, their ability to change metabolism from the oxidative to the glycolytic phenotype is a hallmark called the Warburg effect. Studies on tumor metabolism show that improved glycolysis and glutaminolysis are necessary to maintain rapid cell proliferation, tumor progression, and resistance to cell death. Thyroid neoplasms are common endocrine tumors that are more prevalent in women and elderly individuals. The incidence of thyroid cancer has increased in the Past decades, and recent findings describing the metabolic profiles of thyroid tumors have emerged. Currently, several drugs are in development or clinical trials that target the altered metabolic pathways of tumors are undergoing. We present a review of the metabolic reprogramming in cancerous thyroid tissues with a focus on the factors that promote enhanced glycolysis and the possible identification of promising metabolic targets in thyroid cancer.

  12. Metabolic Reprogramming in Thyroid Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Raquel Guimaraes; Fortunato, Rodrigo S.; Carvalho, Denise P.

    2018-01-01

    Among all the adaptations of cancer cells, their ability to change metabolism from the oxidative to the glycolytic phenotype is a hallmark called the Warburg effect. Studies on tumor metabolism show that improved glycolysis and glutaminolysis are necessary to maintain rapid cell proliferation, tumor progression, and resistance to cell death. Thyroid neoplasms are common endocrine tumors that are more prevalent in women and elderly individuals. The incidence of thyroid cancer has increased in the Past decades, and recent findings describing the metabolic profiles of thyroid tumors have emerged. Currently, several drugs are in development or clinical trials that target the altered metabolic pathways of tumors are undergoing. We present a review of the metabolic reprogramming in cancerous thyroid tissues with a focus on the factors that promote enhanced glycolysis and the possible identification of promising metabolic targets in thyroid cancer. PMID:29629339

  13. Metabolic topography of Parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Seung [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most frequent neurodegenerative diseases, which mainly affects the elderly. Parkinson's disease is often difficult to differentiate from atypical parkinson disorder such as progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, dementia with Lewy body, and corticobasal ganglionic degeneration, based on the clinical findings because of the similarity of phenotypes and lack of diagnostic markers. The accurate diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and atypical Parkinson disorders is not only important for deciding on treatment regimens and providing prognosis, but also it is critical for studies designed to investigate etiology and pathogenesis of parkinsonism and to develop new therapeutic strategies. Although degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system results in marked loss of striatal dopamine content in most of the diseases causing parkinsonism, pathologic studies revealed different topographies of the neuronal cell loss in Parkinsonism. Since the regional cerebral glucose metabolism is a marker of integrated local synaptic activity and as such is sensitive to both direct neuronal/synaptic damage and secondary functional disruption at synapses distant from the primary site of pathology, and assessment of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism with F-18 FDG PET is useful in the differential diagnosis of parkinsonism and evaluating the pathophysiology of Parkinsonism.

  14. Drug metabolism and ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, Hilary

    2005-06-01

    Older people are major consumers of drugs and because of this, as well as co-morbidity and age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, are at risk of associated adverse drug reactions. While age does not alter drug absorption in a clinically significant way, and age-related changes in volume of drug distribution and protein binding are not of concern in chronic therapy, reduction in hepatic drug clearance is clinically important. Liver blood flow falls by about 35% between young adulthood and old age, and liver size by about 24-35% over the same period. First-pass metabolism of oral drugs avidly cleared by the liver and clearance of capacity-limited hepatically metabolized drugs fall in parallel with the fall in liver size, and clearance of drugs with a high hepatic extraction ratio falls in parallel with the fall in hepatic blood flow. In normal ageing, in general, activity of the cytochrome P450 enzymes is preserved, although a decline in frail older people has been noted, as well as in association with liver disease, cancer, trauma, sepsis, critical illness and renal failure. As the contribution of age, co-morbidity and concurrent drug therapy to altered drug clearance is impossible to predict in an individual older patient, it is wise to start any drug at a low dose and increase this slowly, monitoring carefully for beneficial and adverse effects.

