WorldWideScience

Sample records for hospital wards professor

  1. Light Atmosphere in Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone Mandrup

    by the patients in the ward. The project is based on the Danish Regulation for light in hospitals (DS703), which is a supplement to the regulation of artificial lighting in workplaces (DS700). The kick-off to the project was reading the DS703, second paragraph, chapter 2 about general requirements for lighting...... group has quite diverse needs and preferences, while the staff needs task lighting and the patient a space experienced as homely and pleasant. Categories such as ‘pleasure’ and ‘activities’ are also a part of the user aspect. The space is divided into subcategories as ‘location of the space...

  2. Positioning and change in a hospital ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærbeck, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This paper focuses on communication about hygiene in a hospital ward and with the relevant infection control organization. The purpose of this paper is to examine the function of the hygiene coordinator as a key change agent and the communicative challenges and role conflicts implied in her...... practice. The author suggests strategies for improving communication on hygiene on ward level. Design/methodology/approach The empirical material consists of interviews and recordings of communicative events in relation to a breakout of dangerous bacteria in the ward. Change communication is used...... as a contextualizing frame of understanding, and positioning theory and analysis are applied to shed light upon the core challenges of communicating as a change agent when the coordinator's professional position and collegial relations do not support it. Findings It is shown how these challenges are connected...

  3. Characterization of indoor bioaerosols from a hospital ward in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization of indoor bioaerosols from a hospital ward in a tropical ... assessment of indoor air quality and determine pathogenic microorganisms due to particle fall-out. Key words: Indoor air, bioaerosols, hospital ward, tropical setting ...

  4. Exploring positive hospital ward soundscape interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackrill, J; Jennings, P; Cain, R

    2014-11-01

    Sound is often considered as a negative aspect of an environment that needs mitigating, particularly in hospitals. It is worthwhile however, to consider how subjective responses to hospital sounds can be made more positive. The authors identified natural sound, steady state sound and written sound source information as having the potential to do this. Listening evaluations were conducted with 24 participants who rated their emotional (Relaxation) and cognitive (Interest and Understanding) response to a variety of hospital ward soundscape clips across these three interventions. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed that the 'Relaxation' response was significantly affected (n(2) = 0.05, p = 0.001) by the interventions with natural sound producing a 10.1% more positive response. Most interestingly, written sound source information produced a 4.7% positive change in response. The authors conclude that exploring different ways to improve the sounds of a hospital offers subjective benefits that move beyond sound level reduction. This is an area for future work to focus upon in an effort to achieve more positively experienced hospital soundscapes and environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  5. The labour ward analgesic service at King Edward VIII Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The labour ward analgesic service at King Edward VIII. Hospital, Durban. D. A. ROCKE, C. C. ROUT, H. D. RUSSELL, S. SINGH. Abstract The provision of analgesic services to the labour ward at King Edward VIII Hospital was studied during a I-week period. Of249 patients, 113 (45%) received no analgesia whatsoever.

  6. Microbiological assessment of indoor air of teaching hospital wards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus, the objective of this study is to provide fundamental data related to the microbial quality of indoor air of Jimma University Specialized Hospital wards, to estimate the health hazard and to create standards for indoor air quality control. METHODS: The microbial quality of indoor air of seven wards of Jimma University ...

  7. Optimizing Lighting Design for Hospital Wards by Defining User Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Niels; Stidsen, Lone; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2011-01-01

    of lighting design, so it has the ability to support the different users activity and behavior on the ward. By using RFID tracking and manual observations we have analyzed and evaluated the ward functionality as working environment for the staff. The method creates a higher understanding of the ward...... of lighting design in private and public settings are often not similar. The purpose of this article is therefore present a approach dividing the hospital ward in 3 user zones for patients, staff and visitors. The main user of the zone should be in control of the light scenario and thereby a refining...

  8. Rolling out Productive Ward foundation modules across a hospital trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Sam; Gordon, Pete; McSherry, Wilfred

    The Shrewsbury and Telford Hospitals NHS Trust has spent the last 12 months rolling out the Productive Ward foundation modules across the whole organisation. This has resulted in measurable increases in time spent on direct care, and reduced infection rates and ward non-pay (non-staffing) expenditure. This article discusses the initiative and looks at how problems with the hospital supply chain are being addressed.

  9. Design Proposal for Pleasurable Light Atmosphere in Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Fisker, Anna Marie

    2010-01-01

    When constructing and designing Danish hospitals for the future, patients, staff and guests are in focus. It is found important to have a starting point in healing architecture and create an environment with knowledge of users sensory and functionally needs and looks at how hospital wards can sup...

  10. Modelling of coughed droplets in a hospital ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadrizadeh, Sasan; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Coughing and its importance for spreading respiratory infectious diseases has been confirmed in many previous studies. The dispersion process of respiratory droplets released by the coughing of a patient in a hospital ward was studied using computational fluid dynamics simulation. Two relatively ...

  11. Surveillance for hospital-acquired infections on surgical wards in a Dutch university hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp-Hopmans, Titia E. M.; Blok, Hetty E. M.; Troelstra, Annet; Gigengack-Baars, Ada C. M.; Weersink, Annemarie J. L.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Verhoef, Jan; Mascini, Ellen M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine incidence rates of hospital-acquired infections and to develop preventive measures to reduce the risk of hospital-acquired infections. METHODS: Prospective surveillance for hospital-acquired infections was performed during a 5-year period in the wards housing general and

  12. Bacteria contamination of touch surfaces in Polish hospital wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Różańska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of the study has been to evaluate the pathogenic bacteria contamination of touch surfaces in hospital wards. Material and Methods: Samples were taken from frequently touched surfaces in the hospital environment in 13 units of various types. Culturing was carried out on solid blood agar and in growth broth (tryptic soy broth – TSB. Species identification was performed using the analytical profile index (API biochemical testing and confirmed with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS system. Results: The total of 161 samples were taken for the study. Fifty-two of them, after 24 h of culture on a solid medium, demonstrated bacterial growth and further 60 samples had growth after prior multiplication in TSB. Overall, 69.6% of samples exhibited growth of 19 bacterial species. Pathogenic species – representing indicator organisms of efficiency of hospital cleaning – was demonstrated by 21.4% of samples. Among them Acinetobacter spp., Enterocococci spp. and Staphylococcus aureus were identified. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS were predominant. The proportion of various groups of bacteria significantly varied in respective hospitals, and in various types of wards. Disturbing observation is a large proportion of resistance of isolated CNS strains as a potential reservoir of resistance genes. Conclusions: The results show that touch surfaces in hospital units are contaminated by both potentially pathogenic and pathogenic bacterial species. In connection with the reported, also in Poland, frequent omission or incorrect execution of hand hygiene by hospital staff, and probably patients, touch surfaces still constitute important reservoir of pathogenic bacteria. Improving hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers with recommendations is necessary for increasing biological safety of hospital environment. Med Pr 2017;68(3:459–467

  13. Food work and feeding assistance on hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaven, Ben; Bamford, Claire; May, Carl; Moynihan, Paula

    2013-05-01

    Approximately 60 per cent of UK patients aged 65 years or older are at risk of malnutrition or their situation worsening while in hospital. We report the results of a qualitative study embedded in research to prevent malnutrition in older people in hospital (the mappmal study). Our aim was to understand and describe processes that promote or inhibit nutrition in hospital. Throughout 2009 we examined meal services at four UK hospital sites across two regional locations, focusing on older patients admitted with dementia, for stroke or for fractured neck of femur. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with National Health Service staff (n = 54), stakeholders (n = 6), and a focus group with former patients and carers (n = 5). We identified ward-based food work as a technical and interpersonal challenge in narratives around malnutrition. Food work constituted two overlapping spheres of activity: interpersonal engagement through feeding assistance and reassurance and the arrangement of resources that facilitate meals such as the preparation of food trolleys. Our analysis is framed by the literature on emotional labour, dirty work and the professionalisation of nursing. We demonstrate how food work is overlooked by being conceptualised as common sense and as one of the most mundane and elementary tasks in hospitals. © 2012 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2012 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Nurses caring for ENT patients in a district general hospital without a dedicated ENT ward score significantly less in a test of knowledge than nurses caring for ENT patients in a dedicated ENT ward in a comparable district general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxton, C R; Black, D; Muhlschlegel, J; Jardine, A

    2014-12-01

    To assess whether there is a difference in ENT knowledge amongst nurses caring for patients on a dedicated ENT ward and nurses caring for ENT patients in a similar hospital without a dedicated ENT ward. A test of theoretical knowledge of ENT nursing care was devised and administered to nurses working on a dedicated ENT ward and then to nurses working on generic non-subspecialist wards regularly caring for ENT patients in a hospital without a dedicated ENT ward. The test scores were then compared. A single specialist ENT/Maxillo-Facial/Opthalmology ward in hospital A and 3 generic surgical wards in hospital B. Both hospitals are comparable district general hospitals in the south west of England. Nursing staff working in hospital A and hospital B on the relevant wards were approached during the working day. 11 nurses on ward 1, 10 nurses on ward 2, 11 nurses on ward 3 and 10 nurses on ward 4 (the dedicated ENT ward). Each individual test score was used to generate an average score per ward and these scores compared to see if there was a significant difference. The average score out of 10 on ward 1 was 6.8 (+/-1.6). The average score on ward two was 4.8 (+/-1.6). The average score on ward three was 5.5 (+/-2.1). The average score on ward 4, which is the dedicated ENT ward, was 9.7 (+/-0.5). The differences in average test score between the dedicated ENT ward and all of the other wards are statistically significant. Nurses working on a dedicated ENT ward have an average higher score in a test of knowledge than nurses working on generic surgical wards. This difference is statistically significant and persists despite banding or training. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Airflow and Contaminant Distribution in Hospital Wards with a Displacement Ventililation System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, H.; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Li, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Airflow and Contaminant Distribution in Hospital Wards with a Displacement Ventilalation System. The 2nd International Conference on Build Environment and Public Health, BEPH 2004, Shenzhen , China . ABSTRACT Displacement ventilation has not been considered to be an applicable system for hospital...... to accurately predict three-dimensional distribution of air velocity, temperature, and contaminant concentration in the ward. Indoor airflow in a displacement ventilation system involves a combination of different flow streams such as the gravity currents and thermal plumes. It is important to choose...... ventilation system in hospital wards. It is for this purpose that we study the performance of displacement ventilation in hospital wards as one of the steps to optimize the ventilation design. When the prospect of applying displacement ventilation system in a hospital ward is examined, it should be necessary...

  16. Costs of terminal patients who receive palliative care or usual care in different hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven; Kutten, Betty; Keirse, Emmanuel; Berghe, Paul Vanden; Beguin, Claire; Desmedt, Marianne; Deveugele, Myriam; Léonard, Christian; Paulus, Dominique; Menten, Johan

    2010-11-01

    In addition to the effectiveness of hospital care models for terminal patients, policy makers and health care payers are concerned about their costs. This study aims to measure the hospital costs of treating terminal patients in Belgium from the health care payer perspective. Also, this study compares the costs of palliative and usual care in different types of hospital wards. A multicenter, retrospective cohort study compared costs of palliative care with usual care in acute hospital wards and with care in palliative care units. The study enrolled terminal patients from a representative sample of hospitals. Health care costs included fixed hospital costs and charges relating to medical fees, pharmacy and other charges. Data sources consisted of hospital accountancy data and invoice data. Six hospitals participated in the study, generating a total of 146 patients. The findings showed that palliative care in a palliative care unit was more expensive than palliative care in an acute ward due to higher staffing levels in palliative care units. Palliative care in an acute ward is cheaper than usual care in an acute ward. This study suggests that palliative care models in acute wards need to be supported because such care models appear to be less expensive than usual care and because such care models are likely to better reflect the needs of terminal patients. This finding emphasizes the importance of the timely recognition of the need for palliative care in terminal patients treated in acute wards.

  17. Professor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    DEBAT: Danske bistandskroner skal øge den interregionale handel i Afrika - det skaber vækst i Afrika og indirekte handel med danske virksomheder, mener Henrik Hansen, professor ved Økonomisk Institut på KU.......DEBAT: Danske bistandskroner skal øge den interregionale handel i Afrika - det skaber vækst i Afrika og indirekte handel med danske virksomheder, mener Henrik Hansen, professor ved Økonomisk Institut på KU....

  18. Numerical investigation of airborne infection in naturally ventilated hospital wards with central-corridor type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Qi; Qian, Hua; Liu, Li

    2018-01-01

    Natural ventilation is believed to control airborne infection due to high ventilation rates while an undesired flow pattern may cause infection transmission in hospital wards. A computational fluid dynamics simulation was carried out in this study to investigate the impact of airflow pattern....... The results not only give direct evidence to strongly support World Health Organization’s recommendation but also suggest required amendment of the Chinese standard GB 51039-2014 to improve ventilation arrangement in general hospital wards in China. Our findings are useful for improving the future design...... of general hospital wards for airborne infection control....

  19. A Survey on the Attitude of Professors & Residents of Clinical Wards about Disclosing the Results of Diagnoses for Incurable Patients at Urmia University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH Miri Ghaffarzadeh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: One of the most important and complicated problems in medical ethics is to disclose the full truth about diagnosis of incurable diseases which leads to death, and each therapist may be encountered with it during the years of medical profession.

    The aim of this study was to survey on attitude of professors and residents of clinical wards to disclose the diagnosis for incurable patients leading to death.

     

    Methods: In this descriptive study, sampling was carried out by a survey. All faculty members and their residents of teaching hospitals of Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, Iran, were surveyed as sample in 2007. Of 145 subjects, 138 responded to the questionnaire. The collected data were analyzed using Pearson and Spearman correlation tests with a p≤0.05 being considered as significant.

     

    Results: In this study, the tendency to disclose the diagnosis among faculty members and residents was 64.63%. Also, there was no significant relation between age, sex, university degree, educational field, years of service of the faculty members and residents of clinical wards with the tendency for telling the truth to incurable patients.

     

    Conclusion: Final analyses revealed that the faculty members and clinical residents of different fields in terms of diagnosis disclosure do not have a definite idea. However, the majority of them agree to disclose the full truth about diagnoses.

     

  20. Evaluation of bio-aerosols concentration in the different wards of three educational hospitals in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshmatollah Nourmoradi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioaerosols level in the various parts of three educational hospitals of Isfahan, Iran. Materials and Methods: The collection of bioaerosols (including bacterial and fungal microorganisms was carried out with one-stage Anderson sampler. The sampling was carried out at the height of 1.5 m from the floor of various hospitals wards (infectious, surgery, urology wards, and operating room. The volume of each sample was determined based on pre-tests carried and was about 50 L. After sampling, the samples were incubated and analyzed. The effect of various environmental conditions including humidity, temperature, and outdoor bioaerosol levels was also investigated. Results: The lowest numbers of fungal and bacterial concentration were obtained in operating rooms of the hospitals and the highest concentration was observed in infectious disease wards of hospital 1 and 2 and surgery ward of hospital 3. The bacterial concentration was observed to be higher in hospital wards than outdoor, except hospitals′ operating rooms. Conclusion: The findings showed that the bioaerosols level in the hospitals was relatively high. The higher levels of indoor bacteria than outdoor might be associated with the presence of patients, their activity, unsuitable ventilation, and disinfection. Therefore, environmental monitoring and control measures are required to improve hospital environmental quality especially in the wards with immune deficiency patients.

  1. Delivery of pharmaceutical services at ward level in a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellack, N; Martins, V; Botha, N; Meyer, J C

    2009-03-01

    Poor management of pharmaceuticals could lead to wastage of financial resources and poor services in the public sector. The main aim of the study was to investigate the quality of pharmaceutical services at ward level in a teaching hospital. The design of the study was descriptive. Three data collection instruments were designed and pilot-tested prior to the actual data collection. Two structured questionnaires were used to interview the sister-in-charge of each ward and the stock and drug controller at the pharmacy. A checklist for the management of pharmaceuticals was completed for each ward. Descriptive statistics were used to describe and summarise the data. Sisters-in-charge of 30 wards and the stock and drug controller at the pharmacy participated in the study. The relationship with the pharmacy was perceived to be average by 54% (n = 30) of the sisters-in-charge of the wards. Communication with the pharmacy was mainly by telephone and 57% of the sisters-in-charge mentioned that they experienced difficulties in conveying messages to the pharmacy. Ten of the wards received regular ward visits by a pharmacist. Expiry dates were checked by all wards but at different intervals. The majority of the wards (90%) used patient cards, which refer to prescription charts, for stock control and ordering from the pharmacy. Fridge temperatures were checked and charted on a daily basis by 30% of the wards. Written standard operating procedures (SOPs) were used by the pharmacy for issuing ward stock. Although 83% of the wards indicated that they used SOPs, evidence of written SOPs was not available. The results indicated that the management of pharmaceutical services at ward level could be improved. Implementation of appropriate communication systems will enhance cooperation between the pharmacy and the wards. A uniform ward stock control system, either by computer or stock cards, should be introduced. Regular ward visits by a pharmacist to oversee ward stock management are

  2. Evaluation of fungal air contamination in selected wards of two tertiary hospitals in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Kamali Sarwestani

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: According to the results of this study, the frequency and diversity of fungal spores in hospital wards were different. In addition, since the fungal contamination in the hospital environment are affected by various environmental factors and the efficiency of ventilation systems, some of these wards require better ventilation system as well as regular monitoring to remove these fungal bioaerosols in order to maintain the health of patients and health care workers.

  3. Auditing Safety of Compounding and Reconstituting of Intravenous Medicines on Hospital Wards in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvikas-Peltonen, Eeva; Palmgren, Joni; Häggman, Verner; Celikkayalar, Ercan; Manninen, Raija; Airaksinen, Marja

    2017-01-01

    On the hospital wards in Finland, nurses generally reconstitute intravenous medicines, such as antibiotics, analgesics, and antiemetics prescribed by doctors. Medicine reconstitution is prone to many errors. Therefore, it is important to identify incorrect practices in the reconstitution of medicine to improve patient safety in hospitals. The aim of this study was to audit the compounding and reconstituting of intravenous medicines on hospital wards in a secondary-care hospital in Finland by using an assessment tool and microbiological testing for identifying issues posing patient safety risks. A hospital pharmacist conducted an external audit by using a validated 65-item assessment tool for safe-medicine compounding practices on 20 wards of the selected hospital. Also, three different microbiological samples were collected to assure the aseptics. Practices were evaluated using a four-point rating scale of "never performed," "rarely performed," "often performed," and "always performed," and were based on observation and interviews with nurses or ward pharmacists. In addition, glove-, settle plate-, and media fill-tests were collected. Associations between microbial sample results and audit-tool results were discussed. Altogether, only six out of the 65 items were fully implemented in all wards; these were related to logistic practices and quality assurance. More than half of the wards used incorrect practices ("rarely performed" or "never performed") for five items. Most of these obviated practices related to aseptic practices. All media-fill tests were clean but the number of colony forming units in glove samples and settle- plate samples varied from 0 to >100. More contamination was found in wards where environmental conditions were inadequate or the use of gloves was incorrect. Compounding practices were [mostly] quite well adapted, but the aseptic practices needed improvement. Attention should have been directed particularly to good aseptic techniques and

  4. Malnutrition and nutritional care practices in hospital wards for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderwee, Katrien; Clays, Els; Bocquaert, Ilse; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Lardennois, Miguel; Gobert, Micheline; Defloor, Tom

    2011-04-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to gain a better insight into the current nutritional care practices in Belgian hospital wards for older people, and to study the association between these practices and the prevalence of malnutrition. In 1999, the Council of Europe assessed nutritional care practices and support in 12 European countries and showed them to be sparse and inconsistent. At the time of research, no studies had described the association between nutritional care practices and malnutrition prevalence in Belgium. In 2007, a cross-sectional survey was carried out in a representative sample of Belgian hospital wards for older people. In total, 2094 patients from 140 wards for older people were included. The overall prevalence rate of malnutrition in wards for older people was 31.9%. Nutritional care practices such as nutritional screening and assessment, use of a standardized screening instrument and a nutritional protocol were suboptimal. Multilevel analysis revealed that ward characteristics explained for 9.1% whether a patient was malnourished or not. None of the registered nutritional care practices could explain a patient's individual risk. Malnutrition is a frequently occurring problem on hospital wards for older people. Increased consciousness among healthcare professionals and hospital policy makers of the importance of nutritional care will contribute to further improvement in care quality. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Occurrence of airborne vancomycin- and gentamicin-resistant bacteria in various hospital wards in Isfahan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhoseini, Seyed Hamed; Nikaeen, Mahnaz; Khanahmad, Hossein; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Airborne transmission of pathogenic resistant bacteria is well recognized as an important route for the acquisition of a wide range of nosocomial infections in hospitals. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of airborne vancomycin and gentamicin (VM and GM) resistant bacteria in different wards of four educational hospitals. A total of 64 air samples were collected from operating theater (OT), Intensive Care Unit (ICU), surgery ward, and internal medicine ward of four educational hospitals in Isfahan, Iran. Airborne culturable bacteria were collected using all glass impingers. Samples were analyzed for the detection of VM- and GM-resistant bacteria. The average level of bacteria ranged from 99 to 1079 CFU/m(3). The highest level of airborne bacteria was observed in hospital 4 (628 CFU/m(3)) and the highest average concentration of GM- and VM-resistant airborne bacteria were found in hospital 3 (22 CFU/m(3)). The mean concentration of airborne bacteria was the lowest in OT wards and GM- and VM-resistant airborne bacteria were not detected in this ward of hospitals. The highest prevalence of antibiotic-resistant airborne bacteria was observed in ICU ward. There was a statistically significant difference for the prevalence of VM-resistant bacteria between hospital wards (P = 0.012). Our finding showed that the relatively high prevalence of VM- and GM-resistant airborne bacteria in ICUs could be a great concern from the point of view of patients' health. These results confirm the necessity of application of effective control measures which significantly decrease the exposure of high-risk patients to potentially airborne nosocomial infections.

  6. Measuring dynamic social contacts in a rehabilitation hospital: effect of wards, patient and staff characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Audrey; Obadia, Thomas; Martinet, Lucie; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; Fleury, Eric; Guillemot, Didier; Opatowski, Lulla; Temime, Laura

    2018-01-26

    Understanding transmission routes of hospital-acquired infections (HAI) is key to improve their control. In this context, describing and analyzing dynamic inter-individual contact patterns in hospitals is essential. In this study, we used wearable sensors to detect Close Proximity Interactions (CPIs) among patients and hospital staff in a 200-bed long-term care facility over 4 months. First, the dynamic CPI data was described in terms of contact frequency and duration per individual status or activity and per ward. Second, we investigated the individual factors associated with high contact frequency or duration using generalized linear mixed-effect models to account for inter-ward heterogeneity. Hospital porters and physicians had the highest daily number of distinct contacts, making them more likely to disseminate HAI among individuals. Conversely, contact duration was highest between patients, with potential implications in terms of HAI acquisition risk. Contact patterns differed among hospital wards, reflecting varying care patterns depending on reason for hospitalization, with more frequent contacts in neurologic wards and fewer, longer contacts in geriatric wards. This study is the first to report proximity-sensing data informing on inter-individual contacts in long-term care settings. Our results should help better understand HAI spread, parameterize future mathematical models, and propose efficient control strategies.

  7. Supporting Information Access in a Hospital Ward by a Context-Aware Mobile Electronic Patient Record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Mikael B.; Høegh, Rune Thaarup

    2006-01-01

    Context-awareness holds promise for improving the utility of software products. Context-aware mobile systems encompass the ability to automatically discover and react to changes in an environment. Most contemporary context-aware mobile systems aim to support users in private situations, for example......Ward is to support nurses in conducting morning procedures in a hospital ward. MobileWard is context-aware as it is able to discover and react autonomously according to changes in the environment and since it integrates the ability to provide information and services to the user where the relevancy depends....... Implications and limitations of the proposed solution are further discussed....

  8. Understanding thermal comfort perception of nurses in a hospital ward work environment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, M.T.H.; Mishra, A.K.; Loomans, M.G.L.C.; Kort, H.S.M.

    2018-01-01

    In indoor comfort research, thermal comfort of care-professionals in hospital environment is a little explored topic. To address this gap, a mixed methods study, with the nursing staff in hospital wards acting as participants, was undertaken. Responses were collected during three weeks in the summer

  9. Prevalence of Nosocomial Infection in Different Wards of Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Falahi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background The CDC defines a nosocomial infection as a localized or systemic condition caused by an adverse reaction to the presence of an infectious agent(s or its toxin(s. It is an infection that occurs between 48 to 72 hours after admission of patients in the hospital or as soon after the hospital discharge and on the admission time, patients don't have this infection. Objectives This study aimed to characterize the prevalence of nosocomial infection in Ghaem hospital, Mashhad, Iran. Methods This retrospective study was conducted in all wards of the Ghaem hospital, Mashhad during the 1 year period (2013; the data were collected from the wards records and HIS system and analyzed by the SPSS software (version16. Results In the present study, of total 35979 hospitalized patients in different wards of the Ghaem hospital was reported 1.1% of nosocomial infection. In the meantime, overall, the most prevalent organism was Acinetobacter baumannii with a prevalence of 37.2% and the minimum was linked to the Bacillus species with a prevalence 0.3%. The highest and lowest prevalence of the nosocomial infection was in the ICU and CCU with 49.9% and 0.3%, respectively. In general, among all wards of the mentioned hospital, the most frequent nosocomial infection was pneumonia (47.4% and the lowest belonged to CSF (2.3%. Conclusions In our study, the ICU ward was accounted for the highest rate of nosocomial infection, due to the critical importance of this ward. Preventive measures and survivelance system for reduction of nosocomial infections is needed.

  10. Does daily nurse staffing match ward workload variability? Three hospitals' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbay, Uri; Bukchin, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Nurse shortage and rising healthcare resource burdens mean that appropriate workforce use is imperative. This paper aims to evaluate whether daily nursing staffing meets ward workload needs. Nurse attendance and daily nurses' workload capacity in three hospitals were evaluated. Statistical process control was used to evaluate intra-ward nurse workload capacity and day-to-day variations. Statistical process control is a statistics-based method for process monitoring that uses charts with predefined target measure and control limits. Standardization was performed for inter-ward analysis by converting ward-specific crude measures to ward-specific relative measures by dividing observed/expected. Two charts: acceptable and tolerable daily nurse workload intensity, were defined. Appropriate staffing indicators were defined as those exceeding predefined rates within acceptable and tolerable limits (50 percent and 80 percent respectively). A total of 42 percent of the overall days fell within acceptable control limits and 71 percent within tolerable control limits. Appropriate staffing indicators were met in only 33 percent of wards regarding acceptable nurse workload intensity and in only 45 percent of wards regarding tolerable workloads. The study work did not differentiate crude nurse attendance and it did not take into account patient severity since crude bed occupancy was used. Double statistical process control charts and certain staffing indicators were used, which is open to debate. Wards that met appropriate staffing indicators prove the method's feasibility. Wards that did not meet appropriate staffing indicators prove the importance and the need for process evaluations and monitoring. Methods presented for monitoring daily staffing appropriateness are simple to implement either for intra-ward day-to-day variation by using nurse workload capacity statistical process control charts or for inter-ward evaluation using standardized measure of nurse workload intensity

  11. Do daily ward interviews improve measurement of hospital quality and safety indicators? A prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkies, Mitchell N; Bowles, Kelly-Ann; Skinner, Elizabeth H; Haas, Romi; Mitchell, Deb; O'Brien, Lisa; May, Kerry; Ghaly, Marcelle; Ho, Melissa; Haines, Terry P

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if the addition of daily ward interview data improves the capture of hospital quality and safety indicators compared with incident reporting systems alone. An additional aim was to determine the potential characteristics influencing under-reporting of hospital quality and safety indicators in incident reporting systems. A prospective, observational study was performed at two tertiary metropolitan public hospitals. Research assistants from allied health backgrounds met daily with the nurse in charge of the ward and discussed the occurrence of any falls, pressure injuries and rapid response medical team calls. Data were collected from four general medical wards, four surgical wards, an orthopaedic, neurosciences, plastics, respiratory, renal, sub-acute and acute medical assessment unit. An estimated total of 303 falls, 221 pressure injuries and 884 rapid response medical team calls occurred between 15 wards across two hospitals, over a period of 6 months. Hospital incident reporting systems underestimated falls by 30.0%, pressure injuries by 59.3% and rapid response medical team calls by 17.0%. The use of ward interview data collection in addition to hospital incident reporting systems improved data capture of falls by 23.8% (n = 72), pressure injuries by 21.7% (n = 48) and rapid response medical team calls by 12.7% (n = 112). Falls events were significantly less likely to be reported if they occurred on a Monday (P = 0.04) and pressure injuries significantly more likely to be reported if they occurred on a Wednesday (P = 0.01). Hospital quality and safety indicators (falls, pressure injuries and rapid response medical team calls) were under-reported in incident reporting systems, with variability in under-reporting between wards and the day of event occurrence. The use of ward interview data collection in addition to hospital incident reporting systems improved reporting of hospital quality and safety

  12. Poverty and violence, frustration and inventiveness: hospital ward life in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Shahaduz

    2004-11-01

    An ethnographic exploration was done in an orthopaedic ward of a government teaching hospital in Bangladesh to understand the nature of hospital culture in the context of Bangladeshi society at large. Life and work in the ward result in a culture that is simultaneously created by its inhabitants and the conditions in which they are situated. The study shows that biomedicine is a product of particular social conditions and that the hospital reflects features of its society. Behind the injuries and broken limbs in the ward are stories of violence, crime, and intolerance occurring in a society where masses of people fight over limited resources. In the ward people interact in an extremely hierarchical manner. The patients, who are mainly from poor economic backgrounds, remain at the bottom of the hierarchy. Doctors and other staff members are often professionally frustrated. Strikes related to hospital staff's various professional demands hamper the regular flow of work in the ward. Family members are engaged in nursing and provide various kinds of support to their hospitalized relatives. Patients give small bribes to ward boys and cleaners to obtain their day-to-day necessities. Patients joke with each other and mock senior doctors. Thus, they neutralize their powerlessness and drive away the monotony of their stay. Doctors develop 'indigenous' solutions to orthopaedic problems. Instead of using high-tech devices, they employ instruments made of bamboo, bricks, and razor blades. This study shows how medical practice takes shape in an understaffed, under-resourced and poorly financed hospital operating in a low-income country.

  13. Comparative Assessment of Patients’ Rights Observance in the Hospitalization Wards of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences’ Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sharifi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients are one of the most vulnerable social groups. Respecting patients’ rights will lead in advantages like “decrease in hospitalization time” and “increase in patients’ satisfaction”. This study is performed to assess the patients' rights observance in the hospitalization wards of educational hospitals of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this descriptive-cross sectional study 137 medical student (intern were selected by convenience sampling method. We used a questionnaire with 12 questions. Reliability of questionnaire was confirmed by experts of the field and validity was confirmed by Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient (81%. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS (v21 using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance and Tukey test. Findings: In this study the observance rate of patients’ rights was at a good level in 41.6% of cases, at an average level in 55.5% of cases and at a low level in 2.9% of cases. There was a significant difference between several hospitalization wards in the observance rate of patients’ rights. (p = 0.001. The observance rate of patients’ rights in infectious disease ward and gynecology ward was at a lower level in comparison with other wards. Conclusion: The observance rate of patients’ rights was at an average to good level in most of hospitalization ward. However this observance rate is at a low level in some wards. More studies about the causes of these differences can help us in planning about improvement of patients’ rights observance.

  14. The survival time of chocolates on hospital wards: covert observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajendragadkar, Parag R; Moualed, Daniel J; Nicolson, Phillip L R; Adjei, Felicia D; Cakebread, Holly E; Duehmke, Rudolf M; Martin, Claire A

    2013-12-14

    To quantify the consumption of chocolates in a hospital ward environment. Multicentre, prospective, covert observational study. Four wards at three hospitals (where the authors worked) within the United Kingdom. Boxes of Quality Street (Nestlé) and Roses (Cadbury) on the ward and anyone eating these chocolates. Observers covertly placed two 350 g boxes of Quality Street and Roses chocolates on each ward (eight boxes were used in the study containing a total of 258 individual chocolates). These boxes were kept under continuous covert surveillance, with the time recorded when each chocolate was eaten. Median survival time of a chocolate. 191 out of 258 (74%) chocolates were observed being eaten. The mean total observation period was 254 minutes (95% confidence interval 179 to 329). The median survival time of a chocolate was 51 minutes (39 to 63). The model of chocolate consumption was non-linear, with an initial rapid rate of consumption that slowed with time. An exponential decay model best fitted these findings (model R(2)=0.844, P<0.001), with a survival half life (time taken for 50% of the chocolates to be eaten) of 99 minutes. The mean time taken to open a box of chocolates from first appearance on the ward was 12 minutes (95% confidence interval 0 to 24). Quality Street chocolates survived longer than Roses chocolates (hazard ratio for survival of Roses v Quality Street 0.70, 95% confidence interval 0.53 to 0.93, P=0.014). The highest percentages of chocolates were consumed by healthcare assistants (28%) and nurses (28%), followed by doctors (15%). From our observational study, chocolate survival in a hospital ward was relatively short, and was modelled well by an exponential decay model. Roses chocolates were preferentially consumed to Quality Street chocolates in a ward setting. Chocolates were consumed primarily by healthcare assistants and nurses, followed by doctors. Further practical studies are needed.

