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Sample records for host factors involved

  1. Virulence factors of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae involved in colonization, persistence and induction of lesions in its porcine host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiers, Koen; De Waele, Tine; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2010-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia. The virulence factors of this microorganism involved in colonization and the induction of lung lesions have been thoroughly studied and some have been well characterized. A. pleuropneumoniae binds preferentially to cells of the lower respiratory tract in a process involving different adhesins and probably biofilm formation. Apx toxins and lipopolysaccharides exert pathogenic effects on several host cells, resulting in typical lung lesions. Lysis of host cells is essential for the bacterium to obtain nutrients from the environment and A. pleuropneumoniae has developed several uptake mechanisms for these nutrients. In addition to persistence in lung lesions, colonization of the upper respiratory tract – and of the tonsils in particular – may also be important for long-term persistent asymptomatic infection. Information on virulence factors involved in tonsillar and nasal cavity colonization and persistence is scarce, but it can be speculated that similar features as demonstrated for the lung may play a role. PMID:20546697

  2. Experimental infections with Mycoplasma agalactiae identify key factors involved in host-colonization.

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    Eric Baranowski

    Full Text Available Mechanisms underlying pathogenic processes in mycoplasma infections are poorly understood, mainly because of limited sequence similarities with classical, bacterial virulence factors. Recently, large-scale transposon mutagenesis in the ruminant pathogen Mycoplasma agalactiae identified the NIF locus, including nifS and nifU, as essential for mycoplasma growth in cell culture, while dispensable in axenic media. To evaluate the importance of this locus in vivo, the infectivity of two knock-out mutants was tested upon experimental infection in the natural host. In this model, the parental PG2 strain was able to establish a systemic infection in lactating ewes, colonizing various body sites such as lymph nodes and the mammary gland, even when inoculated at low doses. In these PG2-infected ewes, we observed over the course of infection (i the development of a specific antibody response and (ii dynamic changes in expression of M. agalactiae surface variable proteins (Vpma, with multiple Vpma profiles co-existing in the same animal. In contrast and despite a sensitive model, none of the knock-out mutants were able to survive and colonize the host. The extreme avirulent phenotype of the two mutants was further supported by the absence of an IgG response in inoculated animals. The exact role of the NIF locus remains to be elucidated but these data demonstrate that it plays a key role in the infectious process of M. agalactiae and most likely of other pathogenic mycoplasma species as many carry closely related homologs.

  3. Temporal SILAC-based quantitative proteomics identifies host factors involved in chikungunya virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treffers, Emmely E; Tas, Ali; Scholte, Florine E M; Van, Myrthe N; Heemskerk, Matthias T; de Ru, Arnoud H; Snijder, Eric J; van Hemert, Martijn J; van Veelen, Peter A

    2015-07-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthropod-borne reemerging human pathogen that generally causes a severe persisting arthritis. Since 2005, the virus has infected millions of people during outbreaks in Africa, Indian Ocean Islands, Asia, and South/Central America. Many steps of the replication and expression of CHIKV's 12-kb RNA genome are highly dependent on cellular factors, which thus constitute potential therapeutic targets. SILAC and LC-MS/MS were used to define the temporal dynamics of the cellular response to infection. Using samples harvested at 8, 10, and 12 h postinfection, over 4700 proteins were identified and per time point 2800-3500 proteins could be quantified in both biological replicates. At 8, 10, and 12 h postinfection, 13, 38, and 106 proteins, respectively, were differentially expressed. The majority of these proteins showed decreased abundance. Most subunits of the RNA polymerase II complex were progressively degraded, which likely contributes to the transcriptional host shut-off observed during CHIKV infection. Overexpression of four proteins that were significantly downregulated (Rho family GTPase 3 (Rnd3), DEAD box helicase 56 (DDX56), polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1), and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2C (UbcH10) reduced susceptibility of cells to CHIKV infection, suggesting that infection-induced downregulation of these proteins is beneficial for CHIKV replication. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001330 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001330).

  4. Microscopy-based Assays for High-throughput Screening of Host Factors Involved in Brucella Infection of Hela Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Alain; Low, Shyan H; Emmenlauer, Mario; Conde-Alvarez, Raquel; Salcedo, Suzana P; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Dehio, Christoph

    2016-08-05

    Brucella species are facultative intracellular pathogens that infect animals as their natural hosts. Transmission to humans is most commonly caused by direct contact with infected animals or by ingestion of contaminated food and can lead to severe chronic infections. Brucella can invade professional and non-professional phagocytic cells and replicates within endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived vacuoles. The host factors required for Brucella entry into host cells, avoidance of lysosomal degradation, and replication in the ER-like compartment remain largely unknown. Here we describe two assays to identify host factors involved in Brucella entry and replication in HeLa cells. The protocols describe the use of RNA interference, while alternative screening methods could be applied. The assays are based on the detection of fluorescently labeled bacteria in fluorescently labeled host cells using automated wide-field microscopy. The fluorescent images are analyzed using a standardized image analysis pipeline in CellProfiler which allows single cell-based infection scoring. In the endpoint assay, intracellular replication is measured two days after infection. This allows bacteria to traffic to their replicative niche where proliferation is initiated around 12 hr after bacterial entry. Brucella which have successfully established an intracellular niche will thus have strongly proliferated inside host cells. Since intracellular bacteria will greatly outnumber individual extracellular or intracellular non-replicative bacteria, a strain constitutively expressing GFP can be used. The strong GFP signal is then used to identify infected cells. In contrast, for the entry assay it is essential to differentiate between intracellular and extracellular bacteria. Here, a strain encoding for a tetracycline-inducible GFP is used. Induction of GFP with simultaneous inactivation of extracellular bacteria by gentamicin enables the differentiation between intracellular and extracellular

  5. SARS Pathogenesis: Host Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. de Lang (Anna)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWhile it is hypothesized that Sever Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in humans is caused by a disproportional immune response illustrated by inappropriate induction of inflammatory cytokines, the exact nature of the host response to SARS coronavirus (CoV) infection causing severe

  6. Integration Host Factor (IHF binds to the promoter region of the phtD operon involved in phaseolotoxin synthesis in P. syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121

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    Álvarez-Morales Ariel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, the causal agent of halo blight disease in beans, produces a toxin known as phaseolotoxin, in whose synthesis participate a group of genes organized within the genome in a region known as the "Pht cluster". This region, which is thought to have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer, includes 5 transcriptional units, two monocistronic (argK, phtL and three polycistronic (phtA, phtD, phtM, whose expression is temperature dependent. So far, the regulatory mechanisms involved in phaseolotoxin synthesis have not been elucidated and the only well-established fact is the requirement of low temperatures for its synthesis. In this work, we searched for regulatory proteins that could be involved in phaseolotoxin synthesis, focusing on the regulation of the phtD operon. Results In this study we identified the global regulator IHF (Integration Host Factor, which binds to the promoter region of the phtD operon, exerting a negative effect on the expression of this operon. This is the first regulatory protein identified as part of the phaseolotoxin synthesis system. Our findings suggest that the Pht cluster was similarly regulated in the ancestral cluster by IHF or similar protein, and integrated into the global regulatory mechanism of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola, after the horizontal gene transfer event by using the host IHF protein. Conclusion This study identifies the IHF protein as one element involved in the regulation of phaseolotoxin synthesis in P. syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121 and provides new insights into the regulatory mechanisms involved in phaseolotoxin production.

  7. Construction and analysis of regulatory genetic networks in cervical cancer based on involved microRNAs, target genes, transcription factors and host genes.

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    Wang, Ning; Xu, Zhiwen; Wang, Kunhao; Zhu, Minghui; Li, Yang

    2014-04-01

    Over recent years, genes and microRNA (miRNA/miR) have been considered as key biological factors in human carcinogenesis. During cancer development, genes may act as multiple identities, including target genes of miRNA, transcription factors and host genes. The present study concentrated on the regulatory networks consisting of the biological factors involved in cervical cancer in order to investigate their features and affect on this specific pathology. Numerous raw data was collected and organized into purposeful structures, and adaptive procedures were defined for application to the prepared data. The networks were therefore built with the factors as basic components according to their interacting associations. The networks were constructed at three levels of interdependency, including a differentially-expressed network, a related network and a global network. Comparisons and analyses were made at a systematic level rather than from an isolated gene or miRNA. Critical hubs were extracted in the core networks and notable features were discussed, including self-adaption feedback regulation. The present study expounds the pathogenesis from a novel point of view and is proposed to provide inspiration for further investigation and therapy.

  8. Viral and host proteins involved in picornavirus life cycle

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    Weng Kuo-Feng

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Picornaviruses cause several diseases, not only in humans but also in various animal hosts. For instance, human enteroviruses can cause hand-foot-and-mouth disease, herpangina, myocarditis, acute flaccid paralysis, acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, severe neurological complications, including brainstem encephalitis, meningitis and poliomyelitis, and even death. The interaction between the virus and the host is important for viral replication, virulence and pathogenicity. This article reviews studies of the functions of viral and host factors that are involved in the life cycle of picornavirus. The interactions of viral capsid proteins with host cell receptors is discussed first, and the mechanisms by which the viral and host cell factors are involved in viral replication, viral translation and the switch from translation to RNA replication are then addressed. Understanding how cellular proteins interact with viral RNA or viral proteins, as well as the roles of each in viral infection, will provide insights for the design of novel antiviral agents based on these interactions.

  9. Major Host Factors Involved in Epithelial Cell Invasion of Campylobacter jejuni: Role of Fibronectin, Integrin Beta1, FAK, Tiam-1, and DOCK180 in Activating Rho GTPase Rac1

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    Boehm, Manja; Krause-Gruszczynska, Malgorzata; Rohde, Manfred; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Takahashi, Seiichiro; Oyarzabal, Omar A.; Backert, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Host cell entry by the food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni has been reported as one of the primary reasons of tissue damage in infected humans, however, molecular invasion mechanisms and cellular factors involved in this process are widely unclear. Here we used knockout cell lines derived from fibronectin−/−, integrin beta1−/−, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK)−/− deficient mice and corresponding wild-type (WT) controls, to study C. jejuni-induced signaling cascades involved in the bacterial invasion process. Using high resolution scanning electron microscopy, GTPase pull-downs, G-LISA, and gentamicin protection assays we found that each of these host cell factors is indeed required for activation of the small Rho GTPase member Rac1 and maximal host cell invasion of this pathogen. Interestingly, membrane ruffling, tight engulfment of bacteria and invasion were only seen during infection of WT control cells, but not in fibronectin−/−, integrin beta1−/−, and FAK−/− knockout cell lines. We also demonstrate that C. jejuni activates FAK autophosphorylation activity at Y-397 and phosphorylation of Y-925, which is required for stimulating two downstream guanine exchange factors, DOCK180 and Tiam-1, which are upstream of Rac1. Small interfering (si) RNA studies further show that DOCK180 and Tiam-1 act cooperatively to trigger Rac1 activation and C. jejuni invasion. Moreover, mutagenesis data indicate that the bacterial fibronectin-binding protein CadF and the intact flagellum are involved in Rho GTPase activation and host cell invasion. Collectively, our results suggest that C. jejuni infection of host epithelial target cells hijacks a major fibronectin → integrin beta1 → FAK → DOCK180/Tiam-1 signaling cascade, which has a crucial role for Rac1 GTPase activity and bacterial entry into host target cells. PMID:22919583

  10. Host factors in nidovirus replication

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    Wilde, Adriaan Hugo de

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between nidoviruses and the infected host cell was investigated. Arterivirus RNA-synthesising activity was shown to depend on intact membranes and on a cytosolic host protein which does not cosediment with the RTC. Furthermore, the immunosuppressant drug cyclosporin A (CsA) blocks repl

  11. Host factors influencing viral persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Nansen, A; Ørding Andreasen, Susanne

    2000-01-01

    host were used. Our results reveal that very different outcomes may be observed depending on virus strain and immunocompetence of the host. Thus while CD4+ cells are not critical during the initial phase of virus control, infectious virus reappear in mice lacking CD4+ cells, B cells or CD40 ligand...... that these different outcomes may be explained in relatively simple mathematical terms. This suggests that modelling may be used as a means to predict critical host and virus parameters. Therefore, combining mathematical modelling with precise, quantitative, in vivo analyses looks to be a promising approach...

  12. Host genes involved in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soltani, Jalal

    2009-01-01

    Agrobacterium is the nature’s genetic engineer that can transfer genes across the kingdom barriers to both prokaryotic and eukaryotic host cells. The host genes which are involved in Agrobacterium-mediated transformatiom (AMT) are not well known. Here, I studied in a systematic way to identify the

  13. Host genes involved in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soltani, Jalal

    2009-01-01

    Agrobacterium is the nature’s genetic engineer that can transfer genes across the kingdom barriers to both prokaryotic and eukaryotic host cells. The host genes which are involved in Agrobacterium-mediated transformatiom (AMT) are not well known. Here, I studied in a systematic way to identify the w

  14. Cryptococcal meningitis with secondary cutaneous involvement in an immunocompetent host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Saadia; Rahman, Atiya; Herekar, Fivzia; Masood, Sadia

    2013-09-16

    Cryptococcosis is a potentially fatal fungal disease caused by variants of Cryptococcus neoformans species.  The respiratory tract is the usual portal of entry, with a peculiar predilection to invade the central nervous system.  The skin can be secondarily involved in disseminated infection or be exceptionally involved as primary cutaneous infection by inoculation.  The disease is mostly seen in immunodeficiency states.  The diagnosis is frequently unsuspected in immunocompetent patients. We report a case of disseminated cryptococcal meningitis in an immunocompetent young adult. The cutaneous eruption prompted the accurate diagnosis.  The patient, a 20-year-old female, had fever, cough, headache and intractable vomiting for the past two months and was being managed as a case of tuberculous meningitis. Two weeks after starting antituberculous treatment she developed umbilicated papules on the head and neck region. Necessary laboratory workup identified C. neoformans in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and skin specimens.  The titers of cryptococcal antigen were measured in CSF and serum for diagnostic and prognostic purposes.  Anti-fungal treatment resulted in regression of the cutaneous lesions and resolution of systemic complaints. The case highlights the need for high degree of suspicion, especially in healthy young adults, in the diagnosis of cryptococcosis. The cutaneous eruptions can be the first manifestation or a diagnostic clue of enormous significance.

  15. Discovery of insect and human dengue virus host factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, October M; Barrows, Nicholas J; Souza-Neto, Jayme A; Robinson, Timothy J; Hershey, Christine L; Rodgers, Mary A; Ramirez, Jose L; Dimopoulos, George; Yang, Priscilla L; Pearson, James L; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2009-04-23

    Dengue fever is the most frequent arthropod-borne viral disease of humans, with almost half of the world's population at risk of infection. The high prevalence, lack of an effective vaccine, and absence of specific treatment conspire to make dengue fever a global public health threat. Given their compact genomes, dengue viruses (DENV-1-4) and other flaviviruses probably require an extensive number of host factors; however, only a limited number of human, and an even smaller number of insect host factors, have been identified. Here we identify insect host factors required for DENV-2 propagation, by carrying out a genome-wide RNA interference screen in Drosophila melanogaster cells using a well-established 22,632 double-stranded RNA library. This screen identified 116 candidate dengue virus host factors (DVHFs). Although some were previously associated with flaviviruses (for example, V-ATPases and alpha-glucosidases), most of the DVHFs were newly implicated in dengue virus propagation. The dipteran DVHFs had 82 readily recognizable human homologues and, using a targeted short-interfering-RNA screen, we showed that 42 of these are human DVHFs. This indicates notable conservation of required factors between dipteran and human hosts. This work suggests new approaches to control infection in the insect vector and the mammalian host.

  16. EXPLORE SIGNIFICANT FACTORS TO AFFECT CUSTOMER INVOLVEMENT

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    Yu-Jia Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although literature review supported the concept that customer loyalty, brand equity and perceived risk are significant factors to affect customer involvement, very limited studies have extensively examined the relationship among those variables. This research applied quantitative study to comprehensively explore the relationship between customer loyalty, brand equity, perceived risk and customer involvement for consumers. The population for this research was identified as consumers having the shopping experience for digital camera. The findings supported the hypothesis that customer loyalty, brand equity and perceived risk have significant and positive relationship to customer involvement. The findings identified the predictors of customer loyalty, brand equity and perceived risk on the customer involvement and generated the recommendations for corporate operations and future scholar studies.

  17. Orientation mechanisms and sensory organs involved in host location in a dipteran parasitoid larva.

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    Crespo, José E; Lazzari, Claudio R; Castelo, Marcela K

    2011-01-01

    The robber fly Mallophora ruficauda is one of the principal pests of apiculture in the Pampas region of Argentina. Larvae are solitary ectoparasitoids of third-instar scarab beetle larvae. Females of M. ruficauda do not lay eggs on or near the hosts, but on tall grasses. After hatching, larvae are dispersed by the wind and drop to the ground, where they dig and search for potential hosts. It is known that second-instar larvae of M. ruficauda exhibit active host-searching behaviour towards their preferred hosts, i.e., third-instar larvae of Cyclocephala signaticollis. Although host-location seems to be mediated by chemical cues, the mechanism of orientation and the sensory organs involved in host location remain unknown. We carried out behavioural experiments in the laboratory to address these questions. We also tested whether the orientation behaviour is exclusively based on the use of chemical cues. We found that larvae of M. ruficauda detect the chemicals with chemosensilla on the maxillary palps. Only one maxillary palp suffices for orientation, but their bilateral ablation abolishes orientation. Besides, an hexane extract of the host body was as attractive as a live host. Our results support that M. ruficauda larvae find their hosts underground by means of chemoklinotaxis.

  18. Interaction between viral RNA silencing suppressors and host factors in plant immunity.

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    Nakahara, Kenji S; Masuta, Chikara

    2014-08-01

    To elucidate events in the molecular arms race between the host and pathogen in evaluating plant immunity, a zigzag model is useful for uncovering aspects common to different host-pathogen interactions. By analogy of the steps in virus-host interactions with the steps in the standard zigzag model outlined in recent papers, we may regard RNA silencing as pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) against viruses, RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs) as effectors to overcome host RNA silencing and resistance gene (R-gene)-mediated defense as effector-triggered immunity (ETI) recognizing RSSs as avirulence proteins. However, because the standard zigzag model does not fully apply to some unique aspects in the interactions between a plant host and virus, we here defined a model especially designed for viruses. Although we simplified the phenomena involved in the virus-host interactions in the model, certain specific interactive steps can be explained by integrating additional host factors into the model. These host factors are thought to play an important role in maintaining the efficacy of the various steps in the main pathway of defense against viruses in this model for virus-plant interactions. For example, we propose candidates that may interact with viral RSSs to induce the resistance response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cellular immunity and pathogen strategies in combative interactions involving Drosophila hosts and their endoparasitic wasps

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    AJ Nappi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Various cellular innate immune responses protect invertebrates from attack by eukaryotic pathogens. In insects, assessments of the factor(s causing, or contributing to, pathogen mortality have long considered as toxic components certain molecules associated with enzyme-mediated melanogenesis. In Drosophila hosts, observations that have prompted additional or alternative considerations are those that document either the survival of certain endoparasitic wasps despite melanotic encapsulation, or the destruction of the parasite with no evidence of this type of host response. Investigations of the production of some reactive intermediates of oxygen and nitrogen during infection provide a basis for proposing that these molecules constitute important elements of the immune arsenal of Drosophila. Studies of the target specificity of virulence factors injected by female wasps during infection that suppress the host immune response will likely facilitate identification of the toxic host molecules, and contribute to a more detailed understanding of the cell-signaling pathways that regulate their synthesis.

  20. Differential Expression of Genes Involved in Host Recognition, Attachment, and Degradation in the Mycoparasite Tolypocladium ophioglossoides

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    C. Alisha Quandt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability of a fungus to infect novel hosts is dependent on changes in gene content, expression, or regulation. Examining gene expression under simulated host conditions can explore which genes may contribute to host jumping. Insect pathogenesis is the inferred ancestral character state for species of Tolypocladium, however several species are parasites of truffles, including Tolypocladium ophioglossoides. To identify potentially crucial genes in this interkingdom host switch, T. ophioglossoides was grown on four media conditions: media containing the inner and outer portions of its natural host (truffles of Elaphomyces, cuticles from an ancestral host (beetle, and a rich medium (Yeast Malt. Through high-throughput RNASeq of mRNA from these conditions, many differentially expressed genes were identified in the experiment. These included PTH11-related G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs hypothesized to be involved in host recognition, and also found to be upregulated in insect pathogens. A divergent chitinase with a signal peptide was also found to be highly upregulated on media containing truffle tissue, suggesting an exogenous degradative activity in the presence of the truffle host. The adhesin gene, Mad1, was highly expressed on truffle media as well. A BiNGO analysis of overrepresented GO terms from genes expressed during each growth condition found that genes involved in redox reactions and transmembrane transport were the most overrepresented during T. ophioglossoides growth on truffle media, suggesting their importance in growth on fungal tissue as compared to other hosts and environments. Genes involved in secondary metabolism were most highly expressed during growth on insect tissue, suggesting that their products may not be necessary during parasitism of Elaphomyces. This study provides clues into understanding genetic mechanisms underlying the transition from insect to truffle parasitism.

  1. Involvement of Apoptosis in Host-Parasite Interactions in the Zebra Mussel

    OpenAIRE

    Laëtitia Minguez; Nelly Brulé; Bénédicte Sohm; Simon Devin; Laure Giambérini

    2013-01-01

    International audience; The question of whether cell death by apoptosis plays a biological function during infection is key to understanding host-parasite interactions. We investigated the involvement of apoptosis in several host-parasite systems, using zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha as test organisms and their micro-and macroparasites. As a stress response associated with parasitism, heat shock proteins (Hsp) can be induced. In this protein family, Hsp70 are known to be apoptosis inhibit...

  2. Host Cell Factors as Antiviral Targets in Arenavirus Infection

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    Elsa B. Damonte

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the members of the Arenaviridae family, Lassa virus and Junin virus generate periodic annual outbreaks of severe human hemorrhagic fever (HF in endemic areas of West Africa and Argentina, respectively. Given the human health threat that arenaviruses represent and the lack of a specific and safe chemotherapy, the search for effective antiviral compounds is a continuous demanding effort. Since diverse host cell pathways and enzymes are used by RNA viruses to fulfill their replicative cycle, the targeting of a host process has turned an attractive antiviral approach in the last years for many unrelated virus types. This strategy has the additional benefit to reduce the serious challenge for therapy of RNA viruses to escape from drug effects through selection of resistant variants triggered by their high mutation rate. This article focuses on novel strategies to identify inhibitors for arenavirus therapy, analyzing the potential for antiviral developments of diverse host factors essential for virus infection.

  3. Host cell factors as antiviral targets in arenavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linero, Florencia N; Sepúlveda, Claudia S; Giovannoni, Federico; Castilla, Viviana; García, Cybele C; Scolaro, Luis A; Damonte, Elsa B

    2012-09-01

    Among the members of the Arenaviridae family, Lassa virus and Junin virus generate periodic annual outbreaks of severe human hemorrhagic fever (HF) in endemic areas of West Africa and Argentina, respectively. Given the human health threat that arenaviruses represent and the lack of a specific and safe chemotherapy, the search for effective antiviral compounds is a continuous demanding effort. Since diverse host cell pathways and enzymes are used by RNA viruses to fulfill their replicative cycle, the targeting of a host process has turned an attractive antiviral approach in the last years for many unrelated virus types. This strategy has the additional benefit to reduce the serious challenge for therapy of RNA viruses to escape from drug effects through selection of resistant variants triggered by their high mutation rate. This article focuses on novel strategies to identify inhibitors for arenavirus therapy, analyzing the potential for antiviral developments of diverse host factors essential for virus infection.

  4. Host and Viral Factors in HIV-Mediated Bystander Apoptosis

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    Garg, Himanshu; Joshi, Anjali

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections lead to a progressive loss of CD4 T cells primarily via the process of apoptosis. With a limited number of infected cells and vastly disproportionate apoptosis in HIV infected patients, it is believed that apoptosis of uninfected bystander cells plays a significant role in this process. Disease progression in HIV infected individuals is highly variable suggesting that both host and viral factors may influence HIV mediated apoptosis. Amongst the viral factors, the role of Envelope (Env) glycoprotein in bystander apoptosis is well documented. Recent evidence on the variability in apoptosis induction by primary patient derived Envs underscores the role of Env glycoprotein in HIV disease. Amongst the host factors, the role of C-C Chemokine Receptor type 5 (CCR5), a coreceptor for HIV Env, is also becoming increasingly evident. Polymorphisms in the CCR5 gene and promoter affect CCR5 cell surface expression and correlate with both apoptosis and CD4 loss. Finally, chronic immune activation in HIV infections induces multiple defects in the immune system and has recently been shown to accelerate HIV Env mediated CD4 apoptosis. Consequently, those factors that affect CCR5 expression and/or immune activation in turn indirectly regulate HIV mediated apoptosis making this phenomenon both complex and multifactorial. This review explores the complex role of various host and viral factors in determining HIV mediated bystander apoptosis. PMID:28829402

  5. Susceptibility to Phytophthora ramorum in a key infectious host: landscape variation in host genotype, host phenotype, and environmental factors.

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    Anacker, Brian L; Rank, Nathan E; Hüberli, Daniel; Garbelotto, Matteo; Gordon, Sarah; Harnik, Tami; Whitkus, Richard; Meentemeyer, Ross

    2008-01-01

    Sudden oak death is an emerging forest disease caused by the invasive pathogen Phytophthora ramorum. Genetic and environmental factors affecting susceptibility to P. ramorum in the key inoculum-producing host tree Umbellularia californica (bay laurel) were examined across a heterogeneous landscape in California, USA. Laboratory susceptibility trials were conducted on detached leaves and assessed field disease levels for 97 host trees from 12 225-m(2) plots. Genotype and phenotype characteristics were assessed for each tree. Effects of plot-level environmental conditions (understory microclimate, amount of solar radiation and topographic moisture potential) on disease expression were also evaluated. Susceptibility varied significantly among U. californica trees, with a fivefold difference in leaf lesion size. Lesion size was positively related to leaf area, but not to other phenotypic traits or to field disease level. Genetic diversity was structured at three spatial scales, but primarily among individuals within plots. Lesion size was significantly related to amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers, but local environment explained most variation in field disease level. Thus, substantial genetic variation in susceptibility to P. ramorum occurs in its principal foliar host U. californica, but local environment mediates expression of susceptibility in nature.

  6. EptC of Campylobacter jejuni Mediates Phenotypes Involved in Host Interactions and Virulence

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    Cullen, Thomas W.; O'Brien, John P.; Hendrixson, David R.; Giles, David K.; Hobb, Rhonda I.; Thompson, Stuart A.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a natural commensal of the avian intestinal tract. However, the bacterium is also the leading cause of acute bacterial diarrhea worldwide and is implicated in development of Guillain-Barré syndrome. Like many bacterial pathogens, C. jejuni assembles complex surface structures that interface with the surrounding environment and are involved in pathogenesis. Recent work in C. jejuni identified a gene encoding a novel phosphoethanolamine (pEtN) transferase, EptC (Cj0256), that plays a promiscuous role in modifying the flagellar rod protein, FlgG; the lipid A domain of lipooligosaccharide (LOS); and several N-linked glycans. In this work, we report that EptC catalyzes the addition of pEtN to the first heptose sugar of the inner core oligosaccharide of LOS, a fourth enzymatic target. We also examine the role pEtN modification plays in circumventing detection and/or killing by host defenses. Specifically, we show that modification of C. jejuni lipid A with pEtN results in increased recognition by the human Toll-like receptor 4–myeloid differentiation factor 2 (hTLR4-MD2) complex, along with providing resistance to relevant mammalian and avian antimicrobial peptides (i.e., defensins). We also confirm the inability of aberrant forms of LOS to activate Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Most exciting, we demonstrate that strains lacking eptC show decreased commensal colonization of chick ceca and reduced colonization of BALB/cByJ mice compared to wild-type strains. Our results indicate that modification of surface structures with pEtN by EptC is key to its ability to promote commensalism in an avian host and to survive in the mammalian gastrointestinal environment. PMID:23184526

  7. Host-derived, pore-forming toxin-like protein and trefoil factor complex protects the host against microbial infection.

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    Xiang, Yang; Yan, Chao; Guo, Xiaolong; Zhou, Kaifeng; Li, Sheng'an; Gao, Qian; Wang, Xuan; Zhao, Feng; Liu, Jie; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2014-05-06

    Aerolysins are virulence factors belonging to the bacterial β-pore-forming toxin superfamily. Surprisingly, numerous aerolysin-like proteins exist in vertebrates, but their biological functions are unknown. βγ-CAT, a complex of an aerolysin-like protein subunit (two βγ-crystallin domains followed by an aerolysin pore-forming domain) and two trefoil factor subunits, has been identified in frogs (Bombina maxima) skin secretions. Here, we report the rich expression of this protein, in the frog blood and immune-related tissues, and the induction of its presence in peritoneal lavage by bacterial challenge. This phenomena raises the possibility of its involvement in antimicrobial infection. When βγ-CAT was administrated in a peritoneal infection model, it greatly accelerated bacterial clearance and increased the survival rate of both frogs and mice. Meanwhile, accelerated Interleukin-1β release and enhanced local leukocyte recruitments were determined, which may partially explain the robust and effective antimicrobial responses observed. The release of interleukin-1β was potently triggered by βγ-CAT from the frog peritoneal cells and murine macrophages in vitro. βγ-CAT was rapidly endocytosed and translocated to lysosomes, where it formed high molecular mass SDS-stable oligomers (>170 kDa). Lysosomal destabilization and cathepsin B release were detected, which may explain the activation of caspase-1 inflammasome and subsequent interleukin-1β maturation and release. To our knowledge, these results provide the first functional evidence of the ability of a host-derived aerolysin-like protein to counter microbial infection by eliciting rapid and effective host innate immune responses. The findings will also largely help to elucidate the possible involvement and action mechanisms of aerolysin-like proteins and/or trefoil factors widely existing in vertebrates in the host defense against pathogens.

  8. On the involvement of host proteins in Cowpea mosaic virus intercellular spread

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, den P.W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract of thesis Paulus den Hollander entitled “On the involvement of host proteins in Cowpea mosaic virus intercellular spread”. Defence: 18th of November 13.30 h Abstract Intercellular spread of Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) occurs via movement tubules inserted into the

  9. A host defense mechanism involving CFTR-mediated bicarbonate secretion in bacterial prostatitis.

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    Chen Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostatitis is associated with a characteristic increase in prostatic fluid pH; however, the underlying mechanism and its physiological significance have not been elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study a primary culture of rat prostatic epithelial cells and a rat prostatitis model were used. Here we reported the involvement of CFTR, a cAMP-activated anion channel conducting both Cl(- and HCO(3(-, in mediating prostate HCO(3(- secretion and its possible role in bacterial killing. Upon Escherichia coli (E. coli-LPS challenge, the expression of CFTR and carbonic anhydrase II (CA II, along with several pro-inflammatory cytokines was up-regulated in the primary culture of rat prostate epithelial cells. Inhibiting CFTR function in vitro or in vivo resulted in reduced bacterial killing by prostate epithelial cells or the prostate. High HCO(3(- content (>50 mM, rather than alkaline pH, was found to be responsible for bacterial killing. The direct action of HCO(3(- on bacterial killing was confirmed by its ability to increase cAMP production and suppress bacterial initiation factors in E. coli. The relevance of the CFTR-mediated HCO(3(- secretion in humans was demonstrated by the upregulated expression of CFTR and CAII in human prostatitis tissues. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The CFTR and its mediated HCO(3(- secretion may be up-regulated in prostatitis as a host defense mechanism.

  10. G protein signalling involved in host recognition and mycoparasitismrelated chitinase expression in Trichoderma atroviride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Susanne Zeilinger; Barbara Reithner; Kurt Brunner; Valeria Scala; Isabel Peiβl; Matteo Lorito; Robert L Mach

    2004-01-01

    @@ Mycoparasitic species of Trichoderma are commercially applied as biological control agents against various fungal pathogens. The mycoparasitic interaction is host specific and includes recognition,attack and subsequent penetration and killing of the host. Investigations on the underlying events revealed that Trichoderma responds to multiple signals from the host (e. g. lectins or other ligands such as low molecular weight components released from the host's cell wall) and host attack is accompanied by morphological changes and the secretion of hydrolytic enzymes and antibiotics.Degradation of the cell wall of the host fungus is-besides glucanases and proteases-mainly achieved by chitinases. In vivo studies showed that the ech42 gene (encoding endochitinase 42) is expressed before physical contact of Trichoderma with its host, probably representing one of the earliest events in mycoparasitism, whereas Nag1 (N-acetylglucosaminidase) plays a key role in the general induction of the chitinolytic enzyme system of T. atroviride . Investigations on the responsible signal transduction pathways of T. atroviride led to the isolation of several genes encoding key components of the cAMP and MAP kinase signaling pathways, as alpha and β subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins, the regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase,adenylate cyclase, and three MAP kinases. Analysis of knockout mutants, generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, revealed that at least two alpha-subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins are participating in mycoparasitism-related signal transduction. The Tga1 G alpha subunit was shown to be involved in mycoparasitism-related processes such as chitinase expression and overproduction of toxic secondary metabolites, whereas Tga3 was found to be completely avirulent showing defects in chitinase formation and host recognition.

  11. Knots Untie: Molecular Determinants Involved in Knot Formation Induced by Pseudomonas savastanoi in Woody Hosts

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    Eloy Caballo-Ponce

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of the molecular basis of tree diseases is lately receiving a renewed attention, especially with the emerging perception that pathogens require specific pathogenicity and virulence factors to successfully colonize woody hosts. Pathosystems involving woody plants are notoriously difficult to study, although the use of model bacterial strains together with genetically homogeneous micropropagated plant material is providing a significant impetus to our understanding of the molecular determinants leading to disease. The gammaproteobacterium Pseudomonas savastanoi belongs to the intensively studied Pseudomonas syringae complex, and includes three pathogenic lineages causing tumorous overgrowths (knots in diverse economically relevant trees and shrubs. As it occurs with many other bacteria, pathogenicity of P. savastanoi is dependent on a type III secretion system, which is accompanied by a core set of at least 20 effector genes shared among strains isolated from olive, oleander, and ash. The induction of knots of wild-type size requires that the pathogen maintains adequate levels of diverse metabolites, including the phytohormones indole-3-acetic acid and cytokinins, as well as cyclic-di-GMP, some of which can also regulate the expression of other pathogenicity and virulence genes and participate in bacterial competitiveness. In a remarkable example of social networking, quorum sensing molecules allow for the communication among P. savastanoi and other members of the knot microbiome, while at the same time are essential for tumor formation. Additionally, a distinguishing feature of bacteria from the P. syringae complex isolated from woody organs is the possession of a 15 kb genomic island (WHOP carrying four operons and three other genes involved in degradation of phenolic compounds. Two of these operons mediate the catabolism of anthranilate and catechol and, together with another operon, are required for the induction of full-size tumors

  12. The Host Specificities of Baculovirus per os Infectivity Factors.

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    Jingjiao Song

    Full Text Available Baculoviruses are insect-specific pathogens with a generally narrow host ranges. Successful primary infection is initiated by the proper interaction of at least 8 conserved per os infectivity factors (PIFs with the host's midgut cells, a process that remains largely a mystery. In this study, we investigated the host specificities of the four core components of the PIF complex, P74, PIF1, PIF2 and PIF3 by using Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearNPV backbone. The four pifs of HearNPV were replaced by their counterparts from a group I Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV or a group II Spodoptera litura nucleopolyhedrovirus (SpltNPV. Transfection and infection assays showed that all the recombinant viruses were able to produce infectious budded viruses (BVs and were lethal to H. armigera larvae via intrahaemocoelic injection. However, feeding experiments using very high concentration of occlusion bodies demonstrated that all the recombinant viruses completely lost oral infectivity except SpltNPV pif3 substituted pif3-null HearNPV (vHaBacΔpif3-Sppif3-ph. Furthermore, bioassay result showed that the median lethal concentration (LC50 value of vHaBacΔpif3-Sppif3-ph was 23-fold higher than that of the control virus vHaBacΔpif3-Hapif3-ph, indicating that SpltNPV pif3 can only partially substitute the function of HearNPV pif3. These results suggested that most of PIFs tested have strict host specificities, which may account, at least in part, for the limited host ranges of baculoviruses.

  13. Complement factor H in host defense and immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Raffaella; Clark, Simon J; Inforzato, Antonio; Day, Anthony J

    2017-05-01

    Complement is the major humoral component of the innate immune system. It recognizes pathogen- and damage-associated molecular patterns, and initiates the immune response in coordination with innate and adaptive immunity. When activated, the complement system unleashes powerful cytotoxic and inflammatory mechanisms, and thus its tight control is crucial to prevent damage to host tissues and allow restoration of immune homeostasis. Factor H is the major soluble inhibitor of complement, where its binding to self markers (i.e., particular glycan structures) prevents complement activation and amplification on host surfaces. Not surprisingly, mutations and polymorphisms that affect recognition of self by factor H are associated with diseases of complement dysregulation, such as age-related macular degeneration and atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome. In addition, pathogens (i.e., non-self) and cancer cells (i.e., altered-self) can hijack factor H to evade the immune response. Here we review recent (and not so recent) literature on the structure and function of factor H, including the emerging roles of this protein in the pathophysiology of infectious diseases and cancer.

  14. Role of Host Genetic Factors in the Outcome of Hepatitis C Virus Infection

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    Hubert E. Blum

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The natural history of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is determined by a complex interplay between host genetic, immunological and viral factors. This review highlights genes involved in innate and adaptive immune responses associated with different outcomes of HCV infection. For example, an association of HCV clearance with certain HLA alleles has been demonstrated. The mechanisms responsible for these associations have been linked to specific T cell responses for some particular alleles (e.g., HLA-B27. Genetic associations involved in T cell regulation and function further underline the role of the adaptive immune response in the natural history of HCV infection. In addition, some genes involved in innate NK cell responses demonstrate the complex interplay between components of the immune system necessary for a successful host response to HCV infection.

  15. Coevolution of hosts and microorganisms: an analysis of the involvment of cytokines in host-parasite interactions

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    Owen Williams

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasites may employ particular strategies of eluding an immune response by taking advantage of those mechanisms that normally guarantee immunological self-tolerance. Much in the way as it occurs during the establishment of self-tolerance, live pathogens may induce clonal deletion, functional inactivation(anergy and immunosupression. At this latter level, it appears that certain pathogens produce immunosupresive cytokine-like mediators or provoke like host the secrete cytokines that will compromise the anti-parasite immune response. It appears that immune responses that preferentially involve T helper l cells (secretors of interleukin-2-and interferon-y tend to be protective, whereas T helper 2 cells (secretors of IL-4, IL5, IL-6, and IL-10, a population that antagonizes T helper cells, mediate disease susceptibility and are immunopathological reactions. Cytokines produced by T helper 2 cells mediate many symptoms of infection, including eosinophilia, mastocytosis, hyperimmunoglobulinemia, and elevated IgE levels. Administration of IL-2 and IFN-y has beneficial effects in many infections mediated by viruses, bacteria, and protozoa. The use of live vaccinia virus might be an avenue for the treatment of or vaccination against infection. We have found that a vaccinia virus expressing the gene for human IL-2, though attenuated, precipitates autoimmune disease in immunodeficient athymic mice. Thus, although T helper l cytokines may have desired immunostimulatory properties, they also may lead to unwarranted autoaggressive responses.

  16. AN ODORANT-BINDING PROTEIN INVOLVED IN PERCEPTION OF HOST PLANT ODORANTS IN LOCUST Locusta migratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Zhang, Long; Wang, Xiaoqi

    2016-04-01

    Locusts, Locusta migratoria (Orthoptera: Acrididae), are extremely destructive agricultural pests, but very little is known of their molecular aspects of perception to host plant odorants including related odorant-binding proteins (OBPs), though several OBPs have been identified in locust. To elucidate the function of LmigOBP1, the first OBP identified from locust, RNA interference was employed in this study to silence LmigOBP1, which was achieved by injection of dsRNA targeting LmigOBP1 into the hemolymph of male nymphs. Compared with LmigOBP1 normal nymphs, LmigOBP1 knockdown nymphs significantly decreased food (maize leaf, Zea mays) consumption and electro-antennography responses to five maize leaf volatiles, ((Z)-3-hexenol, linalool, nonanal, decanal, and (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate). These suggest that LmigOBP1 is involved in perception of host plant odorants.

  17. Involvement of apoptosis in host-parasite interactions in the zebra mussel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguez, Laëtitia; Brulé, Nelly; Sohm, Bénédicte; Devin, Simon; Giambérini, Laure

    2013-01-01

    The question of whether cell death by apoptosis plays a biological function during infection is key to understanding host-parasite interactions. We investigated the involvement of apoptosis in several host-parasite systems, using zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha as test organisms and their micro- and macroparasites. As a stress response associated with parasitism, heat shock proteins (Hsp) can be induced. In this protein family, Hsp70 are known to be apoptosis inhibitors. Mussels were diagnosed for their respective infections by standard histological methods; apoptosis was detected using the TUNEL methods on paraffin sections and Hsp70 by immunohistochemistry on cryosections. Circulating hemocytes were the main cells observed in apoptosis whereas infected tissues displayed no or few apoptotic cells. Parasitism by intracellular bacteria Rickettsiales-like and the trematode Bucephalus polymorphus were associated with the inhibition of apoptosis whereas ciliates Ophryoglena spp. or the trematode Phyllodistomum folium did not involve significant differences in apoptosis. Even if some parasites were able to modulate apoptosis in zebra mussels, we did not see evidence of any involvement of Hsp70 on this mechanism.

  18. Involvement of apoptosis in host-parasite interactions in the zebra mussel.

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    Laëtitia Minguez

    Full Text Available The question of whether cell death by apoptosis plays a biological function during infection is key to understanding host-parasite interactions. We investigated the involvement of apoptosis in several host-parasite systems, using zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha as test organisms and their micro- and macroparasites. As a stress response associated with parasitism, heat shock proteins (Hsp can be induced. In this protein family, Hsp70 are known to be apoptosis inhibitors. Mussels were diagnosed for their respective infections by standard histological methods; apoptosis was detected using the TUNEL methods on paraffin sections and Hsp70 by immunohistochemistry on cryosections. Circulating hemocytes were the main cells observed in apoptosis whereas infected tissues displayed no or few apoptotic cells. Parasitism by intracellular bacteria Rickettsiales-like and the trematode Bucephalus polymorphus were associated with the inhibition of apoptosis whereas ciliates Ophryoglena spp. or the trematode Phyllodistomum folium did not involve significant differences in apoptosis. Even if some parasites were able to modulate apoptosis in zebra mussels, we did not see evidence of any involvement of Hsp70 on this mechanism.

  19. Bifidobacterial enolase, a cell surface receptor for human plasminogen involved in the interaction with the host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Marco; Biagi, Elena; Centanni, Manuela; Turroni, Silvia; Vici, Manuela; Musiani, Francesco; Vitali, Beatrice; Bergmann, Simone; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2009-10-01

    The interaction with the host plasminogen/plasmin system represents a novel component in the molecular cross-talk between bifidobacteria and human host. Here, we demonstrated that the plasminogen-binding bifidobacterial species B. longum, B. bifidum, B. breve and B. lactis share the key glycolytic enzyme enolase as a surface receptor for human plasminogen. Enolase was visualized on the cell surface of the model strain B. lactis BI07. The His-tagged recombinant protein showed a high affinity for human plasminogen, with an equilibrium dissociation constant in the nanomolar range. By site-directed mutagenesis we demonstrated that the interaction between the B. lactis BI07 enolase and human plasminogen involves an internal plasminogen-binding site homologous to that of pneumococcal enolase. According to our data, the positively charged residues Lys-251 and Lys-255, as well as the negatively charged Glu-252, of the B. lactis BI07 enolase are crucial for plasminogen binding. Acting as a human plasminogen receptor, the bifidobacterial surface enolase is suggested to play an important role in the interaction process with the host.

  20. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Serum Response Factor Binding Protein 1 as a Host Factor for Hepatitis C Virus Entry

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    Gisa Gerold

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV enters human hepatocytes through a multistep mechanism involving, among other host proteins, the virus receptor CD81. How CD81 governs HCV entry is poorly characterized, and CD81 protein interactions after virus binding remain elusive. We have developed a quantitative proteomics protocol to identify HCV-triggered CD81 interactions and found 26 dynamic binding partners. At least six of these proteins promote HCV infection, as indicated by RNAi. We further characterized serum response factor binding protein 1 (SRFBP1, which is recruited to CD81 during HCV uptake and supports HCV infection in hepatoma cells and primary human hepatocytes. SRFBP1 facilitates host cell penetration by all seven HCV genotypes, but not of vesicular stomatitis virus and human coronavirus. Thus, SRFBP1 is an HCV-specific, pan-genotypic host entry factor. These results demonstrate the use of quantitative proteomics to elucidate pathogen entry and underscore the importance of host protein-protein interactions during HCV invasion.

  1. Coral bleaching under thermal stress: putative involvement of host/symbiont recognition mechanisms

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    Tambutte Sylvie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coral bleaching can be defined as the loss of symbiotic zooxanthellae and/or their photosynthetic pigments from their cnidarian host. This major disturbance of reef ecosystems is principally induced by increases in water temperature. Since the beginning of the 1980s and the onset of global climate change, this phenomenon has been occurring at increasing rates and scales, and with increasing severity. Several studies have been undertaken in the last few years to better understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of coral bleaching but the jigsaw puzzle is far from being complete, especially concerning the early events leading to symbiosis breakdown. The aim of the present study was to find molecular actors involved early in the mechanism leading to symbiosis collapse. Results In our experimental procedure, one set of Pocillopora damicornis nubbins was subjected to a gradual increase of water temperature from 28°C to 32°C over 15 days. A second control set kept at constant temperature (28°C. The differentially expressed mRNA between the stressed states (sampled just before the onset of bleaching and the non stressed states (control were isolated by Suppression Subtractive Hybridization. Transcription rates of the most interesting genes (considering their putative function were quantified by Q-RT-PCR, which revealed a significant decrease in transcription of two candidates six days before bleaching. RACE-PCR experiments showed that one of them (PdC-Lectin contained a C-Type-Lectin domain specific for mannose. Immunolocalisation demonstrated that this host gene mediates molecular interactions between the host and the symbionts suggesting a putative role in zooxanthellae acquisition and/or sequestration. The second gene corresponds to a gene putatively involved in calcification processes (Pdcyst-rich. Its down-regulation could reflect a trade-off mechanism leading to the arrest of the mineralization process under stress

  2. Wolbachia as an infectious extrinsic factor manipulating host signalling pathways

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    Ilaria eNegri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wolbachia pipientis is a widespread endosymbiont of filarial nematodes and arthropods. While in worms the symbiosis is obligate, in arthropods Wolbachia induces several reproductive manipulations (i.e. cytoplasmic incompatibility, parthenogenesis, feminization of genetic males and male-killing in order to increase the number of infected females. These various phenotypic effects may be linked to differences in host physiology, and in particular to endocrine-related processes governing growth, development and reproduction. Indeed, a number of evidences links Wolbachia symbiosis to insulin and ecdysteroid signalling, two multilayered pathways known to work antagonistically, jointly or even independently for the regulation of different molecular networks. At present it is not clear whether Wolbachia manipulates one pathway, thus affecting other related metabolic networks, or if it targets both pathways, even interacting at several points in each of them. Interestingly, in view of the interplay between hormone signalling and epigenetic machinery, a direct influence of the infection on hormonal signalling involving ecdysteroids might be achievable through the manipulation of the host’s epigenetic pathways.

  3. Microbiome of prebiotic-treated mice reveals novel targets involved in host response during obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Amandine; Lazarevic, Vladimir; Gaïa, Nadia; Johansson, Maria; Ståhlman, Marcus; Backhed, Fredrik; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Schrenzel, Jacques; François, Patrice; Cani, Patrice D

    2014-10-01

    The gut microbiota is involved in metabolic and immune disorders associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. We previously demonstrated that prebiotic treatment may significantly improve host health by modulating bacterial species related to the improvement of gut endocrine, barrier and immune functions. An analysis of the gut metagenome is needed to determine which bacterial functions and taxa are responsible for beneficial microbiota-host interactions upon nutritional intervention. We subjected mice to prebiotic (Pre) treatment under physiological (control diet: CT) and pathological conditions (high-fat diet: HFD) for 8 weeks and investigated the production of intestinal antimicrobial peptides and the gut microbiome. HFD feeding significantly decreased the expression of regenerating islet-derived 3-gamma (Reg3g) and phospholipase A2 group-II (PLA2g2) in the jejunum. Prebiotic treatment increased Reg3g expression (by ∼50-fold) and improved intestinal homeostasis as suggested by the increase in the expression of intectin, a key protein involved in intestinal epithelial cell turnover. Deep metagenomic sequencing analysis revealed that HFD and prebiotic treatment significantly affected the gut microbiome at different taxonomic levels. Functional analyses based on the occurrence of clusters of orthologous groups (COGs) of proteins also revealed distinct profiles for the HFD, Pre, HFD-Pre and CT groups. Finally, the gut microbiota modulations induced by prebiotics counteracted HFD-induced inflammation and related metabolic disorders. Thus, we identified novel putative taxa and metabolic functions that may contribute to the development of or protection against the metabolic alterations observed during HFD feeding and HFD-Pre feeding.

  4. Fundamental factors determining the nature of parasite aggregation in hosts.

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    Sébastien Gourbière

    Full Text Available The distribution of parasites in hosts is typically aggregated: a few hosts harbour many parasites, while the remainder of hosts are virtually parasite free. The origin of this almost universal pattern is central to our understanding of host-parasite interactions; it affects many facets of their ecology and evolution. Despite this, the standard statistical framework used to characterize parasite aggregation does not describe the processes generating such a pattern. In this work, we have developed a mathematical framework for the distribution of parasites in hosts, starting from a simple statistical description in terms of two fundamental processes: the exposure of hosts to parasites and the infection success of parasites. This description allows the level of aggregation of parasites in hosts to be related to the random variation in these two processes and to true host heterogeneity. We show that random variation can generate an aggregated distribution and that the common view, that encounters and success are two equivalent filters, applies to the average parasite burden under neutral assumptions but it does not apply to the variance of the parasite burden, and it is not true when heterogeneity between hosts is incorporated in the model. We find that aggregation decreases linearly with the number of encounters, but it depends non-linearly on parasite success. We also find additional terms in the variance of the parasite burden which contribute to the actual level of aggregation in specific biological systems. We have derived the formal expressions of these contributions, and these provide new opportunities to analyse empirical data and tackle the complexity of the origin of aggregation in various host-parasite associations.

  5. Rickettsia typhi possesses phospholipase A2 enzymes that are involved in infection of host cells.

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    M Sayeedur Rahman

    Full Text Available The long-standing proposal that phospholipase A2 (PLA2 enzymes are involved in rickettsial infection of host cells has been given support by the recent characterization of a patatin phospholipase (Pat2 with PLA2 activity from the pathogens Rickettsia prowazekii and R. typhi. However, pat2 is not encoded in all Rickettsia genomes; yet another uncharacterized patatin (Pat1 is indeed ubiquitous. Here, evolutionary analysis of both patatins across 46 Rickettsia genomes revealed 1 pat1 and pat2 loci are syntenic across all genomes, 2 both Pat1 and Pat2 do not contain predicted Sec-dependent signal sequences, 3 pat2 has been pseudogenized multiple times in rickettsial evolution, and 4 ubiquitous pat1 forms two divergent groups (pat1A and pat1B with strong evidence for recombination between pat1B and plasmid-encoded homologs. In light of these findings, we extended the characterization of R. typhi Pat1 and Pat2 proteins and determined their role in the infection process. As previously demonstrated for Pat2, we determined that 1 Pat1 is expressed and secreted into the host cytoplasm during R. typhi infection, 2 expression of recombinant Pat1 is cytotoxic to yeast cells, 3 recombinant Pat1 possesses PLA2 activity that requires a host cofactor, and 4 both Pat1 cytotoxicity and PLA2 activity were reduced by PLA2 inhibitors and abolished by site-directed mutagenesis of catalytic Ser/Asp residues. To ascertain the role of Pat1 and Pat2 in R. typhi infection, antibodies to both proteins were used to pretreat rickettsiae. Subsequent invasion and plaque assays both indicated a significant decrease in R. typhi infection compared to that by pre-immune IgG. Furthermore, antibody-pretreatment of R. typhi blocked/delayed phagosomal escapes. Together, these data suggest both enzymes are involved early in the infection process. Collectively, our study suggests that R. typhi utilizes two evolutionary divergent patatin phospholipases to support its intracellular life

  6. Salidroside exhibits anti-dengue virus activity by upregulating host innate immune factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Navita; Mishra, K P; Ganju, Lilly

    2016-12-01

    Dengue is an arboviral disease with no effective therapy available. Therefore, there is an urgent need to find a potent antiviral agent against dengue virus (DENV). In the present study, salidroside, a main bioactive compound of Rhodiola rosea, was evaluated for its antiviral potential against DENV serotype-2 infection and its effect on host innate immune factors. Antiviral effects of salidroside were examined in DENV-infected cells by western blotting, flow cytometry and real-time PCR. Its underlying mechanism involved in antiviral action was determined by evaluating expression of host innate immune factors including RIG-I, IRF-3, IRF-7, PKR, P-eIF2α and NF-κB. Salidroside potently inhibited DENV infection by decreasing DENV envelope protein expression more than tenfold. Salidroside exerts its antiviral activity by increasing expression of RNA helicases such as RIG-I, thereby initiating a downstream signaling cascade that induces upregulation of IRF-3 and IRF-7. It prevents viral protein synthesis by increasing the expression of PKR and P-eIF2α while decreasing NF-κB expression. It was also found to induce the expression of IFN-α. In addition, the number of NK cells and CD8(+) T cells were also found to be increased by salidroside treatment in human PBMCs, which are important in limiting DENV replication during early stages of infection. The findings presented here suggest that salidroside exhibits antiviral activity against DENV by inhibiting viral protein synthesis and boosting host immunity by increasing the expression of host innate immune factors and hence could be considered for the development of an effective therapeutic agent against DENV infection.

  7. Trichoderma Biocontrol: Signal Transduction Pathways Involved in Host Sensing and Mycoparasitism

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    Susanne Zeilinger

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi of the genus Trichoderma are used as biocontrol agents against several plant pathogenic fungi like Rhizoctonia spp., Pythium spp., Botrytis cinerea and Fusarium spp. which cause both soil-borne and leaf- or flower-borne diseases of agricultural plants. Plant disease control by Trichoderma is based on complex interactions between Trichoderma, the plant pathogen and the plant. Until now, two main components of biocontrol have been identified: direct activity of Trichoderma against the plant pathogen by mycoparasitism and induced systemic resistance in plants. As the mycoparasitic interaction is host-specific and not merely a contact response, it is likely that signals from the host fungus are recognised by Trichoderma and provoke transcription of mycoparasitism-related genes.In the last few years examination of signalling pathways underlying Trichoderma biocontrol started and it was shown that heterotrimeric G-proteins and mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases affected biocontrol-relevant processes such as the production of hydrolytic enzymes and antifungal metabolites and the formation of infection structures. MAPK signalling was also found to be involved in induction of plant systemic resistance in Trichoderma virens and in the hyperosmotic stress response in Trichoderma harzianum. Analyses of the function of components of the cAMP pathway during Trichoderma biocontrol revealed that mycoparasitism-associated coiling and chitinase production as well as secondary metabolism are affected by the internal cAMP level; in addition, a cross talk between regulation of light responses and the cAMP signalling pathway was found in Trichoderma atroviride.

  8. Sphingosine kinase 2 is a chikungunya virus host factor co-localized with the viral replication complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, St Patrick; Tritsch, Sarah R; Kota, Krishna; Chiang, Chih-Yuan; Dong, Lian; Kenny, Tara; Brueggemann, Ernest E; Ward, Michael D; Cazares, Lisa H; Bavari, Sina

    2015-10-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging alphavirus which causes severe and prolonged arthralgic febrile illness. The recent global spread of the virus and lack of approved therapeutic options makes it imperative to gain greater insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying CHIKV pathogenesis, in particular host factors recruited by the virus. In the current study, we identify sphingosine kinase 2 (SK2) as a CHIKV host factor co-localized with the viral replication complex (VRC) during infection. SK2 was demonstrated to co-localize with viral RNA and nonstructural proteins. Targeted impairment of SK2 expression or function significantly inhibited CHIKV infection. Furthermore, affinity purification-mass spectrometry studies revealed that SK2 associates with a number of proteins involved in cellular gene expression specifically during viral infection, suggesting a role in replication. Collectively these results identify SK2 as a novel CHIKV host factor.

  9. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Mosquito C6/36 Cells Reveals Host Proteins Involved in Zika Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Qi-Lin; Deng, Cheng-Lin; Chen, Xi; Wang, Jun; Wang, Shao-Bo; Wang, Wei; Deng, Fei; Zhang, Bo; Xiao, Gengfu; Zhang, Lei-Ke

    2017-06-15

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging arbovirus belonging to the genus Flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae During replication processes, flavivirus manipulates host cell systems to facilitate its replication, while the host cells activate antiviral responses. Identification of host proteins involved in the flavivirus replication process may lead to the discovery of antiviral targets. The mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus are epidemiologically important vectors for ZIKV, and effective restrictions of ZIKV replication in mosquitoes will be vital in controlling the spread of virus. In this study, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of ZIKV-infected Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells was performed to investigate host proteins involved in the ZIKV infection process. A total of 3,544 host proteins were quantified, with 200 being differentially regulated, among which CHCHD2 can be upregulated by ZIKV infection in both mosquito C6/36 and human HeLa cells. Our further study indicated that CHCHD2 can promote ZIKV replication and inhibit beta interferon (IFN-β) production in HeLa cells, suggesting that ZIKV infection may upregulate CHCHD2 to inhibit IFN-I production and thus promote virus replication. Bioinformatics analysis of regulated host proteins highlighted several ZIKV infection-regulated biological processes. Further study indicated that the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays roles in the ZIKV entry process and that an FDA-approved inhibitor of the 20S proteasome, bortezomib, can inhibit ZIKV infection in vivo Our study illustrated how host cells respond to ZIKV infection and also provided a candidate drug for the control of ZIKV infection in mosquitoes and treatment of ZIKV infection in patients.IMPORTANCE ZIKV infection poses great threats to human health, and there is no FDA-approved drug available for the treatment of ZIKV infection. During replication, ZIKV manipulates host cell systems to facilitate its replication, while host cells activate

  10. Emerging functions as host cell factors - an encyclopedia of annexin-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehnl, Alexander; Musiol, Agnes; Raabe, Carsten A; Rescher, Ursula

    2016-10-01

    Emerging infectious diseases and drug-resistant infectious agents call for the development of innovative antimicrobial strategies. With pathogenicity now considered to arise from the complex and bi-directional interplay between a microbe and the host, host cell factor targeting has emerged as a promising approach that might overcome the limitations of classical antimicrobial drug development and could open up novel and efficient therapeutic strategies. Interaction with and modulation of host cell membranes is a recurrent theme in the host-microbe relationship. In this review, we provide an overview of what is currently known about the role of the Ca2+ dependent, membrane-binding annexin protein family in pathogen-host interactions, and discuss their emerging functions as host cell derived auxiliary proteins in microbe-host interactions and host cell targets.

  11. DMPD: Macrophage migration inhibitory factor and host innate immune responses tomicrobes. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14620137 Macrophage migration inhibitory factor and host innate immune responses to...microbes. Calandra T. Scand J Infect Dis. 2003;35(9):573-6. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage migration... inhibitory factor and host innate immune responses tomicrobes. PubmedID 14620137 Title Macrophage migration

  12. Echinococcus multilocularis phosphoglucose isomerase (EmPGI): a glycolytic enzyme involved in metacestode growth and parasite-host cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Britta; Spiliotis, Markus; Müller, Joachim; Scholl, Sabrina; Müller, Norbert; Gottstein, Bruno; Hemphill, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    In Echinococcus multilocularis metacestodes, the surface-associated and highly glycosylated laminated layer, and molecules associated with this structure, is believed to be involved in modulating the host-parasite interface. We report on the molecular and functional characterisation of E. multilocularis phosphoglucose isomerase (EmPGI), which is a component of this laminated layer. The EmPGI amino acid sequence is virtually identical to that of its homologue in Echinococcus granulosus, and shares 64% identity and 86% similarity with human PGI. Mammalian PGI is a multi-functional protein which, besides its glycolytic function, can also act as a cytokine, growth factor and inducer of angiogenesis, and plays a role in tumour growth, development and metastasis formation. Recombinant EmPGI (recEmPGI) is also functionally active as a glycolytic enzyme and was found to be present, besides the laminated layer, in vesicle fluid and in germinal layer cell extracts. EmPGI is released from metacestodes and induces a humoral immune response in experimentally infected mice, and vaccination of mice with recEmPGI renders these mice more resistant towards secondary challenge infection, indicating that EmPGI plays an important role in parasite development and/or in modulating the host-parasite relationship. We show that recEmPGI stimulates the growth of isolated E. multilocularis germinal layer cells in vitro and selectively stimulates the proliferation of bovine adrenal cortex endothelial cells but not of human fibroblasts and rat hepatocytes. Thus, besides its role in glycolysis, EmPGI could also act as a factor that stimulates parasite growth and potentially induces the formation of novel blood vessels around the developing metacestode in vivo.

  13. Processing of laminin α chains generates peptides involved in wound healing and host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senyürek, Ilknur; Kempf, Wolfgang E; Klein, Gerd; Maurer, Andreas; Kalbacher, Hubert; Schäfer, Luisa; Wanke, Ines; Christ, Christina; Stevanovic, Stefan; Schaller, Martin; Rousselle, Patricia; Garbe, Claus; Biedermann, Tilo; Schittek, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Laminins play a fundamental role in basement membrane architecture and function in human skin. The C-terminal laminin G domain-like (LG) modules of laminin α chains are modified by proteolysis to generate LG1-3 and secreted LG4-5 tandem modules. In this study, we provide evidence that skin-derived cells process and secrete biologically active peptides from the LG4-5 module of the laminin α3, α4 and α5 chain in vitro and in vivo. We show enhanced expression and processing of the LG4-5 module of laminin α3 in keratinocytes after infection and in chronic wounds in which the level of expression and further processing of the LG4-5 module correlated with the speed of wound healing. Furthermore, bacterial or host-derived proteases promote processing of laminin α3 LG4-5. On a functional level, we show that LG4-5-derived peptides play a role in wound healing. Moreover, we demonstrate that LG4-derived peptides from the α3, α4 and α5 chains have broad antimicrobial activity and possess strong chemotactic activity to mononuclear cells. Thus, the data strongly suggest a novel multifunctional role for laminin LG4-5-derived peptides in human skin and its involvement in physiological processes and pathological conditions such as inflammation, chronic wounds and skin infection.

  14. 13 Factors Limiting Women's Involvement in Development: Lesson ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    the persistent and increasing burdens of poverty, malnutrition, poor health ... This paper investigates factors limiting an active involvement of rural women in .... and children, but decisions on economic and political issues are solely undertaken ...

  15. Human host defense peptide LL-37 stimulates virulence factor production and adaptive resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Strempel

    Full Text Available A multitude of different virulence factors as well as the ability to rapidly adapt to adverse environmental conditions are important features for the high pathogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both virulence and adaptive resistance are tightly controlled by a complex regulatory network and respond to external stimuli, such as host signals or antibiotic stress, in a highly specific manner. Here, we demonstrate that physiological concentrations of the human host defense peptide LL-37 promote virulence factor production as well as an adaptive resistance against fluoroquinolone and aminoglycoside antibiotics in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Microarray analyses of P. aeruginosa cells exposed to LL-37 revealed an upregulation of gene clusters involved in the production of quorum sensing molecules and secreted virulence factors (PQS, phenazine, hydrogen cyanide (HCN, elastase and rhamnolipids and in lipopolysaccharide (LPS modification as well as an induction of genes encoding multidrug efflux pumps MexCD-OprJ and MexGHI-OpmD. Accordingly, we detected significantly elevated levels of toxic metabolites and proteases in bacterial supernatants after LL-37 treatment. Pre-incubation of bacteria with LL-37 for 2 h led to a decreased susceptibility towards gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Quantitative Realtime PCR results using a PAO1-pqsE mutant strain present evidence that the quinolone response protein and virulence regulator PqsE may be implicated in the regulation of the observed phenotype in response to LL-37. Further experiments with synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptides IDR-1018, 1037 and HHC-36 showed no induction of pqsE expression, suggesting a new role of PqsE as highly specific host stress sensor.

  16. Structural basis for antagonizing a host restriction factor by C7 family of poxvirus host-range proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Krumm, Brian; Li, Yongchao; Deng, Junpeng; Xiang, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Human sterile alpha motif domain-containing 9 (SAMD9) protein is a host restriction factor for poxviruses, but it can be overcome by some poxvirus host-range proteins that share homology with vaccinia virus C7 protein. To understand the mechanism of action for this important family of host-range factors, we determined the crystal structures of C7 and myxoma virus M64, a C7 family member that is unable to antagonize SAMD9. Despite their different functions and only 23% sequence identity, the two proteins have very similar overall structures, displaying a previously unidentified fold comprised of a compact 12-stranded antiparallel β-sandwich wrapped in two short α helices. Extensive structure-guided mutagenesis of C7 identified three loops clustered on one edge of the β sandwich as critical for viral replication and binding with SAMD9. The loops are characterized with functionally important negatively charged, positively charged, and hydrophobic residues, respectively, together forming a unique "three-fingered molecular claw." The key residues of the claw are not conserved in two C7 family members that do not antagonize SAMD9 but are conserved in distantly related C7 family members from four poxvirus genera that infect diverse mammalian species. Indeed, we found that all in the latter group of proteins bind SAMD9. Taken together, our data indicate that diverse mammalian poxviruses use a conserved molecular claw in a C7-like protein to target SAMD9 and overcome host restriction.

  17. [Chronic graft-versus-host-disease involving the oral mucosa: clinical presentation and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elad, S; Levitt, M; M Y, Shapira

    2008-11-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is an alloimmune inflammatory process, which results from a donor-origin cellular response against host tissues. The chronic syndrome of GVHD (cGVHD) occurs in approximately 50% of patients post hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and remains the leading cause of non-malignant mortality. Oral cavity is one of the most frequent sites involved in cGVHD, possibly only second to skin. The oral tissues targeted by cGVHD are the mucosae, the salivary glands, the musculoskeletal apparatus and the periodontal structures. The mucosal cGVHD is accompanied by pain and mucosal irritation. Patients with cGVHD present with mucosal erosion and atrophy, lichenoid-hyperkeratotic changes, pseudomembranous ulcerations and mucoceles. Dry mouth may exacerbate mucosal irritation and erosion. In addition to impaired oral functions, cGVHD may lead to secondary malignancies in the form of solid cancers, particularly squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity. Moreover, administration of systemic azathioprine, a commonly used immunosuppressive drug in cGVHD patients, may significantly increase the incidence of tumors of oral cavity. The increased risk of secondary malignancies indicates the need for lifelong surveillance, particularly in younger patients. Scoring of oral GVHD was first addressed by NIH only in 2005. The NIH consensus paper referred to standard criteria for diagnosis, classification, and response to treatment. These scales were introduced for clinical use, although they require prospective validation studies. In the past, other scales were suggested and may still be used for research purposes. Management of oral cGVHD is compromised of preventive protocols and when cGVHD is developed, systemic and topical treatment. Because the majority of patients with oral cGVHD will develop the extensive form of the disease, they will be treated systemically. Systemic treatment is based on steroids and immunosuppressants, and, thus, increases

  18. Identification of microRNAs Involved in the Host Response to Enterovirus 71 Infection by a Deep Sequencing Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lunbiao Cui

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Role of microRNA (miRNA has been highlighted in pathogen-host interactions recently. To identify cellular miRNAs involved in the host response to enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection, we performed a comprehensive miRNA profiling in EV71-infected Hep2 cells through deep sequencing. 64 miRNAs were found whose expression levels changed for more than 2-fold in response to EV71 infection. Gene ontology analysis revealed that many of these mRNAs play roles in neurological process, immune response, and cell death pathways, which are known to be associated with the extreme virulence of EV71. To our knowledge, this is the first study on host miRNAs expression alteration response to EV71 infection. Our findings supported the hypothesis that certain miRNAs might be essential in the host-pathogen interactions.