  15. Metabolic topography of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Seung

    2007-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most frequent neurodegenerative diseases, which mainly affects the elderly. Parkinson's disease is often difficult to differentiate from atypical parkinson disorder such as progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, dementia with Lewy body, and corticobasal ganglionic degeneration, based on the clinical findings because of the similarity of phenotypes and lack of diagnostic markers. The accurate diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and atypical Parkinson disorders is not only important for deciding on treatment regimens and providing prognosis, but also it is critical for studies designed to investigate etiology and pathogenesis of parkinsonism and to develop new therapeutic strategies. Although degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system results in marked loss of striatal dopamine content in most of the diseases causing parkinsonism, pathologic studies revealed different topographies of the neuronal cell loss in Parkinsonism. Since the regional cerebral glucose metabolism is a marker of integrated local synaptic activity and as such is sensitive to both direct neuronal/synaptic damage and secondary functional disruption at synapses distant from the primary site of pathology, and assessment of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism with F-18 FDG PET is useful in the differential diagnosis of parkinsonism and evaluating the pathophysiology of Parkinsonism

  16. Metabolic regulation of yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiechter, A.

    1982-12-01

    Metabolic regulation which is based on endogeneous and exogeneous process variables which may act constantly or time dependently on the living cell is discussed. The observed phenomena of the regulation are the result of physical, chemical, and biological parameters. These parameters are identified. Ethanol is accumulated as an intermediate product and the synthesis of biomass is reduced. This regulatory effect of glucose is used for the aerobic production of ethanol. Very high production rates are thereby obtained. Understanding of the regulation mechanism of the glucose effect has improved. In addition to catabolite repression, several other mechanisms of enzyme regulation have been described, that are mostly governed by exogeneous factors. Glucose also affects the control of respiration in a third class of yeasts which are unable to make use of ethanol as a substrate for growth. This is due to the lack of any anaplerotic activity. As a consequence, diauxic growth behavior is reduced to a one-stage growth with a drastically reduced cell yield. The pulse chemostat technique, a systematic approach for medium design is developed and medium supplements that are essential for metabolic control are identified.

  17. Inflammation and metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navab, Mohamad; Gharavi, Nima; Watson, Andrew D

    2008-07-01

    Poor nutrition, overweight and obesity have increasingly become a public health concern as they affect many metabolic disorders, including heart disease, diabetes, digestive system disorders, and renal failure. Study of the effects of life style including healthy nutrition will help further elucidate the mechanisms involved in the adverse effects of poor nutrition. Unhealthy life style including poor nutrition can result in imbalance in our oxidation/redox systems. Lipids can undergo oxidative modification by lipoxygenases, cyclooxygenases, myeloperoxidase, and other enzymes. Oxidized phospholipids can induce inflammatory molecules in the liver and other organs. This can contribute to inflammation, leading to coronary heart disease, stroke, renal failure, inflammatory bowl disease, metabolic syndrome, bone and joint disorders, and even certain types of cancer. Our antioxidant and antiinflammatory defense mechanisms contribute to a balance between the stimulators and the inhibitors of inflammation. Beyond a point, however, these systems might be overwhelmed and eventually fail. High-density lipoprotein is a potent inhibitor of the formation of toxic oxidized lipids. High-density lipoprotein is also an effective system for stimulating the genes whose products are active in the removal, inactivation, and elimination of toxic lipids. Supporting the high-density lipoprotein function should help maintain the balance in these systems. It is hoped that the present report would elucidate some of the ongoing work toward this goal.

  18. [Metabolic bone disease osteomalacia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuss-Borst, M A

    2014-05-01

    Osteomalacia is a rare disorder of bone metabolism leading to reduced bone mineralization. Underlying vitamin D deficiency and a disturbed phosphate metabolism (so-called hypophosphatemic osteomalacia) can cause the disease. Leading symptoms are dull localized or generalized bone pain, muscle weakness and cramps as well as increased incidence of falls. Rheumatic diseases, such as polymyalgia rheumatica, rheumatoid arthritis, myositis and fibromyalgia must be considered in the differential diagnosis. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) is typically elevated in osteomalacia while serum phosphate and/or 25-OH vitamin D3 levels are reduced. The diagnosis of osteomalacia can be confirmed by an iliac crest bone biopsy. Histological correlate is reduced or deficient mineralization of the newly synthesized extracellular matrix. Treatment strategies comprise supplementation of vitamin D and calcium and for patients with intestinal malabsorption syndromes vitamin D and calcium are also given parenterally. In renal phosphate wasting syndromes substitution of phosphate is the treatment of choice, except for tumor-induced osteomalacia when removal of the tumor leads to a cure in most cases.