  15. Transfers from intensive care unit to hospital ward: a multicentre textual analysis of physician progress notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyla N; Leigh, Jeanna Parsons; Kamran, Hasham; Bagshaw, Sean M; Fowler, Rob A; Dodek, Peter M; Turgeon, Alexis F; Forster, Alan J; Lamontagne, Francois; Soo, Andrea; Stelfox, Henry T

    2018-01-28

    Little is known about documentation during transitions of patient care between clinical specialties. Therefore, we examined the focus, structure and purpose of physician progress notes for patients transferred from the intensive care unit (ICU) to hospital ward to identify opportunities to improve communication breaks. This was a prospective cohort study in ten Canadian hospitals. We analyzed physician progress notes for consenting adult patients transferred from a medical-surgical ICU to hospital ward. The number, length, legibility and content of notes was counted and compared across care settings using mixed-effects linear regression models accounting for clustering within hospitals. Qualitative content analyses were conducted on a stratified random sample of 32 patients. A total of 447 patient medical records that included 7052 progress notes (mean 2.1 notes/patient/day 95% CI 1.9-2.3) were analyzed. Notes written by the ICU team were significantly longer than notes written by the ward team (mean lines of text 21 vs. 15, p notes; mean agreement of patient issues was 42% [95% CI 31-53%]. Qualitative analyses identified eight themes related to focus (central point - e.g., problem list), structure (organization, - e.g., note-taking style), and purpose (intention - e.g., documentation of patient course) of the notes that varied across clinical specialties and physician seniority. Important gaps and variations in written documentation during transitions of patient care between ICU and hospital ward physicians are common, and include discrepancies in documentation of patient information.

  16. Lighting quality in hospital wards - State of the art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Fisker, Anna Marie

    When constructing and designing hospitals for the future, patients, staff and guests are in focus. Designing a healing hospital environment is a very important factor when planning new hospitals. How can aspects such as design, architecture, arts, lights, sounds and materials support and improve...... the patients' recovery rate and the satisfaction of staff and guests? Literature and research on this subject are full of contrasting theories, myths and contradictions as well as lack of understanding of the interplay between different design parameters in an integrated design. The physical settings...

  17. Medical and surgical ward rounds in teaching hospitals of Kuwait University: students’ perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlMutar S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sara AlMutar,1 Lulwa AlTourah,1 Hussain Sadeq,2 Jumanah Karim,2 Yousef Marwan3 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Pediatrics, Mubarak Al-Kabeer Hospital, 3Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Al-Razi Orthopedic Hospital, Kuwait City, Kuwait Background: Teaching sessions for medical students during ward rounds are an essential component of bedside teaching, providing students with the opportunity to regard patients as actual people, and to observe their physical conditions directly, allowing a better understanding of illnesses to be developed. We aim to explore medical students’ perceptions regarding medical and surgical ward rounds within the Faculty of Medicine at Kuwait University, and to evaluate whether this teaching activity is meeting the expectation of learners. Methods: A pretested questionnaire was used to collect data from 141 medical students during the 2012–2013 academic year. They were asked to provide their current and expected ratings about competencies that were supposed to be gained during ward rounds, on a scale from 1 (lowest to 5 (highest. Mean scores were calculated, and the Student t-test was used to compare results. P < 0.05 was the cut-off level for significance. Results: Only 17 students (12.1% declined to participate in the study. The students' current competency scores (for competencies taught within both disciplines – medical and surgical were significantly lower than the scores indicating students’ expectations (P < 0.001. The best-taught competency was bedside examination, in both medical (mean: 3.45 and surgical (mean: 3.05 ward rounds. However, medical ward rounds were better than surgical rounds in covering some competencies, especially the teaching of professional attitude and approach towards patients (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Both medical and surgical ward rounds were deficient in meeting the students’ expectations. Medical educators should utilize the available literature to improve the bedside

  18. The Design and Simulation of Natural Personalised Ventilation (NPV System for Multi-Bed Hospital Wards

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    Zulfikar A. Adamu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Adequate ventilation is necessary for thermal comfort and reducing risks from infectious bio-aerosols in hospital wards, but achieving this with mechanical ventilation has carbon and energy implications. Natural ventilation is often limited to window-based designs whose dilution/mixing effectiveness are subject to constraints of wind speed, cross ventilation, and in the case of hospital wards, proximity of patients to external walls. A buoyancy-driven natural ventilation system capable of achieving dilution/mixing was shown to be feasible in a preceding study of novel system called natural personalised ventilation (NPV. This system combined both architecture and airflow engineering principles of space design and buoyancy and was tested and validated (salt-bath experiment for a single bed ward. This research extends the previous work and is proof-of-concept on the feasibility of NPV system for multi-bed wards. Two different four-bed ward types were investigated of using computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations under wind-neutral conditions. Results predict that NPV system could deliver fresh air to multiple patients, including those located 10 m away from external wall, with absolute flow rates of between 32 L·s−1 and 54 L·s−1 for each patient/bed. Compared to same wards simulated using window design, ingress of airborne contaminants into patients’ breathing zone and summer overheating potential were minimised, while overall ward dilution was maximised. Findings suggest the NPV has potentials for enabling architects and building service engineers to decouple airflow delivery from the visualisation and illumination responsibilities placed upon windows.

  19. Assessment of Measurement Tools of Observation Rate of Nursing Handover Standards in Clinical Wards of Hospital

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    Saadi Amini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives : In health centers, clinical information of patient is transferred among care staffs regularly. One of the common cases in information transferring is during the time of nurses’ handover in hospital which performing it correctly will help schedule patient care, providing safety and facilitating exact transferring of information. The aim of this study is investigating validity and reliability of assessment of observance rate of shift handover in clinical wards checklist. Material and Methods : In order to determine the reliability of checklist, two experts panel meetings were held with the presence of 10 experts in clinical field that in those meetings the reliability was investigated with discussion and consensus of participants. Checklist validity was investigated through pilot study in 4 wards of 4 hospitals and calculated by Kronbach- alpha method with 28 cases of shifts handover in morning, noon, and night shift. Results : In studying reliability, the primary checklist was divided into two checklists: patient handover, equipments and ward handover that included 27 and 72 items, respectively. The reliability of patient handover checklist was verified with 0.9155 Kronbach-alpha and that of equipments and ward handover was verified with 0.8779 Kronbach-alpha. Conclusion : Verifying checklists by mentioned scientific and statistical methods showed that these are very powerful instruments that can be used as one of the assessment tools of shift handover in clinical wards to be used towards promoting received services by customers of healthcare system.

  20. HRM and strategic climates in hospitals: does the message come accross at the ward level?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veld, M.; Paauwe, J.; Boselie, J.P.P.E.F.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined how employees perceive intended strategic goals and HRM at the ward level, and if these perceptions generate the desired effects. The qualitative part of the research reveals that the hospital pursues two strategic goals (i.e. quality and safety). Analysis of the questionnaire

  1. Risk of Cross-Infection in a Hospital Ward with Downward Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Li, Yuguo; Buus, Morten

    2010-01-01

    A two-bed hospital ward with one standing healthcare person and a ceiling-mounted lowimpulse semicircular inlet diffuser is simulated in a full-scale room. Tracer gas is used for simulating gaseous contaminants, and the concentration is measured at different air change rates and different posture...

  2. Spatial Distribution of Infection Risk of SARS Transmission in a Hospital Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, Hua; Li, Yuguo; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2009-01-01

    The classical Wells-Riley model for predicting risk of airborne transmission of diseases assumes a uniform spatial distribution of the infected cases in an enclosed space. A new mathematical model is developed here for predicting the spatial distribution of infection risk of airborne transmitted ......, such as inpatients in a hospital ward, passengers in an airplane etc....

  3. Bed blocking by elderly patients in general-hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, S G; Davies, G H

    1975-08-01

    A point prevalence survey, using a questionnaire, was performed in three general hospitals to investigate the problem of elderly patients blocking acute-hospital beds. A total of 1010 occupied general beds were surveyed and all patients, over the age of 60 years, who had been in hospital more than four weeks, and who, in the opinion of medical and nursing staff, were no longer in need of the facilities of a general hospital, were investigated. Forty-eight patients (4.8 per cent of the total) were found to be genuinely in bed inappropriate to their needs. Rehabilitation, together with assessment of these patients, appeared disorganized and lacked consistency, and decisions regarding suitable 'disposal' appeared to be made without sufficient consultation and conformed to no detectable pattern. The main reason for the continuing bed occupancy of the patients was the length of the waiting lists for alternative residential accommodation and the main single medical factor preventing discharge home or to a hostel was the problem of mobility. By interviewing staff and patients and scrutinizing the questionnaires, it was found that 23 patients (48 per cent) were only suitable for transfer to a long-stay hospital. Of these, however, 15 (31 per cent) could be placed in specialized accommodation if some degree of nursing care, at present not available, was provided.

  4. Inappropriate use of urinary catheters and its common complications in different hospital wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parivash Davoodian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate use of indwelling urinary catheters (IUCs and their related complications is one of the most important problems in hospital wards. The aim of this study was to evaluate inappropriate use of IUCs and their complications among patients in Tehran, Iran. Two hundred and six consecutive patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU as well as medical and surgical wards at the Shahid Mohammadi Hospital in Bandarabbas from September 1 to 30, 2005 and in whom IUCs were used, were studied. Data collected included age of the patients, diagnoses, reason for use of IUC and the complications related to it. Overall, 164 patients (79.6% had IUCs used appropriately while 42 of them (20.6% were catheterized unjustifiably. Inappropriate use of IUCs in the ICU, medical and surgical wards was reported in 12 (18.5%, 16 (19.0% and 14 patients (24.6%, respectively. The most common complication of IUCs was urinary tract infection, which occurred in 91 patients (44.2% and hematuria, which was seen in 3.9% of the patients. Our study suggests that inappropriate use of IUCs is prevalent, particularly in the surgical wards, and the most common complication observed was catheter-associated urinary tract infection.

  5. Eliciting Patients’ Health Concerns in Consulting Rooms and Wards in Vietnamese Public Hospitals

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    Huong Thi Linh Nguyen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the doctor’s elicitation of the patient’s presenting health concern in two clinical settings in the Vietnamese public hospital system: the consulting room and the ward. The data were taken from 66 audio-recorded consultations. Our analysis shows that the elicitors used by the doctor in the consulting room often communicate a weak epistemic stance towards the patient’s health issue, while those used in the ward tend to signal a strong epistemic stance. In addition, this contrast between the elicitors employed in the consulting room and the ward is evident in our data regardless of whether the consultation is a first visit or a same follow-up (in which the doctor is the same one that treated the patient on their last visit, though the contrast is less clear for different follow-ups (in which the doctor has not treated the patient before. An additional finding is that the clinical setting has some bearing on the use of inappropriate elicitation formats (in which the doctor opens the visit with an elicitor which is more appropriate for another type of visit. The precise way in which each of the consulting room and the ward operates is, of course, a feature of the Vietnamese public hospital system itself. Hence, the overall contrast between the elicitors and elicitation formats used in these two settings illustrates how, on a more general level, the institutional context can have an impact on doctor-patient communication.

  6. Cockroaches ’ bacterial infections in wards of hospitals, Hamedan city, west of Iran

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    Nejati Jalil

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the relationship between different species of cockroaches with their bacterial infection in different wards of Hamedan county hospitals, western Iran. Methods: Using sticky trap, hand collection and glass trap, 250 cockroaches were collected from 14 wards of 5 hospitals. After having their identification determined by detection key, all of them were used to isolate bacteria from cuticle and alimentary tract. Results: From four identified species, Blatella germanica were the most common in all of the wards (88.8% and next was the Periplaneta Americana (8%. 20 bacteria species isolated from cockroaches' surface and 21 from digestive organ. Escherichia coli were the most predominant bacteria isolated from external surface (26.5 % as well as alimentary tract (30.8%. The frequency of investigated bacteria on cockroaches' body surface was not significantly different between Periplaneta Americana and Blattella germanica except for Kllebsiella oxytoca (P<0.001 and Providensia Spp (P=0.035. Also, frequency of detected bacteria in cockroaches' digestive organ was not significantly different between these two species. Furthermore, the frequency of bacteria isolated from the cockroaches' external surface was not significantly different from that of digestive organ except for shigella disantery (P<0.001, Pseudomonas aeroginosa (P<0.001 and Klebsiella oxytoca (P=0.01 3. Conclusions: Since cockroaches can carry pathogenic bacteria, so their existence in the hospitals could be a serious public health problem. It is suggested to compile programs in order to control cockroaches especially in the hospitals.

  7. Dextrose infusion and glucose disorders in people without diabetes hospitalized in general wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman-Billard, Sylvie; Joubert, Michael; Reznik, Yves

    2013-11-01

    We measured fasting plasma glucose (FPG) on a single day in all persons without diabetes history admitted in general wards (N=1922). After age and length of stay adjustment, dextrose infusion was associated with a 3-fold increase (p<0.001) of hospital-related hyperglycemia (FPG ≥ 7 mmol/l), highlighting the need to interpret glucose disorders cautiously. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Malnutrition and nutritional care practices in hospital wards for older people

    OpenAIRE

    Vanderwee, Katrien; Clays, Els; Bocquaert, Ilse; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Lardennois, Miguel; Gobert, Micheline; Defloor, Tom

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: This paper is a report of a study conducted to gain a better insight into the current nutritional care practices in Belgian hospital wards for older people, and to study the association between these practices and the prevalence of malnutrition. BACKGROUND: In 1999, the Council of Europe assessed nutritional care practices and support in 12 European countries and showed them to be sparse and inconsistent. At the time of research, no studies had described the association between nutritio...

  9. Involvement in decisions about intravenous treatment for nursing home patients: nursing homes versus hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klomstad, Kristin; Pedersen, Reidar; Førde, Reidun; Romøren, Maria

    2018-05-08

    Many of the elderly in nursing homes are very ill and have a reduced quality of life. Life expectancy is often hard to predict. Decisions about life-prolonging treatment should be based on a professional assessment of the patient's best interest, assessment of capacity to consent, and on the patient's own wishes. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare how these types of decisions were made in nursing homes and in hospital wards. Using a questionnaire, we studied the decision-making process for 299 nursing home patients who were treated for dehydration using intravenous fluids, or for bacterial infections using intravenous antibiotics. We compared the 215 (72%) patients treated in nursing homes to the 84 (28%) nursing home patients treated in the hospital. The patients' capacity to consent was considered prior to treatment in 197 (92%) of the patients treated in nursing homes and 56 (67%) of the patients treated in hospitals (p nursing homes than in hospital (90% vs. 52%). Next of kin and other health personnel were also more rarely involved when the nursing home patient was treated in hospital. Whether advance care planning had been carried out, was more often unknown in the hospital (69% vs. 17% in nursing homes). Hospital doctors expressed more doubt about the decision to admit the patient to the hospital than about the treatment itself. This study indicates a potential for improvement in decision-making processes in general, and in particular when nursing home patients are treated in a hospital ward. The findings corroborate that nursing home patients should be treated locally if adequate health care and treatment is available. The communication between the different levels of health care when hospitalization is necessary, must be better. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01023763 (12/1/09) [The registration was delayed one month after study onset due to practical reasons].

  10. My Ward: The Story of St Thomas', Guy's and the Evelina Children's Hospitals and their Ward Names Wendy Mathews My Ward: The Story of St Thomas', Guy's and the Evelina Children's Hospitals and their Ward Names | Walpole House Publishing £5 I 135pp | 9780956394200 0956394205 [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    This is a fascinating record of the stories behind the names of wards at three London hospitals and of the hospitals themselves. Made possible by a grant from Guy's and st Thomas' Charity, it is beautifully produced and illustrated and is a great historical read.

  11. Measurement of air contamination in different wards of public sector hospital, Sukkur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Badaruddin AllahDino; Bhutto, Gul Hassan; Rizvi, Wajid Hussain

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and assess the index of bacterial contamination in different wards of the Public Sector Hospital of Sukkur (Teaching) Pakistan; whether or not the air contamination was statistically different from the acceptable level using active and passive sampling. In addition to this main hypothesis, other investigations included: occurrence of the most common bacteria, whether or not the bacterial contamination in the wards was a persistent problem and identification of the effective antibiotics against the indentified bacteria. The evidence sought based on the One Sample T test suggests that there is a (statistically) significant difference between the observed (higher) than the acceptance level (pcontamination problem was persistent as there was no significant difference among observed contamination of all three visits at (p>0.01) and the result of antibiotic susceptibility test highlights sensitivity and resistance level of antibiotics for the indentified bacteria.

  12. Medication Prescribing Pattern at a Pediatric Ward of an Ethiopian Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitsum Sebsibe Teni

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: drug use in pediatric patients is a unique dilemma in the management and monitoring of disease. This study aimed at assessing medication prescribing in a pediatric ward of an  Ethiopian hospital. Materials and Methods: a retrospective cross-sectional study was done by reviewing the medical records of 249 patients among those admitted in the period between 11th of September 2007 and 10th of September 2008 to the pediatric ward of Gondar University Referral Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. Data on characteristics like age, sex and weight; the diagnoses for which patients were admitted and medications prescribed to them during their stay in the ward was collected from the medical records of the patients. Results: an average of 3 diagnoses per patient with the most frequently diagnosed being malnutrition (29.23%, severe community acquired pneumonia (12.96% and underweight (8.86% were reported. A mean of 4.5 medications per patient with the most commonly prescribed being antibacterials namely penicillins which constituted 25.42%, other antibacterials making up 19.61% and medications used for correcting water, electrolyte and acid-base disturbances accounting for 17.19% of the total number of medications prescribed in the ward. The most common individual medications prescribed to the patients included crystalline penicillin, gentamicin and maintenance fluid constituting 9.22, 7.52 and 6.45 percentages respectively most of them in solution forms which were administered dominantly intravenously. Conclusion In this study the common prescription of antibacterials and those used for correcting water, electrolyte and acid-base disturbances was observed which went with the common diagnoses of malnutrition and pneumonia. 

  13. Implementing ward based clinical pharmacy services in an Ethiopian University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mekonnen AB

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical pharmacy practice has developed internationally to expand the role of a pharmacist well beyond the traditional roles of compounding, dispensing and supplying drugs to roles more directly in caring for patients. Studies on the activities of the clinical pharmacist in an inpatient ward in resource constrained settings are scarce, however.Objective: To assess ward based clinical pharmacy services in an internal medicine ward of Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Methods: The study was carried out in the internal medicine ward from March to April, 2011 at Jimma University Specialized Hospital. The study design was a prospective observational study where pharmaceutical care services provided by clinical pharmacists for inpatients were documented over a period of two months. Interventions like optimization of rational drug use and physician acceptance of these recommendations were documented. Clinical significance of interventions was evaluated by an independent team (1 internist, 1 clinical pharmacologist using a standardized method for categorizing drug related problems (DRPs. Results: A total of 149 drug related interventions conducted for 48 patients were documented; among which 133(89.3% were clinical pharmacists initiated interventions and 16(10.7% interventions were initiated by other health care professionals. The most frequent DRPs underlying interventions were unnecessary drug therapy, 36(24.2%; needs additional drug therapy, 34(22.8% and noncompliance, 29(19.5%. The most frequent intervention type was change of dosage/instruction for use, 23(15.4%. Acceptance rate by physicians was 68.4%. Among the interventions that were rated as clinically significant, 46(48.9% and 25(26.6% had major and moderate clinical importance respectively. Conclusion: Involving trained clinical pharmacists in the healthcare team leads to clinically relevant and well accepted optimization of medicine use in a resource limited settings. This

  14. Informed switching strongly decreases the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in hospital wards.

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    Roger D Kouyos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistant nosocomial infections are an important cause of mortality and morbidity in hospitals. Antibiotic cycling has been proposed to contain this spread by a coordinated use of different antibiotics. Theoretical work, however, suggests that often the random deployment of drugs ("mixing" might be the better strategy. We use an epidemiological model for a single hospital ward in order to assess the performance of cycling strategies which take into account the frequency of antibiotic resistance in the hospital ward. We assume that information on resistance frequencies stems from microbiological tests, which are performed in order to optimize individual therapy. Thus the strategy proposed here represents an optimization at population-level, which comes as a free byproduct of optimizing treatment at the individual level. We find that in most cases such an informed switching strategy outperforms both periodic cycling and mixing, despite the fact that information on the frequency of resistance is derived only from a small sub-population of patients. Furthermore we show that the success of this strategy is essentially a stochastic phenomenon taking advantage of the small population sizes in hospital wards. We find that the performance of an informed switching strategy can be improved substantially if information on resistance tests is integrated over a period of one to two weeks. Finally we argue that our findings are robust against a (moderate preexistence of doubly resistant strains and against transmission via environmental reservoirs. Overall, our results suggest that switching between different antibiotics might be a valuable strategy in small patient populations, if the switching strategies take the frequencies of resistance alleles into account.

  15. Internet of Health Things: Toward intelligent vital signs monitoring in hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Cristiano André; Pasluosta, Cristian F; Eskofier, Björn; da Silva, Denise Bandeira; da Rosa Righi, Rodrigo

    2018-06-02

    Large amounts of patient data are routinely manually collected in hospitals by using standalone medical devices, including vital signs. Such data is sometimes stored in spreadsheets, not forming part of patients' electronic health records, and is therefore difficult for caregivers to combine and analyze. One possible solution to overcome these limitations is the interconnection of medical devices via the Internet using a distributed platform, namely the Internet of Things. This approach allows data from different sources to be combined in order to better diagnose patient health status and identify possible anticipatory actions. This work introduces the concept of the Internet of Health Things (IoHT), focusing on surveying the different approaches that could be applied to gather and combine data on vital signs in hospitals. Common heuristic approaches are considered, such as weighted early warning scoring systems, and the possibility of employing intelligent algorithms is analyzed. As a result, this article proposes possible directions for combining patient data in hospital wards to improve efficiency, allow the optimization of resources, and minimize patient health deterioration. It is concluded that a patient-centered approach is critical, and that the IoHT paradigm will continue to provide more optimal solutions for patient management in hospital wards. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. An unusual outbreak of nontuberculous mycobacteria in hospital respiratory wards: Association with nontuberculous mycobacterial colonization of hospital water supply network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore D′Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM infection is increasing worldwide arousing concerns that NTM infection may become a serious health challenge. We recently observed a significant increase of NTM-positive sputa samples from patients referred to respiratory disease wards of a large tertiary hospital in Rome. A survey to identify possible NTM contamination revealed a massive presence of NTM in the hospital water supply network. After decontamination procedures, NTM presence dropped both in water pipelines and sputa samples. We believe that this observation should encourage water network surveys for NTM contamination and prompt decontamination procedures should be considered to reduce this potential source of infection.

  17. Effectiveness of hospital-wide methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection control policies differs by ward specialty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemarie Sadsad

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is a major cause of preventable nosocomial infections and is endemic in hospitals worldwide. The effectiveness of infection control policies varies significantly across hospital settings. The impact of the hospital context towards the rate of nosocomial MRSA infections and the success of infection control is understudied. We conducted a modelling study to evaluate several infection control policies in surgical, intensive care, and medical ward specialties, each with distinct ward conditions and policies, of a tertiary public hospital in Sydney, Australia. We reconfirm hand hygiene as the most successful policy and find it to be necessary for the success of other policies. Active screening for MRSA, patient isolation in single-bed rooms, and additional staffing were found to be less effective. Across these ward specialties, MRSA transmission risk varied by 13% and reductions in the prevalence and nosocomial incidence rate of MRSA due to infection control policies varied by up to 45%. Different levels of infection control were required to reduce and control nosocomial MRSA infections for each ward specialty. Infection control policies and policy targets should be specific for the ward and context of the hospital. The model we developed is generic and can be calibrated to represent different ward settings and pathogens transmitted between patients indirectly through health care workers. This can aid the timely and cost effective design of synergistic and context specific infection control policies.

  18. Dynamic change of surface microbiota with different environmental cleaning methods between two wards in a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-Hua; Tu, Chi-Chao; Kuo, Han-Yueh; Zeng, Rong-Fong; Yu, Cheng-Sheng; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing; Liou, Ming-Li

    2017-01-01

    Terminal disinfection and daily cleaning have been performed in hospitals in Taiwan for many years to reduce the risks of healthcare-associated infections. However, the effectiveness of these cleaning approaches and dynamic changes of surface microbiota upon cleaning remain unclear. Here, we report the surface changes of bacterial communities with terminal disinfection and daily cleaning in a medical intensive care unit (MICU) and only terminal disinfection in a respiratory care center (RCC) using 16s ribosomal RNA (rRNA) metagenomics. A total of 36 samples, including 9 samples per sampling time, from each ward were analysed. The clinical isolates were recorded during the sampling time. A large amount of microbial diversity was detected, and human skin microbiota (HSM) was predominant in both wards. In addition, the colonization rate of the HSM in the MICU was higher than that in the RCC, especially for Moraxellaceae. A higher alpha-diversity (p = 0.005519) and a lower UniFrac distance was shown in the RCC due to the lack of daily cleaning. Moreover, a significantly higher abundance among Acinetobacter sp., Streptococcus sp. and Pseudomonas sp. was shown in the RCC compared to the MICU using the paired t test. We concluded that cleaning changes might contribute to the difference in diversity between two wards.

  19. Neuroinfection survey at a neurological ward in a Brazilian tertiary teaching hospital

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    Paulo E Marchiori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken to characterize the neuroinfection profile in a tertiary neurological ward. INTRODUCTION: Neuroinfection is a worldwide concern and bacterial meningitis, tetanus and cerebral malaria have been reported as the commonest causes in developing countries. METHODS: From 1999 to 2007, all patients admitted to the Neurology Ward of Hospital das Clínicas, São Paulo University School of Medicine because of neuroinfection had their medical records reviewed. Age, gender, immunological status, neurological syndrome at presentation, infectious agent and clinical outcome were recorded. RESULTS: Three hundred and seventy four cases of neuroinfectious diseases accounted for 4.2% of ward admissions and the identification of infectious agent was successful in 81% of cases. Mean age was 40.5 + 13.4 years, 63.8% were male, 19.7% were immunocompromised patients and meningoencephalitis was the most common clinical presentation despite infectious agent. Viruses and bacteria were equally responsible for 29.4% of neuroinfectious diseases; parasitic, fungal and prion infections accounted for 28%, 9.6% and 3.5% respectively. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Treponema pallidum, Taenia solium, Schistosoma mansoni, Cryptococcus neoformans and Histoplasma capsulatum were the more common infectious pathogens in the patients. Infection mortality rate was 14.2%, of which 62.3% occurred in immunocompetent patients. CONCLUSION: Our institution appeared to share some results with developed and developing countries. Comparison with literature may be considered as quality control to health assistance.

  20. Balancing nurses' workload in hospital wards: study protocol of developing a method to manage workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Oetelaar, W F J M; van Stel, H F; van Rhenen, W; Stellato, R K; Grolman, W

    2016-11-10

    Hospitals pursue different goals at the same time: excellent service to their patients, good quality care, operational excellence, retaining employees. This requires a good balance between patient needs and nursing staff. One way to ensure a proper fit between patient needs and nursing staff is to work with a workload management method. In our view, a nursing workload management method needs to have the following characteristics: easy to interpret; limited additional registration; applicable to different types of hospital wards; supported by nurses; covers all activities of nurses and suitable for prospective planning of nursing staff. At present, no such method is available. The research follows several steps to come to a workload management method for staff nurses. First, a list of patient characteristics relevant to care time will be composed by performing a Delphi study among staff nurses. Next, a time study of nurses' activities will be carried out. The 2 can be combined to estimate care time per patient group and estimate the time nurses spend on non-patient-related activities. These 2 estimates can be combined and compared with available nursing resources: this gives an estimate of nurses' workload. The research will take place in an academic hospital in the Netherlands. 6 surgical wards will be included, capacity 15-30 beds. The study protocol was submitted to the Medical Ethical Review Board of the University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht and received a positive advice, protocol number 14-165/C. This method will be developed in close cooperation with staff nurses and ward management. The strong involvement of the end users will contribute to a broader support of the results. The method we will develop may also be useful for planning purposes; this is a strong advantage compared with existing methods, which tend to focus on retrospective analysis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  1. Monitoring of airborne bacteria and aerosols in different wards of hospitals - Particle counting usefulness in investigation of airborne bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhoseini, Seyed Hamed; Nikaeen, Mahnaz; Khanahmd, Hossein; Hatamzadeh, Maryam; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    The presence of airborne bacteria in hospital environments is of great concern because of their potential role as a source of hospital-acquired infections (HAI). The aim of this study was the determination and comparison of the concentration of airborne bacteria in different wards of four educational hospitals, and evaluation of whether particle counting could be predictive of airborne bacterial concentration in different wards of a hospital. The study was performed in an operating theatre (OT), intensive care unit (ICU), surgery ward (SW) and internal medicine (IM) ward of four educational hospitals in Isfahan, Iran. A total of 80 samples were analyzed for the presence of airborne bacteria and particle levels. The average level of bacteria ranged from 75-1194 CFU/m (3) . Mean particle levels were higher than class 100,000 cleanrooms in all wards. A significant correlation was observed between the numbers of 1-5 µm particles and levels of airborne bacteria in operating theatres and ICUs. The results showed that factors which may influence the airborne bacterial level in hospital environments should be properly managed to minimize the risk of HAIs especially in operating theaters. Microbial air contamination of hospital settings should be performed by the monitoring of airborne bacteria, but particle counting could be considered as a good operative method for the continuous monitoring of air quality in operating theaters and ICUs where higher risks of infection are suspected.

  2. [Learning styles in medical residents and their professors of a pediatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Muñoz, Irina Elizabeth; Gómez-Negrete, Alonso; Varela-Ruiz, Margarita; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel; Mercado-Arellano, José Agustín; Sciandra-Rico, Martha Minerva; Matute-González, Mario Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background: the learning styles are cognitive, emotional, and psychological characteristics, which function as relatively stable indicators of how teachers and students perceive, interact, and respond to their learning environments. Knowing students' styles allows teachers to have tools to improve medical education. Our objective was to identify learning styles in pediatric residents and professors from a pediatric hospital. Methods: a learning styles questionnaire was applied to residents and theirs professors; data was analyzed in SPSS 12 software. Results: the dominant learning style in pediatric residents was reflexive and for professors was theoretical. There wasn't any difference between sexes or between medical or surgical specialities. There was more correlation between professors and residents when there was an increase in training time. Conclusions: the learning styles between professors and residents are different, especially at the beginning of the medical specialty courses; that's why it is necessary to realize a confrontation between the students' learning styles and teaching methods used by professors to improve significant learning. To know learning styles gives residents an important alternative to find a better study strategy.

  3. The Relationship between Place of Residence and Hospitalization Rate in the Biggest Referral Hospital of the Northwest according to Hospitalization Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Talebpour

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ​ Background and objectives: In accordance with the global pattern, the urban population in Iran is higher than the rural population. But, are the statistics of using hospitalization services in public hospitals in these two categories similar to this pattern? This study seeks to determine the effect of place of residence on hospitalization rate by examining annual hospitalization statistics of the country’s biggest referral hospital in the northwest. Material and Methods: The method used in this study is cross-sectional and all cases of hospitalization in Imam Reza Hospital as the northwest’s biggest referral hospital were picked by available sampling method. The cases of 30260 hospitalized patients were examined through direct observation and items extracted from their files were recorded in the checklist. In order to determine the relations between the variables, K2 test was applied and the P-value was considered less than 0.05 The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS.16 software. Results: Results indicated that the frequency distribution of patients in terms of their urban or rural residence did not yield any significant difference (P>0/05. Results also showed that the highest hospitalization rate for urban patients was 16.1% (3305 individuals in surgery ward while it was 14.2% (1384 individuals for rural patients in orthopedic ward. The least significant statistical difference between urban and rural hospitalization rates was observed in renal ward with 72.9% (1162 individual urban patients and 27.1% (432 individuals rural patients of total patients hospitalized in this ward. The most significant statistical difference between urban and rural hospitalization rates was observed in ICU with 44.9% (297 individuals urban patients and 55.1% (365 individuals rural patients of the total patients hospitalized in this ward. Conclusion: A relative comparison among illnesses in urban and rural populations, aside from illnesses caused by trauma

  4. Lost in hospital: a qualitative interview study that explores the perceptions of NHS inpatients who spent time on clinically inappropriate hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, Lucy; Adamson, Joy; Watt, Ian; Wright, John

    2015-10-01

    Prior research suggests that the placement of patients on clinically inappropriate hospital wards may increase the risk of experiencing patient safety issues. To explore patients' perspectives of the quality and safety of the care received during their inpatient stay on a clinically inappropriate hospital ward. Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews. Nineteen patients who had spent time on at least one clinically inappropriate ward during their hospital stay at a large NHS teaching hospital in England. Patients would prefer to be treated on the correct specialty ward, but it is generally accepted that this may not be possible. When patients are placed on inappropriate wards, they may lack a sense of belonging. Participants commented on potential failings in communication, medical staff availability, nurses' knowledge and the resources available, each of which may contribute to unsafe care. Patients generally acknowledge the need for placement on inappropriate wards due to demand for inpatient beds, but may report dissatisfaction in terms of preference and belonging. Importantly, patients recount issues resulting from this placement that may compromise their safety. Hospital managers should be encouraged to appreciate this insight and potential threat to safe practice and where possible avoid inappropriate ward transfers and admissions. Where such admissions are unavoidable, staff should take action to address the gaps in safety of care that have been identified. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Quantitative Risk Assessment of Patient Manual Handling in Wards of One of the Hospitals of Tehran using MAPO Method, Iran

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    Sajad Ataei

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Manual handling of disabled patients is one of the important and effective factors in acute low back pain among exposed nurses. The present study was conducted with the objective of quantitative risk assessment of patient manual handling among nurses in wards of one of the hospitals in Tehran using MAPO method. Methods: The present study was conducted as an analytical-cross-sectional study in 26 wards of one of the hospitals in Tehran city. Samples were selected by census method from nurses and paramedics of different wards of hospital. Data collection was performed using demographic information and MAPO checklist. Results: The highest score of MAPO were, respectively, related to wards of DI clinic (score, 14.7, men orthopedic (score, 6.3, and general operating room (score, 57. 53.8% of hospital wards were at the level 2 corrective action, which indicated that the risk of musculoskeletal disorder is 2.4 times higher than level 1 corrective action. Conclusion: Given that the proportion of disabled patient in cooperation and/or partial cooperation, lifting tools, auxiliary, wheelchair, and training have the most role among risk factors for above-mentioned wards, increasing the number of human resources and wheelchair, use of lifting and auxiliary tools and training reduce MAPO score and consequently the risk of musculoskeletal disorders.