  19. Lipoarabinomannan in urine during tuberculosis treatment: association with host and pathogen factors and mycobacteriuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood Robin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detection of lipoarabinomannan (LAM, a Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb cell wall antigen, is a potentially attractive diagnostic. However, the LAM-ELISA assay has demonstrated variable sensitivity in diagnosing TB in diverse clinical populations. We therefore explored pathogen and host factors potentially impacting LAM detection. Methods LAM-ELISA assay testing, sputum smear and culture status, HIV status, CD4 cell count, proteinuria and TB outcomes were prospectively determined in adults diagnosed with TB and commencing TB treatment at a South African township TB clinic. Sputum TB isolates were characterised by IS61110-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP and urines were tested for mycobacteriuria by Xpert® MTB/RIF assay. Results 32/199 (16.1% of patients tested LAM-ELISA positive. Median optical density and proportion testing LAM positive remained unchanged during 2 weeks of treatment and then declined over 24 weeks. LAM was associated with positive sputum smear and culture status, HIV infection and low CD4 cell counts but not proteinuria, RFLP strain or TB treatment outcome. The sensitivity of LAM for TB in HIV-infected patients with CD4 counts of ≥ 200, 100-199, 50-99, and Conclusions Urinary LAM was related to host immune factors, was unrelated to Mtb strain and declined steadily after an initial 2 weeks of TB treatment. The strong association of urine LAM with mycobacteriuria is a new finding, indicating frequent TB involvement of the renal tract in advanced HIV infection.

  20. Lipoarabinomannan in urine during tuberculosis treatment: association with host and pathogen factors and mycobacteriuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Robin; Racow, Kimberly; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Middelkoop, Keren; Vogt, Monica; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Lawn, Stephen D

    2012-02-27

    Detection of lipoarabinomannan (LAM), a Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) cell wall antigen, is a potentially attractive diagnostic. However, the LAM-ELISA assay has demonstrated variable sensitivity in diagnosing TB in diverse clinical populations. We therefore explored pathogen and host factors potentially impacting LAM detection. LAM-ELISA assay testing, sputum smear and culture status, HIV status, CD4 cell count, proteinuria and TB outcomes were prospectively determined in adults diagnosed with TB and commencing TB treatment at a South African township TB clinic. Sputum TB isolates were characterised by IS61110-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and urines were tested for mycobacteriuria by Xpert® MTB/RIF assay. 32/199 (16.1%) of patients tested LAM-ELISA positive. Median optical density and proportion testing LAM positive remained unchanged during 2 weeks of treatment and then declined over 24 weeks. LAM was associated with positive sputum smear and culture status, HIV infection and low CD4 cell counts but not proteinuria, RFLP strain or TB treatment outcome. The sensitivity of LAM for TB in HIV-infected patients with CD4 counts of ≥ 200, 100-199, 50-99, and Urinary LAM was related to host immune factors, was unrelated to Mtb strain and declined steadily after an initial 2 weeks of TB treatment. The strong association of urine LAM with mycobacteriuria is a new finding, indicating frequent TB involvement of the renal tract in advanced HIV infection.

  1. Propionibacterium acnes CAMP factor and host acid sphingomyelinase contribute to bacterial virulence: potential targets for inflammatory acne treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruaki Nakatsuji

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the progression of acne vulgaris, the disruption of follicular epithelia by an over-growth of Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes permits the bacteria to spread and become in contact with various skin and immune cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have demonstrated in the present study that the Christie, Atkins, Munch-Peterson (CAMP factor of P. acnes is a secretory protein with co-hemolytic activity with sphingomyelinase that can confer cytotoxicity to HaCaT keratinocytes and RAW264.7 macrophages. The CAMP factor from bacteria and acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase from the host cells were simultaneously present in the culture supernatant only when the cells were co-cultured with P. acnes. Either anti-CAMP factor serum or desipramine, a selective ASMase inhibitor, significantly abrogated the P. acnes-induced cell death of HaCaT and RAW264.7 cells. Intradermal injection of ICR mouse ears with live P. acnes induced considerable ear inflammation, macrophage infiltration, and an increase in cellular soluble ASMase. Suppression of ASMase by systemic treatment with desipramine significantly reduced inflammatory reaction induced by intradermal injection with P. acnes, suggesting the contribution of host ASMase in P. acnes-induced inflammatory reaction in vivo. Vaccination of mice with CAMP factor elicited a protective immunity against P. acnes-induced ear inflammation, indicating the involvement of CAMP factor in P. acnes-induced inflammation. Most notably, suppression of both bacterial CAMP factor and host ASMase using vaccination and specific antibody injection, respectively, cooperatively alleviated P. acnes-induced inflammation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings envision a novel infectious mechanism by which P. acnes CAMP factor may hijack host ASMase to amplify bacterial virulence to degrade and invade host cells. This work has identified both CAMP factor and ASMase as potential molecular targets for the development of drugs

  2. Virus and host factors affecting the clinical outcome of Bluetongue Virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caporale, M.; Gialleonorado, L.; Janowicz, A.; Wilkie, G.; Shaw, A.; Savini, G.; Rijn, van P.A.; Mertens, P.; Ventura, M.; Palmarini, M.

    2014-01-01

    Bluetongue is a major infectious disease of ruminants caused by bluetongue virus (BTV), an arbovirus transmitted by Culicoides. Here, we assessed virus and host factors influencing the clinical outcome of BTV infection using a single experimental framework. We investigated how mammalian host species

  3. Targeting Host Factors to Treat West Nile and Dengue Viral Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj N. Krishnan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available West Nile (WNV and Dengue (DENV viruses are major arboviral human pathogens belonging to the genus Flavivirus. At the current time, there are no approved prophylactics (e.g., vaccines or specific therapeutics available to prevent or treat human infections by these pathogens. Due to their minimal genome, these viruses require many host molecules for their replication and this offers a therapeutic avenue wherein host factors can be exploited as treatment targets. Since several host factors appear to be shared by many flaviviruses the strategy may result in pan-flaviviral inhibitors and may also attenuate the rapid emergence of drug resistant mutant viruses. The scope of this strategy is greatly enhanced by the recent en masse identification of host factors impacting on WNV and DENV infection. Excellent proof-of-principle experimental demonstrations for host-targeted control of infection and infection-induced pathogenesis have been reported for both WNV and DENV. These include exploiting not only those host factors supporting infection, but also targeting host processes contributing to pathogenesis and innate immune responses. While these early studies validated the host-targeting approach, extensive future investigations spanning a range of aspects are needed for a successful deployment in humans.

  4. The Golgi associated ERI3 is a Flavivirus host factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Alex Michael; Calvert, Meredith E. K.; Read, Leah R.; Kang, Seokyoung; Levitt, Brandt E.; Dimopoulos, George; Bradrick, Shelton S.; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne Flavivirus classified into four serotypes (DENV-1-4) that causes Dengue fever (DF), Dengue hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) or Dengue shock syndrome (DSS). An estimated 390 million people are at risk for infection with DENV and there are no effective vaccines or therapeutics. We utilized RNA chromatography coupled with quantitative mass spectrometry (qMS) to identify host RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that interact with DENV-2 RNA. We identified ERI3 (also PRNPIP and PINT1), a putative 3′–5′ RNA exonuclease, which preferentially associates with DENV-2 genomic RNA via interactions with dumbbell structures in the 3′ UTR. ERI3 is required for accumulation of DENV-2 genomic RNA and production of infectious particles. Furthermore, the mosquito homologue of ERI3 is required for DENV-2 replication in adult Aedes aegypti mosquitos implying that the requirement for ERI3 is conserved in both DENV hosts. In human cells ERI3 localizes to the Golgi in uninfected cells, but relocalizes near sites of DENV-2 replication in infected cells. ERI3 is not required for maintaining DENV-2 RNA stability or translation of the viral polyprotein, but is required for viral RNA synthesis. Our results define a specific role for ERI3 and highlight the importance of Golgi proteins in DENV-2 replication. PMID:27682269

  5. Host and Environmental Factors Modulate the Exposure of Free-Ranging and Farmed Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) to Coxiella burnetii

    OpenAIRE

    González-Barrio, David; Velasco Ávila , Ana Luisa; Boadella, Mariana; Beltrán-Beck, Beatriz; Barasona, José Ángel; Santos, João P. V.; Queirós, João; García-Pérez, Ana L; Barral, Marta; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The control of multihost pathogens, such as Coxiella burnetii, should rely on accurate information about the roles played by the main hosts. We aimed to determine the involvement of the red deer (Cervus elaphus) in the ecology of C. burnetii. We predicted that red deer populations from broad geographic areas within a European context would be exposed to C. burnetii, and therefore, we hypothesized that a series of factors would modulate the exposure of red deer to C. burnetii. To test this hyp...

  6. A Trematode Parasite Derived Growth Factor Binds and Exerts Influences on Host Immune Functions via Host Cytokine Receptor Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Azad A.; Zolnierczyk, Katarzyna; Japa, Ornampai; Owen, Jonathan P.; Maddison, Ben C.; Hodgkinson, Jane E.; Gough, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    The trematode Fasciola hepatica is responsible for chronic zoonotic infection globally. Despite causing a potent T-helper 2 response, it is believed that potent immunomodulation is responsible for rendering this host reactive non-protective host response thereby allowing the parasite to remain long-lived. We have previously identified a growth factor, FhTLM, belonging to the TGF superfamily can have developmental effects on the parasite. Herein we demonstrate that FhTLM can exert influence over host immune functions in a host receptor specific fashion. FhTLM can bind to receptor members of the Transforming Growth Factor (TGF) superfamily, with a greater affinity for TGF-β RII. Upon ligation FhTLM initiates the Smad2/3 pathway resulting in phenotypic changes in both fibroblasts and macrophages. The formation of fibroblast CFUs is reduced when cells are cultured with FhTLM, as a result of TGF-β RI kinase activity. In parallel the wound closure response of fibroblasts is also delayed in the presence of FhTLM. When stimulated with FhTLM blood monocyte derived macrophages adopt an alternative or regulatory phenotype. They express high levels interleukin (IL)-10 and arginase-1 while displaying low levels of IL-12 and nitric oxide. Moreover they also undergo significant upregulation of the inhibitory receptor PD-L1 and the mannose receptor. Use of RNAi demonstrates that this effect is dependent on TGF-β RII and mRNA knock-down leads to a loss of IL-10 and PD-L1. Finally, we demonstrate that FhTLM aids newly excysted juveniles (NEJs) in their evasion of antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) by reducing the NO response of macrophages—again dependent on TGF-β RI kinase. FhTLM displays restricted expression to the F. hepatica gut resident NEJ stages. The altered fibroblast responses would suggest a role for dampened tissue repair responses in facilitating parasite migration. Furthermore, the adoption of a regulatory macrophage phenotype would allow for a reduced

  7. A Trematode Parasite Derived Growth Factor Binds and Exerts Influences on Host Immune Functions via Host Cytokine Receptor Complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad A Sulaiman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The trematode Fasciola hepatica is responsible for chronic zoonotic infection globally. Despite causing a potent T-helper 2 response, it is believed that potent immunomodulation is responsible for rendering this host reactive non-protective host response thereby allowing the parasite to remain long-lived. We have previously identified a growth factor, FhTLM, belonging to the TGF superfamily can have developmental effects on the parasite. Herein we demonstrate that FhTLM can exert influence over host immune functions in a host receptor specific fashion. FhTLM can bind to receptor members of the Transforming Growth Factor (TGF superfamily, with a greater affinity for TGF-β RII. Upon ligation FhTLM initiates the Smad2/3 pathway resulting in phenotypic changes in both fibroblasts and macrophages. The formation of fibroblast CFUs is reduced when cells are cultured with FhTLM, as a result of TGF-β RI kinase activity. In parallel the wound closure response of fibroblasts is also delayed in the presence of FhTLM. When stimulated with FhTLM blood monocyte derived macrophages adopt an alternative or regulatory phenotype. They express high levels interleukin (IL-10 and arginase-1 while displaying low levels of IL-12 and nitric oxide. Moreover they also undergo significant upregulation of the inhibitory receptor PD-L1 and the mannose receptor. Use of RNAi demonstrates that this effect is dependent on TGF-β RII and mRNA knock-down leads to a loss of IL-10 and PD-L1. Finally, we demonstrate that FhTLM aids newly excysted juveniles (NEJs in their evasion of antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC by reducing the NO response of macrophages-again dependent on TGF-β RI kinase. FhTLM displays restricted expression to the F. hepatica gut resident NEJ stages. The altered fibroblast responses would suggest a role for dampened tissue repair responses in facilitating parasite migration. Furthermore, the adoption of a regulatory macrophage phenotype would allow

  8. Virulence Factors and Strategies of Leptopilina spp.: Selective Responses in Drosophila Hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mark J.; Kalamarz, Marta E.; Paddibhatla, Indira; Small, Chiyedza; Rajwani, Roma; Govind, Shubha

    2010-01-01

    To ensure survival, parasitic wasps of Drosophila have evolved strategies to optimize host development to their advantage. They also produce virulence factors that allow them to overcome or evade host defense. Wasp infection provokes cellular and humoral defense reactions, resulting in alteration in gene expression of the host. The activation of these reactions is controlled by conserved mechanisms shared by other invertebrate and vertebrate animals. Application of genomics and bioinformatics approaches is beginning to reveal comparative host gene expression changes after infection by different parasitic wasps. We analyze this comparison in the context of host physiology and immune cells, as well as the biology of the venom factors that wasps introduce into their hosts during oviposition. We compare virulence strategies of Leptopilina boulardi and L. heterotoma, in relation to genome-wide changes in gene expression in the fly hosts after infection. This analysis highlights fundamental differences in the changes that the host undergoes in its immune and general physiology in response to the two parasitic wasps. Such a comparative approach has the potential of revealing mechanisms governing the evolution of pathogenicity and how it impacts host range. PMID:19773069

  9. RNAi screen reveals an Abl kinase-dependent host cell pathway involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa internalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia F Pielage

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Internalization of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa by non-phagocytic cells is promoted by rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton, but the host pathways usurped by this bacterium are not clearly understood. We used RNAi-mediated gene inactivation of approximately 80 genes known to regulate the actin cytoskeleton in Drosophila S2 cells to identify host molecules essential for entry of P. aeruginosa. This work revealed Abl tyrosine kinase, the adaptor protein Crk, the small GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42, and p21-activated kinase as components of a host signaling pathway that leads to internalization of P. aeruginosa. Using a variety of complementary approaches, we validated the role of this pathway in mammalian cells. Remarkably, ExoS and ExoT, type III secreted toxins of P. aeruginosa, target this pathway by interfering with GTPase function and, in the case of ExoT, by abrogating P. aeruginosa-induced Abl-dependent Crk phosphorylation. Altogether, this work reveals that P. aeruginosa utilizes the Abl pathway for entering host cells and reveals unexpected complexity by which the P. aeruginosa type III secretion system modulates this internalization pathway. Our results furthermore demonstrate the applicability of using RNAi screens to identify host signaling cascades usurped by microbial pathogens that may be potential targets for novel therapies directed against treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections.

  10. Identification of sequence motifs involved in Dengue virus-host interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnet Mary, J; Paramasivan, R; Shenbagarathai, R

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is a rapidly spreading mosquito-borne virus infection, which remains a serious global public health problem. As there is no specific treatment or commercial vaccine available for effective control of the disease, the attempts on developing novel control strategies are underway. Viruses utilize the surface receptor proteins of host to enter into the cells. Though various proteins were said to be receptors of Dengue virus (DENV) using Virus Overlay Protein Binding Assay, the precise interaction between DENV and host is not explored. Understanding the structural features of domain III envelope glycoprotein would help in developing efficient antiviral inhibitors. Therefore, an attempt was made to identify the sequence motifs present in domain III envelope glycoprotein of Dengue virus. Computational analysis revealed that the NGR motif is present in the domain III envelope glycoprotein of DENV-1 and DENV-3. Similarly, DENV-1, DENV-2 and DENV-4 were found to contain Yxxphi motif which is a tyrosine-based sorting signal responsible for the interaction with a mu subunit of adaptor protein complex. High-throughput virtual screening resulted in five compounds as lead molecules based on glide score, which ranges from -4.664 to -6.52 kcal/Mol. This computational prediction provides an additional tool for understanding the virus-host interactions and helps to identify potential targets in the host. Further, experimental evidence is warranted to confirm the virus-host interactions and also inhibitory activity of reported lead compounds.

  11. Yersinia virulence factors - a sophisticated arsenal for combating host defences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Steve; Williams, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The human pathogens Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica cause enterocolitis, while Yersinia pestis is responsible for pneumonic, bubonic, and septicaemic plague. All three share an infection strategy that relies on a virulence factor arsenal to enable them to enter, adhere to, and colonise the host while evading host defences to avoid untimely clearance. Their arsenal includes a number of adhesins that allow the invading pathogens to establish a foothold in the host and to adhere to specific tissues later during infection. When the host innate immune system has been activated, all three pathogens produce a structure analogous to a hypodermic needle. In conjunction with the translocon, which forms a pore in the host membrane, the channel that is formed enables the transfer of six 'effector' proteins into the host cell cytoplasm. These proteins mimic host cell proteins but are more efficient than their native counterparts at modifying the host cell cytoskeleton, triggering the host cell suicide response. Such a sophisticated arsenal ensures that yersiniae maintain the upper hand despite the best efforts of the host to counteract the infecting pathogen.

  12. Yersinia virulence factors - a sophisticated arsenal for combating host defences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Steve; Williams, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The human pathogens Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica cause enterocolitis, while Yersinia pestis is responsible for pneumonic, bubonic, and septicaemic plague. All three share an infection strategy that relies on a virulence factor arsenal to enable them to enter, adhere to, and colonise the host while evading host defences to avoid untimely clearance. Their arsenal includes a number of adhesins that allow the invading pathogens to establish a foothold in the host and to adhere to specific tissues later during infection. When the host innate immune system has been activated, all three pathogens produce a structure analogous to a hypodermic needle. In conjunction with the translocon, which forms a pore in the host membrane, the channel that is formed enables the transfer of six ‘effector’ proteins into the host cell cytoplasm. These proteins mimic host cell proteins but are more efficient than their native counterparts at modifying the host cell cytoskeleton, triggering the host cell suicide response. Such a sophisticated arsenal ensures that yersiniae maintain the upper hand despite the best efforts of the host to counteract the infecting pathogen. PMID:27347390

  13. Mecanismos moleculares de la traducción cap-independiente de MNSV: análisis estructural y funcional de los factores virales y del huésped= Molecular mechanism of cap-independent translation of MNSV: structural and functional analysis of the viral and host factors involved

    OpenAIRE

    Miras Marín, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    La traducción cap-independiente es frecuente en ARNs virales, los cuáles carecen de estructura 5’-cap y/o cola poli(A) típicas de los ARNm eucarióticos. En su lugar, muchos virus de ARN de plantas tienen elementos de ARN en sus 3’-UTRs capaces de potenciar la traducción independiente de cap (3’-CITEs). Se ha descrito que estos 3’-CITEs se unen directamente y requieren de factores de iniciación a la traducción. (eIF) para su actividad. Hemos demostrado que la traducción cap-independiente de lo...

  14. Quantitative Label-Free Phosphoproteomics Reveals Differentially Regulated Protein Phosphorylation Involved in West Nile Virus-Induced Host Inflammatory Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Sun, Jun; Ye, Jing; Ashraf, Usama; Chen, Zheng; Zhu, Bibo; He, Wen; Xu, Qiuping; Wei, Yanming; Chen, Huanchun; Fu, Zhen F; Liu, Rong; Cao, Shengbo

    2015-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) can cause neuro-invasive and febrile illness that may be fatal to humans. The production of inflammatory cytokines is key to mediating WNV-induced immunopathology in the central nervous system. Elucidating the host factors utilized by WNV for productive infection would provide valuable insights into the evasion strategies used by this virus. Although attempts have been made to determine these host factors, proteomic data depicting WNV-host protein interactions are limited. We applied liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for label-free, quantitative phosphoproteomics to systematically investigate the global phosphorylation events induced by WNV infection. Quantifiable changes to 1,657 phosphoproteins were found; of these, 626 were significantly upregulated and 227 were downregulated at 12 h postinfection. The phosphoproteomic data were subjected to gene ontology enrichment analysis, which returned the inflammation-related spliceosome, ErbB, mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor kappa B, and mechanistic target of rapamycin signaling pathways. We used short interfering RNAs to decrease the levels of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta, bifunctional polynucleotide phosphatase/kinase, and retinoblastoma 1 and found that the activity of nuclear factor kappa B (p65) is significantly decreased in WNV-infected U251 cells, which in turn led to markedly reduced inflammatory cytokine production. Our results provide a better understanding of the host response to WNV infection and highlight multiple targets for the development of antiviral and anti-inflammatory therapies.

  15. Lymphvascular space involvement : an independent prognostic factor in endometrial cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briet, JM; Hollema, H; Reesink, N; Aalders, Jan; Mourits, MJE; ten Hoor, KA; Pras, Elisabeth; Boezen, HM; van der Zee, AGJ; Nijman, HW

    2005-01-01

    Purpose of investigation. To evaluate whether lymphvascular space involvement (LVSI) is a risk factor for relapse of disease and lymph node metastasis in endometrial cancer. Methods. From 1978 till 2003, 609 patients with epithelial endometrial cancer were treated at the Groningen University Medical

  16. Factors Affecting Teen Involvement in Pennsylvania 4-H Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Bart E.; Ewing, John C.; Bruce, Jacklyn A.

    2010-01-01

    The study reported here determined the factors that affect teen involvement in 4-H programming. The design of the study was descriptive and correlational in nature. Using a purposive sampling procedure, a survey questionnaire was distributed to all (N=214) 4-H members attending the 4-H State Leadership Conference. The major findings of the study…

  17. Participatory Evaluation: Factors to Consider when Involving Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Janet; Cater, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a critical perspective on the increasing involvement of young people in participatory evaluation as well as identifies the factors to consider when designing a youth-led evaluation project. Through this avenue, young people will increase their participation in organizational development and community change. Youth-led…

  18. An Ehrlichia chaffeensis tandem repeat protein interacts with multiple host targets involved in cell signaling, transcriptional regulation, and vesicle trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeel, Abdul; Kuriakose, Jeeba A; McBride, Jere W

    2009-05-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligately intracellular bacterium that exhibits tropism for mononuclear phagocytes forming cytoplasmic membrane-bound microcolonies called morulae. To survive and replicate within phagocytes, E. chaffeensis exploits the host cell by modulating a number of host cell processes, but the ehrlichial effector proteins involved are unknown. In this study, we determined that p47, a secreted, differentially expressed, tandem repeat (TR) protein, interacts with multiple host proteins associated with cell signaling, transcriptional regulation, and vesicle trafficking. Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed that p47 interacts with polycomb group ring finger 5 (PCGF5) protein, Src protein tyrosine kinase FYN (FYN), protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 2 (PTPN2), and adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1). p47 interaction with these proteins was further confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation assays and colocalization in HeLa cells transfected with p47-green fluorescent fusion protein (AcGFP1-p47). Moreover, confocal microscopy demonstrated p47-expressing dense-cored (DC) ehrlichiae colocalized with PCGF5, FYN, PTPN2, and CAP1. An amino-terminally truncated form of p47 containing TRs interacted only with PCGF5 and not with FYN, PTPN2, and CAP1, indicating differences in p47 domains that are involved in these interactions. These results demonstrate that p47 is involved in a complex network of interactions involving numerous host cell proteins. Furthermore, this study provides a new insight into the molecular and functional distinction of DC ehrlichiae, as well as the effector proteins involved in facilitating ehrlichial survival in mononuclear phagocytes.

  19. DMPD: The interferon regulatory factor family in host defense: mechanism of action. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17502370 The interferon regulatory factor family in host defense: mechanism of acti....html) (.csml) Show The interferon regulatory factor family in host defense: mechanism of action. PubmedID 1...7502370 Title The interferon regulatory factor family in host defense: mechanism

  20. Discovery of Host Factors and Pathways Utilized in Hantaviral Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    known to be involved in endocytic uptake and trafficking prompting us to investigate SMG1 more fully. Hap -1 (Mock) Prior to sort Sorted A...the direct effects of cholesterol depletion and reconstitution upon viral infection can be readily observed. Human A549 cells were treated with MBCD...for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not be

  1. Host susceptibility factors in mycobacterial infection. Genetics and body morphotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guide, Shireen V; Holland, Steven M

    2002-03-01

    Through identification and evaluation of mutations and polymorphisms in components of the IFN gamma response pathways, a better understanding of the mechanisms and risk factors influencing the development of mycobacterial disease is gained. This may lead the way for development of therapeutic and preventative strategies. Although conventional science has focused on identifying discrete mutations, greater awareness of the impact of subtle changes, both at the genetic (polymorphisms) and physical levels (body morphotype), may prove critical in the investigative process. There has been extraordinary progress in the understanding of mycobacterial susceptibility factors over the last few years. The recognition of characteristic phenotypes will lead to the identification of new genetic bases for disease.

  2. IDENTIFYING MOTIVATION FACTOR INVOLVEMENT OF SARAWAK MALAY WOMEN ENTREPRENEUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masyantie Mohamad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sarawak multilayered cake among Sarawak product signature famous among the local as well as international tourist visiting Sarawak. In fact, Sarawak Malay women entrepreneurs have become very necessary players in the entrepreneurial field specifically in this cottage industries from the early introduction of this business, they have facing various problem in this businesses. Thus, this research aims to build an understanding of motivational factor that encourage Sarawak Malay women entrepreneurial experiences especially in multilayered cake businesses. Using qualitative methods, this research aims to identify the entrepreneurial motivations factors; with regards to start-up motivation by Sarawak Malay women. The finding shows that the motivations that influence Malay women within Kuching, Sarawak areas to start and grow their business are involve self-driven and context driven that motivate them involve in multilayered cakes businesses.

  3. Human Genome-Wide RNAi Screen for Host Factors That Modulate Intracellular Salmonella Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Thornbrough, Joshua M.; Tom Hundley; Raphael Valdivia; Worley, Micah J.

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a bacterial pathogen of humans that can proliferate within epithelial cells as well as professional phagocytes of the immune system. While much has been learned about the microbial genes that influence the infectious process through decades of intensive research, relatively little is known about the host factors that affect infection. We performed a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify host genes that Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) utilizes to ...

  4. To be or not to be: The host genetic factor and beyond in Helicobacter pylori mediated gastro-duodenal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta De, Dipanjana; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2015-03-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) have long been associated with a spectrum of disease outcomes in the gastro-duodenal system. Heterogeneity in bacterial virulence factors or strains is not enough to explain the divergent disease phenotypes manifested by the infection. This review focuses on host genetic factors that are involved during infection and eventually are thought to influence the disease phenotype. We have summarized the different host genes that have been investigated for association studies in H. pylori mediated duodenal ulcer or gastric cancer. We discuss that as the bacteria co-evolved with the host; these host gene also show much variation across different ethnic population. We illustrate the allelic distribution of interleukin-1B, across different population which is one of the most popular candidate gene studied with respect to H. pylori infections. Further, we highlight that several polymorphisms in the pathway gene can by itself or collectively affect the acid secretion pathway axis (gastrin: somatostatin) thereby resulting in a spectrum of disease phenotype.

  5. Identification of host cytosolic sensors and bacterial factors regulating the type I interferon response to Legionella pneumophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M Monroe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative bacterial pathogen that replicates in host macrophages and causes a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires' Disease. The innate immune response to L. pneumophila remains poorly understood. Here we focused on identifying host and bacterial factors involved in the production of type I interferons (IFN in response to L. pneumophila. It was previously suggested that the delivery of L. pneumophila DNA to the host cell cytosol is the primary signal that induces the type I IFN response. However, our data are not easily reconciled with this model. We provide genetic evidence that two RNA-sensing proteins, RIG-I and MDA5, participate in the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Importantly, these sensors do not seem to be required for the IFN response to L. pneumophila DNA, whereas we found that RIG-I was required for the response to L. pneumophila RNA. Thus, we hypothesize that bacterial RNA, or perhaps an induced host RNA, is the primary stimulus inducing the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Our study also identified a secreted effector protein, SdhA, as a key suppressor of the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Although viral suppressors of cytosolic RNA-sensing pathways have been previously identified, analogous bacterial factors have not been described. Thus, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms by which an intracellular bacterial pathogen activates and also represses innate immune responses.

  6. Metarhizium anisopliae host-pathogen interaction: differential immunoproteomics reveals proteins involved in the infection process of arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Lucélia; Silva, Walter O B; Pinto, Antônio F M; Schrank, Augusto; Vainstein, Marilene H

    2010-04-01

    Metarhizium anisopliae is an entomopathogenic fungus well characterized for the biocontrol of a wide range of plagues. Its pathogenicity depends on the secretion of hydrolytic enzymes that degrade the host cuticle. To identify proteins involved in the infection process and in host specify, immunoproteomic analysis was performed using antiserum produced against crude extract of M. anisopliae cultured in the presence of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus and Dysdercus peruvianus cuticles. Spots detected using antisera produced against M. anisopliae cultured in cuticles and spore surface proteins, but not with antiserum against M. anisopliae cultured in glucose, were identified so as to give insights about the infection process. An MS/MS allowed the identification of proteases, like elastase, trypsin, chymotrypsin, carboxypeptidase and subtilisin (Pr1A, Pr1I and PR1J), chitinases, DNase I and proline-rich protein. Chymotrypsin and Pr1I were inferred as host specific, being recognized in D. peruvianus infection only. This research represents an important contribution to the understanding the adaptation mechanisms of M. anisopliae to different hosts.

  7. Muscovy duck reovirus infection rapidly activates host innate immune signaling and induces an effective antiviral immune response involving critical interferons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhilong; Luo, Guifeng; Wang, Quanxi; Wang, Song; Chi, Xiaojuan; Huang, Yifan; Wei, Haitao; Wu, Baocheng; Huang, Shile; Chen, Ji-Long

    2015-02-25

    Muscovy duck reovirus (MDRV) is a highly pathogenic virus in waterfowl and causes significant economic loss in the poultry industry worldwide. Because the host innate immunity plays a key role in defending against virus invasion, more and more attentions have been paid to the immune response triggered by viral infection. Here we found that the genomic RNA of MDRV was able to rapidly induce the production of interferons (IFNs) in host. Mechanistically, MDRV infection induced robust expression of IFNs in host mainly through RIG-I, MDA5 and TLR3-dependent signaling pathways. In addition, we observed that silencing VISA expression in 293T cells could significantly inhibit the secretion of IFNs. Remarkably, the production of IFNs was reduced by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB or knocking down the expression of IRF-7. Furthermore, our study showed that treatment of 293T cells and Muscovy duck embryo fibroblasts with IFNs markedly impaired MDRV replication, suggesting that these IFNs play an important role in antiviral response during the MDRV infection. Importantly, we also detected the induced expression of RIG-I, MDA5, TLR3 and type I IFN in Muscovy ducks infected with MDRV at different time points post infection. The results from in vivo studies were consistent with those in 293T cells infected with MDRV. Taken together, our findings reveal that the host can resist MDRV invasion by activating innate immune response involving RIG-I, MDA5 and TLR3-dependent signaling pathways that govern IFN production.

  8. Functional analysis of host factors that mediate the intracellular lifestyle of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Ming Qin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn, the major causative agent of human fungal meningoencephalitis, replicates within phagolysosomes of infected host cells. Despite more than a half-century of investigation into host-Cn interactions, host factors that mediate infection by this fungal pathogen remain obscure. Here, we describe the development of a system that employs Drosophila S2 cells and RNA interference (RNAi to define and characterize Cn host factors. The system recapitulated salient aspects of fungal interactions with mammalian cells, including phagocytosis, intracellular trafficking, replication, cell-to-cell spread and escape of the pathogen from host cells. Fifty-seven evolutionarily conserved host factors were identified using this system, including 29 factors that had not been previously implicated in mediating fungal pathogenesis. Subsequent analysis indicated that Cn exploits host actin cytoskeletal elements, cell surface signaling molecules, and vesicle-mediated transport proteins to establish a replicative niche. Several host molecules known to be associated with autophagy (Atg, including Atg2, Atg5, Atg9 and Pi3K59F (a class III PI3-kinase were also uncovered in our screen. Small interfering RNA (siRNA mediated depletion of these autophagy proteins in murine RAW264.7 macrophages demonstrated their requirement during Cn infection, thereby validating findings obtained using the Drosophila S2 cell system. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy analyses demonstrated that Atg5, LC3, Atg9a were recruited to the vicinity of Cn containing vacuoles (CnCvs in the early stages of Cn infection. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy and/or PI3-kinase activity further demonstrated a requirement for autophagy associated host proteins in supporting infection of mammalian cells by Cn. Finally, systematic trafficking studies indicated that CnCVs associated with Atg proteins, including Atg5, Atg9a and LC3, during trafficking to a terminal intracellular

  9. Obesity and endocrine therapy: host factors and breast cancer outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Pamela J

    2013-08-01

    Obesity is becoming increasingly prevalent and it has been linked to poor breast cancer outcomes. Because obesity is associated with increased adipose tissue mass and aromatase activity [the target of aromatase inhibitors (AIs)], there is concern that these agents may be less effective in women who are overweight or obese. Four of the randomized trials of AIs vs. tamoxifen conducted in the adjuvant breast cancer setting (ATAC, BIG 1-98 and TEAM in the postmenopausal setting and ABCSG-12 in the premenopausal setting) have reported effects of body mass index (BMI) on the relative effectiveness of an AI vs. tamoxifen. Obesity was confirmed as an adverse prognostic factor in ATAC and BIG 1-98 but not the TEAM study; in ABSCG-12, obesity was associated with poor outcomes in the anastrozole arm only. In the three postmenopausal trials, the use of an AI vs. tamoxifen was associated with better outcomes at all levels of BMI [all hazard ratios for recurrence breast cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mycobacterium biofilms: factors involved in development, dispersal, and therapeutic strategies against biofilm-relevant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xiaohong; Deng, Wanyan; Liu, Minqiang; Xie, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria can develop biofilm (BF), a multicellular structure largely combining bacteria and their extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The formation of biofilm results in an alternative existence in which microbes ensure their survival in adverse environments. Biofilm-relevant infections are more persistent, resistant to most antibiotics, and more recalcitrant to host immunity. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, can develop biofilm, though whether M. tuberculosis can form biofilm within tuberculosis patients has yet to be determined. Here, we summarize the factors involved in the development and dispersal of mycobacterial biofilms, as well as underlying regulatory factors and inhibitors against biofilm to deepen our understanding of their development and to elucidate potential novel modes of action for future antibiotics. Key factors in biofilm formation identified as drug targets represent a novel and promising avenue for developing better antibiotics.

  11. Microbial Hub Taxa Link Host and Abiotic Factors to Plant Microbiome Variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T Agler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant-associated microorganisms have been shown to critically affect host physiology and performance, suggesting that evolution and ecology of plants and animals can only be understood in a holobiont (host and its associated organisms context. Host-associated microbial community structures are affected by abiotic and host factors, and increased attention is given to the role of the microbiome in interactions such as pathogen inhibition. However, little is known about how these factors act on the microbial community, and especially what role microbe-microbe interaction dynamics play. We have begun to address this knowledge gap for phyllosphere microbiomes of plants by simultaneously studying three major groups of Arabidopsis thaliana symbionts (bacteria, fungi and oomycetes using a systems biology approach. We evaluated multiple potential factors of microbial community control: we sampled various wild A. thaliana populations at different times, performed field plantings with different host genotypes, and implemented successive host colonization experiments under lab conditions where abiotic factors, host genotype, and pathogen colonization was manipulated. Our results indicate that both abiotic factors and host genotype interact to affect plant colonization by all three groups of microbes. Considering microbe-microbe interactions, however, uncovered a network of interkingdom interactions with significant contributions to community structure. As in other scale-free networks, a small number of taxa, which we call microbial "hubs," are strongly interconnected and have a severe effect on communities. By documenting these microbe-microbe interactions, we uncover an important mechanism explaining how abiotic factors and host genotypic signatures control microbial communities. In short, they act directly on "hub" microbes, which, via microbe-microbe interactions, transmit the effects to the microbial community. We analyzed two "hub" microbes (the

  12. Mechanisms, Cofactors, and Augmenting Factors Involved in Anaphylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Muñoz-Cano

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Anaphylaxis is an acute and life-threatening systemic reaction. Many triggers have been described, including food, drug, and hymenoptera allergens, which are the most frequently involved. The mechanisms described in anaphylactic reactions are complex and implicate a diversity of pathways. Some of these mechanisms may be key to the development of the anaphylactic reaction, while others may only modify its severity. Although specific IgE, mast cells, and basophils are considered the principal players in anaphylaxis, alternative mechanisms have been proposed in non-IgE anaphylactic reactions. Neutrophils, macrophages, as well as basophils, have been involved, as have IgG-dependent, complement and contact system activation. A range of cationic substances can induce antibody-independent mast cells activation through MRGPRX2 receptor. Cofactors and augmenting factors may explain why, in some patients, food allergen exposure can cause anaphylaxis, while in other clinical scenario it can be tolerated or elicits a mild reaction. With the influence of these factors, food allergic reactions may be induced at lower doses of allergen and/or become more severe. Exercise, alcohol, estrogens, and some drugs such as Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, β-blockers, and lipid-lowering drugs are the main factors described, though their mechanisms and signaling pathways are poorly understood.

  13. Factors Associated with Involvement in Bullying: A Study in Nicaragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva M. Romera

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available School bullying is one of the main problems affecting the quality of peer relationships in schools and in general the coexistence. At European level, there are scientific findings that indicate its nature, characteristics and factors related to its involvement. However, in poor and developing countries, where the problem is more serious, there is a high degree of awareness on this matter. The present study aimed to identify what factors may be influencing the occurrence of bullying in a representative sample of primary schools in the Nicaraguan capital. For this propose, 3042 students from Managua and its metropolitan area were explored with instruments comparable to those used in Europe. A multinomial logistic regression analysis indicated that being a boy, to show antisocial behaviors and attitudes and contact with drugs were the three factors most related with the role of aggressor, as well as negative relationships had a significant influence on involvement in this phenomenon, either as a victim, aggressor or victimized aggressor. Results are discussed in relation to the profiles of aggressor and victim of bullying in international studies focusing on differences in developed countries.

  14. Factors involved in mechanical fatigue degradation of dental resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohbauer, U; Belli, R; Ferracane, J L

    2013-07-01

    The design of clinical trials allows for limited insights into the fatigue processes occurring in resin composites and the factors involved therein. In vitro studies, in contrast, can fundamentally narrow study interests to focus on particular degradation mechanisms and, to date, represent the major contributors to the state of knowledge on the subject. These studies show that microstructural features are important in determining strength and fracture toughness, whereas fatigue resistance is mainly related to the susceptibility of the matrix and the filler/matrix interface to mechanical and chemical degradation. In this review, we focus on fracture mechanisms occurring during fatigue, on the methods used to assess them, and on additional phenomena involved in the degradation of initial mechanical properties of resin composites.

  15. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1993-01-01

    Long-term manned space travel will require a better understanding of skeletal muscle atrophy which results from microgravity. Astronaut strength and dexterity must be maintained for normal mission operations and for emergency situations. Although exercise in space slows the rate of muscle loss, it does not prevent it. A biochemical understanding of how gravity/tension/exercise help to maintain muscle size by altering protein synthesis and/or degradation rate should ultimately allow pharmacological intervention to prevent muscle atrophy in microgravity. The overall objective is to examine some of the basic biochemical processes involved in tension-induced muscle growth. With an experimental in vitro system, the role of exogenous and endogenous muscle growth factors in mechanically stimulated muscle growth are examined. Differentiated avian skeletal myofibers can be 'exercised' in tissue culture using a newly developed dynamic mechanical cell stimulator device which simulates different muscle activity patterns. Patterns of mechanical activity which significantly affect muscle growth and metabolic characteristics were found. Both exogenous and endogenous growth factors are essential for tension-induced muscle growth. Exogenous growth factors found in serum, such as insulin, insulin-like growth factors, and steroids, are important regulators of muscle protein turnover rates and mechanically-induced muscle growth. Endogenous growth factors are synthesized and released into the culture medium when muscle cells are mechanically stimulated. At least one family of mechanically induced endogenous factors, the prostaglandins, help to regulate the rates of protein turnover in muscle cells. Endogenously synthesized IGF-1 is another. The interaction of muscle mechanical activity and these growth factors in the regulation of muscle protein turnover rates with our in vitro model system is studied.

  16. Citizen science data reveal ecological, historical and evolutionary factors shaping interactions between woody hosts and wood-inhabiting fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann-Clausen, Jacob; Maruyama, Pietro K; Bruun, Hans Henrik; Dimitrov, Dimitar; Laessøe, Thomas; Frøslev, Tobias Guldberg; Dalsgaard, Bo

    2016-12-01

    Woody plants host diverse communities of associated organisms, including wood-inhabiting fungi. In this group, host effects on species richness and interaction network structure are not well understood, especially not at large geographical scales. We investigated ecological, historical and evolutionary determinants of fungal species richness and network modularity, that is, subcommunity structure, across woody hosts in Denmark, using a citizen science data set comprising > 80 000 records of > 1000 fungal species on 91 genera of woody plants. Fungal species richness was positively related to host size, wood pH, and the number of species in the host genus, with limited influence of host frequency and host history, that is, time since host establishment in the area. Modularity patterns were unaffected by host history, but largely reflected host phylogeny. Notably, fungal communities differed substantially between angiosperm and gymnosperm hosts. Host traits and evolutionary history appear to be more important than host frequency and recent history in structuring interactions between hosts and wood-inhabiting fungi. High wood acidity appears to act as a stress factor reducing fungal species richness, while large host size, providing increased niche diversity, enhances it. In some fungal groups that are known to interact with live host cells in the establishment phase, host selectivity is common, causing a modular community structure. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Cycle Inhibiting Factors (Cifs): Cyclomodulins That Usurp the Ubiquitin-Dependent Degradation Pathway of Host Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb, Frédéric; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Oswald, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs) are type III secreted effectors produced by diverse pathogenic bacteria. Cifs are “cyclomodulins” that inhibit the eukaryotic host cell cycle and also hijack other key cellular processes such as those controlling the actin network and apoptosis. This review summarizes current knowledge on Cif since its first characterization in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, the identification of several xenologues in distant pathogenic bacteria, to its structure elucidation and the recent deciphering of its mode of action. Cif impairs the host ubiquitin proteasome system through deamidation of ubiquitin or the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 that regulates Cullin-Ring-ubiquitin Ligase (CRL) complexes. The hijacking of the ubiquitin-dependent degradation pathway of host cells results in the modulation of various cellular functions such as epithelium renewal, apoptosis and immune response. Cif is therefore a powerful weapon in the continuous arm race that characterizes host-bacteria interactions. PMID:22069713

  18. Cycle inhibiting factors (cifs): cyclomodulins that usurp the ubiquitin-dependent degradation pathway of host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb, Frédéric; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Oswald, Eric

    2011-04-01

    Cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs) are type III secreted effectors produced by diverse pathogenic bacteria. Cifs are "cyclomodulins" that inhibit the eukaryotic host cell cycle and also hijack other key cellular processes such as those controlling the actin network and apoptosis. This review summarizes current knowledge on Cif since its first characterization in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, the identification of several xenologues in distant pathogenic bacteria, to its structure elucidation and the recent deciphering of its mode of action. Cif impairs the host ubiquitin proteasome system through deamidation of ubiquitin or the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 that regulates Cullin-Ring-ubiquitin Ligase (CRL) complexes. The hijacking of the ubiquitin-dependent degradation pathway of host cells results in the modulation of various cellular functions such as epithelium renewal, apoptosis and immune response. Cif is therefore a powerful weapon in the continuous arm race that characterizes host-bacteria interactions.

  19. Cycle Inhibiting Factors (Cifs: Cyclomodulins That Usurp the Ubiquitin-Dependent Degradation Pathway of Host Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Oswald

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs are type III secreted effectors produced by diverse pathogenic bacteria. Cifs are “cyclomodulins” that inhibit the eukaryotic host cell cycle and also hijack other key cellular processes such as those controlling the actin network and apoptosis. This review summarizes current knowledge on Cif since its first characterization in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, the identification of several xenologues in distant pathogenic bacteria, to its structure elucidation and the recent deciphering of its mode of action. Cif impairs the host ubiquitin proteasome system through deamidation of ubiquitin or the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 that regulates Cullin-Ring-ubiquitin Ligase (CRL complexes. The hijacking of the ubiquitin-dependent degradation pathway of host cells results in the modulation of various cellular functions such as epithelium renewal, apoptosis and immune response. Cif is therefore a powerful weapon in the continuous arm race that characterizes host-bacteria interactions.

  20. Host genetic factors in susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Koushik Chatterjee

    2010-04-01

    HIV-1 infection has rapidly spread worldwide and has become the leading cause of mortality in infectious diseases. The duration for development of AIDS (AIDS progression) is highly variable among HIV–1 infected individuals, ranging from 2–3 years to no signs of AIDS development in the entire lifetime. Several factors regulate the rate at which HIV-1 infection progresses to AIDS. Host genetic factors play an important role in the outcome of such complex or multifactor diseases as AIDS and are also known to regulate the rate of disease progression. This review focuses on the major host genes reported to affect the progression to AIDS in HIV-1 infected individuals.

  1. Chlamydial entry involves TARP binding of guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Josh Lane

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis attachment to cells induces the secretion of the elementary body-associated protein TARP (Translocated Actin Recruiting Protein. TARP crosses the plasma membrane where it is immediately phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by unknown host kinases. The Rac GTPase is also activated, resulting in WAVE2 and Arp2/3-dependent recruitment of actin to the sites of chlamydia attachment. We show that TARP participates directly in chlamydial invasion activating the Rac-dependent signaling cascade to recruit actin. TARP functions by binding two distinct Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs, Sos1 and Vav2, in a phosphotyrosine-dependent manner. The tyrosine phosphorylation profile of the sequence YEPISTENIYESI within TARP, as well as the transient activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K, appears to determine which GEF is utilized to activate Rac. The first and second tyrosine residues, when phosphorylated, are utilized by the Sos1/Abi1/Eps8 and Vav2, respectively, with the latter requiring the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. Depletion of these critical signaling molecules by siRNA resulted in inhibition of chlamydial invasion to varying degrees, owing to a possible functional redundancy of the two pathways. Collectively, these data implicate TARP in signaling to the actin cytoskeleton remodeling machinery, demonstrating a mechanism by which C.trachomatis invades non-phagocytic cells.

  2. Ecological and developmental dynamics of a host-parasite system involving a sea anemone and two ctenophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitzel, Adam M; Sullivan, James C; Brown, Briana K; Chin, Diana W; Cira, Emily K; Edquist, Sara K; Genco, Brandon M; Joseph, Oliver C; Kaufman, Christian A; Kovitvongsa, Kathryn; Muñoz, Martha M; Negri, Tiffany L; Taffel, Jonathan R; Zuehlke, Robert T; Finnerty, John R

    2007-12-01

    The lined sea anemone Edwardsiella lineata has evolved a derived parasitic life history that includes a novel body plan adapted for life inside its ctenophore hosts. Reputedly its sole host is the sea walnut, Mnemiopsis leidyi, a voracious planktivore and a seasonally abundant member of many pelagic ecosystems. However, we have observed substantially higher E. lineata prevalence in a second ctenophore species, the ctenophore predator Beroë ovata. The interplay among these 3 species has important conservation consequences as M. leidyi introductions are thought to be responsible for the severe depletion of numerous commercial fisheries in the Mediterranean basin, and both E. lineata and B. ovata have been proposed as biological controls for invasive M. leidyi. Over a 3-yr period (2004-2006), we collected 8,253 ctenophores from Woods Hole, Massachusetts, including M. leidyi, B. ovata, and a third ctenophore, Pleurobrachia pileus, and we recorded E. lineata infection frequencies, parasite load, and parasite location. We also conducted laboratory experiments to determine the likely mechanisms for parasite introduction and the effect of each host on parasite development. We observed peak E. lineata infection frequencies of 0% in P. pileus, 59% in M. leidyi, and 100% in B. ovata, suggesting that B. ovata could be an important natural host for E. lineata. However, in laboratory experiments, E. lineata larvae proved far more successful at infecting M. leidyi than B. ovata, and E. lineata parasites excised from M. leidyi exhibited greater developmental competence than parasites excised from B. ovata. Although we show that E. lineata is efficiently transferred from M. leidyi to B. ovata when the latter preys upon the former, we conclude that E. lineata larvae are not well adapted for parasitizing the latter species and that the E. lineata parasite is not well adapted for feeding in B. ovata; these developmental and ecological factors underlie the host specificity of this

  3. Human neurocysticercosis: immunological features involved in the host's susceptibility to become infected and to develop disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciutto, Edda; Cárdenas, Graciela; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Fragoso, Gladis; Larralde, Carlos; Fleury, Agnes

    2013-06-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) is a clinically and radiologically heterogeneous disease caused by the establishment of Taenia solium larvae in the central nervous system. Herein, the immunological and endocrinological features involved in resistance to infection and severe forms of the disease are reviewed, and their clinical relevance is discussed.

  4. Microevolutionary events involving narrow host plasmids influences local fixation of vancomycin-resistance in Enterococcus populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R Freitas

    Full Text Available Vancomycin-resistance in enterococci (VRE is associated with isolates within ST18, ST17, ST78 Enterococcus faecium (Efm and ST6 Enterococcus faecalis (Efs human adapted lineages. Despite of its global spread, vancomycin resistance rates in enterococcal populations greatly vary temporally and geographically. Portugal is one of the European countries where Tn1546 (vanA is consistently found in a variety of environments. A comprehensive multi-hierarchical analysis of VRE isolates (75 Efm and 29 Efs from Portuguese hospitals and aquatic surroundings (1996-2008 was performed to clarify the local dynamics of VRE. Clonal relatedness was established by PFGE and MLST while plasmid characterization comprised the analysis of known relaxases, rep initiator proteins and toxin-antitoxin systems (TA by PCR-based typing schemes, RFLP comparison, hybridization and sequencing. Tn1546 variants were characterized by PCR overlapping/sequencing. Intra- and inter-hospital dissemination of Efm ST18, ST132 and ST280 and Efs ST6 clones, carrying rolling-circle (pEFNP1/pRI1 and theta-replicating (pCIZ2-like, Inc18, pHTβ-like, two pRUM-variants, pLG1-like, and pheromone-responsive plasmids was documented. Tn1546 variants, mostly containing ISEf1 or IS1216, were located on plasmids (30-150 kb with a high degree of mosaicism and heterogeneous RFLP patterns that seem to have resulted from the interplay between broad host Inc18 plasmids (pIP501, pRE25, pEF1, and narrow host RepA_N plasmids (pRUM, pAD1-like. TAs of Inc18 (ω-ε-ζ and pRUM (Axe-Txe plasmids were infrequently detected. Some plasmid chimeras were persistently recovered over years from different clonal lineages. This work represents the first multi-hierarchical analysis of VRE, revealing a frequent recombinatorial diversification of a limited number of interacting clonal backgrounds, plasmids and transposons at local scale. These interactions provide a continuous process of parapatric clonalization driving a full

  5. Microevolutionary Events Involving Narrow Host Plasmids Influences Local Fixation of Vancomycin-Resistance in Enterococcus Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Ana R.; Novais, Carla; Tedim, Ana P.; Francia, María Victoria; Baquero, Fernando; Peixe, Luísa; Coque, Teresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistance in enterococci (VRE) is associated with isolates within ST18, ST17, ST78 Enterococcus faecium (Efm) and ST6 Enterococcus faecalis (Efs) human adapted lineages. Despite of its global spread, vancomycin resistance rates in enterococcal populations greatly vary temporally and geographically. Portugal is one of the European countries where Tn1546 (vanA) is consistently found in a variety of environments. A comprehensive multi-hierarchical analysis of VRE isolates (75 Efm and 29 Efs) from Portuguese hospitals and aquatic surroundings (1996–2008) was performed to clarify the local dynamics of VRE. Clonal relatedness was established by PFGE and MLST while plasmid characterization comprised the analysis of known relaxases, rep initiator proteins and toxin-antitoxin systems (TA) by PCR-based typing schemes, RFLP comparison, hybridization and sequencing. Tn1546 variants were characterized by PCR overlapping/sequencing. Intra- and inter-hospital dissemination of Efm ST18, ST132 and ST280 and Efs ST6 clones, carrying rolling-circle (pEFNP1/pRI1) and theta-replicating (pCIZ2-like, Inc18, pHTβ-like, two pRUM-variants, pLG1-like, and pheromone-responsive) plasmids was documented. Tn1546 variants, mostly containing ISEf1 or IS1216, were located on plasmids (30–150 kb) with a high degree of mosaicism and heterogeneous RFLP patterns that seem to have resulted from the interplay between broad host Inc18 plasmids (pIP501, pRE25, pEF1), and narrow host RepA_N plasmids (pRUM, pAD1-like). TAs of Inc18 (ω-ε-ζ) and pRUM (Axe-Txe) plasmids were infrequently detected. Some plasmid chimeras were persistently recovered over years from different clonal lineages. This work represents the first multi-hierarchical analysis of VRE, revealing a frequent recombinatorial diversification of a limited number of interacting clonal backgrounds, plasmids and transposons at local scale. These interactions provide a continuous process of parapatric clonalization driving a full

  6. Natural and human induced factors influencing the abundance of Schistosoma host snails in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monde, Concillia; Syampungani, Stephen; van den Brink, Paul J

    2016-06-01

    Schistosomiasis remains a global public health problem affecting about 240 million people. In Zambia, 2 million are infected while 3 million live with the risk of getting infected. Research and interventions relating to schistosomiasis are mainly linked to disease epidemiology. Malacological and ecological aspects of the disease are superficially understood. Developing effective control measures requires an understanding of interacting environmental and socioeconomic factors of host snails vis-a-vis schistosomiasis. Therefore, the present work involved collecting social and environmental data in a large field study in two zones in Zambia that are different in terms of temperature and rainfall amounts. Social data collected through questionnaires included demographic, educational and knowledge of schistosomiasis disease dynamics. Environmental data included physicochemical factors, aquatic plants and snails. Gender (P < 0.001) significantly influences livelihood strategies, while age (P = 0.069) and level of education (P = 0.086) have a moderate influence in zone I. In zone III, none of these factors (age, P = 0.378; gender, P = 0.311; education, P = 0.553) play a significant role. Environmental parameters explained 43 and 41 % variation in species composition for zones I and III, respectively. Most respondents' (52 %, 87 %) perception is that there are more cases of bilharzia in hot season than in other seasons (rainy season 23 %, 7 %; cold season 8 %, 0 % and year round 17 %, 6 %) for zone I and zone III, respectively.

  7. Factors associated with male involvement in reproductive care in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishwajit, Ghose; Tang, Shangfeng; Yaya, Sanni; Ide, Seydou; Fu, Hang; Wang, Manli; He, Zhifei; Da, Feng; Feng, Zhanchun

    2017-01-03

    Men's active involvement in reproductive healthcare has shown to be positively associated with maternal and child health outcomes. Bangladesh has made appreciable progress in its pursuance of maternal mortality related goals in the framework of the MDGs. However, there remains a lot to be accomplished to realise the long-term goals for which active participation of male counterparts in reproductive care is crucial. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to investigate factors associated with male involvement in reproductive health among Bangladeshi men. We used data from Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS) conducted in 2011. Study participants were 1196 married men, aged between 15 and 69 years and living in both urban and rural households. Level of male involvement (outcome variable) was measured based on the responses on knowledge, awareness and practice regarding reproductive health. Chi-square tests and multivariable logistic regression models were performed for data analysis. Out of 1196 participants, only 40% were found to be active about partners' reproductive healthcare. Chi-square test showed significant association between active involvement and ever hearing about family planning (FP) in television, learning about FP through community health events, community health workers and poster/billboard. Results from logistic regression analysis revealed that type of residency [p = 0.004, AOR = 0.666, 95% CI = 0.504-0.879], literacy [secondary/higher education- p = 0.006. AOR = 0.579, 95% CI = 0.165-0.509], learning about family planning from Newspaper [p < 0.001. AOR = 1.952, 95% CI = 1.429-2.664], and television [p = 0.017. AOR = 1.514 95% CI = 1.298-1.886], and having been communicated about family planning by community health workers [p = 0.017. AOR = 1.946, 95% CI = 1.129-3.356] were significantly associated with active involvement of men in reproductive health issues. Level

  8. Involvement of the skin during bluetongue virus infection and replication in the ruminant host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darpel, Karin E; Monaghan, Paul; Simpson, Jennifer; Anthony, Simon J; Veronesi, Eva; Brooks, Harriet W; Elliott, Heather; Brownlie, Joe; Takamatsu, Haru-Hisa; Mellor, Philip S; Mertens, Peter Pc

    2012-04-30

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is a double stranded (ds) RNA virus (genus Orbivirus; family Reoviridae), which is considered capable of infecting all species of domestic and wild ruminants, although clinical signs are seen mostly in sheep. BTV is arthropod-borne ("arbovirus") and able to productively infect and replicate in many different cell types of both insects and mammalian hosts. Although the organ and cellular tropism of BTV in ruminants has been the subject of several studies, many aspects of its pathogenesis are still poorly understood, partly because of inherent problems in distinguishing between "virus replication" and "virus presence".BTV replication and organ tropism were studied in a wide range of infected sheep tissues, by immuno-fluorescence-labeling of non-structural or structural proteins (NS2 or VP7 and core proteins, respectively) using confocal microscopy to distinguish between virus presence and replication. These results are compared to gross and microscopic pathological findings in selected organs from infected sheep. Replication was demonstrated in two major cell types: vascular endothelial cells, and agranular leukocytes which morphologically resemble lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages and/or dendritic cells. Two organs (the skin and tonsils) were shown to support relatively high levels of BTV replication, although they have not previously been proposed as important replication sites during BTV infection. The high level of BTV replication in the skin is thought to be of major significance for the pathogenesis and transmission of BTV (via biting insects) and a refinement of our current model of BTV pathogenesis is discussed.

  9. Neutrophil extracellular traps contain calprotectin, a cytosolic protein complex involved in host defense against Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin F Urban

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the first line of defense at the site of an infection. They encounter and kill microbes intracellularly upon phagocytosis or extracellularly by degranulation of antimicrobial proteins and the release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs. NETs were shown to ensnare and kill microbes. However, their complete protein composition and the antimicrobial mechanism are not well understood. Using a proteomic approach, we identified 24 NET-associated proteins. Quantitative analysis of these proteins and high resolution electron microscopy showed that NETs consist of modified nucleosomes and a stringent selection of other proteins. In contrast to previous results, we found several NET proteins that are cytoplasmic in unstimulated neutrophils. We demonstrated that of those proteins, the antimicrobial heterodimer calprotectin is released in NETs as the major antifungal component. Absence of calprotectin in NETs resulted in complete loss of antifungal activity in vitro. Analysis of three different Candida albicans in vivo infection models indicated that NET formation is a hitherto unrecognized route of calprotectin release. By comparing wild-type and calprotectin-deficient animals we found that calprotectin is crucial for the clearance of infection. Taken together, the present investigations confirmed the antifungal activity of calprotectin in vitro and, moreover, demonstrated that it contributes to effective host defense against C. albicans in vivo. We showed for the first time that a proportion of calprotectin is bound to NETs in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Neutrophil extracellular traps contain calprotectin, a cytosolic protein complex involved in host defense against Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Constantin F; Ermert, David; Schmid, Monika; Abu-Abed, Ulrike; Goosmann, Christian; Nacken, Wolfgang; Brinkmann, Volker; Jungblut, Peter R; Zychlinsky, Arturo

    2009-10-01

    Neutrophils are the first line of defense at the site of an infection. They encounter and kill microbes intracellularly upon phagocytosis or extracellularly by degranulation of antimicrobial proteins and the release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). NETs were shown to ensnare and kill microbes. However, their complete protein composition and the antimicrobial mechanism are not well understood. Using a proteomic approach, we identified 24 NET-associated proteins. Quantitative analysis of these proteins and high resolution electron microscopy showed that NETs consist of modified nucleosomes and a stringent selection of other proteins. In contrast to previous results, we found several NET proteins that are cytoplasmic in unstimulated neutrophils. We demonstrated that of those proteins, the antimicrobial heterodimer calprotectin is released in NETs as the major antifungal component. Absence of calprotectin in NETs resulted in complete loss of antifungal activity in vitro. Analysis of three different Candida albicans in vivo infection models indicated that NET formation is a hitherto unrecognized route of calprotectin release. By comparing wild-type and calprotectin-deficient animals we found that calprotectin is crucial for the clearance of infection. Taken together, the present investigations confirmed the antifungal activity of calprotectin in vitro and, moreover, demonstrated that it contributes to effective host defense against C. albicans in vivo. We showed for the first time that a proportion of calprotectin is bound to NETs in vitro and in vivo.

  11. A paradigm for endosymbiotic life: cell differentiation of Rhizobium bacteria provoked by host plant factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondorosi, Eva; Mergaert, Peter; Kereszt, Attila

    2013-01-01

    Symbiosis between Rhizobium bacteria and legumes leads to the formation of the root nodule. The endosymbiotic bacteria reside in polyploid host cells as membrane-surrounded vesicles where they reduce atmospheric nitrogen to support plant growth by supplying ammonia in exchange for carbon sources and energy. The morphology and physiology of endosymbionts, despite their common function, are highly divergent in different hosts. In galegoid plants, the endosymbionts are terminally differentiated, uncultivable polyploid cells, with remarkably elongated and even branched Y-shaped cells. Bacteroid differentiation is controlled by host peptides, many of which have antibacterial activity and require the bacterial function of BacA. Although the precise and combined action of several hundred host peptides and BacA has yet to be discovered, similarities, especially to certain insect-bacterium symbioses involving likewise host peptides for manipulation of endosymbionts, suggest convergent evolution. Rhizobium-legume symbiosis provides a rich source of information for understanding host-controlled endosymbiotic life in eukaryotic cells.

  12. Study of signal transduction factors involved in mycoparasitic response of Trichoderma atroviride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lorito M; Zeilinger S; Ambrosino P; Brunner K; Reithner B; Mach R L; Woo S L; Cristilli M; Scala F

    2004-01-01

    @@ Numerous Trichoderma spp. are mycoparasites and commercially applied as biological control agents against a large number of plant pathogenic fungi. The mycoparasitic interaction is host-specific and several research strategies have been applied to identify the main genes and compounds involved in the antagonist-plant-pathogen three-way interaction. During mycoparasitism, signals from the host fungus are recognised by Trichoderma, stimulating antifungal activities that are accompanied by morphological changes and the secretion of hydrolytic enzymes and antibiotics. Interestingly some morphological changes appeared highly conserved in the strategy of pathogenicity within the fungal world, i.e. the formation of appressoria as well as the secretion of hydrolytic enzymes seem to be general mechanisms of attack both for plant pathogens and mycoparasitic antagonists. This knowledge is being used to identify receptors and key components of signalling pathways involved in fungus-fungus interaction. For this purpose we have cloned the first genes (tmk1 , tga1 , tga3) from T. atroviride showing a high similarity to MAP kinase and G protein subunits (see abstract by Zeilinger et al.),which have been found to have an important role in pathogenicity by Magnaporthe grisea. To identify the function and involvement of these factors in mycoparasitism by T. atroviride, tmk1, tga1, tga3disruptant strains were produced. The knock-out mutants were tested by in vivo biocontrol assays for their ability to inhibit soil and foliar plant pathogens such as Rhizoctonia solani, Pythium ultimum and Botrytis cinerea . Disruption of these genes corresponded to a complete loss of biocontrol ability,suggesting a significant role in mycoparasitism. In particular, it has been suggested that tga3 regulates the expression of chitinase-encoding genes, the secretion of the corresponding enzymes and the process of conidiation. Comparative proteome analysis of wild type and disruptants supported this

  13. Hypersensitivity reactions to fluoroquinolones: analysis of the factors involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanca-López, N; Ariza, A; Doña, I; Mayorga, C; Montañez, M I; Garcia-Campos, J; Gomez, F; Rondón, C; Blanca, M; Torres, M J

    2013-05-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to fluoroquinolones seem to be on the increase, especially immediate type reactions. The aim of this study was to determine whether several conditions, including gender, age, type of reaction, time interval between the reaction and the study, type of symptoms, the specific fluoroquinolone involved in the reaction and previous confirmed hypersensitivity to betalactams or to other drugs were factors contributing to the development of hypersensitivity to fluoroquinolones. We analysed retrospectively all patients attending our allergy department between January 2005 and December 2010 because of a reaction associated with fluoroquinolone administration. The diagnosis was confirmed by basophil activation test or drug provocation tests. In accordance with the results, patients were then classified as having hypersensitivity or non-hypersensitivity to fluoroquinolones. A group of 218 patients was evaluated; 69 were confirmed as having hypersensitivity, 146 as non-hypersensitivity and 3 were excluded. Comparisons between groups showed that the allergic patients more often had a previous confirmed hypersensitivity to betalactams (P = 0.029), immediate reactions (P = 0.001) and anaphylaxis (P = 0.000), and moxifloxacin was the fluoroquinolone most frequently involved (P = 0.027). The logistic regression analysis showed three factors associated with the diagnosis of hypersensitivity reactions to fluoroquinolones: previous hypersensitivity to betalactams (OR: 4.571; 95% CI: 0.987-21.171; adjusted OR: 23.654; 95% CI: 1.529-365.853), immediate reactions (OR: 17.333; 95% CI: 4.374-68.691; adjusted OR: 52.493; 95% CI: 6.621-416.200) and reactions induced by moxifloxacin (OR: 3.091; 95% CI: 1.160-8.239; adjusted OR: 13.610; 95% CI: 2.419-76.565). In patients who develop reactions to fluoroquinolones, hypersensitivity is more often confirmed in those with immediate reactions and when moxifloxacin is involved. Moreover, patients with hypersensitivity to

  14. Ecological and genetic factors influencing the transition between host-use strategies in sympatric Heliconius butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, R M; Naisbit, R E; Mallet, J; Jiggins, C D

    2013-09-01

    Shifts in host-plant use by phytophagous insects have played a central role in their diversification. Evolving host-use strategies will reflect a trade-off between selection pressures. The ecological niche of herbivorous insects is partitioned along several dimensions, and if populations remain in contact, recombination will break down associations between relevant loci. As such, genetic architecture can profoundly affect the coordinated divergence of traits and subsequently the ability to exploit novel habitats. The closely related species Heliconius cydno and H. melpomene differ in mimetic colour pattern, habitat and host-plant use. We investigate the selection pressures and genetic basis underlying host-use differences in these two species. Host-plant surveys reveal that H. melpomene specializes on a single species of Passiflora. This is also true for the majority of other Heliconius species in secondary growth forest at our study site, as expected under a model of interspecific competition. In contrast, H. cydno, which uses closed-forest habitats where both Heliconius and Passiflora are less common, appears not to be restricted by competition and uses a broad selection of the available Passiflora. However, other selection pressures are likely involved, and field experiments reveal that early larval survival of both butterfly species is highest on Passiflora menispermifolia, but most markedly so for H. melpomene, the specialist on that host. Finally, we demonstrate an association between host-plant acceptance and colour pattern amongst interspecific hybrids, suggesting that major loci underlying these important ecological traits are physically linked in the genome. Together, our results reveal ecological and genetic associations between shifts in habitat, host use and mimetic colour pattern that have likely facilitated both speciation and coexistence.

  15. MR findings of acute graft-versus-host disease involving gastrointestinal tracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jae Joon; Kim, Myeong Jin; Kim, Joo Hee; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hee Chul [National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Ilsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    To evaluate the MR findings of gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogenic bone marrow transplantation. Five patients (M:F=3:2, age range: 9-58 years) with suspected gastrointestinal GVHD underwent abdominal MRI, and the findings were evaluated. Because of acute myelocytic leukemia (n=4) or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n=1), all had undergone allogenic bone marrow transplantation 2-6 (mean, 3.5) weeks earlier. T2-weighted half-fourier acquisition snapshot turbo spin-echo, T1-weighted spoiled gradient-echo (SGE), and postcontrast T1-weighted SGE MR imaging, with and without fat-suppression, was performed. All five patients showed bowel wall thickening and marked contrast enhancement in the jejunum (n=5), ileum (n=4), duodenum (n=3), sigmoid colon (n=3), gastric antrum (n=2), and rectum (n=2). Bowel wall thickening showed a target appearance in the jejunum (n=2, 40.4%), lieum (n=1, 25.0%), sigmoid colon (n=1, 33.3%), and rectum (n=1, 50.0%), while the remaining cases showed diffuse wall thickening without layering. Small amount of ascites was noted in four patients (80%), and multiple small conglomerated retroperitoneal lymph nodes in three (60%). In all patients, a signal intensity of slightly enlarged liver due to iron overload secondary to multiple blood transfusions, gave rise to decreased signal intensity at both T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging. In patients with GVHD, the commonly noted MR findings were bowel was thickening with contrast enhancement, ascites and retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy.