  19. A Comprehensive Review on Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspinder Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is defined by a constellation of interconnected physiological, biochemical, clinical, and metabolic factors that directly increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and all cause mortality. Insulin resistance, visceral adiposity, atherogenic dyslipidemia, endothelial dysfunction, genetic susceptibility, elevated blood pressure, hypercoagulable state, and chronic stress are the several factors which constitute the syndrome. Chronic inflammation is known to be associated with visceral obesity and insulin resistance which is characterized by production of abnormal adipocytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-1 (IL-1, IL-6, leptin, and adiponectin. The interaction between components of the clinical phenotype of the syndrome with its biological phenotype (insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, etc. contributes to the development of a proinflammatory state and further a chronic, subclinical vascular inflammation which modulates and results in atherosclerotic processes. Lifestyle modification remains the initial intervention of choice for such population. Modern lifestyle modification therapy combines specific recommendations on diet and exercise with behavioural strategies. Pharmacological treatment should be considered for those whose risk factors are not adequately reduced with lifestyle changes. This review provides summary of literature related to the syndrome’s definition, epidemiology, underlying pathogenesis, and treatment approaches of each of the risk factors comprising metabolic syndrome.

  20. Integration of metabolomics data into metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töpfer, Nadine; Kleessen, Sabrina; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Metabolite levels together with their corresponding metabolic fluxes are integrative outcomes of biochemical transformations and regulatory processes and they can be used to characterize the response of biological systems to genetic and/or environmental changes. However, while changes in transcript or to some extent protein levels can usually be traced back to one or several responsible genes, changes in fluxes and particularly changes in metabolite levels do not follow such rationale and are often the outcome of complex interactions of several components. The increasing quality and coverage of metabolomics technologies have fostered the development of computational approaches for integrating metabolic read-outs with large-scale models to predict the physiological state of a system. Constraint-based approaches, relying on the stoichiometry of the considered reactions, provide a modeling framework amenable to analyses of large-scale systems and to the integration of high-throughput data. Here we review the existing approaches that integrate metabolomics data in variants of constrained-based approaches to refine model reconstructions, to constrain flux predictions in metabolic models, and to relate network structural properties to metabolite levels. Finally, we discuss the challenges and perspectives in the developments of constraint-based modeling approaches driven by metabolomics data.

  1. Metabolic Adaptation to Muscle Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Marco E.; Coon, Jennifer E.; Kalhan, Satish C.; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Saidel, Gerald M.; Stanley, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Although all tissues in the body can adapt to varying physiological/pathological conditions, muscle is the most adaptable. To understand the significance of cellular events and their role in controlling metabolic adaptations in complex physiological systems, it is necessary to link cellular and system levels by means of mechanistic computational models. The main objective of this work is to improve understanding of the regulation of energy metabolism during skeletal/cardiac muscle ischemia by combining in vivo experiments and quantitative models of metabolism. Our main focus is to investigate factors affecting lactate metabolism (e.g., NADH/NAD) and the inter-regulation between carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism during a reduction in regional blood flow. A mechanistic mathematical model of energy metabolism has been developed to link cellular metabolic processes and their control mechanisms to tissue (skeletal muscle) and organ (heart) physiological responses. We applied this model to simulate the relationship between tissue oxygenation, redox state, and lactate metabolism in skeletal muscle. The model was validated using human data from published occlusion studies. Currently, we are investigating the difference in the responses to sudden vs. gradual onset ischemia in swine by combining in vivo experimental studies with computational models of myocardial energy metabolism during normal and ischemic conditions.

  2. Gut Microbiota and Metabolic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu Yeon Hur

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gut microbiota plays critical physiological roles in the energy extraction and in the control of local or systemic immunity. Gut microbiota and its disturbance also appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of diverse diseases including metabolic disorders, gastrointestinal diseases, cancer, etc. In the metabolic point of view, gut microbiota can modulate lipid accumulation, lipopolysaccharide content and the production of short-chain fatty acids that affect food intake, inflammatory tone, or insulin signaling. Several strategies have been developed to change gut microbiota such as prebiotics, probiotics, certain antidiabetic drugs or fecal microbiota transplantation, which have diverse effects on body metabolism and on the development of metabolic disorders.

  3. Clinical update on metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Diego Hernández-Camacho

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome has been defined as a global issue since it affects a lot of people. Numerous factors are involved in metabolic syndrome development. It has been described that metabolic syndrome has negative consequences on health. Consequently, a lot of treatments have been proposed to palliate it such as drugs, surgery or life style changes where nutritional habits have shown to be an important point in its management. The current study reviews the literature existing about the actual epidemiology of metabolic syndrome, the components involucrate in its appearance and progression, the clinical consequences of metabolic syndrome and the nutritional strategies reported in its remission. A bibliographic search in PubMed and Medline was performed to identify eligible studies. Authors obtained that metabolic syndrome is present in population from developed and undeveloped areas in a huge scale. Environmental and genetic elements are involucrate in metabolic syndrome development. Metabolic syndrome exponentially increased risk of cardiovascular disease, some types of cancers, diabetes mellitus type 2, sleep disturbances, etc. Nutritional treatments play a crucial role in metabolic syndrome prevention, treatment and recovery.