  6. Hospitality and tourism management professor receives Fulbright to teach in India

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Sookhan

    2009-01-01

    Mahmood A. Khan, professor of hospitality and tourism management at Virginia Tech's Pamplin College of Business, has been awarded a Fulbright-Nehru Scholar grant to teach at the Indian Institute of Technology in New Delhi during the 2009-10 academic year.

  7. Air and surface contamination patterns of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on eight acute hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, E; Shore, A C; Deasy, E C; Galvin, S; Dolan, A; Walley, N; McHugh, S; Fitzgerald-Hughes, D; Sullivan, D J; Cunney, R; Coleman, D C; Humphreys, H

    2014-03-01

    Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can be recovered from hospital air and from environmental surfaces. This poses a potential risk of transmission to patients. To investigate associations between MRSA isolates recovered from air and environmental surfaces with those from patients when undertaking extensive patient and environmental sampling. This was a prospective observational study of patients and their environment in eight wards of a 700-bed tertiary care hospital during 2010 and 2011. Sampling of patients, air and surfaces was carried out on all ward bays, with more extended environmental sampling in ward high-dependency bays and at particular times of the day. The genetic relatedness of isolates was determined by DNA microarray profiling and spa typing. MRSA was recovered from 30/706 (4.3%) patients and from 19/132 (14.4%) air samples. On 9/132 (6.8%) occasions both patient and air samples yielded MRSA. In 32 high-dependency bays, MRSA was recovered from 12/161 (7.4%) patients, 8/32 (25%) air samples, and 21/644 (3.3%) environmental surface samples. On 10/132 (7.6%) occasions, MRSA was isolated from air in the absence of MRSA-positive patients. Patient demographic data combined with spa typing and DNA microarray profiling revealed four likely transmission clusters, where patient and environmental isolates were deemed to be very closely related. Air sampling yielded MRSA on frequent occasions, especially in high-dependency bays. Environmental and air sampling combined with patient demographic data, spa typing and DNA microarray profiling indicated the presence of clusters that were not otherwise apparent. Copyright © 2014 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Blood sample collection and patient identification demand improvement: a questionnaire study of preanalytical practices in hospital wards and laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Olof; Söderberg, Johan; Van Guelpen, Bethany; Stenlund, Hans; Grankvist, Kjell; Brulin, Christine

    2010-09-01

    Scand J Caring Sci; 2010; 24; 581-591 
 Blood sample collection and patient identification demand improvement: a questionnaire study of preanalytical practices in hospital wards and laboratories   Most errors in venous blood testing result from human mistakes occurring before the sample reach the laboratory.   To survey venous blood sampling (VBS) practices in hospital wards and to compare practices with hospital laboratories.   Staff in two hospitals (all wards) and two hospital laboratories (314 respondents, response rate 94%), completed a questionnaire addressing issues relevant to the collection of venous blood samples for clinical chemistry testing.   The findings suggest that instructions for patient identification and the collection of venous blood samples were not always followed. For example, 79% of the respondents reported the undesirable practice (UDP) of not always using wristbands for patient identification. Similarly, 87% of the respondents noted the UDP of removing venous stasis after the sampling is finished. Compared with the ward staff, a significantly higher proportion of the laboratory staff reported desirable practices regarding the collection of venous blood samples. Neither education nor the existence of established sampling routines was clearly associated with VBS practices among the ward staff.   The results of this study, the first of its kind, suggest that a clinically important risk of error is associated with VBS in the surveyed wards. Most important is the risk of misidentification of patients. Quality improvement of blood sample collection is clearly needed, particularly in hospital wards. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  9. [Medium-term strategy for the specific management of pneumology hospitals and wards after the decentralization of the sanitary system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muşat, Simona Nicoleta; Ioniţa, Diana; Paceonea, Mirela; Chiriac, Nona Delia; Stoicescu, Ileana Paula; Mihălţan, F D

    2011-01-01

    Identifying and promoting new management techniques for the descentralized pneumology hospitals or wards was one of the most ambitious objectives of the project "Quality in the pneumology medical services through continuous medical education and organizational flexibility", financed by the Human Resourses Development Sectorial Operational Programme 2007-2013 (ID 58451). The "Medium term Strategy on the specific management of the pneumology hospitals or wards after the descentralization of the sanitary system" presented in the article was written by the project's experts and discussed with pneumology managers and local authorities representatives. This Strategy application depends on the colaboration of the pneumology hospitals with professional associations, and local and central authorities.

  10. Assessment of Midwives’ Communication Skills at the Maternity Wards of Teaching Hospitals in Mashhad in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talate Khadivzadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim:The quality of communication between midwives and parturient women is a determinant of maternal satisfaction with midwifery care. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the communication skills of midwives at maternity wards of Mashhad teaching hospitals in 2014.   Methods:In this descriptive study, 49 midwives, working at Mashhad teaching hospitals, were randomly selected. All midwives worked rotating shifts at the wards. The midwives’ communication skills were assessed by the researcher, using the self-structured  observation checklist of communicative performance.   Results: The mean age of midwives was 39.11±9.66 years and their mean work experience was 15.9±8.77 years. In total, 68.3% of the participants experienced childbirth themselves. 66.7% of midwives were moderately  keen on midwifery as a profession. The mean score of the checklist obtained by midwives was 67.9±10.7. There was no relationship between midwives’ communication skills and work experience, childbirth experience, age or interest in midwifery. Conclusion:Considering the inadequacy of midwives’ communication skills, which could be the major cause of maternal dissatisfaction with delivery care, it is recommended that in-service training courses be held by applying new teaching methods. Moreover, the educational needs of midwives, including communication skills, should be considered in these training programs .

  11. Design and validation of a questionnaire to assess organizational culture in French hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saillour-Glénisson, F; Domecq, S; Kret, M; Sibe, M; Dumond, J P; Michel, P

    2016-09-17

    Although many organizational culture questionnaires have been developed, there is a lack of any validated multidimensional questionnaire assessing organizational culture at hospital ward level and adapted to health care context. Facing the lack of an appropriate tool, a multidisciplinary team designed and validated a dimensional organizational culture questionnaire for healthcare settings to be administered at ward level. A database of organizational culture items and themes was created after extensive literature review. Items were regrouped into dimensions and subdimensions (classification validated by experts). Pre-test and face validation was conducted with 15 health care professionals. In a stratified cluster random sample of hospitals, the psychometric validation was conducted in three phases on a sample of 859 healthcare professionals from 36 multidisciplinary medicine services: 1) the exploratory phase included a description of responses' saturation levels, factor and correlations analyses and an internal consistency analysis (Cronbach's alpha coefficient); 2) confirmatory phase used the Structural Equation Modeling (SEM); 3) reproducibility was studied by a test-retest. The overall response rate was 80 %; the completion average was 97 %. The metrological results were: a global Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.93, higher than 0.70 for 12 sub-dimensions; all Dillon-Goldstein's rho coefficients higher than 0.70; an excellent quality of external model with a Goodness of Fitness (GoF) criterion of 0.99. Seventy percent of the items had a reproducibility ranging from moderate (Intra-Class Coefficient between 50 and 70 % for 25 items) to good (ICC higher than 70 % for 33 items). COMEt (Contexte Organisationnel et Managérial en Etablissement de Santé) questionnaire is a validated multidimensional organizational culture questionnaire made of 6 dimensions, 21 sub-dimensions and 83 items. It is the first dimensional organizational culture questionnaire

  12. Pattern and outcome of patients discharged from chest ward of a university hospital

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    Ruchi Sachdeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To describe morbidity and mortality profile of patients discharged from chest ward of a university hospital. Materials and Methods: Prospectively selected information (age, gender, residence, length of stay, outcome and primary diagnosis of all consecutive in-patients was recorded for six month reference period. Results: Out of 967 patients, mean age was 50.64 years (±15.71; M:F = 3.5:1; 81.3% were from rural area. Primary diagnosis was tuberculosis/sequel among 528 (54.60% and non-TB among 439 (45.4% patients (chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases [COPD] - 20.3%; pneumonia - 15.8%; lung cancer - 5.0%; asthma - 1.6%; bronchiectasis - 0.9%, lung abscess - 0.8%, miscellaneous - 1.0%. Total deaths observed was 142 (14.7% of all discharges and 54.25% of deaths occurred within 48 hours of admission suggesting criticality/late presentation; time distribution of death was similar considering 8-hourly period of 24-h cycle. Average length of stay for all patients was 6.91 (±5.14 days while it was 7.38 (±4.98 days for discharge live and 4.19 (±5.21 days for expired patients. Conclusion: Study provides a snapshot of patients discharged from chest ward that may aid in decision making, improving quality of care and initiation of educational activities at primary level.

  13. Summative Evaluation on the Hospital Wards. What Do Faculty Say to Learners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasley, Peggy B.; Arnold, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    No previous studies have described how faculty give summative evaluations to learners on the medical wards. The aim of this study was to describe summative evaluations on the medical wards. Participants were students, house staff and faculty at the University of Pittsburgh. Ward rotation evaluative sessions were tape recorded. Feedback was…

  14. Nurses experiences regarding staffing patterns in the surgical wards of a private hospital in Gauteng South Africa

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    Moloko Malatji

    2017-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore and describe nurses' experiences regarding staffing patterns in the surgical wards of a private hospital in Gauteng in order to develop recommendations for staffing patterns in these wards. Methodology: A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was used. Data was collected by means of in-depth semi structured individual interviews from a purposive sample of professional nurses working in the surgical wards of this hospital. Data was analysed using Tesch's method of qualitative thematic analysis. Principles of trustworthiness and ethical principles to ensure the protection of human rights were applied throughout the study. Results: The findings of the study revealed one central theme which reflected that participants experienced the staffing patterns of the surgical wards negatively. Two main themes emerged as, nurses had negative experiences in the surgical wards as well as negative emotional experiences related to the staffing patterns. Conclusion: It is evident from the findings of the study that nurses are experiencing staffing patterns negatively.

  15. Cross Infection in Hospital Wards with Downward Ventilation - Different Locations of Return Openings without and with Partitions between Beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Li, Yuguo; Buus, Morten

    2009-01-01

    A two-bed hospital ward with one standing healthcare assistant and a ceiling-mounted low-impulse semicircular inlet diffuser is simulated in a full-scale room. Tracer gas is used for simulating gaseous contaminants, and the concentration is measured at different air change rates and different pos...

  16. Prevalence of potential drug–drug interactions among internal medicine ward in University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia

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    Akshaya Srikanth Bhagavathula

    2014-05-01

    Conclusion: We have recorded a high rate of prevalence of potential DDI in the internal medicine ward of UOG hospital and a high number of clinically significant DDIs which the most prevalent DDI were of moderate severity. Careful selection of drugs and active pharmaceutical care is encouraged in order to avoid negative consequences of these interactions.

  17. Pharmacy sales data versus ward stock accounting for the surveillance of broad-spectrum antibiotic use in hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Antibiotic consumption in hospitals is commonly measured using the accumulated amount of drugs delivered from the pharmacy to ward held stocks. The reliability of this method, particularly the impact of the length of the registration periods, has not been evaluated and such evaluation was aim of the study. Methods During 26 weeks, we performed a weekly ward stock count of use of broad-spectrum antibiotics - that is second- and third-generation cephalosporins, carbapenems, and quinolones - in five hospital wards and compared the data with corresponding pharmacy sales figures during the same period. Defined daily doses (DDDs) for antibiotics were used as measurement units (WHO ATC/DDD classification). Consumption figures obtained with the two methods for different registration intervals were compared by use of intraclass correlation analysis and Bland-Altman statistics. Results Broad-spectrum antibiotics accounted for a quarter to one-fifth of all systemic antibiotics (ATC group J01) used in the hospital and varied between wards, from 12.8 DDDs per 100 bed days in a urological ward to 24.5 DDDs in a pulmonary diseases ward. For the entire study period of 26 weeks, the pharmacy and ward defined daily doses figures for all broad-spectrum antibiotics differed only by 0.2%; however, for single wards deviations varied from -4.3% to 6.9%. The intraclass correlation coefficient, pharmacy versus ward data, increased from 0.78 to 0.94 for parenteral broad-spectrum antibiotics with increasing registration periods (1-4 weeks), whereas the corresponding figures for oral broad-spectrum antibiotics (ciprofloxacin) were from 0.46 to 0.74. For all broad-spectrum antibiotics and for parenteral antibiotics, limits of agreement between the two methods showed, according to Bland-Altman statistics, a deviation of ± 5% or less from average mean DDDs at 3- and 4-weeks registration intervals. Corresponding deviation for oral antibiotics was ± 21% at a 4-weeks interval

  18. Pharmacy sales data versus ward stock accounting for the surveillance of broad-spectrum antibiotic use in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Jon B; Myhr, Randi; Reikvam, Asmund

    2011-12-13

    Antibiotic consumption in hospitals is commonly measured using the accumulated amount of drugs delivered from the pharmacy to ward held stocks. The reliability of this method, particularly the impact of the length of the registration periods, has not been evaluated and such evaluation was aim of the study. During 26 weeks, we performed a weekly ward stock count of use of broad-spectrum antibiotics--that is second- and third-generation cephalosporins, carbapenems, and quinolones--in five hospital wards and compared the data with corresponding pharmacy sales figures during the same period. Defined daily doses (DDDs) for antibiotics were used as measurement units (WHO ATC/DDD classification). Consumption figures obtained with the two methods for different registration intervals were compared by use of intraclass correlation analysis and Bland-Altman statistics. Broad-spectrum antibiotics accounted for a quarter to one-fifth of all systemic antibiotics (ATC group J01) used in the hospital and varied between wards, from 12.8 DDDs per 100 bed days in a urological ward to 24.5 DDDs in a pulmonary diseases ward. For the entire study period of 26 weeks, the pharmacy and ward defined daily doses figures for all broad-spectrum antibiotics differed only by 0.2%; however, for single wards deviations varied from -4.3% to 6.9%. The intraclass correlation coefficient, pharmacy versus ward data, increased from 0.78 to 0.94 for parenteral broad-spectrum antibiotics with increasing registration periods (1-4 weeks), whereas the corresponding figures for oral broad-spectrum antibiotics (ciprofloxacin) were from 0.46 to 0.74. For all broad-spectrum antibiotics and for parenteral antibiotics, limits of agreement between the two methods showed, according to Bland-Altman statistics, a deviation of ± 5% or less from average mean DDDs at 3- and 4-weeks registration intervals. Corresponding deviation for oral antibiotics was ± 21% at a 4-weeks interval. There is a need for caution in

  19. Evaluation of paediatric injury hospitalization incidence at Hospital Ward in Grudziądz

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    Ewa Barczykowska

    2016-05-01

    4Correction Unit No. 2 in Grudziadz     Mailing address: Marta Lewicka, Collegium Medicum im. L. Rydygiera w Bydgoszczy, UMK w Toruniu, ul. Techników 3, 85-801 Bydgoszcz, Poland; Phone 52 585 21 93, e-mail: marta_grabinska@hotmail.com   Abstract Introduction. Children's and adolescents' injuries are a serious medical problem, as they lead to substantial medical and socio-economic effects. Aim of the paper. The aim of the conducted research was to analyze incidence and causes of hospitalizing children between birth and 18 years of age on the grounds of injuries. Material and methods. Medical histories of 2 832 children between birth and 18 years of age treated for injuries in 2006-2010 in Wladyslaw Bieganski Regional Specialist Hospital in Grudziadz were analyzed. Results. Correlations between treatment method and subsequent years of research (p<0,05, between children's age group and type of injury, and between type of injury and season of the year and hospitalization time, were shown to be statistically significant. No correlation was found in the studied population between subsequent years of research and injury types or residence of the injured. Conclusions. 1. The most frequent causes for placing children in the hospital were cranioencephalic injuries, injuries to the osteoarticular system, and burns. 2. The children's age determined the type of injury inflicted. Children in the youngest age group were most frequently hospitalized for burns, children in the age of 3-6 years for foreign bodies, and in the group of 7-18 years of age for injuries to the chest and to the osteoarticular system. 3. Boys were more frequently injured in a manner requiring hospital treatment than girls were. 4. A decisive majority of injured children required only conservative treatment and a stay in the hospital for no more than 3 days. 5. A constant tendency of higher occurence of injuries in children during spring and summer, was observed. Keywords: children, injuries

  20. Dispersion of exhaled droplet nuclei in a two-bed hospital ward with three different ventilation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, H.; Li, Y.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2006-01-01

    hospital ward with three ventilation systems, i.e. mixing, downward and displacement ventilation. Two life-size breathing thermal manikins were used to simulate a source patient and a receiving patient. The exhalation jet from a bed-lying manikin was visualized using smoke. N2O was used as tracer gas...... are well mixed in the ward. Bed distance does not affect the personal exposure of the receiving patient. For displacement ventilation, the exhaled jet can penetrate a long distance. A high concentration layer of exhaled droplet nuclei because of thermal stratification locking has also been observed...

  1. [Evaluations by hospital-ward physicians of patient care management quality for patients hospitalized after an emergency department admission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartiaux, M; Mols, P

    2017-01-01

    patient management in the acute and sub-acute setting of an Emergency Department is challenging. An assessment of the quality of provided care enables an evaluation of failings. It contributes to the identification of areas for improvement. to obtain an analysis, by hospital-ward physicians, of adult patient care management quality, as well as of the correctness of diagnosis made during emergency admissions. To evaluate the consequences of inadequate patient care management on morbidity, mortality and cost and duration of hospitalization. prospective data analysis obtained between the 1/12/2009 and the 21/12/2009 from physicians using a questionnaire on adult-patient emergency admissions and subsequent hospitalization. questionnaires were completed for 332 patients. Inadequate management of patient care were reported for 73/332 (22 %) cases. Incorrect diagnoses were reported for 20/332 (6 %) cases. 35 cases of inadequate care management (10.5 % overall) were associated with morbidity (34 cases) or mortality (1 case), including 4 cases (1.2 % ) that required emergency intensive-care or surgical interventions. this quality study analyzed the percentage of patient management cases and incorrect diagnoses in the emergency department. The data for serious outcome and wrong diagnosis are comparable with current literature. To improve performance, we consider the process for establishing a diagnosis and therapeutic care.

  2. Evaluation of chest and abdominal injuries in trauma patients hospitalized in the surgery ward of poursina teaching hospital, guilan, iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Hossein; Kazemnezhad-Leili, Ehsan; Mohtasham-Amiri, Zahra; Darzi, Ali Asghar; Davoudi-Kiakalayeh, Ali; Dehnadi-Moghaddam, Anoush; Kouchakinejad-Eramsadati, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Trauma, especially chest and abdominal trauma are increasing due to the growing number of vehicles on the roads, which leads to an increased incidence of road accidents. Urbanization, industrialization and additional problems are the other associated factors which accelerate this phenomenon. A better understanding of the etiology and pattern of such injuries can help to improve the management and ultimate the outcomes of these patients. This study aimed to evaluate the patients with chest and abdominal trauma hospitalized in the surgery ward of Poursina teaching hospital, Guilan, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, the data of all chest and abdominal trauma patients hospitalized in the surgery ward of Poursina teaching hospital were collected from March 2011 to March 2012. Information about age, gender, injured areas, type of injury (penetrating or blunt), etiology of the injury, accident location (urban or rural) and patients' discharge outcomes were collected by a questionnaire. In total, 211 patients with a mean age of 34.1 ± 1.68 years was entered into the study. The most common cause of trauma was traffic accidents (51.7%). Among patients with chest trauma, 45 cases (35.4%) had penetrating injuries and 82 cases (64.6%) blunt lesions. The prevalence of chest injuries was 35.5% and rib fractures 26.5%. In chest injuries, the prevalence of hemothorax was 65.3%, pneumothorax 2.7%, lung contusion 4% and emphysema 1.3%, respectively. There were 24 cases (27.9%) with abdominal trauma which had penetrating lesions and 62 cases (72.1%) with blunt lesions. The most common lesions in patients with penetrating abdominal injuries were spleen (24.2%) and liver (12.1%) lesions. The outcomes of the patients were as follow: 95.7% recovery and 4.3% death. The majority of deaths were observed among road traffic victims (77.7%). Considering the fact that road-related accidents are quite predictable and controllable; therefore, the quality promotion of traumatic patients' care

  3. Investigation of type and density of bio-aerosols in air samples from educational hospital wards of Kerman city, 2014

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    Mohammad Malakootian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bio-aerosols in the air of hospital wards have an important role in the development of infections. It is important to make quantitative and qualitative estimations of microorganisms in the air of these wards as an index for environmental hygiene applicable to different hospital wards. The aim of the study was to investigate degrees of diversity and density of bio-aerosols in the education hospitals of Kerman city. Methods: This study applied a descriptive-cross-sectional methodology in the second half of 2014 in the education hospitals of Kerman city, with bed capacity of over 300. As many as 200 samples were collected from the air in different wards of each hospital using the standard method of the National Occupational Health and Safety Institute. Following collection, samples were placed in an incubator for 48 hours and then bio-aerosol detections were made for and resulting data reported as colonies/m3. Results: Results indicated that maximum and minimum degrees of bacterial density were observed in operation rooms and in the intensive care unit (ICU of Shafa hospital. Furthermore, comparison showedthat the operating room at Afzalipour hospital had the lowest level of fungal contamination, while ICU at Bahonar hospital had the highest level of fungal contamination. The emitted fungi of Aspergillus and Penicillium along with the bacteria, staphylococci and Acinetobacter had greater frequencies. The means of bacterial density and fungal density were not equal across the studied hospitals and significant statistical, difference was observed between means of bacterial and fungal density (P ≤ 0.001. Conclusion: Amounts of bacterial and fungal density were greater than those proposed in the American Industrial Health State Conference in 73.3% of the wards in the educational hospitals of Kerman city sampled in this study. Therefore it is suggested that implementation of some, necessary measures for continuous monitoring, promotion of

  4. A Study of Causes of Readmission Patients Toxicological Ward of the Loghman Hakim Hospital, in Tehran in 2014

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    R. Ghasempour

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Readmission to hospital because of the impact on the cost and quality of hospital care and Impose an additional burden on the healthcare system, Is an important priority for hospital managers. The aim of Study Was causes of readmission patients toxicological ward of the loghman hakim hospital, Research in Tehran. Method: This is an applied cross-sectional retrospective study. Research community included Admissions in 1393 in toxicological ward of the loghman hakim hospital. Research Size based on Morgan is 300 clinical records. Sampling Method was simple randomly. Readmission in the present study in hospitalized form was more than one defined. Demographic data includes (age, gender, marital status, occupation, education and variables related to hospitalization (hospitalization Frequency, length of stay, and poisoning quality, discharge situation, referral and insurance by means of information form was extracted from records. In two level Descriptive statistics (frequency and percentage and inferential statistics (correlation chi-square test, dependent T test and Chi-square test were analyzed using SPSS21 software and hypothesis testing was done. Finding: During the study period300 readmission cases were hospitalized in toxicological ward of the loghman hakim hospital.13/4% patient was readmission. The readmission cause in 41/6% patient was related to family issues. It Can be named respectively emotional, spiritual, and addiction with regard to other topics. The total cost of treating patients was 206521754 Rials. The average cost of stay per patient 10256639 Rials, payment by patient 928136 Rials, and Subsidies health payment by health ministry was 1834370 Rials. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that, several factors may be involved in readmission to hospital patients poisons ,the most important of them can be mentioned in the four ares of family problems, emotional problems, mental problems and addiction.

  5. Analysis of Clostridium difficile infections in patients hospitalized at the nephrological ward in Poland

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    Agata Kujawa-Szewieczek

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few studies have evaluated the incidence and risk factors of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI in the adult Polish population, in particular in solid organ recipients hospitalized at the nephrological ward.Aim: The aim of this study was to analyze Clostridium difficile infections (CDI among patients hospitalized in the Department of Nephrology, Transplantation and Internal Medicine, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice.Material/Methods: Thirty-seven patients with Clostridium difficile infection diagnosed between October 2011 and November 2013 (26 months, identified among a total of 3728 patients hospitalized in this department during this period, were included in this retrospective, single-center study. The CDI definition was based on the current recommendations of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.Results: The observation period was divided into two 13-month intervals. Increased incidence (of borderline significance of CDI in the second period compared to the first period was observed (1.33% vs 0.65% respectively; p=0.057. Patients after kidney (n=11, kidney and pancreas (n=2 and liver (n=5 transplantation represented 48% of the analyzed CDI patients, and in half of these patients (50% CDI symptoms occurred within the first 3 months after transplantation. Clostridium difficile infection leads to irreversible deterioration of graft function in 38% of kidney recipients. Most incidents of CDI (70% were identified as nosocomial infection.Conclusions: 1. Clostridium difficile infection is particularly common among patients in the early period after solid organ transplantation. 2. Clostridium difficile infection may lead to irreversible deterioration of transplanted kidney function.

  6. Antibiotic Conformity with Culture Results of Hospitalized Pneumonia Patients in Melati Ward at Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung, Indonesia

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    Randhi Rinaldi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pneumonia is an infection with the highest mortality rate in Indonesian hospitals. According to The American Thoracic Society and The Infectious Diseases Society of America (ATS/IDSA, empirical use of antibiotics is still effective for pneumonia treatment. Inappropriate use of antibiotics would cause negative effects such as prolonged hospitalization, a high cost of treatment, and increased antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The goal of this study was to clarify the empirical use of antibiotic conformity with a bacteria culture. Methods: This study was conducted from August to October 2013 using a descriptive retrospective method based on 116 medical records of pneumonia patients hospitalized in Melati Ward, Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung during 2011–2012. The type of bacteria, conformity with antibiotics given to patients, and type of antibiotics were analyzed. The conformity of antibiotics was assessed based on the resistance test. If the results were sensitive, they would be put in the conforming group and in the non-conforming group if the results were resistant or intermediate. Data was derived with descriptive statistics, using percentage and frequency distribution, illustrated in tables and figures. Results: Based on culture results and sensitivity of antibiotic empirical therapy given, 55.17% cases were conformed. The most widely used antibiotic group was Third-generation Cephalosporin (60.34%. The most common bacterias were Klebsiella pneumonia (34.5% and Acinetobacter baumanni (13.8%. Conclusions: Most of the antibiotics given to pneumonia patients are still appropriate with results of the bacteria culture test and resistance test.

  7. Particle Removal Efficiency of the Portable HEPA Air Cleaner in a Simulated Hospital Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, Hua; Li, Yuguo; Sun, Hequan

    2010-01-01

    of beds in an isolation ward is insufficient. An experiment was conducted in a full scale experimental ward with a dimension of 6.7 m × 6 m × 2.7 m and 6 beds to test these hypotheses for a portable HEPA filter. The removal efficiency for different size particles was measured at different locations...

  8. Chemical restraint in routine clinical practice: a report from a general hospital psychiatric ward in Greece

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    Papamichael Georgios

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a dearth of studies regarding chemical restraint in routine clinical psychiatric practice. There may be wide variations between different settings and countries. Methods A retrospective study on chemical restraint was performed in the 11-bed psychiatric ward of the General Hospital of Arta, in northwestern Greece. All admissions over a 2-year-period (from March 2008 to March 2010 were examined. Results Chemical restraint was applied in 33 cases (10.5% of total admissions. From a total of 82 injections, 22 involved a benzodiazepine and/or levomepromazine, whereas 60 injections involved an antipsychotic agent, almost exclusively haloperidol (96.7% of cases, usually in combination with a benzodiazepine (61.7% of cases. In 36.4% of cases the patient was further subjected to restraint or seclusion. Conclusions In our unit, clinicians prefer the combined antipsychotic/benzodiazepine regimen for the management of patients' acute agitation and violent behaviour. Conventional antipsychotics are administrated almost exclusively and in a significant proportion of cases further coercive measures are applied. Studies on the practice of chemical restraint should be regularly performed in clinical settings.

  9. [Severe post-partum hemorrhage: descriptive study at the Robert-Debré Hospital maternity ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyal, F; Deffarges, J; Luton, D; Blot, P; Oury, J F; Sibony, O

    2002-06-01

    To analyze the prevalence, cause, treatment, and risk factors of severe post-partum hemorrhage (transfusion, surgery, radiology) observed at the maternity ward of the Robert-Debré Hospital, Paris. Method. This retrospective cohort was collected from a database including 19182 deliveries from 1992 to 1998. The entire medical file was reviewed in cases of severe hemorrhage. The prevalence of severe post-partum hemorrhage was 23 per 10,000 deliveries (44 patients). Transfusion was performed in 44/44 and hysterectomy in 3/44. Three patients were transferred to the intensive care unit. There were no deaths. At multivariate analysis, risk factors for severe post-partum hemorrhage were: abnormal placental insertion (OR=7.2; 95CI: 2.18-18.3), cesarean (OR=5.8; 95CI: 2.9-11.6), multiple pregnancy (OR=3.2; 95CI: 1.3-7.8), prematurity (OR=3, 95CI: 1.5-6.2), hypertension (OR=2.9; 95CI: 1.3-6.3). Twenty-six percent of the patients had no risk factors. The prevalence of severe pot-partum hemorrhage is low in our experience. The methodology used for this retrospective cohort does not enable an explanation. Intensive obstetrical care is necessary in case of abnormal placenta insertion. In 10 out of 44 cases, severe post-partum hemorrhage occurred in a context of insufficient monitoring, late or erroneous diagnosis, or incorrect treatment.

  10. Implications of design on infection prevention and control practice in a novel hospital unit: the Medical Ward of the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanSteelandt, Amanda; Conly, John; Ghali, William; Mather, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The physical design of hospital wards is associated with transmission of pathogenic organisms and hospital-acquired infections. A novel hospital unit, the Medical Ward of the 21st Century (W21C), optimizes features for infection prevention and control practices. Ethnographic research on the W21C versus conventional hospital wards examined the experiential and behavioural elements of the different designs. Three recurring themes emerged regarding the design features on the W21C and included visual cues, 'having a place for things', and less sharing of spaces and materials. Observational data of healthcare worker practices demonstrated significantly higher compliance with hand hygiene opportunities on the W21C compared with older hospital units. These findings suggest how the physical design of a hospital ward may enhance infection prevention and control practices.

  11. End-of-life care in the general wards of a Singaporean hospital: an Asian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, Jason; Kee, Adrian Chin-Leong; Tan, Adeline; Mukhopadhyay, Amartya; See, Kay Choong; Aung, Ngu Wah; Seah, Angeline S T; Lim, Tow Keang

    2011-12-01

    Despite international differences in cultural perspectives on end-of-life issues, little is known of the care for the dying in the general wards of acute hospitals in Asia. We performed a retrospective medical chart review of all 683 adult patients who died without intensive care unit (ICU) admission in our Singaporean hospital in 2007. We first evaluated the prevalence of do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders and orders for or against life-sustaining therapies; second, if such orders were discussed with the patients and/or family members; and third, the actual treatments provided before death. There were DNR orders for 66.2% of patients and neither commitment for DNR nor cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for 28.1%. Orders to limit life-sustaining therapies, including ICU admission, intubation, and vasopressors/inotropes were infrequent. Only 6.2% of the alert and conversant patients with DNR orders were involved in discussions on these orders. In contrast, such discussions with their family members occurred 82.9% of the time. Interventions in the last 24 hours of life included CPR (9.4%), intubation (6.4%), vasopressors/inotropes (14.8%), tube feeding (24.7%), and antibiotics (44.9%). Analgesia was provided in 29.1% of patients. There was a lack of commitment by doctors on orders for DNR/CPR and to limit life-sustaining therapies, infrequent discussions with patients on end-of-life decisions, and excessive burdensome interventions with inadequate palliative care for the dying. These findings may reflect certain Asian cultural biases. More work is required to improve our quality of end-of-life care.

  12. Characterization of colonizing Staphylococcus aureus isolated from surgical wards' patients in a Nigerian university hospital.