  16. Delayed onset muscle soreness: Involvement of neurotrophic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizumura, Kazue; Taguchi, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is quite a common consequence of unaccustomed strenuous exercise, especially exercise containing eccentric contraction (lengthening contraction, LC). Its typical sign is mechanical hyperalgesia (tenderness and movement related pain). Its cause has been commonly believed to be micro-damage of the muscle and subsequent inflammation. Here we present a brief historical overview of the damage-inflammation theory followed by a discussion of our new findings. Different from previous observations, we have observed mechanical hyperalgesia in rats 1-3 days after LC without any apparent microscopic damage of the muscle or signs of inflammation. With our model we have found that two pathways are involved in inducing mechanical hyperalgesia after LC: activation of the B2 bradykinin receptor-nerve growth factor (NGF) pathway and activation of the COX-2-glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) pathway. These neurotrophic factors were produced by muscle fibers and/or satellite cells. This means that muscle fiber damage is not essential, although it is sufficient, for induction of DOMS, instead, NGF and GDNF produced by muscle fibers/satellite cells play crucial roles in DOMS.

  17. Identification of FAM111A as an SV40 host range restriction and adenovirus helper factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debrah A Fine

    Full Text Available The small genome of polyomaviruses encodes a limited number of proteins that are highly dependent on interactions with host cell proteins for efficient viral replication. The SV40 large T antigen (LT contains several discrete functional domains including the LXCXE or RB-binding motif, the DNA binding and helicase domains that contribute to the viral life cycle. In addition, the LT C-terminal region contains the host range and adenovirus helper functions required for lytic infection in certain restrictive cell types. To understand how LT affects the host cell to facilitate viral replication, we expressed full-length or functional domains of LT in cells, identified interacting host proteins and carried out expression profiling. LT perturbed the expression of p53 target genes and subsets of cell-cycle dependent genes regulated by the DREAM and the B-Myb-MuvB complexes. Affinity purification of LT followed by mass spectrometry revealed a specific interaction between the LT C-terminal region and FAM111A, a previously uncharacterized protein. Depletion of FAM111A recapitulated the effects of heterologous expression of the LT C-terminal region, including increased viral gene expression and lytic infection of SV40 host range mutants and adenovirus replication in restrictive cells. FAM111A functions as a host range restriction factor that is specifically targeted by SV40 LT.

  18. A Supramolecular Host-Guest Carrier System for Growth Factors Employing VHH Fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabanas-Danés, J.; Rodrigues, E.D.; Landman, Ellie B.M.; Weerd, van J.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Verrips, T.; Huskens, J.; Karperien, H.B.J.; Jonkheijm, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    A supramolecular strategy is presented for the assembly of growth factors employing His6-tagged single-domain antibodies (VHH). A combination of orthogonal supramolecular interactions of β-cyclodextrin (βCD)-adamantyl (Ad) host-guest and N-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-histidine (His) interactions was

  19. Host-related factors explaining interindividual variability of carotenoid bioavailability and tissue concentrations in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohn, Torsten; Desmarchelier, Charles; Dragsted, Lars O.; Nielsen, Charlotte S.; Stahl, Wilhelm; Rühl, Ralph; Keijer, Jaap; Borel, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Carotenoid dietary intake and their endogenous levels have been associated with a decreased risk of several chronic diseases. There are indications that carotenoid bioavailability depends, in addition to the food matrix, on host factors. These include diseases (e.g. colitis), life-style habits (e

  20. Distinct immunoregulatory properties of macrophage migration inhibitory factors encoded by Eimeria parasites and their chicken host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory cytokine that plays an important role in host defense against a variety of microorganisms including protozoan parasites. Interestingly, some microbial pathogens also express a MIF-like protein, although its role in disease pathogenesi...

  1. Graft-versus-leukemia reactivity involves cluster formation between superantigen-reactive donor T lymphocytes and host macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müerköster, S; Wachowski, O; Zerban, H; Schirrmacher, V; Umansky, V; Rocha, M

    1998-12-01

    T-cell-mediated antitumor effects play an important role clinically in allogeneic graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) reactivity, whereas T-cell-mediated antihost effects are associated with a risk of developing graft-versus-host (GvH) disease. GvL and GvH were compared in an animal tumor model system after the systemic transfer of allogeneic antitumor immune T lymphocytes from B10.D2 [H-2d; minor lymphocyte-stimulating antigen (Mls)b] mice into ESb-MP tumor-bearing or normal DBA/2 (H-2d; Mls(a)) mice. Here we demonstrate that this T-cell-mediated therapy involves the formation of clusters of donor CD4 and CD8 T cells with host macrophages, in particular, with a subpopulation expressing the lymphocyte adhesion molecule sialoadhesin. DBA/2 mice and the derived tumor ESb-MP express viral superantigen 7 (Mls(a)), an endogenous viral superantigen that is absent from B10.D2 mice. To test the contribution of viral superantigen 7-reactive Vbeta6 donor T cells in the GvL-mediated eradication of liver metastases, we performed immunohistological and transmission electron microscopy studies. Vbeta6+ CD4 and CD8 T cells from B10.D2 donors formed tight clusters with host sialoadhesin-positive macrophages, and transmission electron microscopy pictures revealed direct membrane-membrane interactions between T cells and macrophages. Clusters were more abundant and consisted of more cells in tumor-bearing hosts (GvL model) than in non-tumor-bearing hosts (GvH model). In addition, Vbeta6 T cells within the clusters showed a strong proliferation activity, indicating stimulation. Moreover, in an in vitro tumor cytostasis assay, primed as well as nonprimed purified Vbeta6 T cells from donor mice were able to inhibit the proliferation of superantigen-expressing ESb-MP lymphoma cells. This suggests that the transferred superantigen-reactive Vbeta6 T cells contribute to the eradication of metastases. The observed cell clusters might be sites for antigen presentation and the activation of tumor

  2. Structural determinants of host specificity of complement Factor H recruitment by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achila, David; Liu, Aizhuo; Banerjee, Rahul; Li, Yue; Martinez-Hackert, Erik; Zhang, Jing-Ren; Yan, Honggao

    2015-01-15

    Many human pathogens have strict host specificity, which affects not only their epidemiology but also the development of animal models and vaccines. Complement Factor H (FH) is recruited to pneumococcal cell surface in a human-specific manner via the N-terminal domain of the pneumococcal protein virulence factor choline-binding protein A (CbpAN). FH recruitment enables Streptococcus pneumoniae to evade surveillance by human complement system and contributes to pneumococcal host specificity. The molecular determinants of host specificity of complement evasion are unknown. In the present study, we show that a single human FH (hFH) domain is sufficient for tight binding of CbpAN, present the crystal structure of the complex and identify the critical structural determinants for host-specific FH recruitment. The results offer new approaches to the development of better animal models for pneumococcal infection and redesign of the virulence factor for pneumococcal vaccine development and reveal how FH recruitment can serve as a mechanism for both pneumococcal complement evasion and adherence.

  3. Host genetics and environmental factors regulate ecological succession of the mouse colon tissue-associated microbiota.

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    Philip Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The integration of host genetics, environmental triggers and the microbiota is a recognised factor in the pathogenesis of barrier function diseases such as IBD. In order to determine how these factors interact to regulate the host immune response and ecological succession of the colon tissue-associated microbiota, we investigated the temporal interaction between the microbiota and the host following disruption of the colonic epithelial barrier. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Oral administration of DSS was applied as a mechanistic model of environmental damage of the colon and the resulting inflammation characterized for various parameters over time in WT and Nod2 KO mice. RESULTS: In WT mice, DSS damage exposed the host to the commensal flora and led to a migration of the tissue-associated bacteria from the epithelium to mucosal and submucosal layers correlating with changes in proinflammatory cytokine profiles and a progressive transition from acute to chronic inflammation of the colon. Tissue-associated bacteria levels peaked at day 21 post-DSS and declined thereafter, correlating with recruitment of innate immune cells and development of the adaptive immune response. Histological parameters, immune cell infiltration and cytokine biomarkers of inflammation were indistinguishable between Nod2 and WT littermates following DSS, however, Nod2 KO mice demonstrated significantly higher tissue-associated bacterial levels in the colon. DSS damage and Nod2 genotype independently regulated the community structure of the colon microbiota. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of these experiments demonstrate the integration of environmental and genetic factors in the ecological succession of the commensal flora in mammalian tissue. The association of Nod2 genotype (and other host polymorphisms and environmental factors likely combine to influence the ecological succession of the tissue-associated microflora accounting in part for their

  4. Novel Burkholderia mallei Virulence Factors Linked to Specific Host-Pathogen Protein Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-23

    fundamental molecular host-pathogen interac- tions that mediate these activities have gathered less atten- tion. Although the transcriptional immune response...Hines, H. B., and Jeddeloh, J. A. (2004) Quorum sensing: A transcriptional regulatory system involved in the pathogenicity of Burkholderia mallei...orthology database for prokaryotes and eukaryotes inferred by evolutionary evidence. BMC Bioinformatics 13, 143 25. Yu, C., Zavaljevski, N., Desai, V

  5. Novel Burkholderia mallei Virulence Factors Linked to Specific Host-Pathogen Protein Interactions*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memišević, Vesna; Zavaljevski, Nela; Pieper, Rembert; Rajagopala, Seesandra V.; Kwon, Keehwan; Townsend, Katherine; Yu, Chenggang; Yu, Xueping; DeShazer, David; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is an infectious intracellular pathogen whose virulence and resistance to antibiotics makes it a potential bioterrorism agent. Given its genetic origin as a commensal soil organism, it is equipped with an extensive and varied set of adapted mechanisms to cope with and modulate host-cell environments. One essential virulence mechanism constitutes the specialized secretion systems that are designed to penetrate host-cell membranes and insert pathogen proteins directly into the host cell's cytosol. However, the secretion systems' proteins and, in particular, their host targets are largely uncharacterized. Here, we used a combined in silico, in vitro, and in vivo approach to identify B. mallei proteins required for pathogenicity. We used bioinformatics tools, including orthology detection and ab initio predictions of secretion system proteins, as well as published experimental Burkholderia data to initially select a small number of proteins as putative virulence factors. We then used yeast two-hybrid assays against normalized whole human and whole murine proteome libraries to detect and identify interactions among each of these bacterial proteins and host proteins. Analysis of such interactions provided both verification of known virulence factors and identification of three new putative virulence proteins. We successfully created insertion mutants for each of these three proteins using the virulent B. mallei ATCC 23344 strain. We exposed BALB/c mice to mutant strains and the wild-type strain in an aerosol challenge model using lethal B. mallei doses. In each set of experiments, mice exposed to mutant strains survived for the 21-day duration of the experiment, whereas mice exposed to the wild-type strain rapidly died. Given their in vivo role in pathogenicity, and based on the yeast two-hybrid interaction data, these results point to the importance of these pathogen proteins in modulating host ubiquitination pathways, phagosomal escape, and actin

  6. Factors and Strategies That Influence Faculty Involvement in Public Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Barbara A.

    2016-01-01

    Data from several national research and evaluation projects involving 32 diverse institutions offer insights into what motivates college-faculty involvement in public service and outreach efforts, what faculty find to be obstacles to involvement, and what institutions can do to facilitate involvement. One salient policy supporting faculty…

  7. Comprehensive assessment of host responses to ionizing radiation by nuclear factor-κB bioluminescence imaging-guided transcriptomic analysis.

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    Chung-Ta Chang

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the host responses to ionizing radiation by nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB bioluminescence imaging-guided transcriptomic tool. Transgenic mice carrying the NF-κB-driven luciferase gene were exposed to a single dose of 8.5 Gy total-body irradiation. In vivo imaging showed that a maximal NF-κB-dependent bioluminescent intensity was observed at 3 h after irradiation and ex vivo imaging showed that liver, intestine, and brain displayed strong NF-κB activations. Microarray analysis of these organs showed that irradiation altered gene expression signatures in an organ-specific manner and several pathways associated with metabolism and immune system were significantly altered. Additionally, the upregulation of fatty acid binding protein 4, serum amyloid A2, and serum amyloid A3 genes, which participate in both inflammation and lipid metabolism, suggested that irradiation might affect the cross pathways of metabolism and inflammation. Moreover, the alteration of chemokine (CC-motif ligand 5, chemokine (CC-motif ligand 20, and Jagged 1 genes, which are involved in the inflammation and enterocyte proliferation, suggested that these genes might be involved in the radiation enteropathy. In conclusion, this report describes the comprehensive evaluation of host responses to ionizing radiation. Our findings provide the fundamental information about the in vivo NF-κB activity and transcriptomic pattern after irradiation. Moreover, novel targets involved in radiation injury are also suggested.

  8. Effects of Host Plant Factors on the Bacterial Communities Associated with Two Whitefly Sibling Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ming-Ming; Guo, Lei; Tao, Yun-Li; Zhang, You-Jun; Wan, Fang-Hao; Chu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Although discrepancy in the specific traits and ecological characteristics of Bemisia tabaci between species are partially attributed to the B. tabaci-associated bacteria, the factors that affect the diversity of B. tabaci-associated bacteria are not well-understood. We used the metagenomic approach to characterize the B. tabaci-associated bacterial community because the approach is an effective tool to identify the bacteria. To investigate the effects of the host plant and a virus, tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), on the bacterial communities of B. tabaci sibling species B and Q, we analyzed the bacterial communities associated with whitefly B and Q collected from healthy cotton, healthy tomato, and TYLCV-infected tomato. The analysis used miseq-based sequencing of a variable region of the bacterial 16S rDNA gene. For the bacteria associated with B. tabaci, we found that the influence of the host plant species was greater than that of the whitefly cryptic species. With further analysis of host plants infected with the TYLCV, the virus had no significant effects on the B. tabaci-associated bacterial community. The effects of different plant hosts and TYLCV-infection on the diversity of B. tabaci-associated bacterial communities were successfully analyzed in this study. To explain why B. tabaci sibling species with different host ranges differ in performance, the analysis of the bacterial community may be essential to the explanation.

  9. Familial and social factors of involving teenagers into alcohol use

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    Andreeva, Tatiana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many authors discuss factors which influence involving adolescence into alcohol use. This study was aimed to assess contribution of factors related to alcohol use in the family, getting into situations of alcohol use as well as preventive work in teenage establishments.MATERIAL AND METHODS: Survey of 373 adolescents attending teenage clubs was conducted in Kazan, Russia, with questions related to alcohol use in the family and among peers, age and circumstances of first alcohol use. The outcome measure was whether respondents were current alcohol users. Associations were explored through logistic regression models.RESULTS: Alcohol use by teenagers did not differ by gender. Odds of using alcohol increased with age (OR=1.46 95%CI 1.19-1.80 per year. Risk of alcohol use was lower if no family members used alcohol (OR=0.3 95%CI 0.2-0.5 compared to those teenagers who have any family members who used alcohol. After adding to the model variables related to the first alcohol use, most significant was association with the response that no one has ever proposed to drink alcohol (OR=0.014 95%CI 0.005-0.041 compared to any situations of alcohol use, while the association with familial factors was attenuated. This shows that impact of familial factors could be mediated through the occasions of alcohol use. Teenagers whose parents do not use alcohol less likely get into situations where they are proposed to drink in a peer group (12% vs. 24% or at a party (18% vs. 25%.Adolescents who expressed negative attitude to alcohol-related work in youth clubs more likely were alcohol users themselves (OR=21.1 95%CI 2.6-170.3, which is better applicable for diagnostics than for program evaluation.CONCLUSION: Absence of alcohol in the family predetermines alcohol use by adolescents. Teenagers whose parents do not use alcohol less likely get into situations where they are suggested to drink alcohol.

  10. Class I ADP-ribosylation factors are involved in enterovirus 71 replication.

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    Jianmin Wang

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease in infants and children. Replication of enterovirus 71 depends on host cellular factors. The viral replication complex is formed in novel, cytoplasmic, vesicular compartments. It has not been elucidated which cellular pathways are hijacked by the virus to create these vesicles. Here, we investigated whether proteins associated with the cellular secretory pathway were involved in enterovirus 71 replication. We used a loss-of-function assay, based on small interfering RNA. We showed that enterovirus 71 RNA replication was dependent on the activity of Class I ADP-ribosylation factors. Simultaneous depletion of ADP-ribosylation factors 1 and 3, but not three others, inhibited viral replication in cells. We also demonstrated with various techniques that the brefeldin-A-sensitive guanidine nucleotide exchange factor, GBF1, was critically important for enterovirus 71 replication. Our results suggested that enterovirus 71 replication depended on GBF1-mediated activation of Class I ADP-ribosylation factors. These results revealed a connection between enterovirus 71 replication and the cellular secretory pathway; this pathway may represent a novel target for antiviral therapies.

  11. Computational approach for identification of Anopheles gambiae miRNA involved in modulation of host immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirugnanasambantham, Krishnaraj; Hairul-Islam, Villianur Ibrahim; Saravanan, Subramanian; Subasri, Subramaniyan; Subastri, Ariraman

    2013-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that play key roles in regulating gene expression in animals, plants, and viruses, which involves in biological processes including development, cancer, immunity, and host-microorganism interactions. In this present study, we have used the computational approach to identify potent miRNAs involved in Anopheles gambiae immune response. Analysis of 217,261 A. gambiae ESTs and further study of RNA folding revealed six new miRNAs. The minimum free energy of the predicted miRNAs ranged from -27.2 to -62.63 kcal/mol with an average of -49.38 kcal/mol. While its A + U % ranges from 50 to 65 % with an average value of 57.37 %. Phylogenetic analysis of the predicted miRNAs revealed that aga-miR-277 was evolutionary highly conserved with more similarity with other mosquito species. Observing further the target identification of the predicted miRNA, it was noticed that the aga-miR-2304 and aga-miR-2390 are involved in modulation of immune response by targeting the gene encoding suppressin and protein prophenoloxidase. Further detailed studies of these miRNAs will help in revealing its function in modulation of A. gambiae immune response with respect to its parasite.

  12. Visual Genome-Wide RNAi Screening to Identify Human Host Factors Required for Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macedo Dossin, Fernando; Choi, Seo Yeon; Kim, Nam Youl; Kim, Hi Chul; Jung, Sung Yong; Schenkman, Sergio; Almeida, Igor C.; Emans, Neil; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H.

    2011-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, a neglected tropical infection that affects millions of people in the Americas. Current chemotherapy relies on only two drugs that have limited efficacy and considerable side effects. Therefore, the development of new and more effective drugs is of paramount importance. Although some host cellular factors that play a role in T. cruzi infection have been uncovered, the molecular requirements for intracellular parasite growth and persistence are still not well understood. To further study these host-parasite interactions and identify human host factors required for T. cruzi infection, we performed a genome-wide RNAi screen using cellular microarrays of a printed siRNA library that spanned the whole human genome. The screening was reproduced 6 times and a customized algorithm was used to select as hits those genes whose silencing visually impaired parasite infection. The 162 strongest hits were subjected to a secondary screening and subsequently validated in two different cell lines. Among the fourteen hits confirmed, we recognized some cellular membrane proteins that might function as cell receptors for parasite entry and others that may be related to calcium release triggered by parasites during cell invasion. In addition, two of the hits are related to the TGF-beta signaling pathway, whose inhibition is already known to diminish levels of T. cruzi infection. This study represents a significant step toward unveiling the key molecular requirements for host cell invasion and revealing new potential targets for antiparasitic therapy. PMID:21625474

  13. Visual genome-wide RNAi screening to identify human host factors required for Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

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    Auguste Genovesio

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, a neglected tropical infection that affects millions of people in the Americas. Current chemotherapy relies on only two drugs that have limited efficacy and considerable side effects. Therefore, the development of new and more effective drugs is of paramount importance. Although some host cellular factors that play a role in T. cruzi infection have been uncovered, the molecular requirements for intracellular parasite growth and persistence are still not well understood. To further study these host-parasite interactions and identify human host factors required for T. cruzi infection, we performed a genome-wide RNAi screen using cellular microarrays of a printed siRNA library that spanned the whole human genome. The screening was reproduced 6 times and a customized algorithm was used to select as hits those genes whose silencing visually impaired parasite infection. The 162 strongest hits were subjected to a secondary screening and subsequently validated in two different cell lines. Among the fourteen hits confirmed, we recognized some cellular membrane proteins that might function as cell receptors for parasite entry and others that may be related to calcium release triggered by parasites during cell invasion. In addition, two of the hits are related to the TGF-beta signaling pathway, whose inhibition is already known to diminish levels of T. cruzi infection. This study represents a significant step toward unveiling the key molecular requirements for host cell invasion and revealing new potential targets for antiparasitic therapy.

  14. Host Cell Factors in Filovirus Entry: Novel Players, New Insights

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    Stefan Pöhlmann

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Filoviruses cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans with high case-fatality rates. The cellular factors exploited by filoviruses for their spread constitute potential targets for intervention, but are incompletely defined. The viral glycoprotein (GP mediates filovirus entry into host cells. Recent studies revealed important insights into the host cell molecules engaged by GP for cellular entry. The binding of GP to cellular lectins was found to concentrate virions onto susceptible cells and might contribute to the early and sustained infection of macrophages and dendritic cells, important viral targets. Tyrosine kinase receptors were shown to promote macropinocytic uptake of filoviruses into a subset of susceptible cells without binding to GP, while interactions between GP and human T cell Ig mucin 1 (TIM-1 might contribute to filovirus infection of mucosal epithelial cells. Moreover, GP engagement of the cholesterol transporter Niemann-Pick C1 was demonstrated to be essential for GP-mediated fusion of the viral envelope with a host cell membrane. Finally, mutagenic and structural analyses defined GP domains which interact with these host cell factors. Here, we will review the recent progress in elucidating the molecular interactions underlying filovirus entry and discuss their implications for our understanding of the viral cell tropism.

  15. CT-analysis of the course of gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease-Patterns of involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketelsen, D., E-mail: dominik.ketelsen@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Vogel, W.; Bethge, W.; Faul, C. [Department of Internal Medicine-Oncology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Ottfried-Mueller-Str. 5, 72070 Tuebingen (Germany); Claussen, C.D.; Horger, M. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    Objective: To describe the main patterns of distribution of gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and their chronological course. Methods: Twenty-five adult patients (17 men, 8 women, mean age 47 years) were enrolled from 11/2003 to 11/2007. All patients underwent abdominopelvic CT shortly after onset of GVHD-related symptoms and also at follow up. The mean number of CT examinations per patient was 3.2 {+-} 2.7 with a total of 81 in a median time period of 97 days after HCT. The gastrointestinal tract was divided into 7 segments. Gastrointestinal abnormalities were defined as follows: presence of wall thickening (>4 mm), increased mucosal enhancement, bowel dilatation (>3 cm for the small bowel, >8 cm for the colon), fluid-filled loops of the bowel, bowel loop separation and double-halo sign. Results: 40% (10/25) of the patients presented a classical pattern of evolution of involved segments by GI-GVHD. In these cases, especially the small bowel was initially involved showing a retreat with time towards the terminal ileum with longer length of stay in this location. 28% (7/25) of the patients presented with a nonclassical permanently migratory involvement of the GI jumping from one GI segment to another. Other 32% (8/25) of our patients revealed a nonclassical persistent, unchanged involvement pattern of GI involvement by GVHD at time. Conclusion: Contrary to existing reports, our data collected in 25 patients diagnosed with GI-GVHD after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation suggest the presence of three different courses (classical, nonclassical migratory and nonclassical persistent) of this disorder. Awareness of this knowledge enables more accurate risk stratification.

  16. Heteroconium chaetospira induces resistance to clubroot via upregulation of host genes involved in jasmonic acid, ethylene, and auxin biosynthesis.

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    Rachid Lahlali

    Full Text Available An endophytic fungus, Heteroconium chaetospira isolate BC2HB1 (Hc, suppressed clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae -Pb on canola in growth-cabinet trials. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that Hc penetrated canola roots and colonized cortical tissues. Based on qPCR analysis, the amount of Hc DNA found in canola roots at 14 days after treatment was negatively correlated (r = 0.92, P<0.001 with the severity of clubroot at 5 weeks after treatment at a low (2×10(5 spores pot(-1 but not high (2×10(5 spores pot(-1 dose of pathogen inoculum. Transcript levels of nine B. napus (Bn genes in roots treated with Hc plus Pb, Pb alone and a nontreated control were analyzed using qPCR supplemented with biochemical analysis for the activity of phenylalanine ammonia lyases (PAL. These genes encode enzymes involved in several biosynthetic pathways related potentially to plant defence. Hc plus Pb increased the activity of PAL but not that of the other two genes (BnCCR and BnOPCL involved also in phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, relative to Pb inoculation alone. In contrast, expression of several genes involved in the jasmonic acid (BnOPR2, ethylene (BnACO, auxin (BnAAO1, and PR-2 protein (BnPR-2 biosynthesis were upregulated by 63, 48, 3, and 3 fold, respectively, by Hc plus Pb over Pb alone. This indicates that these genes may be involved in inducing resistance in canola by Hc against clubroot. The upregulation of BnAAO1 appears to be related to both pathogenesis of clubroot and induced defence mechanisms in canola roots. This is the first report on regulation of specific host genes involved in induced plant resistance by a non-mycorrhizal endophyte.

  17. Involvement of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase signalling pathway in host cell invasion by Toxoplasma gondii

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    Robert-Gangneux F.

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about signalling in Toxoplasma gondii, but it is likely that protein kinases might play a key role in the parasite proliferation, differentiation and probably invasion. We previously characterized Mitogen-Activated Protein (MAP kinases in T. gondii lysates. In this study, cultured cells were tested for their susceptibility to Toxoplasma gondii infection after tachyzoite pretreatment with drugs interfering with AMP kinase activation pathways. Protein kinases inhibitors, i.e. genistein, R031-8220 and PD098059, reduced tachyzoite infectivity by 38 ± 4.5 %, 85.5 ± 9 % and 56 ± 10 %, respectively. Conversely, protein kinases activators, i.e. bombesin and PMA, markedly increased infectivity (by 202 ± 37 % and 258 ± 14 %, respectively. These results suggest that signalling pathways involving PKC and AAAP kinases play a role in host cell invasion by Toxoplasma.

  18. Host factors and HIV-1 replication: clinical evidence and potential therapeutic approaches

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    Mariana eSanta-Marta

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available HIV and human defense mechanisms have co-evolved to counteract each other. In the process of infection, HIV takes advantage of cellular machinery and blocks the action of the host restriction factors. A small subset of HIV+ individuals control HIV infection and progression to AIDS in the absence of treatment. These individuals known, as long-term non-progressors (LNTPs exhibit genetic and immunological characteristics that confer upon them an efficient resistance to infection and/or disease progression. The identification of some of these host factors led to the development of therapeutic approaches that attempted to mimic the natural control of HIV infection. Some of these approaches are currently being tested in clinical trials. While there are many genes which carry mutations and polymorphisms associated with non-progression, this review will be specifically focused on HIV host restriction factors (RF including both the main chemokine receptors and chemokines as well as intracellular restriction factors including, APOBEC, TRIM, tetherin and SAMHD1. The understanding of molecular profiles and mechanisms present in LTNPs should provide new insights to control HIV infection and contribute to the development of novel therapies against AIDS.

  19. Mammalian antimicrobial proteins and peptides: overview on the RNase A superfamily members involved in innate host defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boix, Ester; Nogués, M Victòria

    2007-05-01

    The review starts with a general outlook of the main mechanisms of action of antimicrobial proteins and peptides, with the final aim of understanding the biological function of antimicrobial RNases, and identifying the key events that account for their selective properties. Although most antibacterial proteins and peptides do display a wide-range spectrum of action, with a cytotoxic activity against bacteria, fungi, eukaryotic parasites and viruses, we have only focused on their bactericidal activity. We start with a detailed description of the main distinctive structural features of the bacteria target and on the polypeptides, which act as selective host defence weapons.Following, we include an overview of all the current available information on the mammalian RNases which display an antimicrobial activity. There is a wealth of information on the structural, catalytic mechanism and evolutionary relationships of the RNase A superfamily. The bovine pancreatic RNase A (RNase A), the reference member of the mammalian RNase family, has been the main research object of several Nobel laureates in the 60s, 70s and 80s. A potential antimicrobial function was only recently suggested for several members of this family. In fact, the recent evolutionary studies indicate that this protein family may have started off with a host defence function. Antimicrobial RNases constitute an interesting example of proteins involved in the mammalian innate immune defence system. Besides, there is wealth of available information on the mechanism of action of short antimicrobial peptides, but little is known on larger polypeptides, that is, on proteins. Therefore, the identification of the mechanisms of action of antimicrobial RNases would contribute to the understanding of the proteins involved in the innate immunity.

  20. Human genome-wide RNAi screen for host factors that modulate intracellular Salmonella growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornbrough, Joshua M; Hundley, Tom; Valdivia, Raphael; Worley, Micah J

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a bacterial pathogen of humans that can proliferate within epithelial cells as well as professional phagocytes of the immune system. While much has been learned about the microbial genes that influence the infectious process through decades of intensive research, relatively little is known about the host factors that affect infection. We performed a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify host genes that Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) utilizes to facilitate growth within human epithelial cells. In this screen, with siRNAs targeting every predicted gene in the human genome, we identified 252 new human-host-susceptibility factors (HSFs) for S. typhimurium. We also identified 39 genes whose silencing results in increased intracellular growth of S. typhimurium. The HSFs identified are regulated most centrally by NFκB and associate with each other through an extremely dense network of interactions that center around a group of kinases. Most genes identified were not previously appreciated as playing roles in the intracellular lifecycle of S. enterica. Numerous HSFs identified with interesting characteristics that could play plausible roles in mediating intracellular microbial growth are discussed. Importantly, this study reveals significant overlap between the host network that supports S. typhimurium growth within human epithelial cells and the one that promotes the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within human macrophages. In addition to providing much new information about the molecular mechanisms underlying S. enterica-host cell interplay, all 252 HSFs identified are candidates for new anti-microbial targets for controlling S. enterica infections, and some may provide broad-spectrum anti-microbial activity.

  1. Genome-wide RNAi screen identifies broadly-acting host factors that inhibit arbovirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Yasunaga

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Vector-borne viruses are an important class of emerging and re-emerging pathogens; thus, an improved understanding of the cellular factors that modulate infection in their respective vertebrate and insect hosts may aid control efforts. In particular, cell-intrinsic antiviral pathways restrict vector-borne viruses including the type I interferon response in vertebrates and the RNA interference (RNAi pathway in insects. However, it is likely that additional cell-intrinsic mechanisms exist to limit these viruses. Since insects rely on innate immune mechanisms to inhibit virus infections, we used Drosophila as a model insect to identify cellular factors that restrict West Nile virus (WNV, a flavivirus with a broad and expanding geographical host range. Our genome-wide RNAi screen identified 50 genes that inhibited WNV infection. Further screening revealed that 17 of these genes were antiviral against additional flaviviruses, and seven of these were antiviral against other vector-borne viruses, expanding our knowledge of invertebrate cell-intrinsic immunity. Investigation of two newly identified factors that restrict diverse viruses, dXPO1 and dRUVBL1, in the Tip60 complex, demonstrated they contributed to antiviral defense at the organismal level in adult flies, in mosquito cells, and in mammalian cells. These data suggest the existence of broadly acting and functionally conserved antiviral genes and pathways that restrict virus infections in evolutionarily divergent hosts.

  2. Host Factors and Biomarkers Associated with Poor Outcomes in Adults with Invasive Pneumococcal Disease.

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    Shigeo Hanada

    Full Text Available Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD causes considerable morbidity and mortality. We aimed to identify host factors and biomarkers associated with poor outcomes in adult patients with IPD in Japan, which has a rapidly-aging population.In a large-scale surveillance study of 506 Japanese adults with IPD, we investigated the role of host factors, disease severity, biomarkers based on clinical laboratory data, treatment regimens, and bacterial factors on 28-day mortality.Overall mortality was 24.1%, and the mortality rate increased from 10.0% in patients aged ˂50 years to 33.1% in patients aged ≥80 years. Disease severity also increased 28-day mortality, from 12.5% among patients with bacteraemia without sepsis to 35.0% in patients with severe sepsis and 56.9% with septic shock. The death rate within 48 hours after admission was high at 54.9%. Risk factors for mortality identified by multivariate analysis were as follows: white blood cell (WBC count <4000 cells/μL (odds ratio [OR], 6.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.7-12.8, p < .001; age ≥80 years (OR, 6.5; 95% CI, 2.0-21.6, p = .002; serum creatinine ≥2.0 mg/dL (OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 2.5-8.1, p < .001; underlying liver disease (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.6-7.8, p = .002; mechanical ventilation (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.7-5.6, p < .001; and lactate dehydrogenase ≥300 IU/L (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.4-4.0, p = .001. Pneumococcal serotype and drug resistance were not associated with poor outcomes.Host factors, disease severity, and biomarkers, especially WBC counts and serum creatinine, were more important determinants of mortality than bacterial factors.

  3. Gut Microbiome and Infant Health: Brain-Gut-Microbiota Axis and Host Genetic Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Xiaomei; Xu, Wanli; Romisher, Rachael; Poveda, Samantha; Forte, Shaina; Starkweather, Angela; Henderson, Wendy A.

    2016-01-01

    The development of the neonatal gut microbiome is influenced by multiple factors, such as delivery mode, feeding, medication use, hospital environment, early life stress, and genetics. The dysbiosis of gut microbiota persists during infancy, especially in high-risk preterm infants who experience lengthy stays in the Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Infant microbiome evolutionary trajectory is essentially parallel with the host (infant) neurodevelopmental process and growth. The role of the gut microbiome, the brain-gut signaling system, and its interaction with the host genetics have been shown to be related to both short and long term infant health and bio-behavioral development. The investigation of potential dysbiosis patterns in early childhood is still lacking and few studies have addressed this host-microbiome co-developmental process. Further research spanning a variety of fields of study is needed to focus on the mechanisms of brain-gut-microbiota signaling system and the dynamic host-microbial interaction in the regulation of health, stress and development in human newborns.

  4. Gut Microbiome and Infant Health: Brain-Gut-Microbiota Axis and Host Genetic Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Xiaomei; Xu, Wanli; Romisher, Rachael; Poveda, Samantha; Forte, Shaina; Starkweather, Angela; Henderson, Wendy A

    2016-09-01

    The development of the neonatal gut microbiome is influenced by multiple factors, such as delivery mode, feeding, medication use, hospital environment, early life stress, and genetics. The dysbiosis of gut microbiota persists during infancy, especially in high-risk preterm infants who experience lengthy stays in the Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Infant microbiome evolutionary trajectory is essentially parallel with the host (infant) neurodevelopmental process and growth. The role of the gut microbiome, the brain-gut signaling system, and its interaction with the host genetics have been shown to be related to both short and long term infant health and bio-behavioral development. The investigation of potential dysbiosis patterns in early childhood is still lacking and few studies have addressed this host-microbiome co-developmental process. Further research spanning a variety of fields of study is needed to focus on the mechanisms of brain-gut-microbiota signaling system and the dynamic host-microbial interaction in the regulation of health, stress and development in human newborns.

  5. Temperature shift and host cell contact up-regulate sporozoite expression of Plasmodium falciparum genes involved in hepatocyte infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Siau

    proteins involved in hepatocyte invasion, while the other two were predominantly expressed during hepatic parasite development. The genome-wide up-regulation of expression observed supports the hypothesis that the shift from the mosquito to the mammalian host contributes to activate quiescent salivary gland sporozoites into a state of readiness for the hepatic stages. Functional studies on four of the up-regulated genes validated our approach as one means to determine the repertoire of proteins implicated during the early events of the Plasmodium infection, and in this case that of P. falciparum, the species responsible for the severest forms of malaria.

  6. Transcription factor ATF3 links host adaptive response to breast cancer metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolford, Chris C.; McConoughey, Stephen J.; Jalgaonkar, Swati P.; Leon, Marino; Merchant, Anand S.; Dominick, Johnna L.; Yin, Xin; Chang, Yiseok; Zmuda, Erik J.; O’Toole, Sandra A.; Millar, Ewan K.A.; Roller, Stephanie L.; Shapiro, Charles L.; Ostrowski, Michael C.; Sutherland, Robert L.; Hai, Tsonwin

    2013-01-01

    Host response to cancer signals has emerged as a key factor in cancer development; however, the underlying molecular mechanism is not well understood. In this report, we demonstrate that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), a hub of the cellular adaptive response network, plays an important role in host cells to enhance breast cancer metastasis. Immunohistochemical analysis of patient tumor samples revealed that expression of ATF3 in stromal mononuclear cells, but not cancer epithelial cells, is correlated with worse clinical outcomes and is an independent predictor for breast cancer death. This finding was corroborated by data from mouse models showing less efficient breast cancer metastasis in Atf3-deficient mice than in WT mice. Further, mice with myeloid cell–selective KO of Atf3 showed fewer lung metastases, indicating that host ATF3 facilitates metastasis, at least in part, by its function in macrophage/myeloid cells. Gene profiling analyses of macrophages from mouse tumors identified an ATF3-regulated gene signature that could distinguish human tumor stroma from distant stroma and could predict clinical outcomes, lending credence to our mouse models. In conclusion, we identified ATF3 as a regulator in myeloid cells that enhances breast cancer metastasis and has predictive value for clinical outcomes. PMID:23921126

  7. Clinical heterogeneity of human neurocysticercosis results from complex interactions among parasite, host and environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Agnès; Escobar, Alfonso; Fragoso, Gladis; Sciutto, Edda; Larralde, Carlos

    2010-04-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) is endemic in most countries of Latin America, Asia and Africa and is re-emerging in some industrialized nations. Both within and among endemic countries, NC is very variable in its clinical and radiological features, as well as in the intensity of the immuno-inflammatory reactions of the hosts. This review, focusing on the Mexican experience, describes and interprets the heterogeneity of NC as the result of different combinations among factors associated with the parasite, host and environment. The review may serve to foster similar descriptive efforts in other endemic areas of the world in order to facilitate the identification of the distinct factors that participate in the complex pathogenesis and diverse clinical outcomes of NC. In particular, it is necessary to understand the precise physiopathology of the inflammatory reaction associated with NC, as inflammation is one of the characteristics of those NC cases that are clinically more severe and less responsive to current treatments. Devising new medical interventions through the use of molecular regulators of the innate and adaptive immune responses of the host is a largely unexplored approach that could improve the existing forms of treatment. Copyright 2010 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cancer immunology--analysis of host and tumor factors for personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Shuji; Galon, Jérôme; Fuchs, Charles S; Dranoff, Glenn

    2011-08-09

    Immune cells in the tumor microenvironment have an important role in regulating tumor progression. Therefore, stimulating immune reactions to tumors can be an attractive therapeutic and prevention strategy. Cancer cells and host cells constantly interact with each other in the tumor microenvironment; thus, cancer immunology is an interdisciplinary area where integrated analysis of both host and tumor factors is needed. Cancer represents a heterogeneous group of diseases with different genetic and epigenetic alterations; therefore, molecular classification of cancer (for example lung, prostate and breast cancers) is an important component in clinical decision making. However, most studies on antitumor immunity and clinical outcome lack analysis of tumor molecular biomarkers. In this Review, we discuss colorectal cancer as a prototypical example of cancer. Common molecular classifiers of colon cancer include KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutations, microsatellite instability, LINE-1 methylation, and CpG island methylator phenotype. Since tumor molecular features and immune reactions are inter-related, a comprehensive assessment of these factors is critical. Examining the effects of tumor-host interactions on clinical outcome and prognosis represents an evolving interdisciplinary field of molecular pathological epidemiology. Pathological immunity evaluation may provide information on prognosis and help identify patients who are more likely to benefit from immunotherapy.

  9. Helicobacter pylori virulence genes and host genetic polymorphisms as risk factors for peptic ulcer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection plays an important role in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Several factors have been proposed as possible H. pylori virulence determinants; for example, bacterial adhesins and gastric inflammation factors are associated with an increased risk of PUD. However, differences in bacterial virulence factors alone cannot explain the opposite ends of the PUD disease spectrum, that is duodenal and gastric ulcers; presumably, both bacterial and host factors contribute to the differential response. Carriers of the high-producer alleles of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1B, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α who also carry low-producer allele of anti-inflammatory cytokines have severe gastric mucosal inflammation, whereas carriers of the alternative alleles have mild inflammation. Recent reports have suggested that the PSCA and CYP2C19 ultra-rapid metabolizer genotypes are also associated with PUD.

  10. Factors Affecting the Formation of 2:1 Host:Guest Inclusion Complexes of 2-[(R-Phenylamine]-1,4-naphthalenediones (PAN in β- and γ-Cyclodextrins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher K. Jankowski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The molecular hosts cyclodextrins form inclusion complexes with a wide variety of guests, resulting in complexes with various host:guest stoichiometries. In the case of a series of 19 1,4-naphthoquinolines as guests with either β- or γ-cyclodextrin studied using electrospray mass spectroscopy, in most cases only 1:1 complexes were observed, with 2:1 host:guest complexes observed in just 6 out of 38 host:guest combinations. It is shown that these higher-order complexes were observed only in the case of small (or no electronically withdrawing substituents, and were much less likely in the case of the larger γ-cyclodextrin host. The size and electronic properties of the substituents involved shows that both steric and electronic factors must be taken into account in predicting which cyclodextrin host:guest stoichiometries will be stable enough to form (or once formed, be robust enough to be observed in the ESI-MS experiments. It is clear that the prediction of host-guest stoichiometry for a specific host-guest pair is complicated, and involves a subtle interplay of both electronic and steric factors. However, there are definite trends, which can be used to help predict host:guest stoichiometry for a given host-guest pair.

  11. Factors affecting patterns of Amblyomma triste (Acari: Ixodidae) parasitism in a rodent host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Valeria C; Nava, Santiago; Antoniazzi, Leandro R; Monje, Lucas D; Racca, Andrea L; Guglielmone, Alberto A; Beldomenico, Pablo M

    2015-07-30

    Here we offer a multivariable analysis that explores associations of different factors (i.e., environmental, host parameters, presence of other ectoparasites) with the interaction of Amblyomma triste immature stages and one of its main hosts in Argentina, the rodent Akodon azarae. Monthly and for two years, we captured and sampled rodents at 16 points located at 4 different sites in the Parana River Delta region. The analyses were conducted with Generalized Linear Mixed Models with a negative binomial response (counts of larvae or nymphs). The independent variables assessed were: (a) environmental: trapping year, season, presence of cattle; type of vegetation (natural grassland or implanted forest); rodent abundance; (b) host parameters: body length; sex; body condition; blood cell counts; natural antibody titres; and (c) co-infestation with other ectoparasites: other stage of A. triste; Ixodes loricatus; lice; mites; and fleas. Two-way interaction terms deemed a priori as relevant were also included in the analysis. Larvae were affected by all environmental variables assessed and by the presence of other ectoparasites (lice, fleas and other tick species). Host factors significantly associated with larval count were sex and levels of natural antibodies. Nymphs were associated with season, presence of cattle, body condition, body length and with burdens of I. loricatus. In most cases, the direction and magnitude of the associations were context-dependent (many interaction terms were significant). The findings of greater significance and implications of our study are two. Firstly, as burdens of A. triste larvae and nymphs were greater where cattle were present, and larval tick burdens were higher in implanted forests, silvopastoral practices developing in the region may affect the population dynamics of A. triste, and consequently the eco-epidemiology of Rickettsia parkeri. Secondly, strong associations and numerous interactions with other ectoparasites suggest that

  12. Factors that Influence Male Involvement in Sexual and Reproductive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    a local nongovernmental organization, Kisumu Medical and Education Trust ... status of male involvement in reproductive health services in western Kenya and ..... vulnerabilities and expose any reproductive health secrets, exposures that ...

  13. A Multidimensional Study of School-Family-Community Partnership Involvement: School, School Counselor, and Training Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Julia A.; Griffin, Dana

    2010-01-01

    A multidimensional study examines both the dimensions of school counselors' involvement in school-family-community partnerships and the factors related to their involvement in partnerships. The School Counselor Involvement in Partnerships Survey was revised and its factor structure examined. Principal factor analyses revealed three dimensions of…

  14. Azorhizobium caulinodans Transmembrane Chemoreceptor TlpA1 Involved in Host Colonization and Nodulation on Roots and Stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Yang, Jinbao; Sun, Yu; Liu, Xiaolin; Li, Yan; Zhang, Zhenpeng; Xie, Zhihong

    2017-01-01

    Azorhizobium caulinodans ORS571 is a motile soil bacterium that interacts symbiotically with legume host Sesbania rostrata, forming nitrogen-fixing root and stem nodules. Bacterial chemotaxis plays an important role in establishing this symbiotic relationship. To determine the contribution of chemotaxis to symbiosis in A. caulinodans ORS571-S. rostrata, we characterized the function of TlpA1 (transducer-like protein in A. caulinodans), a chemoreceptor predicted by SMART (Simple Modular Architecture Research Tool), containing two N-terminal transmembrane regions. The tlpA1 gene is located immediately upstream of the unique che gene cluster and is transcriptionally co-oriented. We found that a ΔtlpA1 mutant is severely impaired for chemotaxis to various organic acids, glycerol and proline. Furthermore, biofilm forming ability of the strain carrying the mutation is reduced under certain growth conditions. Interestingly, competitive colonization ability on S. rostrata root surfaces is impaired in the ΔtlpA1 mutant, suggesting that chemotaxis of the A. caulinodans ORS571 contributes to root colonization. We also found that TlpA1 promotes competitive nodulation not only on roots but also on stems of S. rostrata. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that TlpA1 is a transmembrane chemoreceptor involved in A. caulinodans-S. rostrata symbiosis.

  15. Azorhizobium caulinodans Transmembrane Chemoreceptor TlpA1 Involved in Host Colonization and Nodulation on Roots and Stems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Azorhizobium caulinodans ORS571 is a motile soil bacterium that interacts symbiotically with legume host Sesbania rostrata, forming nitrogen-fixing root and stem nodules. Bacterial chemotaxis plays an important role in establishing this symbiotic relationship. To determine the contribution of chemotaxis to symbiosis in A. caulinodans ORS571-S. rostrata, we characterized the function of TlpA1 (transducer-like protein in A. caulinodans, a chemoreceptor predicted by SMART (Simple Modular Architecture Research Tool, containing two N-terminal transmembrane regions. The tlpA1 gene is located immediately upstream of the unique che gene cluster and is transcriptionally co-oriented. We found that a ΔtlpA1 mutant is severely impaired for chemotaxis to various organic acids, glycerol and proline. Furthermore, biofilm forming ability of the strain carrying the mutation is reduced under certain growth conditions. Interestingly, competitive colonization ability on S. rostrata root surfaces is impaired in the ΔtlpA1 mutant, suggesting that chemotaxis of the A. caulinodans ORS571 contributes to root colonization. We also found that TlpA1 promotes competitive nodulation not only on roots but also on stems of S. rostrata. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that TlpA1 is a transmembrane chemoreceptor involved in A. caulinodans-S. rostrata symbiosis.

  16. Targeting host factors: A novel rationale for the management of hepatitis C virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahmoud Aboelneen Khattab

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis C is recognized as a major threat to global public health. The current treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C is the addition of ribavirin to interferon-based therapy which has limited efficacy, poor tolerability, and significant expense. New treatment options that are more potent and less toxic are much needed. Moreover, more effective treatment is an urgent priority for those who relapse or do not respond to current regimens. A major obstacle in combating hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is that the fidelity of the viral replication machinery is notoriously low, thus enabling the virus to quickly develop mutations that resist compounds targeting viral enzymes. Therefore, an approach targeting the host cofactors, which are indispensable for the propagation of viruses, may be an ideal target for the development of antiviral agents because they have a lower rate of mutation than that of the viral genome, as long as they have no side effects to patients. Drugs targeting, for example, receptors of viral entry, host metabolism or nuclear receptors, which are factors required to complete the HCV life cycle, may be more effective in combating the viral infection. Targeting host cofactors of the HCV life cycle is an attractive concept because it imposes a higher genetic barrier for resistance than direct antiviral compounds. However the principle drawback of this strategy is the greater potential for cellular toxicity.

  17. Genetic factors involves in intracranial aneurysms--actualities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohan, D; Munteanu, V; Coman, T; Ciurea, A V

    2015-01-01

    ...% of all IAs in the population. Cerebral aneurysm disease is related to hemodynamic and genetic factors, associated with structural weakness in the arterial wall, which was acquired by a specific, often unknown, event...

  18. Option Pricing Method in a Market Involving Interval Number Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The method for pricing the option in a market with interval number factors is proposed. The no-arbitrage principle in the interval number valued market and the rule to judge the reasonability of a price interval are given. Using the method, the price interval where the riskless interest and the volatility under B-S setting is given. The price interval from binomial tree model when the key factors u, d, R are all interval numbers is also discussed.

  19. Some factors involved in microprojectile-mediated indica rice transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUERui; QIUXiaohui; YANMeixian; HUANGDanian; CAOShouyun; TIANWenzhong

    1997-01-01

    Immature embryos and calli derived from immature or mature embryos of the 16 indica rice varieties have been transformed by using particle bombardment. To improve growth state of subcultured calli, we set up a variety of parameters to optimize the important tactors involved in Biolistic system, and added various hormones, mannitol, and MES to CC or NB medium.

  20. Chronic graft-versus-host disease following umbilical cord blood transplantation: retrospective survey involving 1072 patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narimatsu, Hiroto; Miyakoshi, Shigesaburo; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Kami, Masahiro; Matsumura, Tomoko; Yuji, Koichiro; Murashige, Naoko; Kusumi, Eiji; Kodama, Yuko; Komatsu, Tsunehiko; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Kouzai, Yasushi; Okada, Masaya; Osugi, Yuko; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Inoue, Masami; Takahashi, Satoshi; Kai, Shunro; Kato, Koji; Inoue-Nagamura, Tokiko; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Kato, Shunichi

    2008-09-15

    We have little information on chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after cord blood transplantation (CBT). We investigated its clinical features in 1072 Japanese patients with hematologic malignancies who received a transplant through the Japan Cord Blood Bank Network. The primary end point was to investigate the incidence of any chronic GVHD. Median age of the patients was 33 years (range, 0-79 years). The cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD 2 years after transplantation was 28%. Chronic GVHD was fatal in 29 patients. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that development of chronic GVHD was favorably associated with both overall survival and event-free survival. Multivariate analysis identified risk factors of chronic GVHD: higher patient body weight, higher number of mismatched antigens for GVHD direction, myeloablative preparative regimen, use of mycophenolate mofetil in GVHD prophylaxis, and development of grades II to IV acute GVHD. Although chronic GVHD is a significant problem after CBT, it is associated with improved survival, perhaps due to graft-versus-malignancy effects.

  1. No Major Host Genetic Risk Factor Contributed to A(H1N1)2009 Influenza Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo; Bracho, María Alma; Galán, Juan Carlos; Pumarola, Tomàs; Castilla, Jesús; Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl; Rodríguez-Dominguez, Mario; Quintela, Inés; Bonet, Núria; Garcia-Garcerà, Marc; Domínguez, Angela; González-Candelas, Fernando; Calafell, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    While most patients affected by the influenza A(H1N1) pandemic experienced mild symptoms, a small fraction required hospitalization, often without concomitant factors that could explain such a severe course. We hypothesize that host genetic factors could contribute to aggravate the disease. To test this hypothesis, we compared the allele frequencies of 547,296 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between 49 severe and 107 mild confirmed influenza A cases, as well as against a general population sample of 549 individuals. When comparing severe vs. mild influenza A cases, only one SNP was close to the conventional p = 5×10−8. This SNP, rs28454025, sits in an intron of the GSK233 gene, which is involved in a neural development, but seems not to have any connections with immunological or inflammatory functions. Indirectly, a previous association reported with CD55 was replicated. Although sample sizes are low, we show that the statistical power in our design was sufficient to detect highly-penetrant, quasi-Mendelian genetic factors. Hence, and assuming that rs28454025 is likely to be a false positive, no major genetic factor was detected that could explain poor influenza A course. PMID:26379185

  2. Yersinia virulence factors - a sophisticated arsenal for combating host defences [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Atkinson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The human pathogens Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica cause enterocolitis, while Yersinia pestis is responsible for pneumonic, bubonic, and septicaemic plague. All three share an infection strategy that relies on a virulence factor arsenal to enable them to enter, adhere to, and colonise the host while evading host defences to avoid untimely clearance. Their arsenal includes a number of adhesins that allow the invading pathogens to establish a foothold in the host and to adhere to specific tissues later during infection. When the host innate immune system has been activated, all three pathogens produce a structure analogous to a hypodermic needle. In conjunction with the translocon, which forms a pore in the host membrane, the channel that is formed enables the transfer of six ‘effector’ proteins into the host cell cytoplasm. These proteins mimic host cell proteins but are more efficient than their native counterparts at modifying the host cell cytoskeleton, triggering the host cell suicide response. Such a sophisticated arsenal ensures that yersiniae maintain the upper hand despite the best efforts of the host to counteract the infecting pathogen.

  3. Munchausen Syndrome by proxy: Definition, context, and psychological factors involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gomes Gonçalves

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Munchausen syndrome by proxy refers to a pathology characterized by physical and emotional abuse in which the simulation or production of symptoms is directed towards a child, which involves taking him or her to health treatments and unnecessary surgeries. The difficulties in the diagnosis of this form of abuse and the emotional aspects involved highlight the destructive effects in the infancy subjectivity due to the lack of loving capacity protecting and prioritizing the child demands. Psychoanalysis offers a differentiated view, comprehending that the mother attempts to elaborate her own psychic conflicts by the repetition of traumatic experience. There is a necessity of comprehension of the instinct destructivity presented in the maternal unconscious dynamics revealed in the modality of caring which is reflected in violence.

  4. Exosomes: A Promising Factor Involved in Cancer Hypoxic Microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Yang, X; Yang, Y; Zhu, H; Chen, X; Zhang, H; Wang, F; Qin, Q; Cheng, H; Sun, X

    2015-01-01

    As a significant tumor feature, hypoxia can trigger cancer adaptive processes, induce malignant phenotype development, and promote drug resistance. Previous studies demonstrated that exosomes are critical during these procedures. Exosomes are small vesicles formed in vesicular bodies in the endosomal network. These small vesicles are mainly involved in the transport of bioactive molecules between cells. Exosomes are also involved in the mediation of some cellular communications depending on derived donor cells; thus, recipient cells undergo phenotypic changes. Furthermore, hypoxia can remarkably stimulate exosomal secretion; for instance, nucleic acids and proteins as transmission signals in exosomes in a tumor microenvironment are involved in various functions, such as inducing intratumoral heterogeneity, altering immunological responses, producing cancer-associated fibroblasts, and promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Moreover, exosome contents resemble those of a donor cell; this finding indicates that exosomes may also be regarded as suitable biomarkers of hypoxia status. Therefore, exosomes can be used to facilitate diagnosis and prognosis with minimal invasive procedures. Further studies on exosomes in cancer may provide new therapeutic strategies.

  5. [Rbf1 (RPG-box binding factor), a transcription factor involved in yeast-hyphal transition of Candida albicans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Y; Ishii, N; Watanabe, M; Yoshihara, F; Arisawa, M

    1998-01-01

    The major fungal pathogen for fungal diseases which have become a major medical problem in the last few years is Candida albicans, which can grow both in yeast and hyphae forms. This ability of C. albicans is thought to contribute to its colonization and dissemination within host tissues. In a recent few years, accompanying the introduction of molecular biological tools into C. albicans organism, several factors involved in the signal transduction pathway for yeast-hyphal transition have been identified. One MAP kinase pathway in C. albicans, similar to that leading to STE12 activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been reported. C. albicans strains mutant in these genes show retarded filamentous growth on a solid media but no impairment of filamentous growth in mice. These results suggest two scenarios that a kinase signaling cascade plays a part in stimulating the morphological transition in C. albicans, and that there would be another signaling pathway effective in animals. In this latter true hyphal pathway, although some candidate proteins, such as Efg1 (transcription factor), Int1 (integrin-like membrane protein), or Phr1 (pH-regulated membrane protein), have been identified, it is still too early to say that we understand the whole picture of that cascade. We have cloned a C. albicans gene encoding a novel DNA binding protein, Rbf1, that predominantly localizes in the nucleus, and shows transcriptional activation capability. Disruption of the functional RBF1 genes of C. albicans induced the filamentous growth on all solid and liquid media tested, suggesting that Rbf1 might be another candidate for the true hyphal pathway. Relationships with other factors described above, and the target (regulated) genes of Rbf1 is under investigation.

  6. Genomic analysis of host - Peste des petits ruminants vaccine viral transcriptome uncovers transcription factors modulating immune regulatory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunath, Siddappa; Kumar, Gandham Ravi; Mishra, Bishnu Prasad; Mishra, Bina; Sahoo, Aditya Prasad; Joshi, Chaitanya G; Tiwari, Ashok K; Rajak, Kaushal Kishore; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2015-02-24

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), is an acute transboundary viral disease of economic importance, affecting goats and sheep. Mass vaccination programs around the world resulted in the decline of PPR outbreaks. Sungri 96 is a live attenuated vaccine, widely used in Northern India against PPR. This vaccine virus, isolated from goat works efficiently both in sheep and goat. Global gene expression changes under PPR vaccine virus infection are not yet well defined. Therefore, in this study we investigated the host-vaccine virus interactions by infecting the peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from goat with PPRV (Sungri 96 vaccine virus), to quantify the global changes in the transcriptomic signature by RNA-sequencing. Viral genome of Sungri 96 vaccine virus was assembled from the PPRV infected transcriptome confirming the infection and demonstrating the feasibility of building a complete non-host genome from the blood transcriptome. Comparison of infected transcriptome with control transcriptome revealed 985 differentially expressed genes. Functional analysis showed enrichment of immune regulatory pathways under PPRV infection. Key genes involved in immune system regulation, spliceosomal and apoptotic pathways were identified to be dysregulated. Network analysis revealed that the protein - protein interaction network among differentially expressed genes is significantly disrupted in infected state. Several genes encoding TFs that govern immune regulatory pathways were identified to co-regulate the differentially expressed genes. These data provide insights into the host - PPRV vaccine virus interactome for the first time. Our findings suggested dysregulation of immune regulatory pathways and genes encoding Transcription Factors (TFs) that govern these pathways in response to viral infection.

  7. Zagreb and Tenerife: Airline Accidents Involving Linguistic Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is currently implementing a program to improve the language proficiency of pilots and air traffic controllers worldwide. In justifying the program, ICAO has cited a number of airline accidents that were at least partly caused by language factors. Two accidents cited by ICAO are analysed in this…

  8. Factors Involved in Extracellular Matrix Turnover in Human Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregori Casals

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The molecular mechanisms by which myocardial ischemia translates into ventricular remodeling remain unclear. Methods: We investigated whether hypoxia and proinflammatory cytokines are specific inducers of remodeling signals in an in vitro model of cultured adult human ventricular myocytes (AC16 cells. Results:Hypoxia modified the ratio of matrix remodeling factors by increasing the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP and reducing tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase type 1 (TIMP-1 secretion in AC16 cells. These effects, however, were not associated with either modifications in expression of matrix metalloproteinase type 2, collagen-I or metalloproteinase activity. Hypoxia does, actually increase the production of the cardiac antifibrogenic growth factors, Apelin and VEGF, through an Hypoxia Inducible Factor type 1-dependent mechanism. Concerning proinflammatory signaling pathways, IL1β emerged as a powerful inducer of matrix turnover, since it significantly enhanced PIIINP, TIMP-1 and hyaluronic acid production and increased metalloproteinase activity. In contrast, TNFα did not modify matrix turnover but markedly induced the production of Apelin and VEGF. Conclusion: Hypoxia and increased TNFα activity likely exert cardioprotective actions by activating the cardiac antifibrogenic factors Apelin and VEGF. In contrast, IL1β is a strong promoter of interstitial collagen remodeling that may contribute to ventricular dilation and heart failure in the ischemic myocardium.

  9. Zagreb and Tenerife: Airline Accidents Involving Linguistic Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is currently implementing a program to improve the language proficiency of pilots and air traffic controllers worldwide. In justifying the program, ICAO has cited a number of airline accidents that were at least partly caused by language factors. Two accidents cited by ICAO are analysed in this…

  10. Analysis of cathepsin and furin proteolytic enzymes involved in viral fusion protein activation in cells of the bat reservoir host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah El Najjar

    Full Text Available Bats of different species play a major role in the emergence and transmission of highly pathogenic viruses including Ebola virus, SARS-like coronavirus and the henipaviruses. These viruses require proteolytic activation of surface envelope glycoproteins needed for entry, and cellular cathepsins have been shown to be involved in proteolysis of glycoproteins from these distinct virus families. Very little is currently known about the available proteases in bats. To determine whether the utilization of cathepsins by bat-borne viruses is related to the nature of proteases in their natural hosts, we examined proteolytic processing of several viral fusion proteins in cells derived from two fruit bat species, Pteropus alecto and Rousettus aegyptiacus. Our work shows that fruit bat cells have homologs of cathepsin and furin proteases capable of cleaving and activating both the cathepsin-dependent Hendra virus F and the furin-dependent parainfluenza virus 5 F proteins. Sequence analysis comparing Pteropus alecto furin and cathepsin L to proteases from other mammalian species showed a high degree of conservation; however significant amino acid variation occurs at the C-terminus of Pteropus alecto furin. Further analysis of furin-like proteases from fruit bats revealed that these proteases are catalytically active and resemble other mammalian furins in their response to a potent furin inhibitor. However, kinetic analysis suggests that differences may exist in the cellular localization of furin between different species. Collectively, these results indicate that the unusual role of cathepsin proteases in the life cycle of bat-borne viruses is not due to the lack of active furin-like proteases in these natural reservoir species; however, differences may exist between furin proteases present in fruit bats compared to furins in other mammalian species, and these differences may impact protease usage for viral glycoprotein processing.

  11. Host and viral factors contributing to CD8+ T cell failure in hepatitis C virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christoph Neumann-Haefelin; Hans Christian Spangenberg; Hubert E Blum; Robert Thimme

    2007-01-01

    Virus-specific CD8+ T cells are thought to be the major anti-viral effector cells in hepatitis C virus (HCV)infection. Indeed, viral clearance is associated with vigorous CD8+ T cell responses targeting multiple epitopes. In the chronic phase of infection, HCV-specific CD8+ T cell responses are usually weak, narrowly focused and display often functional defects regarding cytotoxicity, cytokine production, and proliferative capacity. In the last few years, different mechanisms which might contribute to the failure of HCV-specific CD8+ T cells in chronic infection have been identified,including insufficient CD4+ help, deficient CD8+ T cell differentiation, viral escape mutations, suppression by viral factors, inhibitory cytokines, inhibitory ligands, and regulatory T cells. In addition, host genetic factors such as the host's human leukocyte antigen (HLA) background may play an important role in the efficiency of the HCVspecific CD8+ T cell response and thus outcome of infection. The growing understanding of the mechanisms contributing to T cell failure and persistence of HCV infection will contribute to the development of successful immunotherapeutical and -prophylactical strategies.

  12. Energy transfer between a nanosystem and its host fluid: A multiscale factorization approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sereda, Yuriy V.; Espinosa-Duran, John M.; Ortoleva, Peter J., E-mail: ortoleva@indiana.edu [Center for Cell and Virus Theory, Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, 800 E. Kirkwood Ave, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States)

    2014-02-21

    Energy transfer between a macromolecule or supramolecular assembly and a host medium is considered from the perspective of Newton's equations and Lie-Trotter factorization. The development starts by demonstrating that the energy of the molecule evolves slowly relative to the time scale of atomic collisions-vibrations. The energy is envisioned to be a coarse-grained variable that coevolves with the rapidly fluctuating atomistic degrees of freedom. Lie-Trotter factorization is shown to be a natural framework for expressing this coevolution. A mathematical formalism and workflow for efficient multiscale simulation of energy transfer is presented. Lactoferrin and human papilloma virus capsid-like structure are used for validation.

  13. Host factors are dominant in the development of post-liver transplant non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Salih; Boga; Armando; Salim; Munoz-Abraham; Manuel; I; Rodriguez-Davalos; Sukru; H; Emre; Dhanpat; Jain; Michael; L; Schilsky

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease(NAFLD) is a recognized problem in patients after orthotopic liver transplantation and may lead to recurrent graft injury. As the increased demand for liver allografts fail to match the available supply of donor organs, split liver transplantation(SLT) has emerged as an important technique to increase the supply of liver grafts. SLT allows two transplants to occur from one donor organ, and provides a unique model for observing the pathogenesis of NAFLD with respect to the role of recipient environmental and genetic factors. Here we report on two recipients of a SLT from the same deceased donor where only one developed non-alcoholic steatohepatitis(NASH), suggesting that host factors are critical for the development of NASH.

  14. Path-factors involving paths of order seven and nine

    OpenAIRE

    EGAWA, Yoshimi; Furuya, Michitaka

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we show the following two theorems (here $c_{i}(G-X)$ is the number of components $C$ of $G-X$ with $|V(C)|=i$): (i)~If a graph $G$ satisfies $c_{1}(G-X)+\\frac{1}{3}c_{3}(G-X)+\\frac{1}{3}c_{5}(G-X)\\leq \\frac{2}{3}|X|$ for all $X\\subseteq V(G)$, then $G$ has a $\\{P_{2},P_{7}\\}$-factor. (ii)~If a graph $G$ satisfies $c_{1}(G-X)+c_{3}(G-X)+\\frac{2}{3}c_{5}(G-X)+\\frac{1}{3}c_{7}(G-X)\\leq \\frac{2}{3}|X|$ for all $X\\subseteq V(G)$, then $G$ has a $\\{P_{2},P_{9}\\}$-factor.

  15. Multiple Factors Involved in the Pathogenesis of White Matter Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing; Wang, Dilong; Lan, Linfang

    2017-01-01

    White matter lesions (WMLs), also known as leukoaraiosis (LA) or white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), are characterized mainly by hyperintensities on T2-weighted or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. With the aging of the population and the development of imaging technology, the morbidity and diagnostic rates of WMLs are increasing annually. WMLs are not a benign process. They clinically manifest as cognitive decline and the subsequent development of dementia. Although WMLs are important, their pathogenesis is still unclear. This review elaborates on the advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of WMLs, focusing on anatomy, cerebral blood flow autoregulation, venous collagenosis, blood brain barrier disruption, and genetic factors. In particular, the attribution of WMLs to chronic ischemia secondary to venous collagenosis and cerebral blood flow autoregulation disruption seems reasonable. With the development of gene technology, the effect of genetic factors on the pathogenesis of WMLs is gaining gradual attention. PMID:28316994

  16. The interplay of host genetic factors and Epstein-Barr virus in the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria Li Lung; Arthur Kwok Leung Cheung; Josephine Mun Yee Ko; Hong Lok Lung; Yue Cheng; Wei Dai

    2014-01-01

    The interplay between host cell genetics and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection contributes to the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Understanding the host genetic and epigenetic alterations and the influence of EBV on cell signaling and host gene regulation will aid in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of NPC and provide useful biomarkers and targets for diagnosis and therapy. In this review, we provide an update of the oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes associated with NPC, as wel as genes associated with NPC risk including those involved in carcinogen detoxification and DNA repair. We also describe the importance of host genetics that govern the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex and immune responses, and we describe the impact of EBV infection on host cell signaling changes and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. High-power genomic sequencing approaches are needed to elucidate the genetic basis for inherited susceptibility to NPC and to identify the genes and pathways driving its molecular pathogenesis.

  17. Graft-versus-host disease after orthotopic liver transplantation: multivariate analysis of risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfeki, Mohamed A; Pungpapong, Surakit; Genco, Petrina V; Nakhleh, Raouf E; Nguyen, Justin H; Harnois, Denise M

    2015-12-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a rare, fatal complication following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). To date, several risk factors have been proposed, but reports on these factors have been inconclusive. This is a retrospective, case-control study of prospectively collected data from 2775 OLTs performed at our institution. Eight cases of GVHD after OLT were diagnosed on the basis of the patient's clinical characteristics, and the findings were confirmed with skin and colonic biopsies. Each case was matched to three controls based on the diagnosis of liver disease, recipient's age, and blood group. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify risk factors associated with the development of GVHD after OLT. The univariate and multivariate analyses identified two main risk factors associated with development of GVHD in OLT recipients, a difference between recipient and donor age of >20 yr, and any human leukocyte antigen class I matches. Taking these two risk factors into consideration while matching prospective donors and recipients may reduce further incidence of GVHD in OLT patients. However, further studies are recommended to validate these findings. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The c-terminus of wheat streak mosaic virus coat protein is involved in differential infection of wheat and maize through host-specific long-distance transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multifunctional viral coat proteins (CPs) play important roles in the virus life-cycle. The CP determinants and mechanisms involved in extension of host range of monocot-infecting viruses are poorly understood. The role of the C-terminal region of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) CP in virus transpo...