  4. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Ready to create rich interactive experiences with your artwork, designs, or prototypes? This is the ideal place to start. With this hands-on guide, you'll explore several themes in interactive art and design-including 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, computer vision, and geolocation-and learn the basic programming and electronics concepts you need to implement them. No previous experience is necessary. You'll get a complete introduction to three free tools created specifically for artists and designers: the Processing programming language, the Arduino microcontroller, and the openFr

  5. Energy metabolism and the metabolic syndrome: does a lower basal metabolic rate signal recovery following weight loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Mario J; Cummings, Nicola K; Ping-Delfos, Wendy L Chan She

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether basal metabolic rate (BMR) was causally related to MetS, and to study the role of gender in this relationship. Seventy-two Caucasian subjects (43 women, 29 men) had changes in basal metabolic rate (BMR), carbohydrate oxidation rate (COR), fat oxidation rate (FOR) and prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) assessed in response to weight loss. There was a significant gender×MetS interaction in BMR at the start. Women with MetS had higher adjusted BMR, whilst men with MetS had lower adjusted BMR than their respective counterparts. Weight loss resulted in a significant decrease in fat mass (-5.2±0.31 kg, p=0.001), fat free mass (-2.3±0.27 kg, p=0.001), BMR (-549±58 kJ/d, p=0.001) and a decreased proportion of MetS (22/72, χ(2)=0.005). Subjects who recovered from MetS after weight loss (RMS) had ∼250 kJ/d significantly lower adjusted BMR compared to those who were never MetS (NMS, p=0.046) and those who still had MetS (MetS+, p=0.047). Regression analysis showed that change (Δ) in BMR was best determined by Δglucose×gender interaction (r(2)=23%), ΔFOR (r(2)=20.3%), ΔCOR (r(2)=19.4%) and Δtriglycerides (r(2)=7.8%). There is a sexual dimorphism of BMR in MetS. Overall, the data support the notion that alterations in BMR may be central to the etiopathogenesis of MetS. Copyright © 2012 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Coordinations between gene modules control the operation of plant amino acid metabolic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galili Gad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Being sessile organisms, plants should adjust their metabolism to dynamic changes in their environment. Such adjustments need particular coordination in branched metabolic networks in which a given metabolite can be converted into multiple other metabolites via different enzymatic chains. In the present report, we developed a novel "Gene Coordination" bioinformatics approach and use it to elucidate adjustable transcriptional interactions of two branched amino acid metabolic networks in plants in response to environmental stresses, using publicly available microarray results. Results Using our "Gene Coordination" approach, we have identified in Arabidopsis plants two oppositely regulated groups of "highly coordinated" genes within the branched Asp-family network of Arabidopsis plants, which metabolizes the amino acids Lys, Met, Thr, Ile and Gly, as well as a single group of "highly coordinated" genes within the branched aromatic amino acid metabolic network, which metabolizes the amino acids Trp, Phe and Tyr. These genes possess highly coordinated adjustable negative and positive expression responses to various stress cues, which apparently regulate adjustable metabolic shifts between competing branches of these networks. We also provide evidence implying that these highly coordinated genes are central to impose intra- and inter-network interactions between the Asp-family and aromatic amino acid metabolic networks as well as differential system interactions with other growth promoting and stress-associated genome-wide genes. Conclusion Our novel Gene Coordination elucidates that branched amino acid metabolic networks in plants are regulated by specific groups of highly coordinated genes that possess adjustable intra-network, inter-network and genome-wide transcriptional interactions. We also hypothesize that such transcriptional interactions enable regulatory metabolic adjustments needed for adaptation to the stresses.