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    Deboye O Kolawole

    Full Text Available In contrast to developed countries, only limited data on the prevalence, resistance and clonal structure of Staphylococcus aureus are available for African countries. Since S. aureus carriage is a risk factor for postoperative wound infection, patients who had been hospitalized in surgical wards in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital were screened for S. aureus carriage. All S. aureus isolates were genotyped (spa, agr and assigned to multilocus sequence types (MLST. Species affiliation, methicillin-resistance, and the possession of pyrogenic toxin superantigens (PTSAg, exfoliative toxins (ETs and Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL were analyzed. Of 192 patients screened, the S. aureus carrier rate was 31.8 % (n = 61. Of these isolates, 7 (11.5% were methicillin-resistant (MRSA. The isolates comprised 24 spa types. The most frequent spa types were t064, t084, t311, and t1931, while the most prevalent MLST clonal complexes were CC5 and CC15. The most frequent PTSAg genes detected were seg/sei (41.0% followed by seb (29.5%, sea (19.7%, seh (14.7% and sec (11.5. The difference between the possession of classical and newly described PTSAg genes was not significant (63.9% versus 59.0% respectively; P = 0.602. PVL encoding genes were found in 39.3% isolates. All MRSA isolates were PVL negative, SCCmec types I and VI in MLST CC 5 and CC 30, respectively. Typing of the accessory gene regulator (agr showed the following distribution: agr group 1 (n = 20, group II (n = 17, group III (n = 14 and group IV (n = 10. Compared to European data, enterotoxin gene seb and PVL-encoding genes were more prevalent in Nigerian methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates, which may therefore act as potential reservoir for PVL and PTSAg genes.

  13. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii on computer interface surfaces of hospital wards and association with clinical isolates

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    Ma Ling

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computer keyboards and mice are potential reservoirs of nosocomial pathogens, but routine disinfection for non-water-proof computer devices is a problem. With better hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers (HCWs, the impact of these potential sources of contamination on clinical infection needs to be clarified. Methods This study was conducted in a 1600-bed medical center of southern Taiwan with 47 wards and 282 computers. With education and monitoring program of hand hygiene for HCWs, the average compliance rate was 74% before our surveillance. We investigated the association of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, three leading hospital-acquired pathogens, from ward computer keyboards, mice and from clinical isolates in non-outbreak period by pulsed field gel electrophoresis and antibiogram. Results Our results revealed a 17.4% (49/282 contamination rate of these computer devices by S. aureus, Acinetobacter spp. or Pseudomonas spp. The contamination rates of MRSA and A. baumannii in the ward computers were 1.1% and 4.3%, respectively. No P. aeruginosa was isolated. All isolates from computers and clinical specimens at the same ward showed different pulsotypes. However, A. baumannii isolates on two ward computers had the same pulsotype. Conclusion With good hand hygiene compliance, we found relatively low contamination rates of MRSA, P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii on ward computer interface, and without further contribution to nosocomial infection. Our results suggested no necessity of routine culture surveillance in non-outbreak situation.

  14. Exploring staff perceptions and experiences of volunteers and visitors on the hospital ward at mealtimes using an ethnographic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottrey, Ella; Palermo, Claire; Huggins, Catherine E; Porter, Judi

    2018-04-01

    To explore multiple perspectives and experiences of volunteer and visitor involvement and interactions at hospital mealtimes. In addition, to understand how the volunteer and visitor role at mealtimes is perceived within the hospital system. Mealtime assistance can improve patients' food intake and mealtime experience. Barriers to providing mealtime assistance include time pressures, staff availability and inadequate communication. Volunteers and visitors can encourage and assist patients at mealtimes. There is a lack of evidence on the relationship between hospital staff, volunteers and visitors. A qualitative, ethnographic approach. Sixty-seven hours of fieldwork were conducted on two subacute wards within an Australian healthcare network in 2015. Mealtime practices and interactions of hospital staff, volunteers and visitors were observed. Sixty-one staff, volunteers and visitors were interviewed in 75 ethnographic and semi-structured interviews. Data were inductively and thematically analysed. Three key themes emerged as follows: "help"-volunteers and visitors were considered helpful when they assisted patients at mealtimes, supported well-being and aided staff-patient communication; "hindrance"-staff perceived visitors as negative presences when they inhibited patient progress and impacted staff work practices; and "reality of practice"-visiting hours, visitor engagement in patient therapy and communication between staff, volunteers and visitors were important practical considerations of mealtime involvement. The findings show how and why volunteers and visitors can be helpful and unhelpful at hospital mealtimes on subacute wards. More research on the role and contribution of volunteers and visitors on hospital wards will inform future practice in healthcare settings. This healthcare organisation should continue to encourage volunteer and visitor involvement at hospital mealtimes. More effort is needed to educate visitors about patients' therapeutic goals and

  15. Predictors of parent post-traumatic stress symptoms after child hospitalization on general pediatric wards: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Linda S; Wray, Jo; Gay, Caryl; Dearmun, Annette K; Lee, Kirsty; Cooper, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify predictors of parental post-traumatic stress symptoms following child hospitalization. In this prospective cohort study, a sample of 107 parents completed questionnaires during their child's hospitalization on pediatric (non-intensive care) wards and again three months after discharge. Eligible parents had a child expected to be hospitalized for three or more nights. Standardized questionnaires were used to assess parent distress during the child's hospitalization, parent coping strategies and resources, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress after the hospitalization. Correlations and multiple regressions were used to determine whether parent distress during hospitalization and coping strategies and resources predicted post-traumatic stress symptoms three months after the child's discharge, while controlling for relevant covariates. Three months after the child's hospital discharge, 32.7% of parents (n=35) reported some degree of post-traumatic stress symptoms, and 21.5% (n=23) had elevated (≥34) scores consistent with a probable diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder. In the multivariable model, parent anxiety and uncertainty during hospitalization and use of negative coping strategies, such as denial, venting and self-blame, were associated with higher post-traumatic stress symptoms scores at three months post-discharge, even after controlling for the child's health status. Parental anxiety and depression during hospitalization moderated the relationship between negative coping strategies and post-traumatic stress symptoms. More than one quarter of parents of children hospitalized on pediatric (non-intensive care) wards experienced significant post-traumatic stress symptoms after their child's discharge. Parents' hospital-related anxiety, uncertainty and use of negative coping strategies are potentially modifiable factors that most strongly influenced post-traumatic stress symptoms. Further research is urgently needed

  16. Identification and characteristics of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in surgical wards in a Chinese university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dalin; Ma, Linlin; Wu, Zhenyu; Li, Mingcheng; Li, Xiaohan; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Kun

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumanni isolated from surgical wards in a university hospital, China. A total of 143 non-duplicate A. baumannii were isolated from 517 inpatients in surgery intensive care units (ICUs), burn wards, and general surgery wards. Of these, 102 isolates of A. baumannii (71.3%) were resistant to imipenem. Among imipenem-resistant isolates, all isolates were resistant to almost all antimicrobial agents except polymyxin E, all isolates were positive for blaOXA-23 and blaOXA-51 in addition to ISAba1, 52 (51%) were positive for blaOXA-58, 8 (7.8%) contained blaVIM-2, which co-harbored with blaOXA-58. Molecular typing revealed the presence of three clones among imipenem-resistant isolates. This study confirmed that A. baumannii strains harboring OXA or VIM type β-lactamases are widely distributed throughout the surgery wards. The data demonstrate that there was a high prevalence of imipenem-resistant A. baumannii infection in the region.

  17. Spatial distribution of infection risk of SARS transmission in a hospital ward

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Hua; Li, Yuguo [School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Nanjing, JiangSu (China); Nielsen, Peter V. [Department of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University, DK-9000 Aalborg (Denmark); Huang, Xinhua [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China)

    2009-08-15

    The classical Wells-Riley model for predicting risk of airborne transmission of diseases assumes a uniform spatial distribution of the infected cases in an enclosed space. A new mathematical model is developed here for predicting the spatial distribution of infection risk of airborne transmitted diseases by integrating the Wells-Riley equation into computational fluid dynamics. We applied our new integrated model to analyze a large nosocomial SARS outbreak in Hong Kong during the 2003 SARS epidemics, which was studied in the literature with regard to the association between airflow and SARS infection. The predicted numbers of infected cases of medical students in the same cubicle, the adjacent cubicle and the distant cubicle were 6.39, 0.78 and 0.2 respectively while the observed numbers of infected medical students in the three cubicles were 7, 0 and 0 respectively during the morning of March 6th, which was the highest attack period. The predicted numbers of infected cases of inpatients during the morning of March 6th in the same cubicle, the adjacent cubic and the distance cubicle were 7.8, 5.1, and 4.8 respectively which also agree well with the observed distribution of the infected inpatients during the entire infection period. The new developed model provides a new modelling tool for investigating the airborne transmission of diseases in enclosed spaces. The model is applicable when the susceptible stays mostly at the same location in an enclosed space during the infectious period, such as inpatients in a hospital ward, passengers in an airplane etc. (author)

  18. Microbial Contamination on Used Surgical Masks among Hospital Personnel and Microbial Air Quality in their Working Wards: A Hospital in Bangkok.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luksamijarulkul, Pipat; Aiempradit, Natkitta; Vatanasomboon, Pisit

    2014-09-01

    To assess the relationship of bacterial and fungal contamination on used surgical masks worn by the hospital personnel and microbial air quality in their working wards. This is a cross-sectional study of 230 used surgical masks collected from 214 hospital personnel, and 215 indoor air samples collected from their working wards to culture for bacterial and fungal counts. This study was carried out at the hospital in Bangkok. Group or genus of isolated bacteria and fungi were preliminarily identified by Gram's stain and lacto-phenol cotton blue. Data were analyzed using paired t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient at the significant level of pcontamination on inside area of the used masks were 47 ± 56 and 15 ± 9 cfu/ml/piece, and on outside area were 166 ± 199 and 34 ± 18 cfu/ml/piece, respectively, pcontamination on used masks from hospital personnel working in the male and female medical wards and out-patient department, as well as the bacterial and fungal counts of the indoor air sample collected from the same area were relatively higher than the other wards. The predominant isolated bacteria and fungi contaminated on inside and outside areas of the used masks and air samples were similar (Staphylococcus spp. and Aspergillus spp.; respectively). For its relationship, results found that bacterial and fungal counts in air samples showed significantly positive correlation with the bacterial contamination load on outside area of the used masks, r=0.16, p=0.018 and r=0.21, p=0.003, respectively. High bacterial contamination on outside area of the used masks was demonstrated, and it showed a significant correlation with microbial air quality of working wards.

  19. Microbial Contamination on Used Surgical Masks among Hospital Personnel and Microbial Air Quality in their Working Wards: A Hospital in Bangkok

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pipat Luksamijarulkul

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the relationship of bacterial and fungal contamination on used surgical masks worn by the hospital personnel and microbial air quality in their working wards. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of 230 used surgical masks collected from 214 hospital personnel, and 215 indoor air samples collected from their working wards to culture for bacterial and fungal counts. This study was carried out at the hospital in Bangkok. Group or genus of isolated bacteria and fungi were preliminarily identified by Gram’s stain and lacto-phenol cotton blue. Data were analyzed using paired t-test and Pearson’s correlation coefficient at the significant level of p<0.050. Results: Means and standard deviation of bacterial and fungal contamination on inside area of the used masks were 47 ± 56 and 15 ± 9 cfu/ml/piece, and on outside area were 166 ± 199 and 34 ± 18 cfu/ml/piece, respectively, p<0.001. The bacterial and fungal contamination on used masks from hospital personnel working in the male and female medical wards and out-patient department, as well as the bacterial and fungal counts of the indoor air sample collected from the same area were relatively higher than the other wards. The predominant isolated bacteria and fungi contaminated on inside and outside areas of the used masks and air samples were similar (Staphylococcus spp. and Aspergillus spp.; respectively. For its relationship, results found that bacterial and fungal counts in air samples showed significantly positive correlation with the bacterial contamination load on outside area of the used masks, r=0.16, p=0.018 and r=0.21, p=0.003, respectively. Conclusion: High bacterial contamination on outside area of the used masks was demonstrated, and it showed a significant correlation with microbial air quality of working wards.

  20. Very Low Levels of Physical Activity in Older Patients During Hospitalization at an Acute Geriatric Ward: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villumsen, Morten; Jorgensen, Martin Gronbech; Andreasen, Jane; Rathleff, Michael Skovdal; Mølgaard, Carsten Møller

    2015-10-01

    Lack of activity during hospitalization may contribute to functional decline. The purpose of this study was to investigate (1) the time spent walking during hospitalization by geriatric patients referred to physical and/or occupational therapy and (2) the development in time spent walking during hospitalization. In this observational study, 24-hr accelerometer data (ActivPal) were collected from inclusion to discharge in 124 patients at an acute geriatric ward. The median time spent walking was 7 min per day. During the first quartile of hospitalization, the patients spent 4 (IQR:1;11) min per day walking, increasing to 10 (IQR:1;29) min during the last quartile. Improvement in time spent walking was primarily observed in the group able to perform the Timed Up & Go task at admission. When walking only 7 min per day, patients could be classified as inactive and at risk for functional decline; nonetheless, the physical activity level increased significantly during hospitalization.

  1. An observational study in psychiatric acute patients admitted to General Hospital Psychiatric Wards in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margari Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives this Italian observational study was aimed at collecting data of psychiatric patients with acute episodes entering General Hospital Psychiatric Wards (GHPWs. Information was focused on diagnosis (DSM-IV, reasons of hospitalisation, prescribed treatment, outcome of aggressive episodes, evolution of the acute episode. Methods assessments were performed at admission and discharge. Used psychometric scales were the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS, the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS and the Nurses' Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE-30. Results 864 adult patients were enrolled in 15 GHPWs: 728 (320 M; mean age 43.6 yrs completed both admission and discharge visits. A severe psychotic episode with (19.1% or without (47.7% aggressive behaviour was the main reason of admission. Schizophrenia (42.8% at admission and 40.1% at discharge and depression (12.9% at admission and 14.7% at discharge were the predominant diagnoses. The mean hospital stay was 12 days. The mean (± SD total score of MOAS at admission, day 7 and discharge was, respectively, 2.53 ± 5.1, 0.38 ± 2.2, and 0.21 ± 1.5. Forty-four (6.0% patients had episodes of aggressiveness at admission and 8 (1.7% at day 7. A progressive improvement in each domain/item vs. admission was observed for MOAS and BPRS, while NOSIE-30 did not change from day 4 onwards. The number of patients with al least one psychotic drug taken at admission, in the first 7 days of hospitalisation, and prescribed at discharge, was, respectively: 472 (64.8%, 686 (94.2% and 676 (92.9%. The respective most frequently psychotic drugs were: BDZs (60.6%, 85.7%, 69.5%, typical anti-psychotics (48.3%, 57.0%, 49.6%, atypical anti-psychotics (35.6%, 41.8%, 39.8% and antidepressants (40.9%, 48.8%, 43.2%. Rates of patients with one, two or > 2 psychotic drugs taken at admission and day 7, and prescribed at discharge, were, respectively: 24.8%, 8.2% and 13.5% in mono-therapy; 22.0%, 20

  2. Quality assessment of emergency wards in Khorramabad public hospitals based on EFQM model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohammad hasan Imani-Nasab

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: Findings show that quality of studied wards is less than the model standards and other similar studies considerably. From view point of the researcher the existing gap with external studies is logical and in comparison with internal studies is irrational. The studied wards acquired the most score in process criterion and the least score in policy and strategy criterion. Also ,findings shows a negative relation between results of assessment based on EFQM model and current evaluation system of the ministry of health, so it is suggested that the current system should be revised fundamenally.

  3. Identification of the benefits, enablers and barriers to integrating junior pharmacists into the ward team within one UK-based hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Man Yui; Wright, David John; Blacklock, Jeanette; Needle, Richard John

    2017-01-01

    A high nurse-vacancy rate combined with high numbers of applications for junior pharmacist roles resulted in Colchester Hospital University National Health System Foundation Trust trial employing junior pharmacists into traditional nursing posts with the aim of integrating pharmacists into the ward team and enhancing local medicines optimization. The aim of the evaluation was to describe the implementation process and practice of the integrated care pharmacists (ICPs) in order to inform future innovations of a similar nature. Four band 6 ward-based ICPs were employed on two wards funded within current ward staffing expenditure. With ethical committee approval, interviews were undertaken with the ICPs and focus groups with ward nurses, senior ward nurses and members of the medical team. Data were analyzed thematically to identify service benefits, barriers and enablers. Routine ward performance data were obtained from the two ICP wards and two wards selected as comparators. Appropriate statistical tests were performed to identify differences in performance. Four ICPs were interviewed, and focus groups were undertaken with three junior nurses, four senior nurses and three medical practitioners. Service enablers were continuous ward time, undertaking drug administration, positive feedback and use of effective communication methods. Barriers were planning, funding model, career development, and interprofessional working and social isolation. ICPs were believed to save nurse time and improve medicines safety. The proportion of patients receiving medicine reconciliation within 24 hours increased significantly in the ICP wards. All ICPs had resigned from their role within 12 months. It was believed that by locating pharmacists on the ward full time and allowing them to undertake medicines administration and medicines reconciliation, the nursing time would be saved and medicines safety improved. There was however significant learning to be derived from the implementation

  4. Malnutrition in patients admitted to the medical wards of the Douala General Hospital: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luma, Henry Namme; Eloumou, Servais Albert Fiacre Bagnaka; Mboligong, Franklin Ngu; Temfack, Elvis; Donfack, Olivier-Tresor; Doualla, Marie-Solange

    2017-07-03

    Malnutrition is common in acutely ill patients occurring in 30-50% of hospitalized patients. Awareness and screening for malnutrition is lacking in most health institutions in sub-Saharan Africa. This study aimed at screening for malnutrition using anthropometric and laboratory indices in patients admitted to the internal medicine wards. A cross-sectional study. We screened for malnutrition in 251 consecutive patients admitted from January to March 2013 in the internal medicine wards. Malnutrition defined as body mass index (BMI) less than 18.5 kg/m 2 and/or mid upper arm circumference (MUAC) less than 22 cm in women and 23 cm in men. Weight loss greater than 10% in the last 6 months prior to admission, relevant laboratory data, diagnosis at discharge and length of hospital stay (LOS) were also recorded. Mean age was 47 (SD 16) years. 52.6% were male. Mean BMI was 24.44 (SD 5.79) kg/m 2 and MUAC was 27.8 (SD 5.0) cm. Median LOS was 7 (IQR 5-12) days. 42.4% of patients reported weight loss greater than 10% in the 6 months before hospitalization. MUAC and BMI correlated significantly (r = 0.78; p malnutrition by the two methods showed moderate agreement (κ = 0.56; p malnutrition was 19.34% (35/251). Blood albumin and hemoglobin were significantly lower in malnourished patients. Malnourished patients had a significantly longer LOS (p = 0.019) when compared to those with no malnutrition. Malnutrition was most common amongst patients with malignancy. Malnutrition is common in patients admitted to the medical wards of the Douala General Hospital. Nutritional screening and assessment should be integrated in the care package of all admitted patients.

  5. An Appraisal Of The Colour Of Hospital Wards On The Recovery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The environment where psychiatric patients are kept has been identified as an aid to their recovery attitudes. Based on the fact that the patients were being treated by qualified hands, an attempt is made to examine the significance of colour of the psychiatry ward environment as relating to the patients' rehabilitation in this ...

  6. The effect of an active on-ward participation of hospital pharmacists in Internal Medicine teams on preventable Adverse Drug Events in elderly inpatients: protocol of the WINGS study (Ward-oriented pharmacy in newly admitted geriatric seniors)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klopotowska, J.E.; Wierenga, P.C.; de Rooij, S.E.; Stuijt, C.C.; Arisz, L.; Kuks, P.F.; Dijkgraaf, M.G.; Lie-A-Huen, L.; Smorenburg, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    The potential of clinical interventions, aiming at reduction of preventable Adverse Drug Events (preventable ADEs) during hospital stay, have been studied extensively. Clinical Pharmacy is a well-established and effective service, usually consisting of full-time on-ward participation of clinical

  7. Confidential conversations between supervisor and employee as a means for improving leadership: a quasi-experimental study in hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivimäki, M

    1996-11-01

    Although yearly confidential conversations between a supervisor and an employee have been recommended as a means for improving leadership, evidence on the actual effects of these conversations has been lacking. The present study therefore investigated whether confidential conversations improve perceptions of goal clarity, sufficiency of feedback and innovativeness, and elicit satisfaction with the supervisor's leadership style within the hospital setting. Nine wards were divided into one experimental group (3 wards) and two control groups (3 + 3 wards). A questionnaire on goal clarity, feedback, innovativeness and satisfaction was administered twice to every group (1st measurement: r = 186, 2nd measurement: n = 163). The experimental group began confidential conversations after the first measurement, control group 1 entered into conversations during both measurements, and control group 2 did not enter into conversations at the time of either measurement. Confidential conversations improved perceived feedback. In both measurements, the sufficiency of feedback was reported to be significantly better in the groups having conversations than in the other groups. In addition, there was a significant positive change in the perceived sufficiency of feedback in the experimental group but not in the other groups. Confidential conversations did not affect the perceptions of goal clarity and innovativeness or elicit satisfaction with the supervisor's management style.

  8. Surgical face masks worn by patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: impact on infectivity of air on a hospital ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmadhikari, Ashwin S; Mphahlele, Matsie; Stoltz, Anton; Venter, Kobus; Mathebula, Rirhandzu; Masotla, Thabiso; Lubbe, Willem; Pagano, Marcello; First, Melvin; Jensen, Paul A; van der Walt, Martie; Nardell, Edward A

    2012-05-15

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis transmission in hospitals threatens staff and patient health. Surgical face masks used by patients with tuberculosis (TB) are believed to reduce transmission but have not been rigorously tested. We sought to quantify the efficacy of surgical face masks when worn by patients with multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). Over 3 months, 17 patients with pulmonary MDR-TB occupied an MDR-TB ward in South Africa and wore face masks on alternate days. Ward air was exhausted to two identical chambers, each housing 90 pathogen-free guinea pigs that breathed ward air either when patients wore surgical face masks (intervention group) or when patients did not wear masks (control group). Efficacy was based on differences in guinea pig infections in each chamber. Sixty-nine of 90 control guinea pigs (76.6%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 68-85%) became infected, compared with 36 of 90 intervention guinea pigs (40%; 95% CI, 31-51%), representing a 56% (95% CI, 33-70.5%) decreased risk of TB transmission when patients used masks. Surgical face masks on patients with MDR-TB significantly reduced transmission and offer an adjunct measure for reducing TB transmission from infectious patients.

  9. Performance Assessment and analysis of national building codes with fire safety in all wards of a hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mahdinia

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aimsAIDS as a re-emergent disease and Viral hepatitis (B and C as one of thBackground and objective: Fire safety is an important problem in hospitals. Movement less, lack of awareness and special situation of residents are the reasons of this subject. In more countries such as Iran, fire protection regulations have compiled within the framework of national building codes. Current building codes don't create sufficient safety for patient in the hospitals in different situations and more of the advanced countries in the world effort to establish building code, base  on performance. This study to be accomplished with this goal that determination of fire risk level in the wards of a hospital and survey the efficiency of the national building codes. Methodsfire risk assesses is done, using "engineering fire risk assessment method" with the checklist for Data gathering. In this manner, risk calculate in all compartments and in the next  stage for survey the effect of building codes, with this supposition that all compartment is  conforming to building code requirement, risk level calculate in two situation.Resultsthe results of present study reveals that, risk level in all wards is more than one and even though risk less than one is acceptable, consequently minimum of safely situations didn't  produce in most wards. The results show the national building code in the different conditions  don't have appropriate efficient for creation of suitable safety. Conclusionin order to access to a fire safety design with sufficient efficiency, suitable selection is use of risk assessment based on, design methods.

  10. Nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards: A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tove, Lindhardt; Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Frail elderly people admitted to hospital often receive help from relatives in managing their daily lives. These relatives are likely to continue to feel responsible after admission, and to hold valuable knowledge, which may contribute to decision-making related to care and treatment....... OBJECTIVE: To illuminate nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards, and of the barriers and promoters for collaboration. DESIGN AND SETTING: The design was descriptive. Three acute units in a large Danish university hospital participated....... PARTICIPANTS: Six registered nurses and two auxiliary nurses in charge of discharge planning for the patients were included. METHOD: Open interviews using an interview guide. Manifest and latent content analysis was applied. RESULT: The main theme Encountering relatives-to be caught between ideals and practice...

  11. Nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards: a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Tommi Bo; Hallberg, I.R.; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Frail elderly people admitted to hospital often receive help from relatives in managing their daily lives. These relatives are likely to continue to feel responsible after admission, and to hold valuable knowledge, which may contribute to decision-making related to care and treatment....... OBJECTIVE: To illuminate nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards, and of the barriers and promoters for collaboration. DESIGN AND SETTING: The design was descriptive. Three acute units in a large Danish university hospital participated....... PARTICIPANTS: Six registered nurses and two auxiliary nurses in charge of discharge planning for the patients were included. METHOD: Open interviews using an interview guide. Manifest and latent content analysis was applied. RESULT: The main theme Encountering relatives-to be caught between ideals and practice...

  12. Assessment of Microbial Contamination of Surfaces and Medical Equipment in Wards of the Panjom Azar Hospital of Gorgan in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghaye Noroozi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Methods: In this cross-sectional study, different wards of panjom Azar educational hospital including ICU, dialysis and surgery room were investigated. Samples were collected randomly, for three months from July to September 2014, from beds, oxygen masks, oxygen manometer, patient table, covers of the patient's medical records, nurse's desk, border walls and water tap.  Samples were then cultured on blood agar and EMB agar. In order to determine the bacteria type, specific culture media with specific biochemical tests and diagnostic disks were used. Results: Results showed that from 216 samples collected from the levels, the 190 cases (88% had microbial contamination. Most of the recognized bacteria were Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter and klebsiela. Results of microbial culture of equipments and levels were positive in case of bacterial contamination and maximum contamination was observed in the dialysis ward of the hospital. Conclusion: Due to the relatively high detected contamination, contamination control of levels and patient care equipments could considered as an effective action in reducing nosocomial infections. Thus, using appropriate disinfectant equipment, monitoring the disinfectants preparation, continuous monitoring and detection of common microorganisms are the most important ways for infection control in hospitals.

  13. Feasibility of telecare solution for patients admitted with COPD exacerbation: screening data from a pulmonary ward in a university hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Magnus; Marså, Kristoffer; Andreassen, Helle

    2014-01-01

    are to assess the reasons for the exclusion of patients, and the reasons for patients not consenting to participate, as well as to identify the predictors for consenting or not consenting among the subgroup of eligible patients. Methods: In this study, all data in the screening log were collected over a period...... help patients manage their disease at home and thereby possibly reduce the risk of readmission. Purpose: The primary aim of this study is to assess the feasibility of a telehealth care solution when offered in connection with discharges from a pulmonary ward at a university hospital. Secondary aims...

  14. [The current aspects of hospital infections in maternity and neonatal wards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribarova, N; Todorova, M; Khristov, Kh

    1994-01-01

    The epidemiologic, etiologic and clinical structure of HAI in the maternity and neonatal wards in the country for the 1982-1992 period has been specified. 934 women in child-birth and 2357 neonates acquire nosocomial infections at an average annually. A comparatively constant level in HAI epidemic process intensity is observed with inconsiderable diversions in the beginning and by the end of the studied period. Staphylococci like causative agents of HAI take up a leading place in both types of wards with especially marked incidence rate among the newborn children. The predominant clinical forms in the women in child-birth are the surgical wound infections, skin and genital infections and in the neonates--the staphylodermatites, upper respiratory airway infections, pulmonary and enteric infections.

  15. Inappropriate use of urinary catheters in patients admitted to medical wards in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Calvo, Beatriz; Vara, Rebeca; Villar, Rocío N; Aguado, José María

    2013-10-01

    The prevalence and predisposing factors were determined for inappropriate urinary catheterization (UC) among inpatients in medical wards. A cross-sectional study was conducted including all patients aged ≥ 18 years admitted to medical wards in a 1300-bed tertiary-care centre, and who had a urinary catheter in place on the day of the survey. Of 380 patients observed, 46 (12.1%) had a urinary catheter in place. Twelve of them (26.1%) were inappropriately catheterized. The most common indication for inappropriate UC was urine output monitoring in a cooperative, non-critically ill patient. Inappropriateness was associated with increased age, poor functional status, urinary incontinence, dementia, and admission from a long-term care facility. Further educational efforts should be focused on improving catheterization prescribing practices by physicians. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Mobile and fixed computer use by doctors and nurses on hospital wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pia; Lindgaard, Anne-Mette; Prgomet, M.

    2009-01-01

    devices clinicians completed a very low proportion of observed tasks at the bedside. The design of the devices and ward space configurations place limitations on how and where devices are used and on the mobility of clinical work. In such circumstances, clinicians will initiate workarounds to compensate......, computers on wheels (COWs) and tablet PCs-was made. Two types of COWs were available on the wards: generic COWs (laptops mounted on trolleys) and ergonomic COWs (an integrated computer and cart device). Heuristic evaluation of the user interfaces was also carried out. RESULTS: The majority (93...... and doctors were observed performing workarounds, such as transcribing medication orders from the computer to paper. CONCLUSIONS: The choice of device was related to clinical role, nature of the clinical task, degree of mobility required, including where task completion occurs, and device design. Nurses' work...

  17. Enacting 'team' and 'teamwork': using Goffman's theory of impression management to illuminate interprofessional practice on hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Simon; Reeves, Scott

    2011-05-01

    Interprofessional teamwork is widely advocated in health and social care policies. However, the theoretical literature is rarely employed to help understand the nature of collaborative relations in action or to critique normative discourses of teamworking. This paper draws upon Goffman's (1963) theory of impression management, modified by Sinclair (1997), to explore how professionals 'present' themselves when interacting on hospital wards and also how they employ front stage and backstage settings in their collaborative work. The study was undertaken in the general medicine directorate of a large NHS teaching hospital in England. An ethnographic approach was used, including interviews with 49 different health and social care staff and participant observation of ward-based work. These observations focused on both verbal and non-verbal interprofessional interactions. Thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. The study findings suggest that doctor-nurse relationships were characterised by 'parallel working', with limited information sharing or effective joint working. Interprofessional working was based less on planned, 'front stage' activities, such as wards rounds, than on ad hoc backstage opportunistic strategies. These backstage interactions, including corridor conversations, allowed the appearance of collaborative 'teamwork' to be maintained as a form of impression management. These interactions also helped to overcome the limitations of planned front stage work. Our data also highlight the shifting 'ownership' of space by different professional groups and the ways in which front and backstage activities are structured by physical space. We argue that the use of Sinclair's model helps to illuminate the nature of collaborative interprofessional relations within an acute care setting. In such settings, the notion of teamwork, as a form of regular interaction and with a shared team identity, appears to have little relevance. This suggests that interventions to

  18. Evaluation of the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Pourmovahed

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients experience high levels of anxiety before angiography, which is mostly associated with irreparable effects on health status of such individuals. Use of alternative medicine to reduce stress and anxiety is of paramount importance. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on 70 patients admitted to cardiac wards before angiography in three selected hospitals of Shiraz, Iran in 2015. Samples were selected through randomized and available sampling and divided into two groups of control (n=35 and intervention (n=35. In this study, the intervention group received one hour of music before angiography for 20 minutes, whereas the usual care of ward was provided for the control group. Data was collected using the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI by Spielberger one hour before angiography (immediately before the intervention and 20 minutes after angiography (immediately after the intervention through interviews with all the participants. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 22 using descriptive statistics, Chi-square, as well as paired and independent-tests. Results: In this study, mean anxiety scores of patients in the intervention and control groups before the intervention were 48.45±6.63 and 48.25±6.63, respectively. After the intervention, these scores were changed to 44.28±5.21 and 49.02±7.74 in the intervention (P=0.004 and control (P=0.90 groups, respectively. Therefore, a significant difference was observed between the groups after the intervention (P=0.008. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, music before angiography could lead to a significant decrease in anxiety level of patients. Therefore, this approach could be used as an effective method to alleviate anxiety in patients.

  19. Evaluation of the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pourmovahed Zahra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Patients experience high levels of anxiety before angiography, which is mostly associated with irreparable effects on health status of such individuals. Use of alternative medicine to reduce stress and anxiety is of paramount importance. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography. Materials and Method: This clinical trial was conducted on 70 patients admitted to cardiac wards before angiography in three selected hospitals of Shiraz, Iran in 2015. Samples were randomized convenience sampling and divided into two groups of control (n=35 and intervention (n=35. In this study, the intervention group received one hour of music before angiography for 20 minutes, whereas the usual care of ward was provided for the control group. Data was collected using the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI by Spielberger one hour before angiography (immediately before the intervention and 20 minutes after angiography (immediately after the intervention through interviews with all the participants. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 22 using descriptive statistics, Chi-square, as well as paired and independent-tests. Results: In this study, mean anxiety scores of patients in the intervention and control groups before the intervention were 48.45±6.63 and 48.25±6.63, respectively. After the intervention, these scores were changed to 44.28±5.21 and 49.02±7.74 in the intervention (P=0.004 and control (P=0.90 groups, respectively. Therefore, a significant difference was observed between the groups after the intervention (P=0.008. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, music before angiography could lead to a significant decrease in anxiety level of patients. Therefore, this approach could be used as an effective method to alleviate anxiety in patients.