  19. Identification of pathogenic factors potentially involved in Staphylococcus aureus keratitis using proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shamila; Cole, Nerida; Hume, Emma B H; Garthwaite, Linda L; Nguyen-Khuong, Terry; Walsh, Bradley J; Willcox, Mark D P

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus is a leading cause of microbial keratitis, characterized by destruction of the cornea by bacterial exoproteins and host-associated factors. The aim of this study was to compare extracellular and cell-associated proteins produced by two different isolates of S. aureus, a virulent clinical isolate (Staph 38) and a laboratory strain (Staphylococcus aureus 8325-4) of weaker virulence in the mouse keratitis model. Proteins were analyzed using 2D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified by subsequent mass spectrometry. Activity of staphylococcal adhesins was assessed by allowing strains to bind to various proteins adsorbed onto polymethylmethacrylate squares. Thirteen proteins in the extracellular fraction and eight proteins in the cell-associated fractions after bacterial growth were produced in increased amounts in the clinical isolate Staph 38. Four of these proteins were S. aureus virulence factor adhesins, fibronectin binding protein A, staphopain, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 2 and extracellular adherence protein. The clinical isolate Staph 38 adhered to a greater extent to all mammalian proteins tested, indicating the potential of the adhesins to be active on its surface. Other proteins with increased expression in Staph 38 included potential moonlighting proteins and proteins involved in transcription or translation. This is the first demonstration of the proteome of S. aureus isolates from keratitis. These results indicate that the virulent clinical isolate produces more potentially important virulence factors compared to the less virulent laboratory strain and these may be associated with the ability of a S. aureus strain to cause more severe keratitis.

  20. Host factors and genetic susceptibility to infections due to intracellular bacteria and fastidious organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asner, S A; Morré, S A; Bochud, P-Y; Greub, G

    2014-12-01

    While genetic polymorphisms play a paramount role in tuberculosis (TB), less is known about their contribution to the severity of diseases caused by other intracellular bacteria and fastidious microorganisms. We searched electronic databases for observational studies reporting on host factors and genetic predisposition to infections caused by intracellular fastidious bacteria published up to 30 May 2014. The contribution of genetic polymorphisms was documented for TB. This includes genetic defects in the mononuclear phagocyte/T helper cell type 1 (Th1) pathway contributing to disseminated TB disease in children and genome-wide linkage analysis (GWAS) in reactivated pulmonary TB in adults. Similarly, experimental studies supported the role of host genetic factors in the clinical presentation of illnesses resulting from other fastidious intracellular bacteria. These include IL-6 -174G/C or low mannose-binding (MBL) polymorphisms, which are incriminated in chronic pulmonary conditions triggered by C. pneumoniae, type 2-like cytokine secretion polymorphisms, which are correlated with various clinical patterns of M. pneumoniae infections, and genetic variation in the NOD2 gene, which is an indicator of tubal pathology resulting from Chamydia trachomatis infections. Monocyte/macrophage migration and T lymphocyte recruitment defects are corroborated to ineffective granuloma formation observed among patients with chronic Q fever. Similar genetic polymorphisms have also been suggested for infections caused by T. whipplei although not confirmed yet. In conclusion, this review supports the paramount role of genetic factors in clinical presentations and severity of infections caused by intracellular fastidious bacteria. Genetic predisposition should be further explored through such as exome sequencing.

  1. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis: Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and host risk factors in a large urban setting in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Gomes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Factors related to the development of extrapulmonary forms of tuberculosis (EPTB are still poorly understood, particularly in high-endemic countries like Brazil. The objective of the paper is to determine host and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB strain-related factors associated with the development of EPTB in Espírito Santo state, Brazil. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a retrospective laboratory-based surveillance study of new tuberculosis (TB cases diagnosed in Espírito Santo state, Brazil between 1998 and 2007. We genotyped 612 isolates of MTB from 606 TB patients using spoligotyping and IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP typing and compared sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of patients with pulmonary TB (PTB and EPTB. Among 606 patients, 464 (77% had PTB, 79 (13% had EPTB, 51 (8% had both, and 12 (2% had miliary TB. The IS6110 RFLP analysis demonstrated that 250 (41% isolates belonged to clustered RFLP patterns, 27 (11% of which were from EPTB. We identified 73 clusters including 35 (48% composed of 2 isolates each. By spoligotyping, 506 (83% MTB isolates fell into known patterns and 106 (17% fell into patterns with no family assignment; 297 (48% isolates belonged to the Latin-American Mediterranean family. Higher school level (4-7 years OR: 0.16 95% CI 0.34-0.73 and > 8 years of education, OR 0.06 95% CI 0.009-0.50 white ethnicity (OR: 2.54 95% CI 1.03-6.25 and HIV infection (OR: 16.83 95% CI 5.23-54.18 were associated with EPTB. No specific strain lineage or percentage of clustering was associated with EPTB. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that risk factors for EPTB are related more to host than to MTB strain lineage characteristics.

  2. Psychological factors involved in prurigo nodularis: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazzi, Carla; Erma, Daniela; Piccinno, Roberta; Veraldi, Stefano; Caccialanza, Massimo

    2011-08-01

    Emotional stresses and psychological disorders seem to be concurrent factors in some cases of prurigo nodularis (PN), a chronic skin condition with a difficult therapeutic approach. In order to improve the therapeutic strategies, we performed a psychometric study on 20 patients affected by generalized and histological proven PN. Specific questionnaires were employed to examine the hypotheses (General Health Questionnaire, State Trait Anxiety Inventory - form Y, Beck Depression Inventory-II, and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire). The results show that symptoms of anxiety and depression associated with PN are more severe than in the control group and that some specific traits of personality are more frequently represented in such subjects. The results of our study represent a first attempt to analyze the psychological problems and the personality dimensions which seem to characterize PN patients. Such evidence supports the importance of a psychological approach in the clinical management of PN, which should always include psychological assessment and treatment together with the other therapeutic options.

  3. Underlying causal factors associated with construction worker fatalities involving stepladders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneurin Thomas James Grant

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Stepladders are frequently utilized on construction projects as a means of access to elevation. Stepladder heights commonly range from 4 feet (1.2 m to 14 feet (4.3 m. Since these heights are not extreme, there is a common misperception that stepladder use presents a low risk. On the contrary, extreme care must be exercised to ensure that work on stepladders is performed safely, as described in the conspicuously located recommendations and brightly-colored warnings that adorn virtually all newly-purchased equipment. Despite this, accidents involving stepladders occur on a regular basis.  This study was conducted to better understand the underlying causes of these accidents. The narrative descriptions of 180 stepladder-related fatalities were obtained from the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration and were analyzed to identify the at-risk behaviors that preceded the fatality incidents. The results showed that most of the incidents should have been anticipated and could have been avoided. Unsafe practices such as improper lockout-tagout of electrical equipment, loss of balance, working on a folded stepladder, over-reaching, straddling the ladder, “walking” the ladder, poor footing, and unstable/shifting ladders, among others were identified. Virtually all of these fatalities could have been avoided by adhering to the guidelines posted on the stepladders and by complying with basic safe construction practices.

  4. Underlying causal factors associated with construction worker fatalities involving stepladders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneurin Thomas James Grant

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Stepladders are frequently utilized on construction projects as a means of access to elevation. Stepladder heights commonly range from 4 feet (1.2 m to 14 feet (4.3 m. Since these heights are not extreme, there is a common misperception that stepladder use presents a low risk. On the contrary, extreme care must be exercised to ensure that work on stepladders is performed safely, as described in the conspicuously located recommendations and brightly-colored warnings that adorn virtually all newly-purchased equipment. Despite this, accidents involving stepladders occur on a regular basis.  This study was conducted to better understand the underlying causes of these accidents. The narrative descriptions of 180 stepladder-related fatalities were obtained from the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration and were analyzed to identify the at-risk behaviors that preceded the fatality incidents. The results showed that most of the incidents should have been anticipated and could have been avoided. Unsafe practices such as improper lockout-tagout of electrical equipment, loss of balance, working on a folded stepladder, over-reaching, straddling the ladder, “walking” the ladder, poor footing, and unstable/shifting ladders, among others were identified. Virtually all of these fatalities could have been avoided by adhering to the guidelines posted on the stepladders and by complying with basic safe construction practices. 

  5. Influence of host factors and parasite biomass on the severity of imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argy, Nicolas; Kendjo, Eric; Augé-Courtoi, Claire; Cojean, Sandrine; Clain, Jérôme; Houzé, Pascal; Thellier, Marc; Hubert, Veronique; Deloron, Philippe; Houzé, Sandrine

    2017-01-01

    Imported malaria in France is characterized by various clinical manifestations observed in a heterogeneous population of patients such as travelers/expatriates and African migrants. In this population, host factors and parasite biomass associated with severe imported malaria are poorly known. From data collected by the Centre National de Référence du Paludisme, we identified epidemiological, demographic and biological features including parasite biomass and anti-plasmodial antibody levels (negative, positive and strongly positive serology) associated with different disease severity groups (very severe, moderately severe, and uncomplicated malaria) in 3 epidemiological groups (travelers/expatriates, first- and second-generation migrants). Age, ethnicity, absence of prior infection with P. falciparum, antibody levels, plasma PfHRP2 levels, total and circulating parasite biomass were related to severe malaria onset. Sequestered parasite biomass tended to be increased in very severe malaria, and was strongly correlated to the antibody level of the host. Prior exposure to P. falciparum is associated with high anti-plasmodial antibody levels which influence clinical presentation of imported malaria and its correlated circulating and sequestered parasite burden.

  6. The correlated factors of the uneven performances of the CDM host countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinshan

    2012-03-01

    The Kyoto Protocol’s Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) has experienced a rapid growth. Up to 2010, 2763 projects have been registered, standing for about 433 million ton CO2 equivalent (CO2-eq.) of annual carbon credits. However, the performances of CDM host countries are remarkably unbalanced. Previous literature suggested that economic and investment conditions, energy intensity, energy structure, the share of annual carbon credits from high global warming potential (GWP) green house gas (GHG), capacity and institutional buildings of domestic CDM governance can play important roles in promoting CDM. This quantitative analysis shows that domestic economic and investment conditions are the most decisive factors determining the performance of the CDM host countries. Additionally, the influence of carbon intensity of energy consumption is relatively modest, and energy intensity of GDP as well as the share of annual carbon credits from high GWP GHG is less significant. Moreover, several leading CDM countries are not as successful as they seem to be, when the influences of their vast territories, distinguished economic and investment conditions are excluded. Therefore, to simply transplant the CDM governances of these countries can hardly guarantee that other countries will boost their carbon credit outputs.

  7. Nerve growth factor involvement in liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To define NGF (nerve growth factor) and its highaffinity receptor trkANGF presence and distribution in fibrotic liver and in HCC, and to verify if NGF might have a role in fibrosis and HCC.METHODS: Intracellular distribution of NGF and trkANGF were assessed by immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy in liver specimens from HCC,cirrhosis or both. ELISA was used to measure circulating NGF levels.RESULTS: NGF and trkANGF were highly expressed in HCC tissue, mainly localized in hepatocytes, endothelial and some Kupffer cells. In the cirrhotic part of the liver they were also markedly expressed in bile ducts epithelial and spindle-shaped cells. Surprisingly, in cirrhotic tissue from patients without HCC, both NGF and trkANGF were negative. NGF serum levels in cirrhotic and/or HCC patient were up to 25-fold higher than in controls.CONCLUSION: NGF was only detected in liver tissue with HCC present. Intracellular distribution suggests paracrine and autocrine mechanisms of action. Better definition of mechanisms may allow for therapeutic and diagnostic/prognostic use of NGF.

  8. Effects of host plants on digestive enzymatic activities and some components involved in intermediary metabolism of Chrysodeixis chalcites (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mardani-Talaee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chrysodeixis chalcites (Esper is a serious pest that causes devastating damages in infested areas to many fruits, vegetables, ornamental crops and weeds. In the current study, effects of three host plants including lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.; corn (Zea mays L. and dill (Anethum graveolens L. were determined on digestive enzyme activities and intermediary metabolism of C. chalcites larvae. The highest activities of α-amylase, glucosidases and specific proteases were observed in the larvae fed on dill. Our results showed that C. chalcites larvae had the highest TAG-lipase activity on corn in comparison with other host plants. Significant differences were found among enzymatic activities of acid (ACP and alkaline phosphatases, aspartate aminotransferases and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH in the haemolymph of C. chalcites larvae reared on lemon balm, corn and dill, respectively, although activity of alanine aminotransferase showed no statistically significant differences among different host plants. The enzymatic activity of ACP significantly decreased on dill in comparison with lemon balm and corn. The activity of LDH significantly increased on dill compared with other host plants. These results revealed that dill (A. graveolens is the most appropriate host plant for larvae of C. chalcites as evidenced by the highest digestive enzyme activities and intermediary metabolism.

  9. Identification and Structural Basis of Binding to Host Lung Glycogen by Streptococcal Virulence Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammerts van Bueren,A.; Higgins, M.; Wang, D.; Burke, R.; Boraston, A.

    2007-01-01

    The ability of pathogenic bacteria to recognize host glycans is often essential to their virulence. Here we report structure-function studies of previously uncharacterized glycogen-binding modules in the surface-anchored pullulanases from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpuA) and Streptococcus pyogenes (PulA). Multivalent binding to glycogen leads to a strong interaction with alveolar type II cells in mouse lung tissue. X-ray crystal structures of the binding modules reveal a novel fusion of tandem modules into single, bivalent functional domains. In addition to indicating a structural basis for multivalent attachment, the structure of the SpuA modules in complex with carbohydrate provides insight into the molecular basis for glycogen specificity. This report provides the first evidence that intracellular lung glycogen may be a novel target of pathogenic streptococci and thus provides a rationale for the identification of the streptococcal {alpha}-glucan-metabolizing machinery as virulence factors.

  10. Time resolved bovine host reponse to virulence factors mapped in milk by selected reaction monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bislev, Stine Lønnerup; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Codrea, Marius Cosmin

    TIME RESOLVED BOVINE HOST RESPONSE TO VIRULENCE FACTORS, MAPPED IN MILK BY SELECTED REACTION MONITORING S.L. Bislev1, U. Kusebauch2, M.C. Codrea1, R. Moritz2, C.M. Røntved1, E. Bendixen1 1 Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Aarhus University, Tjele, Denmark; 2...... Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, Washington, USA Mastitis is beyond doubt the largest health problem in modern milk production. Many different pathogens can cause infections in the mammary gland, and give rise to severe toll on animal welfare, economic gain as well as on excessive use of antibiotics...... in food production. Rapid diagnostic methods are still not available, and particularly pathogen-specific biomarkers would be highly valuable, as these may allow correct antibiotic treatment to be applied shortly after an udder infection has been observed. Moreover, with automatic milking systems and on...

  11. Time resolved bovine host reponse to virulence factors mapped in milk by selected reaction monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bislev, Stine Lønnerup; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Codrea, Marius Cosmin

    in food production. Rapid diagnostic methods are still not available, and particularly pathogen-specific biomarkers would be highly valuable, as these may allow correct antibiotic treatment to be applied shortly after an udder infection has been observed. Moreover, with automatic milking systems and on-line....... Furthermore, this SRM approach provides a strong tool for investigating these proteins in very large scale experiments, particularly with the scope to investigate whether these candidate biomarkers are suited for monitoring animal health in milk production.......TIME RESOLVED BOVINE HOST RESPONSE TO VIRULENCE FACTORS, MAPPED IN MILK BY SELECTED REACTION MONITORING S.L. Bislev1, U. Kusebauch2, M.C. Codrea1, R. Moritz2, C.M. Røntved1, E. Bendixen1 1 Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Aarhus University, Tjele, Denmark; 2...

  12. Host-related factors explaining interindividual variability of carotenoid bioavailability and tissue concentrations in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohn, Torsten; Desmarchelier, Charles; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    2017-01-01

    Carotenoid dietary intake and their endogenous levels have been associated with a decreased risk of several chronic diseases. There are indications that carotenoid bioavailability depends, in addition to the food matrix, on host factors. These include diseases (e.g. colitis), life-style habits (e.......g. smoking), gender and age, as well as genetic variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms that govern carotenoid metabolism. These are expected to explain interindividual differences that contribute to carotenoid uptake, distribution, metabolism and excretion, and therefore possibly also...... their association with disease risk. For instance, digestion enzymes fostering micellization (PNLIP, CES), expression of uptake/efflux transporters (SRARB1, CD36, NPC1L1), cleavage enzymes (BCO1/2), intracellular transporters (FABP2), secretion into chylomicrons (APOB, MTTP), carotenoid metabolism in the blood...

  13. Host-related factors explaining interindividual variability of carotenoid bioavailability and tissue concentrations in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohn, Torsten; Desmarchelier, Charles; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    2017-01-01

    Carotenoid dietary intake and their endogenous levels have been associated with a decreased risk of several chronic diseases. There are indications that carotenoid bioavailability depends, in addition to the food matrix, on host factors. These include diseases (e.g. colitis), life-style habits (e.......g. smoking), gender and age, as well as genetic variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms that govern carotenoid metabolism. These are expected to explain interindividual differences that contribute to carotenoid uptake, distribution, metabolism and excretion, and therefore possibly also...... their association with disease risk. For instance, digestion enzymes fostering micellization (PNLIP, CES), expression of uptake/efflux transporters (SRARB1, CD36, NPC1L1), cleavage enzymes (BCO1/2), intracellular transporters (FABP2), secretion into chylomicrons (APOB, MTTP), carotenoid metabolism in the blood...

  14. Highlights Regarding Host Predisposing Factors to Recurrent Vulvovaginal Candidiasis: Chronic Stress and Reduced Antioxidant Capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciene Akimoto-Gunther

    Full Text Available We studied host factors that could predispose women to develop recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC, including glycemia, insulin resistance, chronic stress, antioxidant capacity, overall immune status, local inflammation and vaginal microbiota. The presence of yeasts in vaginal culture was screened in 277 women, with or without signs and symptoms of VVC and RVVC. The presence of an inflammatory process and microbiota were analyzed through vaginal bacterioscopy and cervical-vaginal cytology, respectively. Fasting-blood samples were collected by standard venipuncture for biochemical analyses. Flow cytometry was employed to obtain the T helper/T cytotoxic lymphocyte ratio, and insulin resistance was assessed by the HOMA index (HI. Yeasts were isolated from 71 (26% women: 23 (32.4% with a positive culture but without symptoms (COL, 22 (31% in an acute episode (VVC, and 26 (36.6% with RVVC. C. albicans was the main yeast isolated in all clinical profiles. The control group (negative culture comprised 206 women. Diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance were more associated with the positive-culture groups (COL, VVC and RVVC than with negative ones. The RVVC group showed lower mean levels of cortisol than the control group and lower antioxidant capacity than all other groups. The T Helper/T cytotoxic lymphocyte ratio was similar in all groups. The RVVC group showed a similar level of vaginal inflammation to the control group, and lower than in the COL and VVC groups. Only the CVV group showed a reduction in vaginal lactobacillus microbiota. Our data suggest that both chronic stress (decreased early-morning cortisol levels and reduced antioxidant capacity can be host predisposing factors to RVVC.

  15. Highlights Regarding Host Predisposing Factors to Recurrent Vulvovaginal Candidiasis: Chronic Stress and Reduced Antioxidant Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto-Gunther, Luciene; Bonfim-Mendonça, Patrícia de Souza; Takahachi, Gisele; Irie, Mary Mayumi T.; Miyamoto, Sônia; Consolaro, Márcia Edilaine Lopes; Svidzinsk, Terezinha I. Estivalet

    2016-01-01

    We studied host factors that could predispose women to develop recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC), including glycemia, insulin resistance, chronic stress, antioxidant capacity, overall immune status, local inflammation and vaginal microbiota. The presence of yeasts in vaginal culture was screened in 277 women, with or without signs and symptoms of VVC and RVVC. The presence of an inflammatory process and microbiota were analyzed through vaginal bacterioscopy and cervical-vaginal cytology, respectively. Fasting-blood samples were collected by standard venipuncture for biochemical analyses. Flow cytometry was employed to obtain the T helper/T cytotoxic lymphocyte ratio, and insulin resistance was assessed by the HOMA index (HI). Yeasts were isolated from 71 (26%) women: 23 (32.4%) with a positive culture but without symptoms (COL), 22 (31%) in an acute episode (VVC), and 26 (36.6%) with RVVC. C. albicans was the main yeast isolated in all clinical profiles. The control group (negative culture) comprised 206 women. Diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance were more associated with the positive-culture groups (COL, VVC and RVVC) than with negative ones. The RVVC group showed lower mean levels of cortisol than the control group and lower antioxidant capacity than all other groups. The T Helper/T cytotoxic lymphocyte ratio was similar in all groups. The RVVC group showed a similar level of vaginal inflammation to the control group, and lower than in the COL and VVC groups. Only the CVV group showed a reduction in vaginal lactobacillus microbiota. Our data suggest that both chronic stress (decreased early-morning cortisol levels) and reduced antioxidant capacity can be host predisposing factors to RVVC. PMID:27415762

  16. Role of viral and host factors in interferon based therapy of hepatitis C virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The current standard of care (SOC) for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the combination of pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN), Ribavirin and protease inhibitor for HCV genotype 1. Nevertheless, this treatment is successful only in 70-80% of the patients. In addition, the treatment is not economical and is of immense physical burden for the subject. It has been established now, that virus-host interactions play a significant role in determining treatment outcomes. Therefore identifying biological markers that may predict the treatment response and hence treatment outcome would be useful. Both IFN and Ribavirin mainly act by modulating the immune system of the patient. Therefore, the treatment response is influenced by genetic variations of the human as well as the HCV genome. The goal of this review article is to summarize the impact of recent scientific advances in this area regarding the understanding of human and HCV genetic variations and their effect on treatment outcomes. Google scholar and PubMed have been used for literature research. Among the host factors, the most prominent associations are polymorphisms within the region of the interleukin 28B (IL28B) gene, but variations in other cytokine genes have also been linked with the treatment outcome. Among the viral factors, HCV genotypes are noteworthy. Moreover, for sustained virological responses (SVR), variations in core, p7, non-structural 2 (NS2), NS3 and NS5A genes are also important. However, all considered single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of IL28B and viral genotypes are the most important predictors for interferon based therapy of HCV infection. PMID:24079723

  17. Genome-Wide Search for Host Association Factors during Ovine Progressive Pneumonia Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Thompson

    Full Text Available Ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV is an important virus that causes serious diseases in sheep and goats with a prevalence of 36% in the USA. Although OPPV was discovered more than half of a century ago, little is known about the infection and pathogenesis of this virus. In this report, we used RNA-seq technology to conduct a genome-wide probe for cellular factors that are associated with OPPV infection. A total of approximately 22,000 goat host genes were detected of which 657 were found to have been significantly up-regulated and 889 down-regulated at 12 hours post-infection. In addition to previously known restriction factors from other viral infections, a number of factors which may be specific for OPPV infection were uncovered. The data from this RNA-seq study will be helpful in our understanding of OPPV infection, and also for further study in the prevention and intervention of this viral disease.

  18. Leptospira seroprevalence and associations between seropositivity, clinical disease and host factors in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engvall E Olsson

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the seroprevalence of different serovars of Leptospira spp. and their association with clinical disease and host factors in Swedish horses. Methods Sera from 2017 horses brought to equine clinics during 1997–98 were investigated. The sera were examined by microscopic agglutination test for the presence of antibodies against the following L. interrogans serovars: Bratislava strain Jez, Icterohaemorrhagiae strain Kantorowicz and Pomona strain Pomona and also L. kirschneri sv Grippotyphosa strain Duyster and L. borgpetersenii sv Sejroe strain M 84. Host factors, disease factors, season, pasture access and outdoor confinement variables were analysed with respect to seropositivity to sv Bratislava and Icterohaemorrhagiae. Multivariable logistic regression was used to model seropositivity to sv Bratislava and Icterohaemorrhagiae (seroprevalence > 8%. Results The seroprevalence, at a cut-off 1:100, were for sv Bratislava (16.6%, Icterohaemorrhagiae (8.3%, Sejroe (1.2%, Pomona (0.5% and Grippotyphosa (0.4%. In the multivariable analysis, it was demonstrated that seroprevalence increased with age for sv Bratislava and Icterohaemorrhagiae. For sv Bratislava the seasons April – June and October – December and for sv Icterohaemorrhagiae October – December had higher seroprevalences than other seasons. Horses not used for racing had higher levels of seropositivity to sv Bratislava. Furthermore, horses with respiratory problems as well as horses with fatigue had higher levels of seropositivity to sv Bratislava. Ponies and coldbloods, and horses with access to pasture, had lower seroprevalence for sv Icterohaemorrhagiae. Healthy horses had lower seroprevalence for sv Icterohaemorrhagiae, than non-healthy horses. Conclusion There was no significant association between clinical signs and disease and positive titres to sv Bratislava (except for the association between respiratory

  19. S100A8/A9 Is Not Involved in Host Defense against Murine Urinary Tract Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Dessing; L.M. Butter; G.J. Teske; N. Claessen; C.M. van der Loos; T. Vogl; J. Roth; T. van der Poll; S. Florquin; J.C. Leemans

    2010-01-01

    Background: Inflammation is commonly followed by the release of endogenous proteins called danger associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that are able to warn the host for eminent danger. S100A8/A9 subunits are DAMPs that belong to the S100 family of calcium binding proteins. S100A8/A9 complexes indu

  20. S100A8/A9 Is Not Involved in Host Defense against Murine Urinary Tract Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dessing, M.C.; Butter, L.M.; Teske, G.J.; Claessen, N.; van der Loos, C.M.; Vogl, T.; Roth, J.; van der Poll, T.; Florquin, S.; Leemans, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Inflammation is commonly followed by the release of endogenous proteins called danger associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that are able to warn the host for eminent danger. S100A8/A9 subunits are DAMPs that belong to the S100 family of calcium binding proteins. S100A8/A9 complexes

  1. Involvement of PI 3 kinase/Akt-dependent Bad phosphorylation in Toxoplasma gondii-mediated inhibition of host cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Juan-Hua; Cha, Guang-Ho; Zhou, Wei; Chu, Jia-Qi; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Lee, Young-Ha

    2013-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii-infected cells are resistant to various apoptotic stimuli, however, the role of the pro-apoptotic BH3-only Bad protein in T. gondii-imposed inhibition of host cell apoptosis in connection with the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-PKB/Akt pathway was not well delineated. Here, we investigated the signaling patterns of Bad, Bax and PKB/Akt in T. gondii-infected and uninfected THP-1 cells treated with staurosporine (STS) or PI3K inhibitors. STS treatment, without T. gondii infection, reduced the viability of THP-1 cells in proportion to STS concentration and triggered many cellular death events such as caspase-3 and -9 activation, Bax translocation, cytochrome c release from host cell mitochondria into cytosol, and PARP cleavage in the host cell. However, T. gondii infection eliminated the STS-triggered mitochondrial apoptotic events described above. Additionally, T. gondii infection in vitro and in vivo induced the phosphorylation of PKB/Akt and Bad in a parasite-load-dependent manner which subsequently inhibited Bax translocation. The PI3K inhibitors, LY294002 and Wortmannin, both blocked parasite-induced phosphorylation of PKB/Akt and Bad. Furthermore, THP-1 cells pretreated with these PI3K inhibitors showed reduced phosphorylation of Bad in a dose-dependent manner and subsequently failed to inhibit the Bax translocation, also these cells also failed to overcome the T. gondii-imposed inhibition of host cell apoptosis. These data demonstrate that the PI3K-PKB/Akt pathway may be one of the major route for T. gondii in the prevention of host cell apoptosis and T. gondii phosphorylates the pro-apoptotic Bad protein to prevent apoptosis.

  2. Predicting involvement in prison gang activity: street gang membership, social and psychological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jane L; Alleyne, Emma; Mozova, Katarina; James, Mark

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether street gang membership, psychological factors, and social factors such as preprison experiences could predict young offenders' involvement in prison gang activity. Data were collected via individual interviews with 188 young offenders held in a Young Offenders Institution in the United Kingdom. Results showed that psychological factors such as the value individuals attached to social status, a social dominance orientation, and antiauthority attitudes were important in predicting young offenders' involvement in prison gang activity. Further important predictors included preimprisonment events such as levels of threat, levels of individual delinquency, and levels of involvement in group crime. Longer current sentences also predicted involvement in prison gang activity. However, street gang membership was not an important predictor of involvement in prison gang activity. These findings have implications for identifying prisoners involved in prison gang activity and for considering the role of psychological factors and group processes in gang research.

  3. Caenorhabditis elegans-based screen identifies Salmonella virulence factors required for conserved host-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenor, Jennifer L; McCormick, Beth A; Ausubel, Frederick M; Aballay, Alejandro

    2004-06-01

    A Caenorhabditis elegans-Salmonella enterica host-pathogen model was used to identify both novel and previously known S. enterica virulence factors (HilA, HilD, InvH, SptP, RhuM, Spi4-F, PipA, VsdA, RepC, Sb25, RfaL, GmhA, LeuO, CstA, and RecC), including several related to the type III secretion system (TTSS) encoded in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). Mutants corresponding to presumptive novel virulence-related genes exhibited diminished ability to invade epithelial cells and/or to induce polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration in a tissue culture model of mammalian enteropathogenesis. When expressed in C. elegans intestinal cells, the S. enterica TTSS-exported effector protein SptP inhibited a conserved p38 MAPK signaling pathway and suppressed the diminished pathogenicity phenotype of an S. enterica sptP mutant. These results show that C. elegans is an attractive model to study the interaction between Salmonella effector proteins and components of the innate immune response, in part because there is a remarkable overlap between Salmonella virulence factors required for human and nematode pathogenesis.

  4. Host genetic risk factors for West Nile virus infection and disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail W Bigham

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV, a category B pathogen endemic in parts of Africa, Asia and Europe, emerged in North America in 1999, and spread rapidly across the continental U.S. Outcomes of infection with WNV range from asymptomatic to severe neuroinvasive disease manifested as encephalitis, paralysis, and/or death. Neuroinvasive WNV disease occurs in less than one percent of cases, and although host genetic factors are thought to influence risk for symptomatic disease, the identity of these factors remains largely unknown. We tested 360 common haplotype tagging and/or functional SNPs in 86 genes that encode key regulators of immune function in 753 individuals infected with WNV including: 422 symptomatic WNV cases and 331 cases with asymptomatic infections. After applying a Bonferroni correction for multiple tests and controlling for population stratification, SNPs in IRF3 (OR 0.54, p = 0.035 and MX1, (OR 0.19, p = 0.014 were associated with symptomatic WNV infection and a single SNP in OAS1 (OR 9.79, p = 0.003 was associated with increased risk for West Nile encephalitis and paralysis (WNE/P. Together, these results suggest that genetic variation in the interferon response pathway is associated with both risk for symptomatic WNV infection and WNV disease progression.

  5. Integration host factor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, mIHF, compacts DNA by a bending mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpit Mishra

    Full Text Available The bacterial chromosomal DNA is folded into a compact structure called as 'nucleoid' so that the bacterial genome can be accommodated inside the cell. The shape and size of the nucleoid are determined by several factors including DNA supercoiling, macromolecular crowding and nucleoid associated proteins (NAPs. NAPs bind to different sites of the genome in sequence specific or non-sequence specific manner and play an important role in DNA compaction as well as regulation. Until recently, few NAPs have been discovered in mycobacteria owing to poor sequence similarities with other histone-like proteins of eubacteria. Several putative NAPs have now been identified in Mycobacteria on the basis of enriched basic residues or histone-like "PAKK" motifs. Here, we investigate mycobacterial Integration Host Factor (mIHF for its architectural roles as a NAP using atomic force microscopy and DNA compaction experiments. We demonstrate that mIHF binds DNA in a non-sequence specific manner and compacts it by a DNA bending mechanism. AFM experiments also indicate a dual architectural role for mIHF in DNA compaction as well as relaxation. These results suggest a convergent evolution in the mechanism of E. coli and mycobacterial IHF in DNA compaction.

  6. Endogenous tissue factor pathway inhibitor has a limited effect on host defence in murine pneumococcal pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Boogaard, Florry E; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Meijers, Joost C M; Schultz, Marcus J; Broze, George J; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia. Coagulation and inflammation interact in the host response to infection. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is a natural anticoagulant protein that inhibits tissue factor (TF), the main activator of inflammation-induced coagulation. It was the objective of this study to investigate the effect of endogenous TFPI levels on coagulation, inflammation and bacterial growth during S. pneumoniae pneumonia in mice. The effect of low endogenous TFPI levels was studied by administration of a neutralising anti-TFPI antibody to wild-type mice, and by using genetically modified mice expressing low levels of TFPI, due to a genetic deletion of the first Kunitz domain of TFPI (TFPIK1(-/-)) rescued with a human TFPI transgene. Pneumonia was induced by intranasal inoculation with S. pneumoniae and samples were obtained at 6, 24 and 48 hours after infection. Anti-TFPI reduced TFPI activity by ~50 %. Homozygous lowTFPI mice and heterozygous controls had ~10 % and ~50 % of normal TFPI activity, respectively. TFPI levels did not influence bacterial growth or dissemination. Whereas lung pathology was unaffected in all groups, mice with ~10 % (but not with ~50 %) of TFPI levels displayed elevated lung cytokine and chemokine concentrations 24 hours after infection. None of the groups with low TFPI levels showed an altered procoagulant response in lungs or plasma during pneumonia. These data argue against an important role for endogenous TFPI in the antibacterial, inflammatory and procoagulant response during pneumococcal pneumonia.

  7. A granulin-like growth factor secreted by the carcinogenic liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, promotes proliferation of host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Smout

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, infects millions of people throughout south-east Asia and is a major cause of cholangiocarcinoma, or cancer of the bile ducts. The mechanisms by which chronic infection with O. viverrini results in cholangiocarcinogenesis are multi-factorial, but one such mechanism is the secretion of parasite proteins with mitogenic properties into the bile ducts, driving cell proliferation and creating a tumorigenic environment. Using a proteomic approach, we identified a homologue of human granulin, a potent growth factor involved in cell proliferation and wound healing, in the excretory/secretory (ES products of the parasite. O. viverrini granulin, termed Ov-GRN-1, was expressed in most parasite tissues, particularly the gut and tegument. Furthermore, Ov-GRN-1 was detected in situ on the surface of biliary epithelial cells of hamsters experimentally infected with O. viverrini. Recombinant Ov-GRN-1 was expressed in E. coli and refolded from inclusion bodies. Refolded protein stimulated proliferation of murine fibroblasts at nanomolar concentrations, and proliferation was inhibited by the MAPK kinase inhibitor, U0126. Antibodies raised to recombinant Ov-GRN-1 inhibited the ability of O. viverrini ES products to induce proliferation of murine fibroblasts and a human cholangiocarcinoma cell line in vitro, indicating that Ov-GRN-1 is the major growth factor present in O. viverrini ES products. This is the first report of a secreted growth factor from a parasitic worm that induces proliferation of host cells, and supports a role for this fluke protein in establishment of a tumorigenic environment that may ultimately manifest as cholangiocarcinoma.

  8. A granulin-like growth factor secreted by the carcinogenic liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, promotes proliferation of host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Smout

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, infects millions of people throughout south-east Asia and is a major cause of cholangiocarcinoma, or cancer of the bile ducts. The mechanisms by which chronic infection with O. viverrini results in cholangiocarcinogenesis are multi-factorial, but one such mechanism is the secretion of parasite proteins with mitogenic properties into the bile ducts, driving cell proliferation and creating a tumorigenic environment. Using a proteomic approach, we identified a homologue of human granulin, a potent growth factor involved in cell proliferation and wound healing, in the excretory/secretory (ES products of the parasite. O. viverrini granulin, termed Ov-GRN-1, was expressed in most parasite tissues, particularly the gut and tegument. Furthermore, Ov-GRN-1 was detected in situ on the surface of biliary epithelial cells of hamsters experimentally infected with O. viverrini. Recombinant Ov-GRN-1 was expressed in E. coli and refolded from inclusion bodies. Refolded protein stimulated proliferation of murine fibroblasts at nanomolar concentrations, and proliferation was inhibited by the MAPK kinase inhibitor, U0126. Antibodies raised to recombinant Ov-GRN-1 inhibited the ability of O. viverrini ES products to induce proliferation of murine fibroblasts and a human cholangiocarcinoma cell line in vitro, indicating that Ov-GRN-1 is the major growth factor present in O. viverrini ES products. This is the first report of a secreted growth factor from a parasitic worm that induces proliferation of host cells, and supports a role for this fluke protein in establishment of a tumorigenic environment that may ultimately manifest as cholangiocarcinoma.

  9. Ecological factors driving the long-term evolution of influenza's host range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobey, Sarah; Pascual, Mercedes; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of a pathogen's host range is shaped by the ecology of its hosts and by the physiological traits that determine host specificity. For many pathogen traits, there is a trade-off: a phenotype suitable for infecting one set of hosts poorly infects another. Introducing and analysing a simple evo-epidemiological model, here we study how such a trade-off is expected to affect evolution of the host ranges of influenza viruses. We examine a quantitative trait underlying host specificity, given by an influenza virus's degree of adaptation to certain conformations of sialic acid receptors, and investigate how this receptor preference evolves in a minimal network of host species, including humans, that differ in life history and receptor physiology. Using adaptive dynamics theory, we establish thresholds in interspecific transmission rates and host population sizes that govern the emergence and persistence of human-adapted viruses. These ecological thresholds turn out to be largely independent of the strength of the evolutionary trade-off, underscoring the importance of ecological conditions in determining a disease's host range. PMID:20444714

  10. KAP1 Is a Host Restriction Factor That Promotes Human Adenovirus E1B-55K SUMO Modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bürck, Carolin; Mund, Andreas; Berscheminski, Julia

    2016-01-01

    characterized, but represent a decisive moment in establishing a productive infection. Here, we identify a novel host viral restriction factor, KAP1. This heterochromatin associated transcription factor regulates the dynamic organization of host chromatin structure via its ability to influence epigenetic marks...... epigenetic gene silencing and to promote SUMO modification of E1B-55K by a so far unknown mechanism. IMPORTANCE: Here we describe a novel cellular restriction factor for Human Adenovirus (HAdV) that sheds light on very early modulation processes in viral infection. We reported that chromatin formation...... and cellular SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling play a key role in HAdV transcriptional regulation (1-4). We observed that the cellular chromatin-associated factor, and epigenetic reader SPOC1 represses HAdV infection and gene expression. Here, we illustrate the role of the SPOC1 interacting factor KAP1 during...

  11. M062 is a host range factor essential for myxoma virus pathogenesis and functions as an antagonist of host SAMD9 in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Wennier, Sonia; Zhang, Leiliang; McFadden, Grant

    2011-04-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) M062R is a functional homolog of the C7L family of host range genes from orthopoxviruses. We constructed a targeted M062R-knockout-MYXV (vMyxM062-KO) and characterized its properties in vitro and in vivo. In European rabbits, infection by vMyxM062-KO was completely asymptomatic. The surviving rabbits did not gain full protection against the subsequent lethal-dose challenge with wild-type MYXV. We also looked for cellular tropism defects in a variety of cultured cells. In all of the rabbit cells tested, vMyxM062-KO conducts an abortive infection, although it initiates viral DNA replication. In many, but not all, human cancer cells that are permissive for wild-type MYXV, vMyxM062-KO exhibited a profound replication defect. We categorized human cells tested into two groups: (i) type A, which support productive replication for wild-type MYXV but are unable to produce significant levels of progeny virus by vMyxM062-KO, and (ii) type B, which are permissive to infections by both wild-type MYXV and vMyxM062-KO. Furthermore, using proteomic strategies, we identified sterile α motif domain containing 9 (SAMD9), an interferon-regulated cellular protein implicated in human inflammatory disorders, as a unique host binding partner of M062 in human cells. Significantly, knocking down SAMD9 in type A human cancer cells led to a substantial rescue of vMyxM062-KO infection. In summary, M062 is a novel host range factor that controls productive MYXV replication in rabbit cells and in a wide variety of human cells. M062 also binds and antagonizes cellular SAMD9 in human cells, suggesting that SAMD9 is a novel innate antiviral factor against poxviruses.

  12. The Fish Pathogen Vibrio vulnificus Biotype 2: Epidemiology, Phylogeny, and Virulence Factors Involved in Warm-Water Vibriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Carmen; Sanjuán, Eva; Fouz, Belén; Pajuelo, David; Lee, Chung-Te; Hor, Lien-I; Barrera, Rodolfo

    2015-06-01

    Vibrio vulnificus biotype 2 is the etiological agent of warm-water vibriosis, a disease that affects eels and other teleosts, especially in fish farms. Biotype 2 is polyphyletic and probably emerged from aquatic bacteria by acquisition of a transferable virulence plasmid that encodes resistance to innate immunity of eels and other teleosts. Interestingly, biotype 2 comprises a zoonotic clonal complex designated as serovar E that has extended worldwide. One of the most interesting virulence factors produced by serovar E is RtxA13, a multifunctional protein that acts as a lethal factor for fish, an invasion factor for mice, and a survival factor outside the host. Two practically identical copies of rtxA13 are present in all biotype 2 strains regardless of the serovar, one in the virulence plasmid and the other in chromosome II. The plasmid also contains other genes involved in survival and growth in eel blood: vep07, a gene for an outer membrane (OM) lipoprotein involved in resistance to eel serum and vep20, a gene for an OM receptor specific for eel-transferrin and, probably, other related fish transferrins. All the three genes are highly conserved within biotype 2, which suggests that they are under a strong selective pressure. Interestingly, the three genes are related with transferable plasmids, which emphasizes the role of horizontal gene transfer in the evolution of V. vulnificus in nutrient-enriched aquatic environments, such as fish farms.

  13. Aberrant germinal center formation, follicular T-helper cells, and germinal center B-cells were involved in chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Liang; Lie, Albert K W; Zhang, You; Wong, Cheuk-Hong; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2015-09-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is an important complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To define the roles of T-cells and B-cells in cGVHD, a murine minor histocompatibility complex-mismatched HSCT model was used. Depletion of donor splenocyte CD4(+) T-cells and B220(+) B-cells alleviated cGVHD. Allogeneic recipients had significantly increased splenic germinal centers (GCs), with significant increases in follicular T-helper (Tfh) cells and GC B-cells. There were increased expressions in Tfh cells of inducible T-cell co-stimulator (ICOS), interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-17, and in GC B-cells of B-cell activating factor receptor and ICOS ligand. Depletion of donor splenocyte CD4(+) T-cells abrogated aberrant GC formation and suppressed Tfh cells and GC B-cells. Interestingly, depletion of donor splenocyte B200(+) B-cells also suppressed Tfh cells in addition to GC B-cells. These results suggested that in cGVHD, both Tfh and GC B-cells were involved, and their developments were mutually dependent. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus was effective in suppressing cGVHD, Tfh cells, and GC B-cells, either as a prophylaxis or when cGVHD had established. These results implied that therapeutic targeting of both T-cells and B-cells in cGVHD might be effective. Signaling via mTOR may be another useful target in cGVHD.

  14. The contribution of tumor and host tissue factor expression to oncogene-driven gliomagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, Nathalie; Meehan, Brian; Garnier, Delphine; Hashemi, Maryam; Montermini, Laura; Lee, Tae Hoon; Milsom, Chloe; Pawlinski, Rafal; Ohlfest, John; Anderson, Mark; Mackman, Nigel; Rak, Janusz

    2014-11-14

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive form of glial brain tumors, associated with angiogenesis, thrombosis, and upregulation of tissue factor (TF), the key cellular trigger of coagulation and signaling. Since TF is upregulated by oncogenic mutations occurring in different subsets of human brain tumors we investigated whether TF contributes to tumourigenesis driven by oncogenic activation of EGFR (EGFRvIII) and RAS pathways in the brain. Here we show that TF expression correlates with poor prognosis in glioma, but not in GBM. In situ, the TF protein expression is heterogeneously expressed in adult and pediatric gliomas. GBM cells harboring EGFRvIII (U373vIII) grow aggressively as xenografts in SCID mice and their progression is delayed by administration of monoclonal antibodies blocking coagulant (CNTO 859) and signaling (10H10) effects of TF in vivo. Mice in which TF gene is disrupted in the neuroectodermal lineage exhibit delayed progression of spontaneous brain tumors driven by oncogenic N-ras and SV40 large T antigen (SV40LT) expressed under the control of sleeping beauty transposase. Reduced host TF levels in low-TF/SCID hypomorphic mice mitigated growth of glioma subcutaneously but not in the brain. Thus, we suggest that tumor-associated TF may serve as therapeutic target in the context of oncogene-driven disease progression in a subset of glioma.

  15. A chromosomally encoded virulence factor protects the Lyme disease pathogen against host-adaptive immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuli Yang

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Borrelia burgdorferi, the bacterial pathogen of Lyme borreliosis, differentially expresses select genes in vivo, likely contributing to microbial persistence and disease. Expression analysis of spirochete genes encoding potential membrane proteins showed that surface-located membrane protein 1 (lmp1 transcripts were expressed at high levels in the infected murine heart, especially during early stages of infection. Mice and humans with diagnosed Lyme borreliosis also developed antibodies against Lmp1. Deletion of lmp1 severely impaired the pathogen's ability to persist in diverse murine tissues including the heart, and to induce disease, which was restored upon chromosomal complementation of the mutant with the lmp1 gene. Lmp1 performs an immune-related rather than a metabolic function, as its deletion did not affect microbial persistence in immunodeficient mice, but significantly decreased spirochete resistance to the borreliacidal effects of anti-B. burgdorferi sera in a complement-independent manner. These data demonstrate the existence of a virulence factor that helps the pathogen evade host-acquired immune defense and establish persistent infection in mammals.

  16. Integration host factor is required for replication of pYGK-derived plasmids in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Juárez-Rodríguez, María D; Demuth, Donald R

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we show that integration host factor protein (IHF) is required for replication of pYGK plasmids in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. YGK plasmids were not replicated in A. actinomycetemcomitans strains lacking either the α- or β- subunit of IHF. However, the deletion mutants were complemented, and plasmid replication was restored when the promoter region and gene for either ihfA or ihfB was cloned into pYGK. We also identified two motifs that resemble the consensus IHF-binding site in a 813-bp fragment containing the pYGK origin of replication. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, purified IHFα-IHFβ protein complex was shown to bind to probes containing either of these motifs. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that plasmid replication is IHF-dependent in the family Pasteurellaceae. In addition, using site-direct mutagenesis, the XbaI and KpnI restriction sites in the suicide vector pJT1 were modified to generate plasmid pJT10. The introduction of these new unique sites in pJT10 facilitates the transfer of transcriptional or translational lacZ fusion constructs for the generation of single-copy chromosomal insertion of the reporter construct. Plasmid pJT10 and its derivatives will be useful for genetic studies in Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) and probably other genera of Pasteurellaceae, including Haemophilus, Pasteurella, and Mannheimia.

  17. Proteomic analysis of Fasciola hepatica excretory and secretory products (FhESPs) involved in interacting with host PBMCs and cytokines by shotgun LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Huang, Si-Yang; Yue, Dong-Mei; Wang, Jin-Lei; Wang, Yujian; Li, Xiangrui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2017-02-01

    Fasciola hepatica is a helminth parasite with a worldwide distribution, which can cause chronic liver disease, fasciolosis, leading to economic losses in the livestock and public health in many countries. Control is mostly reliant on the use of drugs, and as a result, drug resistance has now emerged. The identification of F. hepatica genes involved in interaction between the parasite and host immune system is utmost important to elucidate the evasion mechanisms of the parasite and develop more effective strategies against fasciolosis. In this study, we aimed to identify molecules in F. hepatica excretory and secretory products (FhESPs) interacting with the host peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), Th1-like cytokines (IL2 and IFN-γ), and Th17-like cytokines (IL17) by Co-IP combined with tandem mass spectrometry. The results showed that 14, 16, and 9 proteins in FhESPs could bind with IL2, IL17, and IFN-γ, respectively, which indicated that adult F. hepatica may evade the host immune responses through directly interplaying with cytokines. In addition, nine proteins in FhESPs could adhere to PBMCs. Our findings provided potential targets as immuno-regulators, and will be helpful to elucidate the molecular basis of host-parasite interactions and search for new potential proteins as vaccine and drug target candidates.

  18. Host Factors Invovled in the Entry of Coronaviruses into Mammalian Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burkard, C.

    2015-01-01

    Enveloped viruses need to fuse with a host cell membrane in order to deliver their genome into the host cell. While some viruses fuse with the plasma membrane, many viruses are endocytosed prior to fusion. Specific cues in the endosomal microenvironment induce conformational changes in the viral fus

  19. A Helicobacter pylori Homolog of Eukaryotic Flotillin Is Involved in Cholesterol Accumulation, Epithelial Cell Responses and Host Colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie L. Hutton

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori acquires cholesterol from membrane raft domains in eukaryotic cells, commonly known as “lipid rafts.” Incorporation of this cholesterol into the H. pylori cell membrane allows the bacterium to avoid clearance by the host immune system and to resist the effects of antibiotics and antimicrobial peptides. The presence of cholesterol in H. pylori bacteria suggested that this pathogen may have cholesterol-enriched domains within its membrane. Consistent with this suggestion, we identified a hypothetical H. pylori protein (HP0248 with homology to the flotillin proteins normally found in the cholesterol-enriched domains of eukaryotic cells. As shown for eukaryotic flotillin proteins, HP0248 was detected in detergent-resistant membrane fractions of H. pylori. Importantly, H. pylori HP0248 mutants contained lower levels of cholesterol than wild-type bacteria (P < 0.01. HP0248 mutant bacteria also exhibited defects in type IV secretion functions, as indicated by reduced IL-8 responses and CagA translocation in epithelial cells (P < 0.05, and were less able to establish a chronic infection in mice than wild-type bacteria (P < 0.05. Thus, we have identified an H. pylori flotillin protein and shown its importance for bacterial virulence. Taken together, the data demonstrate important roles for H. pylori flotillin in host-pathogen interactions. We propose that H. pylori flotillin may be required for the organization of virulence proteins into membrane raft-like structures in this pathogen.

  20. A Helicobacter pylori Homolog of Eukaryotic Flotillin Is Involved in Cholesterol Accumulation, Epithelial Cell Responses and Host Colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Melanie L; D'Costa, Kimberley; Rossiter, Amanda E; Wang, Lin; Turner, Lorinda; Steer, David L; Masters, Seth L; Croker, Ben A; Kaparakis-Liaskos, Maria; Ferrero, Richard L

    2017-01-01

    The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori acquires cholesterol from membrane raft domains in eukaryotic cells, commonly known as "lipid rafts." Incorporation of this cholesterol into the H. pylori cell membrane allows the bacterium to avoid clearance by the host immune system and to resist the effects of antibiotics and antimicrobial peptides. The presence of cholesterol in H. pylori bacteria suggested that this pathogen may have cholesterol-enriched domains within its membrane. Consistent with this suggestion, we identified a hypothetical H. pylori protein (HP0248) with homology to the flotillin proteins normally found in the cholesterol-enriched domains of eukaryotic cells. As shown for eukaryotic flotillin proteins, HP0248 was detected in detergent-resistant membrane fractions of H. pylori. Importantly, H. pylori HP0248 mutants contained lower levels of cholesterol than wild-type bacteria (P pylori flotillin protein and shown its importance for bacterial virulence. Taken together, the data demonstrate important roles for H. pylori flotillin in host-pathogen interactions. We propose that H. pylori flotillin may be required for the organization of virulence proteins into membrane raft-like structures in this pathogen.

  1. Angiostrongylus cantonensis cathepsin B-like protease (Ac-cathB-1 is involved in host gut penetration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Ying

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the global spread of the emerging zoonosis, human angiostrongyliasis, has attracted increasing attention, understanding of specific gene function has been impeded by the inaccessibility of genetic manipulation of the pathogen nematode causing this disease, Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Many parasitic proteases play key roles in host-parasite interactions, but those of A. cantonensis are always expressed as the inactive form in prokaryotic expression systems, thereby impeding functional studies. Hence, a lentiviral system that drives secreted expression of target genes fused to a Myc-His tag was used to obtain recombinant Ac-cathB-1 with biological activity. Although this class of proteases was always reported to function in nutrition and immune evasion in parasitic nematodes, recombinant Ac-cathB-1 was capable of hydrolysis of fibronectin and laminin as well as the extracellular matrix of IEC-6 monolayer, so that the intercellular space of the IEC-6 monolayer increased 5.15 times as compared to the control, while the shape of the adherent cells partly rounded up. This suggests a probable role for this protease in intestinal epithelial penetration. The inhibition of Ac-cathB-1 enzymatic activity with antiserum partly suppressed larval penetration ability in the isolated intestine. Thus, an effective system for heterologous expression of parasite proteases is presented for studying gene function in A. cantonensis; and Ac-cathB-1 was related to larval penetration ability in the host small intestine.

  2. Identical accumulation and immobilization of sulfated and nonsulfated Nod factors in host and nonhost root hair cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedhart, J.; Bono, J.J.; Bisseling, T.; Gadella, T.W.J.

    2003-01-01

    Nod factors are signaling molecules secreted by Rhizobium bacteria. These lipo-chitooligosaccharides (LCOs) are required for symbiosis with legumes and can elicit specific responses at subnanomolar concentrations on a compatible host. How plants perceive LCOs is unclear. In this study, using fluores

  3. Analyses of risk factors for intestinal acute graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    燕法红

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk factors of intestinal acute graft-versus-host disease(aGVHD)after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(allo-HSCT).Methods The clinical data of 534 cases of 533 patients undergoing allo-HSCT during Jan 2004 and Sep 2012were retrospectively analyzed.The effects of donor-recipient HLA

  4. EGFR and EphA2 are host factors for hepatitis C virus entry and possible targets for antiviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupberger, Joachim; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Xiao, Fei; Thumann, Christine; Fofana, Isabel; Zona, Laetitia; Davis, Christopher; Mee, Christopher J.; Turek, Marine; Gorke, Sebastian; Royer, Cathy; Fischer, Benoit; Zahid, Muhammad N.; Lavillette, Dimitri; Fresquet, Judith; Cosset, François-Loïc; Rothenberg, S Michael; Pietschmann, Thomas; Patel, Arvind H.; Pessaux, Patrick; Doffoël, Michel; Raffelsberger, Wolfgang; Poch, Olivier; Mckeating, Jane A.; Brino, Laurent; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease. Therapeutic options are limited and preventive strategies are absent. Entry is the first step of infection and requires the cooperative interaction of several host cell factors. Using a functional RNAi kinase screen we identified epidermal growth factor receptor and ephrin receptor A2 as host co-factors for HCV entry. Blocking of kinase function by approved inhibitors broadly inhibited HCV infection of all major HCV genotypes and viral escape variants in cell culture and an animal model in vivo. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) mediate HCV entry by regulating CD81-claudin-1 co-receptor associations and membrane fusion. These results identify RTKs as novel HCV entry co-factors and uncover that kinase inhibitors have significant antiviral activity. Inhibition of RTK function may constitute a novel approach for prevention and treatment of HCV infection. PMID:21516087

  5. Biotic mortality factors affecting emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) are highly dependent on life stage and host tree crown condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, D E; Duan, J J; Shrewsbury, P M

    2015-10-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is a serious invasive forest pest in North America responsible for killing tens to hundreds of millions of ash trees since it was accidentally introduced in the 1990 s. Although host-plant resistance and natural enemies are known to be important sources of mortality for EAB in Asia, less is known about the importance of different sources of mortality at recently colonized sites in the invaded range of EAB, and how these relate to host tree crown condition. To further our understanding of EAB population dynamics, we used a large-scale field experiment and life-table analyses to quantify the fates of EAB larvae and the relative importance of different biotic mortality factors at 12 recently colonized sites in Maryland. We found that the fates of larvae were highly dependent on EAB life stage and host tree crown condition. In relatively healthy trees (i.e., with a low EAB infestation) and for early instars, host tree resistance was the most important mortality factor. Conversely, in more unhealthy trees (i.e., with a moderate to high EAB infestation) and for later instars, parasitism and predation were the major sources of mortality. Life-table analyses also indicated how the lack of sufficient levels of host tree resistance and natural enemies contribute to rapid population growth of EAB at recently colonized sites. Our findings provide further evidence of the mechanisms by which EAB has been able to successfully establish and spread in North America.

  6. To be involved or not: factors that influence nurses' involvement in providing treatment decisional support in advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthow, Christine; Moss, Cheryle; McKinlay, Eileen; McCullough, Leslie; Wise, Debbie

    2009-02-01

    Decisional support is a multifaceted process of facilitating patients' decision making regarding treatment choices. Effective decisional support practices of nurses in relation to the use of anticancer therapies in patients with advanced disease are central to quality cancer care. A recent qualitative descriptive study (n=21) exploring the decision making practices of doctors and nurses in one tertiary cancer centre in New Zealand identified many complexities associated with nurses and their participation in decisional support. The study revealed that cancer nurses had varied opinions about the meaning and importance of their roles in treatment related decision making. This variation was significant and led the researchers to undertake a detailed secondary exploration of factors that impacted on the nurses' involvement in the provision of decisional support. Four key groups of factors were identified. These were factors relating to degree of knowledge, level of experience, beliefs and understandings about nursing roles and cancer therapies, and structural interfaces in the work setting. Understanding these factors is important because it allows modification of the conditions which impact on the ability to provide effective decisional care. It also provides some understanding of clinical drivers associated with nurses' decisional support work with patients who have advanced cancer.

  7. THE EXTERNAL FACTORS OF STUDENTS’ INVOLVEMENT IN SPEAKING ACTIVITY AT SMP PROGRESIF BUMI SHALAWAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Nurul Haikal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This research is conducted to know what factors that influence the students’ involvement in speaking activity in order to practice their speaking skill and what strategies that the teacher used to encourage those external factors. This research uses descriptive qualitative method. There are two instruments used for this research, namely, class observation and interview. Based on the results of class observation and interview, the researcher concludes that teacher factor gives the greatest impact on students’ involvement and the appropriate strategies can support those external factors.

  8. Generalized Identities Involving Common Factors of Generalized Fibonacci, Jacobsthal and Jacobsthal-Lucas Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashwant K. Panwar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present generalized identities involving common factors of generalized Fibonacci, Jacobsthal and jacobsthal-Lucas numbers. Binet’s formula will employ to obtain the identities.

  9. S100A8/A9 is not involved in host defense against murine urinary tract infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark C Dessing

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inflammation is commonly followed by the release of endogenous proteins called danger associated molecular patterns (DAMPs that are able to warn the host for eminent danger. S100A8/A9 subunits are DAMPs that belong to the S100 family of calcium binding proteins. S100A8/A9 complexes induce an inflammatory response and their expression correlates with disease severity in several inflammatory disorders. S100A8/A9 promote endotoxin- and Escherichia (E. coli-induced sepsis showing its contribution in systemic infection. The role of S100A8/A9 during a local infection of the urinary tract system caused by E. coli remains unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the contribution of S100A8/A9 in acute urinary tract infection (UTI by instilling 2 different doses of uropathogenic E. coli transurethrally in wild type (WT and S100A9 knockout (KO mice. Subsequently, we determined bacterial outgrowth, neutrophilic infiltrate and inflammatory mediators in bladder and kidney 24 and 48 hours later. UTI resulted in a substantial increase of S100A8/A9 protein in bladder and kidney tissue of WT mice. S100A9 KO mice displayed similar bacterial load in bladder or kidney homogenate compared to WT mice using 2 different doses at 2 different time points. S100A9 deficiency had little effect on the inflammatory responses to E. Coli-induced UTI infection, as assessed by myeloperoxidase activity in bladder and kidneys, histopathologic analysis, and renal and bladder cytokine concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: We show that despite high S100A8/A9 expression in bladder and kidney tissue upon UTI, S100A8/A9 does not contribute to an effective host response against E. Coli in the urinary tract system.

  10. School, Neighborhood, and Family Factors Are Associated with Children's Bullying Involvement: A Nationally Representative Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowes, Lucy; Arseneault, Louise; Maughan, Barbara; Taylor, Alan; Caspi, Ashalom; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2009-01-01

    School size and problems with neighbors is associated with a greater risk of being a bullying victim while family factors such as maltreatment and domestic violence are associated with involvement in bullying. The findings are based on the Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study that involves 2,232 children.

  11. Perceptions of Risk Factors for Female Gang Involvement among African American and Hispanic Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-Barnes, Chanequa J.; Mason, Craig A.

    2001-01-01

    Female minority students at an urban alternative high school completed interviews regarding perceptions of risk factors for female gang involvement. Peer pressure was the largest influence on female gang involvement. Respondents believed girls might turn to gangs for protection from neighborhood crime, abusive families, and other gangs. Lack of…

  12. Factors involved in the etiology of temporomandibular disorders - a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHISNOIU, ANDREA MARIA; PICOS, ALINA MONICA; POPA, SEVER; CHISNOIU, PETRE DANIEL; LASCU, LIANA; PICOS, ANDREI; CHISNOIU, RADU

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim This review aims at presenting a current view on the most frequent factors involved in the mechanisms causing temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Method We conducted a critical review of the literature for the period January 2000 to December 2014 to identify factors related to TMD development and persistence. Results The etiology of TMD is multidimensional: biomechanical, neuromuscular, bio-psychosocial and biological factors may contribute to the disorder. Occlusal overloading and parafunctions (bruxism) are frequently involved as biomechanical factors; increased levels of estrogen hormones are considered biological factors affecting the temporo-mandibular-joint. Among bio-psychosocial factors, stress, anxiety or depression, were frequently encountered. Conclusions The etiopathogenesis of this condition is poorly understood, therefore TMDs are difficult to diagnose and manage. Early and correct identification of the possible etiologic factors will enable the appropriate treatment scheme application in order to reduce or eliminate TMDs debilitating signs and symptoms. PMID:26732121

  13. Drosophila host model reveals new enterococcus faecalis quorum-sensing associated virulence factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Neuza; Varahan, Sriram; Gorman, Matthew J; Palmer, Kelli L; Zaidman-Remy, Anna; Yokohata, Ryoji; Nakayama, Jiro; Hancock, Lynn E; Jacinto, António; Gilmore, Michael S; de Fátima Silva Lopes, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis V583 is a vancomycin-resistant clinical isolate which belongs to the hospital-adapted clade, CC2. This strain harbours several factors that have been associated with virulence, including the fsr quorum-sensing regulatory system that is known to control the expression of GelE and SprE proteases. To discriminate between genes directly regulated by Fsr, and those indirectly regulated as the result of protease expression or activity, we compared gene expression in isogenic mutants of V583 variously defective in either Fsr quorum sensing or protease expression. Quorum sensing was artificially induced by addition of the quorum signal, GBAP, exogenously in a controlled manner. The Fsr regulon was found to be restricted to five genes, gelE, sprE, ef1097, ef1351 and ef1352. Twelve additional genes were found to be dependent on the presence of GBAP-induced proteases. Induction of GelE and SprE by GBAP via Fsr resulted in accumulation of mRNA encoding lrgAB, and this induction was found to be lytRS dependent. Drosophila infection was used to discern varying levels of toxicity stemming from mutations in the fsr quorum regulatory system and the genes that it regulates, highlighting the contribution of LrgAB and bacteriocin EF1097 to infection toxicity. A contribution of SprE to infection toxicity was also detected. This work brought to light new players in E. faecalis success as a pathogen and paves the way for future studies on host tolerance mechanisms to infections caused by this important nosocomial pathogen.

  14. The geographical distribution and habitats of three liver fluke intermediate hosts in South - Africa and the health implications involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N. de Kock

    2008-09-01

    described as permanent, standing, fresh and clear. Although the highest percentage of samples of all three species was reported from loci that fell within the interval ranging from 16-20°C, a significant number of samples of L. truncatula came from loci falling with in the 11-15°C interval. In view of the fact that Lymnaea species are well known as intermediate hosts for liver fluke in South Africa and elsewhere in the world, the widespread occurrence of these snails could have considerable health and economic consequences. Lymnaea natalenis is the most important and probably the only intermediate host of Fasciola gigantica, the most common liver fluke in Africa but F. gigantica has been reliably reported only from Lesotho where its traditional intermediate host, L. truncatula is widespread. However, the epidemiology of fasciolosis in South Africa has been complicated by the invasion of many water-bodies by L. columella because this species has proved to be a successful host for F. hepatica where it had been introduced elsewhere in the world. To our knowledge its role in South Africa in this respect has not yet been evaluated. Due to the fact that no statistics are available in print, the results of positive serological tests on cattle herds all over South Africa were used to compile a map depicting the possible occurrence of Fasciola species in livestock in this country. Although human infections with Fasciola in Africa was considered as very rare in 1975 the situation has changed. It is considered an underrated and underreported disease in humans in Ethiopia and in Egypt an increase in cases of fasciolosis and prevalence’s as high as 12.8% in humans have also recently been reported. To our knowledge the only cases of human fasciolosis reported in literature for South Africa were from northern KwaZulu-Natal where F. hepatica infections were found in 22 out of 7 569 school children examined in 1981. Efforts to obtain recent statisticson human infections from various

  15. Genetic Factors and Host Traits Predict Spore Morphology for a Butterfly Pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobus C. de Roode

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus throughout the world are commonly infected by the specialist pathogen Ophryocystis elektroscirrha (OE. This protozoan is transmitted when larvae ingest infectious stages (spores scattered onto host plant leaves by infected adults. Parasites replicate internally during larval and pupal stages, and adult monarchs emerge covered with millions of dormant spores on the outsides of their bodies. Across multiple monarch populations, OE varies in prevalence and virulence. Here, we examined geographic and genetic variation in OE spore morphology using clonal parasite lineages derived from each of four host populations (eastern and western North America, South Florida and Hawaii. Spores were harvested from experimentally inoculated, captive-reared adult monarchs. Using light microscopy and digital image analysis, we measured the size, shape and color of 30 replicate spores per host. Analyses examined predictors of spore morphology, including parasite source population and clone, parasite load, and the following host traits: family line, sex, wing area, and wing color (orange and black pigmentation. Results showed significant differences in spore size and shape among parasite clones, suggesting genetic determinants of morphological variation. Spore size also increased with monarch wing size, and monarchs with larger and darker orange wings tended to have darker colored spores, consistent with the idea that parasite development depends on variation in host quality and resources. We found no evidence for effects of source population on variation in spore morphology. Collectively, these results provide support for heritable variation in spore morphology and a role for host traits in affecting parasite development.

  16. Effect of stiffness and thickness ratio of host plate and piezoelectric patches on reduction of the stress concentration factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesharaki, Javad Jafari; Madani, Seyed Ghasem; Golabi, Sa'id

    2016-09-01

    This paper focuses on the effects of stiffness ratio and thickness ratio on reducing stress concentration factor using piezoelectric patches in a rectangular plate with a hole, as a classical shape. Various locations of actuators and induction of positive/negative strains into the host plate are investigated and the best location of patches is presented. The study investigated the ratio effects and piezoelectric patches bounded on a rectangular host plate having various thicknesses and materials. Results show that the best position of actuators varies based on values of thickness and stiffness ratios of the host plate and piezoelectric patches. Also, the location of maximum stress concentration is transmitted from top and bottom of the hole to another point around the edge by changing the location of the piezoelectric actuators. To verify the results, some experimental tests are applied. The results show good agreement between the finite element analysis and experimental tests.

  17. Factors influencing the degree and pattern of parental involvement in play therapy for sexually abused children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Although much has been written about the role of therapists in children's recovery from child sexual abuse, relatively little attention has been paid to the role of nonoffending parents. This study investigated the work of a team of therapists who sometimes included such parents in therapy sessions with children. The study sought to understand what factors were influencing the degree and pattern of parental involvement and to understand what effect these patterns of parental involvement were having on the process and outcomes of therapy. The study successfully identified a range of factors influencing the patterns of parental involvement, but more research will be needed to understand the effect on outcomes.