  7. [THE INCONSISTENCIES OF REGULATION OF METABOLISM IN PHYLOGENESIS AT THREE LEVELS OF "RELATIVE BIOLOGICAL PERFECTION": ETIOLOGY OF METABOLIC PANDEMICS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V N

    2015-11-01

    The regulation of metabolism in vivo can be comprehended by considering stages of becoming inphylogenesis of humoral, hormonal, vegetative regulators separately: at the level of cells; in paracrin-regulated cenosises of cells; organs and systems under open blood circulation and closed system of blood flow. The levels of regulations formed at different stages of phylogenesis. Their completion occurred at achievement of "relative biological perfection". Only this way need of cells in functional, structural interaction and forming of multicellular developed. The development of organs and systems of organs also completed at the level of "relative biological perfection". From the same level the third stage of becoming of regulation of metabolism at the level of organism started. When three conditions of "relative biological perfection" achieved consequently at level in vivo are considered in species Homo sapiens using system approach it is detected that "relative biological perfection" in vivo is accompanied by different inconsistencies of regulation of metabolism. They are etiologic factors of "metabolic pandemics ". The inconsistencies (etiological factors) are consider as exemplified by local (at the level of paracrin-regulated cenosises of cells) and system (at the level of organism) regulation of biological reaction metabolism-microcirculation that results in dysfunction of target organs and development of pathogenesis of essential metabolic arterial hypertension. The article describes phylogenetic difference between visceral fatty cells and adpocytes, regulation of metabolism by phylogenetically late insulin, reaction of albumin at increasing of content of unesterified fatty acids in blood plasma, difference of function of resident macrophage and monocytes-macrophages in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, obesity, under diabetes mellitus and essential metabolic arterial hypertension.

  8. Interaction graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seiller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Interaction graphs were introduced as a general, uniform, construction of dynamic models of linear logic, encompassing all Geometry of Interaction (GoI) constructions introduced so far. This series of work was inspired from Girard's hyperfinite GoI, and develops a quantitative approach that should...... be understood as a dynamic version of weighted relational models. Until now, the interaction graphs framework has been shown to deal with exponentials for the constrained system ELL (Elementary Linear Logic) while keeping its quantitative aspect. Adapting older constructions by Girard, one can clearly define...... "full" exponentials, but at the cost of these quantitative features. We show here that allowing interpretations of proofs to use continuous (yet finite in a measure-theoretic sense) sets of states, as opposed to earlier Interaction Graphs constructions were these sets of states were discrete (and finite...

  9. Embarrassing Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deterding, Sebastian; Lucero, Andrés; Holopainen, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Wherever the rapid evolution of interactive technologies disrupts standing situational norms, creates new, often unclear situational audiences, or crosses cultural boundaries, embarrassment is likely. This makes embarrassment a fundamental adoption and engagement hurdle, but also a creative design...

  10. Diffractive interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Duca, V.; Marage, P.

    1996-08-01

    The general framework of diffractive deep inelastic scattering is introduced and reports given in the session on diffractive interactions at the international workshop on deep-inelastic scattering and related phenomena, Rome, April 1996, are presented. (orig.)

  11. Interaction Widget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingstrup, Mads

    2003-01-01

    This pattern describes the idea of making a user interface of discrete, reusable entities---here called interaction widgets. The idea behind widgets is described using two perspectives, that of the user and that of the developer. It is the forces from these two perspectives that are balanced...... in the pattern. The intended audience of the pattern is developers and researchers within the field of human computer interaction....

  12. Hair Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Cani , Marie-Paule; Bertails , Florence

    2006-01-01

    International audience; Processing interactions is one of the main challenges in hair animation. Indeed, in addition to the collisions with the body, an extremely large number of contacts with high friction rates are permanently taking place between individual hair strands. Simulating the latter is essential: without hair self-interactions, strands would cross each other during motion or come to rest at the same location, yielding unrealistic behavior and a visible lack of hair volume. This c...

  13. Effect of saccharin on metabolic cooperation between human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosser, D.D.; Bols, N.C.

    1983-01-01

    Autoradiography was used to study the effect of saccharin on metabolic cooperation between human diploid fibroblasts. When the donors, HGPRT+ cells, and recipients, HGPRT- cells, were plated together in the presence of saccharin, all the interactions that developed in 4 and 24 h were positive for metabolic cooperation. When saccharin was added after donor cells and recipient cells had made contact, the proportion of interactions that were positive for metabolic cooperation was unchanged but the number of grains over primary recipients was reduced. However, in donor cells saccharin caused a reduction in [ 3 H]hypoxanthine incorporation into both acid-soluble and acid-insoluble fractions, although the relative distribution of radioactivity between these two fractions and between the phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated derivatives of [ 3 H]hypoxanthine was unchanged. Metabolic cooperation was studied under conditions in which the number of grains over the nuclei of both the primary recipient and the primary recipient's donor could be counted. The change in the number of grains over these two cell types in response to saccharin was compared and found to be the same. Thus in normal human fibroblasts saccharin does not appear to affect metabolic cooperation, which is a measure of cell-to-cell communication