  20. Multiple challenges of antibiotic use in a large hospital in Ethiopia - a ward-specific study showing high rates of hospital-acquired infections and ineffective prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutema, Girma; Håkonsen, Helle; Engidawork, Ephrem; Toverud, Else-Lydia

    2018-05-03

    This project aims to study the use of antibiotics in three clinical wards in the largest tertiary teaching hospital in Ethiopia for a period of 1 year. The specific aims were to assess the prevalence of patients on antibiotics, quantify the antibiotic consumption and identify the main indications of use. The material was all the medical charts (n = 2231) retrieved from three clinical wards (internal medicine, gynecology/obstetrics and surgery) in Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital (TASH) in Addis Ababa between September 2013 and September 2014. Data collection was performed manually by four pharmacists. Each medical chart represented one patient. About 60% of the patients were admitted to internal medicine, 20% to each of the other two wards. The number of bed days (BD) was on average 16.5. Antibiotics for systemic use were prescribed to 73.7% of the patients (on average: 2.1 antibiotics/patient) of whom 86.6% got a third or fourth generation cephalosporin (mainly ceftriaxone). The average consumption of antibiotics was 81.6 DDD/100BD, varying from 91.8 in internal medicine and 71.6 in surgery to 47.6 in gynecology/obstetrics. The five most frequently occurring infections were pneumonia (26.6%), surgical site infections (21.5%), neutropenic fever (6.9%), sepsis (6.4%) and urinary tract infections (4.7%). About one fourth of the prescriptions were for prophylactic purposes. Hospital acquired infections occurred in 23.5% of the patients (353 cases of surgical site infection). The prescribing was based on empirical treatment and sensitivity testing was reported in only 3.8% of the cases. In the present study from three wards in the largest tertiary teaching hospital in Ethiopia, three out of four patients were prescribed antibiotics, primarily empirically. The mean antibiotic consumption was 81.6 DDD/100BD. Surgical site infections constituted a large burden of the infections treated in the hospital, despite extensive prescribing of prophylaxis. The findings show

  1. Outbreak of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in different wards at a regional hospital related to untrained bedside caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Hsun; Li, Jin-Feng; Huang, Li-Yueh; Lin, Fu-Mei; Yang, Ya-Sung; Siu, L Kristopher; Chang, Feng-Yee; Lin, Jung-Chung

    2017-10-01

    This study describes an outbreak caused by imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (IRAB) involving 2 general wards at the Penghu branch of Tri-Service General Hospital. Clinical data obtained from the patients with IRAB during an outbreak from May 2014-October 2014 were reviewed. Microbiologic sampling from the environment and the hands of health care workers (HCWs) was performed. Clinical isolates from case patients were genotyped using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). During the outbreak period, 12 patients were colonized or infected with IRAB. The hospital room environments of the case patients were contaminated with IRAB. Hands of nurses and physicians were not colonized with IRAB, but the hands of 2 bedside caregivers of case patients were colonized with IRAB. The PFGE analysis revealed that at least 2 major genetically distinct strains disseminated between 2 different wards. After implementation of infection control measures with a cohort of nursing patients, hand hygiene education for caregivers who had not received instructions before the outbreak, and a critical value alert system to notify case patients, the outbreak was controlled successfully. This outbreak study highlights the importance of adherence to hand hygiene by all HCWs to prevent the dissemination of multidrug-resistant organisms. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Identification of the benefits, enablers and barriers to integrating junior pharmacists into the ward team within one UK-based hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung MY

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Man Yui Hung,1 David John Wright,2 Jeanette Blacklock,2 Richard John Needle1,2 1Pharmacy Department, Colchester Hospital University NHS Foundation Trust, Colchester, 2School of Pharmacy, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK Introduction: A high nurse-vacancy rate combined with high numbers of applications for junior pharmacist roles resulted in Colchester Hospital University National Health System Foundation Trust trial employing junior pharmacists into traditional nursing posts with the aim of integrating pharmacists into the ward team and enhancing local medicines optimization. The aim of the evaluation was to describe the implementation process and practice of the integrated care pharmacists (ICPs in order to inform future innovations of a similar nature.Methods: Four band 6 ward-based ICPs were employed on two wards funded within current ward staffing expenditure. With ethical committee approval, interviews were undertaken with the ICPs and focus groups with ward nurses, senior ward nurses and members of the medical team. Data were analyzed thematically to identify service benefits, barriers and enablers. Routine ward performance data were obtained from the two ICP wards and two wards selected as comparators. Appropriate statistical tests were performed to identify differences in performance.Results: Four ICPs were interviewed, and focus groups were undertaken with three junior nurses, four senior nurses and three medical practitioners. Service enablers were continuous ward time, undertaking drug administration, positive feedback and use of effective communication methods. Barriers were planning, funding model, career development, and interprofessional working and social isolation. ICPs were believed to save nurse time and improve medicines safety. The proportion of patients receiving medicine reconciliation within 24 hours increased significantly in the ICP wards. All ICPs had resigned from their role within 12 months.Discussion: It was

  3. Surfaces and Air Bacteriology of Selected Wards at a Referral Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getachew, Hailu; Derbie, Awoke; Mekonnen, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    The hospital environment is a source of medically important pathogens that are mostly multidrug resistant (MDR) and posing a major therapeutic challenge. The aim of this study was to assess the surface and air bacteriology of selected wards at Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital (FHRH), Northwest Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was carried out from 15th February to 30th April 2017. A total of 356 surface and air samples were collected from selected wards using 5% sheep blood agar (Oxoid, UK) and processed at FHRH microbiology laboratory following the standard bacteriological procedures. Pure isolates were tested against the recommended antibiotics using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion methods, and the susceptibility profile was determined based on Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 23 for Windows. Of the total 356 samples processed, 274 were from surfaces and 82 were from air. Among these, 141 (39.6%) showed bacterial growth, yielding a total of 190 isolates. Gram-positive isolates were predominant at 81.6% ( n =155), while the gram negatives were at 18.4% ( n =35). The main isolates were coagulase negative staphylococci ( CoNs ), 44%, followed by S. aureus , 37.4%, and Klebsiella species at 11.6%. The bacterial load on surfaces and air was found beyond the standard limits. Besides, the antimicrobial susceptibility profile of the isolates showed that about 75% of the identified isolates were found resistant for two and more antimicrobial agents tested. This study showed high degree of bacterial load that is beyond the standard limits on both surfaces and air samples of the hospital. Furthermore, some 75% of the isolates were found multidrug resistant. Therefore, it is important to evaluate and strengthen the infection prevention practice of the hospital. Moreover, stakeholders should also reinforce actions to decrease the pressure of antimicrobial resistance in the studied area.

  4. Quantity and quality of interaction between staff and older patients in UK hospital wards: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Hannah Ruth; Griffiths, Peter; Mesa-Eguiagaray, Ines; Pickering, Ruth; Gould, Lisa; Bridges, Jackie

    2016-10-01

    The quality of staff-patient interactions underpins the overall quality of patient experience and can affect other important outcomes. However no studies have been identified that comprehensively explore both the quality and quantity of interactions in general hospital settings. To quantify and characterise the quality of staff-patient interactions and to identify factors associated with negative interaction ratings. Data were gathered at two acute English NHS hospitals between March and April 2015. Six wards for adult patients participated including medicine for older people (n=4), urology (n=1) and orthopaedics (n=1). Eligible patients on participating wards were randomly selected for observation. Staff-patient interactions were observed using the Quality of Interactions Schedule. 120h of care were observed with each 2h observation session determined from a balanced random schedule (Monday-Friday, 08:00-22:00h). Multilevel logistic regression models were used to determine factors associated with negative interactions. 1554 interactions involving 133 patients were observed. The median length of interaction was 36s with a mean of 6 interactions per patient per hour. Seventy three percent of interactions were categorized as positive, 17% neutral and 10% negative. Forty percent of patients had at least one negative interaction (95% confidence interval 32% to 49%). Interactions initiated by the patient (adjusted Odds Ratio [OR] 5.30), one way communication (adjusted OR 10.70), involving two or more staff (adjusted OR 5.86 for 2 staff, 6.46 for 3+ staff), having a higher total number of interactions (adjusted OR 1.09 per unit increase), and specific types of interaction content were associated with increased odds of negative interaction (pinteraction was associated with increased odds of negative interaction in a reduced model. There was no significant association with gender, age or cognitive impairment. There was substantially more variation at ward level (variance

  5. Sauti Za Wananchi “voice of the people”: patient satisfaction on the medical wards at a Kenyan Referral Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Geren Starr; Jerotich, Tecla Sum; Cheriro, Betsy Rono; Kiptoo, Robert Sitienei; Crowe, Susie Joanne; Koros, Elijah Kipkorir; Muthoni, Doreen Mutegi; Onalo, Paul Theodore

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Patient satisfaction is one indicator of healthcare quality. Few studies have examined the inpatient experiences in resource-scarce environments in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods To examine patient satisfaction on the public medical wards at a Kenyan referral hospital, we performed a cross-sectional survey focused on patients’ satisfaction with medical information and their relationship with staffing and hospital routine. Ratings of communication with providers, efforts to protect privacy, information about costs, food, and hospital environment were also elicited. Results Overall, the average patient satisfaction rating was 64.7, nearly midway between “average” and “good” Higher rated satisfaction was associated with higher self-rated general health scores and self-rated health gains during the hospitalization (p = 0.023 and p = 0.001). Women who shared a hospital bed found privacy to be “below average” to “poor” Most men (72.7%) felt information about costs was insufficient. Patients rated food and environmental quality favorably while also frequently suggesting these areas could be improved. Conclusion Overall, patients expressed satisfaction with the care provided. These ratings may reflect modest patients’ expectations as well as acceptable circumstances and performance. Women expressed concern about privacy while men expressed a desire for more information on costs. Inconsistencies were noted between patient ratings and free response answers. PMID:25469201

  6. Epidemiology, species distribution, antifungal susceptibility and outcome of candidemia among Internal Medicine Wards of community hospitals of Udine province, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Silvestri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Candidemia is an emerging problem among patients hospitalized in Internal Medicine Wards (IMW. We performed a retrospective study to assess the epidemiology, species distribution, antifungal susceptibility and outcome of candidaemia recorded over a 3-year period (2010-2012 among IMW of community hospitals of Udine province in Italy: forty-eight patients were identified, with an overall incidence of 1.44 cases/1000 hospital admissions/year. Candida albicans was the most frequent species, followed by Candida parapsilosis that accounted for 42.9% of Tolmezzo cases. All isolates were susceptible to amphotericin and caspofungin, while 11.4% of strains were not-susceptible to voriconazole and 14.3% to fluconazole. Crude mortality was 41.7%. In conclusion, in community hospitals overall incidence of candidemia is similar to tertiary care hospitals, but 80% of cases are detected in IMW. Candida species distribution is overlapping, but differences in local epidemiology were found and should be taken into consideration. No resistance to amphotericin and caspofungin was found while resistance to azoles was observed. Knowledge of this data might be useful when planning the best therapeutic strategy.

  7. Functional changes during hospital stay in older patients admitted to an acute care ward: a multicenter observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie L De Buyser

    Full Text Available Changes in physical performance during hospital stay have rarely been evaluated. In this study, we examined functional changes during hospital stay by assessing both physical performance and activities of daily living. Additionally, we investigated characteristics of older patients associated with meaningful in-hospital improvement in physical performance.The CRiteria to assess appropriate Medication use among Elderly complex patients project recruited 1123 patients aged ≥65 years, consecutively admitted to geriatric or internal medicine acute care wards of seven Italian hospitals. We analyzed data from 639 participating participants with a Mini Mental State Examination score ≥18/30. Physical performance was assessed by walking speed and grip strength, and functional status by activities of daily living at hospital admission and at discharge. Meaningful improvement was defined as a measured change of at least 1 standard deviation. Multivariable logistic regression models predicting meaningful improvement, included age, gender, type of admission (through emergency room or elective, and physical performance at admission.Mean age of the study participants was 79 years (range 65-98, 52% were female. Overall, mean walking speed and grip strength performance improved during hospital stay (walking speed improvement: 0.04±0.20 m/s, p<0.001; grip strength improvement: 0.43±5.66 kg, p = 0.001, no significant change was observed in activities of daily living. Patients with poor physical performance at admission had higher odds for in-hospital improvement.Overall, physical performance measurements show an improvement during hospital stay. The margin for meaningful functional improvement is larger in patients with poor physical function at admission. Nevertheless, most of these patients continue to have poor performance at discharge.

  8. "Occupational Exposure To Xylene In Workers, Employing At Pathology Wards Of Hospitals Belonging To The Qazvin University Of Medical Sciences "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Taheri SJ

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene, toluene, and xylene are extensively used in the different environments and industries, causing adverse effects on individuals who are being exposed occupationally and environmentally to these hazardous compounds. In this study, occupational exposure to xylene in workers, employing at pathology wards of hospitals belonging to the Qazvin University of Medical Sciences have been investigated. Materials and Methods: Methyl Hiporic Acid (MHA as a main metabolite of xylene in urine was used to evaluate the workers exposure to this chemical. The urine samples were taken from all 30 workers from 4 hospitals, i.e. Kosar, Shahid Rajaei, Booali and Qods. Through this study, 30 administrative employees were also selected as control group. The direct DBA colorimetric method was used to measure MHA in the workers urine. Results: The results obtained from this study showed that, there were significant differences between MHA and working days, type of jobs, and length of exposure time. This study also showed that, there were no significant differences between urinary MHA concentration and sex, age, and smoking habit. Conclusion: Through this study, it was also clearly obtained that, xylene exposure can not affect on the total and direct serum bilirobin in the workers blood. Finally, it is worth mentioning that, although this study showed no acute exposure to xylene in hospitals pathology wards, the effect of chronic exposure to such compound cannot be ignored, therefore protecting workers against like these organic solvents are strongly recommended as their TLVs are considerably being reduced during these years

  9. The Effect of Stress Management on Occupational Stress and Satisfaction among Midwives in Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital Wards in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimyar Jahromi, Mahdi; Minaei, Shahnaz; Abdollahifard, Sareh; Maddahfar, Majid

    2016-09-01

    Occupational stress is one of the major problems of health care staff, substantially affecting their professional and personal performance. This research has been conducted with the aim of determining the effect of stress management on occupational stress and satisfaction among the Midwives in Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital wards at Motahari Hospital in Jahrom, Iran 2013-2014. This is a Quasi-experimental study of the pre- and post-clinical trials type. The study population included midwives employed in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital wards selected trough census. The samples were categorized into two groups randomly. The intervention group participated in the short-term training workshop of stress management. The studied samples were measured in terms of occupational stress and satisfaction before, right after, and one month after the workshop. Occupational stress measurement was measured by Toft-Anderson occupational stress questionnaire (1981). Similarly, the occupational satisfaction was measured by JDI checklist developed by Stephen Robins (1994). In order to analyze the information, SPSS 16 together with descriptive statistics tests (frequency, percentile, mean, and standard deviation), independent sample t-tests, iterative measurement and Spearman correlation coefficient were used.  A total of 70 people (two 35-person groups) of midwives participated in this study. The findings revealed that there was a significant difference between the mean of scores of occupational stress between the two groups before and after the workshop (p=0.001). There was, however, no significant difference between the scores of satisfactions across the two groups. Training of skills of coping with stress including stress management can be effective in diminishing level of occupational stress. Mitigation of stress without catering for professional, occupational, organizational, and environmental factors would not lead to development of job satisfaction.

  10. Dispersion of Exhalation Pollutants in a Two-bed Hospital Ward with a Downward Ventilation System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, Hua; Nielsen, Peter V.; Hyldgård, Carl-Erik

    2006-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended the use of downward ventilation systems in isolation rooms to reduce the risk of cross-infection from airborne transmissible diseases. The expected airflow pattern of a downward ventilation design would supply cooler and slightly...... to investigate the airflow pattern and pollutant dispersion in the test ward. Based on both experimental and numerical results, the laminar airflow pattern was shown to be impossible to achieve due to turbulent flow mixing and flow entrainment into the supply air stream. The thermal plumes produced above people...... were found to induce flow mixing. We also studied the effects of the locations of the supply and extraction openings on both the flow pattern and pollutant exposure level in the occupied zone. A number of practical recommendations are suggested....

  11. An IBCLC in the Maternity Ward of a Mother and Child Hospital: A Pre- and Post-Intervention Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Chiurco

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Published evidence on the impact of the integration of International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs for breastfeeding promotion is growing, but still relatively limited. Our study aims at evaluating the effects of adding an IBCLC for breastfeeding support in a mother and child hospital environment. We conducted a prospective study in the maternity ward of our maternal and child health Institute, recruiting 402 mothers of healthy term newborns soon after birth. The 18-month intervention of the IBCLC (Phase II was preceded (Phase I by data collection on breastfeeding rates and factors related to breastfeeding, both at hospital discharge and two weeks later. Data collection was replicated just before the end of the intervention (Phase III. In Phase III, a significantly higher percentage of mothers: (a received help to breastfeed, and also received correct information on breastfeeding and community support, (b started breastfeeding within two hours from delivery, (c reported a good experience with the hospital staff. Moreover, the frequency of sore and/or cracked nipples was significantly lower in Phase III. However, no difference was found in exclusive breastfeeding rates at hospital discharge or at two weeks after birth.

  12. [Bacterial contamination of mobile phones shared in hospital wards and the consciousness and behavior of nurses about biological cleanliness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, Ikuharu; Tabuchi, Yuna; Takahashi, Yuko; Oda, Yuriko; Nakai, Masami; Yanase, Aki; Watazu, Chiyoko

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the contamination of mobile phones shared in hospital wards and its relationship with the consciousness and behavior of nurses about biological cleanliness. Samples from mobile phones were cultured to detect viable bacteria (n=110) and Staphylococcus aureus (n=54). A questionnaire survey was conducted on 110 nurses carrying mobile phones on the day of sampling. Viable bacteria were detected on 79.1% of the mobile phones, whereas S. aureus was detected on 68.6%. All the nurses were aware of hand washing with water or alcohol after regular work, but 33.6% of the nurses were not conscious of hand washing with water or alcohol after using a mobile phone. There was a significant positive relationship between the frequency of using mobile phones and the number of hand washings with water or alcohol. A significant negative relationship was found between the detection of viable bacteria and the number of hand washings with alcohol. The results of logistic regression analysis showed that the detection of viable bacteria was related significantly with the number of hand washings with alcohol (Odds ratio, 0.350; 95%CI, 0.143-0.857) and that the detection of S. aureus was related significantly with the frequency of using mobile phones (Odds ratio, 0.183; 95%CI, 0.036-0.933). It is important to be conscious of the fact that mobile phones shared in hospital wards are easily contaminated. Because hand washing with water or alcohol prevents the contamination of the mobile phones, nurses should take standard precautions after using mobile phones.

  13. Impact of a Local Low-Cost Ward-Based Response System in a Canadian Tertiary Care Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Blotsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Medical emergency teams (METs or rapid response teams (RRTs facilitate early intervention for clinically deteriorating hospitalized patients. In healthcare systems where financial resources and intensivist availability are limited, the establishment of such teams can prove challenging. Objectives. A low-cost, ward-based response system was implemented on a medical clinical teaching unit in a Montreal tertiary care hospital. A prospective before/after study was undertaken to examine the system’s impact on time to intervention, code blue rates, and ICU transfer rates. Results. Ninety-five calls were placed for 82 patients. Median time from patient decompensation to intervention was 5 min (IQR 1–10, compared to 3.4 hours (IQR 0.6–12.4 before system implementation (p<0.001. Total number of ICU admissions from the CTU was reduced from 4.8/1000 patient days (±2.2 before intervention to 3.3/1000 patient days (±1.4 after intervention (IRR: 0.82, p=0.04 (CI 95%: 0.69–0.99. CTU code blue rates decreased from 2.2/1000 patient days (±1.6 before intervention to 1.2/1000 patient days (±1.3 after intervention (IRR: 0.51, p=0.02 (CI 95%: 0.30–0.89. Conclusion. Our local ward-based response system achieved a significant reduction in the time of patient decompensation to initial intervention, in CTU code blue rates, and in CTU to ICU transfers without necessitating additional usage of financial or human resources.

  14. Prevalence and Antibiogram of Microbial Agents Causing Nosocomial Urinary Tract Infection in Surgical Ward of Dhaka Medical College Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tashmin Afroz Binte Islam

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nosocomial infections pose substantial risk to patients receiving care in hospitals. In Bangladesh, this problem is aggravated by inadequate infection control due to poor hygiene, resource and structural constraints and lack of awareness regarding nosocomial infections. Objective: We carried out this study to determine the prevalence of different microorganisms from urine in surgery ward and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern against various antibiotics. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out in Department of Microbiology, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka over a period of 12 months from July 2011 to June 2012. A total of 52 urine specimens were collected from catheterized patients admitted in general surgery ward of Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH and incubated in blood agar, MacConkey agar media and the isolates were identified by different biochemical tests – oxidase test and reaction in MIU (motility indole urease and Simmon’s citrate and TSI (triple sugar iron media. ESBL producers were detected by double-disk synergy test (DDST. Results: Bacteria were isolated from 35 specimens and Escherichia coli was the commonest isolate (23, 65.71% followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa 6 (17.14%, Klebsiella pneumoniae 3 (8.57%, Acinetobacter baumannii 2 (5.72% and Proteus vulgaris 1 (2.86% respectively. Among the isolates, 10 (28.57% ESBL producers were detected and the highest ESBL production was observed in Escherichia coli (8, 22.85% followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae 1 (2.86% and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1 (2.86%. The isolates were resistant to most of the commonly used antimicrobial agents. Conclusion: The emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR bacteria poses a difficult task for physicians who have limited therapeutic options. However, the high rate of nosocomial infections and multi-resistant pathogens necessitate urgent comprehensive interventions of infection control.

  15. Study of the outcome of suicide attempts: characteristics of hospitalization in a psychiatric ward group, critical care center group, and non-hospitalized group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemuyama Nobuo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The allocation of outcome of suicide attempters is extremely important in emergency situations. Following categorization of suicidal attempters who visited the emergency room by outcome, we aimed to identify the characteristics and potential needs of each group. Methods The outcomes of 1348 individuals who attempted suicide and visited the critical care center or the psychiatry emergency department of the hospital were categorized into 3 groups, "hospitalization in the critical care center (HICCC", "hospitalization in the psychiatry ward (HIPW", or "non-hospitalization (NH", and the physical, mental, and social characteristics of these groups were compared. In addition, multiple logistic analysis was used to extract factors related to outcome. Results The male-to-female ratio was 1:2. The hospitalized groups, particularly the HICCC group, were found to have biopsychosocially serious findings with regard to disturbance of consciousness (JCS, general health performance (GAS, psychiatric symptoms (BPRS, and life events (LCU, while most subjects in the NH group were women who tended to repeat suicide-related behaviors induced by relatively light stress. The HIPW group had the highest number of cases, and their symptoms were psychologically serious but physically mild. On multiple logistic analysis, outcome was found to be closely correlated with physical severity, risk factor of suicide, assessment of emergent medical intervention, and overall care. Conclusion There are different potential needs for each group. The HICCC group needs psychiatrists on a full-time basis and also social workers and clinical psychotherapists to immediately initiate comprehensive care by a medical team composed of multiple professionals. The HIPW group needs psychological education to prevent repetition of suicide attempts, and high-quality physical treatment and management skill of the staff in the psychiatric ward. The NH group subjects need a

  16. Optimization of hospital ward resources with patient relocation using Markov chain modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Reenberg; Nielsen, Bo Friis; Reinhardt, Line Blander

    2017-01-01

    available to the hospital. Patient flow is modeled using a homogeneous continuous-time Markov chain and optimization is conducted using a local search heuristic. Our model accounts for patient relocation, which has not been done analytically in literature with similar scope. The study objective is to ensure...... are distributed. Furthermore, our heuristic is found to efficiently derive the optimal solution. Applying our model to the hospital case, we found that relocation of daily arrivals can be reduced by 11.7% by re-distributing beds that are already available to the hospital....

  17. New onset of insomnia in hospitalized patients in general medical wards: incidence, causes, and resolution rate

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, An; Raja, Bronson; Waldhorn, Richard; Baez, Valentina; Mohammed, Idiris

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Insomnia is common in hospitalized patients. However, no study has examined new onset of insomnia in patients without a prior history of insomnia. Objectives: Incidence of new onset of insomnia in inpatients, associated factors and resolution rate after 2 weeks. Method: This is a prospective observational study conducted at a community hospital. We used the Insomnia Severity Index questionnaire to screen for insomnia in all patients located in the general medical floors f...

  18. [Direct costs and clinical aspects of adverse drug reactions in patients admitted to a level 3 hospital internal medicine ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribiño, Gabriel; Maldonado, Carlos; Segura, Omar; Díaz, Jorge

    2006-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) occur frequently in hospitals and increase costs of health care; however, few studies have quantified the clinical and economic impact of ADRs in Colombia. These impacts were evaluated by calculating costs associated with ADRs in patients hospitalized in the internal medicine ward of a Level 3 hospital located in Bogotá, Colombia. In addition, salient clinical features of ADRs were identified and characterized. Intensive follow-ups for a cohort of patients were conducted for a five month period in order to detect ADRs; different ways to classify them, according to literature, were considered as well. Information was collected using the INVIMA reporting format, and causal probability was evaluated with the Naranjo algorithm. Direct costs were calculated from the perspective of payer, based on the following costs: additional hospital stay, medications, paraclinical tests, additional procedures, patient displacement to intermediate or intensive care units, and other costs. Of 836 patients admitted to the service, 268 adverse drug reactions were detected in 208 patients (incidence proportion 25.1%, occurence rate 0.32). About the ADRs found, 74.3% were classified as probable, 92.5% were type A, and 81.3% were moderate. The body system most often affected was the circulatory system (33.9%). Drugs acting on the blood were most frequently those ones associated with adverse reactions (37.6%). The costs resulting from medical care of adverse drug reactions varied from COL dollar 93,633,422 (USD dollar 35,014.92) to COL dollar 122,155,406 (USD dollar 45,680.94), according to insurance type, during the study period. Adverse drug reactions have a significant negative health and financial impact on patient welfare. Because of the substantial resources required for their medical care and the significant proportion of preventable adverse reactions, active programs of institutional pharmacovigilance are highly recommended.

  19. Balancing nurses' workload in hospital wards : Study protocol of developing a method to manage workload

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Oetelaar, W. F J M; Van Stel, H. F.; Van Rhenen, W.; Stellato, R. K.; Grolman, W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hospitals pursue different goals at the same time: excellent service to their patients, good quality care, operational excellence, retaining employees. This requires a good balance between patient needs and nursing staff. One way to ensure a proper fit between patient needs and nursing

  20. Disease patterns in the medical wards of a rural South African hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypertension dominated the disease pattern followed by pulmonary tuberculosis, gastro-enteritis, pneumonia, diabetes, and asthma. The findings of this study suggest that diseases prominent in the affluent urban population affect patients seen at this rural hospital. The focus of primary care physicians should be to manage ...

  1. Colonization with hospital flora and its associated risk factors in neonates hospitalized in neonatal ward of a teaching center in Isfahan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirani, Kiana; Mostafavizadeh, Kamyar; Ataei, Behrouz; Akhani, Khatere

    2018-01-01

    Due to the high incidence and prevalence of infection in neonatal ward, especially Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) reported by different studies and the important role of colonization with hospital germs in the development of nosocomial infections, we intended to evaluate the risk of colonization with hospital germs in neonates and its associated risk factors. This cross-sectional, descriptive-analytical study was conducted in 2016 in a Teaching Center in Iran. In total, 51 neonates were selected based on the inclusion criteria, and after recording their information in a checklist, samples were taken by swab from outer ear, axilla, and groin for culture. Neonates with negative culture from mentioned regions were enrolled in the study. The swab samples again were taken and sent for culture from mentioned regions in at least 3 days after hospitalization. Culture results from first and second sampling were collected and analyzed statistically. This study was conducted on 51 neonates. The mean gestational age among the neonates ranged from 35.25 (Week) ± 2.98. 22 girls (43.1%) and 29 boys (56.9%), most of them were born by cesarean. Based on the results of logistic regression, a significant association was found between the occurrence of colonization of hospital flora and the place hospitalization of the newborns (odds ratio (OR): 4.750; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.26-17.85). This study revealed that the only risk factors of colonization with hospital flora in neonates are the type of delivery and place of hospitalization. Based on findings of the study, it is recommended to focus on efforts in increasing the rate of natural birth as well as improving conditions of infection control in NICUs to reduce the number of incidences of colonization with hospital flora in neonates.

  2. The assessment of neonates’ exposure to traumatic factors in the cardiac ward within the first 24 hours of hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Cepuch

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: During the first 24 hours of hospitalization, neonates with ductus-dependent CHD are exposed to a number of traumatic impulses arising from the need for necessary care and therapeutic procedures. Material and methods: The studied group consisted of neonates in a stable condition, suffering from ductusdependent CHD, monitored from the first to the fifth day of their life. The research involved the observation of 10 patients of the cardiac ward at the University Children’s Hospital. The research was carried out by means of the following methods: observation with available assessment tools, such as author’s questionnaire, CRIES scale, sound level meter and stopper. Results: The total number of all procedures performed on the group of 10 neonates amounted to 622 per day. The average number of invasive procedures per day performed on one patient was 6.6, while the procedures connected with touching averaged at 57.3. The average daily noise level amounted to 72.2 dB; the total daily time of exposure to artificial light averaged at 87 minutes, with the average duration of a single lighting episode lasting 14.6 minutes. The average pain level of a neonate connected with chosen invasive procedures fell between 5 and 7 points in the CRIES scale. Conclusions: The impact of traumatic factors disrupts the process of adaptation, may adversely influence further development of central nervous system, perception and sense organs and disturbs psychological development.

  3. Antibiotic resistance in hospitals: a ward-specific random effect model in a low antibiotic consumption environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrin, Magne; Raastad, Ragnhild; Tvete, Ingunn Fride; Berild, Dag; Frigessi, Arnoldo; Leegaard, Truls; Monnet, Dominique L; Walberg, Mette; Müller, Fredrik

    2013-04-15

    Association between previous antibiotic use and emergence of antibiotic resistance has been reported for several microorganisms. The relationship has been extensively studied, and although the causes of antibiotic resistance are multi-factorial, clear evidence of antibiotic use as a major risk factor exists. Most studies are carried out in countries with high consumption of antibiotics and corresponding high levels of antibiotic resistance, and currently, little is known whether and at what level the associations are detectable in a low antibiotic consumption environment. We conduct an ecological, retrospective study aimed at determining the impact of antibiotic consumption on antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in three hospitals in Norway, a country with low levels of antibiotic use. We construct a sophisticated statistical model to capture such low signals. To reduce noise, we conduct our study at hospital ward level. We propose a random effect Poisson or binomial regression model, with a reparametrisation that allows us to reduce the number of parameters. Inference is likelihood based. Through scenario simulation, we study the potential effects of reduced or increased antibiotic use. Results clearly indicate that the effects of consumption on resistance are present under conditions with relatively low use of antibiotic agents. This strengthens the recommendation on prudent use of antibiotics, even when consumption is relatively low. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. A survey of the quality of nursing services for brain trauma patients in the emergency wards of hospitals in Guilan Province, Iran (2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Seyed Ali; Ayoubian, Ali; Mardani, Sheida; Hashemidehaghi, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Head trauma is the main cause of disabilities and death among young people, and the side effects of head trauma pose some of the greatest medical challenges. Rapid diagnosis and the use of proper treatments can prevent more severe brain damage. The purpose of this research was to determine the quality of nursing services provided to brain trauma patients in hospitals in Guilan Province, Iran. The study was conducted as a descriptive, cross-sectional study in the emergency wards of selected hospitals in Guilan in 2012. The research population was comprised of all the brain trauma patients in these hospitals. We developed a two-section questionnaire, ascertained its validity, and determined that it had a reliability of 88% (Cronbach's alpha). Subsequently, we used the questionnaire for gathering data. The data were analyzed using SPSS statistical software, and descriptive analysis tests (frequency rate and average) and deductive analyses tests (chi-squared) also were used. The results showed that the quality of health services provided to brain-trauma patients in the emergency ward was at the moderate level of 58.8% of the cases and at a low level in 41.2% of the cases. Based on the results that showed that the services were of moderate quality, the staff members in the emergency ward were required to update their knowledge and use the required measures to minimize or prevent side effects in brain-trauma patients; clearly, mastery of such measures was a real need among the emergency ward's staff.