  18. siRNA Screen Identifies Trafficking Host Factors that Modulate Alphavirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoshitzky, Sheli R; Pegoraro, Gianluca; Chī, Xi Olì; D Ng, Lián; Chiang, Chih-Yuan; Jozwick, Lucas; Clester, Jeremiah C; Cooper, Christopher L; Courier, Duane; Langan, David P; Underwood, Knashka; Kuehl, Kathleen A; Sun, Mei G; Caì, Yíngyún; Yú, Shu Qìng; Burk, Robin; Zamani, Rouzbeh; Kota, Krishna; Kuhn, Jens H; Bavari, Sina

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the repertoire of cellular factors involved in the replication of pathogenic alphaviruses. To uncover molecular regulators of alphavirus infection, and to identify candidate drug targets, we performed a high-content imaging-based siRNA screen. We revealed an actin-remodeling pathway involving Rac1, PIP5K1- α, and Arp3, as essential for infection by pathogenic alphaviruses. Infection causes cellular actin rearrangements into large bundles of actin filaments termed actin foci. Actin foci are generated late in infection concomitantly with alphavirus envelope (E2) expression and are dependent on the activities of Rac1 and Arp3. E2 associates with actin in alphavirus-infected cells and co-localizes with Rac1-PIP5K1-α along actin filaments in the context of actin foci. Finally, Rac1, Arp3, and actin polymerization inhibitors interfere with E2 trafficking from the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface, suggesting a plausible model in which transport of E2 to the cell surface is mediated via Rac1- and Arp3-dependent actin remodeling.

  19. siRNA Screen Identifies Trafficking Host Factors that Modulate Alphavirus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheli R Radoshitzky

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the repertoire of cellular factors involved in the replication of pathogenic alphaviruses. To uncover molecular regulators of alphavirus infection, and to identify candidate drug targets, we performed a high-content imaging-based siRNA screen. We revealed an actin-remodeling pathway involving Rac1, PIP5K1- α, and Arp3, as essential for infection by pathogenic alphaviruses. Infection causes cellular actin rearrangements into large bundles of actin filaments termed actin foci. Actin foci are generated late in infection concomitantly with alphavirus envelope (E2 expression and are dependent on the activities of Rac1 and Arp3. E2 associates with actin in alphavirus-infected cells and co-localizes with Rac1-PIP5K1-α along actin filaments in the context of actin foci. Finally, Rac1, Arp3, and actin polymerization inhibitors interfere with E2 trafficking from the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface, suggesting a plausible model in which transport of E2 to the cell surface is mediated via Rac1- and Arp3-dependent actin remodeling.

  20. Postmortem examination of the kidney in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients: possible involvement of graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumi, Eiji; Kami, Masahiro; Hara, Shigeo; Hoshino, Junichi; Yamaguchi, Yutaka; Murashige, Naoko; Kishi, Yukiko; Shibagaki, Yugo; Shibata, Taro; Matsumura, Tomoko; Yuji, Koichiro; Masuoka, Kazuhiro; Wake, Atsushi; Miyakoshi, Shigesaburo; Taniguchi, Shuichi

    2008-03-01

    To investigate the association between graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and renal injury after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT), we compared autopsy findings of 26 consecutive allo-SCT recipients with two control groups: patients with hematologic malignancies who received cytotoxic chemotherapy alone (Control 1, n = 21) and those with non-hematologic diseases (Control 2, n = 12). We evaluated the following renal pathology; renal tubulitis, allograft glomerulitis, intimal arteritis, allograft nephropathy, and peritubular capillaritis. These changes were found in 11 allo-SCT recipients and 10 patients in Control 1, but none in Control 2. While overall frequency of renal impairments was similar between allo-SCT recipients and Control 1 (3/26 vs. 1/21), allo-SCT recipients were more likely to have renal tubulitis and peritubular capillaritis compared to Control 1 (5/26 vs. 1/21), but less likely to present with glomerulitis (1/26 vs. 6/21). Grade III-IV acute or extensive-type chronic GVHD were seen in all of the three patients with renal tubulitis and four of the five patients with peritubular capillaritis. Allo-SCT recipients with severe GVHD tended to have tubulitis and peritubular capillaritis. These findings have implications of some renal impairment attributable to GVHD.

  1. The geographical distribution and habitats of three liver fluke intermediate hosts in South - Africa and the health implications involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N. de Kock

    2008-09-01

    described as permanent, standing, fresh and clear. Although the highest percentage of samples of all three species was reported from loci that fell within the interval ranging from 16-20°C, a significant number of samples of L. truncatula came from loci falling with in the 11-15°C interval. In view of the fact that Lymnaea species are well known as intermediate hosts for liver fluke in South Africa and elsewhere in the world, the widespread occurrence of these snails could have considerable health and economic consequences. Lymnaea natalenis is the most important and probably the only intermediate host of Fasciola gigantica, the most common liver fluke in Africa but F. gigantica has been reliably reported only from Lesotho where its traditional intermediate host, L. truncatula is widespread. However, the epidemiology of fasciolosis in South Africa has been complicated by the invasion of many water-bodies by L. columella because this species has proved to be a successful host for F. hepatica where it had been introduced elsewhere in the world. To our knowledge its role in South Africa in this respect has not yet been evaluated. Due to the fact that no statistics are available in print, the results of positive serological tests on cattle herds all over South Africa were used to compile a map depicting the possible occurrence of Fasciola species in livestock in this country. Although human infections with Fasciola in Africa was considered as very rare in 1975 the situation has changed. It is considered an underrated and underreported disease in humans in Ethiopia and in Egypt an increase in cases of fasciolosis and prevalence’s as high as 12.8% in humans have also recently been reported. To our knowledge the only cases of human fasciolosis reported in literature for South Africa were from northern KwaZulu-Natal where F. hepatica infections were found in 22 out of 7 569 school children examined in 1981. Efforts to obtain recent statisticson human infections from various

  2. Eop1 from a Rubus strain of Erwinia amylovora functions as a host-range limiting factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselin, J E; Bonasera, J M; Kim, J F; Oh, C-S; Beer, S V

    2011-08-01

    Strains of Erwinia amylovora, the bacterium causing the disease fire blight of rosaceous plants, are separated into two groups based on host range: Spiraeoideae and Rubus strains. Spiraeoideae strains have wide host ranges, infecting plants in many rosaceous genera, including apple and pear. In the field, Rubus strains infect the genus Rubus exclusively, which includes raspberry and blackberry. Based on comparisons of limited sequence data from a Rubus and a Spiraeoideae strain, the gene eop1 was identified as unusually divergent, and it was selected as a possible host specificity factor. To test this, eop1 genes from a Rubus strain and a Spiraeoideae strain were cloned and mutated. Expression of the Rubus-strain eop1 reduced the virulence of E. amylovora in immature pear fruit and in apple shoots. Sequencing the orfA-eop1 regions of several strains of E. amylovora confirmed that forms of eop1 are conserved among strains with similar host ranges. This work provides evidence that eop1 from a Rubus-specific strain can function as a determinant of host specificity in E. amylovora.

  3. Qualitative analysis of factors that increase and reduce involvement in gambling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egidijus

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During the rapid development of gambling business, the number of pathological gamblers is increasing as well. The problem of pathological gambling is just as important as alcoholism or drug addiction. However, there is a lack of information and research of this topicin Lithuania. The aim of work: to investigate and analyse the factors that increase or reduce involvement in gambling. Research questions: 1 What factors increase involvement in gambling? 2 What factors reduce involvement in gambling? Critical case sampling was used for selection of the participants. Subjects were required to a have experience of involvement in gambling for at least one year; b have experience of negative impact of gambling on quality of life; c have at least 6 months of gambling abstinence. Five individuals participated in the research; all of them were males who live in Vilnius. Age of the participants varied from 19 to 45. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. The matic analysis of the data led to the identification of four major the matic categories: psychological factors; social relations; material well being; quality of life. There search results show that negatyve childhood experience, gambling friends, escaping from various troubles, disputes in family and high financial needs can increase involvement in gambling. Factors that reduce involvement in gambling are: feeling support of social environment, proper evaluation of financial position, awareness of one‘s own addiction to gambling and desire to change life.

  4. Host and environmental risk factors associated with Cryptosporidium scophthalmi (Apicomplexa) infection in cultured turbot, Psetta maxima (L.) (Pisces, Teleostei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Pellitero, Pilar; Perez, Andrés; Quiroga, M Isabel; Redondo, M José; Vázquez, Sonia; Riaza, Ana; Palenzuela, Oswaldo; Sitjà-Bobadilla, Ariadna; Nieto, José M

    2009-11-12

    An epidemiological cohort study of Cryptosporidium scophthalmi in cultured turbot Psetta maxima L. of Northwestern Spain was conducted along a four-year period. Four different ongrowing cohorts were monitored monthly from introduction into the ongrowing tanks (10-50 g) until reaching market size (400-1400 g). The association of host and environmental factors with five categories of parasite abundance was assessed using a multivariable regression framework. Epidemiological factors assessed here were water temperature, weight, length, month of collection, season, age, origin, condition factor, water filtration, and status to the myxozoan Enteromyxum scophthalmi infection. E. scophthalmi was included into the analysis because it targets the same organ than C. scophthalmi and it was prevalent in the studied population. The multivariable analysis demonstrated the statistically significant association between several factors and parasite abundance. C. scophthalmi abundance was associated (P<0.05) with age, condition factor, season, and status to E. scophthalmi infection. Young animals, with poor condition factor, during spring or summer, and not infected with the myxozoan were most likely to be highly infected by C. scophthalmi. Inclusion of these four variables significantly (P<0.05) improved the model, compared to the model that did not include any of these epidemiological factors. Increasing levels of C. scophthalmi abundance were associated (P<0.01) with higher severity of C. scophthalmi-compatible lesions. The frequency of distribution of C. scophthalmi abundance was clearly right-skewed and fitted a negative binomial distribution, whereas the intensity of infection fitted a Poisson distribution. The quantification of the variance-to-mean ratio stratified by age demonstrated overdispersion for 8-16 months old fish, although this bivariate association is likely affected by several other factors, as suggested by the results of the multivariable analysis. The negative

  5. Factors associated with involvement in nonmetropolitan LGBTQ organizations: Proximity? Generativity? Minority stress? Social location?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paceley, Megan S; Oswald, Ramona Faith; Hardesty, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about involvement in LGBTQ organizations. Factors associated with involvement in nonmetropolitan LGBTQ organizations were examined using logistic regression and survey data from 426 LGBTQ individuals residing in a nonmetropolitan region. Involvement was examined in five types of organizations (professional, social/recreational, religious, political, and community center/charity). The same model testing proximity, generativity, minority stress, and social location hypotheses was repeated for each organization type. Results demonstrate that the generativity hypothesis is most strongly supported. Indeed, emotional attachment to the LGBTQ community significantly increased the odds of involvement in every type of organization. However, the factors associated with involvement otherwise differed by organization type. Implications for organizational leaders are discussed.

  6. Factors Involved in Iranian Women Heads of Household's Health Promotion Activities: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, Forough; Seyedfatemi, Naima; Rezaei, Mahboubeh

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to explore and describe the factors involved in Iranian women heads of household's health promotion activities. Grounded theory was used as the method. Sixteen women heads of household were recruited. Data were generated by semi structured interviews. Our findings indicated that remainder of resources (money, time and energy) alongside perceived severity of health risk were two main factors whereas women's personal and socio-economic characteristics were two contextual factors involved in these women's health promotion activities. To help these women improve their health status, we recommended that the government, non-governmental organizations and health care professionals provide them with required resources and increase their knowledge by holding training sessions.

  7. Factors involved in the etiology of temporomandibular disorders - a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    CHISNOIU, ANDREA MARIA; PICOS, ALINA MONICA; POPA, SEVER; CHISNOIU, PETRE DANIEL; LASCU, LIANA; PICOS, ANDREI; CHISNOIU, RADU

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim This review aims at presenting a current view on the most frequent factors involved in the mechanisms causing temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Method We conducted a critical review of the literature for the period January 2000 to December 2014 to identify factors related to TMD development and persistence. Results The etiology of TMD is multidimensional: biomechanical, neuromuscular, bio-psychosocial and biological factors may contribute to the disorder. Occlusal overload...

  8. Avian reovirus nonstructural protein p17-induced G(2)/M cell cycle arrest and host cellular protein translation shutoff involve activation of p53-dependent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulu, Julius L C; Huang, Wei R; Wang, L; Shih, Wen L; Liu, Hung J

    2010-08-01

    The effects of avian reovirus (ARV) p17 protein on cell cycle progression and host cellular protein translation were studied. ARV infection and ARV p17 transfection resulted in the accumulation of infected and/or transfected cells in the G(2)/M phase of the cell cycle. The accumulation of cells in the G(2)/M phase was accompanied by upregulation and phosphorylation of the G(2)/M-phase proteins ATM, p53, p21(cip1/waf1), Cdc2, cyclin B1, Chk1, Chk2, and Cdc25C, suggesting that p17 induces a G(2)/M cell cycle arrest through activation of the ATM/p53/p21(cip1/waf1)/Cdc2/cyclin B1 and ATM/Chk1/Chk2/Cdc25C pathways. The G(2)/M cell cycle arrest resulted in increased virus replication. In the present study, we also provide evidence demonstrating that p17 protein is responsible for ARV-induced host cellular protein translation shutoff. Increased phosphorylation levels of the eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2) and initiation factor eIF2alpha and reduced phosphorylation levels of the eukaryotic translation initiation factors eIF4E, eIF4B, and eIF4G, as well as 4E-BP1 and Mnk-1 in p17-transfected cells, demonstrated that ARV p17 suppresses translation initiation factors and translation elongation factors to induce host cellular protein translation shutoff. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin resulted in a decrease in the levels of phosphorylated 4E-BP1, eIF4B, and eIF4G and an increase in the levels eEF2 but did not affect ARV replication, suggesting that ARV replication was not hindered by inhibition of cap-dependent translation. Taken together, our data indicate that ARV p17-induced G(2)/M arrest and host cellular translation shutoff resulted in increased ARV replication.

  9. Adaptation to toxic hosts as a factor in the evolution of insecticide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyokhin, Andrei; Chen, Yolanda H

    2017-06-01

    Insecticide resistance is a serious economic problem that jeopardizes sustainability of chemical control of herbivorous insects and related arthropods. It can be viewed as a specific case of adaptation to toxic chemicals, which has been driven in large part, but not exclusively, by the necessity for insect pests to tolerate defensive compounds produced by their host plants. Synthetic insecticides may simply change expression of specific sets of detoxification genes that have evolved due to ancestral associations with host plants. Feeding on host plants with more abundant or novel secondary metabolites has even been shown to prime insect herbivores to tolerate pesticides. Clear understanding of basic evolutionary processes is important for achieving lasting success in managing herbivorous arthropods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of temperature on symptom expression, detection of host factors in virus infected Piper nigrum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umadevi, P; Bhat, A I; Krishnamurthy, K S; Anandaraj, M

    2016-05-01

    Expression of symptoms in black pepper plants (Piper nigrum) infected with Piper yellow mottle virus (PYMoV) vary depending on the season, being high during summer months. Here, we explored the influence of temperature on symptom expression in PYMoV infected P. nigrum. Our controlled environment study revealed increase in virus titer, total proteins, IAA and reducing sugars when exposed to temperature stress. There was change in the 2-D separated protein before and after exposure. The 2-D proteomics LC-MS identified host and viral proteins suggesting virus-host interaction during symptom expression. The analysis as well as detection of host biochemical compounds may help in understanding the detailed mechanisms underlying the viral replication and damage to the crop, and thereby plan management strategies.

  11. Clusters of Factors Identify A High Prevalence of Pregnancy Involvement Among US Adolescent Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, May; Lin, Hua; Flores, Glenn

    2015-08-01

    The study purpose was to use recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) to identify factors that, when clustered, are associated with a high prevalence of pregnancy involvement among US adolescent males. The National Survey of Family Growth is a nationally representative survey of individuals 15-44 years old. RPA was done for the 2002 and 2006-2010 cycles to identify factors which, when combined, identify adolescent males with the highest prevalence of pregnancy involvement. Pregnancy-involvement prevalence among adolescent males was 6 %. Two clusters of adolescent males have the highest pregnancy-involvement prevalence, at 84-87 %. In RPA, the highest pregnancy-involvement prevalence (87 %) was seen in adolescent males who ever HIV tested, had >4 lifetime sexual partners, reported less than an almost certain chance of feeling less physical pleasure with condom use, had an educational attainment of 4 lifetime sexual partners, reported less than an almost certain chance of feeling less physical pleasure with condom use, had an educational attainment ≥11th grade, were >17 years old, and had their first contraceptive education ≥10th grade, had a pregnancy-involvement prevalence of 84 %. Pregnancy-prevention efforts among adolescent males who have been involved in a pregnancy may need to target risk factors identified in clusters with the highest pregnancy prevalence to prevent subsequent pregnancies in these adolescent males and improve their future outcomes.

  12. Interaction of CSFV E2 protein with swine host factors as detected by yeast two-hybrid system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas P Gladue

    Full Text Available E2 is one of the envelope glycoproteins of pestiviruses, including classical swine fever virus (CSFV and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV. E2 is involved in several critical functions, including virus entry into target cells, induction of a protective immune response and virulence in swine. However, there is no information regarding any host binding partners for the E2 proteins. Here, we utilized the yeast two-hybrid system and identified fifty-seven host proteins as positive binding partners which bound E2 from both CSFV and BVDV with the exception of two proteins that were found to be positive for binding only to CSFV E2. Alanine scanning of CSFV E2 demonstrated that the binding sites for these cellular proteins on E2 are likely non-linear binding sites. The possible roles of the identified host proteins are discussed as the results presented here will be important for future studies to elucidate mechanisms of host protein-virus interactions during pestivirus infection. However, due to the limitations of the yeast two hybrid system, the proteins identified is not exhaustive and each interaction identified needs to be confirmed by independent experimental approaches in the context of virus-infected cells before any definitive conclusion can be drawn on relevance for the virus life cycle.

  13. EGFR and EphA2 are host factors for hepatitis C virus entry and possible targets for antiviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupberger, Joachim; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Xiao, Fei; Thumann, Christine; Fofana, Isabel; Zona, Laetitia; Davis, Christopher; Mee, Christopher J; Turek, Marine; Gorke, Sebastian; Royer, Cathy; Fischer, Benoit; Zahid, Muhammad N; Lavillette, Dimitri; Fresquet, Judith; Cosset, François-Loïc; Rothenberg, S Michael; Pietschmann, Thomas; Patel, Arvind H; Pessaux, Patrick; Doffoël, Michel; Raffelsberger, Wolfgang; Poch, Olivier; McKeating, Jane A; Brino, Laurent; Baumert, Thomas F

    2011-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease, but therapeutic options are limited and there are no prevention strategies. Viral entry is the first step of infection and requires the cooperative interaction of several host cell factors. Using a functional RNAi kinase screen, we identified epidermal growth factor receptor and ephrin receptor A2 as host cofactors for HCV entry. Blocking receptor kinase activity by approved inhibitors broadly impaired infection by all major HCV genotypes and viral escape variants in cell culture and in a human liver chimeric mouse model in vivo. The identified receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) mediate HCV entry by regulating CD81-claudin-1 co-receptor associations and viral glycoprotein-dependent membrane fusion. These results identify RTKs as previously unknown HCV entry cofactors and show that tyrosine kinase inhibitors have substantial antiviral activity. Inhibition of RTK function may constitute a new approach for prevention and treatment of HCV infection.

  14. Behavioural risk factors in two generations of non-Western migrants: do trends converge towards the host population?

    OpenAIRE

    Hosper, K.; Nierkens, V.; Nicolaou, M; Stronks, K

    2007-01-01

    Migrant mortality does not conform to a single pattern of convergence towards prevalence rates in the host population. To understand better how migrant mortality develops, it is necessary to further investigate how the underlying behavioural determinants change following migration. We studied whether the prevalence of behavioural risk factors over two generations of Turkish and Moroccan migrants converge towards the prevalence rates in the Dutch population. From a random sample from the popul...

  15. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis”. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  16. Analysis of factors associated with injury severity in crashes involving young New Zealand drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Harold B.; Kaplan, Sigal; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Young people are a risk to themselves and other road users, as motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of their death. A thorough understanding of the most important factors associated with injury severity in crashes involving young drivers is important for designing well-targeted restrictive...... measures within youth-oriented road safety programs. The current study estimates discrete choice models of injury severity of crashes involving young drivers conditional on these crashes having occurred. The analysis examined a comprehensive set of single-vehicle and two-vehicle crashes involving at least...... fit than a binary and a generalized ordered logit. Results show that the young drivers’ behavior, the presence of passengers and the involvement of vulnerable road users were the most relevant factors associated with higher injury severity in both single-vehicle and two-vehicle crashes. Seatbelt non...

  17. Factors affecting virus dynamics and microbial host-virus interactions in marine environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mojica, K.D.A.; Brussaard, C.P.D.

    2015-01-01

    Marine microorganisms constitute the largest percentage of living biomass and serve as the major driving force behind nutrient and energy cycles. While viruses only comprise a small percentage of this biomass (i.e., 5%), they dominate in numerical abundance and genetic diversity. Through host infect

  18. Factors affecting virus dynamics and microbial host-virus interactions in marine environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mojica, K.D.A.; Brussaard, C.P.D.

    2014-01-01

    Marine microorganisms constitute the largest percentage of living biomass and serve as the major driving force behind nutrient and energy cycles. While viruses only comprise a small percentage of this biomass (i.e., 5%), they dominate in numerical abundance and genetic diversity. Through host infect

  19. Factors affecting virus dynamics and microbial host-virus interactions in marine environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mojica, K.D.A.; Brussaard, C.P.D.

    2014-01-01

    Marine microorganisms constitute the largest percentage of living biomass and serve as the major driving force behind nutrient and energy cycles. While viruses only comprise a small percentage of this biomass (i.e., 5%), they dominate in numerical abundance and genetic diversity. Through host infect

  20. Factors affecting virus dynamics and microbial host-virus interactions in marine environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mojica, K.D.A.; Brussaard, C.P.D.

    2015-01-01

    Marine microorganisms constitute the largest percentage of living biomass and serve as the major driving force behind nutrient and energy cycles. While viruses only comprise a small percentage of this biomass (i.e., 5%), they dominate in numerical abundance and genetic diversity. Through host infect

  1. Genetic structure in the seabuckthorn carpenter moth (Holcocerus hippophaecolus in China: the role of outbreak events, geographical and host factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Tao

    Full Text Available Understanding factors responsible for structuring genetic diversity is of fundamental importance in evolutionary biology. The seabuckthorn carpenter moth (Holcocerus hippophaecolus Hua is a native species throughout the north of China and is considered the main threat to seabuckthorn, Hippophae rhamnoides L. We assessed the influence of outbreaks, environmental factors and host species in shaping the genetic variation and structure of H. hippophaecolus by using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP markers. We rejected the hypothesis that outbreak-associated genetic divergence exist, as evidenced by genetic clusters containing a combination of populations from historical outbreak areas, as well as non-outbreak areas. Although a small number of markers (4 of 933 loci were identified as candidates under selection in response to population densities. H. hippophaecolus also did not follow an isolation-by-distance pattern. We rejected the hypothesis that outbreak and drought events were driving the genetic structure of H. hippophaecolus. Rather, the genetic structure appears to be influenced by various confounding bio-geographical factors. There were detectable genetic differences between H. hippophaecolus occupying different host trees from within the same geographic location. Host-associated genetic divergence should be confirmed by further investigation.

  2. A host basal transcription factor is a key component for infection of rice by TALE-carrying bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Meng; Ke, Yinggen; Huang, Renyan; Ma, Ling; Yang, Zeyu; Chu, Zhaohui; Xiao, Jinghua; Li, Xianghua; Wang, Shiping

    2016-07-29

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are sequence-specific DNA binding proteins found in a range of plant pathogenic bacteria, where they play important roles in host-pathogen interactions. However, it has been unclear how TALEs, after they have been injected into the host cells, activate transcription of host genes required for infection success. Here, we show that the basal transcription factor IIA gamma subunit TFIIAγ5 from rice is a key component for infection by the TALE-carrying bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the causal agent for bacterial blight. Direct interaction of several TALEs with TFIIAγ5 is required for activation of disease susceptibility genes. Conversely, reduced expression of the TFIIAγ5 host gene limits the induction of susceptibility genes and thus decreases bacterial blight symptoms. Suppression or mutation of TFIIAγ5 can also reduce bacterial streak, another devastating disease of rice caused by TALE-carrying X. oryzae pv. oryzicola. These results have important implications for formulating a widely applicable strategy with which to improve resistance of plants to TALE-carrying pathogens.

  3. Factors associated with sex work involvement among transgender women in Jamaica: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen H Logie

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: Findings reveal high HIV infection rates among transgender women in Jamaica. Sex work-involved participants experience social and structural drivers of HIV, including violence, stigma, and unemployment. Transgender women involved in transactional sex also experience high rates of incarceration, forced sex and homelessness in comparison with non-sex workers. Taken together, these findings suggest that social ecological factors elevate HIV exposure among sex work-involved transgender women in Jamaica. Findings can inform interventions to advance human rights and HIV prevention and care cascades with transgender women in Jamaica.

  4. Grandmother Involvement as a Protective Factor for Early Childhood Social Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Melissa A.; Scaramella, Laura V.; Neppl, Tricia K.; Ontai, Lenna L.; Conger, Rand D.

    2010-01-01

    Despite high rates of grandmother involvement with young grandchildren, very little research has examined the associations between non-residential grandmother involvement and grandchild social adjustment. The present study draws 127 families enrolled in the Family Transitions Project to consider the degree to which mother-reported maternal grandmother involvement buffers 3- and 4-year old grandchildren from economic, parenting, and child temperamental risks for reduced social competence and elevated externalizing behaviors. Findings indicate that higher levels of mother-reported grandmother involvement reduced the negative association between observed grandchild negative emotional reactivity and social competence. Further, high levels of mother-reported grandmother involvement protected grandchildren from the positive association between observed harsh mother parenting and grandchild externalizing behaviors. These findings underscore the relevance of moving beyond the nuclear family to understand factors linked to social adjustment during early childhood. PMID:20954774

  5. A novel metalloproteinase virulence factor is involved in Bacillus thuringiensis pathogenesis in nematodes and insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Donghai; Lin, Jian; Huang, Qiong; Zheng, Wen; Liu, Guoqiang; Zheng, Jinshui; Zhu, Lei; Sun, Ming

    2016-03-01

    The Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis has been developed as the leading microbial insecticide for years. The pathogenesis of B. thuringiensis requires common extracellular factors that depend on the PlcR regulon, which regulates a large number of virulence factors; however, the precise role of many of these proteins is not known. In this study, we describe the complete lifecycle of a nematicidal B. thuringiensis strain in the free living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans using in vitro and in vivo molecular techniques to follow host and bacterial effectors during the infection process. We then focus on the metalloproteinase ColB, a collagenase, which was found highly important for destruction of the intestine thereby facilitates the adaptation and colonization of B. thuringiensis in C. elegans. In vivo green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter-gene studies showed that ColB expression is highly induced and regulated by the global activator PlcR. Finally, we demonstrated that ColB also takes part in B. thuringiensis virulence in an insect model following injection and oral infection. Indeed, addition of purified ColB accelerates the action of Cry toxin proteins in insects, too. These results give novel insights into host adaptation for B. thuringiensis and other B. cereus group bacteria and highlight the role of collagenase metalloproteases to synergize infection process.

  6. Behavioural risk factors in two generations of non-Western migrants: do trends converge towards the host population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosper, Karen; Nierkens, Vera; Nicolaou, Mary; Stronks, Karien

    2007-01-01

    Migrant mortality does not conform to a single pattern of convergence towards prevalence rates in the host population. To understand better how migrant mortality develops, it is necessary to further investigate how the underlying behavioural determinants change following migration. We studied whether the prevalence of behavioural risk factors over two generations of Turkish and Moroccan migrants converge towards the prevalence rates in the Dutch population. From a random sample from the population register of Amsterdam, 291 Moroccan and 505 Turkish migrants, aged 15-30, participated in a structured interview that included questions on smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity and weight/height. Data from the Dutch population were available from Statistics Netherlands. By calculating age-adjusted Odds Ratio's, prevalence rates among both generations were compared with prevalence rates in the host population for men and women separately. We found indications of convergence across generations towards the prevalence rates in the host population for smoking in Turkish men, for overweight in Turkish and Moroccan women and for physical inactivity in Turkish women. Alcohol consumption, however, remained low in all subgroups and did not converge towards the higher rates in the host population. In addition, we found a reversed trend among Turkish women regarding smoking: the second generation smoked significantly more, while the first generation did not differ from ethnic Dutch. In general, behavioural risk factors in two generations of non-Western migrants in the Netherlands seem to converge towards the prevalence rates in the Dutch population. However, some subgroups and risk factors showed a different pattern.

  7. The late endosomal adaptor p14 is a macrophage host-defense factor against Salmonella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Nicole; Nairz, Manfred; Hilber, Diana; Hess, Michael W; Weiss, Günter; Huber, Lukas A

    2012-06-01

    The outcome of an infection depends on the balance between host resistance and bacterial virulence. Here, we show that the late endosomal adaptor p14 (also known as LAMTOR2) is one of the components for cellular host defense against the intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. During Salmonella infection, the complex of p14 and MP1 is required for the accurately timed transport of Salmonella through the endolysosomal system. Loss of p14 opens a time window that allows Salmonella to populate a replication niche, in which early and late antimicrobial effector systems, comprising NADPH phagocytic oxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase, respectively, are inappropriately activated. Thus, p14 supports the accurate transport of Salmonella through the endolysosomal system, thereby limiting bacterial replication in both, professional phagocytes and in non-phagocytic cells in vitro, and helps mice to successfully battle Salmonella infection in vivo.

  8. Potential host-related risk factors for recurrent urinary tract infection in Saudi women of childbearing age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Abul-Fotouh Abdel-Maguid; Solyman, Awatif Abdel-Karim; Kamal, Sanaa Moharram

    2016-08-01

    Risk factors for recurrent urinary tract infection (rUTI) in women may differ between individuals, age, and the community. This study aimed to evaluate host related risk factors for rUTI in sexually active Saudi women during the childbearing period. A case-control study was conducted in five healthcare centers and included married, nonpregnant women aged 18-40 years. A total of 217 women had rUTI (cases) and 252 did not (controls). A validated questionnaire, with a face-to-face interview, was applied to assess various demographic, behavioral, medical, and sexual data. Additionally, a thorough physical examination, saliva and blood analyses, uroflowmetry, and genitourinary ultrasonography were performed. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the significant host related risk factors associated with rUTI. In multivariate analysis, attributable risks for rUTI were a history of childhood UTI [odds ratio (OR) = 6.8)] back-to-front douching/wiping after bowel movement (OR = 2.6), younger age at first intercourse (OR = 6.3), increased frequency of sexual intercourse (OR = 4.8), obstructed urinary flow (OR = 1.9), and genital prolapse (OR = 3.4). A total of 9.68 % of cases and none of the controls had high postvoid residual urine (positive predictive value for rUTI = 100 %). This is the first reported study to evaluate host related risk factors for rUTI in childbearing-age women in Saudi Arabia. Study findings indicate the association between rUTI and various factors that have been already established, with addition of improper rectal hygiene as a potential risk for recurrence.

  9. Coordinated destruction of cellular messages in translation complexes by the gammaherpesvirus host shutoff factor and the mammalian exonuclease Xrn1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covarrubias, Sergio; Gaglia, Marta M; Kumar, G Renuka; Wong, Wesley; Jackson, Andrew O; Glaunsinger, Britt A

    2011-10-01

    Several viruses encode factors that promote host mRNA degradation to silence gene expression. It is unclear, however, whether cellular mRNA turnover pathways are engaged to assist in this process. In Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus this phenotype is enacted by the host shutoff factor SOX. Here we show that SOX-induced mRNA turnover is a two-step process, in which mRNAs are first cleaved internally by SOX itself then degraded by the cellular exonuclease Xrn1. SOX therefore bypasses the regulatory steps of deadenylation and decapping normally required for Xrn1 activation. SOX is likely recruited to translating mRNAs, as it cosediments with translation initiation complexes and depletes polysomes. Cleaved mRNA intermediates accumulate in the 40S fraction, indicating that recognition occurs at an early stage of translation. This is the first example of a viral protein commandeering cellular mRNA turnover pathways to destroy host mRNAs, and suggests that Xrn1 is poised to deplete messages undergoing translation in mammalian cells.

  10. Coordinated destruction of cellular messages in translation complexes by the gammaherpesvirus host shutoff factor and the mammalian exonuclease Xrn1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Covarrubias

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Several viruses encode factors that promote host mRNA degradation to silence gene expression. It is unclear, however, whether cellular mRNA turnover pathways are engaged to assist in this process. In Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus this phenotype is enacted by the host shutoff factor SOX. Here we show that SOX-induced mRNA turnover is a two-step process, in which mRNAs are first cleaved internally by SOX itself then degraded by the cellular exonuclease Xrn1. SOX therefore bypasses the regulatory steps of deadenylation and decapping normally required for Xrn1 activation. SOX is likely recruited to translating mRNAs, as it cosediments with translation initiation complexes and depletes polysomes. Cleaved mRNA intermediates accumulate in the 40S fraction, indicating that recognition occurs at an early stage of translation. This is the first example of a viral protein commandeering cellular mRNA turnover pathways to destroy host mRNAs, and suggests that Xrn1 is poised to deplete messages undergoing translation in mammalian cells.

  11. Herpes simplex virus virion host shutoff protein requires a mammalian factor for efficient in vitro endoribonuclease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, P; Jones, F E; Saffran, H A; Smiley, J R

    2001-02-01

    The virion host shutoff protein (vhs) of herpes simplex virus (HSV) triggers global shutoff of host protein synthesis and accelerated mRNA turnover during virus infection and induces endoribonucleolytic cleavage of exogenous RNA substrates when it is produced in a rabbit reticulocyte (RRL) in vitro translation system. Although vhs induces RNA turnover in the absence of other HSV gene products, it is not yet known whether cellular factors are required for its activity. As one approach to addressing this question, we expressed vhs in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression of vhs inhibited colony formation, and the severity of this effect varied with the carbon source. The biological relevance of this effect was assessed by examining the activity of five mutant forms of vhs bearing previously characterized in-frame linker insertions. The results indicated a complete concordance between the growth inhibition phenotype in yeast and mammalian host cell shutoff. Despite these results, expression of vhs did not trigger global mRNA turnover in vivo, and cell extracts of yeast expressing vhs displayed little if any vhs-dependent endoribonuclease activity. However, activity was readily detected when such extracts were mixed with RRL. These data suggest that the vhs-dependent endoribonuclease requires one or more mammalian macromolecular factors for efficient activity.

  12. Temporomandibular joint involvement as a positive clinical prognostic factor in necrotising external otitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeheskeli, E; Eta, R Abu; Gavriel, H; Kleid, S; Eviatar, E

    2016-05-01

    Necrotising otitis externa is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. This study investigated whether temporomandibular joint involvement had any prognostic effect on the course of necrotising otitis externa in patients who had undergone hyperbaric oxygen therapy after failed medical and sometimes surgical therapy. A retrospective case series was conducted of patients in whom antibiotic treatment and surgery had failed, who had been hospitalised for further treatment and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Twenty-three patients with necrotising otitis externa were identified. The temporomandibular joint was involved in four patients (17 per cent); these patients showed a constant gradual improvement in C-reactive protein and were eventually discharged free of disease, except one patient who was lost to follow up. Four patients (16 per cent) without temporomandibular joint involvement died within 90 days of discharge, while all patients with temporomandibular joint involvement were alive. Three patients (13 per cent) without temporomandibular joint involvement needed recurrent hospitalisation including further hyperbaric oxygen therapy; no patients with temporomandibular joint involvement required such treatment. Patients with temporomandibular joint involvement had lower rates of recurrent disease and no mortality. Therefore, we suggest considering temporomandibular joint involvement as a positive prognostic factor in necrotising otitis externa management.

  13. socio-cultural factors influencing male involvement in home-based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-08-08

    Aug 8, 2011 ... East African Medical Journal Vol. 88 No. 8 August ... Objective: To investigate socio-cultural factors that influence male involvement in ... 59.7% of the respondents had not received formal training on home-based care. Those.

  14. Socio-cultural factors influencing male involvement in home-based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Socio-cultural factors influencing male involvement in home-based care for people living with HIV and ... East African Medical Journal ... of close relatives and 59.7% of the respondents had not received formal training on home-based care.

  15. School, neighborhood, and family factors are associated with children's bullying involvement: a nationally representative longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowes, Lucy; Arseneault, Louise; Maughan, Barbara; Taylor, Alan; Caspi, Avshalom; Moffitt, Terrie E

    2009-05-01

    To test whether school, neighborhood, and family factors are independently associated with children's involvement in bullying, over and above their own behaviors that may increase their risk for becoming involved in bullying. We examined bullying in the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, a nationally representative 1994-1995 birth cohort of 2,232 children. We used mother and teacher reports to identify children who experienced bullying between the ages of 5 and 7 years either as victims, bullies, or bully-victims. We collected information about school characteristics from the Department for Children, Schools and Families. We collected reports from mothers about children's neighborhood and home environments and reports from mothers and teachers about children's internalizing and externalizing problems when they were 5 years old. Multinomial logistic regressions showed that over and above other socioenvironmental factors and children's behavior problems, school size was associated with an increased risk for being a victim of bullying, problems with neighbors was associated with an increased risk for being a bully-victim, and family factors (e.g., child maltreatment, domestic violence) were associated with all groups of children involved in bullying. Socioenvironmental factors are associated with children's risk for becoming involved in bullying over and above their own behaviors. Intervention programs aimed at reducing bullying should extend their focus beyond schools to include local communities and families.

  16. Factors Affecting the Involvement of Teachers in Guidance and Counselling as a Whole-School Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Sarah K. Y.; Hui, Eadaoin K. P.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores factors affecting the involvement of regular secondary school teachers in the whole-school approach to guidance and counselling by interviewing 12 secondary school teachers in Hong Kong. Emerging themes include teachers' ownership of their role in student guidance and counselling, the alignment of their disposition with…

  17. Molecular characterization of Candida in the oral cavity and factors involved in biofilm formation and virulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraneveld, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    The research described in this thesis addresses current issues related to oral Candida infections. Interactions of Candida with the oral microbiome were characterized and factors involved in biofilm formation and virulence were studied. All in all, the work described in this thesis contributes

  18. Analysis of the Internal and External Factors Involved in Second Language Acquisition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒲艳春

    2009-01-01

    Materialist dialectics holds that internal causes are the basis of change and the external causes are the condition of change, and that external causes become operative through internal causes. This law can be applied into SLA. The internal causes and external causes influence SLA gready. This paper mainly discusses the factors involved in SLA process.

  19. Personal and Situational Factors Affecting Exercise Involvement: The Importance of Enjoyment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankel, Leonard M.

    1985-01-01

    Interviews were conducted with participants and dropouts of a male employee fitness program in order to investigate factors affecting involvement. A combination of items pertaining to reactions to the program, initial goals for joining, and social support for the program could effectively discriminate between participants and dropouts. (Author/MT)

  20. Determining success factors for effective strategic change: Role of middle managers' strategic involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minhajul Islam Ukil

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Middle managers are believed to play most crucial part in strategic change that in consequence leads to organizational success. The present study seeks to identify the underlying success factors for effective strategic change and, to investigate the relationship between middle management strategic involvement and effective strategic change. Data were collected following a survey administered among a group of mid-level managers (N=144 serving in twenty different private commercial banks in Bangladesh, and analyzed using various statistical tests including descriptive analysis, Pearson correlation, and simple and multiple regressions in STATA. Results uncovers that factors like relation with top management, strategy, role and skills are essential for effective strategic change. This study also reveals significant relationship between middle management strategic involvement and effective strategic change. Findings of this research suggest that organizations shall involve mid-level managers to formulate and implement strategy since middle mangers work as a bridge between top management and ground level workers.

  1. Genetic Factors in Rhizobium Affecting the Symbiotic Carbon Costs of N2 Fixation and Host Plant Biomass Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skøt, L.; Hirsch, P. R.; Witty, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of genetic factors in Rhizobium on host plant biomass production and on the carbon costs of N2 fixation in pea root nodules was studied. Nine strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum were constructed, each containing one of three symbiotic plasmids in combination with one of three different...... with the background of B151. The relationship between nitrogenase activity, carbon costs of N2 fixation and host plant biomass production is discussed....... the lowest carbon costs of N2 fixation (7.10–8.10 μmol C/μmol N2), but shoot dry weight of those plants was also smaller than that of plants nodulated by strains with the background of B151 or JI8400. Nodules formed by these two strain types had carbon costs of N2 fixation varying between 11.26 and 13...

  2. Partially hydrolyzed guar gum affects the expression of genes involved in host defense functions and cholesterol absorption in colonic mucosa of db/db male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Zenta; Naito, Yuji; Takagi, Tomohisa; Mizushima, Katsura; Tokunaga, Makoto; Ishihara, Noriyuki; R Juneja, Lekh; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2012-07-01

    Biomedical evidence in the last 20 years has shown that the consumption of partially hydrolyzed guar gum may influence lipid and/or carbohydrate metabolism at many levels. Since intestine represents the first interface to interact with dietary partially hydrolyzed guar gum in vivo, we evaluated gene expression profiles in small intestinal mucosa of db/db mice fed with partially hydrolyzed guar gum in an effort to delineate its effect on the small intestine. DNA microarray and real-time PCR analyses were performed to evaluate the gene expression profiles in mice small intestinal mucosa. Among the 28,853 transcripts represented on the GeneChip® microarray, no more than 20 genes exhibited up- or down-regulation by 1.5-fold or more after four weeks following partially hydrolyzed guar gum consumption. No adverse effects were apparent. We detected up- or down-regulation of some genes known to be involved in host defense functions and cholesterol absorption.

  3. Individual host factors associated with Onchocerca volvulus microfilarial densities 15, 80 and 180 days after a first dose of ivermectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pion, Sébastien D S; Grout, Lise; Kamgno, Joseph; Nana-Djeunga, Hugues; Boussinesq, Michel

    2011-09-01

    Reduction in Onchocerca volvulus skin microfilarial densities after treatment with ivermectin shows wide between-host variation. Data from two separate studies conducted in Cameroon on onchocerciasis patients treated for the first time with ivermectin were analyzed to identify host factors associated with microfilarial density at different time-points after treatment. In one site (Nkam valley), the dataset included 103 adult males for whom age, number of palpable onchocercal nodules and microfilarial densities on D0 (pre-treatment), D15, D80 and D180 were available. In the other site (Vina valley), analyses were conducted on 965 individuals of both sexes aged 5 years and over; in this dataset, available information included age, gender, exact dose of ivermectin received, onchocerciasis endemicity level in the village of residence and microfilarial densities on D0 and D180. Negative binomial regression models of microfilarial density at the different intervals post-treatment were fitted, using maximum likelihood, with the available independent variables. Gender and age were found to be associated with microfilarial density on D180. The initial microfilarial density influenced post-treatment densities at all the time-points. All other things being equal, microfilarial densities on D180 were higher in individuals harbouring a higher number of nodules or living in communities with high endemicity levels. This study demonstrates that O. volvulus microfilarial density measured after a first treatment with ivermectin, and thus probably the rate of skin repopulation by microfilariae (mf) varies according to several host factors. Should such factors also influence ivermectin efficacy after repeated treatment, then they should be taken into account to determine whether sub-optimal responses to treatment reported from various areas in Africa are actually due to parasite-related factors, particularly to the emergence of resistant populations.

  4. Relevant Factors in the Process of Socialization, Involvement and Belonging of Descendants in Family Businesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melquicedec Lozano-Posso

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research works toward the identification of the factors that comprise the process of socialization, involvement and initial belonging of descendants in family businesses and the key relationships between them. By means of a qualitative detailed study of four cases, complemented by a quantitative survey of 274 Colombian family businesses, the authors generate a new model that takes into account both factors explored in previous research as well as others identified in this study. Findings confirm the specific dependency of each stage on the subsequent ones; socialization influences involvement, which in turn influences the belonging of the descendants to the family business, with a strong presence of factors such as knowledge, leadership, mode, timing, and motivation. Those responsible for the orientation of potential successors may examine these findings in order to optimize their preparation efforts and support of family human resources for the continuity of the business.

  5. Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baulch, Janet

    2013-09-11

    This is a 'glue grant' that was part of a DOE Low Dose project entitled 'Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation'. This collaborative program has involved Drs. David L. Springer from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), John H. Miller from Washington State University, Tri-cities (WSU) and William F. Morgan then from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). In July 2008, Dr. Morgan moved to PNNL and Dr. Janet E. Baulch became PI for this project at University of Maryland. In November of 2008, a one year extension with no new funds was requested to complete the proteomic analyses. The project stemmed from studies in the Morgan laboratory demonstrating that genomically unstable cells secret a soluble factor or factors into the culture medium, that cause cytogenetic aberrations and apoptosis in normal parental GM10115 cells. The purpose of this project was to identify the death inducing effect (DIE) factor or factors, estimate their relative abundance, identify the cell signaling pathways involved and finally recapitulate DIE in normal cells by exogenous manipulation of putative DIE factors in culture medium. As reported in detail in the previous progress report, analysis of culture medium from the parental cell line, and stable and unstable clones demonstrated inconsistent proteomic profiles as relate to candidate DIE factors. While the proposed proteomic analyses did not provide information that would allow DIE factors to be identified, the analyses provided another important set of observations. Proteomic analysis suggested that proteins associated with the cellular response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial function were elevated in the medium from unstable clones in a manner consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings correlate with previous studies of these clones that demonstrated functional differences between the mitochondria of stable and

  6. Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baulch, Janet

    2013-09-11

    This is a 'glue grant' that was part of a DOE Low Dose project entitled 'Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation'. This collaborative program has involved Drs. David L. Springer from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), John H. Miller from Washington State University, Tri-cities (WSU) and William F. Morgan then from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). In July 2008, Dr. Morgan moved to PNNL and Dr. Janet E. Baulch became PI for this project at University of Maryland. In November of 2008, a one year extension with no new funds was requested to complete the proteomic analyses. The project stemmed from studies in the Morgan laboratory demonstrating that genomically unstable cells secret a soluble factor or factors into the culture medium, that cause cytogenetic aberrations and apoptosis in normal parental GM10115 cells. The purpose of this project was to identify the death inducing effect (DIE) factor or factors, estimate their relative abundance, identify the cell signaling pathways involved and finally recapitulate DIE in normal cells by exogenous manipulation of putative DIE factors in culture medium. As reported in detail in the previous progress report, analysis of culture medium from the parental cell line, and stable and unstable clones demonstrated inconsistent proteomic profiles as relate to candidate DIE factors. While the proposed proteomic analyses did not provide information that would allow DIE factors to be identified, the analyses provided another important set of observations. Proteomic analysis suggested that proteins associated with the cellular response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial function were elevated in the medium from unstable clones in a manner consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings correlate with previous studies of these clones that demonstrated functional differences between the mitochondria of stable and

  7. Citrobacter rodentium NleB Protein Inhibits Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor-associated Factor 3 (TRAF3) Ubiquitination to Reduce Host Type I Interferon Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaofei; Pham, Thanh H; Feuerbacher, Leigh Ann; Chen, Kangming; Hays, Michael P; Singh, Gyanendra; Rueter, Christian; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon; Hardwidge, Philip R

    2016-08-26

    Interferon signaling plays important roles in both intestinal homeostasis and in the host response to pathogen infection. The extent to which bacterial pathogens inhibit this host pathway is an understudied area of investigation. We characterized Citrobacter rodentium strains bearing deletions in individual type III secretion system effector genes to determine whether this pathogen inhibits the host type I IFN response and which effector is responsible. The NleB effector limited host IFN-β production by inhibiting Lys(63)-linked ubiquitination of TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3). Inhibition was dependent on the glycosyltransferase activity of NleB. GAPDH, a target of NleB during infection, bound to TRAF3 and was required for maximal TRAF3 ubiquitination. NleB glycosyltransferase activity inhibited GAPDH-TRAF3 binding, resulting in reduced TRAF3 ubiquitination. Collectively, our data reveal important interplay between GAPDH and TRAF3 and suggest a mechanism by which the NleB effector inhibits type I IFN signaling.

  8. Analysis of the transcriptome of adult Dictyocaulus filaria and comparison with Dictyocaulus viviparus, with a focus on molecules involved in host-parasite interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiola, Stefano; Young, Neil D; Sternberg, Paul W; Strube, Christina; Korhonen, Pasi K; Mitreva, Makedonka; Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre; Hofmann, Andreas; Jex, Aaron R; Gasser, Robin B

    2014-03-01

    Parasitic nematodes cause diseases of major economic importance in animals. Key representatives are species of Dictyocaulus (=lungworms), which cause bronchitis (=dictyocaulosis, commonly known as "husk") and have a major adverse impact on the health of livestock. In spite of their economic importance, very little is known about the immunomolecular biology of these parasites. Here, we conducted a comprehensive investigation of the adult transcriptome of Dictyocaulus filaria of small ruminants and compared it with that of Dictyocaulus viviparus of bovids. We then identified a subset of highly transcribed molecules inferred to be linked to host-parasite interactions, including cathepsin B peptidases, fatty-acid and/or retinol-binding proteins, β-galactoside-binding galectins, secreted protein 6 precursors, macrophage migration inhibitory factors, glutathione peroxidases, a transthyretin-like protein and a type 2-like cystatin. We then studied homologues of D. filaria type 2-like cystatin encoded in D. viviparus and 24 other nematodes representing seven distinct taxonomic orders, with a particular focus on their proposed role in immunomodulation and/or metabolism. Taken together, the present study provides new insights into nematode-host interactions. The findings lay the foundation for future experimental studies and could have implications for designing new interventions against lungworms and other parasitic nematodes. The future characterisation of the genomes of Dictyocaulus spp. should underpin these endeavours.

  9. Global analysis of ion dependence unveils hidden steps in DNA binding and bending by integration host factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, Paula; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Kuznetsov, Serguei V.; Rice, Phoebe A.; Ansari, Anjum

    2013-09-01

    Proteins that recognize and bind to specific sites on DNA often distort the DNA at these sites. The rates at which these DNA distortions occur are considered to be important in the ability of these proteins to discriminate between specific and nonspecific sites. These rates have proven difficult to measure for most protein-DNA complexes in part because of the difficulty in separating the kinetics of unimolecular conformational rearrangements (DNA bending and kinking) from the kinetics of bimolecular complex association and dissociation. A notable exception is the Integration Host Factor (IHF), a eubacterial architectural protein involved in chromosomal compaction and DNA recombination, which binds with subnanomolar affinity to specific DNA sites and bends them into sharp U-turns. The unimolecular DNA bending kinetics has been resolved using both stopped-flow and laser temperature-jump perturbation. Here we expand our investigation by presenting a global analysis of the ionic strength dependence of specific binding affinity and relaxation kinetics of an IHF-DNA complex. This analysis enables us to obtain each of the underlying elementary rates (DNA bending/unbending and protein-DNA association/dissociation), and their ionic strength dependence, even under conditions where the two processes are coupled. Our analysis indicates interesting differences in the ionic strength dependence of the bi- versus unimolecular steps. At moderate [KCl] (100-500 mM), nearly all the ionic strength dependence to the overall equilibrium binding affinity appears in the bimolecular association/dissociation of an initial, presumably weakly bent, encounter complex, with a slope SKbi ≈ 8 describing the loglog-dependence of the equilibrium constant to form this complex on [KCl]. In contrast, the unimolecular equilibrium constant to form the fully wrapped specific complex from the initial complex is nearly independent of [KCl], with SKuni water molecules, which is osmotically favored by

  10. Transcriptome analysis of Neisseria meningitidis in human whole blood and mutagenesis studies identify virulence factors involved in blood survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebert Echenique-Rivera

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available During infection Neisseria meningitidis (Nm encounters multiple environments within the host, which makes rapid adaptation a crucial factor for meningococcal survival. Despite the importance of invasion into the bloodstream in the meningococcal disease process, little is known about how Nm adapts to permit survival and growth in blood. To address this, we performed a time-course transcriptome analysis using an ex vivo model of human whole blood infection. We observed that Nm alters the expression of ≈30% of ORFs of the genome and major dynamic changes were observed in the expression of transcriptional regulators, transport and binding proteins, energy metabolism, and surface-exposed virulence factors. In particular, we found that the gene encoding the regulator Fur, as well as all genes encoding iron uptake systems, were significantly up-regulated. Analysis of regulated genes encoding for surface-exposed proteins involved in Nm pathogenesis allowed us to better understand mechanisms used to circumvent host defenses. During blood infection, Nm activates genes encoding for the factor H binding proteins, fHbp and NspA, genes encoding for detoxifying enzymes such as SodC, Kat and AniA, as well as several less characterized surface-exposed proteins that might have a role in blood survival. Through mutagenesis studies of a subset of up-regulated genes we were able to identify new proteins important for survival in human blood and also to identify additional roles of previously known virulence factors in aiding survival in blood. Nm mutant strains lacking the genes encoding the hypothetical protein NMB1483 and the surface-exposed proteins NalP, Mip and NspA, the Fur regulator, the transferrin binding protein TbpB, and the L-lactate permease LctP were sensitive to killing by human blood. This increased knowledge of how Nm responds to adaptation in blood could also be helpful to develop diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to control the devastating

  11. Factors associated with sex work involvement among transgender women in Jamaica: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logie, Carmen H; Wang, Ying; Lacombe-Duncan, Ashley; Jones, Nicolette; Ahmed, Uzma; Levermore, Kandasi; Neil, Ava; Ellis, Tyrone; Bryan, Nicolette; Marshall, Annecka; Newman, Peter A

    2017-04-06

    Transgender women are disproportionately impacted by HIV. Transgender women involved in sex work may experience exacerbated violence, social exclusion, and HIV vulnerabilities, in comparison with non-sex work-involved transgender women. Scant research has investigated sex work among transgender women in the Caribbean, including Jamaica, where transgender women report pervasive violence. The study objective was to examine factors associated with sex work involvement among transgender women in Jamaica. In 2015, we implemented a cross-sectional survey using modified peer-driven recruitment with transgender women in Kingston and Ocho Rios, Jamaica, in collaboration with a local community-based AIDS service organization. We conducted multivariable logistic regression analyses to identify factors associated with paid sex and transactional sex. Exchanging oral, anal or vaginal sex for money only was categorized as paid sex. Exchanging sex for survival needs (food, accommodation, transportation), drugs or alcohol, or for money along with survival needs and/or drugs/alcohol, was categorized as transactional sex. Among 137 transgender women (mean age: 24.0 [SD: 4.5]), two-thirds reported living in the Kingston area. Overall, 25.2% reported being HIV-positive. Approximately half (n = 71; 51.82%) reported any sex work involvement, this included sex in exchange for: money (n = 64; 47.06%); survival needs (n = 27; 19.85%); and drugs/alcohol (n = 6; 4.41%). In multivariable analyses, paid sex and transactional sex were both associated with: intrapersonal (depression), interpersonal (lower social support, forced sex, childhood sexual abuse, intimate partner violence, multiple partners/polyamory), and structural (transgender stigma, unemployment) factors. Participants reporting transactional sex also reported increased odds of incarceration perceived to be due to transgender identity, forced sex, homelessness, and lower resilience, in comparison with participants reporting

  12. Modulation of Host Immunity by Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Virulence Factors: A Synergic Inhibition of Both Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Canedo-Marroquín

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (hRSV is a major cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ARTIs and high rates of hospitalizations in children and in the elderly worldwide. Symptoms of hRSV infection include bronchiolitis and pneumonia. The lung pathology observed during hRSV infection is due in part to an exacerbated host immune response, characterized by immune cell infiltration to the lungs. HRSV is an enveloped virus, a member of the Pneumoviridae family, with a non-segmented genome and negative polarity-single RNA that contains 10 genes encoding for 11 proteins. These include the Fusion protein (F, the Glycoprotein (G, and the Small Hydrophobic (SH protein, which are located on the virus surface. In addition, the Nucleoprotein (N, Phosphoprotein (P large polymerase protein (L part of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex, the M2-1 protein as a transcription elongation factor, the M2-2 protein as a regulator of viral transcription and (M protein all of which locate inside the virion. Apart from the structural proteins, the hRSV genome encodes for the non-structural 1 and 2 proteins (NS1 and NS2. HRSV has developed different strategies to evade the host immunity by means of the function of some of these proteins that work as virulence factors to improve the infection in the lung tissue. Also, hRSV NS-1 and NS-2 proteins have been shown to inhibit the activation of the type I interferon response. Furthermore, the hRSV nucleoprotein has been shown to inhibit the immunological synapsis between the dendritic cells and T cells during infection, resulting in an inefficient T cell activation. Here, we discuss the hRSV virulence factors and the host immunological features raised during infection with this virus.

  13. Effects of (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate on some protein factors involved in the epidermal growth factor receptor signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinjiu Huang; Ruiqing Xu; Baoan Song; Song Yang; Li Zhao; Shouwei Wua

    2009-01-01

    (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major polyphenolic constituent of green tea, can inhibit activity of specific receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and related downstream signal transduction pathways, resulting in the control of unwanted cell proliferation. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway is one of the most important pathways that regulates growth, survival, proliferation and differentiation in mammalian cells. This review addresses the effects of EGCG on some protein factors involved in the EGFR signaling pathway in a direct or indirect manner. Based on our understanding of the interaction between EGCG and these factors, and based on their structures, EGCG could be used as a lead compound for designing and synthesizing novel drugs with significant biological activity.

  14. Factors Affecting Adolescents' Involvement in Cyberbullying: What Divides the 20% from the 80%?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Namin; Ahn, Hwasil

    2015-07-01

    Despite some variations among cyberbullying studies, about 20% of the youth population surveyed appears to be involved in cyberbullying. Coincidentally, the current study found that exactly 20% of the students surveyed were involved in cyberbullying as bullies (7.8%), victims (7.5%), and bully/victims (4.7%). What divides those 20% from the 80% of noninvolved students? This study aimed to produce a parsimonious and accurate model that can predict the occurrence of involvement in cyberbullying among youth. Data were collected from a questionnaire survey administered to 1,036 students enrolled in secondary schools in South Korea. Stepwise logistic regression (SLR) was carried out to predict the dichotomous dependent variable (involved/noninvolved) with 10 independent variables grouped into three categories: (a) demographic, (b) media-related, and (c) school and psychology factors. The result of the SLR analysis yielded a four-step model including the variables of cyber-confidence, weekday game time, mobile activities, and age as being significant in explaining the 20/80 division (model χ(2)=34.306, df=4, pcyberbullying than other students. In particular, the construct of cyber-confidence calls for further elaboration and research, given its controversial function with respect to adolescents' involvement in cyberbullying. Also, this study may bring about insights into practical considerations needed for concerned researchers, teachers, and parents to identify who is inside the group involved in cyberbullying so as to help the participating adolescents escape from the circle of cyberbullying.

  15. Dual RNA-sequencing of Eucalyptus nitens during Phytophthora cinnamomi challenge reveals pathogen and host factors influencing compatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Febe Elizabeth Meyer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Damage caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands remains an important concern on forest tree species. The pathogen causes root and collar rot, stem cankers and dieback of various economically important Eucalyptus spp. In South Africa, susceptible cold tolerant Eucalyptus plantations have been affected by various Phytophthora spp. with P. cinnamomi considered one of the most virulent. The molecular basis of this compatible interaction is poorly understood. In this study, susceptible Eucalyptus nitens plants were stem inoculated with P. cinnamomi and tissue was harvested five days post inoculation. Dual RNA-sequencing, a technique which allows the concurrent detection of both pathogen and host transcripts during infection, was performed. Approximately 1% of the reads mapped to the draft genome of P. cinnamomi while 78% of the reads mapped to the Eucalyptus grandis genome. The highest expressed P. cinnamomi gene in planta was a putative crinkler effector (CRN1. Phylogenetic analysis indicated the high similarity of this P. cinnamomi CRN1 to that of Phytophthora infestans. Some CRN effectors are known to target host nuclei to suppress defense. In the host, over 1400 genes were significantly differentially expressed in comparison to mock inoculated trees, including suites of pathogenesis related (PR genes. In particular, a PR-9 peroxidase gene with a high similarity to a Carica papaya PR-9 ortholog previously shown to be suppressed upon infection by Phytophthora palmivora was down-regulated two-fold. This PR-9 gene may represent a cross-species effector target during P. cinnamomi infection. This study identified pathogenicity factors, potential manipulation targets and attempted host defense mechanisms activated by E. nitens that contributed to the susceptible outcome of the interaction.

  16. Influence of independent risk factors on health status of persons involved in the process of education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guriev A.V.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to increase efficiency of health education for subjects involved in the process of education. Materials: 498 questionnaires have been worked out for respondents. Methods: They have included supervision, questioning, free interviewing and methods for statistical processing of results of research. Results: The following factors have been revealed: peculiarity of leisure-time; bad quality of interaction between subjects of educational system and health care system. The characteristic of extra-curriculum risk factors has been done. Conclusion: It is stressed that the survey has determined the basic directions of training for teachers and adults to form healthy way of life.

  17. NAC Transcription Factors of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and their Involvement in Leaf Senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Michael

    yielding cereal crops are generated. In cereals, the process of leaf senescence is of utmost relevance when discussing yield. It is during the senescence process that all nutrients are transported from the withering leaf to the developing grains. Furthermore, the timing of senescence determines...... parts of the senescence process. The specific aims of this study were therefore (1) to establish and characterise the NAC transcription factors of the model cereal crop barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) (2) to identify and study putative barley NAC transcription factors involved in the regulation of leaf...

  18. A population-based study to investigate host genetic factors associated with hepatitis B infection and pathogenesis in the Chinese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Brien Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    genes involved in the pathway leading to chronic viral infection, liver cirrhosis and, ultimately, hepatocellular carcinoma would provide insights to those factors leading to HBV replication, liver inflammation, fibrosis, and the carcinogenic process. An understanding of the contribution of host genetic factors and their interactions may inform public health policy, improve diagnostics and clinical management, and provide targets for drug development.

  19. Identifying contributing factors to fatal and serious injury motorcycle collisions involving children in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Jennifer; Ravi, Mano Deepa; Yuen, Jeremy; Hoareau, Effie; Hashim, Hizal Hanis

    2013-01-01

    In Malaysia, motorcycle crashes constitute approximately 60 percent of all road trauma, and a substantial proportion involve children 16 years and younger. There are, however, many gaps in our knowledge on contributing factors to crashes and injury patterns amongst children killed and seriously injured in motorcycle crashes. The aim of this study was to examine fatal and serious injury motorcycle-related collisions to identify contributing factors and injury patterns amongst child motorcyclists. All identified motorcyclist fatal crashes between 2007 and 2011 (inclusive) were extracted from the national Police-reported crash database (M-ROADS) and a range of variables were selected for examination. A total of 17,677 crashes were extracted where a rider or pillion was killed and of these crashes 2,038 involved children, equating to 12 percent. Examination of crashes involving children revealed that some crashes involved more than two children on the motorcycle, therefore, overall children constituted 9.5% of fatal and 18.4% of serious injury collisions. A high proportion of child fatal or serious injury collisions involved the child as the rider (62%), and this was most common for children aged between 10 and 16 years. The majority of collisions occurred on rural roads, in speed limit zones of 50-70km/h, and approximately one-third occurred at an intersection. Collisions involving another motorcycle or a passenger vehicle contributed to 41% and 53% of the total fatalities and severe injuries, respectively. A high proportion (43.9%) of the children (25.5% riders and 18.8% pillion) sustained head injuries with 37.7% being in the 10-16 age group. Furthermore, 52.4% of the children sustaining head injuries did not wear a helmet. The implications of these findings for countermeasures within a Safe System framework, particularly interventions aimed at reducing the rate of unlicensed riding and helmet wearing, and infrastructure countermeasures are discussed.

  20. Incidence and risk factors of bone marrow involvement by non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittivorapart, Janejira; Chinthammitr, Yingyong

    2011-02-01

    Since trephine bone marrow biopsy is an invasive procedure, the identification of a subgroup of patients with Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) who have a minimal risk of bone marrow involvement would be helpful. This study is aimed to determine the incidence of bone marrow involvement (BMI) by NHL and the predictors of no BMI to not only avoid this invasive procedure but also decrease the cost of investigation. Data from 320 patients with NHL at division of hematology between January 2008 and June 2009 were reviewed and analyzed. The cell types of NHL were classified as B-cell in 283 patients (88.4%), T-cell in 37 patients (11.6%) and incidence of BMI is 24.4% and 18.9% in B- and T-cell, respectively. Factors significantly associated with BMI in univariate analysis were the hepatic and splenic involvement (p = 0.03 and low percent of blood neutrophil (p high percent of blood lymphocyte (p low absolute neutrophil count (p = 0.002), high absolute lymphocyte count (p = 0.045), low platelet count (p high LDH (p = 0.026), and high alkaline phosphatase (p = 0.020). On the multivariate analysis, factors associated with BMI included LN below diaphragm, anemia, low percent of blood neutrophil and low platelet count. Excluding Burkitt lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma, NHL patients with no LN below diaphragm, no hepatic & splenic involvement, no significant weight loss, hemoglobin (Hb) >11 g/dL and platelet > 150,000/uL had BMI in 3/78 (3.8%). The incidence of bone marrow involvement in NHL is 23.8%. Excluding Burkitt lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma, NHL patients with no LN below diaphragm, no hepatic & splenic involvement, no significant weight loss, Hb > 11 g/dL and platelet > 150,000/uL had low risk of BMI.

  1. Diurnal rhythmicity in biological processes involved in bioavailability of functional food factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurusaki, Takashi; Sakakibara, Hiroyuki; Aoshima, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Shunsuke; Sakono, Masanobu; Shimoi, Kayoko

    2013-05-01

    In the past few decades, many types of functional factors have been identified in dietary foods; for example, flavonoids are major groups widely distributed in the plant kingdom. However, the absorption rates of the functional food factors are usually low, and many of these are difficult to be absorbed in the intact forms because of metabolization by biological processes during absorption. To gain adequate beneficial effects, it is therefore mandatory to know whether functional food factors are absorbed in sufficient quantity, and then reach target organs while maintaining beneficial effects. These are the reasons why the bioavailability of functional food factors has been well investigated using rodent models. Recently, many of the biological processes have been reported to follow diurnal rhythms recurring every 24 h. Therefore, absorption and metabolism of functional food factors influenced by the biological processes may vary with time of day. Consequently, the evaluation of the bioavailability of functional food factors using rodent models should take into consideration the timing of consumption. In this review, we provide a perspective overview of the diurnal rhythm of biological processes involved in the bioavailability of functional food factors, particularly flavonoids.

  2. Interleukin-16 Gene Polymorphisms Are Considerable Host Genetic Factors for Patients’ Susceptibility to Chronic Hepatitis B Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Romani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Host genetic background is known as an important factor in patients’ susceptibility to infectious diseases such as viral hepatitis. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of genetic polymorphisms of interleukin-16 (IL-16 cytokine on susceptibility of hepatitis B virus (HBV infected patients to develop chronic HBV infection. Genotyping was conducted using PCR followed by enzymatic digestion and RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. We genotyped three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the Il-16 gene (rs11556218 T>G, rs4778889 T>C, and rs4072111 C>T to test for relationship between variation at these loci and patients’ susceptibility to chronic HBV infection. Allele frequency of Il-16 gene rs4072111 and rs11556218 was significantly different between chronic HBV patients and healthy blood donors. Genotype frequency of rs4778889 polymorphism of Il-16 gene was significantly different when chronic HBV patients and HBV clearance subjects were compared. Our results showed that Il-16 gene polymorphisms are considerable host genetic factors when we chase biomarkers for prognosis of HBV infected patients.

  3. Serratia marcescens suppresses host cellular immunity via the production of an adhesion-inhibitory factor against immunosurveillance cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kenichi; Adachi, Tatsuo; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2014-02-28

    Injection of a culture supernatant of Serratia marcescens into the bloodstream of the silkworm Bombyx mori increased the number of freely circulating immunosurveillance cells (hemocytes). Using a bioassay with live silkworms, serralysin metalloprotease was purified from the culture supernatant and identified as the factor responsible for this activity. Serralysin inhibited the in vitro attachment of both silkworm hemocytes and murine peritoneal macrophages. Incubation of silkworm hemocytes or murine macrophages with serralysin resulted in degradation of the cellular immune factor BmSPH-1 or calreticulin, respectively. Furthermore, serralysin suppressed in vitro phagocytosis of bacteria by hemocytes and in vivo bacterial clearance in silkworms. Disruption of the ser gene in S. marcescens attenuated its host killing ability in silkworms and mice. These findings suggest that serralysin metalloprotease secreted by S. marcescens suppresses cellular immunity by decreasing the adhesive properties of immunosurveillance cells, thereby contributing to bacterial pathogenesis.