  14. Metabolism during hypodynamia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federov, I. V.

    1980-01-01

    Physical immobilization, inaction due to space travel, a sedentary occupation, or bed confinement due to a chronic illness elicit similar alternations in the metabolism of man and animals (rat, rabbit, dog, mouse). After a preliminary period of weight loss, there is eventually weight gain due to increased lipid storage. Protein catabolism is enhanced and anabolism depressed, with elevated urinary excretion of amino acids, creatine, and ammonia. Glycogen stores are depleted and glyconeogenesis is accelerated. Polyuria develops with subsequent redistribution of body fluids in which the blood volume of the systemic circulation is decreased and that of pulmonary circulation increased. This results in depressed production of vasopressin by the posterior pituitary which further enhances urinary water and salt loss.

  15. Olfaction Under Metabolic Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Recently published work and emerging research efforts have suggested that the olfactory system is intimately linked with the endocrine systems that regulate or modify energy balance. Although much attention has been focused on the parallels between taste transduction and neuroendocrine controls of digestion due to the novel discovery of taste receptors and molecular components shared by the tongue and gut, the equivalent body of knowledge that has accumulated for the olfactory system, has largely been overlooked. During regular cycles of food intake or disorders of endocrine function, olfaction is modulated in response to changing levels of various molecules, such as ghrelin, orexins, neuropeptide Y, insulin, leptin, and cholecystokinin. In view of the worldwide health concern regarding the rising incidence of diabetes, obesity, and related metabolic disorders, we present a comprehensive review that addresses the current knowledge of hormonal modulation of olfactory perception and how disruption of hormonal signaling in the olfactory system can affect energy homeostasis. PMID:22832483

  16. Metabolic syndrome and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmendia, Jenny V; Moreno, Dolores; Garcia, Alexis H; De Sanctis, Juan B

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a syndrome that involves at least three disorders dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, obesity and/or hypertension. MetS has been associated with several chronic diseases in the adulthood; however, in the recent years, the syndrome was redefined in children. Girls with early menarche and asthma, and children with MetS and asthma that reach adulthood appear to have higher risk to develop severe or difficult to control asthma and a higher probability to suffer cardiovascular diseases. It has been proposed that patients with MetS and endocrinological disorders should be considered a different entity in which pharmacologic treatment should be adjusted according to the individual. Recent patents on the field have addressed new issues on how endocrine control should be managed along with asthma therapeutics. In the near future, new approaches should decrease the high morbidity and mortality associated to these types of patients.

  17. Early anaerobic metabolisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene; Rosing, Minik T; Bjerrum, Christian

    2006-01-01

    probably driven by the cycling of H2 and Fe2+ through primary production conducted by anoxygenic phototrophs. Interesting and dynamic ecosystems would have also been driven by the microbial cycling of sulphur and nitrogen species, but their activity levels were probably not so great. Despite the diversity......Before the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis, the biosphere was driven by anaerobic metabolisms. We catalogue and quantify the source strengths of the most probable electron donors and electron acceptors that would have been available to fuel early-Earth ecosystems. The most active ecosystems were...... of potential early ecosystems, rates of primary production in the early-Earth anaerobic biosphere were probably well below those rates observed in the marine environment. We shift our attention to the Earth environment at 3.8Gyr ago, where the earliest marine sediments are preserved. We calculate, consistent...

  18. Microbial syntrophy: interaction for the common good.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brandon E L; Henneberger, Ruth; Huber, Harald; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2013-05-01

    Classical definitions of syntrophy focus on a process, performed through metabolic interaction between dependent microbial partners, such as the degradation of complex organic compounds under anoxic conditions. However, examples from past and current scientific discoveries suggest that a new, simple but wider definition is necessary to cover all aspects of microbial syntrophy. We suggest the term 'obligately mutualistic metabolism', which still focuses on microbial metabolic cooperation but also includes an ecological aspect: the benefit for both partners. By the combined metabolic activity of microorganisms, endergonic reactions can become exergonic through the efficient removal of products and therefore enable a microbial community to survive with minimal energy resources. Here, we explain the principles of classical and non-classical syntrophy and illustrate the concepts with various examples. We present biochemical fundamentals that allow microorganism to survive under a range of environmental conditions and to drive important