  5. Estimating potential infection transmission routes in hospital wards using wearable proximity sensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Vanhems

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Contacts between patients, patients and health care workers (HCWs and among HCWs represent one of the important routes of transmission of hospital-acquired infections (HAI. A detailed description and quantification of contacts in hospitals provides key information for HAIs epidemiology and for the design and validation of control measures. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used wearable sensors to detect close-range interactions ("contacts" between individuals in the geriatric unit of a university hospital. Contact events were measured with a spatial resolution of about 1.5 meters and a temporal resolution of 20 seconds. The study included 46 HCWs and 29 patients and lasted for 4 days and 4 nights. 14,037 contacts were recorded overall, 94.1% of which during daytime. The number and duration of contacts varied between mornings, afternoons and nights, and contact matrices describing the mixing patterns between HCW and patients were built for each time period. Contact patterns were qualitatively similar from one day to the next. 38% of the contacts occurred between pairs of HCWs and 6 HCWs accounted for 42% of all the contacts including at least one patient, suggesting a population of individuals who could potentially act as super-spreaders. CONCLUSIONS: Wearable sensors represent a novel tool for the measurement of contact patterns in hospitals. The collected data can provide information on important aspects that impact the spreading patterns of infectious diseases, such as the strong heterogeneity of contact numbers and durations across individuals, the variability in the number of contacts during a day, and the fraction of repeated contacts across days. This variability is however associated with a marked statistical stability of contact and mixing patterns across days. Our results highlight the need for such measurement efforts in order to correctly inform mathematical models of HAIs and use them to inform the design and evaluation of

  6. Epidemiologic Evaluation of Ocular Trauma in Patients Admitted to Ophthalmology Ward of Farshchian Hospital in Hamadan in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Bazzazi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Ocular trauma is one of the important reasons of visual loss which can cause multiple damages to eyelid, eyeball and adenexal tissues. Furthermore, ocular trauma is one of the major causes of unilateral blindness and the third leading cause of hospi-talization in ophthalmology wards. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence and characteristics of eye trauma at Farshchian hospital in Hamadan in 2012. Material & Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study, 70 patients with ocular trauma, admitted to Farshchian hospital, were studied. We assessed the age, sex, job , educational level, location, cause of trauma, its type and site of injury. The data was analyzed by SPSS 16 software and t, ?2 statistical tests. Results: The mean age of patients in this study was 24.01 years (SD= 16.04. Among 70 pa-tients, 58 people (82.1% were males and 12 patients (17.1% were females. The most com-mon cause of trauma was observed in 19 patients (27.1%. The most common location of the trauma in this study was homing, seen in 28 patients (40%. Among the 70 patients, 29 peo-ple (41.4% had open globe injuries, 25 people had (35.7% closed globe injuries, 5 patients (7.1% had burning and 11 patients (15.7% had adenexal injury. Conclusions: The results showed that most ocular traumas occur in the early ages and in males. The most common type of them is open globe injury and the most common cause is a sharp object. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (1:25-31

  7. Oral health and orofacial pain in people with dementia admitted to acute hospital wards: observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Rijt, Liza J M; Weijenberg, Roxane A F; Feast, Alexandra R; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Lobbezoo, Frank; Sampson, Elizabeth L

    2018-05-23

    Orofacial pain in people with dementia is difficult to detect, and often under-treated. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of orofacial pain in people with dementia in acute hospitals in the UK. Secondary aims were to examine oral health status and explore associations between orofacial pain and oral health factors. This cross-sectional observational study was carried out in two UK hospitals. Using the Orofacial Pain Scale in Non-Verbal Individuals (OPS-NVI) to identify orofacial pain, 101 participants with dementia, admitted to acute medical wards, were observed for at least 3 min during rest and chewing. Verbal participants were then asked about presence of orofacial pain, using self-report pain scales. Finally, a brief oral assessment was performed. Orofacial pain, assessed with the OPS-NVI, was present in 11.9% (95% C.I. 5.9, 18.8) of participants at rest and 21.9% (95% C.I. 14.6, 31.3) whilst chewing. Participants who were no longer able to self-report pain were significantly more likely to experience orofacial pain. Oral health in both dentate and edentate participants was poor. Brush frequency, indication of chewing quality, consistency of the food, presence of extra-oral abnormalities, person who performed mouth care, and oral hygiene in dentate participants were significant predictors for the presence of orofacial pain. Improving oral care in acute hospital patients with dementia, particularly those who cannot self-report pain, may significantly reduce pain and suffering in this population.

  8. Improving communication between staff and disabled children in hospital wards: testing the feasibility of a training intervention developed through intervention mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumm, Rebecca; Thomas, Eleanor; Lloyd, Claire; Hambly, Helen; Tomlinson, Richard; Logan, Stuart; Morris, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    To develop and test the feasibility of a novel parent-inspired training intervention for hospital ward staff to improve communication with disabled children when inpatients. Training content and delivery strategies were informed by the iterative process of Intervention Mapping and developed in collaboration with parents of disabled children. UK University Hospital children's ward. 80 medical, nursing, allied health professionals, clerical and housekeeping staff on a children's ward. Themes identified in previous qualitative research formed the basis of the training. Learning objectives included prioritising communication, cultivating empathy, improving knowledge and developing confidence. Participant feedback was used to refine content and delivery. Intervention documentation adheres to the Template for Intervention Description and Replication checklist. Highlighting mandated National Health Service policies and involving the hospital Patient and Carer Experience Group facilitated management support for the training. Eighty staff participated in one of four 1-hour sessions. A paediatric registrar and nurse delivered sessions to mixed groups of staff. General feedback was very positive. The intervention, fully documented in a manual, includes videos of parent carers discussing hospital experiences, interactive tasks, small group discussion, personal reflection and intention planning. Generic and local resources were provided. It was feasible to deliver this new communication training to hospital ward staff and it was positively received. Early feedback was encouraging and indicates a commitment to behaviour change. Further piloting is required to establish the transferability of the intervention to other hospitals, followed by consideration of downstream markers to evaluate the effects on disabled children's inpatient experience. Organisational and cultural change is required to support individual behaviour change.

  9. Female babies and risk-aversion: Causal evidence from hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogrebna, Ganna; Oswald, Andrew J; Haig, David

    2018-03-01

    Using ultrasound scan data from paediatric hospitals, and the exogenous 'shock' of learning the gender of an unborn baby, the paper documents the first causal evidence that offspring gender affects adult risk-aversion. On a standard Holt-Laury criterion, parents of daughters, whether unborn or recently born, become almost twice as risk-averse as parents of sons. The study demonstrates this in longitudinal and cross-sectional data, for fathers and mothers, for babies in the womb and new-born children, and in a West European nation and East European nation. These findings may eventually aid our understanding of risky health behaviors and gender inequalities. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhancing the Safety Climate and Reducing Violence Against Staff in Closed Hospital Wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaak, Valerie; Vashdi, Dana; Bar-Noy, Dor; Kostisky, Hava; Hirschmann, Shmuel; Grinshpoon, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of an intervention program to enhance unit safety climate and minimize employee risk of injury from patient violence. The intervention program, including a 3-day workshop, was offered to personnel on maximum security units of an Israeli psychiatric hospital. Safety climate was examined before and after the implementation of the intervention, and incidents of patient violence were investigated. Six months after the intervention, a significant improvement in employees' perceptions of management's commitment to safety as well as a marginally significant improvement in communication about safety issues were found. This study demonstrated that an intervention program to enhance safety climate was associated with a decrease in the number of aggressive incidents. The researchers concluded that this intervention program is likely to return a sense of safety to workers and reduce workplace violence.

  11. Outcomes of glycemic control in Hispanic geriatric diabetic patients admitted to a general ward community hospital in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Rodríguez, Miguel; Pérez-López, Shirley; Torres-Torres, Nancy; Torres-Semprit, Erick; Millán-Aponte, Ismenio

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most prevalent medical conditions among the Hispanic population. Although studies with patients in intensive care units have shown poor outcomes among those with uncontrolled glucose, more recent data have shown increased mortality associated with a tighter inpatient glucose control. In view of the lack of information regarding geriatric Hispanic patients with diabetes this study evaluated the effect of glucose control in the outcomes of this population in a community hospital in Puerto Rico. Through analysis of data from a previous study we evaluated 502 admissions of Hispanic geriatric patients with diabetes as comorbidity, for glucose control, management of diabetes and outcome. Data was stratified by age groups (65-74 years, 75-84 years and > or = 85 years) and outcomes were compared between the groups using chi-square and odds ratio. The most common admission diagnosis was pneumonia. Hypoglycemia was the most common complication and was associated with tighter glucose control in the age group of 75-84 years. An increased risk of having an acute coronary syndrome/acute myocardial infarction among uncontrolled patients was observed in the 75-84 year old group. Finally, although we found a high prevalence of uncontrolled blood glucose, only 54% of the patients received interventions for their glucose control. Poor glucose control seems to be associated with a tendency for decreased risk of hypoglycemia and higher risk of acute coronary syndrome/acute myocardial infarction as complications among geriatric patients with diabetes admitted to a general ward.

  12. Etiologic evaluation of patients with dysphagia admitted to ENT and Thorax surgery wards of Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad, Northeast of Iran

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    Mohammad Naeimi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction: Dysphagia is a common chief complain of various diseases with different benign or malignant etiologies. Iran is one of countries with a high incidence rate of esophageal cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the common causes of dysphagia for earlier diagnosis and treatment of this disease and reduction of its morbidity and mortality rate. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, we analyzed the etiology of dysphagia in 200 patients who were admitted to ENT and thorax surgery wards of Mashhad Ghaem Hospital during 2005-2007. Results: Of 200 patients, 79 patients were female and 121 patients were male. The most prevalent cause of dysphagia in these patients was esophageal SCC and the most common endoscopic presentation was the ulcerative view. Other common etiologic factors were esophageal stenosis, adenocarcinoma, mediastinal tumors, achalasia, lyomyoma, sarcoma and diffuse esophageal spasm, respectively. Conclusion: According to these results, the complaint of dysphagia with or without odinophagia has particular clinical importance, especially in our country with high frequency of esophageal malignancies.

  13. The politics of black patients' identity: ward-rounds on the 'black side' of a South African psychiatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, L

    1991-06-01

    There are many macrosocial studies of the political organisation of health and mental health care in South Africa, and the maldistribution of resources by race is well known. Little attention, however, has been given to the minutiae of the negotiation of power in the clinical setting. This article, which reports on part of a larger study of aspects of culture in South African psychiatry, focuses on interactions in ward-rounds on the 'Black side' of a South African psychiatric hospital. Through analysis of cases, the complexity of interpreting what transpires in such a setting and the central role that the concept of culture has in debates amongst staff members are demonstrated. Close analysis demonstrates the inadequacy of models which seek to locate the institutional racism of apartheid psychiatry in the motives of individual clinicians. Clinicians may simultaneously reproduce and subvert aspects of apartheid practice. A consideration of the social positioning of the clinician both as a South African and as a practitioner of psychiatry is central to the development of psychiatry in a post-apartheid South Africa.

  14. Surgical site infections in an abdominal surgical ward at Kosovo Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raka, Lul; Krasniqi, Avdyl; Hoxha, Faton; Musa, Ruustem; Mulliqi, Gjyle; Krasniqi, Selvete; Kurti, Arsim; Dervishaj, Antigona; Nuhiu, Beqir; Kelmendi, Baton; Limani, Dalip; Tolaj, Ilir

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal surgical site infections (SSI) cause substantial morbidity and mortality for patients undergoing operative procedures. We determined the incidence of and risk factors for SSI after abdominal surgery in the Department of Abdominal Surgery at the University Clinical Centre of Kosovo (UCCK). Prospective surveillance of patients undergoing abdominal surgery was performed between December 2005 and June 2006. CDC definitions were followed to detect SSI and study forms were based on Europe Link for Infection Control through Surveillance (HELICS) protocol. A total of 253 surgical interventions in 225 patients were evaluated. The median age of patients was 42 years and 55.1% of them were male. The overall incidence rate of SSI was 12%. Follow-up was achieved for 84.1% of the procedures. For patients with an SSI, the median duration of hospitalization was 9 days compared with 4 days for those without an SSI (p 2, use of antibiotic prophylaxis and NNIS class of > 2 were all significant at p < .001. The SSI rates for the NNIS System risk classes 0, 1 and 2-3 were 4.2%, 46.7% and 100%, respectively. SSI caused considerable morbidity among surgical patients in UCCK. Appropriate active surveillance and infection control measures should be introduced during preoperative, intra-operative, and postoperative care to reduce infection rates.

  15. Epidemiology and outcomes of children with renal failure in the pediatric ward of a tertiary hospital in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halle, Marie Patrice; Lapsap, Carine Tsou; Barla, Esther; Fouda, Hermine; Djantio, Hilaire; Moudze, Beatrice Kaptue; Akazong, Christophe Adjahoung; Priso, Eugene Belley

    2017-12-06

    Pediatric nephrology is challenging in developing countries and data on the burden of kidney disease in children is difficult to estimate due to absence of renal registries. We aimed to describe the epidemiology and outcomes of children with renal failure in Cameroon. We retrospectively reviewed 103 medical records of children from 0 to 17 years with renal failure admitted in the Pediatric ward of the Douala General Hospital from 2004 to 2013. Renal failure referred to either acute kidney injury (AKI) or Stage 3-5 chronic kidney disease (CKD). AKI was defined and graded using either the modified RIFLE criteria or the Pediatrics RIFLE criteria, while CKD was graded using the KDIGO criteria. Outcomes of interest were need and access to dialysis and in-hospital mortality. For patients with AKI renal recovery was evaluated at 3 months. Median age was 84 months (1QR:15-144) with 62.1% males. Frequent clinical symptoms were asthenia, anorexia, 68.8% of participants had anuria. AKI accounted for 84.5% (n = 87) and CKD for 15.5% (n = 16). Chronic glomerulonephritis (9/16) and urologic malformations (7/16) were the causes of CKD and 81.3% were at stage 5. In the AKI subgroup, 86.2% were in stage F, with acute tubular necrosis (n = 50) and pre-renal AKI (n = 31) being the most frequent mechanisms. Sepsis, severe malaria, hypovolemia and herbal concoction were the main etiologies. Eight of 14 (57%) patients with CKD, and 27 of 40 (67.5%) with AKI who required dialysis, accessed it. In-hospital mortality was 50.7% for AKI and 50% for CKD. Of the 25 patients in the AKI group with available data at 3 months, renal recovery was complete in 22, partial in one and 2 were dialysis dependent. Factors associated to mortality were young age (p = 0.001), presence of a coma (p = 0.021), use of herbal concoction (p = 0.024) and acute pulmonary edema (p = 0.011). Renal failure is severe and carries a high mortality in hospitalized children in Cameroon

  16. A Qualitative and Quantitative Survey on Air-Transmitted Fungal Contamination in Different Wards of Kamkar Hospital in Qom, Iran, in 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Azizifar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Fungi spores can be found everywhere. The amount and variety of fungal spores and their vast spread could be a preliminary step to the initiation of different diseases in people with different levels of health.

    Methods: In the present study six wards including nephrology, internal ward for women, surgery ward for men, operating theater for E.N.T., ophthalmology, infectious diseases ward and the laboratory were chosen for sampling on the basis of their types of activities and their in-patients. We used Anderson sampling method, collected samples within two minutes with flow rate of 28.3 L/Min in sabouraud medium.

    Results: Maximum contamination in the infectious diseases ward was 300 CFU/m3 and minimum contamination in E.N.T. was 94 CFU/m3. The maximum percentage of fungal spores in the hospital air was observed to be as follows: penicillin with 36.36%, Cladosporium 24.74%, A.niger 17.97%, Rhizopus 10.57% and A.flavus 2.74A%.

    Conclusion: Fungal contamination concentration in hospital indoor air in this study was higher than the recommended limits and other similar studies from a quantitative point of view, but it was similar to other studies in terms of identified species.

  17. Medically unexplained illness and the diagnosis of hysterical conversion reaction (HCR in women’s medicine wards of Bangladeshi hospitals: a record review and qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendall Emily A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frequent reporting of cases of hysterical conversion reaction (HCR among hospitalized female medical patients in Bangladesh’s public hospital system led us to explore the prevalence of “HCR” diagnoses within hospitals and the manner in which physicians identify, manage, and perceive patients whom they diagnose with HCR. Methods We reviewed admission records from women’s general medicine wards in two public hospitals to determine how often and at what point during hospitalization patients received diagnoses of HCR. We also interviewed 13 physicians about their practices and perceptions related to HCR. Results Of 2520 women admitted to the selected wards in 2008, 6% received diagnoses of HCR. HCR patients had wide-ranging symptoms including respiratory distress, headaches, chest pain, convulsions, and abdominal complaints. Most doctors diagnosed HCR in patients who had any medically-unexplained physical symptom. According to physician reports, women admitted to medical wards for HCR received brief diagnostic evaluations and initial treatment with short-acting tranquilizers or placebo agents. Some were referred to outpatient psychiatric treatment. Physicians reported that repeated admissions for HCR were common. Physicians noted various social factors associated with HCR, and they described failures of the current system to meet psychosocial needs of HCR patients. Conclusions In these hospital settings, physicians assign HCR diagnoses frequently and based on vague criteria. We recommend providing education to increase general physicians’ awareness, skill, and comfort level when encountering somatization and other common psychiatric issues. Given limited diagnostic capacity for all patients, we raise concern that when HCR is used as a "wastebasket" diagnosis for unexplained symptoms, patients with treatable medical conditions may go unrecognized. We also advocate introducing non-physician hospital personnel to address

  18. Nurses' worry or concern and early recognition of deteriorating patients on general wards in acute care hospitals: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douw, Gooske; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Holwerda, Tineke; Huisman-de Waal, Getty; van Zanten, Arthur R H; van Achterberg, Theo; van der Hoeven, Johannes G

    2015-05-20

    Nurses often recognize deterioration in patients through intuition rather than through routine measurement of vital signs. Adding the 'worry or concern' sign to the Rapid Response System provides opportunities for nurses to act upon their intuitive feelings. Identifying what triggers nurses to be worried or concerned might help to put intuition into words, and potentially empower nurses to act upon their intuitive feelings and obtain medical assistance in an early stage of deterioration. The aim of this systematic review is to identify the signs and symptoms that trigger nurses' worry or concern about a patient's condition. We searched the databases PubMed, CINAHL, Psychinfo and Cochrane Library (Clinical Trials) using synonyms related to the three concepts: 'nurses', 'worry/concern' and 'deterioration'. We included studies concerning adult patients on general wards in acute care hospitals. The search was performed from the start of the databases until 14 February 2014. The search resulted in 4,006 records, and 18 studies (five quantitative, nine qualitative and four mixed-methods designs) were included in the review. A total of 37 signs and symptoms reflecting the nature of the criterion worry or concern emerged from the data and were summarized in 10 general indicators. The results showed that worry or concern can be present with or without change in vital signs. The signs and symptoms we found in the literature reflect the nature of nurses' worry or concern, and nurses may incorporate these signs in their assessment of the patient and their decision to call for assistance. The fact that it is present before changes in vital signs suggests potential for improving care in an early stage of deterioration.

  19. [Nosocomial urinary tract and surgical site infection rates in the Maternity Ward at the General Referral Hospital in Katuba, Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukuke, Hendrick Mbutshu; Kasamba, Eric; Mahuridi, Abdulu; Nlandu, Roger Ngatu; Narufumi, Suganuma; Mukengeshayi, Abel Ntambue; Malou, Vicky; Makoutode, Michel; Kaj, Françoise Malonga

    2017-01-01

    In Intertropical Africa hospitalized patients are exposed to a risk of nosocomial infections. The dearth of published data on this subject limits the descriptive analysis of the situation. This study aimed to determine the incidence, the germs responsible for these infections and the risk factors of nosocomial infections in the Maternity Ward at the General Referral Hospital in Katuba, Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo. We conducted a descriptive, longitudinal study from 1 October 2014 to 1 January 2015. Our study population consisted of 207 women who had been hospitalized in the Maternity Ward at the General Referral Hospital in Katuba. We carried out a comprehensive data collection. Nosocomial infection rate accounted for 15.5%. Parturient women who had been hospitalized for more than three days were three times more likely to develop a nosocomial infection (p=0.003), while those who had had a complicated delivery were four times more likely to be at risk of developing nosocomial infection (p = 0.000). Escherichia coli was the most isolated causative agent (38.1%), followed by Citrobacter freundi (23.8%), Acinobacter baumani (.18, 2%), Staphylococcus aureus (18.2%), Enterococcus aureus (14.3%) and Pseudomonas aeroginosa (9.1%). Ampicillin was the most prescribed antibiotic, to which isolated microbes were resistant. It is necessary to improve hospital hygiene and to conduct further study to examine the similarity between germs strains in the environment and those in biological fluids.

  20. [Outbreak of hospital acquired Legionnaires' disease in patients of ophthalmic ward. Nosocomial Legionella infections for the first time observed in Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stypułkowska-Misiurewicz, Hanna; Pancer, Katarzyna; Krogulska, Bozena; Matuszewska, Renata

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to describe the criteria used for identification of first and so far the only one outbreak of hospital bacterial infections due to L. pneumophila. The infected persons were patients hospitalized at ophthalmic ward for more than 10 days. Four patients were found ill among 27 hospitalized (15%) at ophthalmic ward and 3 of them died (75%) in spite treatment in intensive care unit. The source of infection was found in the hospital hot water system. It was shown that L. pneumophila sg 1 and sg 2-14 were settled in the tanks and pipelines of hot water installations. The high number of L. pneumophila sg I and sg 2-14 colony forming units (> 10 000 cfu /100 ml) were found in the water specimens taken from the hospital water system, showing the high risk of Legionella infection for patients. Cleaning and disinfection of hot water system was repeated three times using composition every time modified as stronger mechanical, thermal and chemical methods. Complete elimination of Legionella from hot water system was achieved after cutting off deadlegs of water and replacement of both old hot water reservoirs with new ones. Collected experience served for preparation of guidelines for control and prevention of Legionella infections in hospital buildings, published on National Institute of Hygiene web site A month later Polish Ministry of Health published the Directives concerning the quality of drinking water to which the control of Legionella infection has been included.

  1. Nurse Level of Education, Quality of Care and Patient Safety in the Medical and Surgical Wards in Malaysian Private Hospitals: A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahman, Hamzah; Jarrar, Mu'taman; Don, Mohammad Sobri

    2015-04-23

    Nursing knowledge and skills are required to sustain quality of care and patient safety. The numbers of nurses with Bachelor degrees in Malaysia are very limited. This study aims to predict the impact of nurse level of education on quality of care and patient safety in the medical and surgical wards in Malaysian private hospitals. A cross-sectional survey by questionnaire was conducted. A total 652 nurses working in the medical and surgical wards in 12 private hospitals were participated in the study. Multistage stratified simple random sampling performed to invite nurses working in small size (less than 100 beds), medium size (100-199 beds) and large size (over than 200) hospitals to participate in the study. This allowed nurses from all shifts to participate in this study. Nurses with higher education were not significantly associated with both quality of care and patient safety. However, a total 355 (60.9%) of respondents participated in this study were working in teaching hospitals. Teaching hospitals offer training for all newly appointed staff. They also provide general orientation programs and training to outline the policies, procedures of the nurses' roles and responsibilities. This made the variances between the Bachelor and Diploma nurses not significantly associated with the outcomes of care. Nursing educational level was not associated with the outcomes of care in Malaysian private hospitals. However, training programs and the general nursing orientation programs for nurses in Malaysia can help to upgrade the Diploma-level nurses. Training programs can increase their self confidence, knowledge, critical thinking ability and improve their interpersonal skills. So, it can be concluded that better education and training for a medical and surgical wards' nurses is required for satisfying client expectations and sustaining the outcomes of patient care.

  2. Epidemiology and resistance features of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from the ward environment and patients in the burn ICU of a Chinese hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yali; Shen, Xiaodong; Huang, Guangtao; Zhang, Cheng; Luo, Xiaoqiang; Yin, Supeng; Wang, Jing; Hu, Fuquan; Peng, Yizhi; Li, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important opportunistic pathogen that causes severe nosocomial infections, especially in intensive care units (ICUs). Over the past decades, an everincreasing number of hospital outbreaks caused by A. baumannii have been reported worldwide. However, little attention has been directed toward the relationship between A. baumannii isolates from the ward environment and patients in the burn ICU. In this study, 88 A. baumannii isolates (26 from the ward environment and 62 from patients) were collected from the burn ICU of the Southwest Hospital in Chongqing, China, from July through December 2013. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing results showed that drug resistance was more severe in isolates from patients than from the ward environment, with all of the patient isolates being fully resistant to 10 out of 19 antimicrobials tested. Isolations from both the ward environment and patients possessed the β-lactamase genes bla OXA-51, bla OXA-23, bla AmpC, bla VIM, and bla PER. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), these isolates could be clustered into 4 major PFGE types and 4 main sequence types (ST368, ST369, ST195, and ST191) among which, ST368 was the dominant genotype. Epidemiologic and molecular typing data also revealed that a small-scale outbreak of A. baumannii infection was underway in the burn ICU of our hospital during the sampling period. These results suggest that dissemination of β-lactamase genes in the burn ICU might be closely associated with the high-level resistance of A. baumannii, and the ICU environment places these patients at a high risk for nosocomial infection. Cross-contamination should be an important concern in clinical activities to reduce hospitalacquired infections caused by A. baumannii.

  3. Adverse Drug Reactions Causing Admission to Medical Wards: A Cross-Sectional Survey at 4 Hospitals in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouton, Johannes P; Njuguna, Christine; Kramer, Nicole; Stewart, Annemie; Mehta, Ushma; Blockman, Marc; Fortuin-De Smidt, Melony; De Waal, Reneé; Parrish, Andy G; Wilson, Douglas P K; Igumbor, Ehimario U; Aynalem, Getahun; Dheda, Mukesh; Maartens, Gary; Cohen, Karen

    2016-05-01

    Limited data exist on the burden of serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in sub-Saharan Africa, which has high HIV and tuberculosis prevalence. We determined the proportion of adult admissions attributable to ADRs at 4 hospitals in South Africa. We characterized drugs implicated in, risk factors for, and the preventability of ADR-related admissions.We prospectively followed patients admitted to 4 hospitals' medical wards over sequential 30-day periods in 2013 and identified suspected ADRs with the aid of a trigger tool. A multidisciplinary team performed causality, preventability, and severity assessment using published criteria. We categorized an admission as ADR-related if the ADR was the primary reason for admission.There were 1951 admissions involving 1904 patients: median age was 50 years (interquartile range 34-65), 1057 of 1904 (56%) were female, 559 of 1904 (29%) were HIV-infected, and 183 of 1904 (10%) were on antituberculosis therapy (ATT). There were 164 of 1951 (8.4%) ADR-related admissions. After adjustment for age and ATT, ADR-related admission was independently associated (P ≤ 0.02) with female sex (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.51, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.06-2.14), increasing drug count (aOR 1.14 per additional drug, 95% CI 1.09-1.20), increasing comorbidity score (aOR 1.23 per additional point, 95% CI 1.07-1.41), and use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) if HIV-infected (aOR 1.92 compared with HIV-negative/unknown, 95% CI 1.17-3.14). The most common ADRs were renal impairment, hypoglycemia, liver injury, and hemorrhage. Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, insulin, rifampicin, and warfarin were most commonly implicated, respectively, in these 4 ADRs. ART, ATT, and/or co-trimoxazole were implicated in 56 of 164 (34%) ADR-related admissions. Seventy-three of 164 (45%) ADRs were assessed as preventable.In our survey, approximately 1 in 12 admissions was because of an ADR. The range of ADRs and implicated drugs reflect South Africa's high HIV

  4. Pharmacotherapy for adverse events reduces the length of hospital stay in patients admitted to otolaryngology ward: a single arm intervention study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Suzuki

    Full Text Available To determine whether adverse events extend the duration of hospitalization, and to evaluate the effectiveness of medical intervention in ameliorating adverse events and reducing the prolonged hospital stay associated with adverse events.A single arm intervention study was conducted from October 2012 to March 2014 in the otolaryngology ward of a 614-bed, university-affiliated hospital. Adverse events were monitored daily by physicians, pharmacists and nurses, and recorded in the electronic medical chart for each patient. Appropriate drug management of adverse events was performed by physicians in liaison with pharmacists. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to assess the length of hospitalization of patients who underwent medical intervention for adverse events.Of 571 patients admitted to the otolaryngology ward in a year, 219 patients (38.4% experienced adverse events of grade ≥2. The duration of hospitalization was affected by the grade of adverse events, with a mean duration of hospital stay of 9.2, 17.2, 28.3 and 47.0 days for grades 0, 1, 2, and 3-4, respectively. Medical intervention lowered the incidence of grade ≥2 adverse events to 14.5%. The length of hospitalization was significantly shorter in patients who showed an improvement of adverse events after medical intervention than those who did not (26.4 days vs. 41.6 days, hazard ratio 1.687, 95% confidence interval: 1.260-2.259, P<0.001. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis indicated that insomnia, constipation, nausea/vomiting, infection, non-cancer pain, oral mucositis, odynophagia and neutropenia were significant risk factors for prolongation of hospital stay.Patients who experienced adverse events are at high risk of prolonged hospitalization. Medical intervention for adverse events was found to be effective in reducing the length of hospital stay associated with adverse events.

  5. Assessing the appropriateness of parenteral nutrition use in hospitalized patients. A comparison on parenteral nutrition bag prescription in different wards and nutritional outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponta, Monica Laura; Rabbione, Laura; Borgio, Cristina; Quirico, Eliana; Patrito, Elena; Petrachi, Maria Novella; Girotto, Elisabetta; Sillano, Marisa; Geninatti, Silvio; Zanardi, Michela; Pezzana, Andrea

    2018-06-01

    Our aim is to assess parenteral nutrition (PN) bag prescription in hospitalized patients and evaluate clinical outcomes linked to PN therapy. We performed an observational longitudinal retrospective study on PN prescription in a General Public Hospital in Turin, Italy, on ninety-five patients receiving PN prescribed by the Nutrition Support Team (NST). We described patients' demography and assessed nutritional outcomes, as well as PN bag prescription in different wards. Medians were calculated for several clinical parameters before and after PN therapy. A z-test for proportions has been performed to better understand the impact of various conditions on clinical outcomes and to compare differences between administered nutrients and required amounts. The NST resulted responsible for only 18% of bags prescribed in the geriatrics ward and for 48% in the surgery wards. PN was not able to fulfill nutritional requirements resulting in a median lack of 3.1 calories and 0.23 g of proteins per kilogram of reference body weight per day. Despite this, PN therapy was able to improve total blood proteins and calcium blood levels in our cohort. The NST changed the prescription in 55.8% of the pre-existing PN regimens. More strict adherence to guidelines is needed in order to maximize effectiveness of PN and observe a positive impact on clinical parameters. Copyright © 2018 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. How many EMA-workshops are needed to collect a representative sample of events in a hospital ward?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    The effect modifier assessment (EMA) method (Edwards & Winkel, 2016) is a method for assessing the impact of an intervention and modifiers on a desired outcome e.g. improved work environment. The EMA-method captures events (a change in work) in a ward and for each event asses 1) impact on work...... and diverse tasks. This poses a problem when using the EMA-method and raises the research question of this abstract: How many EMA-workshops are needed to generate a representative collection of events in a ward? Methods Six EMA-workshops each with a full surgical team of six people was conducted in a heart...... on surgery. The ward was organized in three specialties: Heart surgery, Lung surgery and Child heart surgery. Events differed between specialties and therefor it was expected that saturation would be reached after minimum three workshops. The heart center is comparable to other surgical units...

  7. [Validation of the Polish version of The Authentic Leadership Questionnaire for the of evaluation purpose of nursing management staff in national hospital wards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierpińska, Lidia

    2013-09-01

    The Authentic Leadership Questionnaire (ALQ) is a standardized research instrument for the evaluation of individual elements of leader's conduct which contribute to the authentic leadership. The application of this questionnaire in Polish conditions required to carry out the validation process. The aim of the study was to evaluate of validity and reliability of the Polish version of the American research instrument for the needs of evaluation of authenticity of leadership of the nursing management in Polish hospitals. The study covered 286 nurses (143 head nurses and 143 of their subordinates) employed in 45 hospitals in Poland. Theoretical validity of the instrument was evaluated using Fisher's transformation (r-Person correlation coefficient), while the criterion validity of the ALQ was evaluated using rho-Spearman correlation coefficient and the BOHIPSZO questionnaire. The reliability of the ALQ was assessed by means of the Cronbach-alpha coefficient. The ALQ questionnaire applied for the evaluation of authenticity of leadership of the nursing management in Polish hospital wards shows an acceptable theoretical and criterion validity and reliability (Cronbach-alpha coefficient 0.80). The Polish version of the ALQ is valid and reliable, and may be applied in studies concerning the evaluation of authenticity of leadership of the nursing management in Polish hospital wards.

  8. Indoor air bacterial load and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of isolates in operating rooms and surgical wards at jimma university specialized hospital, southwest ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, Chalachew; Kibru, Gebre; Tsegaye, Wondewosen

    2011-03-01

    Surgical site infection is the second most common health care associated infection. One of the risk factors for such infection is bacterial contamination of operating rooms' and surgical wards' indoor air. In view of that, the microbiological quality of air can be considered as a mirror of the hygienic condition of these rooms. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the bacterial load and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of isolates in operating rooms' and surgical wards' indoor air of Jimma University Specialized Hospital. A cross sectional study was conducted to measure indoor air microbial quality of operating rooms and surgical wards from October to January 2009/2010 on 108 indoor air samples collected in twelve rounds using purposive sampling technique by Settle Plate Method (Passive Air Sampling following 1/1/1 Schedule). Sample processing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were done following standard bacteriological techniques. The data was analyzed using SPSS version 16 and interpreted according to scientifically determined baseline values initially suggested by Fisher. The mean aerobic colony counts obtained in OR-1(46cfu/hr) and OR-2(28cfu/hr) was far beyond the set 5-8cfu/hr acceptable standards for passive room. Similarly the highest mean aerobic colony counts of 465cfu/hr and 461cfu/hr were observed in Female room-1 and room-2 respectively when compared to the acceptable range of 250-450cfu/hr. In this study only 3 isolates of S. pyogenes and 48 isolates of S. aureus were identified. Over 66% of S. aureus was identified in Critical Zone of Operating rooms. All isolates of S. aureus showed 100% and 82.8% resistance to methicillin and ampicillin respectively. Higher degree of aerobic bacterial load was measured from operating rooms' and surgical wards' indoor air. Reducing foot trafficking, improving the ventilation system and routine cleaning has to be made to maintain the aerobic bacteria load with in optimal level.