  4. Analysis of molecular markers as predictive factors of lymph node involvement in breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Luciana Marques; De Moraes, Luis Henrique Ferreira; Do Canto, Abaeté Leite; Dos Santos, Laurita; Martin, Airton Abrahão; Rogatto, Silvia Regina; De Azevedo Canevari, Renata

    2017-01-01

    Nodal status is the most significant independent prognostic factor in breast cancer. Identification of molecular markers would allow stratification of patients who require surgical assessment of lymph nodes from the large numbers of patients for whom this surgical procedure is unnecessary, thus leading to a more accurate prognosis. However, up to now, the reported studies are preliminary and controversial, and although hundreds of markers have been assessed, few of them have been used in clinical practice for treatment or prognosis in breast cancer. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether protein phosphatase Mg2+/Mn2+ dependent 1D, β-1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase, neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally down-regulated 9, prohibitin, phosphoinositide-3-kinase regulatory subunit 5 (PIK3R5), phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate 4-kinase type IIα, TRF1-interacting ankyrin-related ADP-ribose polymerase 2, BCL2 associated agonist of cell death, G2 and S-phase expressed 1 and PAX interacting protein 1 genes, described as prognostic markers in breast cancer in a previous microarray study, are also predictors of lymph node involvement in breast carcinoma Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed on primary breast tumor tissues from women with negative lymph node involvement (n=27) compared with primary tumor tissues from women with positive lymph node involvement (n=23), and was also performed on primary tumors and paired lymph node metastases (n=11). For all genes analyzed, only the PIK3R5 gene exhibited differential expression in samples of primary tumors with positive lymph node involvement compared with primary tumors with negative lymph node involvement (P=0.0347). These results demonstrate that the PIK3R5 gene may be considered predictive of lymph node involvement in breast carcinoma. Although the other genes evaluated in the present study have been previously characterized to be involved with

  5. Analysis of molecular markers as predictive factors of lymph node involvement in breast carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Luciana Marques; De Moraes, Luis Henrique Ferreira; Do Canto, Abaeté Leite; Dos Santos, Laurita; Martin, Airton Abrahão; Rogatto, Silvia Regina; De Azevedo Canevari, Renata

    2017-01-01

    Nodal status is the most significant independent prognostic factor in breast cancer. Identification of molecular markers would allow stratification of patients who require surgical assessment of lymph nodes from the large numbers of patients for whom this surgical procedure is unnecessary, thus leading to a more accurate prognosis. However, up to now, the reported studies are preliminary and controversial, and although hundreds of markers have been assessed, few of them have been used in clinical practice for treatment or prognosis in breast cancer. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether protein phosphatase Mg2+/Mn2+ dependent 1D, β-1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase, neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally down-regulated 9, prohibitin, phosphoinositide-3-kinase regulatory subunit 5 (PIK3R5), phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate 4-kinase type IIα, TRF1-interacting ankyrin-related ADP-ribose polymerase 2, BCL2 associated agonist of cell death, G2 and S-phase expressed 1 and PAX interacting protein 1 genes, described as prognostic markers in breast cancer in a previous microarray study, are also predictors of lymph node involvement in breast carcinoma Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed on primary breast tumor tissues from women with negative lymph node involvement (n=27) compared with primary tumor tissues from women with positive lymph node involvement (n=23), and was also performed on primary tumors and paired lymph node metastases (n=11). For all genes analyzed, only the PIK3R5 gene exhibited differential expression in samples of primary tumors with positive lymph node involvement compared with primary tumors with negative lymph node involvement (P=0.0347). These results demonstrate that the PIK3R5 gene may be considered predictive of lymph node involvement in breast carcinoma. Although the other genes evaluated in the present study have been previously characterized to be involved with

  6. Implications for the offspring of circulating factors involved in beta cell adaptation in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nalla, Amarnadh; Ringholm, Lene; Søstrup, Birgitte

    2014-01-01

    is able to stimulate proliferation of rat beta cells. We have identified several circulating factors that may contribute to beta cell adaptation to pregnancy. Further studies are needed to elucidate their possible role in glucose homeostasis in the mother and her offspring.......OBJECTIVE: Several studies have shown an increase in beta cell mass during pregnancy. Somatolactogenic hormones are known to stimulate the proliferation of existing beta cells in rodents whereas the mechanism in humans is still unclear. We hypothesize that in addition to somatolactogenic hormones...... there are other circulating factors involved in beta cell adaptation to pregnancy. This study aimed at screening for potential pregnancy-associated circulating beta cell growth factors. SAMPLES: Serum samples from nonpregnant and pregnant women. METHODS: The effect of serum from pregnant women...

  7. Model correction factor method for reliability problems involving integrals of non-Gaussian random fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franchin, P.; Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Kiureghian, Armen Der

    2002-01-01

    The model correction factor method (MCFM) is used in conjunction with the first-order reliability method (FORM) to solve structural reliability problems involving integrals of non-Gaussian random fields. The approach replaces the limit-state function with an idealized one, in which the integrals...... are considered to be Gaussian. Conventional FORM analysis yields the linearization point of the idealized limit-state surface. A model correction factor is then introduced to push the idealized limit-state surface onto the actual limit-state surface. A few iterations yield a good approximation of the reliability...... reliability method; Model correction factor method; Nataf field integration; Non-Gaussion random field; Random field integration; Structural reliability; Pile foundation reliability...

  8. The involvement of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha in Toll-like receptor 7/8-mediated inflammatory response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sally A Nicholas; Vadim V Sumbayev

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 7 and 8 are crucial in host defence against single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses. Such viruses cause severe illnesses, which remain a serious medical burden in both industrialised and developing countries. TLR7/8 downstream signaling leads to a dramatic cellular stress associated with energy consumption. However, the molecular mechanisms of cell survival and adaptation to TLR7/8-induced stress, which give the cells an opportunity to initiate proper inflammatory reactions, are not clear at all. Here we report for the first time that ligand-induced ac-tivation of TLR7/8 leads to the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) protein in THP-1 human myeloid macrophages via redox-and reactive nitrogen species-dependent mechanisms. MAP kinases and phosphoi-nositol-3K are not involved in TLR7/8-mediated HIF-1α accumulation. Experiments with HIF-la knockdown THP-1 cells have clearly demonstrated that HIF-1α is important for the protection of these cells against TLR7/8-induced depletion of ATP. Thus, HIF-1α might support both cell survival and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines upon TLR7/8 activation.

  9. Fusion of Cytothrophoblast with Syncytiotrophoblast in the Human Placenta: Factors Involved in Syncytialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauster M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Human placental villi are covered by a characteristic epithelial-like layer. It consists of mononucleated cytotrophoblasts and an overlyingsyncytiotrophoblast layer both in contact to the trophoblastic basement membrane. The syncytiotrophoblast mostly lacks DNA replication andseems to transcribe only barely mRNA. Therefore, the syncytiotrophoblast depends on cell compounds delivered by fusing cytotrophoblasts. Delivery of fresh cytoplasmic contents into the syncytiotrophoblast is achieved by continuous fusion with cytotrophoblasts throughout gesta-tion. Fusion between cytotrophoblasts and the syncytiotrophoblast is driven by multiple factors, including environmental growth factors andcytokines, which turn on a specific cascade of fusogenic proteins in cytotrophoblasts destined for fusion. The cascade includes protein kinasesand transcription factors, as well as induced expression of fusion-promoting proteins associated with the cell membrane. Additionally, specificproteases are activated, which cleave and remodel structural proteins to prepare the cell for fusion. However, not only fusogenic proteins, butalso plasma membrane architecture and physicochemical factors such as calcium and oxygen affect intertrophoblastic fusion. Coordinatedaction of all factors involved is crucial for proper cytotrophoblast – syncytiotrophoblast fusion. Deregulation of a single factor might cause aninadequate fusion rate and could lead to pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia or even spontaneous abortion.

  10. Host preference of the bean weevil Zabrotes subfasciatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Isabel Ribeiro do Valle Teixeira; Angel Roberto Barchuk; Fernando Sérgio Zucoloto

    2008-01-01

    It is largely known that the range of an insect diet is mostly determined by oviposition behavior, mainly in species with endophytic larvae such as Zabrotes subfasciatus.However, the proximate factors determining host choice and the subsequent steps leading to the expansion or reduction of the host number and occasional host shifts are largelyun known. We analyzed various factors determining host preference of Z. subfasciatus through the evaluation of: (i) oviposition preference of a wild population of Z. subfasciatus on the usual host (bean) and unusual hosts (lentil, chickpea and soy), and the performance of the offspring; (ii) artificial selection for increasing preference for hosts initially less frequently chosen; (iii) comparison of oviposition behavior between two different popula-tions (reared for~30 generations in beans or chickpeas, respectively); (iv) oviposition timing on usual and unusual hosts; and (v) identification of preference hierarchies. We found that when using unusual hosts, there is no correlation between performance and preference and that the preference hierarchy changes only slightly when the population passes through several generations on the less frequently accepted host. We also found a positive response to artificial selection for increasing oviposition on the less preferred host; however, when the host-choice experiment involved two varieties of the usual host, the response was faster than when the choice involved usual and unusual hosts. Finally, beetles reared on an unusual host (chickpea) for 26 generations showed similar good fitness on both usual and unusual hosts,indicating that the use of a new host does not necessarily result in the loss of performance on the original host. Nevertheless, this population showed lower fitness on the usual host than that of the original population, suggesting an underlying partial trade-off phenomenon which may contribute to a broadening of diet of this insect species.

  11. Factors Influencing the Private Involvement in Urban Rail Public-Private Partnership Projects in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjian Ke

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Private investors have been encouraged to participate in the development and operation of urban rail projects in China through Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs, given the fact that subnational governments are suffering from urgent development demands and severe fiscal pressure. However, there is no formal assessment to determine the private involvement in a PPP project. This problem is particularly critical in the sector of urban rail, in which the huge investment cannot rely on the private sector alone. This study hence aimed to uncover and identify the influencing factors. Multiple research methods, including content analysis, case study and focus group discussion were adopted to achieve the research purpose. Seven types of influencing factors were identified, including project financial model, government fiscal commitment, risk allocation, public accountability, efficiency considerations, policy and regulations, and organisational marketing strategies. The findings add to the current knowledge base by uncovering the drivers behind private involvement in a PPP project. They are also beneficial for industry practitioners as a basis/checklist to determine the private involvement.

  12. Improving Aspergillus niger as a production host through manipulation of pH responding transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars; Bruno, K.S.; Thykær, Jette

    ). In the present study the effect of modulation of transcription factors in Aspergillus niger, which is an industrially important micro-organism used in various processes including organic acid and enzyme production, was investigated. The strategy described in this work focuses on regulation connected to p...

  13. Pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome: Host factors in Down syndrome and the general population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Bruijn

    2013-01-01

    We find that Down syndrome is an important risk factor for developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in children, but the reason why remains to be elucidated. In addition, we find several differences between adult and pediatric ARDS. The association between C-reactive protein (CRP) level

  14. Adolescent gang involvement: The role of individual, family, peer, and school factors in a multilevel perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, Michela; Sharkey, Jill; Vieno, Alessio; Mayworm, Ashley; Dougherty, Danielle; Nylund-Gibson, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Youth gang involvement is a serious public health challenge as adolescents involved in gangs are more likely than others to engage in violence and aggression. To better understand gang involvement, we examined the role of protective (empathy and parental support) and risk (peer deviance and lack of safety at school) factors, as well as their interactions, in predicting adolescent gang affiliation. The study involved a sample of 26,232 students (53.4% females; mean age = 14.62, SD = 1.69) participating in the California Healthy Kids Survey (CHKS), a survey investigating a wide range of youth health and risk behaviors administered in all California schools every 2 years. Using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM), findings indicated that high levels of empathy and parental support were associated with a lower likelihood of affiliating with a gang. Associating with deviant peers and perceiving the school as unsafe were positively correlated with gang membership. At the school level, lack of safety and type of school (special education, vocational, or alternative school vs. comprehensive schools) were associated with greater probability of gang membership. Empathy mitigated the association between deviant peers and gang membership.

  15. Genetic, metabolic and environmental factors involved in the development of liver cirrhosis in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Lopez, Omar; Martinez-Lopez, Erika; Roman, Sonia; Fierro, Nora A; Panduro, Arturo

    2015-11-07

    Liver cirrhosis (LC) is a chronic illness caused by inflammatory responses and progressive fibrosis. Globally, the most common causes of chronic liver disease include persistent alcohol abuse, followed by viral hepatitis infections and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. However, regardless of the etiological factors, the susceptibility and degree of liver damage may be influenced by genetic polymorphisms that are associated with distinct ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Consequently, metabolic genes are influenced by variable environmental lifestyle factors, such as diet, physical inactivity, and emotional stress, which are associated with regional differences among populations. This Topic Highlight will focus on the genetic and environmental factors that may influence the metabolism of alcohol and nutrients in the setting of distinct etiologies of liver disease. The interaction between genes and environment in the current-day admixed population, Mestizo and Native Mexican, will be described. Additionally, genes involved in immune regulation, insulin sensitivity, oxidative stress and extracellular matrix deposition may modulate the degree of severity. In conclusion, LC is a complex disease. The onset, progression, and clinical outcome of LC among the Mexican population are influenced by specific genetic and environmental factors. Among these are an admixed genome with a heterogenic distribution of European, Amerindian and African ancestry; a high score of alcohol consumption; viral infections; a hepatopathogenic diet; and a high prevalence of obesity. The variance in risk factors among populations suggests that intervention strategies directed towards the prevention and management of LC should be tailored according to such population-based features.

  16. Tumor and Host Factors Controlling Antitumor Immunity and Efficacy of Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spranger, Stefani; Sivan, Ayelet; Corrales, Leticia; Gajewski, Thomas F

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent clinical advances in immunotherapy, a fraction of cancer patients fails to respond to these interventions. Evidence from preclinical mouse models as well as clinical samples has provided evidence that the extent of activated T cell infiltration within the tumor microenvironment is associated with clinical response to immunotherapies including checkpoint blockade. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms mediating the lack of T cell infiltration into the tumor microenvironment will be instrumental for the development of new therapeutic strategies to render those patients immunotherapy responsive. Recent data have suggested that major sources of intersubject heterogeneity include differences in somatic mutations in specific oncogene pathways between cancers of individual subjects and also environmental factors including commensal microbial composition. Successful identification of such causal factors should lead to new therapeutic approaches that may facilitate T cell entry into noninflamed tumors and expand the fraction of patients capable of responding to novel immunotherapies.

  17. Effect of host-related factors on the intensity of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Luciano Bello

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in the identification of factors associated with liver disease progression in patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV. We assessed host-related factors associated with a histologically advanced stage of this disease and determined the rate of liver fibrosis progression in HCV-infected patients. We included patients submitted to liver biopsy, who were anti-HCV and HCV RNA positive, who showed a parenteral risk factor (blood transfusion or intravenous drug use, and who gave information about alcohol consumption.Patients were divided into two groups for analysis: group 1 - grades 0 to 2; group 2 - grades 3 to 4. The groups were compared in terms of sex, age at the time of infection, estimated duration of infection and alcoholism. The rate of fibrosis progression (index of fibrosis was determined based on the relationship between disease stage and duration of infection (years. Logistic regression analysis revealed that age at the time of infection (P or = 40 years (median = 0.47. The main factors associated with a more rapid fibrosis progression were age at the time of infection and the estimated duration of infection. Patients who acquired HCV after 40 years of age showed a higher rate of fibrosis progression.

  18. Characterization of a protein tyrosine phosphatase as a host factor promoting baculovirus replication in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Xue, Renju; Li, Xianyang; Hu, Cuimei; Xia, Qingyou

    2016-04-01

    The relevance of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) to host-pathogen interaction is highlighted in mammalian studies, whereas less is known in insects. Here we presented the categorization of the PTP complement of silkworm and characterized their homologous relationship with human and fruit fly PTPs. Among the 36 PTP genes, ptp-h, which was proposed to be the origin of baculovirus ptp belongs to atypical VH1-like dual-specific PTP subset and encodes a catalytic active protein. The maximum expression level of Bmptp-h was at 5th instar and in fat body. Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) infection potently induced its expression in silkworm larvae and in BmE cells. Knock-down of Bmptp-h by RNA interference significantly inhibited viral replication, and over-expression enhanced viral replication as determined by viral DNA abundance and BmNPV-GFP positive cells. These results suggest that BmPTP-h might be one of the host factors that is beneficial to baculovirus infection by promoting viral replication.

  19. The role of host and microbial factors in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal bacteraemia arising from a single bacterial cell bottleneck.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Gerlini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of bacteraemia after challenge with one million pneumococci of three isogenic variants was investigated. Sequential analyses of blood samples indicated that most episodes of bacteraemia were monoclonal events providing compelling evidence for a single bacterial cell bottleneck at the origin of invasive disease. With respect to host determinants, results identified novel properties of splenic macrophages and a role for neutrophils in early clearance of pneumococci. Concerning microbial factors, whole genome sequencing provided genetic evidence for the clonal origin of the bacteraemia and identified SNPs in distinct sub-units of F0/F1 ATPase in the majority of the ex vivo isolates. When compared to parental organisms of the inoculum, ex-vivo pneumococci with mutant alleles of the F0/F1 ATPase had acquired the capacity to grow at low pH at the cost of the capacity to grow at high pH. Although founded by a single cell, the genotypes of pneumococci in septicaemic mice indicate strong selective pressure for fitness, emphasising the within-host complexity of the pathogenesis of invasive disease.

  20. New Calculations for Phase Space Factors Involved in Double Beta Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Stoica, Sabin

    2013-01-01

    We present new results for the phase space factors involved in double beta decay for beta-beta- transitions to ground states and excited 0+1 states, for isotopes of experimental interest. The Coulomb distortion of the electron wave functions is treated by solving numerically the Dirac equation with inclusion of the finite nuclear size and electron screening effects, and using a Coulomb potential derived from a realistic proton density distribution in the daughter nucleus. Our results are compared with other results from literature, obtained in different approximations, and possible causes that can give differences are discussed.

  1. Transcription factors involved in the regulation of natural killer cell development and function: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Elia Luevano

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells belong to the innate immune system and are key effectors in the immune response against cancer and infection. Recent studies have contributed to the knowledge of events controlling NK cell fate. The use of knockout mice has enabled the discovery of key transcription factors (TFs essential for NK cell development and function. Yet, unwrapping the downstream targets of these TFs and their influence on NK cells remains a challenge. In this review we discuss the latest TFs described to be involved in the regulation of NK cell development and maturation.

  2. Clinical incidents involving students on placement: an analysis of incident reports to identify potential risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaida, J E; Maloney, S; Lo, K; Morgan, P

    2015-06-01

    Students are sometimes involved in incidents during clinical training. To the authors' knowledge, no quantitative studies of incidents specifically involving physiotherapy students on clinical placement are available in the literature. A retrospective audit (2008 to 2011) of incident reports involving physiotherapy students was conducted to identify the nature and features of incidents. The study aimed to determine if injuries to a student or patient were more or less likely when the supervisor was in close proximity, and whether students with lower academic performance in their preclinical semester were more likely to be involved in an incident. There were 19 care-delivery-related and three equipment-related incidents. There were no incidents of violent, aggressive or demeaning behaviour towards students. The incident rate was 9.0/100,000 student-hours for third-year students and 6.8/100,000 student-hours for fourth-year students. The majority of incidents (55%) occurred from 11 am to 12-noon and from 3 pm to 3.30 pm. Incidents more often resulted in patient or student injury when the supervisor was not in close proximity (approximately 50% vs approximately 20%), although the difference was not significant (P=0.336). The academic results of students involved in incidents were equivalent to the whole cohort in their preclinical semester {mean 75 [standard deviation (SD) 6] vs 76 (SD 7); P=0.488}. The unexpected temporal clustering of incidents warrants further investigation. Student fatigue may warrant attention as a potential contributor; however, contextual factors, such as staff workload, along with organisational systems, structures and procedures may be more relevant. The potential relationship between supervisor proximity and injury also warrants further exploration. The findings of the present study should be integrated into clinical education curricula and communicated to clinical educators. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by

  3. Inhibitory effect of presenilin inhibitor LY411575 on maturation of hepatitis C virus core protein, production of the viral particle and expression of host proteins involved in pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoguro, Teruhime; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Kasai, Hirotake; Yamashita, Atsuya; Moriishi, Kohji

    2016-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is responsible for the formation of infectious viral particles and induction of pathogenicity. The C-terminal transmembrane region of the immature core protein is cleaved by signal peptide peptidase (SPP) for maturation of the core protein. SPP belongs to the family of presenilin-like aspartic proteases. Some presenilin inhibitors are expected to suppress HCV infection and production; however, this anti-HCV effect has not been investigated in detail. In this study, presenilin inhibitors were screened to identify anti-HCV compounds. Of the 13 presenilin inhibitors tested, LY411575 was the most potent inhibitor of SPP-dependent cleavage of HCV core protein. Production of intracellular core protein and supernatant infectious viral particles from HCV-infected cells was significantly impaired by LY411575 in a dose-dependent manner (half maximum inhibitory concentration = 0.27 μM, cytotoxic concentration of the extracts to cause death to 50% of viable cells > 10 μM). No effect of LY411575 on intracellular HCV RNA in the subgenomic replicon cells was detected. LY411575 synergistically promoted daclatasvir-dependent inhibition of viral production, but not that of viral replication. Furthermore, LY411575 inhibited HCV-related production of reactive oxygen species and expression of NADPH oxidases and vascular endothelial growth factor. Taken together, our data suggest that LY411575 suppresses HCV propagation through SPP inhibition and impairs host gene expressions related to HCV pathogenicity.

  4. Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri surface proteome by 2D-DIGE: Ferric enterobactin receptor and other outer membrane proteins potentially involved in citric host interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnielli, Carolina Moretto; Artier, Juliana; de Oliveira, Julio Cezar Franco; Novo-Mansur, Maria Teresa Marques

    2017-01-16

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (XAC) is the causative agent of citrus canker, a disease of great economic impact around the world. Understanding the role of proteins on XAC cellular surface can provide new insights on pathogen-plant interaction. Surface proteome was performed in XAC grown in vivo (infectious) and in vitro (non-infectious) conditions, by labeling intact cells followed by cellular lysis and direct 2D-DIGE analysis. Seventy-nine differential spots were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Highest relative abundance for in vivo condition was observed for spots containing DnaK protein, 60kDa chaperonin, conserved hypothetical proteins, malate dehydrogenase, phosphomannose isomerase, and ferric enterobactin receptors. Elongation factor Tu, OmpA-related proteins, Oar proteins and some Ton-B dependent receptors were found in spots decreased in vivo. Some proteins identified on XAC's surface in infectious condition and predicted to be cytoplasmic, such as DnaK and 60KDa chaperonin, have also been previously found at cellular surface in other microorganisms. This is the first study on XAC surface proteome and results point to mediation of molecular chaperones in XAC-citrus interaction. The approach utilized here can be applied to other pathogen-host interaction systems and help to achieve new insights in bacterial pathogenicity toward promising targets of biotechnological interest.

  5. Resident interest and factors involved in entering a pediatric pulmonary fellowship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gershan William M

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relatively little is known about interest in pediatric pulmonology among pediatric residents. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to determine at this institution: 1 the level of pediatric resident interest in pursuing a pulmonary fellowship, 2 potential factors involved in development of such interest, 3 whether the presence of a pulmonary fellowship program affects such interest. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to all 52 pediatric residents at this institution in 1992 and to all 59 pediatric residents and 14 combined internal medicine/pediatrics residents in 2002, following development of a pulmonary fellowship program. Results Response rates were 79% in 1992 and 86% in 2002. Eight of the 43 responders in 1992 (19% had considered doing a pulmonary fellowship compared to 7 of 63 (11% in 2002. The highest ranked factors given by the residents who had considered a fellowship included wanting to continue one's education after residency, enjoying caring for pulmonary patients, and liking pulmonary physiology and the pulmonary faculty. Major factors listed by residents who had not considered a pulmonary fellowship included not enjoying the tracheostomy/ventilator population and chronic pulmonary patients in general, and a desire to enter general pediatrics or another fellowship. Most residents during both survey periods believed that they would be in non-academic or academic general pediatrics in 5 years. Only 1 of the 106 responding residents (~1% anticipated becoming a pediatric pulmonologist. Conclusions Although many pediatric residents consider enrolling in a pulmonary fellowship (~10–20% here, few (~1% here will actually pursue a career in pediatric pulmonology. The presence of a pulmonary fellowship program did not significantly alter resident interest, though other confounding factors may be involved.

  6. Screening and identification of host factors interacting with UL14 of herpes simplex virus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fuqing; Xing, Junji; Wang, Shuai; Li, Meili; Zheng, Chunfu

    2011-08-01

    The UL14 protein of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is highly conserved in herpesvirus family. However, its exact function during the HSV-1 replication cycle is little known. In the present study, a high throughput yeast two-hybrid system was employed to screen the cellular factors interacting with UL14, and five target candidates were yielded: (1) TSC22 domain family protein 3 (TSC22D3); (2) Mediator of RNA polymerase II transcription subunit 8 isoform 1(MED8); (3) Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3); (4) Arrestin beta-2 (ARRB2); (5) Cereblon (CRBN). Indirect immunofluorescent assay showed that both TSC22D3 and MED8 co-localized with UL14. Co-immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that UL14 could be immunoprecipitated by TSC22D3, suggesting that UL14 interacted with TSC22D3 under physiological condition. In summary, this study opened up new avenues toward delineating the function and physiological significance of UL14 during the HSV-1 replication cycle.

  7. beta-1,3-Glucan-Induced Host Phospholipase D Activation Is Involved in Aspergillus fumigatus Internalization into Type II Human Pneumocyte A549 Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Xuelin; Yu, Rentao; Zhen, Dongyu; Tao, Sha; Schmidt, Martina; Han, Li

    2011-01-01

    The internalization of Aspergillus fumigatus into lung epithelial cells is a process that depends on host cell actin dynamics. The host membrane phosphatidylcholine cleavage driven by phospholipase D (PLD) is closely related to cellular actin dynamics. However, little is known about the impact of PL

  8. Identification of Burkholderia cenocepacia strain H111 virulence factors using nonmammalian infection hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwager, Stephan; Agnoli, Kirsty; Köthe, Manuela;

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia H111, a strain isolated from a cystic fibrosis patient, has been shown to effectively kill the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We used the C. elegans model of infection to screen a mini-Tn5 mutant library of B. cenocepacia H111 for attenuated virulence....... Of the approximately 5,500 B. cenocepacia H111 random mini-Tn5 insertion mutants that were screened, 22 showed attenuated virulence in C. elegans. Except for the quorum-sensing regulator cepR, none of the mutated genes coded for the biosynthesis of classical virulence factors such as extracellular proteases...... or siderophores. Instead, the mutants contained insertions in metabolic and regulatory genes. Mutants attenuated in virulence in the C. elegans infection model were also tested in the Drosophila melanogaster pricking model, and those also attenuated in this model were further tested in Galleria mellonella. Six...

  9. Are host characteristics or exposure factors mainly involved in the acquisition of zoonotic Salmonella and Campylobacter coinfection in humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradel, Kim O; Schønheyder, Henrik C; Kristensen, Brian; Dethlefsen, Claus; Ejlertsen, Tove; Nielsen, Henrik

    2009-03-01

    We hypothesized that patients coinfected with zoonotic Salmonella and Campylobacter were frailer than monoinfected Salmonella or Campylobacter patients. The study cohort included all first-time Salmonella/Campylobacter infections in Aarhus and North Jutland counties, Denmark, from 1991 through 2003. Data on comorbidity, hospitalization in relation to the Salmonella/Campylobacter infection, and 1-year mortality were obtained from electronic registries. Among 13,449 individuals, 114 (0.85%) had Salmonella/Campylobacter coinfection, 6567 (48.8%) had Salmonella monoinfection, and 6768 (50.3%) had Campylobacter monoinfection. There were no major differences in age, gender, comorbidity, hospitalization rates, 1-year mortality, or seasonal variation between coinfected patients on the one hand and each of the monoinfected patient groups on the other. The main difference was encountered between the Salmonella serotype distribution as 49.1% of coinfected patients versus 20.3% of monoinfected Salmonella patients had Salmonella serotypes other than Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]: 4.07 [2.73-6.06]). In conclusion, Salmonella/Campylobacter coinfected patients were not frailer than monoinfected patients. The difference in Salmonella serotype distribution was compatible with a higher proportion of coinfections acquired during foreign travel.

  10. Involvement of vascular endothelial growth factor in nasal obstruction in patients with nasal allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuji Yamashita

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF enhances vascular permeability and that mast cells produce VEGF, suggesting the involvement of VEGF in allergic diseases. In the present study we quantitatively analyzed VEGF in the nasal lavage fluid of patients with nasal allergy. We performed nasal antigen challenge with Japanese cedar pollen antigen in 10 healthy adult volunteers and in 10 cedar pollen IgE-positive patients with nasal allergy. In all patients with nasal allergy, VEGF and histamine levels in the nasal lavage fluid reached a peak 30 min after antigen challenge, then returned to prechallenge values 2 h after antigen challenge. In these patients, the histamine level increased three-fold, while the VEGF level increased 10-fold. However, in all healthy adult volunteers, VEGF and histamine levels did not increase. A stronger correlation was noted between the ratio of decreased nasal cavity volume and the ratio of increased VEGF levels (R = 0.823; P < 0.001 than between the ratio of nasal cavity volume and the ratio of increased histamine levels (R = 0.660; P < 0.01. These results suggest that VEGF may contribute to the pathogenesis of nasal obstruction in the early phase of nasal allergy as a new factor involved in increasing vascular permeability.

  11. A pilot study on factors involved with work participation in the early stages of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Van der Hiele

    Full Text Available Up to 30% of recently diagnosed MS patients lose their jobs in the first four years after diagnosis. Taking into account the personal and socio-economic importance of sustaining employment, it is of the utmost importance to examine factors involved with work participation.To investigate differences in self-reported functioning in recently diagnosed MS patients with and without a paid job.Self-reports of physical and cognitive functioning, depression, anxiety and fatigue were gathered from 44 relapsing-remitting MS patients diagnosed within 3 years.Patients with a paid job (57% reported better physical functioning (p<0.001, better memory functioning (p = 0.01 and a lower physical impact of fatigue (p = 0.018 than patients without a paid job. Physical functioning was the main predictor of employment status in a logistic regression model. In those with a paid job better memory functioning (r = 0.54, p = 0.005 and a lower social impact of fatigue (r =  -0.46, p = 0.029 correlated with an increased number of working hours.Better physical functioning is the primary factor involved with increased work participation in early MS. Better self-reported memory functioning and less social fatigue were associated with increased working hours. These findings highlight the importance of battling these symptoms in the early stages of MS.

  12. [Host factors in the regulation of the Vibrio fischeri lux operon in Escherichia coli cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukhov, I V; Kotova, V Iu; Zavil'gel'skiĭ, G B

    2006-01-01

    It has been shown that the chaperonin GroEL, together with GroES co-chaperonin and Lon ATP-dependent protease are involved in the regulation of expression of the Vibrio fischeri lux operon in Escherichia coli cells. The cells of E. coli groE (pF1)- bearing a plasmid with the complete V. fischeri lux regulon were weakly luminescent. The cells of E. coli lonA (pF1) displayed intense bioluminescence. The same effects also occurred in mutant E. coli strains bearing a hybrid plasmid pVFR1, where the luxR gene and the regulatory region of the V. fischeri lux operon were inserted before the Photorhabdus luminescens luxCDABE cassette. The V. fischeri luxR gene was cloned in the pGEX-KG vector with the formation of a hybrid gene gst-luxR. It was shown that affinity chromatography of the product of expression, the chimeric protein GST-LuxR, on a column with glutathione-agarose resulted in its copurification with the proteins GroEL and Lon. Consequently, LuxR, the transcription activator of the lux operon, forms complexes with these proteins. It is supposed that GroEL/GroES is responsible for the folding of the LuxR protein, and Lon protease degrades the LuxR protein either before its folding into an active globule or at denaturing.

  13. Identification of host cell factors required for intoxication through use of modified cholera toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimaraes, Carla P; Carette, Jan E; Varadarajan, Malini; Antos, John; Popp, Maximilian W; Spooner, Eric; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2011-11-28

    We describe a novel labeling strategy to site-specifically attach fluorophores, biotin, and proteins to the C terminus of the A1 subunit (CTA1) of cholera toxin (CTx) in an otherwise correctly assembled and active CTx complex. Using a biotinylated N-linked glycosylation reporter peptide attached to CTA1, we provide direct evidence that ~12% of the internalized CTA1 pool reaches the ER. We also explored the sortase labeling method to attach the catalytic subunit of diphtheria toxin as a toxic warhead to CTA1, thus converting CTx into a cytolethal toxin. This new toxin conjugate enabled us to conduct a genetic screen in human cells, which identified ST3GAL5, SLC35A2, B3GALT4, UGCG, and ELF4 as genes essential for CTx intoxication. The first four encode proteins involved in the synthesis of gangliosides, which are known receptors for CTx. Identification and isolation of the ST3GAL5 and SLC35A2 mutant clonal cells uncover a previously unappreciated differential contribution of gangliosides to intoxication by CTx.

  14. The influence of contextual factors on patient involvement during follow-up consultations after colorectal cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thora G; Soelver, Lisbeth; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To identify the contextual factors that influence individual patient involvement during colorectal cancer surgical follow-up consultations. BACKGROUND: The healthcare system is subject to the requirement and expectation of greater involvement of patients and relatives...... the identification of current contextual factors. RESULTS: The results showed five contextual factors that seemed to have an impact on patient involvement. The first, 'Two dimensions of patient involvement: treatment-oriented and person-oriented' highlighted a dual interpretation of patient involvement...... in the consultation situation. The two dimensions seemed to be influenced by four additional factors: 'Doctors leading the agenda', 'Traditional health professional roles', 'Unclear responsibilities' and 'Guidance primarily focused on treatment'. CONCLUSION: The results showed how patient involvement in clinical...

  15. Identification of transcription factors potentially involved in the juvenile to adult phase transition in Citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Mari-Cruz; Forment, Javier; Gadea, José; Carrasco, Jose Luis; Juarez, José; Navarro, Luís; Ancillo, Gema

    2013-11-01

    The juvenile to adult transition (JAT) in higher plants is required for them to reach reproductive competence. However, it is a poorly understood process in woody plants, where only a few genes have been definitely identified as being involved in this transition. This work aims at increasing our understanding of the mechanisms regulating the JAT in citrus. Juvenile and adult plants from Pineapple sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) and Rough lemon (C. jambhiri) were used to screen for differentially expressed transcription factors (TFs) using a 1·15K microarray developed on the basis of the CitrusTF database. Murcott tangor (C. reticulata × C. sinensis) and Duncan grapefruit (C. paradisi) were incorporated into the quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR validation in order to select those genes whose phase-specific regulation was common to the four species. A browsable web database has been created with information about the structural and functional annotation related to 1152 unigenes of putative citrus TFs (CTFs). This database constitutes a valuable resource for research on transcriptional regulation and comparative genomics. Moreover, a microarray has been developed and used that contains these putative CTFs, in order to identify eight genes that showed differential expression in juvenile and adult meristems of four different species of citrus. Those genes have been characterized, and their expression pattern in vegetative and reproductive tissues has been analysed. Four of them are MADS-box genes, a family of TFs involved in developmental processes, whereas another one resembles MADS-box genes but lacks the MADS box itself. The other three showed high partial sequence similarity restricted to specific Arabidopsis protein domains but negligible outside those domains. The work presented here indicates that the JAT in citrus could be controlled by mechanisms that are in part common to those of Arabidopsis, but also somehow different, since specific factors

  16. Natural selection drives the fine-scale divergence of a coevolutionary arms race involving a long-mouthed weevil and its obligate host plant

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    Toju Hirokazu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the major recent advances in evolutionary biology is the recognition that evolutionary interactions between species are substantially differentiated among geographic populations. To date, several authors have revealed natural selection pressures mediating the geographically-divergent processes of coevolution. How local, then, is the geographic structuring of natural selection in coevolutionary systems? Results I examined the spatial scale of a "geographic selection mosaic," focusing on a system involving a seed-predatory insect, the camellia weevil (Curculio camelliae, and its host plant, the Japanese camellia (Camellia japonica. In this system, female weevils excavate camellia fruits with their extremely-long mouthparts to lay eggs into seeds, while camellia seeds are protected by thick pericarps. Quantitative evaluation of natural selection demonstrated that thicker camellia pericarps are significantly favored in some, but not all, populations within a small island (Yakushima Island, Japan; diameter ca. 30 km. At the extreme, camellia populations separated by only several kilometers were subject to different selection pressures. Interestingly, in a population with the thickest pericarps, camellia individuals with intermediate pericarp thickness had relatively high fitness when the potential costs of producing thick pericarps were considered. Also importantly, some parameters of the weevil - camellia interaction such as the severity of seed infestation showed clines along temperature, suggesting the effects of climate on the fine-scale geographic differentiation of the coevolutionary processes. Conclusion These results show that natural selection can drive the geographic differentiation of interspecific interactions at surprisingly small spatial scales. Future studies should reveal the evolutionary/ecological outcomes of the "fine scale geographic mosaics" in biological communities.

  17. Ellagitannins of the fruit rind of pomegranate (Punica granatum antagonize in vitro the host inflammatory response mechanisms involved in the onset of malaria

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    Bhattacharya Deepak

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sun-dried rind of the immature fruit of pomegranate (Punica granatum is presently used as a herbal formulation (OMARIA, Orissa Malaria Research Indigenous Attempt in Orissa, India, for the therapy and prophylaxis of malaria. The pathogenesis of cerebral malaria, a complication of the infection by Plasmodium falciparum, is an inflammatory cytokine-driven disease associated to an up-regulation and activity of metalloproteinase-9 and to the increase of TNF production. The in vitro anti-plasmodial activity of Punica granatum (Pg was recently described. The aim of the present study was to explore whether the anti-malarial effect of OMARIA could also be sustained via other mechanisms among those associated to the host immune response. Methods From the methanolic extract of the fruit rind, a fraction enriched in tannins (Pg-FET was prepared. MMP-9 secretion and expression were evaluated in THP-1 cells stimulated with haemozoin or TNF. The assays were conducted in the presence of the Pg-FET and its chemical constituents ellagic acid and punicalagin. The effect of urolithins, the ellagitannin metabolites formed by human intestinal microflora, was also investigated. Results Pg-FET and its constituents inhibited the secretion of MMP-9 induced by haemozoin or TNF. The effect occurred at transcriptional level since MMP-9 mRNA levels were lower in the presence of the tested compounds. Urolithins as well inhibited MMP-9 secretion and expression. Pg-FET and pure compounds also inhibited MMP-9 promoter activity and NF-kB-driven transcription. Conclusions The beneficial effect of the fruit rind of Punica granatum for the treatment of malarial disease may be attributed to the anti-parasitic activity and the inhibition of the pro-inflammatory mechanisms involved in the onset of cerebral malaria.

  18. Multi-faceted proteomic characterization of host protein complement of Rift Valley fever virus virions and identification of specific heat shock proteins, including HSP90, as important viral host factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, Jonathan E; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Benedict, Ashwini; Costantino, Julie; Ward, Michael; Peyser, Brian D; Retterer, Cary J; Tressler, Lyal E; Wanner, Laura M; McGovern, Hugh F; Zaidi, Anum; Anthony, Scott M; Kota, Krishna P; Bavari, Sina; Hakami, Ramin M

    2014-01-01

    Rift Valley fever is a potentially fatal disease of humans and domestic animals caused by Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). Infection with RVFV in ruminants can cause near 100% abortion rates and recent outbreaks in naïve human populations have suggested case fatality rates of greater than thirty percent. To elucidate the roles that host proteins play during RVFV infection, proteomic analysis of RVFV virions was conducted using complementary analytical approaches, followed by functional validation studies of select identified host factors. Coupling the more traditional Gel LC/MS/MS approach (SDS PAGE followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry) with an alternative technique that preserves protein complexes allowed the protein complement of these viral particles to be thoroughly examined. In addition to viral proteins present within the virions and virion-associated host proteins, multiple macromolecular complexes were identified. Bioinformatic analysis showed that host chaperones were among over-represented protein families associated with virions, and functional experiments using siRNA gene silencing and small molecule inhibitors identified several of these heat shock proteins, including heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), as important viral host factors. Further analysis indicated that HSP inhibition effects occur during the replication/transcription phase of the virus life cycle, leading to significant lowering of viral titers without compromising the functional capacity of released virions. Overall, these studies provide much needed further insight into interactions between RVFV and host cells, increasing our understanding of the infection process and suggesting novel strategies for anti-viral development. In particular, considering that several HSP90 inhibitors have been advancing through clinical trials for cancer treatment, these results also highlight the exciting potential of repurposing HSP90 inhibitors to treat RVF.

  19. Multi-faceted proteomic characterization of host protein complement of Rift Valley fever virus virions and identification of specific heat shock proteins, including HSP90, as important viral host factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E Nuss

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever is a potentially fatal disease of humans and domestic animals caused by Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV. Infection with RVFV in ruminants can cause near 100% abortion rates and recent outbreaks in naïve human populations have suggested case fatality rates of greater than thirty percent. To elucidate the roles that host proteins play during RVFV infection, proteomic analysis of RVFV virions was conducted using complementary analytical approaches, followed by functional validation studies of select identified host factors. Coupling the more traditional Gel LC/MS/MS approach (SDS PAGE followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with an alternative technique that preserves protein complexes allowed the protein complement of these viral particles to be thoroughly examined. In addition to viral proteins present within the virions and virion-associated host proteins, multiple macromolecular complexes were identified. Bioinformatic analysis showed that host chaperones were among over-represented protein families associated with virions, and functional experiments using siRNA gene silencing and small molecule inhibitors identified several of these heat shock proteins, including heat shock protein 90 (HSP90, as important viral host factors. Further analysis indicated that HSP inhibition effects occur during the replication/transcription phase of the virus life cycle, leading to significant lowering of viral titers without compromising the functional capacity of released virions. Overall, these studies provide much needed further insight into interactions between RVFV and host cells, increasing our understanding of the infection process and suggesting novel strategies for anti-viral development. In particular, considering that several HSP90 inhibitors have been advancing through clinical trials for cancer treatment, these results also highlight the exciting potential of repurposing HSP90 inhibitors to treat RVF.

  20. Genome sequencing reveals diversification of virulence factor content and possible host adaptation in distinct subpopulations of Salmonella enterica

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    Rodriguez-Rivera Lorraine D

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Divergence of bacterial populations into distinct subpopulations is often the result of ecological isolation. While some studies have suggested the existence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica subclades, evidence for these subdivisions has been ambiguous. Here we used a comparative genomics approach to define the population structure of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica, and identify clade-specific genes that may be the result of ecological specialization. Results Multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs data for 16 newly sequenced and 30 publicly available genomes showed an unambiguous subdivision of S. enterica subsp. enterica into at least two subpopulations, which we refer to as clade A and clade B. Clade B strains contain several clade-specific genes or operons, including a β-glucuronidase operon, a S-fimbrial operon, and cell surface related genes, which strongly suggests niche specialization of this subpopulation. An additional set of 123 isolates was assigned to clades A and B by using qPCR assays targeting subpopulation-specific SNPs and genes of interest. Among 98 serovars examined, approximately 20% belonged to clade B. All clade B isolates contained two pathogenicity related genomic islands, SPI-18 and a cytolethal distending toxin islet; a combination of these two islands was previously thought to be exclusive to serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A. Presence of β-glucuronidase in clade B isolates specifically suggests an adaptation of this clade to the vertebrate gastrointestinal environment. Conclusions S. enterica subsp. enterica consists of at least two subpopulations that differ specifically in genes involved in host and tissue tropism, utilization of host specific carbon and nitrogen sources and are therefore likely to differ in ecology and transmission characteristics.

  1. Host-viral effects of chromatin assembly factor 1 interaction with HCMV IE2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung-Bau Lee; Li-Jung Juan; Chung-Fan Lee; Derick S-C Ou; Kalpana Dulal; Liang-Hao Chang; Chen-Han Ma; Chien-Fu Huang; Hua Zhu; Young-Sun Lin

    2011-01-01

    Chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF1) consisting of p150, p60 and p48 is known to assemble histones onto newly synthesized DNA and thus maintain the chromatin structure. Here, we show that CAF1 expression was induced in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-infected cells, concomitantly with global chromatin decondensation. This apparent conflict was thought to result, in part, from CAF1 mislocalization to compartments of HCMV DNA synthesis through binding of its largest subunit p150 to viral immediate-early protein 2 (IE2). p150 interaction with p60 and IE2 facilitated HCMV DNA synthesis. The IE2Q548R mutation, previously reported to result in impaired HCMV growth with unknown mechanism, disrupted IE2/p150 and IE2/histones association in our study. Moreover, IE2 interaction with histones partly depends on p150, and the HCMV-induced chromatin decondensation was reduced in cells ectopically expressing the p150 mutant defective in IE2 binding. These results not only indicate that CAF1 was hijacked by IE2 to facilitate the replication of the HCMV genome, suggesting chromatin assembly plays an important role in herpesviral DNA synthesis, but also provide a model of the virus-induced chromatin instability through CAF1.

  2. Allele frequency of antiretroviral host factor TRIMCyp in wild-caught cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Akatsuki; Kawamoto, Yoshi; Higashino, Atsunori; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Ikoma, Tomoko; Suzaki, Yuriko; Ami, Yasushi; Shioda, Tatsuo; Nakayama, Emi E.; Akari, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    A recent study showed that the frequency of an antiretroviral factor TRIM5 gene-derived isoform, TRIMCyp, in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) varies widely according to the particular habitat examined. However, whether the findings actually reflect the prevalence of TRIMCyp in wild cynomolgus macaques is still uncertain because the previous data were obtained with captive monkeys in breeding and rearing facilities. Here, we characterized the TRIM5 gene in cynomolgus macaques captured in the wild, and found that the frequency of the TRIMCyp allele was comparable to those in captive monkeys. This suggests that the previous results with captive monkeys do indeed reflect the natural allele frequency and that breeding and rearing facilities may not affect the frequency of TRIM5 alleles. Interestingly, the prevalence of a minor haplotype of TRIMCyp in wild macaques from the Philippines was significantly lower than in captive ones, suggesting that it is advantageous for wild monkeys to possess the major haplotype of TRIMCyp. Overall, our results add to our understanding of the geographic and genetic prevalence of cynomolgus macaque TRIMCyp. PMID:22969754

  3. Association of ABO Blood Types With Atherosclerosis Risk Factors and Number of Involved Coronary Arteries

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    Golmohammadi Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cardiovascular disease (CVD is a common cause of morbidity and mortality. The relationship between ABO blood groups and main risk factors of CVD is unknown. So this study was designed to investigate whether there is an association between ABO blood groups and cardiovascular risk factors in otherwise healthy people. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, risk factors for CVD were screened in 300 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD who were hospitalized in Madani hospital (biggest heart center in Tabriz in 2013-2014 and evaluated by a questionnaire that aimed to extract information about age, sex, smoking, blood group type, weight, height, blood pressure, diabetes mellitus and family history of CVD. Data were analyzed with SPSS 17. Results: Of the total selected 300 patients, 69.3% were male, 35.3% were smoker, 61% were hypertensive, 30.3% were diabetic mellitus, 31% had hyperlipidemia, 70.97% were obese and 17.3% had family history of CVD. The mean age was 62.06 ± 11.40 years. Blood groups O (28%, A (43.3%, B (19% and AB (7.3% were the most frequent ones, respectively. According to our results, we found that the rate of CAD in individuals with the blood group A was higher than the other blood groups. Regarding the risk factors, however, no significant difference was observed between the blood groups. Conclusion: A correlation was found between blood group A and the incidence of CAD and there was no significant difference between the blood groups and cardiovascular risk factors and number of involved coronary arteries.

  4. Involvement of inflammatory factors in pancreatic carcinogenesis and preventive effects of anti-inflammatory agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Mami; Mutoh, Michihiro; Ishigamori, Rikako; Fujii, Gen; Imai, Toshio

    2013-03-01

    Chronic inflammation is known to be a risk for many cancers, including pancreatic cancer. Heavy alcohol drinking and cigarette smoking are major causes of pancreatitis, and epidemiological studies have shown that smoking and chronic pancreatitis are risk factors for pancreatic cancer. Meanwhile, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) are elevated in pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer tissues in humans and in animal models. Selective inhibitors of iNOS and COX-2 suppress pancreatic cancer development in a chemical carcinogenesis model of hamsters treated with N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP). In addition, hyperlipidemia, obesity, and type II diabetes are also suggested to be associated with chronic inflammation in the pancreas and involved in pancreatic cancer development. We have shown that a high-fat diet increased pancreatic cancer development in BOP-treated hamsters, along with aggravation of hyperlipidemia, severe fatty infiltration, and increased expression of adipokines and inflammatory factors in the pancreas. Of note, fatty pancreas has been observed in obese and/or diabetic cases in humans. Preventive effects of anti-hyperlipidemic/anti-diabetic agents on pancreatic cancer have also been shown in humans and animals. Taking this evidence into consideration, modulation of inflammatory factors by anti-inflammatory agents will provide useful data for prevention of pancreatic cancer.

  5. Mechanisms involved in alleviation of intestinal inflammation by bifidobacterium breve soluble factors.

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    Elise Heuvelin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Soluble factors released by Bifidobacterium breve C50 (Bb alleviate the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by immune cells, but their effect on intestinal epithelium remains elusive. To decipher the mechanisms accounting for the cross-talk between bacteria/soluble factors and intestinal epithelium, we measured the capacity of the bacteria, its conditioned medium (Bb-CM and other Gram(+ commensal bacteria to dampen inflammatory chemokine secretion. METHODS: TNFalpha-induced chemokine (CXCL8 secretion and alteration of NF-kappaB and AP-1 signalling pathways by Bb were studied by EMSA, confocal microscopy and western blotting. Anti-inflammatory capacity was also tested in vivo in a model of TNBS-induced colitis in mice. RESULTS: Bb and Bb-CM, but not other commensal bacteria, induced a time and dose-dependent inhibition of CXCL8 secretion by epithelial cells driven by both AP-1 and NF-kappaB transcription pathways and implying decreased phosphorylation of p38-MAPK and IkappaB-alpha molecules. In TNBS-induced colitis in mice, Bb-CM decreased the colitis score and inflammatory cytokine expression, an effect reproduced by dendritic cell conditioning with Bb-CM. CONCLUSIONS: Bb and secreted soluble factors contribute positively to intestinal homeostasis by attenuating chemokine production. The results indicate that Bb down regulate inflammation at the epithelial level by inhibiting phosphorylations involved in inflammatory processes and by protective conditioning of dendritic cells.

  6. Butterfly Larval Host Plant use in a Tropical Urban Context: Life History Associations, Herbivory, and Landscape Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiple, Ashish D.; Khurad, Arun M.; Dennis, Roger L. H.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines butterfly larval host plants, herbivory and related life history attributes within Nagpur City, India. The larval host plants of 120 butterfly species are identified and their host specificity, life form, biotope, abundance and perennation recorded; of the 126 larval host plants, most are trees (49), with fewer herbs (43), shrubs (22), climbers (7) and stem parasites (2). They include 89 wild, 23 cultivated, 11 wild/cultivated and 3 exotic plant species; 78 are perennials, 43 annuals and 5 biannuals. Plants belonging to Poaceae and Fabaceae are most widely used by butterfly larvae. In addition to distinctions in host plant family affiliation, a number of significant differences between butterfly families have been identified in host use patterns: for life forms, biotopes, landforms, perennation, host specificity, egg batch size and ant associations. These differences arising from the development of a butterfly resource database have important implications for conserving butterfly species within the city area. Differences in overall butterfly population sizes within the city relate mainly to the number of host plants used, but other influences, including egg batch size and host specificity are identified. Much of the variation in population size is unaccounted for and points to the need to investigate larval host plant life history and strategies as population size is not simply dependent on host plant abundance. PMID:21864159

  7. Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in children--host factors and vaccination response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingels, Helene Andrea Sinclair

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is still a leading cause of septicaemia, pneumonia and meningitis in young children world-wide with over half a million children dying annually from pneumococcal disease.  Some children are prone to repeated episodes of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) because of an underlying predisposing disease. Recurrent IPD (rIPD) is a rarity and published reports on rIPD are limited by having few children included, selected groups of patients or short follow-up periods. Deficiencies in the innate or adaptive immune system have been described in children with rIPD, but the frequency of immunodeficiency among such patients is unknown. The aim of this PhD thesis was to examine paediatric cases of laboratory-confirmed rIPD, over a 33-year period in Denmark, to determine risk factors and study aspects of the immunological background for this problem in children. In October 2007, a seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was implemented in the Danish infant immunization programme. An additional aim of the thesis was to examine the impact of vaccination on a population level, following the first three years of general PCV7 vaccination in Denmark. The thesis consists of three papers, which are all directly or indirectly based on data retrieved from the National Streptococcus Pneumoniae Registry. This registry is nationwide and dates back to 1938. The registry contains data from all laboratory-confirmed cases of IPD in Denmark and is continually updated for national surveillance. In Paper 1, we conducted a 33-year retrospective nationwide study of paediatric rIPD. By using data from the National Streptococcus Pneumoniae Registry combined with clinical data from hospital records, we could describe one of the largest known cohorts of children (n:59) with rIPD . We covered epidemiological, microbiological, and clinical features of this clinical entity. Of all children experiencing rIPD, 47% had a known predisposing underlying disease at the time of

  8. Salmonella typhimurium's transthyretin-like protein is a host-specific factor important in fecal survival in chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C Hennebry

    Full Text Available The transthyretin-like protein (TLP from Salmonella enterica subspecies I is a periplasmic protein with high level structural similarity to a protein found in mammals and fish. In humans, the protein homologue, transthyretin, binds and carries retinol and thyroxine, and a series of other, unrelated aromatic compounds. Here we show that the amino acid sequence of the TLP from different species, subspecies and serovars of the Salmonella genus is highly conserved and demonstrate that the TLP gene is constitutively expressed in S. Typhimurium and that copper and other divalent metal ions severely inhibit enzyme activity of the TLP, a cyclic amidohydrolase that hydrolyses 5-hydroxyisourate (5-HIU. In order to determine the in vivo role of the S. Typhimurium TLP, we constructed a strain of mouse-virulent S. Typhimurium SL1344 bearing a mutation in the TLP gene (SL1344 ΔyedX. We assessed the virulence of this strain via oral inoculation of mice and chickens. Whilst SL1344 ΔyedX induced a systemic infection in both organisms, the bacterial load detected in the faeces of infected chickens was significantly reduced when compared to the load of S. Typhimurium SL1344. These data demonstrate that the TLP gene is required for survival of S. Typhimurium in a high uric acid environment such as chicken faeces, and that metabolic traits of Salmonellae in natural and contrived hosts may be fundamentally different. Our data also highlight the importance of using appropriate animal models for the study of bacterial pathogenesis especially where host-specific virulence factors or traits are the subject of the study.

  9. Role of Intrinsic (Graft) Versus Extrinsic (Host) Factors in the Growth of Transplanted Organs Following Allogeneic and Xenogeneic Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, T; Watanabe, H; Shah, J A; Sahara, H; Shimizu, A; Nomura, S; Asfour, A; Danton, M; Boyd, L; Dardenne Meyers, A; Ekanayake-Alper, D K; Sachs, D H; Yamada, K

    2017-01-24

    In our studies of life-supporting α-1,3-galactocyltransferase knockout (GalT-KO) pig-to-baboon kidneys, we found that some recipients developed increased serum creatinine with growth of the grafts, without histological or immunological evidence of rejection. We hypothesized that the rapid growth of orthotopic pig grafts in smaller baboon recipients may have led to deterioration of organ function. To test this hypothesis for both kidneys and lungs, we assessed whether the growth of outbred (Yorkshire) organ transplants in miniature swine was regulated by intrinsic (graft) or extrinsic (host environment) factors. Yorkshire kidneys exhibited persistent growth in miniature swine, reaching 3.7 times their initial volume over 3 mo versus 1.2 times for miniature swine kidneys over the same time period. Similar rapid early growth of lung allografts was observed and, in this case, led to organ dysfunction. For xenograft kidneys, a review of our results suggests that there is a threshold for kidney graft volume of 25 cm(3) /kg of recipient body weight at which cortical ischemia is induced in transplanted GalT-KO kidneys in baboons. These results suggest that intrinsic factors are responsible, at least in part, for growth of donor organs and that this property should be taken into consideration for growth-curve-mismatched transplants, especially for life-supporting organs transplanted into a limited recipient space.

  10. The roles of host and pathogen factors and the innate immune response in the pathogenesis of Clostridium difficile infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xingmin; Hirota, Simon A.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is the most common cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhea and the etiologic agent of pseudomembranous colitis. The clinical manifestation of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is highly variable, from asymptomatic carriage, to mild self-limiting diarrhea, to the more severe pseudomembranous colitis. Furthermore, in extreme cases, colonic inflammation and tissue damage can lead to toxic megacolon, a condition requiring surgical intervention. C. difficile expresses two key virulence factors; the exotoxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), which are glucosyltransferases that target host-cell monomeric GTPases. In addition, some hypervirulent strains produce a third toxin, binary toxin or C. difficile transferase (CDT), which may contribute to the pathogenesis of CDI. More recently, other factors such as surface layer proteins (SLPs) and flagellin have also been linked to the inflammatory responses observed in CDI. Although the adaptive immune response can influence the severity of CDI, the innate immune responses to C. difficile and its toxins play crucial roles in CDI onset, progression, and overall prognosis. Despite this, the innate immune responses in CDI have drawn relatively little attention from clinical researchers. Targeting these responses may prove useful clinically as adjuvant therapies, especially in refractory and/or recurrent CDI. This review will focus on recent advances in our understanding of how C. difficile and its toxins modulate innate immune responses that contribute to CDI pathogenesis. PMID:25242213

  11. Limited agreement of independent RNAi screens for virus-required host genes owes more to false-negative than false-positive factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linhui Hao

    Full Text Available Systematic, genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi analysis is a powerful approach to identify gene functions that support or modulate selected biological processes. An emerging challenge shared with some other genome-wide approaches is that independent RNAi studies often show limited agreement in their lists of implicated genes. To better understand this, we analyzed four genome-wide RNAi studies that identified host genes involved in influenza virus replication. These studies collectively identified and validated the roles of 614 cell genes, but pair-wise overlap among the four gene lists was only 3% to 15% (average 6.7%. However, a number of functional categories were overrepresented in multiple studies. The pair-wise overlap of these enriched-category lists was high, ∼19%, implying more agreement among studies than apparent at the gene level. Probing this further, we found that the gene lists implicated by independent studies were highly connected in interacting networks by independent functional measures such as protein-protein interactions, at rates significantly higher than predicted by chance. We also developed a general, model-based approach to gauge the effects of false-positive and false-negative factors and to estimate, from a limited number of studies, the total number of genes involved in a process. For influenza virus replication, this novel statistical approach estimates the total number of cell genes involved to be ∼2,800. This and multiple other aspects of our experimental and computational results imply that, when following good quality control practices, the low overlap between studies is primarily due to false negatives rather than false-positive gene identifications. These results and methods have implications for and applications to multiple forms of genome-wide analysis.

  12. Are the risk and protective factors similar for gang-involved, pressured-to-join, and non-gang-involved youth? A social-ecological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrin, Gabriel J; Hong, Jun Sung; Espelage, Dorothy L

    2015-11-01

    This study examines the risk and protective factors for gang involvement among subgroups of youth (i.e., current or former gang members, youth who resisted gang membership, and non-gang-involved youth) using the social-ecological framework. Middle and high school students (N = 17,366) from school districts in a large Midwestern county participated. Results indicated that males were more likely than females to be involved in gangs. For the individual context, our findings indicate that racial and ethnic minorities, females, and youth with depression/suicidal ideation are likely to be at risk for gang involvement. For the family context, we found that having gang-involved family members and family dysfunction are related to youth gang involvement. For the peer context, peers' alcohol and drug use and bullying were significantly associated with gang involvement. For the school context, as our results demonstrate, youth who perceived fair treatment from teachers and other adults in school and those with a sense of belonging in school are more likely to avoid gang membership. For the neighborhood context, we found that presence of adult support in the neighborhood and perceived neighborhood safety are negatively associated with gang membership. Findings suggest that gang prevention efforts need to target multiple ecologies that surround and influence youth. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Studying Factors Involved in Biogenesis of Lysobacter sp. XL1 Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryakova, I V; Suzina, N E; Vinokurova, N G; Shishkova, N A; Vasilyeva, N V

    2017-04-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Lysobacter sp. XL1 produces outer membrane vesicles that are heterogeneous in size, density, and protein composition. One of the subpopulations is secretory vesicles for lytic protease L5 of Lysobacter sp. XL1 (Kudryakova et al. (2015) FEMS Microbiol. Lett., 362, fnv137). Protein L5 was assumed to influence biogenesis of these secretory vesicles that contain it. Using a Pseudomonas fluorescens Q2-87/B expression system, it was shown that the recombinant L5 protein may act as a factor of vesicle biogenesis. This points to a possible involvement of L5 protein in Lysobacter sp. XL1 vesicle biogenesis. Furthermore, it was established that the main phospholipid of Lysobacter sp. XL1 vesicles is cardiolipin, and vesicles are formed predominantly of outer membrane regions enriched with this phospholipid. This indicates that cardiolipin participates in biogenesis of all vesicle subpopulations in Lysobacter sp. XL1.

  14. Analysis of molecular markers as predictive factors of lymph node involvement in breast carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paula, Luciana Marques; De Moraes, Luis Henrique Ferreira; Do Canto, Abaeté Leite

    2017-01-01

    Nodal status is the most significant independent prognostic factor in breast cancer. Identification of molecular markers would allow stratification of patients who require surgical assessment of lymph nodes from the large numbers of patients for whom this surgical procedure is unnecessary, thus...... leading to a more accurate prognosis. However, up to now, the reported studies are preliminary and controversial, and although hundreds of markers have been assessed, few of them have been used in clinical practice for treatment or prognosis in breast cancer. The purpose of the present study...... ankyrin-related ADP-ribose polymerase 2, BCL2 associated agonist of cell death, G2 and S-phase expressed 1 and PAX interacting protein 1 genes, described as prognostic markers in breast cancer in a previous microarray study, are also predictors of lymph node involvement in breast carcinoma Reverse...

  15. Consistent analysis of one-nucleon spectroscopic factors involving weakly- and strongly-bound nucleons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okołowicz, J.; Lam, Y. H.; Płoszajczak, M.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Smirnova, N. A.

    2016-06-01

    There is a considerable interest in understanding the dependence of one-nucleon removal cross sections on the asymmetry of the neutron Sn and proton Sp separation energies, following a large amount of experimental data and theoretical analyses in a framework of sudden and eikonal approximations of the reaction dynamics. These theoretical calculations involve both the single-particle cross section and the shell-model description of the projectile initial state and final states of the reaction residues. The configuration mixing in shell-model description of nuclear states depends on the proximity of one-nucleon decay threshold but does it depend sensitively on Sn -Sp? To answer this question, we use the shell model embedded in the continuum to investigate the dependence of one-nucleon spectroscopic factors on the asymmetry of Sn and Sp for mirror nuclei 24Si, 24Ne and 28S, 28Mg and for a series of neon isotopes (20 ≤ A ≤ 28).

  16. Platelet-derived growth factor involvement in myocardial remodeling following infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenyuan; Zhao, Tieqiang; Huang, Valerie; Chen, Yuanjian; Ahokas, Robert A; Sun, Yao

    2011-11-01

    Cardiac remodeling occurs in the infarcted heart (MI). The underlying regulatory mechanisms are under investigation. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a family of growth factors that stimulates cell growth, differentiation and migration. Herein, we sought to determine whether PDGF is involved in cardiac repair/remodeling following MI. The temporal and spatial expressions of PDGF isoforms (A, B, C and D) and PDGF receptor (PDGFR)-α and β as well as cell types expressing PDGF were examined in the infarcted rat heart. Sham-operated rats served as controls. We found that the normal myocardium expressed all PDGF isoforms, and cell types expressing PDGF were primarily interstitial cells. Following MI, PDGF-A and D were significantly increased in the infarcted myocardium during 6 weeks of the observation period and cells expressing PDGF-A and D were primarily endothelial cells, macrophages and myofibroblasts (myoFb). PDGF-B and C expressions were, however, reduced in the infarcted heart. In the noninfarcted myocardium, PDGF-D expression was increased in the late stage of MI and cells expressing PDGF-D were predominantly fibroblasts. Both PDGFR-α and β were significantly increased in the infarcted myocardium in the early and late stages of MI and in the noninfarcted myocardium in the late stage of MI. Enhanced PDGF-A, PDGF-D and PDGFR are coincident with angiogenesis, and inflammatory and fibrogenic responses in the infarcted myocardium, suggesting their regulation on cardiac repair. Elevated PDGF-D in the noninfarcted myocardium suggests its involvement in the development of interstitial fibrosis that appears in the late stage of MI.

  17. Hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor is centrally involved in learning under moderate stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Morgan; Chen, Alon; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2013-08-01

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neuropeptide is found to have a pivotal role in the regulation of the behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to stressful challenges. Here, we studied the involvement of the hypothalamic CRF in learning under stressful conditions. We have used a site-specific viral approach to knockdown (KD) CRF expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). The two-way shuttle avoidance (TWSA) task was chosen to assess learning and memory under stressful conditions. Control animals learned to shuttle from one side to the other to avoid electrical foot shock by responding to a tone. Novel object and social recognition tasks were used to assess memory under less stressful conditions. KD of PVN-CRF expression decreased the number of avoidance responses in a TWSA session under moderate (0.8 mA), but not strong (1.5 mA), stimulus intensity compared to control rats. On the other hand, KD of PVN-CRF had no effect on memory performance in the less stressful novel object or social recognition tasks. Interestingly, basal or stress-induced corticosterone levels in CRF KD rats were not significantly different from controls. Taken together, the data suggest that the observed impairment was not a result of alteration in HPA axis activity, but rather due to reduced PVN-CRF activity on other brain areas. We propose that hypothalamic CRF is centrally involved in learning under moderate stressful challenge. Under 'basal' (less stressful) conditions or when the intensity of the stress is more demanding, central CRF ceases to be the determinant factor, as was indicated by performances in the TWSA with higher stimulus intensity or in the less stressful tasks of object and social recognition.

  18. Trophic factor-induced excitatory synaptogenesis involves postsynaptic modulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodin, Melanie A; Munno, David W; Syed, Naweed I

    2002-01-15

    Neurotrophic factors have well established roles in neuronal development, although their precise involvement in synapse formation and plasticity is yet to be fully determined. Using soma-soma synapses between identified Lymnaea neurons, we have shown recently that trophic factors are required for excitatory but not inhibitory synapse formation. However, neither the precise site (presynaptic versus postsynaptic cell) nor the underlying mechanisms have yet been defined. In the present study, synapse formation between the presynaptic cell visceral dorsal 4 (VD4) and its postsynaptic partner right pedal dorsal 1 (RPeD1) was examined to define the cellular mechanisms mediating trophic factor-induced excitatory synaptogenesis in cell culture. When paired in a soma-soma configuration in the presence of defined media (DM, nonproteinacious), mutually inhibitory synapses were appropriately reconstructed between VD4 and RPeD1. However, when cells were paired in the presence of increasing concentrations of Lymnaea brain-conditioned medium (CM), a biphasic synapse (initial excitatory synaptic component followed by inhibition) developed. The CM-induced excitatory synapse formation required trophic factor-mediated activation of receptor tyrosine kinases in the postsynaptic cell, RPeD1, and a concomitant modulation of existing postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Specifically, when RPeD1 was isolated in DM, exogenously applied ACh induced a hyperpolarizing response that was sensitive to the AChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA). In contrast, a single RPeD1 isolated in CM exhibited a biphasic response to exogenously applied ACh. The initial depolarizing phase of the biphasic response was sensitive to both mecamylamine and hexamethonium chloride, whereas the hyperpolarizing phase was blocked by MLA. In soma-soma-paired neurons, the VD4-induced synaptic responses in RPeD1 were sensitive to the cholinergic antagonists in a concentration range similar to that

  19. Perpetual factors involved in performance of air traffic controllers using a microwave landing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershzohn, G.

    1978-01-01

    The task involved the control of two simulated aircraft targets per trial, in a 37.0 -km radius terminal area, by means of conventional radar vectoring and/or speed control. The goal was to insure that the two targets crossed the Missed Approach Point (MAP) at the runway threshold exactly 60 sec apart. The effects on controller performance of the MLS configuration under wind and no-wind conditions were examined. The data for mean separation time between targets at the MAP and the range about that mean were analyzed by appropriate analyses of variance. Significant effects were found for mean separation times as a result of the configuration of the MLS and for interaction between the configuration and wind conditions. The analysis of variance for range indicated significantly poorer performance under the wind condition. These findings are believed to be a result of certain perceptual factors involved in radar air traffic control (ATC) using the MLS with separation of targets in time.

  20. Adiponectin stimulates Wnt inhibitory factor-1 expression through epigenetic regulations involving the transcription factor specificity protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Lam, Janice B B; Chow, Kim H M; Xu, Aimin; Lam, Karen S L; Moon, Randall T; Wang, Yu

    2008-11-01

    Adiponectin (ADN) is an adipokine possessing growth inhibitory activities against various types of cancer cells. Our previous results demonstrated that ADN could impede Wnt/beta-catenin-signaling pathways in MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells [Wang,Y. et al. (2006) Adiponectin modulates the glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta/beta-catenin signaling pathway and attenuates mammary tumorigenesis of MDA-MB-231 cells in nude mice. Cancer Res., 66, 11462-11470]. Here, we extended our studies to elucidate the effects of ADN on regulating the expressions of Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF1), a Wnt antagonist frequently silenced in human breast tumors. Our results showed that ADN time dependently stimulated WIF1 gene and protein expressions in MDA-MB-231 cells. Overexpression of WIF1 exerted similar inhibitory effects to those of ADN on cell proliferations, nuclear beta-catenin activities, cyclin D1 expressions and serum-induced phosphorylations of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta. Blockage of WIF1 activities significantly attenuated the suppressive effects of ADN on MDA-MB-231 cell growth. Furthermore, our in vivo studies showed that both supplementation of recombinant ADN and adenovirus-mediated overexpression of this adipokine substantially enhanced WIF1 expressions in MDA-MB-231 tumors implanted in nude mice. More interestingly, we found that ADN could alleviate methylation of CpG islands located within the proximal promoter region of WIF1, possibly involving the specificity protein 1 (Sp1) transcription factor and its downstream target DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1). Upon ADN treatment, the protein levels of both Sp1 and DNMT1 were significantly decreased. Using silencing RNA approaches, we confirmed that downregulation of Sp1 resulted in an increased expression of WIF1 and decreased methylation of WIF1 promoter. Taken together, these data suggest that ADN might elicit its antitumor activities at least partially through promoting WIF1 expressions.

  1. Evaluating the Biological and Ecological Factors Influencing Transmission of Larval Digenetic Trematodes: A Test of Second Intermediate Host Specificity of Two North American Halipegus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigge, Heather A; Bolek, Matthew G

    2016-12-01

    approximate 2-fold difference in the average percentage of worms that established in odonates from the ostracod, Cypridopsis sp., than from the harpacticoid copepod, Phyllognathopus sp., and the difference was nearly 3-fold between Cypridopsis sp. and the cyclopoid copepod, Thermocyclops sp. Therefore, despite all 3 microcrustacean species becoming infected, not all species were equally suited for transmission and completion of the life cycle. Differences among the 3 microcrustacean species in cercaria ingestion, metacercarial growth and development, and odonate predation rates on infected microcrustacean species were important factors in determining transmission of the 2 Halipegus species to odonate hosts.

  2. Human factors involvement in bringing the power of AI to a heterogeneous user population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwinski, Mary; Nguyen, Trung

    1994-01-01

    The Human Factors involvement in developing COMPAQ QuickSolve, an electronic problem-solving and information system for Compaq's line of networked printers, is described. Empowering customers with expert system technology so they could solve advanced networked printer problems on their own was a major goal in designing this system. This process would minimize customer down-time, reduce the number of phone calls to the Compaq Customer Support Center, improve customer satisfaction, and, most importantly, differentiate Compaq printers in the marketplace by providing the best, and most technologically advanced, customer support. This represents a re-engineering of Compaq's customer support strategy and implementation. In its first generation system, SMART, the objective was to provide expert knowledge to Compaq's help desk operation to more quickly and correctly answer customer questions and problems. QuickSolve is a second generation system in that customer support is put directly in the hands of the consumers. As a result, the design of QuickSolve presented a number of challenging issues. Because the produce would be used by a diverse and heterogeneous set of users, a significant amount of human factors research and analysis was required while designing and implementing the system. Research that shaped the organization and design of the expert system component as well.

  3. Identification of the key weather factors affecting overwintering success of Apolygus lucorum eggs in dead host tree branches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hongsheng; Liu, Bing; Lu, Yanhui; Desneux, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effects of weather on insect population dynamics is crucial to simulate and forecast pest outbreaks, which is becoming increasingly important with the effects of climate change. The mirid bug Apolygus lucorum is an important pest on cotton, fruit trees and other crops in China, and primarily lays its eggs on dead parts of tree branches in the fall for subsequent overwintering. As such, the eggs that hatch the following spring are most strongly affected by ambient weather factors, rather than by host plant biology. In this study, we investigated the effects of three major weather factors: temperature, relative humidity and rainfall, on the hatching rate of A. lucorum eggs overwintering on dead branches of Chinese date tree (Ziziphus jujuba). Under laboratory conditions, rainfall (simulated via soaking) was necessary for the hatching of overwintering A. lucorum eggs. In the absence of rainfall (unsoaked branches), very few nymphs successfully emerged under any of the tested combinations of temperature and relative humidity. In contrast, following simulated rainfall, the hatching rate of the overwintering eggs increased dramatically. Hatching rate and developmental rate were positively correlated with relative humidity and temperature, respectively. Under field conditions, the abundance of nymphs derived from overwintering eggs was positively correlated with rainfall amount during the spring seasons of 2009-2013, while the same was not true for temperature and relative humidity. Overall, our findings indicate that rainfall is the most important factor affecting the hatching rate of overwintering A. lucorum eggs on dead plant parts and nymph population levels during the spring season. It provides the basic information for precisely forecasting the emergence of A. lucorum and subsequently timely managing its population in spring, which will make it possible to regional control of this insect pest widely occurring in multiple crops in summer.

  4. ROP6 is involved in root hair deformation induced by Nod factors in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Danxia; Li, Xiangyong; Han, Yapeng; Cheng, Lin; Yuan, Hongyu; Wang, Lei

    2016-11-01

    Roots of leguminous plants perceive Nod factor signals, and then root hair deformation responses such as swelling and curling are activated. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms of such root hair deformation. We have previously shown that LjROP6, a member of the Rho family of small GTPases, was identified as an NFR5 (Nod Factor Receptor 5)-interacting protein and participated in symbiotic nodulation in Lotus japonicus. In this study, we identified ten LjROP GTPases including LjROP6, and they were distributed into groups II, III, IV but not group I by phylogenetic analysis. The expression profiles of ten LjROP genes during nodulation were examined. LjROP6 belonged to group IV and interacted with NFR5 in a GTP-dependent manner. Overexpression of either wild-type ROP6 or a constitutively active mutant (ROP6-CA) generated root hair tip growth depolarization, while overexpression of a dominant negative mutant (ROP6-DN) exhibited normal root hair growth. After inoculating with Mesorhizobium loti or adding Nod factors to hairy roots, overexpression of ROP6 and ROP6-CA exhibited extensive root hair deformation, while overexpression of ROP6-DN inhibited root hair deformation. The infection event and nodule number were increased in ROP6 and ROP6-CA overexpressing transgenic plants; but decreased in ROP6-DN overexpressing transgenic plants. These studies provide strong evidence that ROP6 GTPase, which binds NFR5 in a GTP-dependent manner, is involved in root hair development as well as root hair deformation responses induced by NFs in the early stage of symbiotic interaction in L. japonicus.

  5. Risk and Protective Factors of Suicidal Ideation and Attempt among Adolescents with Different Types of School Bullying Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Cheng-Fang; Liu, Tai-Ling; Yang, Pinchen; Hu, Huei-Fan

    2015-01-01

    Suicide has been found to be prevalent among adolescents involved in bullying; however, there has been a lack of research examining whether the risk and protective factors of suicidal ideation and attempt are different among adolescents with different types of bullying involvement. The aims of this study were to examine the risk and protective factors of suicidal ideation and attempt among adolescents with different experiences of bullying involvement, victimization, and perpetration. A total of 4,533 adolescents participated in this study. Different groups of bullying involvement, victimization, and perpetration were determined through use of the Chinese version of the School Bullying Experience Questionnaire. The associations of suicidal ideation and attempt with possible risk factors (domestic violence, overweight, depression, anxiety, and alcohol abuse) and protective factors (family support and self-esteem) were examined using logistic regression analysis. Pure victims, pure perpetrators, and victim-perpetrators were more likely to report suicidal ideation and attempt than the neutral group. The risk and protective factors of suicidal ideation and attempt were different across adolescents with different experiences of bullying involvement, victimization, and perpetrators. The risk of suicide should be monitored among adolescents who are involved in any type of bullying. The risk and protective factors of suicide identified in this study should be taken into consideration in prevention and intervention programs for suicide in adolescents involved in bullying.

  6. The Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron protein Bacteroides host factor A participates in integration of the integrative conjugative element CTnDOT into the chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringwald, Kenneth; Gardner, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    CTnDOT is a conjugative transposon found in Bacteroides species. It encodes multiple antibiotic resistances and is stimulated to transfer by exposure to tetracycline. CTnDOT integration into the host chromosome requires IntDOT and a previously unknown host factor. We have identified a protein, designated BHFa (Bacteroides host factor A), that participates in integrative recombination. BHFa is the first host factor identified for a site-specific recombination reaction in the CTnDOT family of integrative and conjugative elements. Based on the amino acid sequence of BHFa, the ability to bind specifically to 4 sites in the attDOT DNA, and its activity in the integration reaction, BHFa is a member of the IHF/HU family of nucleoid-associated proteins. Other DNA bending proteins that bind DNA nonspecifically can substitute for BHFa in the integration reaction. Bacteroides species are normal members of the human colonic microbiota. These species can harbor and spread self-transmissible genetic elements (integrative conjugative elements [ICEs]) that contain antibiotic resistance genes. This work describes the role of a protein, BHFa, and its importance in the integration reaction required for the element CTnDOT to persist in Bacteroides host cells. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. The life cycle of Prosorhynchoides carvajali (Trematoda: Bucephalidae) involving species of bivalve and fish hosts in the intertidal zone of central Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, G; Valdivia, I; López, Z

    2015-09-01

    We describe the life cycle of the bucephalid Prosorhynchoides carvajali from the intertidal rocky zone of central Chile. To elucidate the life cycle of this digenean, two mytilid bivalves, Semimytilus algosus and Perumytilus purpuratus, and ten intertidal fish species belonging to the families Blenniidae, Tripterygiidae, Labrisomidae, Kyphosidae and Gobiesocidae were analysed for natural infections. In addition, experimental infections of fish were undertaken and molecular analyses were performed of several developmental stages of the digeneans in various host species. Experimental infections of fish were made from infected mytilids to determine which fish species were suitable for the metacercarial stage of Prosorhynchoides. We also determined the abundance and prevalence of metacercariae in natural infections in fish and found that they were lower than in the experimental infections. A molecular analysis showed that sporocysts from S. algosus were identical to metacercariae from five fish species and P. carvajali adults. Sporocysts isolated from P. purpuratus were similar to metacercaria found in one fish species only (G. laevifrons) but were different from P. carvajali, with 1.9-2.0% genetic divergence. Therefore, the complete life cycle of P. carvajali consists of the mytilid species S. algosus as the first intermediate host, at least five intertidal fish species as second intermediate hosts (Scartichthys viridis, Auchenionchus microcirrhis, Hypsoblennius sordidus, Helcogrammoides chilensis and Gobiesox marmoratus), two carnivorous fish as definitive hosts (Auchenionchus microcirrhis and A. variolosus) and one occasional definitive host (Syciases sanguineus). This is the second description of a life cycle of a marine digenean from Chile.

  8. Examining Socio-Cultural and Neighborhood Factors Associated with Trajectories of Mexican-Origin Mothers' Education-Related Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Sakshi; Bámaca-Colbert, Mayra Y; Witherspoon, Dawn P; Pomerantz, Eva M; Robins, Richard W

    2017-01-03

    Parental involvement in education is an important determinant of youth's academic success. Yet, there is limited knowledge on how Latino parents' education-related involvement changes over time. Using data from a longitudinal study of 674 Mexican-origin families (mother-adolescent dyad; M age of child at Wave 1=10.4, SD = 0.60), we examined trajectories of parental involvement from 5(th) to 11(th) grade and the effects of socio-cultural (e.g., family SES and acculturation) and contextual (e.g., neighborhood) factors on these trajectories. Results showed that mothers reduced two aspects of the educational involvement: home-based involvement and academic aspirations, but increased on a third aspect of involvement, resource seeking. Furthermore, family SES, acculturation, and neighborhood context were differentially associated with mothers' involvement at 5(th) grade and predicted changes in involvement across elementary and high school.

  9. Host genetic factors in American cutaneous leishmaniasis: a critical appraisal of studies conducted in an endemic area of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Léa Cristina Castellucci

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL is a vector-transmitted infectious disease with an estimated 1.5 million new cases per year. In Brazil, ACL represents a significant public health problem, with approximately 30,000 new reported cases annually, representing an incidence of 18.5 cases per 100,000 inhabitants. Corte de Pedra is in a region endemic for ACL in the state of Bahia (BA, northeastern Brazil, with 500-1,300 patients treated annually. Over the last decade, population and family-based candidate gene studies were conducted in Corte de Pedra, founded on previous knowledge from studies on mice and humans. Notwithstanding limitations related to sample size and power, these studies contribute important genetic biomarkers that identify novel pathways of disease pathogenesis and possible new therapeutic targets. The present paper is a narrative review about ACL immunogenetics in BA, highlighting in particular the interacting roles of the wound healing gene FLI1 with interleukin-6 and genes SMAD2 and SMAD3 of the transforming growth factor beta signalling pathway. This research highlights the need for well-powered genetic and functional studies on Leishmania braziliensis infection as essential to define and validate the role of host genes in determining resistance/susceptibility regarding this disease.

  10. Specific Photocrosslinking of DNA-Protein Complexes: Identification of Contacts Between Integration Host Factor and Its Target DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shu-Wei; Nash, Howard A.

    1994-12-01

    Azide moieties have been specifically placed in the backbone of DNA by chemical coupling between azidophenacyl bromide and uniquely positioned phosphorothioate residues. The derivatized DNA forms specific complexes with a DNA-binding protein and, following irradiation with 302-nm light, makes specific crosslinks to the protein. Isolation of this covalent complex, followed by tryptic digestion and Edman degradation of the resulting crosslinked peptide, identifies the portion of the protein that is near the derivatized segment of the target DNA. We use this method to probe the interaction between a specific DNA sequence and integration host factor (IHF) protein. A single IHF heterodimer is known to contact >25 bp of DNA and thereby introduce a sharp bend. Two segments of a typical IHF site were derivatized with aryl azide. Although the segments were separated by only 5 bp, they crosslinked to different subunits of IHF. The locations of the crosslinks support our current view for the way IHF protein binds to and bends its specific targets.

  11. Population dynamics of intermediate snail hosts of Fasciola hepatica and some environmental factors in San Juan y Martinez municipality, Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Cañete

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The variation of abundances of intermediate snail hosts of Fasciola hepatica in Cuba (Fossaria cubensis and Pseudosuccinea columella was studied during one year under natural conditions at five sampling sites in San Juan y Martinez municipality, Pinar del Rio province, Cuba. The effect of some environmental variables on the lymnaeid abundances was also studied. A canonical correspondence analysis showed that both species do not generally occur together in the same habitat and that most factors affect them in an opposite fashion, although both of them correlate positively through time to the diversity of the habitats. F. cubensis prefers the sites that are in or closer to the city whereas P. columella is more abundant in rural sites. Lymnaeid abundances are mainly affected by nitrite and nitrate concentrations as well as by the abundance of the thiarid Tarebia granifera. F. cubensis is more abundant in polluted habitats with low densities (or absence of T. granifera whereas P. columella prefers cleaner habitats and can coexist with the thiarid, even at its higher densities. The implications of divergent preferences of the two lymnaeids for the control of fasciolosis are discussed.

  12. Transcription factors of Schizophyllum commune involved in mushroom formation and modulation of vegetative growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelkmans, Jordi F; Patil, Mohini B; Gehrmann, Thies; Reinders, Marcel J T; Wösten, Han A B; Lugones, Luis G

    2017-03-22

    Mushrooms are the most conspicuous fungal structures. Transcription factors (TFs) Bri1 and Hom1 of the model fungus Schizophyllum commune are involved in late stages of mushroom development, while Wc-2, Hom2, and Fst4 function early in development. Here, it is shown that Bri1 and Hom1 also stimulate vegetative growth, while biomass formation is repressed by Wc-2, Hom2, and Fst4. The Δbri1Δbri1 and the Δhom1Δhom1 strains formed up to 0.6 fold less biomass when compared to wild-type, while Δwc-2Δwc-2, Δhom2Δhom2, and Δfst4Δfst4 strains formed up to 2.8 fold more biomass. Inactivation of TF gene tea1, which was downregulated in the Δwc-2Δwc-2, Δhom2Δhom2, and Δfst4Δfst4 strains, resulted in a strain that was severely affected in mushroom development and that produced 1.3 fold more biomass than the wild-type. In contrast, introducing a constitutive active version of hom2 that had 4 predicted phosphorylation motifs eliminated resulted in radial growth inhibition and prompt fructification in both Δhom2 and wild-type strains, even in sterile monokaryons. Together, it is concluded that TFs involved in mushroom formation also modulate vegetative growth. Among these TFs is the homeodomain protein Hom2, being the first time that this class of regulatory proteins is implicated in repression of vegetative growth in a eukaryote.

  13. Secreted effectors of the tomato leaf mould fungus Cladosporium fulvum are virulence factors that target host defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cladosporium fulvum is a biotrophic fungal pathogen that causes leaf mould of tomato. Inside the leaf, C. fulvum does not penetrate host cells or develop haustoria but remains confined to the intercellular space between mesophyll cells. Ten effector proteins that are secreted during host colonizatio...

  14. Mothers' and Fathers' Involvement in Home Activities with Their Children: Psychosocial Factors and the Role of Parental Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giallo, Rebecca; Treyvaud, Karli; Cooklin, Amanda; Wade, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Parent involvement in play, learning, and everyday home activities is important for promoting children's cognitive and language development. The aims of the study were to (a) examine differences between mothers' and fathers' self-reported involvement with their children, (b) explore the relationship between child, parent and family factors, and…

  15. Factors involved in selection of a career in surgery and orthopedics for medical students in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollias, C; Banza, L; Mkandawire, N

    2010-03-01

    There is a critical shortage of Orthopedic Surgeons in Malawi as well as all countries in sub-Saharan Africa. To date, there is no published literature that has investigated surgical or Orthopedic career selection amongst African medical trainees. With the goal of facilitating recruitment into Surgery and Orthopedics in Malawi, we explored the key aspects of Malawian Medical Students' choice of careers in surgical disciplines. An on-line survey of all students in clinical years at the College of Medicine in Blantyre, Malawi was performed. The survey was anonymous and constructed de novo by a stringent process including Item Generation, Item reduction, Survey composition, Pre-testing, Assessment of Validity by a recognized survey expert, Pilot testing in on-line format by several Malawian Medical Students, and then formal survey testing. Surgery was the most popular specialty choice among the medical trainees (46%). General Surgery was the popular surgical specialty (27%), followed by Neurosurgery (22%) and Orthopedics (19%). The majority of students (67%) feared occupational exposure to HIV but this did not appear to be a factor in specialty choice (p = 0.9). Students with Orthopedic mentors were significantly more likely to choose Orthopedics as their first choice surgical specialty (p = 0.01). Despite limited resources and surgeons in sub-Saharan Africa, surgical specialties are desirable career choices. This is the first evaluation of factors involved in surgical or Orthopedic career selection in any African context. Future initiatives to improve exposure and mentorship in Orthopedics are fundamental to recruitment into the specialty.

  16. Identification of Heat Shock Transcription Factor Genes Involved in Thermotolerance of Octoploid Cultivated Strawberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wan-Yu; Lin, Lee-Fong; Jheng, Jing-Lian; Wang, Chun-Chung; Yang, Jui-Hung; Chou, Ming-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock transcription factors (HSFs) are mainly involved in the activation of genes in response to heat stress as well as other abiotic and biotic stresses. The growth, development, reproduction, and yield of strawberry are strongly limited by extreme temperatures and droughts. In this study, we used Illumina sequencing and obtained transcriptome data set from Fragaria × ananassa Duchessne cv. Toyonoka. Six contigs and three unigenes were confirmed to encode HSF proteins (FaTHSFs). Subsequently, we characterized the biological functions of two particularly selected unigenes, FaTHSFA2a and FaTHSFB1a, which were classified into class A2 and B HSFs, respectively. Expression assays revealed that FaTHSFA2a and FaTHSFB1a expression was induced by heat shock and correlated well with elevated ambient temperatures. Overexpression of FaTHSFA2a and FaTHSFB1a resulted in the activation of their downstream stress-associated genes, and notably enhanced the thermotolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Besides, both FaTHSFA2a and FaTHSFB1a fusion proteins localized in the nucleus, indicating their similar subcellular distributions as transcription factors. Our yeast one-hybrid assay suggested that FaTHSFA2a has trans-activation activity, whereas FaTHSFB1a expresses trans-repression function. Altogether, our annotated transcriptome sequences provide a beneficial resource for identifying most genes expressed in octoploid strawberry. Furthermore, HSF studies revealed the possible insights into the molecular mechanisms of thermotolerance, thus rendering valuable molecular breeding to improve the tolerance of strawberry in response to high-temperature stress. PMID:27999304

  17. [Factors involved in the burden of the primary caregiver of cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, M C; Meza-Osnaya, G; Pérez-Cruz, I; Cortes-Campero, N; Hernández-Ovalle, J; Hernández-Paredes, P; Juárez-Romero, K; Chino-Hernández, B; Romero-Figueroa, M S

    The aim of the study was to identify the factors involved between burden in the primary caregiver of cancer patients and their quality of life. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a secondary level hospital on 100 primary caregivers of cancer patients. The level of burden was determined using the Zarit scale and the perception of quality of life using the World Health Organisation Quality of Life questionnaire. Quality of life was categorised as high or low and compared between groups according to their level of burden. Descriptive statistics were performed on the study variables, and differences between groups were analysed according to their level of burden. In assessing the overload, it was found that 31% of caregivers had burden. A good quality of life was perceived by 76% of caregivers, while the remaining 24% perceived it as poor. To identify association between these two variables Chi squared (X2) was used to determine whether there was any association between quality of life and overloading of the primary caregiver, giving a P≤.05. A Spearman correlation was also performed, obtaining an r-value of .321 with a P≤.05, finding a slightly positive correlation. The factors that have a bearing on a good quality of life despite having burden were: being married, dedicated to the home, and kinship (to be immediate family: spouse, parents and children). Conversely, the type of cancer, sleep hours, and hours of care influence the perception of a poor quality of life. Copyright © 2017 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Factors involved in alleviating water stress by partial crop removal in pear trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsal, Jordi; Mata, Merce; Arbones, Amadeu; Del Campo, Jesus; Girona, Joan; Lopez, Gerardo

    2008-09-01

    We studied the relief of water stress associated with fruit thinning in pear (Pyrus communis L.) trees during drought to determine what mechanisms, other than stomatal adjustment, were involved. Combinations of control irrigation (equal to crop water use less effective rainfall) and deficit irrigation (equal to 20% of control irrigation), fruit load (unthinned and thinned to 40 fruits per tree) and root pruning (pruned and unpruned) treatments were applied to pear (cv. 'Conference') trees during Stage II of fruit development. Daily patterns of midday stem water potential (Psi(stem)) and leaf conductance to water vapor (g(l)) of deficit-irrigated trees differed after fruit thinning. In response to fruit thinning, gl progressively declined with water stress until 30 days after fruit thinning and then leveled off, whereas the effects of decreased fruit load on Psi(stem) peaked 30-40 days after fruit thinning and then tended to decline. Soil water depletion was significantly correlated with fruit load during drought. Our results indicate that stomatal adjustment and the resulting soil water conservation were the factors determining the Psi(stem) response to fruit thinning. However, these factors could not explain differences in daily patterns between g(l) and Psi(stem) after fruit thinning. In all cases, effects of root pruning treatments on Psi(stem) in deficit-irrigated trees were transitory (Psi(stem) recovered from root pruning in less than 30 days), but the recovery of Psi(stem) after root pruning was faster in trees with low fruit loads. This behavior is compatible with the concept that the water balance (reflected by Psi(stem) values) was better in trees with low fruit loads compared with unthinned trees, perhaps because more carbon was available for root growth. Thus, a root growth component is hypothesized as a mechanism to explain the bimodal Psi(stem) response to fruit thinning during drought.

  19. AP2/ERF Transcription Factors Involved in Response to Tomato Yellow Leaf Curly Virus in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tomato yellow leaf curly virus (TYLCV, transmitted by the whitefly (, causes leaf curling and yellowing, plant dwarfism, and growth inhibition in tomato ( L.. The APETALA2 (AP2 and ethylene response factor (ERF transcription factor (TF family, the largest plant-specific TF family, was identified to function in plant development and pathogen defense. Our study aimed to analyze the mechanism underlying the function of ERF (SlERF TFs in response to TYLCV infection and improve useful information to increase the resistance to TYLCV in tomato. A total of 22 tomato AP2/ERF TFs in response to TYLCV were identified according to transcriptome database. Five ERF-B3 TFs were identified in cultivars Hongbeibei (highly resistant, Zheza-301, Zhefen-702 (both resistant, Jinpeng-1, and Xianke-6 (both susceptible. Interaction network indicated that SlERF TFs could interact with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK. Expression profiles of five ERF-B3 genes (, , , , and were detected by quantitative real-time–polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR after TYLCV infection in five tomato cultivars. expression was upregulated in five tomato cultivars. The expressions of three genes (, , and were upregulated in Zheza-301 and Zhefen-702. and expressions were downregulated in Hongbeibei and Xianke-6, respectively. Yeast one-hybrid showed that the GCC-box binding ability of ERF-B3 TFs differed in resistant and susceptible tomato cultivars. Expression profiles were related to the GCC-box binding ability of SlERF TFs in resistant and susceptible tomato cultivars. The defense mechanism underlying the tomato’s response to TYLCV involved a complicated network, which provided important information for us in breeding and genetic analysis.

  20. Moral Responsibility and Confidence as Factors that Influence Teacher Involvement in Educational Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López Cecilio

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Various factors that are not easily observed have a strong impact on educational change. In this paper, I examine some of the issues that emerged from the data collected while exploring my informants’ perceptions and attitudes towards their changing roles when confronted with curriculum innovation. This research demonstrates that the experience teachers acquire during their career may often enable them to participate in the design of a new study plan. However, this experience does not always justify their role as curriculum-designers in either the eyes of their colleagues or in their own eyes, particularly when coerced into playing this or other roles. The results indicate that teachers, depending on their levels of moral responsibility and confidence, become involved in different roles during their teaching career. Key words: Change, confidence, curriculum, innovation, moral responsibility Existen diversos factores que tienen un fuerte impacto en el cambio educativo y que no se observan fácilmente. En este artículo examino algunos de los temas que emergieron de los datos recogidos mientras exploraba las opiniones y las actitudes de mis informantes hacia sus roles siempre cambiantes cuando se enfrentan a la innovación curricular. Esta investigación demuestra que los profesores, con la experiencia que adquieren durante su carrera, pueden permitirse a menudo participar en el diseño de un nuevo plan de estudios. Sin embargo, para sus colegas o para ellos mismos, esta experiencia no justifica siempre su papel como diseñadores de un plan de estudios particularmente cuando están obligados a jugar éste u otros roles. Los resultados indican que los profesores se involucran en diversos roles durante su carrera como profesores, dependiendo de sus niveles de responsabilidad moral y de confianza. Palabras clave: cambio, confianza, currículo, innovación, responsabilidad moral

  1. The extracellular phage-host interactions involved in the bacteriophage LL-H infection of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. lactis ATCC 15808

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia eMunsch-Alatossava

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus bacteriophage LL-H was determined in 1996. Accordingly, LL-H has been used as a model phage for the infection of dairy Lactobacillus, specifically for thermophilic Lb. delbrueckii ssp. lactis host strains, such as ATCC 15808. One of the major goals of phage LL-H research consisted of the characterization of the the first phage-host interactions at the level of phage adsorption and phage DNA injection steps to determine effective and practical methods to minimise the risks associated with the appearance and attack of phages in the manufacture of yoghurt, and Swiss or Italian type hard cheeses, which typically use thermophilic LAB starter cultures containing Lb. delbrueckii strains among others. This mini review article summarises the present data concerning (i the special features, particle structure and components of phage LL-H and (ii the structure and properties of lipoteichoic acids (LTAs, which are the phage LL-H receptor components of Lb. delbrueckii ssp. lactis host strains. Moreover, a model of the first, extracellular, phage-host interactions for the infection of Lb. delbrueckii ssp. lactis ATCC 15808 by phage LL-H is presented and further discussed.

  2. Coxsackievirus mutants that can bypass host factor PI4KIIIbeta and the need for high levels of PI4P lipids for replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaar, H.M. van der; Linden, L. van der; Lanke, K.H.W.; Strating, J.R.P.M.; Purstinger, G.; Vries, E. de; Haan, C.A. de; Neyts, J.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van

    2012-01-01

    RNA viruses can rapidly mutate and acquire resistance to drugs that directly target viral enzymes, which poses serious problems in a clinical context. Therefore, there is a growing interest in the development of antiviral drugs that target host factors critical for viral replication, since they are

  3. Factors involved in the identification of stuttering severity in a foreign language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosyns, Marjan; Einarsdóttir, Jóhanna T; Van Borsel, John

    2015-01-01

    Speech-language pathologists nowadays are more and more confronted with clients who speak a language different from their own mother tongue. The assessment of persons who speak a foreign language poses particular challenges. The present study investigated the possible role and interplay of factors involved in the identification of stuttering severity in a foreign language. Nineteen speech-language pathologists from five different countries (i.e. Iceland, Sweden, Norway, Finland, and Belgium) rated stuttering severity of speech samples featuring persons who stutter speaking Icelandic, Swedish, Norwegian, or Dutch. Additionally, they were asked to score how easy they found it to rate the samples. Accuracy of rating stuttering severity in another language appeared to be foremost determined by the client's stuttering severity, while experienced ease of rating stuttering severity was essentially related to closeness of the language of the clinician to that of the client and familiarity of the clinician with the client's language. Stuttering measurement training programmes in different languages are needed.

  4. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2: a novel gene involved in zebrafish central nervous system development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Lina; Zhou, Wenhao; Wang, Huijun; Zhang, Jin; Deng, Shanshan; Li, Weihua; Li, Huawei; Mao, Zuohua; Ma, Duan

    2013-09-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (Tfpi-2) is an important serine protease inhibitor in the extracellular matrix (ECM), but its precise physiological significance remains unknown. This work is part of a series of studies intended to investigate functional roles of Tfpi-2 and explore the underlying molecular mechanisms. First, we cloned and identified zebrafish Tfpi-2 (zTfpi-2) as an evolutionarily conserved protein essential for zebrafish development. We also demonstrated that ztfpi-2 is mainly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) of zebrafish, and embryonic depletion of ztfpi-2 caused severe CNS defects. In addition, changes of neural markers, including pax2a, egr2b, huC, ngn1, gfap and olig2, confirmed the presence of developmental abnormalities in the relevant regions of ztfpi-2 morphants. Using microarray analysis, we found that members of the Notch pathway, especially her4 and mib, which mediate lateral inhibition in CNS development, were also downregulated. Intriguingly, both her4 and mib were able to partially rescue the ztfpi-2 morphant phenotype. Furthermore, Morpholino knockdown of ztfpi-2 resulted in upregulation of neuronal markers while downregulation of glial markers, providing evidence that the Notch pathway is probably involved in ztfpi-2-mediated CNS development.

  5. Molecular flexibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis ribosome recycling factor and its functional consequences: An exploration involving mutants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Selvaraj; A Govindan; A Seshadri; B Dubey; U Varshney; M Vijayan

    2013-12-01

    Internal mobility of the two domain molecule of ribosome recycling factor (RRF) is known to be important for its action. Mycobacterium tuberculosis RRF does not complement E. coli for its deficiency of RRF (in the presence of E. coli EF-G alone). Crystal structure had revealed higher rigidity of the M. tuberculosis RRF due to the presence of additional salt bridges between domains. Two inter-domain salt bridges and one between the linker region and the domain containing C-terminal residues were disrupted by appropriate mutations. Except for a C-terminal deletion mutant, all mutants showed RRF activity in E. coli when M. tuberculosis EF-G was also co-expressed. The crystal structures of the point mutants, that of the C-terminal deletion mutant and that of the protein grown in the presence of a detergent, were determined. The increased mobility resulting from the disruption of the salt bridge involving the hinge region allows the appropriate mutant to weakly complement E. coli for its deficiency of RRF even in the absence of simultaneous expression of the mycobacterial EF-G. The loss of activity of the C-terminal deletion mutant appears to be partly due to the rigidification of the molecule consequent to changes in the hinge region.

  6. Consistent analysis of one-nucleon spectroscopic factors involving weakly- and strongly-bound nucleons

    CERN Document Server

    Okołowicz, J; Płoszajczak, M; Macchiavelli, A O; Smirnova, N A

    2015-01-01

    There is a considerable interest in understanding the dependence of one-nucleon removal cross sections on the asymmetry of the neutron $S_n$ and proton $S_p$ separation energies, following a large amount of experimental data and theoretical analyses in a framework of sudden and eikonal approximations of the reaction dynamics. These theoretical calculations involve both the single-particle cross section and the shell-model description of the projectile initial state and final states of the reaction residues. The configuration mixing in shell-model description of nuclear states depends on the proximity of one-nucleon decay threshold but does it depend sensitively on $S_n - S_p$? To answer this question, we use the shell model embedded in the continuum to investigate the dependence of one-nucleon spectroscopic factors on the asymmetry of $S_n$ and $S_p$ for mirror nuclei $^{24}$Si, $^{24}$Ne and $^{28}$S, $^{28}$Mg and for a series of neon isotopes ($20 \\leq A \\leq 28$).

  7. Religious factors associated with alcohol involvement: results from the Mauritian Joint Child Health Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczak, Susan E; Prescott, Carol A; Dalais, Cyril; Raine, Adrian; Venables, Peter H; Mednick, Sarnoff A

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine religious factors associated with alcohol involvement in Mauritius. The three main religions on the island, Hinduism, Catholicism, and Islam, promote different views of the appropriate use of alcohol. Based on reference group theory, we hypothesized that both the content of a religion's alcohol norms and an individual's religious commitment would relate to alcohol use behavior. Participants were from the Joint Child Health Project, a longitudinal study that has followed a birth cohort of 1.795 individuals since 1972 when they were 3 years old. All available participants (67%; 55% male) were assessed in mid-adulthood on religious variables, lifetime drinking, and lifetime alcohol use disorders. Across religions, individuals who viewed their religion as promoting abstinence were less likely to be drinkers. Religious commitment was associated with reduced probability of drinking only in those who viewed their religion as promoting abstinence. Among drinkers, abstention norms and religious commitment were not associated with lower likelihood of alcohol use disorders. In Catholics who viewed their religion as promoting abstinence and still were drinkers, high religious commitment was associated with increased risk for alcohol use disorders. Predictions based on reference group theory were largely supported, with religious norms and commitment differentially related to alcohol use and problems both across religions and among individuals within religions. Findings highlight the importance of examining multiple aspects of religion to better understand the relationship of religion with alcohol behaviors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Involvement of nuclear factor {kappa}B in platelet CD40 signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachem, Ahmed [Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Montreal Heart Institute, 5000 Belanger, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 1C8 (Canada); Yacoub, Daniel [Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Montreal Heart Institute, 5000 Belanger, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 1C8 (Canada); Centre Hospitalier Universite de Montreal, 264 boul. Rene-Levesque est, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2X 1P1 (Canada); Zaid, Younes [Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Montreal Heart Institute, 5000 Belanger, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 1C8 (Canada); Mourad, Walid [Universite de Montreal, Department of Medicine, 2900 boul. Edouard-Montpetit, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada); Centre Hospitalier Universite de Montreal, 264 boul. Rene-Levesque est, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2X 1P1 (Canada); Merhi, Yahye, E-mail: yahye.merhi@icm-mhi.org [Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Montreal Heart Institute, 5000 Belanger, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 1C8 (Canada); Universite de Montreal, Department of Medicine, 2900 boul. Edouard-Montpetit, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada)

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer sCD40L induces TRAF2 association to CD40 and NF-{kappa}B activation in platelets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation downstream of CD40L/CD40 signaling is independent of p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I{kappa}B{alpha} is required for sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of aggregation. -- Abstract: CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a thrombo-inflammatory molecule that predicts cardiovascular events. Platelets constitute the major source of soluble CD40L (sCD40L), which has been shown to potentiate platelet activation and aggregation, in a CD40-dependent manner, via p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Rac1 signaling. In many cells, the CD40L/CD40 dyad also induces activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). Given that platelets contain NF-{kappa}B, we hypothesized that it may be involved in platelet CD40 signaling and function. In human platelets, sCD40L induces association of CD40 with its adaptor protein the tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 2 and triggers phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, which are abolished by CD40L blockade. Inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation without affecting p38 MAPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation has no effect on I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation, indicating a divergence in the signaling pathway originating from CD40 upon its ligation. In functional studies, inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of platelet aggregation in response to a sub-threshold concentration of collagen. This study demonstrates that the sCD40L/CD40 axis triggers NF-{kappa}B activation in platelets. This signaling pathway plays a critical role in platelet activation and aggregation upon sCD40L stimulation and may represent an important target against thrombo

  9. Anti-tumor necrosis factor-a for the treatment of steroid-refractory acute graft-versus-host disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Nogueira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic stem cell transplantation has been increasingly performed for a variety of hematologic diseases. Clinically significant acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD occurs in 9 to 50% of patients who receive allogeneic grafts, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. There is no standard therapy for patients with acute GVHD who do not respond to steroids. Studies have shown a possible benefit of anti-TNF-a (infliximabfor the treatment of acute GVHD. We report here on the outcomes of 10 recipients of related or unrelated stem cell transplants who received 10 mg/kg infliximab, iv, once weekly for a median of 3.5 doses (range: 1-6 for the treatment of severe acute GVHD and who were not responsive to standard therapy. All patients had acute GVHD grades II to IV (II = 2, III = 3, IV = 5. Overall, 9 patients responded and 1 patient had progressive disease. Among the responders, 3 had complete responses and 6 partial responses. All patients with cutaneous or gastrointestinal involvement responded, while only 2 of 6 patients with liver disease showed any response. None of the 10 patients had any kind of immediate toxicity. Four patients died, all of them with sepsis. Six patients are still alive after a median follow-up time of 544 days (92-600 after transplantation. Considering the severity of the cases and the bad prognosis associated with advanced acute GVHD, we find our results encouraging. Anti-TNF-a seems to be a useful agent for the treatment of acute GVHD.

  10. Integration host factor assembly at the cohesive end site of the bacteriophage lambda genome: implications for viral DNA packaging and bacterial gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Saurarshi J; Yang, Teng-Chieh; Catalano, Carlos Enrique

    2014-12-09

    Integration host factor (IHF) is an Escherichia coli protein involved in (i) condensation of the bacterial nucleoid and (ii) regulation of a variety of cellular functions. In its regulatory role, IHF binds to a specific sequence to introduce a strong bend into the DNA; this provides a duplex architecture conducive to the assembly of site-specific nucleoprotein complexes. Alternatively, the protein can bind in a sequence-independent manner that weakly bends and wraps the duplex to promote nucleoid formation. IHF is also required for the development of several viruses, including bacteriophage lambda, where it promotes site-specific assembly of a genome packaging motor required for lytic development. Multiple IHF consensus sequences have been identified within the packaging initiation site (cos), and we here interrogate IHF-cos binding interactions using complementary electrophoretic mobility shift (EMS) and analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) approaches. IHF recognizes a single consensus sequence within cos (I1) to afford a strongly bent nucleoprotein complex. In contrast, IHF binds weakly but with positive cooperativity to nonspecific DNA to afford an ensemble of complexes with increasing masses and levels of condensation. Global analysis of the EMS and AUC data provides constrained thermodynamic binding constants and nearest neighbor cooperativity factors for binding of IHF to I1 and to nonspecific DNA substrates. At elevated IHF concentrations, the nucleoprotein complexes undergo a transition from a condensed to an extended rodlike conformation; specific binding of IHF to I1 imparts a significant energy barrier to the transition. The results provide insight into how IHF can assemble specific regulatory complexes in the background of extensive nonspecific DNA condensation.

  11. Survey of Parents in a Predominately Latino Elementary School to Determine Factors that Affect Parental Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenstab, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    Present research has shown that parental involvement has a large effect on student achievement. The current study utilized both casual-comparative and correlation methodology and identified variables that influence parental involvement. A review of literature with respect to parental involvement was presented. The study utilized survey data from…

  12. The Influence of Psychosocial Factors on Bullying Involvement of Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Chad A.; Forber-Pratt, Anjali J.; Espelage, Dorothy L.; Aragon, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of students with disabilities within the bullying dynamic has been recognized as a pressing issue within the nation's schools. Unfortunately, few studies have examined the psychosocial outcomes related to the bullying involvement of students with disabilities. However, involvement in bullying has been linked to negative short-…

  13. Regulatory Mechanisms Involved in the Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Growth Factor Nerve growth factor (NGF), the prototypical neurotrophin, originally isolated by Levi -Montalcini and colleagues ( Levi -Montalcini, 1987; see...inclusion of NGF antibodies ( Levi -Montalcini, 1987). In addition, these neurons exhibit enhanced differentiation, as evidenced by extensive neurite...the nerve growth factor family reveal a novel member abundantly expressed in Xenopus ovary. Neuron 6: 845-858, 1991. Hefti, F. Nerve growth factor

  14. Parasite host range and the evolution of host resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, F.A.; Hall, A.R.; A., Buckling; P.D., Scanlan

    2015-01-01

    Parasite host range plays a pivotal role in the evolution and ecology of hosts
    and the emergence of infectious disease. Although the factors that promote
    host range and the epidemiological consequences of variation in host range
    are relatively well characterized, the effect of parasite

  15. Host-bacterial interplay in periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudrakshi Chickanna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A literature search was performed using MEDLINE (PubMed and other electronic basis from 1991 to 2014. Search included books and journals based on the systematic and critical reviews, in vitro and in vivo clinical studies on molecular basis of host microbial interactions. Clearly, an understanding of the host susceptibility factor in addition to microbial factors by elucidating the molecular basis offers opportunity for therapeutic manipulation of advancing periodontal destruction. One of the hallmarks of pathogenesis is the ability of pathogenic organisms to invade surrounding tissues and to evade the host defence. This paper focuses the general overview of molecular mechanisms involved in the microbiota and host response to bacterial inimical behavior in periodontics.

  16. Myxoma virus M064 is a novel member of the poxvirus C7L superfamily of host range factors that controls the kinetics of myxomatosis in European rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Wennier, Sonia; Moussatche, Nissin; Reinhard, Mary; Condit, Richard; McFadden, Grant

    2012-05-01

    The myxoma virus (MYXV) carries three tandem C7L-like host range genes (M062R, M063R, and M064R). However, despite the fact that the sequences of these three genes are similar, they possess very distinctive functions in vivo. The role of M064 in MYXV pathogenesis was investigated and compared to the roles of M062 and M063. We report that M064 is a virulence factor that contributes to MYXV pathogenesis but lacks the host range properties associated with M062 and M063.

  17. Poxvirus host range protein CP77 contains an F-box-like domain that is necessary to suppress NF-kappaB activation by tumor necrosis factor alpha but is independent of its host range function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Jung; Hsiao, Jye-Chian; Sonnberg, Stephanie; Chiang, Cheng-Ting; Yang, Min-Hsiang; Tzou, Der-Lii; Mercer, Andrew A; Chang, Wen

    2009-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) activates the nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) signaling pathway that regulates expression of many cellular factors playing important roles in innate immune responses and inflammation in infected hosts. Poxviruses employ many strategies to inhibit NF-kappaB activation in cells. In this report, we describe a poxvirus host range protein, CP77, which blocked NF-kappaB activation by TNF-alpha. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB subunit p65 protein in TNF-alpha-treated HeLa cells was blocked by CP77. CP77 did so without blocking IkappaBalpha phosphorylation, suggesting that upstream kinase activation was not affected by CP77. Using GST pull-down, we showed that CP77 bound to the NF-kappaB subunit p65 through the N-terminal six-ankyrin-repeat region in vitro. CP77 also bound to Cullin-1 and Skp1 of the SCF complex through a C-terminal 13-amino-acid F-box-like sequence. Both regions of CP77 are required to block NF-kappaB activation. We thus propose a model in which poxvirus CP77 suppresses NF-kappaB activation by two interactions: the C-terminal F-box of CP77 binding to the SCF complex and the N-terminal six ankyrins binding to the NF-kappaB subunit p65. In this way, CP77 attenuates innate immune response signaling in cells. Finally, we expressed CP77 or a CP77 F-box deletion protein from a vaccinia virus host range mutant (VV-hr-GFP) and showed that either protein was able to rescue the host range defect, illustrating that the F-box region, which is important for NF-kappaB modulation and binding to SCF complex, is not required for CP77's host range function. Consistently, knocking down the protein level of NF-kappaB did not relieve the growth restriction of VV-hr-GFP in HeLa cells.

  18. The ubiquitin ligase TRIM27 functions as a host restriction factor antagonized by Mycobacterium tuberculosis PtpA during mycobacterial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Teng, Jade L. L.; Zhao, Dongdong; Ge, Pupu; Li, Bingxi; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Liu, Cui Hua

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage-mediated innate immune responses play crucial roles in host defense against pathogens. Recent years have seen an explosion of host proteins that act as restriction factors blocking viral replication in infected cells. However, the essential factors restricting Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and their regulatory roles during mycobacterial infection remain largely unknown. We previously reported that Mtb tyrosine phosphatase PtpA, a secreted effector protein required for intracellular survival of Mtb, inhibits innate immunity by co-opting the host ubiquitin system. Here, we identified a new PtpA-interacting host protein TRIM27, which is reported to possess a conserved RING domain and usually acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase that interferes with various cellular processes. We further demonstrated that TRIM27 restricts survival of mycobacteria in macrophages by promoting innate immune responses and cell apoptosis. Interestingly, Mtb PtpA could antagonize TRIM27-promoted JNK/p38 MAPK pathway activation and cell apoptosis through competitively binding to the RING domain of TRIM27. TRIM27 probably works as a potential restriction factor for Mtb and its function is counteracted by Mtb effector proteins such as PtpA. Our study suggests a potential tuberculosis treatment via targeting of the TRIM27-PtpA interfaces. PMID:27698396

  19. Enterovirus-induced miR-141 contributes to shutoff of host protein translation by targeting the translation initiation factor eIF4E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Bing-Ching; Yu, Sung-Liang; Chen, Jeremy J W; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Yan, Bo-Shiun; Hong, Qi-Sheng; Singh, Sher; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Su, Kang-Yi; Li, Ker-Chau; Cheng, Chiou-Ling; Cheng, Hao-Wei; Lee, Jen-Yi; Lee, Chun-Nan; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2011-01-20

    Viruses rely on the host translation machinery to complete their life cycles. Picornaviruses use an internal ribosome entry site to initiate cap-independent protein translation and in parallel host cap-dependent translation is shut off. This process is thought to occur primarily via cleavage of host translation initiation factors eIF4GI and eIF4GII by viral proteases. Here we describe another mechanism whereby miR-141 induced upon enterovirus infection targets the cap-dependent translation initiation factor, eIF4E, for shutoff of host protein synthesis. Knockdown of miR-141 reduces viral propagation, and silencing of eIF4E can completely reverse the inhibitory effect of the miR-141 antagomiR on viral propagation. Ectopic expression of miR-141 promotes the switch from cap-dependent to cap-independent translation. Moreover, we identified a transcription factor, EGR1, which is partly responsible for miR-141 induction in response to enterovirus infection. Our results suggest that upregulation of miR-141 upon enterovirus infection can facilitate viral propagation by expediting the translational switch.

  20. Staphylococcal Ecb protein and host complement regulator factor H enhance functions of each other in bacterial immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amdahl, Hanne; Jongerius, Ilse; Meri, Taru; Pasanen, Tanja; Hyvärinen, Satu; Haapasalo, Karita; van Strijp, Jos A; Rooijakkers, Suzan H; Jokiranta, T Sakari

    2013-08-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen causing more than a tenth of all septicemia cases and often superficial and deep infections in various tissues. One of the immune evasion strategies of S. aureus is to secrete proteins that bind to the central complement opsonin C3b. One of these, extracellular complement binding protein (Ecb), is known to interfere directly with functions of C3b. Because C3b is also the target of the physiological plasma complement regulator, factor H (FH), we studied the effect of Ecb on the complement regulatory functions of FH. We show that Ecb enhances acquisition of FH from serum onto staphylococcal surfaces. Ecb and FH enhance mutual binding to C3b and also the function of each other in downregulating complement activation. Both Ecb and the C-terminal domains 19-20 of FH bind to the C3d part of C3b. We show that the mutual enhancing effect of Ecb and FH on binding to C3b depends on binding of the FH domain 19 to the C3d part of C3b next to the binding site of Ecb on C3d. Our results show that Ecb, FH, and C3b form a tripartite complex. Upon exposure of serum-sensitive Haemophilus influenzae to human serum, Ecb protected the bacteria, and this effect was enhanced by the addition of the C-terminal domains 19-20 of FH. This finding indicates that the tripartite complex formation could give additional protection to bacteria and that S. aureus is thereby able to use host FH and bacterial Ecb in a concerted action to eliminate C3b at the site of infection.

  1. Abiotic and biotic factors associated with tick population dynamics on a mammalian host: Ixodes hexagonus infesting otters, Lutra lutra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellie Sherrard-Smith

    Full Text Available The Eurasian otter, Lutra lutra, hosts several parasites with zoonotic potential. As this semiaquatic mammal has large ranges across terrestrial, freshwater and marine habitats, it has the capacity for wide dispersion of pathogens. Despite this, parasites of otters have received relatively little attention. Here, we examine their ectoparasite load and assess whether this is influenced by abiotic or biotic variables. Climatic phenomena such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO affect weather conditions in northern Europe. Consequently parasite distributions, particularly species with life stages exposed to the external environment, can be affected. We assessed the extent to which inter-annual variations in large-scale weather patterns (specifically the NAO and Central England (CE temperatures and host characteristics influenced tick prevalence and intensity. Ectoparasites consisted of a single species, the nidiculous tick Ixodes hexagonus (prevalence = 24.3%; mean intensity = 7.2; range = 1-122; on n = 820 otter hosts. The prevalence, but not intensity of infestation, was associated with high CE temperatures, while both prevalence and intensity were associated with positive phases of the NAO. Such associations indicate that I. hexagonus are most abundant when weather conditions are warmer and wetter. Ticks were more prevalent on juvenile than sub-adult or adult otters, which probably reflects the length of time the hosts spend in the holt where these ticks quest. High tick number was associated with poor host condition, so either poor condition hosts are more susceptible to ticks, or tick infestations negatively impact on host condition. Otters are clearly an important and common host for I. hexagonus, which has implications for vector-borne diseases. This work is the first to consider the impacts of long-term weather patterns on I. hexagonus and uses wild-animal cadavers to illustrate the importance of abiotic and biotic pressures impacting

  2. Multiple immune factors are involved in controlling acute and chronic chikungunya virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Suan Poo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent epidemic of the arthritogenic alphavirus, chikungunya virus (CHIKV has prompted a quest to understand the correlates of protection against virus and disease in order to inform development of new interventions. Herein we highlight the propensity of CHIKV infections to persist long term, both as persistent, steady-state, viraemias in multiple B cell deficient mouse strains, and as persistent RNA (including negative-strand RNA in wild-type mice. The knockout mouse studies provided evidence for a role for T cells (but not NK cells in viraemia suppression, and confirmed the role of T cells in arthritis promotion, with vaccine-induced T cells also shown to be arthritogenic in the absence of antibody responses. However, MHC class II-restricted T cells were not required for production of anti-viral IgG2c responses post CHIKV infection. The anti-viral cytokines, TNF and IFNγ, were persistently elevated in persistently infected B and T cell deficient mice, with adoptive transfer of anti-CHIKV antibodies unable to clear permanently the viraemia from these, or B cell deficient, mice. The NOD background increased viraemia and promoted arthritis, with B, T and NK deficient NOD mice showing high-levels of persistent viraemia and ultimately succumbing to encephalitic disease. In wild-type mice persistent CHIKV RNA and negative strand RNA (detected for up to 100 days post infection was associated with persistence of cellular infiltrates, CHIKV antigen and stimulation of IFNα/β and T cell responses. These studies highlight that, secondary to antibodies, several factors are involved in virus control, and suggest that chronic arthritic disease is a consequence of persistent, replicating and transcriptionally active CHIKV RNA.

  3. Cellular intrinsic factors involved in the resistance of squamous cell carcinoma to photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilaberte, Yolanda; Milla, Laura; Salazar, Nerea; Vera-Alvarez, Jesús; Kourani, Omar; Damian, Alejandra; Rivarola, Viviana; Roca, Maria José; Espada, Jesús; González, Salvador; Juarranz, Angeles

    2014-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is widely used to treat non-melanoma skin cancer. However, some patients affected with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) do not respond adequately to PDT with methyl-δ-aminolevulinic acid (MAL-PDT) and the tumors acquire an infiltrative phenotype and became histologically more aggressive, less differentiated, and more fibroblastic. To search for potential factors implicated in SCC resistance to PDT, we have used the SCC-13 cell line (parental) and resistant SCC-13 cells obtained by repeated MAL-PDT treatments (5th and 10th PDT-resistant generations). Xenografts assays in immunodeficient mice showed that the tumors generated by resistant cells were bigger than those induced by parental cells. Comparative genomic hybridization array (aCGH) showed that the three cell types presented amplicons in 3p12.1 CADM2, 7p11.2 EFGR, and 11q13.3 CCND1 genes. The 5th and 10th PDT-resistant cells showed an amplicon in 5q11.2 MAP3K1, which was not present in parental cells. The changes detected by aCGH on CCND1, EFGR, and MAP3K1 were confirmed in extracts of SCC-13 cells by reverse-transcriptase PCR and by western blot, and by immunohistochemistry in human biopsies from persistent tumors after MAL-PDT. Our data suggest that genomic imbalances related to CCND1, EFGR, and particularly MAP3K1 seem to be involved in the development of the resistance of SCC to PDT.

  4. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder medication use: factors involved in prescribing, safety aspects and outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Raga, Jose; Ferreros, Amparo; Knecht, Carlos; de Alvaro, Raquel; Carabal, Eloisa

    2016-01-01

    While treatment of patients with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is based on a multimodal approach that combines medication with specific psychological interventions, pharmacotherapy alone is generally considered an essential and cost-effective element. This paper aims to comprehensively and critically review factors involved in prescribing and medication use in individuals diagnosed with ADHD, focusing on the difficulties facing patients with ADHD seeking treatment, as well as the safety and tolerability aspects of ADHD pharmacotherapies, with particular attention on the cardiovascular adverse events and the potential risk of misuse or diversion of ADHD medications. A comprehensive and systematic literature search of PubMed/MEDLINE database was conducted to identify studies published in peer-reviewed journals until 1 August 2016. Children, adolescents and adults often encounter significant difficulties in the process of accessing specialist assessment and treatment for ADHD as a consequence of disparities in service organization and available treatment provision. Despite the well-established efficacy and overall safety profile, ADHD medications are not exempt from adverse events. The cardiovascular safety of pharmacotherapies used for treating individuals with ADHD has raised particular concerns; however there is little evidence of serious cardiovascular adverse events, including no serious corrected QT (QTc) abnormalities associated with stimulants, atomoxetine or α2-adrenergic receptor agonists. Although the abuse of prescription stimulant drugs, particularly, short-acting stimulants is a prevalent and growing problem, nonmedical use of prescription stimulants within the clinical context is very limited. In addition, nonstimulant ADHD medications lack any reinforcing effects and consequently any abuse potential.

  5. Infection by Toxoplasma gondii Specifically Induces Host c-Myc and the Genes This Pivotal Transcription Factor Regulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Magdalena; Shastri, Anjali J.

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection has previously been described to cause dramatic changes in the host transcriptome by manipulating key regulators, including STATs, NF-κB, and microRNAs. Here, we report that Toxoplasma tachyzoites also mediate rapid and sustained induction of another pivotal regulator of host cell transcription, c-Myc. This induction is seen in cells infected with all three canonical types of Toxoplasma but not the closely related apicomplexan parasite Neospora caninum. Coinfection of cells with both Toxoplasma and Neospora still results in an increase in the level of host c-Myc, showing that c-Myc is actively upregulated by Toxoplasma infection (rather than repressed by Neospora). We further demonstrate that this upregulation may be mediated through c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and is unlikely to be a nonspecific host response, as heat-killed Toxoplasma parasites do not induce this increase and neither do nonviable parasites inside the host cell. Finally, we show that the induced c-Myc is active and that transcripts dependent on its function are upregulated, as predicted. Hence, c-Myc represents an additional way in which Toxoplasma tachyzoites have evolved to specifically alter host cell functions during intracellular growth. PMID:24532536

  6. An siRNA Screen Identifies the U2 snRNP Spliceosome as a Host Restriction Factor for Recombinant Adeno-associated Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Claire A; Sakuma, Toshie; Izumiya, Yoshihiro; Holditch, Sara J; Hickey, Raymond D; Bressin, Robert K; Basu, Upamanyu; Koide, Kazunori; Asokan, Aravind; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2015-08-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) have evolved to exploit the dynamic reorganization of host cell machinery during co-infection by adenoviruses and other helper viruses. In the absence of helper viruses, host factors such as the proteasome and DNA damage response machinery have been shown to effectively inhibit AAV transduction by restricting processes ranging from nuclear entry to second-strand DNA synthesis. To identify host factors that might affect other key steps in AAV infection, we screened an siRNA library that revealed several candidate genes including the PHD finger-like domain protein 5A (PHF5A), a U2 snRNP-associated protein. Disruption of PHF5A expression selectively enhanced transgene expression from AAV by increasing transcript levels and appears to influence a step after second-strand synthesis in a serotype and cell type-independent manner. Genetic disruption of U2 snRNP and associated proteins, such as SF3B1 and U2AF1, also increased expression from AAV vector, suggesting the critical role of U2 snRNP spliceosome complex in this host-mediated restriction. Notably, adenoviral co-infection and U2 snRNP inhibition appeared to target a common pathway in increasing expression from AAV vectors. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of U2 snRNP by meayamycin B, a potent SF3B1 inhibitor, substantially enhanced AAV vector transduction of clinically relevant cell types. Further analysis suggested that U2 snRNP proteins suppress AAV vector transgene expression through direct recognition of intact AAV capsids. In summary, we identify U2 snRNP and associated splicing factors, which are known to be affected during adenoviral infection, as novel host restriction factors that effectively limit AAV transgene expression. Concurrently, we postulate that pharmacological/genetic manipulation of components of the spliceosomal machinery might enable more effective gene transfer modalities with recombinant AAV vectors.

  7. An siRNA Screen Identifies the U2 snRNP Spliceosome as a Host Restriction Factor for Recombinant Adeno-associated Viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire A Schreiber

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Adeno-associated viruses (AAV have evolved to exploit the dynamic reorganization of host cell machinery during co-infection by adenoviruses and other helper viruses. In the absence of helper viruses, host factors such as the proteasome and DNA damage response machinery have been shown to effectively inhibit AAV transduction by restricting processes ranging from nuclear entry to second-strand DNA synthesis. To identify host factors that might affect other key steps in AAV infection, we screened an siRNA library that revealed several candidate genes including the PHD finger-like domain protein 5A (PHF5A, a U2 snRNP-associated protein. Disruption of PHF5A expression selectively enhanced transgene expression from AAV by increasing transcript levels and appears to influence a step after second-strand synthesis in a serotype and cell type-independent manner. Genetic disruption of U2 snRNP and associated proteins, such as SF3B1 and U2AF1, also increased expression from AAV vector, suggesting the critical role of U2 snRNP spliceosome complex in this host-mediated restriction. Notably, adenoviral co-infection and U2 snRNP inhibition appeared to target a common pathway in increasing expression from AAV vectors. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of U2 snRNP by meayamycin B, a potent SF3B1 inhibitor, substantially enhanced AAV vector transduction of clinically relevant cell types. Further analysis suggested that U2 snRNP proteins suppress AAV vector transgene expression through direct recognition of intact AAV capsids. In summary, we identify U2 snRNP and associated splicing factors, which are known to be affected during adenoviral infection, as novel host restriction factors that effectively limit AAV transgene expression. Concurrently, we postulate that pharmacological/genetic manipulation of components of the spliceosomal machinery might enable more effective gene transfer modalities with recombinant AAV vectors.

  8. A novel approach - the propensity to propagate (PTP method for controlling for host factors in studying the transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Nebenzahl-Guimaraes

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Understanding the genetic variations among Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB strains with differential ability to transmit would be a major step forward in preventing transmission. OBJECTIVES: To describe a method to extend conventional proxy measures of transmissibility by adjusting for patient-related factors, thus strengthening the causal association found with bacterial factors. METHODS: Clinical, demographic and molecular fingerprinting data were obtained during routine surveillance of verified MTB cases reported in the Netherlands between 1993 and 2011, and the phylogenetic lineages of the isolates were inferred. Odds ratios for host risk factors for clustering were used to obtain a measure of each patient's and cluster's propensity to propagate (CPP. Mean and median cluster sizes across different categories of CPP were compared amongst four different phylogenetic lineages. RESULTS: Both mean and median cluster size grew with increasing CPP category. On average, CPP values from Euro-American lineage strains were higher than Beijing and EAI strains. There were no significant differences between the mean and median cluster sizes among the four phylogenetic lineages within each CPP category. CONCLUSIONS: Our finding that the distribution of CPP scores was unequal across four different phylogenetic lineages supports the notion that host-related factors should be controlled for to attain comparability in measuring the different phylogenetic lineages' ability to propagate. Although Euro-American strains were more likely to be in clusters in an unadjusted analysis, no significant differences among the four lineages persisted after we controlled for host factors.

  9. Host modulation by therapeutic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugumari Elavarasu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease susceptible group present advanced periodontal breakdown even though they achieve a high standard of oral hygiene. Various destructive enzymes and inflammatory mediators are involved in destruction. These are elevated in case of periodontal destruction. Host modulation aims at bringing these enzymes and mediators to normal level. Doxycycline, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, bisphosphonates, nitrous oxide (NO synthase inhibitors, recombinant human interleukin-11 (rhIL-11, omega-3 fatty acid, mouse anti-human interleukin-6 receptor antibody (MRA, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK inhibitors, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kb inhibitors, osteoprotegerin, and tumor necrosis factor antagonist (TNF-α are some of the therapeutic agents that have host modulation properties.

  10. Parental Involvement as a Protective Factor during the Transition to High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Bing; Gregory, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated whether student-perceived parental involvement predicts improvement in academic, behavioral, and relational outcomes for low-achieving adolescents. With a sample of 59 racially diverse 9th-grade students, the authors measured 3 dimensions of parental involvement: direct participation, academic encouragement, and…

  11. Viewing Generativity and Social Capital as Underlying Factors of Parent Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Sharon; Patel, Nimisha

    2015-01-01

    Parent involvement in education is a multifaceted support that has many well-documented benefits for students of all ages. Parent involvement is also a common expression of generativity as defined in Erik Erikson's theory of psychosocial development. The activities parents engage in during their children's educational pursuits, as well as their…

  12. Understanding Teachers' Perspectives of Factors That Influence Parental Involvement Practices in Special Education in Barbados

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Stacey; Mahon, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Parental involvement has been defined in various ways by researchers and is reported to have many advantages for children's education. The research utilises a case study strategy to investigate teachers' perspectives of parental involvement at four case sites in Barbados. In-depth interviews were done with teachers and analysis utilised content…

  13. Practicing Professional Values: Factors Influencing Involvement in Social Work Student Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Dorothy; Olate, René; Anderson, Keith A.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most promising avenues for the development of professional values is involvement in professional student organizations. A convenience sample of baccalaureate social work students (n = 482) was drawn from 15 institutions. Regression analyses revealed several predictors of involvement in social work student organizations, including…

  14. Organ heterogeneity of host-derived matrix metalloproteinase expression and its involvement in multiple-organ metastasis by lung cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraga, Minoru; Yano, Seiji; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Goto, Hisatsugu; Miki, Toyokazu; Miki, Keisuke; Zhang, Helong; Sone, Saburo

    2002-10-15

    Cancer metastasis is tightly regulated by the interaction of tumor cells and host organ microenvironments. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), produced by both tumor cells and host stromal cells, play a central role in tumor invasion and angiogenesis. We determined whether metastatic potential of lung cancer to multiple organs is dependent solely on the expression of MMPs by tumor cells, using two metastasis models of human lung cancer cell lines expressing various levels of MMPs and a MMP inhibitor (ONO-4817). In the lung metastasis model, tumor cells (PC14, PC14PE6, H226, A549) inoculated i.v. into nude or SCID mice metastasized only in the lung. In the multiple-organ metastasis model, tumor cells (RERF-LC-AI, SBC-3/DOX, H69/VP, which express low levels of MMPs) inoculated i.v. into natural killer cell-depleted SCID mice metastasized into the liver, kidneys, and systemic lymph nodes. Film in situ zymography analysis revealed that the nontumor parenchyma of the lung had no gelatinolytic activity, whereas gelatinolytic activity of the liver and kidney was high and low, respectively. In the lung metastasis model, gelatinolytic activity of lung nodules directly correlated with the in vitro expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 by tumor cells. Inhibition of MMP activity by ONO-4817 suppressed lung metastasis by the cell lines that expressed MMPs, but not those that did not express MMP, via the inhibition of MMP activity of lung tumors. In the multiple-organ metastasis model, liver parenchyma, but not liver nodules, showed gelatinolytic activity. The MMP inhibition reduced metastasis to the liver, but not to the kidney or lymph nodes, via inhibition of MMP activity of liver parenchyma. These findings suggest that MMP expression varies among the host organ microenvironments and that stromal MMPs may promote metastasis of lung cancer. Therefore, antimetastatic effects based on MMP inhibition may be dependent on MMPs derived not only from tumor cells but also from organ

  15. Factors predicting survival in patients with proximal gastric carcinoma involving the esophagus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Fen Zhang; Jiong Shi; Hui-Ping Yu; An-Ning Feng; Xiang-Shan Fan; Gregory Y Lauwers; Hiroshi Mashimo

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the clinicopathologic features which predict surgical overall survival in patients with proximal gastric carcinoma involving the esophagus (PGCE).METHODS:Electronic pathology database established in the Department of Pathology of the Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital was searched for consecutive resection cases of proximal gastric carcinoma over the period from May 2004 through July 2009.Each retrieved pathology report was reviewed and the cases with tumors crossing the gastroesophageal junction line were selected as PGCE.Each tumor was re-staged,following the guidelines on esophageal adenocarcinoma,according to the 7th edition of the American Joint Commission on Cancer Staging Manual.All histology slides were studied along with the pathology report for a retrospective analysis of 13 clinicopathologic features,i.e.,age,gender,Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection,surgical modality,Siewert type,tumor Bormann's type,size,differentiation,histology type,surgical margin,lymphovascular and perineural invasion,and pathologic stage in relation to survival after surgical resection.Prognostic factors for overall survival were assessed with uniand multi-variate analyses.RESULTS:Patients' mean age was 65 years (range:47-90 years).The male:female ratio was 3.3.The 1-,3-and 5-year overall survival rates were 87%,61% and 32%,respectively.By univariate analysis,age,male gender,H,pylori,tumor Bormann's type,size,histology type,surgical modality,positive surgical margin,lymphovascular invasion,and pT stage were not predictivefor overall survival; in contrast,perineural invasion (P =0.003),poor differentiation (P =0.0003),> 15 total lymph nodes retrieved (P =0.008),positive lymphnodes (P =0.001),and distant metastasis (P =0.005)predicted poor post-operative overall survival.Celiac axis nodal metastasis was associated with significantly worse overall survival (P =0.007).By multivariate analysis,≥ 16 positive nodes (P =0.018),lymph node ratio > 0.2 (P =0

  16. A horizontally transferred cyanase gene in the spider mite Tetranychus urticae is involved in cyanate metabolism and is differentially expressed upon host plant change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wybouw, N; Balabanidou, V; Ballhorn, D J; Dermauw, W; Grbić, M; Vontas, J; Van Leeuwen, T

    2012-12-01

    The genome of the phytophagous two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae was recently sequenced, representing the first complete chelicerate genome, but also the first genome of a highly polyphagous agricultural pest. Genome analysis revealed the presence of an unexpected high number of cases of putative horizontal gene transfers, including a gene that encodes a cyanase or cyanate lyase. In this study we show by recombinant expression that the T. urticae cyanase remained functionally active after horizontal gene transfer and has a high affinity for cyanate. Cyanases were also detected in other plant parasitic spider mites species such as Tetranychus evansi and Panonychus citri, suggesting that an ancient gene transfer occurred before the diversification within the Tetranychidae family. To investigate the potential role of cyanase in the evolution of plant parasitic spider mites, we studied cyanase expression patterns in T. urticae in relation to host plant range and cyanogenesis, a common plant defense mechanism. Spider mites can alter cyanase expression levels after transfer to several new host plants, including the cyanogenic Phaseolus lunatus. However, the role of cyanase is probably not restricted to cyanide response, but likely to the plant nutritional quality as a whole. We finally discuss potential interactions between cyanase activity and pyrimidine and amino acid synthesis.