  9. [The composition and antimicrobial resistance of isolates from lower respiratory tract and blood in hospitalized patients in respiratory ward: a multicenter national study in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, X; Zhuo, C; Xu, Y C; Zhong, N S

    2018-04-12

    Objective: To investigate the species and antimicrobial resistance of bacterial pathogens isolated from hospitalized patients in respiratory ward in China. Methods: This was a multicenter retrospective study based on a national epidemiological network called China Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (CARSS). The non-repetitive strains isolated from lower respiratory tract and blood samples in 91 hospitals from seven geographic regions of CARSS were reviewed. The distribution of specimen type, hospital level (secondary and tertiary hospital), patient age group [geriatric (>65 years old), adult (15 to 65 years old), pediatric (28 days to 14 years old ) and newborn group (≤28 days)] and ward type (respiratory intensive care unit and general respiratory ward) were analyzed for MRSA, PRSP, CREC, CRKP, CRPA, CRAB, ESBL-EC and ESBL-KP. The categorical variables were analyzed by chi-square test using SPSS 16.0 statistical software. P respiratory tract (LRT), 2 649 isolates from blood and 5 017 isolates from other samples (urine and secretions)] from 48 752 inpatients (without illness type information) were enrolled in the study. 90.2% (45 491/50 417) isolates were obtained from 63 tertiary hospitals. According to patients' age, all cases were divided into 4 groups, i. e. geriatric(46.0%, 23 177/50 417), adult(29.9%, 15 092/50 417), pediatric(24.0%, 12 112/50 417) and newborn group(0.0%, 36/50 417). All isolates were obtained from respiratory intensive care unit (6.2%, 3 129/50 417) or general respiratory wards (93.8%, 47 288/50 417). The majority of bacterial pathogens were isolated from lower respiratory and blood culture samples, which accounted for 90.0% of all the samples (45 400/50 417). Sputum accounted for 81.6% (41 131/50 417) of samples, and the leading 4 isolates were K . pneumonia (18.9%, 7 784/41 131), P . aeruginosa (13.6%, 5 580/41 131), A . baumanni (11.3%, 4 644/41 131) and S . pneumonia (11.1%, 4 564/41 131). Blood samples accounted for 5.3% (2

  10. Antibiotic resistance, ability to form biofilm and susceptibility to copper alloys of selected staphylococcal strains isolated from touch surfaces in Polish hospital wards

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    Anna Różańska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the employment of sanitary regimes, contact transmission of the aetiological agents of hospital infections is still exceedingly common. The issue of microbe transmission becomes particularly important when facing multidrug-resistant microorganisms such as methicillin-resistant staphylococci. In the case of deficiencies in cleaning and disinfection procedures, hospital equipment made of copper alloys can play an important role, complementing traditional hospital hygiene procedures. The objective of this study was to characterize staphylococcal strains isolated from touch surfaces in Polish hospital wards in terms of their drug resistance, ability to form biofilm and susceptibility to antimicrobial activity of copper alloys. Methods The materials for the study were 95 staphylococcal strains isolated from touch surfaces in 13 different hospital wards from Małopolska province (the south of Poland. Phenotypic and genotypic antibiotic resistance were checked for erythromycin, clindamycin, gentamycin, ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and mupirocin. Biofilm formation ability for the tested strains was checked with the use of culture on Congo red agar. Susceptibility to copper, tin bronze, brass and new silver was tested using a modification of the Japanese standard. Results Over 67% of the analysed staphylococcal strains were methicillin-resistant (MR. Four strains were resistant to all of the tested antibiotics, and 14 were resistant to all except mupirocin. Strains classified as MR had significantly increased resistance to the remaining antibiotic groups. About one-third of the analysed strains revealed biofilm-forming ability. Among the majority of species, biofilm-forming and non-biofilm-forming strains were distributed evenly; in the case of S. haemolyticus only, negative strains accounted for 92.8%. Susceptibility to copper alloys was different between strains and rather lower than in the case of the SA

  11. Evaluation of the decision support system for antimicrobial treatment, TREAT, in an acute medical ward of a university hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arboe, Bente; Laub, Rasmus Rude; Kronborg, Gitte

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: TREAT, a decision support system for antimicrobial therapy, was implemented in an acute medical ward. METHODS: Patients admitted on suspicion of infection were included in the study. The evaluation of TREAT was done both retrospectively and prospectively. Coverage of empirical...... antimicrobial treatments was compared to recommendations from TREAT and the optimal use of local guidelines. RESULTS: Five hundred and eleven patients were included, of whom 162 had a microbiologically documented infection. In the retrospective part of the study, TREAT, physician, and guideline antimicrobial.......247). The coverage of TREAT advice for the bacteraemia patients was non-inferior to the physicians (p=1.00). CONCLUSIONS: TREAT can potentially improve the ecological costs of empirical antimicrobial therapy for patients in acute medical wards, but provided lower coverage than local guidelines....

  12. The Prevalence of Accidental Needle Stick Injury and their Reporting among Healthcare Workers in Orthopaedic Wards in General Hospital Melaka, Malaysia

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    Bhardwaj A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Accidental needle-stick injuries (NSIs are a hazard for health-care workers and general public health. Orthopaedic surgeons may be more prone to NSIs due to the prevalence of bone spikes in the operative field and the use of sharp orthopaedic instruments such as drills, saws and wires. A hospital-based cross sectional study was conducted in the orthopedic wards of Melaka General Hospital. The prevalence of NSIs was 32 (20.9% and majority of it occurred during assisting in operation theatre 13(37.4%. Among them six (18.8% were specialist, 12(37.5% medical officer, 10 (31.2% house officer and four staff nurses (12.5%. Among the respondents 142 (92.8% had been immunized against Hepatitis B and 148 (96.7% participants had knowledge regarding universal precaution. The incidence of NSI among health care workers at orthopaedics ward was not any higher in comparison with the similar studies and it was found out that the prevalence was more in junior doctors compared with specialist and staff nurses and it was statistically significant.

  13. Glycemic control and the outcomes of Hispanic patients with diabetes admitted to the general ward of a community hospital in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Torres, Nancy; Maldonado-Rodríguez, Miguel A; Pérez-López, Shirley; Sierra-Martínez, Kassandra; García, Astrid J

    2011-06-01

    Uncontrolled glucose, present in 40% of diabetic patients admitted to United States hospitals, has been associated with prolonged length of stay and poorer general outcomes in critically ill and surgical patients. However, past studies of general ward patients have shown there to be no consistent benefits of strict glucose control, and the Hispanic population has been underrepresented in such studies. This work evaluated the association between glycemic control and the outcomes of hospitalized Hispanics with diabetes and to describe physicians' interventions in the treatment of diabetes. This is a retrospective chart review of all patients with diabetes admitted over a period of six months in the general ward of a community hospital in Puerto Rico. We evaluated glucose levels during the first 72 hours, length of stay, and reported complications during admission. Outcomes were evaluated with crude odds ratios and multivariate logistic regression. Uncontrolled blood glucose was observed in 59.1% of the 875 patients whose records were revised; of that 59.1%, treatment modification was not prescribed for 43.2%. Patients with poorly controlled glucose were more likely to develop acute coronary syndrome (corrected OR: 11.46; 95% CI = 1.48-88.50) as a complication and less likely to develop hypoglycemia (corrected OR: 0.57; 95% = CI 0.37-0.88). Our results suggest that hospitalized but non-critically ill Hispanic patients with diabetes are prone to poor outcomes secondary to uncontrolled glucose levels; in addition, those results support the creation of standardized protocols for the management of diabetes in this population.

  14. The derivation and validation of a simple model for predicting in-hospital mortality of acutely admitted patients to internal medicine wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhnini, Ali; Saliba, Walid; Schwartz, Naama; Bisharat, Naiel

    2017-06-01

    Limited information is available about clinical predictors of in-hospital mortality in acute unselected medical admissions. Such information could assist medical decision-making.To develop a clinical model for predicting in-hospital mortality in unselected acute medical admissions and to test the impact of secondary conditions on hospital mortality.This is an analysis of the medical records of patients admitted to internal medicine wards at one university-affiliated hospital. Data obtained from the years 2013 to 2014 were used as a derivation dataset for creating a prediction model, while data from 2015 was used as a validation dataset to test the performance of the model. For each admission, a set of clinical and epidemiological variables was obtained. The main diagnosis at hospitalization was recorded, and all additional or secondary conditions that coexisted at hospital admission or that developed during hospital stay were considered secondary conditions.The derivation and validation datasets included 7268 and 7843 patients, respectively. The in-hospital mortality rate averaged 7.2%. The following variables entered the final model; age, body mass index, mean arterial pressure on admission, prior admission within 3 months, background morbidity of heart failure and active malignancy, and chronic use of statins and antiplatelet agents. The c-statistic (ROC-AUC) of the prediction model was 80.5% without adjustment for main or secondary conditions, 84.5%, with adjustment for the main diagnosis, and 89.5% with adjustment for the main diagnosis and secondary conditions. The accuracy of the predictive model reached 81% on the validation dataset.A prediction model based on clinical data with adjustment for secondary conditions exhibited a high degree of prediction accuracy. We provide a proof of concept that there is an added value for incorporating secondary conditions while predicting probabilities of in-hospital mortality. Further improvement of the model performance

  15. Prevalence of delirium in hospitalized internal medicine and surgical adult patients in Shohadaye ashayer hospital of Khoram abad

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    raheleh Asaee

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Asaee R1, Nasari H2,Hoseini S3 1. Assistant professor, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestanl University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad, Iran 1. Assistant professor, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestanl University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad, Iran 2. G.P, Khorramabad, Iran Abstract Background: Delirium is common in elderly persons and in hospitalized patients especially after surgical procedures. But many of them are undetected and don’t receive treatment so they involve with increased mortality and morbidity, adverse outcomes, length of hospital stay and mental disability sequels. Unfortunetly , despite the importance of this syndrom , physicians and staff are able to diagnose only one thirth of the patients. Material and methods: In this cross sectional study, 240 inpatiants (120 from surgery ward and 120 from miernal medicine ward from Shohadaye Ashayer hospital of Khorramabad were selected randomly. The diagnostic criteria for delirium were Mini-Mental state examination (MMSE questionnaire, and patients daily examination for 4 days by MMSE. Results: Delirium was observed in 37 (30.8% of the patients of internal medicine ward and 25 (20.8% of the patients of surgery ward. 27 (22.5% of the patients of internal medicine ward and 37 (30.8% of the patients of surgery ward were suspicious for delirium. In age group of 58-77 years in surgery ward and patients over 77 years in internal medicine ward had the most frequency of delirium. There was significant relationship (p=0.01 between two sex in surgery ward. But there was not significant difference (p=0.92 between two sex in internal medicine ward for delirium. Conclusion: Reading the results of this study and frequency of delirum in surgery and internal medicine wards, presence of a psychiatrist in mentioned wards is necessary of early diagnosis and control of delirium.

  16. Predictors for total medical costs for acute hemorrhagic stroke patients transferred to the rehabilitation ward at a regional hospital in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Min; Ke, Yen-Liang

    2016-02-01

    One-third of the acute stroke patients in Taiwan receive rehabilitation. It is imperative for clinicians who care for acute stroke patients undergoing inpatient rehabilitation to identify which medical factors could be the predictors of the total medical costs. The aim of this study was to identify the most important predictors of the total medical costs for first-time hemorrhagic stroke patients transferred to inpatient rehabilitation using a retrospective design. All data were retrospectively collected from July 2002 to June 2012 from a regional hospital in Taiwan. A stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis was used to identify the most important predictors for the total medical costs. The medical records of 237 patients (137 males and 100 females) were reviewed. The mean total medical cost per patient was United States dollar (USD) 5939.5 ± 3578.5.The following were the significant predictors for the total medical costs: impaired consciousness [coefficient (B), 1075.7; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 138.5-2012.9], dysphagia [coefficient (B), 1025.8; 95% CI = 193.9-1857.8], number of surgeries [coefficient (B), 796.4; 95% CI = 316.0-1276.7], pneumonia in the neurosurgery ward [coefficient (B), 2330.1; 95% CI = 1339.5-3320.7], symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI) in the rehabilitation ward [coefficient (B), 1138.7; 95% CI = 221.6-2055.7], and rehabilitation ward stay [coefficient (B), 64.9; 95% CI = 31.2-98.7] (R(2) = 0.387). Our findings could help clinicians to understand that cost reduction may be achieved by minimizing complications (pneumonia and UTI) in these patients.

  17. Characteristics and clinical management of patients admitted to cholera wards in a regional referral hospital during the 2012 epidemic in Sierra Leone

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    Alexander Blacklock

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: In 2012, Sierra Leone suffered a nationwide cholera epidemic which affected the capital Freetown and also the provinces. This study aims to describe the characteristics and clinical management of patients admitted to cholera isolation wards of the main referral hospital in the Northern Province and compare management with standard guidelines. Design: All available clinical records of patients from the cholera isolation wards were reviewed retrospectively. There was no active case finding. The following data were collected from the clinical records after patients had left the ward: date of admission, demographics, symptoms, dehydration status, diagnoses, tests and treatments given, length of stay, and outcomes. Results: A total of 798 patients were admitted, of whom 443 (55.5% were female. There were 18 deaths (2.3%. Assessment of dehydration status was recorded in 517 (64.8% of clinical records. An alternative or additional diagnosis was made for 214 patients (26.8%. Intravenous (IV fluids were prescribed to 767 patients (96.1%, including 95% of 141 patients who had documentation of being not severely dehydrated. A history of vomiting was documented in 92.1% of all patients. Oral rehydration solution (ORS was given to 629 (78.8% patients. Doxycycline was given to 380 (47.6% patients, erythromycin to 34 (4.3%, and other antibiotics were used on 247 occasions. Zinc was given to 209 (26.2%. Discussion: This retrospective study highlights the need for efforts to improve the quality of triage, adherence to clinical guidance, and record keeping. Conclusions: Data collection and analysis of clinical practices during an epidemic situation would enable faster identification of those areas requiring intervention and improvement.

  18. Prevalence and risk factors of metallo β-lactamase producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter species in burns and surgical wards in a tertiary care hospital

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    Simit H Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The production of Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs is one of the resistance mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter species. There is not much Indian data on the prevalence of MBLs in burns and surgical wards. Materials and Methods: A total of 145 non-duplicate isolates of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter species, isolated from pus/wound swabs and endotracheal secretions from burns and surgical wards, were tested for MBL production by modified ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA disc synergy and double disc synergy tests. Results: Prevalence of MBLs was 26.9% by both the above tests. All MBL-positive isolates were multidrug resistant. Only 6.06% (2/33 P.aeruginosa and 16.67% (1/06 Acinetobacter species were susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam and netilmycin, respectively. These patients had multiple risk factors like >8 days hospital stay, catheterization, IV lines, previous antibiotic use, mechanical ventilation, etc. Graft application and surgical intervention were significant risk factors in MBL-positive patients. Overall mortality in MBL-positive patients was 34.21%. Conclusion: Emergence of MBL-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter species in this hospital is alarming, which reflect excessive use of carbapenems and at the same time, pose a therapeutic challenge to clinicians as well as to microbiologists. Therefore, a strict antibiotic policy and implementation of proper infection control practices will go a long way to prevent further spread of MBLs. Detection of MBLs should also become mandatory in all hospitals.

  19. Building Back Wards in a 'Post' Institutional Era: Hospital Confinement, Group Home Eviction, and Ontario's Treatment of People Labelled with Intellectual Disabilities

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    Natalie Spagnuolo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Although Ontario has closed the regional centres that were intended for people labelled with intellectual disabilities and apologized to survivors, the institutionalization of disabled people persists in other forms in the province. This article demonstrates that the eligibility criteria established by privately-operated and publically-funded group homes contributes to the use of what will be termed 'back ward' placements in institutions such as hospitals and nursing homes. While group homes themselves have been – quite rightly – criticized as neo-institutional forms of residential support, they also play a role in shaping more overt forms of confinement by refusing to tailor their services to the needs of certain individuals. What follows is an analysis of residential support systems that builds upon case studies and reports to expose how impairment hierarchies, based on ranked support needs, determine who will end up in these 'back wards' and who will be offered a place in a group home.

  20. Nonpharmacological Interventions Targeted at Delirium Risk Factors, Delivered by Trained Volunteers (Medical and Psychology Students, Reduced Need for Antipsychotic Medications and the Length of Hospital Stay in Aged Patients Admitted to an Acute Internal Medicine Ward: Pilot Study

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    Stanislaw Gorski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Effectiveness of nonpharmacological multicomponent prevention delivered by trained volunteers (medical and psychology students, targeted at delirium risk factors in geriatric inpatients, was assessed at an internal medicine ward in Poland. Patients and Methods. Participants were recruited to intervention and control groups at the internal medicine ward (inclusion criteria: age ≥ 75, acute medical condition, basic orientation, and logical contact on admission; exclusion criteria: life expectancy < 24 hours, surgical hospitalization, isolation due to infectious disease, and discharge to other medical wards. Every day trained volunteers delivered a multicomponent standardized intervention targeted at risk factors of in-hospital complications to the intervention group. The control group, selected using a retrospective individual matching strategy (1 : 1 ratio, regarding age, gender, and time of hospitalization, received standard care. Outcome Measures. Hospitalization time, deaths, falls, delirium episodes, and antipsychotic prescriptions were assessed retrospectively from medical documentation. Results. 130 patients (38.4% males participated in the study, with 65 in the intervention group. Antipsychotic medications were initiated less frequently in the intervention group compared to the control group. There was a trend towards a shorter hospitalization time and a not statistically significant decrease in deaths in the intervention group. Conclusion. Nonpharmacological multicomponent intervention targeted at delirium risk factors effectively reduced length of hospitalization and need for initiating antipsychotic treatment in elderly patients at the internal medicine ward.

  1. Relationship between healthcare worker surface contacts, care type and hand hygiene: an observational study in a single-bed hospital ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, M-F; Noakes, C J; Sleigh, P A; Bale, S; Waters, L

    2016-09-01

    This study quantifies the relationship between hand hygiene and the frequency with which healthcare workers (HCWs) touch surfaces in patient rooms. Surface contacts and hand hygiene were recorded in a single-bed UK hospital ward for six care types. Surface contacts often formed non-random patterns, but hygiene before or after patient contact depends significantly on care type (P=0.001). The likelihood of hygiene correlated with the number of surface contacts (95% confidence interval 1.1-5.8, P=0.002), but not with time spent in the room. This highlights that a potential subconscious need for hand hygiene may have developed in HCWs, which may support and help focus future hygiene education programmes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Cholestasis sepsis at neonatology ward and neonatal Intensive Care Unit Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital 2007 : incidence, mortality rate and associated risk factors

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    Kadim S. Bachtiar

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Cholestatic jaundice represents serious pathological condition. Septic-cholestasis is a kind of hepato-cellular cholestasis that occured during or after sepsis caused by biliary flow obstruction. This is a cohort study from February to June 2007 on neonatal sepsis patients at Neonatology ward Department of Child Health Faculty of Medicine University of Indonesia-Cipto Mangunkusumo General National Hospital. Aim of this study is to find out the incidence of intrahepatic cholestasis in neonatal sepsis, associated risk factors, and mortality rate in neonatal cholestasis-sepsis. From 138 neonatal sepsis patients, the incidence of intrahepatic cholestasis is 65.9%. None of the risk factors tested in this study showed statistically significant result. Mortality rate of neonatal cholestasis-sepsis is 52.8%. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 107-13Keywords: cholestasis intrahepatic, neonatal sepsis, cholestasis sepsis, conjugated hyperbilirubinemia

  3. Stres zawodowy fizjoterapeutów - badania w wybranych oddziałach szpitalnych = Physiatrists' occupational stress - research in selected hospital wards

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    Ewa Humeniuk

    2016-06-01

    Physiatrists' occupational stress - research in selected hospital wards   Key words: occupational stress, healthcare, physiatrists, difficult situations, psychosocial work-related hazards.   Summary Introduction. Stress is considered to be one of the main determinants affecting workplace in a negative way. Stress in workplace is the main health and security hazard for workers of almost every profession. Lately special focus was put on the health service workers. However, in the polish subject literature reports about stress in the profession of physiatrist is transitory. Goal of work. Assessment of occupational stress and ways of dealing with it physiatrists' working on the children's ward and the Daily Rehabilitation Centre of hospitals eastern Polish. Data and methods. The survey was conducted on the group of 50 physiatrists. Authorial survey created for this work and Subjective Work Assessment Questionnaire were the research tools. Results. People with bigger work experience are exposed to higher level of stress than less experienced physiatrists. The most stressful factors in the profession of physiatrist are: social contacts, sense of danger and responsibility, physical nuisances. It was concluded that stress rises along with work experience. Conclusion. The stress level of physiatrists working with both adults and children is high. It highlights the need to support this profession and to develop skills that would help this group in dealing with stressful situations. Physiatrists who have hobbies, play sports, do relaxation exercises and who have family support deal better with stress. However, they're not very keen on seeking the help of a psychologist, a therapist or a psychiatrist when dealing with stress.

  4. Limits of Freedom: The Ward Churchill Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Nell, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    The University of Colorado's Ward Churchill is but the latest in a long line of professors whose volatile statements have created controversy for themselves and their universities. Specific personnel matters in the case have been meticulously addressed in Boulder, but several larger questions have been curiously neglected. One might well ask, for…

  5. Profile of antimicrobial susceptibility isolated microorganisms from hospitalized patients in PICU ward and detection of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ESBL-producing bacteria by phenotypic methods

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    Shahla Abbas Poor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospital-acquired infections are a major challenge to patient. A range of gram-negative organisms are responsible for hospital-acquired infections, the Enterobacteriaceae family being the most commonly identified group overall. Infections by ESBL producers are associated with severe adverse clinical outcomes that have led to increased mortality, prolonged hospitalization, and rising medical costs. The aim of this study was to survey profile of antimicrobial susceptibility isolated microorganisms from hospitalized patients in PICU ward and detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ESBL-producing bacteria by phenotypic methods. Material and Methods: In this study participants were patients hospitalized in PICU part of Bahrami Hospital, Tehran, with attention to involved organ. For isolation of bacteria from patient’s samples, culture performed on different selective and differential media. After confirmation of bacteria by biochemical tests, susceptibility testing was performed by disc diffusion method. Phenotypic detection of MRSA strains was performed using cefoxcitin disc. ESBL producing strains were detected by ceftazidime (CAZ and ceftazidime/clavulanic acid (CAZ/CLA discs. Results: Among all isolated organisms from clinical samples, the most common isolated organisms were Escherichia coli (24 cases, Pseudomonas areoginosa (9 cases and Staphylococcus aureus (8 cases, respectively. Among eight MRSA isolated strains from different clinical samples, six strains (75% were MRSA. Among 52 isolated gram negative organisms, 5 strains (9/6% were ESBL. Conclusion: Standard interventions to prevent the transmission of antimicrobial resistance in health care facilities include hand hygiene, using barrier precautions in the care of colonized and infected patients, using dedicated instruments and equipment for these patients. The colonized or infected patients should be isolated in single rooms, multibed rooms or areas

  6. A companionship between strangers - the hospital environment as a challenge in patient-patient interaction in oncology wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Lene Søndergård; Larsen, Birte Hedegaard; Birkelund, Regner

    2014-02-01

    To present an identification and discussion of the impact of the hospital environment on interaction among people with cancer. In recent years, researchers have focused on identifying and describing features of the hospital environment that promote healing, recovery and well-being. It has been discovered that architectural features affect hospitalized patients both positively and negatively. But the research has failed to include fellow patients as part of the hospital environment. A qualitative approach influenced by ethnography. Participant observation and individual qualitative interviews were used to collect data. From a total of 85 observed people with cancer 10 men and 10 women were interviewed. Data were collected over 6 months in 2010-2011 and analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Patients had ambiguous views regarding their fellow patients and the hospital environment. The hospital environment imposed conditions that caused stress factors such as the loss of personal privacy and control, but it also offered the possibility of good company and support from fellow patients. Refuge from fellow patients was hard to achieve and the fact that personal conversations might be overheard by fellow patients caused patients to withhold important information from healthcare professionals. Nevertheless, patients accepted the hospital environment uncritically, with resignation or with silent rebellion. Despite the challenges, 18 of 20 patients preferred multiple-bed rooms with the company of fellow patients. The influence of the hospital environment on hospitalized people with cancer and their interpersonal interaction needs to be acknowledged by healthcare professionals. In addition, evidence-based hospital design must include research into patient preferences and arguments. Further investigation is needed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Catheter associated urinary tract infection (CA-UTI) incidence in an Internal Medicine Ward of a Northern Italian Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Ilaria; Lania, Donatella; Bella, Daniele; Formaini Marioni, Cesare; Coccaglio, Romana; Colombini, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CA-UTI) are estimated to be the most frequent nosocomial infections (40%). A catheter is introduced to 10-25% of inpatients, and is often left on site for a long period of time. We carried out a prospective study on inpatients of our Internal Medicine ward to assess the incidence of CA-UTI under the implementation of corrective action. All inpatients who underwent introduction of a urinary catheter upon or after admission to our ward were included in the study. Patients with bacteriuria or positive urine culture before catheterization, others with less than 24 hours catheterism, or bearing a catheter on admission were all excluded from the study. CA-UTI diagnosis was assessed on the basis of CDC 2009 guidelines. The investigation was held between June 2010 and March 2013 in five steps or phases. In the first phase open circuit drainage catheterism was used, in the second phase close circuit drainage catheterism was introduced, while in the third phase disposable lubrification was added to closed circuit drainage catheterism. In the next step (phase 4) we introduced number of days of catheterism control and nurse training; in the last phase (5) emptying urine collection bags on a container was added. In phase 1 we estimated six UTIs out of 18 patients (incidence 33%), in phase 2 we had four infections out of 10 patients (40%). Given the results, we had to reflect on the quality of the procedures of catheter positioning and management . Where feasible, we improved technical practices and during follow-up there was evidence of CA-UTI in 10 patients over 25 (phase 3, 40%), and eight infections over 25 (phase 4, 32%). Once all these steps had been implemented, in phase 5 we determined a sharp reduction in CA-UTI (2 patients over 27, or 7.5%, p=0.025). This improvement was particularly evident in the rate of infection per days of catheter, which was reduced from 43.4/1000 to 13.6/1000. Although the statistical power of the

  8. The Liverpool Care Pathway for cancer patients dying in hospital medical wards: a before-after cluster phase II trial of outcomes reported by family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Massimo; Pellegrini, Fabio; Di Leo, Silvia; Beccaro, Monica; Rossi, Carla; Flego, Guia; Romoli, Vittoria; Giannotti, Michela; Morone, Paola; Ivaldi, Giovanni P; Cavallo, Laura; Fusco, Flavio; Higginson, Irene J

    2014-01-01

    Hospital is the most common place of cancer death but concerns regarding the quality of end-of-life care remain. Preliminary assessment of the effectiveness of the Liverpool Care Pathway on the quality of end-of-life care provided to adult cancer patients during their last week of life in hospital. Uncontrolled before-after intervention cluster trial. The trial was performed within four hospital wards participating in the pilot implementation of the Italian version of the Liverpool Care Pathway programme. All cancer patients who died in the hospital wards 2-4 months before and after the implementation of the Italian version of Liverpool Care Pathway were identified. A total of 2 months after the patient's death, bereaved family members were interviewed using the Toolkit After-Death Family Interview (seven 0-100 scales assessing the quality of end-of-life care) and the Italian version of the Views of Informal Carers - Evaluation of Services (VOICES) (three items assessing pain, breathlessness and nausea-vomiting). An interview was obtained for 79 family members, 46 (73.0%) before and 33 (68.8%) after implementation of the Italian version of Liverpool Care Pathway. Following Italian version of Liverpool Care Pathway implementation, there was a significant improvement in the mean scores of four Toolkit scales: respect, kindness and dignity (+16.8; 95% confidence interval = 3.6-30.0; p = 0.015); family emotional support (+20.9; 95% confidence interval = 9.6-32.3; p family self-efficacy (+14.3; 95% confidence interval = 0.3-28.2; p = 0.049) and coordination of care (+14.3; 95% confidence interval = 4.2-24.3; p = 0.007). No significant improvement in symptom' control was observed. These results provide the first robust data collected from family members of a preliminary clinically significant improvement, in some aspects, of quality of care after the implementation of the Italian version of Liverpool Care Pathway programme. The poor effect for symptom control suggests

  9. Relationship between hospital ward design and healthcare-associated infection rates: a systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Andrea Stiller

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The influence of the hospital’s infrastructure on healthcare-associated colonization and infection rates has thus far infrequently been examined. In this review we examine whether healthcare facility design is a contributing factor to multifaceted infection control strategies. Methods We searched PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL from 1990 to December 31st, 2015, with language restriction to English, Spanish, German and French. Results We identified three studies investigating accessibility of the location of the antiseptic hand rub dispenser. Each of them showed a significant improvement of hand hygiene compliance or agent consumption with the implementation of accessible dispensers near the patient bed. Nine eligible studies evaluated the impact of single-patient rooms on the acquisition of healthcare-associated colonization and infections in comparison to multi-bedrooms or an open ward design. Six of these studies showed a significant benefit of single-patient bedrooms in reducing the healthcare-associated colonization and infection rate, whereas three studies found that single-patient rooms are neither a protective nor risk factor. In meta-analyses, the overall risk ratio for acquisition of healthcare-associated colonization and infection was 0.55 (95% CI: 0.41 to 0.74, for healthcare-associated colonization 0.52 (95% CI: 0.32 to 0.85 and for bacteremia 0.64 (95% CI: 0.53 to 0.76, all in favor of patient care in single-patient bedrooms. Conclusion Implementation of single-patient rooms and easily accessible hand rub dispensers located near the patient’s bed are beneficial for infection control and are useful parts of a multifaceted strategy for reducing healthcare-associated colonization and infections.

  10. Accepting telemedicine in a circulatory medicine ward in major hospitals in South Korea: patients' and health professionals' perception of real-time electrocardiogram monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seo-Joon; Jung, Tae-Young; Lee, Tae-Ro; Han, Jae-Hoon

    2018-04-20

    South Korean government is currently in progress of expanding the coverage of telemedicine projects as part of an attempt to vitalize service industry, but is facing fierce opposition from KMA. Practice of telemedicine requires sufficient discussions among related parties. Although the participation of medical specialists is important, agreement from the public is essential. Three main tertiary care centers in Seoul were selected for data collection. A total of 224 patients (patients n = 180, patient guardian n = 44) and medical professionals (n = 41) were selected using simple random sampling. Mixed method of quantitative survey and qualitative semi-interview was used. This study analyzed patients' and medical professionals' perception about the application of telemedicine in cardiology ward in tertiary care centers to provide baseline data when developing and applying telemedicine services. Results implied high need for encouraging telemedicine projects in order to appeal needs among population by providing experience (p < 0.001) and knowledge (p < 0.001). Other results showed that the need for electrocardiography monitoring was high among not only in remote areas but also in areas close to the capital. 64.52% of all participants thought that telemedicine was needed, and 73.21% of participants were willing to use telemedicine service if provided. Semi-interviews revealed that participants expected more cost and time saving services through remote treatment, by not having to visit long distance hospitals frequently. Research results oppose Korean Medical Association's opinion that the population is against enforcing telemedicine related laws. The findings in this study reflect an up-to-date perception of telemedicine among patients and medical professionals in a tertiary care centers' cardiology ward. Moreover, the study provides a baseline that is needed in order to overcome past failures and to successfully implement telemedicine in South

  11. Comparison of the Efficacy of Oral and Injectable Forms of Prophylactic Antibiotics in Grade Ii Traumatic Ulcers in Emergency Wards of University Hospitals of Yazd

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    MR Hajiesmaieli

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic ulcers are one of the most common causes of referral to emergency wards and interfere with wound healing. Even in a complete sterile condition, all of the ulcers may be contaminated with bacteria, but a few of them progress and cause clinical manifestations. There is a controversy on the use prophylactic antibiotics in traumatic ulcers. In this study we compare the efficacy of oral and injectable forms of antibiotics in prophylaxis of infection. Methods: In this clinical trial study, 237 cases suffering from grade II traumatic ulcers were selected by simple random method and divided into 2 groups; first group was administered 1 gram cephazoline prior to suturing and received no other antibiotics , while the second group received 500 mg cephalexin capsule before suturing and continued the treatment for 24 hours. (500 mg QID .Patients were followed up on day 7, 10 and 30 after discharge from hospital for infection of the wounds. The collected data was analyzed by SPSS 11 software using Chi-squire and Fisher exact tests. Results: According to the findings, confounding variables such as sex, age, width of the wound, traumatic cause and site and also the time course until referral to the emergency ward were similar in both groups. Prevalence of infection in the group receiving oral and injection forms of antibiotic was 2.5% and 1.7%, respectively, difference of which was not significant.(P=0.683 Conclusion: As the prevalence of wound infection is similar in both groups, oral forms of antibiotics can be used instead of injectable forms for wound infection prophylaxis.