  17. Effect of calf starter feeding on gut microbial diversity and expression of genes involved in host immune responses and tight junctions in dairy calves during weaning transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmuthuge, Nilusha; Li, Meiju; Goonewardene, Laksiri A; Oba, Masahito; Guan, L Luo

    2013-05-01

    Calf starters are usually offered to dairy calves to facilitate the weaning process, however, the effect of solid feed consumption on gut health has not been well studied. This study aimed to investigate the effect of calf starter feeding on the gut bacterial community and mucosal immune functions in dairy calves during weaning transition. Mucosal tissue and digesta samples were collected from rumen, jejunum, ileum, cecum, and colon upon slaughtering of calves (n=8) after feeding the experimental diets [milk replacer (MR) or milk replacer + calf starter (MR+S)] for 6 wk. Expression of toll-like receptor (TLR) 10 was downregulated along the gut, whereas TLR2 in colon and TLR6 along the gut were upregulated in MR+S-fed calves compared with MR-fed calves. Ileal TLR9 and TLR10 showed higher expression compared with the other regions regardless of the diet. Peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 demonstrated a diet- and gut-regional dependent expression pattern, whereas β-defensin did not. The diet and gut region also affected the expression of tight junction-regulating genes claudin 4 and occludin. Bacterial diversity tended to be different between the 2 diets, whereas the bacterial density was different among gut regions and sample type. The present study revealed that changes in bacterial diversity, expression of genes encoding host mucosal immune responses, and barrier functions were associated with the MR+S diet, and suggests that solid feed consumption may alter gut microbiome and host mucosal functions during weaning transition.

  18. Incidence, risk factors, and outcome of cytomegalovirus viremia and gastroenteritis in patients with gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutani, Divaya; Dyson, Gregory; Manasa, Richard; Deol, Abhinav; Ratanatharathorn, Voravit; Ayash, Lois; Abidi, Muneer; Lum, Lawrence G; Al-Kadhimi, Zaid; Uberti, Joseph P

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. In addition, cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection of the gastrointestinal tract can complicate the post-transplantation course of these patients and it can be difficult to differentiate the 2 diagnoses given that they can present with similar symptoms. We retrospectively analyzed 252 patients who were diagnosed with GI GVHD to evaluate the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of CMV viremia and CMV gastroenteritis in these patients. The median age at the time of transplantation was 51 years, 35% were related donor transplantations, and 65% were unrelated donor transplantations. A total of 114 (45%) patients developed CMV viremia at a median of 34 days (range, 14 to 236 days) after transplantation. Only recipient CMV IgG serostatus was significantly associated with development of CMV viremia (P gastroenteritis; 2 patients had evidence of CMV gastroenteritis and GVHD on the first biopsy and 29 on the second biopsy. Median time to development of CMV gastroenteritis was 52 days (range, 19 to 236 days) after transplantation. Using death as a competing risk, the cumulative incidence of CMV gastroenteritis at 1 year was 16.4%. The incidence of CMV gastroenteritis in relation to the donor/recipient serostatus was as follows: D+/R+, 22%; D-/R+, 31%; D+/R-, 12%; and D-/R-, 0. Median follow-up time for the 252 patients was 35.4 (95% CI 23.8 to 44.8) months. The estimated overall survival rate at 1 and 2 years was .45 (95% confidence interval [CI], .39 to .52) and .39 (95% CI, .33 to .46), respectively. Of the examined variables, those related to the overall survival were maximal clinical GVHD grade (P gastroenteritis (P = .008). Development of CMV viremia was not associated with increased mortality. In conclusion, CMV gastroenteritis is common complication in patients with GI GVHD and can adversely affect the prognosis.

  19. Host-pathogen systems biology: logical modelling of hepatocyte growth factor and Helicobacter pylori induced c-Met signal transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kähne Thilo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF stimulates mitogenesis, motogenesis, and morphogenesis in a wide range of tissues, including epithelial cells, on binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met. Abnormal c-Met signalling contributes to tumour genesis, in particular to the development of invasive and metastatic phenotypes. The human microbial pathogen Helicobacter pylori can induce chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration and more rarely, gastric adenocarcinoma. The H. pylori effector protein cytotoxin associated gene A (CagA, which is translocated via a type IV secretion system (T4SS into epithelial cells, intracellularly modulates the c-Met receptor and promotes cellular processes leading to cell scattering, which could contribute to the invasiveness of tumour cells. Using a logical modelling framework, the presented work aims at analysing the c-Met signal transduction network and how it is interfered by H. pylori infection, which might be of importance for tumour development. Results A logical model of HGF and H. pylori induced c-Met signal transduction is presented in this work. The formalism of logical interaction hypergraphs (LIH was used to construct the network model. The molecular interactions included in the model were all assembled manually based on a careful meta-analysis of published experimental results. Our model reveals the differences and commonalities of the response of the network upon HGF and H. pylori induced c-Met signalling. As another important result, using the formalism of minimal intervention sets, phospholipase Cγ1 (PLCγ1 was identified as knockout target for repressing the activation of the extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2, a signalling molecule directly linked to cell scattering in H. pylori infected cells. The model predicted only an effect on ERK1/2 for the H. pylori stimulus, but not for HGF treatment. This result could be confirmed experimentally in MDCK cells using a specific

  20. Global genetic differentiation in a cosmopolitan pest of stored beans: effects of geography, host-plant usage and anthropogenic factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Midori Tuda

    Full Text Available Genetic differentiation can be promoted allopatrically by geographic isolation of populations due to limited dispersal ability and diversification over time or sympatrically through, for example, host-race formation. In crop pests, the trading of crops across the world can lead to intermixing of genetically distinct pest populations. However, our understanding of the importance of allopatric and sympatric genetic differentiation in the face of anthropogenic genetic intermixing is limited. Here, we examined global sequence variation in two mitochondrial and one nuclear genes in the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus that uses different legumes as hosts. We analyzed 180 samples from 42 populations of this stored bean pest from tropical and subtropical continents and archipelagos: Africa, the Middle East, South and Southeast Asia, Oceania and South America. For the mitochondrial genes, there was weak but significant genetic differentiation across continents/archipelagos. Further, we found pronounced differentiation among subregions within continents/archipelagos both globally and within Africa but not within Asia. We suggest that multiple introductions into Asia and subsequent intermixing within Asia have generated this pattern. The isolation by distance hypothesis was supported globally (with or without continents controlled but not when host species was restricted to cowpeas Vigna unguiculata, the ancestral host of C. maculatus. We also document significant among-host differentiation both globally and within Asia, but not within Africa. We failed to reject a scenario of a constant population size in the recent past combined with selective neutrality for the mitochondrial genes. We conclude that mitochondrial DNA differentiation is primarily due to geographic isolation within Africa and to multiple invasions by different alleles, followed by host shifts, within Asia. The weak inter-continental differentiation is most likely due to frequent inter

  1. Global genetic differentiation in a cosmopolitan pest of stored beans: effects of geography, host-plant usage and anthropogenic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuda, Midori; Kagoshima, Kumiko; Toquenaga, Yukihiko; Arnqvist, Göran

    2014-01-01

    Genetic differentiation can be promoted allopatrically by geographic isolation of populations due to limited dispersal ability and diversification over time or sympatrically through, for example, host-race formation. In crop pests, the trading of crops across the world can lead to intermixing of genetically distinct pest populations. However, our understanding of the importance of allopatric and sympatric genetic differentiation in the face of anthropogenic genetic intermixing is limited. Here, we examined global sequence variation in two mitochondrial and one nuclear genes in the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus that uses different legumes as hosts. We analyzed 180 samples from 42 populations of this stored bean pest from tropical and subtropical continents and archipelagos: Africa, the Middle East, South and Southeast Asia, Oceania and South America. For the mitochondrial genes, there was weak but significant genetic differentiation across continents/archipelagos. Further, we found pronounced differentiation among subregions within continents/archipelagos both globally and within Africa but not within Asia. We suggest that multiple introductions into Asia and subsequent intermixing within Asia have generated this pattern. The isolation by distance hypothesis was supported globally (with or without continents controlled) but not when host species was restricted to cowpeas Vigna unguiculata, the ancestral host of C. maculatus. We also document significant among-host differentiation both globally and within Asia, but not within Africa. We failed to reject a scenario of a constant population size in the recent past combined with selective neutrality for the mitochondrial genes. We conclude that mitochondrial DNA differentiation is primarily due to geographic isolation within Africa and to multiple invasions by different alleles, followed by host shifts, within Asia. The weak inter-continental differentiation is most likely due to frequent inter-continental gene

  2. Food rejections in children: Cognitive and social/environmental factors involved in food neophobia and picky/fussy eating behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafraire, Jérémie; Rioux, Camille; Giboreau, Agnès; Picard, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    Food neophobia and picky/fussy eating behavior are presented as the two main forms of children's food rejections which are responsible for a reduction of their dietary repertoire. We review the key factors, presented in the literature, that are involved in food rejections during childhood. We first consider a range of "cognitive factors", such as food perception, mental representations, categorization of food items, and emotions and feelings toward food. Next we focus on "social and environmental factors", as these might also significantly influence and modulate children's food rejections. We then summarize the findings to provide a comprehensive view of the factors involved in children's food rejections. Finally, we discuss the need for future studies on food rejections, regarding (i) the distinction between food neophobia and picky/fussy eating, and (ii) the potential link between food categorization abilities and children's food neophobia and pickiness.

  3. Factors associated with sex work involvement among transgender women in Jamaica: a cross‐sectional study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Logie, Carmen H; Wang, Ying; Lacombe‐Duncan, Ashley; Jones, Nicolette; Ahmed, Uzma; Levermore, Kandasi; Neil, Ava; Ellis, Tyrone; Bryan, Nicolette; Marshall, Annecka; Newman, Peter A

    2017-01-01

    Introduction : Transgender women are disproportionately impacted by HIV. Transgender women involved in sex work may experience exacerbated violence, social exclusion, and HIV vulnerabilities, in comparison with non‐sex work...

  4. Teacher Involvement as a Protective Factor from the Association between Race-Based Bullying and Smoking Initiation

    OpenAIRE

    Earnshaw, Valerie A.; Rosenthal, Lisa; Carroll-Scott, Amy; Peters, Susan M.; McCaslin, Catherine; ICKOVICS, Jeannette R.

    2014-01-01

    Experiencing bullying as a victim is associated with negative health and health behavior outcomes, including substance use, among adolescents. However, understandings of protective factorsfactors that enhance adolescents’ resilience to the negative consequences of bullying – remain limited. The current study investigates whether teacher involvement protects adolescent students from the association between being bullied due to race and smoking initiation. Students were recruited from 12 Kin...

  5. LysM domains of Medicago truncatula NFP protein involved in Nod factor perception. Glycosylation state, molecular modeling and docking of chitooligosaccharides and Nod factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Lonneke; Lefebvre, Benoit; Cullimore, Julie; Imberty, Anne

    2006-09-01

    The establishment of the symbiosis between legume plants and rhizobial bacteria depends on the production of rhizobial lipo-chitooligosaccharidic signals (the Nod factors) that are specifically recognized by roots of the host plant. In Medicago truncatula, specific recognition of Sinorhizobium meliloti and its Nod factors requires the NFP (Nod factor perception) gene, which encodes a putative serine/threonine receptor-like kinase (RLK). The extracellular region of this protein contains three tandem lysin motifs (LysMs), a short peptide domain that is implicated in peptidoglycan or chitin binding in various bacterial or eukaryotic proteins, respectively. We report here the homology modeling of the three LysM domains of M. truncatula NFP based on the structure of a LysM domain of the Escherichia coli membrane-bound lytic murein transglycosidase D (MltD). Expression of NFP in a homologous system (M. truncatula roots) revealed that the protein is highly N-glycosylated, probably with both high-mannose and complex glycans. Surface analysis and docking calculations performed on the models of the three domains were used to predict the most favored binding modes for chitooligosaccharides and Nod factors. A convergent model can be proposed where the sulfated, O-acetylated lipo-chitooligosaccharidic Nod factor of S. meliloti binds in similar orientation to the three LysM domains of M. truncatula NFP. N-glycosylation is not expected to interfere with Nod factor binding in this orientation.

  6. Analysis of the Pantoea ananatis pan-genome reveals factors underlying its ability to colonize and interact with plant, insect and vertebrate hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maayer, Pieter; Chan, Wai Yin; Rubagotti, Enrico; Venter, Stephanus N; Toth, Ian K; Birch, Paul R J; Coutinho, Teresa A

    2014-05-27

    Pantoea ananatis is found in a wide range of natural environments, including water, soil, as part of the epi- and endophytic flora of various plant hosts, and in the insect gut. Some strains have proven effective as biological control agents and plant-growth promoters, while other strains have been implicated in diseases of a broad range of plant hosts and humans. By analysing the pan-genome of eight sequenced P. ananatis strains isolated from different sources we identified factors potentially underlying its ability to colonize and interact with hosts in both the plant and animal Kingdoms. The pan-genome of the eight compared P. ananatis strains consisted of a core genome comprised of 3,876 protein coding sequences (CDSs) and a sizeable accessory genome consisting of 1,690 CDSs. We estimate that ~106 unique CDSs would be added to the pan-genome with each additional P. ananatis genome sequenced in the future. The accessory fraction is derived mainly from integrated prophages and codes mostly for proteins of unknown function. Comparison of the translated CDSs on the P. ananatis pan-genome with the proteins encoded on all sequenced bacterial genomes currently available revealed that P. ananatis carries a number of CDSs with orthologs restricted to bacteria associated with distinct hosts, namely plant-, animal- and insect-associated bacteria. These CDSs encode proteins with putative roles in transport and metabolism of carbohydrate and amino acid substrates, adherence to host tissues, protection against plant and animal defense mechanisms and the biosynthesis of potential pathogenicity determinants including insecticidal peptides, phytotoxins and type VI secretion system effectors. P. ananatis has an 'open' pan-genome typical of bacterial species that colonize several different environments. The pan-genome incorporates a large number of genes encoding proteins that may enable P. ananatis to colonize, persist in and potentially cause disease symptoms in a wide range of

  7. Are Outness and Community Involvement Risk or Protective Factors for Alcohol and Drug Abuse Among Sexual Minority Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Brian A; Dyar, Christina; London, Bonita

    2017-07-01

    Sexual minority women (SMW) are at increased risk for substance abuse compared to heterosexual women. Two psychosocial factors that have been implicated in SMW's substance abuse are outness and LGBT community involvement, but findings have been mixed as to whether these are risk or protective factors. One possible explanation is that they may have different consequences for subgroups of SMW (lesbians, bisexual women, and queer women). While being open about one's sexual orientation and involved in the community may be protective for lesbians, discrimination against bisexual women may lead these same factors to contribute to substance abuse for bisexual women. It is unclear how these associations will operate for queer women, given limited research on this subpopulation. The current study examined whether sexual identity moderated the associations between outness and community involvement with alcohol and drug abuse. We also examined whether perceived discrimination would help explain why these associations may be different for subgroups of SMW. A sample of 288 self-identified SMW (113 lesbians, 106 bisexual women, and 69 queer women) completed an online survey. Higher outness was associated with higher alcohol and drug abuse for bisexual women, but not for lesbians or queer women. Similarly, higher community involvement was associated with higher drug abuse for bisexual women, but not for lesbians or queer women. Among bisexual women, the association between community involvement and drug abuse was mediated by perceived discrimination. Further, the association between outness and drug abuse was mediated by both community involvement and perceived discrimination. Findings demonstrate that outness and community involvement function as risk factors for substance abuse for bisexual women, in part due to their associations with discrimination.

  8. Discovering Host Genes Involved in the Infection by the Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Complex and in the Establishment of Resistance to the Virus Using Tobacco Rattle Virus-based Post Transcriptional Gene Silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Lozano-Durán

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of high-throughput technologies allows for evaluating gene expression at the whole-genome level. Together with proteomic and metabolomic studies, these analyses have resulted in the identification of plant genes whose function or expression is altered as a consequence of pathogen attacks. Members of the Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV complex are among the most important pathogens impairing production of agricultural crops worldwide. To understand how these geminiviruses subjugate plant defenses, and to devise counter-measures, it is essential to identify the host genes affected by infection and to determine their role in susceptible and resistant plants. We have used a reverse genetics approach based on Tobacco rattle virus-induced gene silencing (TRV-VIGS to uncover genes involved in viral infection of susceptible plants, and to identify genes underlying virus resistance. To identify host genes with a role in geminivirus infection, we have engineered a Nicotiana benthamiana line, coined 2IRGFP, which over-expresses GFP upon virus infection. With this system, we have achieved an accurate description of the dynamics of virus replication in space and time. Upon silencing selected N. benthamiana genes previously shown to be related to host response to geminivirus infection, we have identified eighteen genes involved in a wide array of cellular processes. Plant genes involved in geminivirus resistance were studied by comparing two tomato lines: one resistant (R, the other susceptible (S to the virus. Sixty-nine genes preferentially expressed in R tomatoes were identified by screening cDNA libraries from infected and uninfected R and S genotypes. Out of the 25 genes studied so far, the silencing of five led to the total collapse of resistance, suggesting their involvement in the resistance gene network. This review of our results indicates that TRV-VIGS is an exquisite reverse genetics tool that may provide new insights into the

  9. Host factor I, Hfq, binds to Escherichia coli ompA mRNA in a growth rate-dependent fashion and regulates its stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vytvytska, O; Jakobsen, J S; Balcunaite, G

    1998-01-01

    ompA was purified and identified as Hfq, a host factor initially recognized for its function in phage Qbeta replication. The ompA RNA-binding activity parallels the amount of Hfq, which is elevated in bacteria cultured at slow growth rate, a condition leading to facilitated degradation of the ompA m...... suggest a regulatory role for Hfq that specifically facilitates the ompA mRNA degradation in a growth rate-dependent manner....

  10. Removal of sulfamethoxazole sulfonamide antibiotic from water by high silica zeolites: a study of the involved host-guest interactions by a combined structural, spectroscopic, and computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasioli, Sonia; Martucci, Annalisa; Paul, Geo; Gigli, Lara; Cossi, Maurizio; Johnston, Cliff T; Marchese, Leonardo; Braschi, Ilaria

    2014-04-01

    Sulfonamide antibiotics are persistent pollutants present in surface and subsurface waters in both agricultural and urban environments. Sulfonamides are of particular concern in the environment because they are known to induce high levels of bacterial resistance. Adsorption of sulfamethoxazole sulfonamide antibiotic into three high silica zeolites (Y, mordenite, and ZSM-5) with pore opening sizes comparable to sulfamethoxazole dimensions is reported. Sulfamethoxazole was almost completely removed from water by zeolite Y and MOR in a few minutes. Adsorption onto ZSM-5 showed an increased kinetics with increasing temperature. Antibiotic sorption was largely irreversible with little antibiotic desorbed. Sulfamethoxazole incorporation and localization into the pore of each zeolite system was defined along with medium-weak and cooperative host-guest interactions in which water molecules play a certain role only in zeolite Y and mordenite.

  11. Genes involved in the transforming growth factor beta signalling pathway and the risk of intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, Y. M.; Tan, S.; Medic, J.; Rinkel, G. J. E.; Wijmenga, C.

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: The 19q13.3 locus for intracranial aneurysms (IA) partly overlaps with the 19q13 locus for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). A common genetic risk factor located in this locus for the two aneurysm types seems plausible. The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) signallin

  12. Organotypic Cultures of Intervertebral Disc Cells: Responses to Growth Factors and Signaling Pathways Involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Pratsinis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration is strongly associated with low back pain, a major cause of disability worldwide. An in-depth understanding of IVD cell physiology is required for the design of novel regenerative therapies. Accordingly, aim of this work was the study of IVD cell responses to mitogenic growth factors in a three-dimensional (3D organotypic milieu, comprising characteristic molecules of IVD’s extracellular matrix. In particular, annulus fibrosus (AF cells were cultured inside collagen type-I gels, while nucleus pulposus (NP cells in chondroitin sulfate A (CSA supplemented collagen gels, and the effects of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor (PDGF, basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF, and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I were assessed. All three growth factors stimulated DNA synthesis in both AF and NP 3D cell cultures, with potencies similar to those observed previously in monolayers. CSA supplementation inhibited basal DNA synthesis rates, without affecting the response to growth factors. ERK and Akt were found to be phosphorylated following growth factor stimulation. Blockade of these two signaling pathways using pharmacologic inhibitors significantly, though not completely, inhibited growth factor-induced DNA synthesis. The proposed culture systems may prove useful for further in vitro studies aiming at future interventions for IVD regeneration.

  13. On the importance of macroeconomic factors for the foreign student’s decision to stay in the host country

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasiljeva, Kristine

    The paper tests empirically whether the macroeconomic variables suggested by migration theories have a significant impact on the foreign student’s decision to stay in their host country. The analysis is based on the combination of country level variables and individual register data. The mean...

  14. Cell-mediated immunity to histocompatibility antigens : controlling factors, with emphasis on Graft-versus-host reactions in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Bril (Herman)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractGraft-versus-Host (GvH) disease is characterized by weight loss, diarrhea, skin lesions, hypofunction of the immune system with concomitant infections, etc. This syndrome is potentially lethal. GvH reactions, which underly this disease, may occur when immunocompetent T lymphocytes are tr

  15. Pathways involved in gut mucosal barrier dysfunction induced in adult rats by maternal deprivation: corticotrophin-releasing factor and nerve growth factor interplay

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Neonatal maternal deprivation (NMD) increases gut paracellular permeability (GPP) through mast cells and nerve growth factor (NGF), and modifies corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and corticosterone levels. CRF, corticosterone and mast cells are involved in stress-induced mucosal barrier impairment. Consequently, this study aimed to specify whether corticosteronaemia and colonic expression of both preproCRF and CRF are modified by NMD, and to determine if altered expression may participate...

  16. Family Engagement in Education in Uttar Pradesh, India: Factors Associated with the Involvement of Families in Their Children's Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Amanda Joy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which families within the Shravasti district of Uttar Pradesh, India are engaged in their children's education, as well as to examine the child, family, school, and community factors that are potentially associated with families' involvement in their children's education. Additionally,…

  17. Socio-Economic Factors Affecting Parents' Involvement in Homework: Practices and Perceptions from Eight Johannesburg Public Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndebele, Misheck

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines socio-economic factors influencing parental involvement in homework at the Foundation Phase in eight Johannesburg public primary schools. The research was conducted among over 600 parents from schools in different geographical and socio-economic areas such as the inner city, suburban and township. Two primary schools were…

  18. Predictive Factors in Undergraduates' Involvement in Campus Secret Cults in Public Universities in Edo State of Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azetta Arhedo, Philip; Aluede, Oyaziwo; Adomeh, Ilu O. C.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the predictive factors in undergraduates' involvement in campus secret cults in public universities in Edo State of Nigeria. The study employed the descriptive method, specifically the survey format. A random sample of three hundred and eighty (380) undergraduates was drawn from the two public universities. Data were elicited…

  19. Toward Digital Citizenship: Examining Factors Affecting Participation and Involvement in the Internet Society among Higher Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zahrani, Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    The current study aims to understand digital citizenship, based on the assumptions of Ribble (2014), by examining factors affecting participation and involvement in the Internet virtual societies among higher education students. A quantitative approach using a survey questionnaire was implemented. The participants were 174 students from the…

  20. Socio-Economic Factors Affecting Parents' Involvement in Homework: Practices and Perceptions from Eight Johannesburg Public Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndebele, Misheck

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines socio-economic factors influencing parental involvement in homework at the Foundation Phase in eight Johannesburg public primary schools. The research was conducted among over 600 parents from schools in different geographical and socio-economic areas such as the inner city, suburban and township. Two primary schools were…

  1. [Family perceptions and moderating factors of involvement in non-residential fathers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Casa, André; Spillner, Murielle; Winkler-Metzke, Christa; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph

    2012-01-01

    The involvement of non-resident fathers with their child was analysed by use of a questionnaire in a sample of 74 divorced or separated families living in the city of Ziurich, Switzerland. Fathers, mothers, and one child separately rated the involvement of the father. The three perspectives were compared and showed significant differences in the dimensions of educational responsibility, cognitive and social support, and the quality of the emotional relationship. The temporal availability and leisure time activities did not show significant differences. The different family perspectives should be considered when assessing a father's involvement with his child. The quality of the relationship of the children to their fathers was primarily fostered by the emotional engagement of the father.

  2. The link between high-fat meals and postprandial activation of blood coagulation factor VII possibly involves kallikrein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, L F; Marckmann, P; Bladbjerg, Else-Marie

    2000-01-01

    Contrary to low-fat meals, high-fat meals are known to cause postprandial factor VII (FVII) activation, but the mechanism is unknown. To study the postprandial FVII activation in detail, 18 young men consumed in randomized order high-fat or low-fat test meals. Fasting and non-fasting blood samples...... that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins may activate prokallikrein. Neither plasma triglycerides nor kallikrein and activated FVII were statistically associated. This may suggest that additional factors are involved in the postprandial FVII activation. No clear evidence for a role of tissue factor expression...

  3. The Yersinia Virulence Factor YopM Hijacks Host Kinases to Inhibit Type III Effector-Triggered Activation of the Pyrin Inflammasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Lawton K; Park, Yong Hwan; Zheng, Yueting; Brodsky, Igor E; Hearing, Patrick; Kastner, Daniel L; Chae, Jae Jin; Bliska, James B

    2016-09-14

    Pathogenic Yersinia, including Y. pestis, the agent of plague in humans, and Y. pseudotuberculosis, the related enteric pathogen, deliver virulence effectors into host cells via a prototypical type III secretion system to promote pathogenesis. These effectors, termed Yersinia outer proteins (Yops), modulate multiple host signaling responses. Studies in Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis have shown that YopM suppresses infection-induced inflammasome activation; however, the underlying molecular mechanism is largely unknown. Here we show that YopM specifically restricts the pyrin inflammasome, which is triggered by the RhoA-inactivating enzymatic activities of YopE and YopT, in Y. pseudotuberculosis-infected macrophages. The attenuation of a yopM mutant is fully reversed in pyrin knockout mice, demonstrating that YopM inhibits pyrin to promote virulence. Mechanistically, YopM recruits and activates the host kinases PRK1 and PRK2 to negatively regulate pyrin by phosphorylation. These results show how a virulence factor can hijack host kinases to inhibit effector-triggered pyrin inflammasome activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Misexpression Screen in Drosophila melanogaster Aiming to Reveal Novel Factors Involved in Formation of Body Parts

    OpenAIRE

    Grieder, N.; Charlafti, I.; Kloter, U.; Jaeckle, H.; Schaefer, U.; Gehring, W

    2007-01-01

    To identify novel factors that lead a fly imaginal disc to adopt its developmental fate, we carried out a modular dominant misexpression screen in imaginal discs. We have identified two factors that appear to change the fate of the respective body structure and appear to lead to the transformation of a body part. In one mutant line, notum tissue, normally derived from wing imaginal tissue, formed close to the site of the sternopleural bristles, which are leg disc derivatives. In the other lin...

  5. 76 FR 36092 - Antidumping Methodologies in Proceedings Involving Non-Market Economies: Valuing the Factor of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... International Trade Administration Antidumping Methodologies in Proceedings Involving Non-Market Economies... methodology used by the Department of Commerce (``the Department'') to value the cost of labor in non- market... wage rates.\\3\\ \\2\\ See Certain Woven Electric Blankets From the People's Republic of China:...

  6. Spatial and temporal factors affecting parasite genotypes encountered by hosts: empirical data from American dog ticks (Dermacentor variabilis) parasitising raccoons (Procyon lotor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmarajan, G; Beasley, J C; Rhodes, O E

    2010-06-01

    The American dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis) is an important vector of numerous pathogens of humans and animals. In this study, we analysed population genetic patterns in D. variabilis at scales of the host individual (infrapopulation) and population (component population) to elucidate fine-scale spatial and temporal factors influencing transmission dynamics. We genotyped D. variabilis collected from raccoons (Procyon lotor) trapped in two habitat patches (located in Indiana, USA) which were spatially proximate (5.9 km) and limited in size (10.48 Ha and 25.47 Ha, respectively). Despite the fine spatial sampling scale, our analyses revealed significant genetic differentiation amongst component populations and infrapopulations (within each component population), indicating a non-random pattern of encountering tick genotypes by raccoons at both scales evaluated. We found evidence for male-biased dispersal in the ticks themselves (in one component population) and an age-bias in spatial scales at which raccoons encountered ticks in the environment. At the scale of the component population, our analyses revealed that raccoons encountered ticks from a limited number of D. variabilis family groups, likely due to high reproductive variance amongst individual ticks. Finally, we found evidence for a temporal effect with raccoons encountering ticks in the environment as "clumps" of related individuals. While the genetic structure of parasite populations are increasingly being investigated at small spatial scales (e.g. the infrapopulation), our data reveal that genetic structuring can originate at scales below that of the infrapopulation, due to the interaction between temporal and biological factors affecting the encounter of parasites by individual hosts. Ultimately, our data indicate that genetic structure in parasites must be viewed as a consequence of both spatial and temporal variance in host-parasite interactions, which in turn are driven by demographic factors related

  7. Evolutionary processes involved in the diversification of chelonian and mammal polystomatid parasites (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea, Polystomatidae) revealed by palaeoecology of their hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héritier, Laurent; Badets, Mathieu; Du Preez, Louis H; Aisien, Martins S O; Lixian, Fan; Combes, Claude; Verneau, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Polystomatid flatworms (Platyhelminthes) are monogenean parasites that infect exclusively aquatic or semi-aquatic sarcopterygians such as the Australian lungfish, amphibians, freshwater turtles and the African common hippopotamus. Previous studies on the phylogenetic relationships of these parasites, excluding Oculotrema hippopotami infecting common hippos, showed a global coevolution between hosts and their parasites at a macroevolutionary scale. These studies also demonstrated a strong correlation between the diversification of early neobatrachian polystomes and Gondwana breakup in the Mesozoic period. However the origin of chelonian polystomes is still in question as a switch from presumably primitive aquatic amniotes to turtles at the time of their first appearance, or soon after during their radiation, was assumed. In order to resolve this sticking point, we extended the phylogeny of polystomes with broader parasite sampling, i.e. 55 polystome species including Nanopolystoma tinsleyi a polystome infecting caecilians and O. hippopotami, and larger set of sequence data covering two nuclear and two mitochondrial genes coding for the ribosomal RNA 18S and 28S, the Cytochrome c Oxidase I and the ribosomal RNA 12S, respectively. The secondary structure of nuclear rRNAs genes (stems and loops) was taken into account for sequence alignments and Bayesian analyses were performed based on the appropriate models of evolution selected independently for the four designed partitions. Molecular calibrations were also conducted for dating the main speciation events in the polystome tree. The phylogenetic position of chelonian parasites that are phylogenetically closer to N. tinsleyi than all other amphibian polystomes and molecular time estimates suggest that these parasites originated following a switch from caecilians, at a geological period when primitive turtles may already have adapted to an aquatic life style, i.e. at about 178Million years ago, or a little later when

  8. Soluble tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor levels in serum as markers of anti-viral host reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, C; Nansen, A; Marker, O

    1999-01-01

    The role of soluble receptors for TNF-alpha (sTNF-Rs) as markers of virus-induced host responses was studied by the use of murine model infections. A marked elevation in serum levels of sTNF-R75, but not sTNF-R55, was found 1 day after infection with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). In mice......-gamma. A simple correlation between release of sTNF-Rs in vivo and macrophage activation in vitro was not present. These findings indicate that sTNF-R75 is indeed a sensitive marker of both innate and specific cell-mediated host reactivity during viral infection, but it is not correlated to a single immunological...

  9. Monocyte-induced development of Th17 cells and the release of S100 proteins are involved in the pathogenesis of graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Katharina; Foell, Dirk; Vogl, Thomas; Mezger, Markus; Wittkowski, Helmut; Fend, Falko; Federmann, Birgit; Gille, Christian; Feuchtinger, Tobias; Lang, Peter; Handgretinger, Rupert; Andreas Bethge, Wolfgang; Holzer, Ursula

    2014-10-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. However, the pathophysiology of GvHD remains poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the induction of Th17 cells by monocytes of patients with GvHD in vitro, demonstrating that monocytes isolated from patients with acute skin and intestinal GvHD stage I-IV and chronic GvHD induce significantly increased levels of Th17 cells compared with patients without GvHD. S100 proteins are known to act as innate amplifier of inflammation. We therefore investigated the presence of S100 proteins in the stool, serum, and bowel tissue of patients with GvHD and the influence of S100 proteins on the induction of Th17 cells. Elevated levels of S100 proteins could be detected in patients with acute GvHD, demonstrating the release of these phagocyte-specific proteins during GvHD. Furthermore, stimulation of monocytes with S100 proteins was found to promote Th17 development, emphasizing the role of S100 proteins in Th17-triggered inflammation. Altogether, our results indicate that induction of Th17 cells by activated monocytes and the stimulatory effects of proinflammatory S100 proteins might play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of acute GvHD. Regarding our data, S100 proteins might be novel markers for the diagnosis and follow-up of GvHD.

  10. Colonization of Barley by the Broad-Host Hemibiotrophic Pathogen Phytophthora palmivora Uncovers a Leaf Development-Dependent Involvement of Mlo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Fevre, Ruth; O'Boyle, Bridget; Moscou, Matthew J; Schornack, Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    The discovery of barley Mlo demonstrated that filamentous pathogens rely on plant genes to achieve entry and lifecycle completion in barley leaves. While having a dramatic effect on foliar pathogens, it is unclear whether overlapping or distinct mechanisms affect filamentous pathogen infection of roots. To remove the bias connected with using different pathogens to understand colonization mechanisms in different tissues, we have utilized the aggressive hemibiotrophic oomycete pathogen Phytophthora palmivora. P. palmivora colonizes root as well as leaf tissues of barley (Hordeum vulgare). The infection is characterized by a transient biotrophy phase with formation of haustoria. Barley accessions varied in degree of susceptibility, with some accessions fully resistant to leaf infection. Notably, there was no overall correlation between degree of susceptibility in roots compared with leaves, suggesting that variation in different genes influences host susceptibility above and below ground. In addition, a developmental gradient influenced infection, with more extensive colonization observed in mature leaf sectors. The mlo5 mutation attenuates P. palmivora infection but only in young leaf tissues. The barley-P. palmivora interaction represents a simple system to identify and compare genetic components governing quantitative colonization in diverse barley tissue types.

  11. The Type III Secretion System (T3SS of Chlamydophila psittaci Is Involved in the Host Inflammatory Response by Activating the JNK/ERK Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-zhi He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydophila psittaci (C. psittaci is a human zoonotic pathogen, which could result in severe respiratory disease. In the present study, we investigated the role and mechanism of the type III secretion system (T3SS of C. psittaci in regulating the inflammatory response in host cells. C. psittaci-infected THP-1 cells were incubated with the specific T3SS inhibitor INP0007, inhibitors of ERK, p38, or JNK, and the levels of inflammatory cytokines were analyzed using Q-PCR and ELISA. The levels of ERK, p38, and JNK phosphorylation were analyzed by Western blot. Our results verified that INP0007 inhibited chlamydial growth in vitro, but the coaddition of exogenous iron completely reversed the growth deficit. INP0007 inhibited the growth of C. psittaci and decreased the levels of IL-8, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β. Exogenous iron restored the chlamydial growth but not the production of inflammatory cytokines. These results demonstrated that the expression of inflammatory cytokines during infection was associated with the T3SS which reduced by incubation with ERK and JNK inhibitors, but not with p38 inhibitor. We concluded that the T3SS elicited inflammatory responses by activating the JNK or ERK signaling pathways in the infection of C. psittaci.

  12. Invasion biology in non-free-living species: interactions between abiotic (climatic) and biotic (host availability) factors in geographical space in crayfish commensals (Ostracoda, Entocytheridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Alexandre; Aguilar-Alberola, Josep A; Baldry, David; Balkis, Husamettin; Ellis, Adam; Gil-Delgado, Jose A; Grabow, Karsten; Klobučar, Göran; Kouba, Antonín; Maguire, Ivana; Martens, Andreas; Mülayim, Ayşegül; Rueda, Juan; Scharf, Burkhard; Soes, Menno; S Monrós, Juan; Mesquita-Joanes, Francesc

    2013-12-01

    In invasion processes, both abiotic and biotic factors are considered essential, but the latter are usually disregarded when modeling the potential spread of exotic species. In the framework of set theory, interactions between biotic (B), abiotic (A), and movement-related (M) factors in the geographical space can be hypothesized with BAM diagrams and tested using ecological niche models (ENMs) to estimate A and B areas. The main aim of our survey was to evaluate the interactions between abiotic (climatic) and biotic (host availability) factors in geographical space for exotic symbionts (i.e., non-free-living species), using ENM techniques combined with a BAM framework and using exotic Entocytheridae (Ostracoda) found in Europe as model organisms. We carried out an extensive survey to evaluate the distribution of entocytherids hosted by crayfish in Europe by checking 94 European localities and 12 crayfish species. Both exotic entocytherid species found, Ankylocythere sinuosa and Uncinocythere occidentalis, were widely distributed in W Europe living on the exotic crayfish species Procambarus clarkii and Pacifastacus leniusculus, respectively. No entocytherids were observed in the remaining crayfish species. The suitable area for A. sinuosa was mainly restricted by its own limitations to minimum temperatures in W and N Europe and precipitation seasonality in circum-Mediterranean areas. Uncinocythere occidentalis was mostly restricted by host availability in circum-Mediterranean regions due to limitations of P. leniusculus to higher precipitation seasonality and maximum temperatures. The combination of ENMs with set theory allows studying the invasive biology of symbionts and provides clues about biogeographic barriers due to abiotic or biotic factors limiting the expansion of the symbiont in different regions of the invasive range. The relative importance of abiotic and biotic factors on geographical space can then be assessed and applied in conservation plans. This

  13. A Systems Survey of Progressive Host-Cell Reorganization during Rotavirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Victoria A; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2016-07-13

    Pathogen invasion is often accompanied by widespread alterations in cellular physiology, which reflects the hijacking of host factors and processes for pathogen entry and replication. Although genetic perturbation screens have revealed the complexity of host factors involved for numerous pathogens, it has remained challenging to temporally define the progression of events in host cell reorganization during infection. We combine high-confidence genome-scale RNAi screening of host factors required for rotavirus infection in human intestinal cells with an innovative approach to infer the trajectory of virus infection from fixed cell populations. This approach reveals a comprehensive network of host cellular processes involved in rotavirus infection and implicates AMPK in initiating the development of a rotavirus-permissive environment. Our work provides a powerful approach that can be generalized to order complex host cellular requirements along a trajectory of cellular reorganization during pathogen invasion.

  14. Use of in vivo Expression Technology for the Identification of Putative Host Adaptation Factors of the Lyme Disease Spirochete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casselli, Timothy; Bankhead, Troy

    2015-01-01

    The causative agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, is an obligate parasite that requires either a tick vector or a mammalian host for survival. Identification of the bacterial genes that are specifically expressed during infection of the mammalian host could provide targets for novel therapeutics and vaccines. In vivo expression technology (IVET) is a reporter-based promoter trap system that utilizes selectable markers to identify promoters of bacterial host-specific genes. Using previously characterized genes for in vivo and in vitro selection, this study utilized an IVET system that allows for selection of B. burgdorferi sequences that act as active promoters only during murine infection. This promoter trap system was able to successfully distinguish active promoter sequences both in vivo and in vitro from control sequences and a library of cloned B. burgdorferi genomic fragments. However, a bottleneck effect during the experimental mouse infection limited the utility for genome-wide promoter screening. Overall, IVET was demonstrated as a tool for the identification of in vivo-induced promoter elements of B. burgdorferi, and the observed infection bottleneck apparent using a polyclonal infection pool provides insight into the dynamics of experimental infection with B. burgdorferi.

  15. Characterization of RACK7 as a Novel Factor Involved in BRCA1 Mutation Mediated Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    control for the restriction digestion. Fig. 2. Library screening and cloning of the gene(s) involved in BRCA-1 mediated DNA damage...hypersensitivity. A. A diagram of the library screening procedure. B. Isolation of the gene candidates that confer the resistance to DNA damage hypersensitivity...in HCC1937 cells. Fig 3. Effect of BRCA1, Noc-4, PKCBP and H3.3 on protection from irradiation hypersensitivity. A. . A diagram of the library

  16. Identification of a novel pathway involving a GATA transcription factor in yeast and possibly in plant Zn uptake and homeostasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthew J. Milner; Nicole S. Pence; Jiping Liu; Leon V. Kochian

    2014-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the regulation of Zn homeostasis in plants and the degree of conservation of Zn homeostasis between plants and yeast, a cDNA library from the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulating plant species, Noccaea caerules-cens, was screened for its ability to restore growth under Zn limiting conditions in the yeast mutant zap1D. ZAP1 is a transcription factor that activates the Zn dependent transcrip-tion of yeast genes involved in Zn uptake, including ZRT1, the yeast high affinity Zn transporter. From this screen two members of the E2F family of transcription factors were found to activate ZRT1 expression in a Zn independent manner. The activation of ZRT1 by the plant E2F proteins involves E2F-mediated activation of a yeast GATA transcription factor which in turn activates ZRT1 expression. A ZRT1 promoter region necessary for activation by E2F and GATA proteins is upstream of two zinc responsive elements previously shown to bind ZAP1 in ZRT1. This activation may not involve direct binding of E2F to the ZRT1 promoter. The expression of E2F genes in yeast does not replace function of ZAP1; instead it appears to activate a novel GATA regulatory pathway involved in Zn uptake and homeostasis that is not Zn responsive.

  17. Comparative Analysis of the Factors Necessitating Commercial Banks and Manufacturing Firms’ Involvement in Corporate Social Responsibility in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abiola Idowu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This research investigates the factors necessitating commercial banks and manufacturing firms’ involvement in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR in Nigeria comparatively. The research took place in Lagos State in South-west geo-political zone in Nigeria. The survey research design was used in this research. Moreover, the purposive sampling was used in selecting five commercial banks and five manufacturing firms. Primary data were gathered with the aid of questionnaire from 216 respondents out of 250 selected respondents from bank and 205 respondents out of 250 selected respondents from manufacturing firms. Fifty copies of the questionnaires were distributed to each company. All respondents selected were involved in CSR activities of their companies. Factors necessitating companies’ involvement in CSR were examined with Analysis of Variance. The research reveals that t-test value is -0.39 and p-value is 0.8, which shows that there is no significant difference between factors necessitating of the commercial banks and manufacturing firms’ involvement in CSR. The research recommends that corporate organizations should give attention to CSR initiatives as these lead to improvement of customers loyalty, improvement of the positive image of the organization, improved relationship with local communities,   and enhances shareholders values as well as improved relations with public authorities amongst others.

  18. Misexpression screen in Drosophila melanogaster aiming to reveal novel factors involved in formation of body parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieder, Nicole C; Charlafti, Ilias; Kloter, Urs; Jäckle, Herbert; Schäfer, Ulrich; Gehring, Walter J

    2007-04-01

    To identify novel factors that lead a fly imaginal disc to adopt its developmental fate, we carried out a modular dominant misexpression screen in imaginal discs. We have identified two factors that appear to change the fate of the respective body structure and appear to lead to the transformation of a body part. In one mutant line, notum tissue, normally derived from wing imaginal tissue, formed close to the site of the sternopleural bristles, which are leg disc derivatives. In the other line, the arista is transformed into a tubular structure, resembling an abnormal leg. We found that ectopic expression of abrupt was responsible for this potential transformation of the arista.

  19. Study on proliferative responses to host Ia antigens in allogeneic bone marrow chimera in mice: sequential analysis of the reactivity and characterization of the cells involved in the responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwabuchi, K.; Ogasawara, K.; Ogasawara, M.; Yasumizu, R.; Noguchi, M.; Geng, L.; Fujita, M.; Good, R.A.; Onoe, K.

    1987-01-01

    Irradiation bone marrow chimeras were established by reconstitution of lethally irradiated AKR mice with C57BL/10 marrow cells to permit serial analysis of the developing reactivities of lymphocytes from such chimeras, (B10----AKR), against donor, host, or third party antigens. We found that substantial proliferative responses to Ia antigens of the recipient strain and also to third party antigens were generated by the thymocytes obtained from the irradiation chimeras at an early stage after bone marrow reconstitution. The majority of the responding thymocytes had surfaces lacking demonstrable peanut agglutinin receptors and were donor type Thy-1+, Ly-2-, and L3T4+ in both anti-recipient and anti-third party MLR. In anti-host responses, however, Ly-2+ thymocytes seemed to be at least partially involved. This capacity of thymus cells to mount a response to antigens of the recipient strain declined shortly thereafter, whereas the capacity to mount MLR against third party antigens persisted. The spleen cells of (B10----AKR) chimeras at the same time developed a more durable capability to exhibit anti-host reactivities and a permanent capability of reacting to third party allo-antigens. The stimulator antigens were Ia molecules on the stimulator cells in both anti-recipient and anti-third party MLR. The responding splenocytes were of donor origin and most of them had Thy-1+, Ly-1+2-, and L3T4+ phenotype.

  20. Analysis of nodulation kinetics in Frankia-Discaria trinervis symbiosis reveals different factors involved in the nodulation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbarini, Luciano Andrés; Wall, Luis Gabriel

    2008-08-01

    The induction of root nodule development in actinorhizal symbiosis would depend on the concentration of factors produced by the bacteria and the plant. A detailed analysis of nodulation description parameters revealed different factors related to the nodulation process. The initial time for nodulation (t(0)), the initial nodulation rate (v(0)) and the total time of nodule development (t(NOD)) were defined and consequently quantified in different experimental conditions: co-inoculation of Discaria trinervis with increasing concentrations of different non-infective bacteria together with the full compatible infective Frankia strain (the indicator strain) used at a limiting concentration or by changing plant factor(s) concentration. All the above nodulation parameters were modified by changing doses of full compatibility infective strain Frankia BCU110501; v(0) appears to be an expression of symbiotic recognition between partners as only fully symbiotic indicator Frankia BCU110501 was able to change it; t(0) seems not to reflect symbiotic recognition because it can also be modified by non-infective Frankia but suggest the existence of a basic level of plant microbe recognition. The initial time for nodulation t(0), reflecting the time required for the early interactions toward nodulation, is an inverse measure of the ability to establish early interactions toward nodulation. The increase in plant factors concentration also reduces t(0) values, suggesting that a plant factor is involved and favors very early interactions. Increases in plant factors concentration also modify the final number of nodules per plant and the nodule cluster profile along the taproot as an expression of the autoregulation phenomenon. Meanwhile, Frankia inoculums' concentration, either infective or not, modified t(NOD) in an opposite way plant factors did. In conclusion, the analysis of nodulation kinetics appears to be an appropriate tool to investigate factors involved in the symbiotic

  1. Cognitive Factors Involved in the First Stage of Programming Skill Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    70j .71 - P3y .71/ Figure 7. One-factor model (Model 7) of the algebra word problem solving test. PS = word problem solving skill . TABLE 2. GOODNESS...14, 389-433. Kyllonen, P.C., & Soule, C. (1988, April). The role of working memory and general problem solving skill in acquiring computer

  2. Membrane association of the Arabidopsis ARF exchange factor GNOM involves interaction of conserved domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anders, Nadine; Nielsen, Michael M.; Keicher, Jutta;

    2008-01-01

    The GNOM protein plays a fundamental role in Arabidopsis thaliana development by regulating endosome-to-plasma membrane trafficking required for polar localization of the auxin efflux carrier PIN1. GNOM is a family member of large ARF guanine nucleotide exchange factors (ARF-GEFs), which regulate...

  3. Background Noise Acceptance and Personality Factors Involved in Library Environment Choices by College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon-Hickey, Susan; Lemley, Trey

    2012-01-01

    For decades, academic libraries made efforts to provide study environments differing in acoustic environment. The present study aimed to provide an evidence basis for this practice by comparing background noise acceptance and personality factors of two groups of college-aged students self identified as preferring quiet or background noise when…

  4. Mapping Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu residues involved in binding of aminoacyl-tRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, Ove; Andersen, C; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde

    1996-01-01

    were characterized with respect to thermal and chemical stability, GTPase activity, tRNA affinity, and activity in an in vitro translation assay. Most conspicuously tRNA affinities were reduced for all mutants. The results verify our structural analysis of elongation factor Tu in complex with aminoacyl...

  5. Mapping Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu residues involved in binding of aminoacyl-tRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, Ove; Andersen, C; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde

    1996-01-01

    -tRNA, which suggested an important role of Lys-89 and Asn-90 in tRNA binding. Furthermore, our results indicate helix B to be an important target site for nucleotide exchange factor EF-Ts. Also the mutants His-66 to Ala and His-118 to either Ala or Glu were characterized in an in vitro translation assay...

  6. The in vivo role of stem cell factor (c-kit ligand) on mastocytosis and host protective immunity to the intestinal nematode Trichinella spiralis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grencis, R K; Else, K J; Huntley, J F; Nishikawa, S I

    1993-01-01

    The role of stem cell factor (SCF) in the generation of intestinal mast cell hyperplasia and host protective immunity following helminth infection was investigated using the Trichinella spiralis/mouse model. In vivo administration of a monoclonal antibody specific for the receptor for SCF (c-kit) was found to completely prevent the generation of intestinal mastocytosis normally observed following T. spiralis infection. This was reflected by markedly reduced intestinal mast cell protease (IMCP) levels in both tissue and serum. Moreover, animals treated with anti-c-kit antibody failed to show any evidence of worm expulsion from the gut. The data demonstrate for the first time, a critical role for the SCF in the generation of mucosal mastocytosis and host protective immunity following an intestinal helminth infection.

  7. A protein phosphatase 1 gamma (PP1γ) of the human protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis is involved in proliferation and cell attachment to the host cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Christian; Pérez, Mauricio; Orrego, Patricio R; Osorio, Luis; Gutiérrez, Bessy; Sagua, Hernán; Castillo, Juan L; Martínez-Oyanedel, Jose; Arroyo, Rossana; Meza-Cervantez, Patricia; da Silveira, Jose Franco; Midlej, Victor; Benchimol, Marlene; Cordero, Esteban; Morales, Patricio; Araya, Jorge E; González, Jorge

    2012-07-01

    In this work, evidence for a critical role of Trichomonas vaginalis protein phosphatase 1 gamma (TvPP1γ) in proliferation and attachment of the parasite to the mammalian cell is provided. Firstly, proliferation and attachment of T. vaginalis parasites to HeLa cells was blocked by calyculin A (CA), a potent PP1 inhibitor. Secondly, it was demonstrated that the enzyme activity of native and recombinant TvPP1γ proteins was inhibited by CA. Thirdly, reverse genetic studies confirmed that antisense oligonucleotides targeted to PP1γ but not PP1α or β inhibited proliferation and attachment of trichomonads CA-treated parasites underwent cytoskeletal modifications, including a lack of axostyle typical labelling, suggesting that cytoskeletal phosphorylation could be regulated by a CA-sensitive phosphatase where the role of PP1γ could not be ruled out. Analysis of subcellular distribution of TvPP1γ by cell fractionation and electron microscopy demonstrated the association between TvPP1γ and the cytoskeleton. The expression of adhesins, AP120 and AP65, at the cell surface was also inhibited by CA. The concomitant inhibition of expression of adhesins and changes in the cytoskeleton in CA-treated parasites suggest a specific role for PP1γ -dependent dephosphorylation in the early stages of the host-parasite interaction. Molecular modelling of TvPP1γ showed the conservation of residues critical for maintaining proper folding into the gross structure common to PP1 proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that TvPP1γ could be considered a potential novel drug target for treatment of trichomoniasis.

  8. Acute strength exercise and the involvement of small or large muscle mass on plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Correia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Blood neurotrophins, such as the brain-derived neurotrophic factor, are considered to be of great importance in mediating the benefits of physical exercise. In this study, the effect of acute strength exercise and the involvement of small versus large muscle mass on the levels of plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor were evaluated in healthy individuals. METHODS: The concentric strengths of knee (large and elbow (small flexor and extensor muscles were measured on two separate days. Venous blood samples were obtained from 16 healthy subjects before and after exercise. RESULTS: The levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the plasma did not significantly increase after both arm and leg exercise. There was no significant difference in the plasma levels of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the arms and legs. CONCLUSION: The present results demonstrate that acute strength exercise does not induce significant alterations in the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor plasma concentrations in healthy individuals. Considering that its levels may be affected by various factors, such as exercise, these findings suggest that the type of exercise program may be a decisive factor in altering peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

  9. Characterization of a transcription factor involved in mother cell specific transcription of the yeast HO gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Stillman, D J; Bankier, A T; Seddon, A; Groenhout, E G; Nasmyth, K A

    1988-01-01

    The yeast HO gene, which encodes an endonuclease involved in initiating mating type interconversion, is expressed in mother cells but not in daughters. It has been demonstrated that the SWI5 gene, which is an activator of HO expression, plays a critical role in this differential mother/daughter expression of HO. In this paper we describe the cloning and sequencing of the SWI5 gene. The predicted amino acid sequence derived from the cloned SWI5 gene shows homology with the repeated DNA-binding...

  10. Evolution of the interaction between Runx2 and VDR, two transcription factors involved in osteoblastogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barriga Elias H

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mineralized skeleton is a major evolutionary novelty that has contributed to the impressive morphological diversifications of the vertebrates. Essential to bone biology is the solidified extracellular matrix secreted by highly specialized cells, the osteoblasts. We now have a rather complete view of the events underlying osteogenesis, from a cellular, molecular, genetic, and epigenetic perspective. Because this knowledge is still largely restricted to mammals, it is difficult, if not impossible, to deduce the evolutionary history of the regulatory network involved in osteoblasts specification and differentiation. In this study, we focused on the transcriptional regulators Runx2 and VDR (the Vitamin D Receptor that, in mammals, directly interact together and stabilize complexes of co-activators and chromatin remodellers, thereby allowing the transcriptional activation of target genes involved in extracellular matrix mineralization. Using a combination of functional, biochemical, and histological approaches, we have asked if the interaction observed between Runx2 and VDR represents a recent mammalian innovation, or if it results from more ancient changes that have occurred deep in the vertebrate lineage. Results Using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization in developing embryos of chick, frog and teleost fishes, we have revealed that the co-expression of Runx2 and VDR in skeletal elements has been particularly strengthened in the lineage leading to amniotes. We show that the teleost Runx2 orthologue as well as the three mammalian Runx1, Runx2 and Runx3 paralogues are able to co-immunoprecipitate with the VDR protein present in nuclear extracts of rat osteoblasts stimulated with 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. In addition, the teleost Runx2 can activate the transcription of the mammalian osteocalcin promoter in transfection experiments, and this response can be further enhanced by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Finally

  11. Involvement of pro- and antinociceptive factors in minocycline analgesia in rat neuropathic pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojewska, Ewelina; Popiolek-Barczyk, Katarzyna; Jurga, Agnieszka M; Makuch, Wioletta; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2014-12-15

    In neuropathic pain the repeated minocycline treatment inhibited the mRNA and protein expression of the microglial markers and metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). The minocycline diminished the pronociceptive (IL-6, IL-18), but not antinociceptive (IL-1alpha, IL-4, IL-10) cytokines at the spinal cord level. In vitro primary cell culture studies have shown that MMP-9, TIMP-1, IL-1beta, IL-1alpha, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-18 are of microglial origin. Minocycline reduces the production of pronociceptive factors, resulting in a more potent antinociceptive effect. This change in the ratio between pro- and antinociceptive factors, in favour of the latter may be the mechanism of minocycline analgesia in neuropathy.

  12. [Factors family background of mothers involved in having a premature baby].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamburova, M; Hristova, I

    2014-01-01

    Level of prematurity is an objective criterion for determining the health welfare of the population. Several family background factors of the mother increases the risk of preterm birth child - family status, unwanted pregnancy, etc. Pregnancy among unmarried women and unwanted pregnancy are associated with a higher risk of giving premature baby. Aim of this study is a survey and analysis of factors of family background of the mother (family status and unplanned pregnancy) and their influence on the birth of a premature baby. The survey found nearly three times higher risk OR = 2,83 95 % CI (1,7-4,7) for the birth of a premature baby among unmarried mothers compared to married women, and twice as high proportion of unplanned pregnancy mothers of preterm infants - 20.7% compared to terminfants-10.4%.

  13. Selective factors involved in oil flotation isolation of black yeasts from the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satow, M M; Attili-Angelis, D; de Hoog, G S; Angelis, D F; Vicente, V A

    2008-01-01

    The oil flotation isolation technique has been successfully applied to recover chaetothyrialean black yeasts and relatives from the environment. The selective mechanisms playing a role in isolation are unknown. The fungi concerned are supposed to occupy specialized microniches in nature, taking advantage of (1) oligotrophism. Mineral oil as a main selective agent may be based on (2) hydrophobicity or on (3) assimilation. All three hypotheses are tested in this paper. Results show that cell wall hydrophobicity is unlikely to be a selective factor. Incubation under poor nutrient conditions provides competitive advantage for black yeasts, especially for Exophiala strains, which are subsequently enriched by mineral oil which enhances growth in this group of fungi. Incubation under mineral media and mineral oil can be used as selective factor.

  14. Critical review on the physical and mechanical factors involved in tissue engineering of cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaut, Carrie; Sugaya, Kiminobu

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage defects often progress to osteoarthritis, which negatively impacts quality of life for millions of people worldwide and leads to high healthcare expenditures. Tissue engineering approaches to osteoarthritis have concentrated on proliferation and differentiation of stem cells by activation and suppression of signaling pathways, and by using a variety of scaffolding techniques. Recent studies indicate a key role of environmental factors in the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to mature cartilage-producing chondrocytes. Therapeutic approaches that consider environmental regulation could optimize chondrogenesis protocols for regeneration of articular cartilage. This review focuses on the effect of scaffold structure and composition, mechanical stress and hypoxia in modulating mesenchymal stem cell fate and the current use of these environmental factors in tissue engineering research.

  15. Extrinsic Factors Involved in the Differentiation of Stem Cells into Insulin-Producing Cells: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca S. Y. Wong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease with many debilitating complications. Treatment of diabetes mellitus mainly revolves around conventional oral hypoglycaemic agents and insulin replacement therapy. Recently, scientists have turned their attention to the generation of insulin-producing cells (IPCs from stem cells of various sources. To date, many types of stem cells of human and animal origins have been successfully turned into IPCs in vitro and have been shown to exert glucose-lowering effect in vivo. However, scientists are still faced with the challenge of producing a sufficient number of IPCs that can in turn produce sufficient insulin for clinical use. A careful choice of stem cells, methods, and extrinsic factors for induction may all be contributing factors to successful production of functional beta-islet like IPCs. It is also important that the mechanism of differentiation and mechanism by which IPCs correct hyperglycaemia are carefully studied before they are used in human subjects.

  16. Catheter-related infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: virulence factors involved and their relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejnickova, Katerina; Hola, Veronika; Ruzicka, Filip

    2014-11-01

    The nosocomial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is equipped with a large arsenal of cell-associated and secreted virulence factors which enhance its invasive potential. The complex relationships among virulence determinants have hitherto not been fully elucidated. In the present study, 175 catheter-related isolates were observed for the presence of selected virulence factors, namely extracellular enzymes and siderophore production, biofilm formation, resistance to antibiotics, and motility. A high percentage of the strains produced most of the tested virulence factors. A positive correlation was identified between the production of several exoproducts, and also between the formation of both types of biofilm. An opposite trend was observed between the two types of biofilm and the production of siderophores. Whereas the relationship between the submerged biofilm production (i.e. the biofilm formed on the solid surface below the water level) and the siderophore secretion was negative, the production of air-liquid interface (A-L) biofilm (i.e. the biofilm floating on the surface of the cultivation medium) and the siderophore secretion were positively correlated. All correlations were statistically significant at the level P = 0.05 with the correlation coefficient γ ≥ 0.50. Our results suggest that: (1) the co-production of the lytic enzymes and siderophores can play an important role in the pathogenesis of the catheter-related infections and should be taken into account when the virulence potential is assessed; (2) biofilm-positive strains are capable of forming both submerged and non-attached A-L biofilms; and (3) the different micro-environment in the submerged biofilm and A-L biofilm layers have opposite consequences for the production of other virulence factors.

  17. Examining factors involved in stress-related working memory impairments: Independent or conditional effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Jonathan B; Tartar, Jaime L; Tamayo, Brittney A

    2015-12-01

    A large and growing body of research demonstrates the impact of psychological stress on working memory. However, the typical study approach tests the effects of a single biological or psychological factor on changes in working memory. The current study attempted to move beyond the standard single-factor assessment by examining the impact of 2 possible factors in stress-related working memory impairments. To this end, 60 participants completed a working memory task before and after either a psychological stressor writing task or a control writing task and completed measures of both cortisol and mind wandering. We also included a measure of state anxiety to examine the direct and indirect effect on working memory. We found that mind wandering mediated the relationship between state anxiety and working memory at the baseline measurement. This indirect relationship was moderated by cortisol, such that the impact of mind wandering on working memory increased as cortisol levels increased. No overall working memory impairment was observed following the stress manipulation, but increases in state anxiety and mind wandering were observed. State anxiety and mind wandering independently mediated the relationship between change in working memory and threat perception. The indirect paths resulted in opposing effects on working memory. Combined, the findings from this study suggest that cortisol enhances the impact of mind wandering on working memory, that state anxiety may not always result in stress-related working memory impairments, and that high working memory performance can protect against mind wandering.

  18. State of the art: psychotherapeutic interventions targeting the psychological factors involved in IBD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Daniela; Menichetti, Julia; Fiorino, Gionata; Vegni, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The present article aims to review the literature on the relationship between psychology and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In particular, the first section is dedicated to explore the role of psychological factors in the etiopathology of the disease, its development and the efficacy of treatments, while the second analyzes existing literature on the role of psychological interventions in the care of IBD patients. Although the role of psychological factors in IBD appears controversial, literature seems to distinguish between antecedents of the disease (stress and lifestyle behavior), potential mediators of disease course (family functioning, attachment style, coping strategies, and illness perception), outcomes of IBD and concurrent factors (anxiety, depression and quality of life). Four types of psychological interventions are described: Stress management, Psychodynamic, Cognitive behavioral and Hypnosis based. Data on the role and efficacy of psychological interventions in IBD patients show little evidence both on reduction of the disease activity and benefits on psychological variables. Psychological interventions seem to be beneficial in the short term especially for adolescents. The importance of considering the connections between psychology and IBD from a broader perspective reflecting the complexity of the phenomenon at multiple levels is discussed.

  19. Factors Involved in the In Vitro Fermentability of Short Carbohydrates in Static Faecal Batch Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Gietl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, research has focused on the positive effects of prebiotics on intestinal health and gut microbiota. The relationship between their chemical structure and their fermentation pattern by human intestinal microbiota is still not well understood. The aim of this study was to improve understanding of this relationship and identify factors that may be used to design galactooligosaccharides that reach more distal regions than commercial prebiotics which mainly target the proximal colon. The following factors were investigated: monomer type, linkage, substitution, and degree of polymerisation. Total organic acid production from sugars by faecal bacteria was fitted to a model which allowed an estimate of the time when half of the maximal organic acid concentration was reached (T50 in static faecal batch cultures. The different factors can be grouped by their effectiveness at prolonging fermentation time as follows: substitution is most effective, with methylgalactose, β-galactose-pentaacetate, D-fucose, and galactitol fermented more slowly than D-galactose. Monomers and linkage also influence fermentation time, with L rhamnose, arabinose, melezitose, and xylose being fermented significantly slower than D-glucose (P<0.05, maltose, isomaltose, cellobiose, and gentiobiose showing that Glcα1-6Glc and Glcβ1-4Glc were utilised slowest. Chain length had the smallest effect on fermentation time.

  20. Characterization of a novel Medicago sativa NAC transcription factor gene involved in response to drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong Xin

    2013-11-01

    Relying on the regulation of transcription factors, plants resist to various abiotic and biotic stresses. NAC (NAM, ATAF1/2, CUC2) are one of the largest families of plant-specific transcription factors and known to play important roles in plant development and response to environmental stresses. A new NAC gene was cloned on the basis of 503 bp EST fragment from the SSH cDNA library of Medicago sativa. It was 1,115 bp including an 816 bp ORF and encodes 271 amino acids. A highly conserved region is located from the 7th amino acid to the 315th amino acid in its N-terminal domain. The NAC protein is subcellularly localized in the nucleus of onion epidemical cells and possible functions as a transcription factor. The relative quantitative real-time RT-PCR was performed at different stress time. The results revealed that the transcription expression of NAC gene could be induced by drought, high salinity and ABA. The transgenic Arabidopsis with NAC gene has the drought tolerance better than the wild-type.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of serum resistance of human influenza H3N2 virus and their involvement in virus adaptation in a new host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrosovich, M; Gao, P; Kawaoka, Y

    1998-08-01

    viruses; a later isolate, however, displayed binding properties more similar to those of classical equine strains. These data suggest that the neuraminidase-resistant sialylglycoconjugates present in horses exert selective pressure on the receptor-binding properties of avian virus HA after its introduction into this host.

  2. Factors associated with crashes involving taxi owners and non-owners: A case of moral hazard and adverse selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Richard; Choi, Jaisung

    2016-02-01

    Taxis experience a higher risk of a motor vehicle crash partly because of their much higher levels of exposure on the roads. Although several studies have been conducted to examine the factors associated with the frequency and severity of taxi collisions, little research has been conducted to examine the differences in the factors associated with owner taxis and non-owner taxis. This study finds that collisions involving non-owners are more likely to be associated with poor or risky driving behaviors than collisions involving taxi vehicle owners. This result is consistent with the economic principles of moral hazard and adverse selection. Hence, policy makers responsible for traffic safety, taxi regulation or taxi operations should consider measures to reduce these market inefficiencies and improve the safety of not only taxi drivers but all road users.

  3. The Staphylococcus aureus protein Sbi acts as a complement inhibitor and forms a tripartite complex with host complement Factor H and C3b.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Haupt

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, similar to other pathogens, binds human complement regulators Factor H and Factor H related protein 1 (FHR-1 from human serum. Here we identify the secreted protein Sbi (Staphylococcus aureus binder of IgG as a ligand that interacts with Factor H by a-to our knowledge-new type of interaction. Factor H binds to Sbi in combination with C3b or C3d, and forms tripartite SbiratioC3ratioFactor H complexes. Apparently, the type of C3 influences the stability of the complex; surface plasmon resonance studies revealed a higher stability of C3d complexed to Sbi, as compared to C3b or C3. As part of this tripartite complex, Factor H is functionally active and displays complement regulatory activity. Sbi, by recruiting Factor H and C3b, acts as a potent complement inhibitor, and inhibits alternative pathway-mediated lyses of rabbit erythrocytes by human serum and sera of other species. Thus, Sbi is a multifunctional bacterial protein, which binds host complement components Factor H and C3 as well as IgG and beta(2-glycoprotein I and interferes with innate immune recogniti