  12. The Introduction of a Full Medication Review Process in a Local Hospital: Successes and Barriers of a Pilot Project in the Geriatric Ward

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    Lies De Bock

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available For the majority of Belgian hospitals, a pharmacist-led full medication review process is not standard care and, therefore, challenging to introduce. With this study, we aimed to evaluate the successes and barriers of the implementation of a pharmacist-led full medication review process in the geriatric ward at a local Belgian hospital. To this end, we carried out an interventional study, performing a full medication review on older patients (≥70 years with polypharmacy (≥5 drugs who had an unplanned admission to the geriatric ward. The process consisted of 3 steps: (1 medication reconciliation upon admission; (2 medication review using an explicit reviewing tool (STOPP/START criteria or GheOP3S tool, followed by a discussion between the pharmacist and the geriatrician; and (3 medication reconciliation upon discharge. Ethical approval was obtained from the Ethical Commission of the Ghent University Hospital. Outcomes included objective data on the interventions (e.g., number of drug discrepancies; number of potentially inappropriate prescriptions (PIP; as well as subjective experiences (e.g., satisfaction with service; opinion on inter-professional communication. There was a special focus on communication aspects within the introduction of this process. In total, 52 patients were included in the study, taking a median of 10 drugs (IQR 8–12. Upon admission, 122 drug discrepancies were detected. During medication review, 254 PIPs were detected and discussed, leading to an improvement in the appropriateness of medication use. The satisfaction of community pharmacists concerning additional communication and the satisfaction of the patients after counselling at discharge were positive. However, several barriers were encountered, such as the time-consuming process to gather necessary information from different sources, the non-continuity of the service due to the lack of trained personnel or the lack of safe, electronic platforms to share

  13. Evaluation of Prescriptions and Use of Intravenous Pantoprazole in General Wards and Intensive Care Unit of Shahid Sadoughi Hospital in Yazd

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    Seyed-Mojtaba Sohrevardi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs are currently the most effective agents for acid related disorders. However, studies show that 25-75% of patients receiving intravenous Pantoprazole had no appropriate justification, indicating high rate of inappropriate prescribing in hospitals. The aim of this study is to examine the appropriate use of intravenous Pantoprazole in accordance with guidelines at Shahid Sadoughi hospital.Methods: From January to April 2015, sample of 100 prescriptions who received Intravenous (IV Pantoprazole were collected with observational and sectional model in Intensive care unit (ICU and general wards of “Shahid Sadoughi” Hospital of Yazd, Iran. Clinical data from patient records are obtained and these data were mapped to establish clinical criteria and appropriate use of Intravenous Pantoprazole.Results: The majority (63% of Intravenous Pantoprazole prescriptions were deemed inappropriate in terms of either indication for use, dose or duration of therapy. 51.5% of the patients were above 55 years old. Endoscopy did not performed in most of the Non UGIB (Non upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases. Most Intravenous Pantoprazole prescriptions were ordered by junior doctors (Intern, and again this group were significantly less likely to prescribe the drug for appropriate reasons when compared with more experienced clinicians.Conclusion: This study suggests that the majority of IV PPI prescriptions in our hospital are inappropriate. Awareness of the result of this article through medical staff could result in more judicious use of intravenous pantoprazole and dose optimization. Physicians and pharmacists can work together to create solutions to inappropriate drug use.

  14. Kids’ Perceptions toward Children’s Ward Healing Environments: A Case Study of Taiwan University Children’s Hospital

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    Jeng-Chung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the opinions of experts who participated in designing the environment of a children’s hospital and reports the results of a questionnaire survey conducted among hospital users. The grounded theory method was adopted to analyze 292 concepts, 79 open codes, 25 axial codes, and 4 selective codes; in addition, confirmatory factor analysis and reliability analysis were performed to identify elements for designing a healing environment in a children’s hospital, and 21 elements from 4 dimensions, namely, emotions, space design, interpersonal interaction, and pleasant surroundings, were determined. Subsequently, this study examined the perceptions of 401 children at National Taiwan University Children’s Hospital. The results revealed that, regarding the children’s responses to the four dimensions and their overall perception, younger children accepted the healing environment to a significantly higher degree than did older children. The sex effect was significant for the space design dimension, and it was not significant for the other dimensions.

  15. Antimicrobial resistance pattern of Gram –negative bacilli isolated of Vali-Asr Hospital wards in Arak

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    Farshid Didgar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infectious diseases are of the most important causes of mortality all around the world particular in developing countries. Recently, the most important thing that has worried medical society is antibiotic resistance. Multi-resistant gram_negative rods are important pathogens in hospitals, causing high rate of mortality.The main goal of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance patterns among common gram-negative bacilli isolated from patients of Vali-Asr Hospital. Material and Methods: This is a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted between the years 2010-2012 in Vali-Asr hospital in Arak. In this study 1120 specimen were examined. Bacterial strains were isolated by conventional methods from various clinical samples of patients including: blood, urine, wound, sputum, CSF, andetc.All isolates were examined for antimicrobial resistance using disc diffusion method. Results: In this study 737 specimen were positive cultures. A total of 332 isolates of Gram-negative bacilli were identified. The most frequent gram negative bacteria were isolated from urine, wound, blood, respiratory secretion and catheter. The most frequent pathogens were E.coli followed by k.pneumonia, entrobacter, p.oaeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp, citrobacter and proteus. High rate of resistance to third generation of cephalospoins & carbapenems observed amang isolates of Acintobacter spp.Prodution of extended spectrum beralactamases (ESBLS was found in 51.4% of all Gram negative bacteria. Conclusion: Antibiotic resistance, particularly multi-drug resistance is frequent among microorganisms of ValiAsr Hospital. Resistance in our country, like other countries have been shown to be increased, so it is highly recommended to prohibit unnecessary prescription of antibiotics.

  16. Prevalence of malnutrition among older people in medical and surgical wards in hospital and quality of nutritional care: A multicenter, cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Loris; Terzoni, Stefano; Lusignani, Maura; Negri, Marina; Froldi, Marco; Destrebecq, Anne

    2017-12-01

    To determine and compare the prevalence of malnutrition in medical and surgical hospital units; to assess quality of nutritional care and patients' perception about quality of food and nutritional care. Hospital malnutrition in older people leads to increased mortality, length of stay, risk of infections and pressure ulcers. Several studies show that malnutrition is often caused by hospitalisation and related to poor nutritional care. Few studies report data on surgical older patients. A cross-sectional, multicenter study was conducted in 12 hospitals in northern Italy. Malnutrition prevalence was determined according to the Mini Nutritional Assessment full-version. Head nurses were interviewed in 80 units, through a validated questionnaire regarding quality of nutritional care. Semi-structured interviews were administered to a sample of patients, to investigate their perception about quality of food and nutritional care. Two hundred twenty-eight patients of 1,066 were malnourished (21.4%). Medical patients were at higher risk, so were women, patients aged 85 or more, with impaired autonomy, pressure ulcers or taking more than three drugs. The lack of personnel impacts on quality of care: in 55% of the units, no nutritional screening is performed; nutritional history is investigated in 48% only. No protocols for nutritional problems exist in 70% of the wards; hardly ever the intake is measured. Patients are mostly satisfied, even though they report that food has no taste and is not well presented. They remark the need for more personnel. Prevalence was high, as found in other studies. Medical patients were at higher risk. Nutritional care was inadequate, and often no measures were adopted to prevent malnutrition. Staffing should be increased during meals. These findings will provide indications on the strategies needed to overcome such barriers. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Diagnostic performance of a multiple real-time PCR assay in patients with suspected sepsis hospitalized in an internal medicine ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Leonella; Mencacci, Antonella; Leli, Christian; Montagna, Paolo; Cardaccia, Angela; Cenci, Elio; Montecarlo, Ines; Pirro, Matteo; di Filippo, Francesco; Cistaro, Emma; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Bistoni, Francesco; Mannarino, Elmo

    2012-04-01

    Early identification of causative pathogen in sepsis patients is pivotal to improve clinical outcome. SeptiFast (SF), a commercially available system for molecular diagnosis of sepsis based on PCR, has been mostly used in patients hospitalized in hematology and intensive care units. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy and clinical usefulness of SF, compared to blood culture (BC), in 391 patients with suspected sepsis, hospitalized in a department of internal medicine. A causative pathogen was identified in 85 patients (22%). Sixty pathogens were detected by SF and 57 by BC. No significant differences were found between the two methods in the rates of pathogen detection (P = 0.74), even after excluding 9 pathogens which were isolated by BC and were not included in the SF master list (P = 0.096). The combination of SF and BC significantly improved the diagnostic yield in comparison to BC alone (P < 0.001). Compared to BC, SF showed a significantly lower contamination rate (0 versus 19 cases; P < 0.001) with a higher specificity for pathogen identification (1.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] of 0.99 to 1.00, versus 0.94, 95% CI of 0.90 to 0.96; P = 0.005) and a higher positive predictive value (1.00, 95% CI of 1.00 to 0.92%, versus 0.75, 95% CI of 0.63 to 0.83; P = 0.005). In the subgroup of patients (n = 191) who had been receiving antibiotic treatment for ≥24 h, SF identified more pathogens (16 versus 6; P = 0.049) compared to BC. These results suggest that, in patients with suspected sepsis, hospitalized in an internal medicine ward, SF could be a highly valuable adjunct to conventional BC, particularly in patients under antibiotic treatment.

  18. Microbial contaminants isolated from items and work surfaces in the post- operative ward at Kawolo general hospital, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sserwadda, Ivan; Lukenge, Mathew; Mwambi, Bashir; Mboowa, Gerald; Walusimbi, Apollo; Segujja, Farouk

    2018-02-06

    Nosocomial infections are a major setback in the healthcare delivery system especially in developing countries due to the limited resources. The roles played by medical care equipment and work surfaces in the transmission of such organisms have inevitably contributed to the elevated mortality, morbidity and antibiotic resistances. A total 138 samples were collected during the study from Kawolo general hospital. Swab samples were collected from various work surfaces and fomites which consisted of; beds, sink taps, infusion stands, switches, work tables and scissors. Cultures were done and the susceptibility patterns of the isolates were determined using Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method. Data was analyzed using Stata 13 and Microsoft Excel 2013 packages. A total of 44.2% (61/138) of the collected swab specimens represented the overall bacterial contamination of the sampled articles. Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae accounted for the highest bacterial contaminants constituting of 75.4% (46/61) and 11.5% (7/61) respectively. Infusion stands and patient beds were found to have the highest bacterial contamination levels both constituting 19.67% (12/61). The highest degree of transmission of organisms to patients was found to be statistically significant for patient beds with OR: 20.1 and P-value 8X10 - 4 . Vancomycin, ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin were the most effective antibiotics with 100%, 80% and 80% sensitivity patterns among the isolates respectively. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) Staphylococcus aureus accounted for 52% (24/46) with 4% (1/24) classified as a possible extensively drug resistant (XDR) whereas Gram negative isolates had 27% (4/15) MDR strains out of which 50%(2/4) were classified as possible pan-drug resistant (PDR). The high prevalence of bacterial contaminants in the hospital work environment is an indicator of poor or ineffective decontamination. The study findings reiterate the necessity to formulate drug usage policies and re

  19. Effects of a humor-centered activity on disruptive behavior in patients in a general hospital psychiatric ward

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Higueras; Hugo Carretero-Dios; José P. Muñoz; Esther Idini; Ana Ortiz; Francisco Rincón; David Prieto-Merino; María M. Rodríguez del Águila

    2006-01-01

    El objetivo de este estudio cuasi-experimental es analizar lo efectos de una actividad centrada en el humor sobre las conductas disruptivas de pacientes hospitalizados en un servicio de Psiquiatría. Se han comparado, teniendo en cuenta dos grupos homogéneos de pacientes hospitalizados en un servicio de Psiquiatría de hospital general (unidad de agudos), dos periodos temporales de 83 días cada uno, siendo el período 1 el de línea base, y el período 2, el de intervención. Para am...

  20. Effects of a humor-centered activity on disruptive behavior in patients in a general hospital psychiatric ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Higueras

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio cuasi-experimental es analizar lo efectos de una actividad centrada en el humor sobre las conductas disruptivas de pacientes hospitalizados en un servicio de Psiquiatría. Se han comparado, teniendo en cuenta dos grupos homogéneos de pacientes hospitalizados en un servicio de Psiquiatría de hospital general (unidad de agudos, dos periodos temporales de 83 días cada uno, siendo el período 1 el de línea base, y el período 2, el de intervención. Para ambos periodos, se codificaron y registraron un total de diez conductas disruptivas. En los 83 días del periodo de intervención, y con una frecuencia de dos días semanales, dos actores profesionales llevaban a cabo las actividades centradas en el humor. Se calculó un Indice de Disrupción Global (IGD, teniendo en cuenta conjuntamente todas las conductas disruptivas, al igual que un Indice de Disrupción Específico (IDE para cada una de las conductas disruptivas. Usando para las comparaciones la corrección de Bonferroni, los resultados indican que el IGD descendió significativamente durante el periodo de intervención, siendo tres las conductas disruptivas que mostraron un descenso significativo (intentos de fuga, autolesiones y peleas.

  1. A smartphone-enabled communication system to improve hospital communication: usage and perceptions of medical trainees and nurses on general internal medicine wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Robert; Lo, Vivian; Morra, Dante; Appel, Eva; Arany, Teri; Curiale, Beth; Ryan, Joanne; Quan, Sherman

    2015-02-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of information and communication technologies to improve how clinicians communicate in hospital settings. We implemented a communication system with support for physician handover and secure messaging on 2 general internal medicine wards. We measured usage and surveyed physicians and nurses on perceptions of the system's effects on communication. Between May 2011 and August 2012, a clinical teaching team received, on average, 14.8 messages per day through the system. Messages were typically sent as urgent (69.1%) and requested a text reply (76.5%). For messages requesting a text reply, 8.6% did not receive a reply. For those messages that did receive a reply, the median response time was 2.3 minutes, and 84.5% of messages received a reply within 15 minutes. Of those who completed the survey, 95.3% were medical residents (82 of 86) and 81.7% were nurses (83 of 116). Medical trainees (82.8%) and nursing staff (78.3%) agreed or strongly agreed that the system helped to speed up their daily work tasks. Overall, 67.1% of the trainees and 73.2% of nurses agreed or strongly agreed that the system made them more accountable in their clinical roles. Only 35.8% of physicians and 26.3% of nurses agreed or strongly agreed that the system was useful for communicating complex issues. In summary, with a system designed to improve communication, we found that there was high uptake and that users perceived that the system improved efficiency and accountability but was not appropriate for communicating complex issues. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  2. Discharge Against Medical Advice in the Pediatric Wards in Boo-ali Sina Hospital, Sari, Iran 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni Saravi, Benyamin; Reza Zadeh, Esmaeil; Siamian, Hasan; Yahghoobian, Mahboobeh

    2013-12-01

    Since children neither comprehended nor contribute to the decision, discharge against medical advice is a challenge of health care systems in the world. Therefore, the current study was designed to determine the rate and causes of discharge against medical advice. This descriptive cross-sectional study was done by reviewing the medical records by census method. Data was analyzed using SPSS software and x(2) statistics was used to determine the relationship between variables. The value of P<0.05 was considered significant. Rate of discharged against medical advice was 108 (2.2%). Mean of age and length of stay were 2.8±4 (SD).3 years old and 3.7±5.4 (SD) days, respectively. Totally, 95 patients (88.7%) had health insurance and 65 (60.2%) patients lived in urban areas. History of psychiatric disease and addiction in 22 (20.6%) of the parents were negative. In addition, 100 (92.3%) patients admitted for medical treatment and the others for surgery. The relationship of the signatory with patients (72.3%) was father. Of 108 patients discharged against medical advice, 20 (12%) were readmitted. The relationship between the day of discharge and discharge against medical advice was significant (ρ =0/03). Rate of discharge against medical advice in Boo-ali hospital is the same as the other studies in the same range. The form which is used for this purpose did not have suitable data elements about description of consequence of such discharge, and it has not shown the real causes of discharge against medical advice.

  3. Evaluation of the Structure of Morning Report Sessions of the Wards of Type One Educational Hospitals and Comparison with Announced Standards of the Ministry of Health and Medical Education

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    Shahram Yazdani

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Morning report is a long-standing method that its promotion has an important role in medical education. The present research was done with the aim of studying the structure of morning report sessions of the wards of type one educational hospitals and comparison with announced standards of the Ministry of Health and Medical Education.Methods: This study was performed in five main educational hospitals included wards of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Surgery, Psychiatry, Neurology, Emergency Medicine, Orthopedic Surgery, Infectious Disease, and Intensive Care Unit wards were evaluated 8 approved standards 3 times for each one, and totally 73 cases. The studied standards consisted of the time of patient introduction, number of patients, duration of session, appropriateness of the session place, the venue, near ward place, Availability of teaching aids, number of sessions per week and a simple reception during the session.Results: Mean time for introduction of each patient was 4.4 minutes, mean number of introduced patients was 3.2 cases, mean duration of the session was 47.4 minutes, presentation in the ward (61.6%, appropriateness of place capacity 95.9%, and mean number of sessions per week was 4.2. No simple reception was seen in any sessions. Abundance of teaching aids was 79.5% for physical examination bed Negatoscope 89%, white board 93.2%, computer 87.7%, printer 19.2%, internet 17.8%, and video projector 83.6%.Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the general structure of morning report in the studied university was appropriate and fulfilled 6 out of 8 Standards. Also, the simple reception was not standard, and the standard of teaching aids was appropriate for 5 out of 7, and printer and internet were inappropriate.

  4. Hiv/hbv, hiv/hcv and hiv/htlv-1 co infection among injecting drug user patients hospitalized at the infectious disease ward of a training hospital in iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, S.M.; Etemadi, A.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the prevalence and risk factors for HBV, HCV and HTLV-I co-infection in the Iranian HIV positive Injecting Drug Users (IDU) patients admitted in hospital. Analyses were based on 154 male IDU patients admitted in Infectious disease ward of Razi Hospital, Ahwaz, Iran, from April 2001 to March 2003. All of them had been tested for HIV infection (Elisa-antibody and Western blot), HBV surface antigen, HCV antibody and HTLV-1 antibody. One hundred and four patients (67.53%) were identified as HIV infected. Among HIV infected, HB surface antigen, HCV antibody and HTLV-I antibody were positive in 44.23% and 74.04% and 16.33% patients respectively. HCV/HBV/HIV and HCV/HBV/HIV/HTLV-1 co-infection were 20.20% and 8.65% respectively. Co-infection with HBV or HCV or HTLV-1 is common among hospitalized HIV-infected IDU patients in the region of study. HIV disease outcomes appear to be adversely affected by HBV/HCV/HTLV-I co-infection, so identification of these viral infections is recommended as routine tests for this population. (author)

  5. An adolescent ward; 'in name only?'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Alison

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the study was to explore how an adolescent ward was used by the two main users, nurses and adolescents, on a purpose-built adolescent ward. In Australia, caring for the adolescent is part of paediatric nursing and many Australian hospitals boast of 'adolescent-only facilities'. These wards are established on the premise that adolescent patients are a 'special' group deserving their own ward space. With the development of adolescent wards, set ideals around what this type of environment provides have also arisen. These ideals are increased privacy and independence for the patient, a chance for peer interaction, to be nursed by specially trained staff and to provide opportunities for adolescent patients to participate in their own care. This study used ethnography to gain a perspective of how ward space was used. Data were collected using participant observation and formal and informal interviews. Data were then analysed using the works of Lefebvre and Foucault. This study found that patient allocation, nursing observation and patient labels impact on how adolescent patients are nursed. Patients are expected to fit in, accepting all ministrations of nursing and staff. On this ward, nursing work was paramount. Nurses treated the adolescent patient like any other. In saying this, the adolescent patient still found ways to adapt to the ward space and its rules and routines; so in this sense, the ward still worked for them, even if nursing work was paramount. This study contributes to current discourse on the formation of specialized facilities in general, as it shows that no matter how a ward space is set up, if the space is not used in that way, then the purported purpose of that ward space will be lost.

  6. The Impact of Cannabis Use on the Dosage of Antipsychotic Drugs in Patients Admitted on the Psychiatric Ward at the University Hospital of the West Indies

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    P Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the impact of cannabis use on the efficacy of antipsychotic drugs in male subjects presenting to the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI with psychotic episodes. Methods: Male subjects, 18–40 years old, admitted to the psychiatric ward of the UHWI between February 2013 and May 2013, diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizophreniform disorder and who tested positive for ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol were recruited for the study. On day one, consenting subjects were assessed using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS. Patients were prescribed seven days of an oral antipsychotic medication (haloperidol, chlorpromazine, risperidone, quetiapine, olanzapine. Medicated subjects were then reassessed using the BPRS on days three and seven. Statistical analysis involved the use of Student’s t-test and repeated measure analysis of variance. Results: In total, 20 subjects were recruited (mean age = 26.00 ± 5.96 years. Subjects were grouped based on the daily chlorpromazine equivalent (CPZE dose given on day one into CPZE1 (CPZE dose of 100–300mg; n = 8 and CPZE2 (CPZE dose of 400–1250 mg; n = 12. There was no significant difference in the total BPRS score between the groups on day one (CPZE1 = 41.38 ± 16.47 versus CPZE2 = 49.42 ± 25.58; p = 0.44; similar findings were obtained for the positive (26.75 ± 9.27 versus 31.83 ± 17.30; p = 0.46 and negative (14.63 ± 7.73 versus 17.58 ± 9.74; p = 0.48 symptom component on the BPRS. For subjects in CPZE1, there was no significant decrease in total BPRS score [F(2,21 = 0.07, p = 0.93] over the study period. For CPZE2, significant reduction in total BPRS scores was achieved [F(2,33 =7.12, p = 0.01], contributed by significant decrease in the positive [F(2,33 = 5.64, p = 0.02 and negative [F(2,33 = 7.53, p = 0.01 symptom components of the BPRS. Conclusion: The findings of this study purport that male cannabis users presenting with psychotic disorders may not achieve optimal

  7. On-ward participation of a hospital pharmacist in a Dutch intensive care unit reduces prescribing errors and related patient harm: an intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klopotowska, J.E.; Kuiper, R.; van Kan, H.J.; de Pont, A.C.; Dijkgraaf, M.G.; Lie-A-Huen, L.; Vroom, M.B.; Smorenburg, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) are at high risk for prescribing errors and related adverse drug events (ADEs). An effective intervention to decrease this risk, based on studies conducted mainly in North America, is on-ward participation of a clinical pharmacist in an

  8. On-ward participation of a hospital pharmacist in a Dutch intensive care unit reduces prescribing errors and related patient harm: an intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klopotowska, Joanna E.; Kuiper, Rob; van Kan, Hendrikus J.; de Pont, Anne-Cornelie; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G.; Lie-A-Huen, Loraine; Vroom, Margreeth B.; Smorenburg, Susanne M.

    2010-01-01

    Patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) are at high risk for prescribing errors and related adverse drug events (ADEs). An effective intervention to decrease this risk, based on studies conducted mainly in North America, is on-ward participation of a clinical pharmacist in an ICU team. As

  9. Identity of Professors of Medical and Surgical Graduate Programs at a University Hospital: A View from Life Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Salcedo Monsalve

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the results of a research in which I decided to analyze the narratives of profes­sors of medical and surgical specialties in a university hospital in the city of Bogota, and inter­pret their teaching experiences, to learn some elements of their identity and the pedagogical knowledge they have built. A qualitative study was conducted from the hermeneutical historical approach, using life stories. Five teachers participated voluntarily. An analysis of the narratives focused on the meaning and the interpretation of the findings in the light of pedagogical theory was performed. In relation to teacher identity, the specialists became teachers unintentionally as a response to own labor requirements of the job at the university hospital. The construction process of the teachers started from their years of schooling, and pedagogical practice has a strong influence on what they learned from their own teachers. The academic activity is being under­taken by the major motivation vocation, expressions of thanks of their students and satisfaction for achieving the proposed learning objectives. The lack of teacher training creates tension and concern among teachers, which could be prevented with teacher education programs.

  10. Howard Atwood Kelly (1858-1943): founding Professor of Gynecology at Johns Hopkins Hospital and pioneer American radium therapist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robison, R. F.

    2010-01-01

    To date no objective scientific medical biography has been published on Howard Atwood Kelly, one of America's foremost radium pioneers. He had become internationally known since 1889 as the founding Chief of the Gynecology Service at Johns Hopkins, well before the discovery of radium. He was also later to maintain his own hospital in Baltimore. He was a multifaceted man and his biography provides some fascinating reading about the treatment of gynaecological cancer in the USA at the end of the 19 th century and well into the 20 th century. An Appendix is included which contains extracts from Curtis Bumam's 1936 Janeway Memorial Lecture on 'Early Experiences with Radium' which was published (without quoting any references) in the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR). Bumam was probably the most important of Kelly's collaborators and he provides unique personal and scientific insights on Kelly and the trials (and) tribulations of obtaining and using radium in 1911. (author)

  11. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA Contamination in Bedside Surfaces of a Hospital Ward and the Potential Effectiveness of Enhanced Disinfection with an Antimicrobial Polymer Surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. M. Yuen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim in this study was to assess the effectiveness of a quaternary ammonium chloride (QAC surfactant in reducing surface staphylococcal contamination in a routinely operating medical ward occupied by patients who had tested positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. The QAC being tested is an antibacterial film that is sprayed onto a surface and can remain active for up to 8 h. A field experimental study was designed with the QAC plus daily hypochlorite cleaning as the experimental group and hypochlorite cleaning alone as the control group. The method of swabbing on moistened surfaces was used for sampling. It was found that 83% and 77% of the bedside surfaces of MRSA-positive and MRSA-negative patients respectively were contaminated with staphylococci at 08:00 hours, and that the staphylococcal concentrations increased by 80% at 1200 h over a 4-hour period with routine ward and clinical activities. Irrespective of the MRSA status of the patients, high-touch surfaces around the bed-units within the studied medical ward were heavily contaminated (ranged 1 to 276 cfu/cm2 amongst the sites with positive culture with staphylococcal bacteria including MRSA, despite the implementation of daily hypochlorite wiping. However, the contamination rate dropped significantly from 78% to 11% after the application of the QAC polymer. In the experimental group, the mean staphylococcal concentration of bedside surfaces was significantly (p < 0.0001 reduced from 4.4 ± 8.7 cfu/cm2 at 08:00 hours to 0.07 ± 0.26 cfu/cm2 at 12:00 hours by the QAC polymer. The results of this study support the view that, in addition to hypochlorite wiping, the tested QAC surfactant is a potential environmental decontamination strategy for preventing the transmission of clinically important pathogens in medical wards.

  12. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination in bedside surfaces of a hospital ward and the potential effectiveness of enhanced disinfection with an antimicrobial polymer surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, John W M; Chung, Terence W K; Loke, Alice Y

    2015-03-11

    The aim in this study was to assess the effectiveness of a quaternary ammonium chloride (QAC) surfactant in reducing surface staphylococcal contamination in a routinely operating medical ward occupied by patients who had tested positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The QAC being tested is an antibacterial film that is sprayed onto a surface and can remain active for up to 8 h. A field experimental study was designed with the QAC plus daily hypochlorite cleaning as the experimental group and hypochlorite cleaning alone as the control group. The method of swabbing on moistened surfaces was used for sampling. It was found that 83% and 77% of the bedside surfaces of MRSA-positive and MRSA-negative patients respectively were contaminated with staphylococci at 08:00 hours, and that the staphylococcal concentrations increased by 80% at 1200 h over a 4-hour period with routine ward and clinical activities. Irrespective of the MRSA status of the patients, high-touch surfaces around the bed-units within the studied medical ward were heavily contaminated (ranged 1 to 276 cfu/cm2 amongst the sites with positive culture) with staphylococcal bacteria including MRSA, despite the implementation of daily hypochlorite wiping. However, the contamination rate dropped significantly from 78% to 11% after the application of the QAC polymer. In the experimental group, the mean staphylococcal concentration of bedside surfaces was significantly (p<0.0001) reduced from 4.4±8.7 cfu/cm2 at 08:00 hours to 0.07±0.26 cfu/cm2 at 12:00 hours by the QAC polymer. The results of this study support the view that, in addition to hypochlorite wiping, the tested QAC surfactant is a potential environmental decontamination strategy for preventing the transmission of clinically important pathogens in medical wards.

  13. Is Ward Experience in Resuscitation Effort Related to the Prognosis of Unexpected Cardiac Arrest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen-Kuang Hou

    2007-09-01

    Conclusion: Hospital wards with more than 5 cardiac arrests per year have a better patient survival rate than those with fewer arrests. This is despite all ward staff receiving the same level of training.

  14. Urinary catheterization in medical wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmanmoh Bhatia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims : The study aims to determine the: 1. frequency of inappropriate catheterization in medical wards and the reasons for doing it. 2. various risk factors associated with inappropriate catheterization, catheter associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI and bacterial colonization on Foley′s catheters (BCFC. Settings and Design: Hospital-based prospective study. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty five patients admitted consecutively in the medical wards of a tertiary care hospital, who underwent catheterization with a Foley′s catheter, at admission, have been included in the study. Patient profiles were evaluated using the following parameters: age, sex, diagnosis, functional status, mental status, indication, duration and place of catheterization, development of BCFC and CAUTI. Statistical tests used: Chi-square test. Results: Thirty-six out of 125 (28.8% patients included were inappropriately catheterized. BCFC developed in 52.8% and 22.4% were diagnosed with a CAUTI. The most frequent indication for inappropriate catheterization was urinary incontinence without significant skin breakdown (27.8%. The risk factors for inappropriate catheterization were female sex (RR=1.29, 95% CI=0.99, 1.69, P60 years (RR=0.65, 95% CI=0.48, 0.89, P3 days (RR=0.62, 95% CI=0.43, 0.89, P60 years (RR=0.47, 95% CI=0.25, 0.90, P3 days (RR=0.24, 95% CI=0.10, 0.58, P< 0.01. Conclusions : Inappropriate catheterization is highly prevalent in medical wards, especially in patients with urinary incontinence. The patients catheterized in the medical emergency and female patients in particular are at high risk. Careful attention to these factors can reduce the frequency of inappropriate catheterization and unnecessary morbidity.

  15. Anatomy of the ward round.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, James A

    2008-07-01

    The ward round has been a central activity of hospital life for hundreds of years. It is hardly mentioned in textbooks. The ward round is a parade through the hospital of professionals where most decision making concerning patient care is made. However the traditional format may be intimidating for patients and inadequate for communication. The round provides an opportunity for the multi-disciplinary team to listen to the patient\\'s narrative and jointly interpret his concerns. From this unfolds diagnosis, management plans, prognosis formation and the opportunity to explore social, psychological, rehabilitation and placement issues. Physical examination of the patient at the bedside still remains important. It has been a tradition to discuss the patient at the bedside but sensitive matters especially of uncertainty may better be discussed elsewhere. The senior doctor as round leader must seek the input of nursing whose observations may be under-appreciated due to traditional professional hierarchy. Reductions in the working hours of junior doctors and shortened length of stay have reduced continuity of patient care. This increases the importance of senior staff in ensuring continuity of care and the need for the joint round as the focus of optimal decision making. The traditional round incorporates teaching but patient\\'s right to privacy and their preferences must be respected. The quality and form of the clinical note is underreported but the electronic record is slow to being accepted. The traditional multi-disciplinary round is disappearing in some centres. This may be regrettable. The anatomy and optimal functioning of the ward round deserves scientific scrutiny and experimentation.

  16. HIV infection, tuberculosis and workload in a general paediatric ward

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Child Health ... To describe the impact of HIV infection and tuberculosis on the workload of a general paediatric ward at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital in 2007. Methods. Prospective descriptive surveillance of the patient composition of a general paediatric ward over a 1-year period.

  17. [Requirements and reality of the German ordinance for staff in psychiatric hospitals: results of a multi-moment study on a psychiatric ward for acute psychosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, M; Rieger, W

    2010-11-01

    The regulation of personnel in psychiatry (PsychPV) stipulates time requirements for all relevant activities in inpatient psychiatric care as a function of the degree of disease severity of the patients treated. The demands made on employees in psychiatric care have risen substantially in recent years. Our aim was to examine whether the standard requirements of the PsychPV cover the actual work load. With the help of a multi-moment study on a general psychiatric ward we examined which activities are performed to which extent by doctors and nurses. Physicians must spend an inordinate amount of time on documentation and the nursing staff on non-patient-related tasks. The causes are the higher number of external requests and higher clinical documentation requirements. This time is lost to the direct patient contact. The PsychPV requirements must be urgently adapted so that more time is again available for the direct patient contact.

  18. Transmission of endemic ST22-MRSA-IV on four acute hospital wards investigated using a combination of spa, dru and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Creamer, E

    2012-11-01

    The transmission of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) between individual patients is difficult to track in institutions where MRSA is endemic. We investigated the transmission of MRSA where ST22-MRSA-IV is endemic on four wards using demographic data, patient and environmental screening, and molecular typing of isolates. A total of 939 patients were screened, 636 within 72 h of admission (on admission) and 303 >72 h after admission, and 1,252 environmental samples were obtained. Isolates were typed by spa, dru and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing. A composite dendrogram generated from the three sets of typing data was used to divide isolates into \\'dendrogram groups\\' (DGs). Ten percent of patients (92\\/939) were MRSA-positive; 7 % (44\\/636) on admission and 16 % (48\\/303) >72 h after admission (p = 0.0007). MRSA was recovered from 5 % of environmental specimens (65\\/1,252). Most isolates from patients (97 %, 85\\/88) and the environment (97 %, 63\\/65) exhibited the ST22-MRSA-IV genotype. Four DGs (DG1, DG4, DG16 and DG17) accounted for 58 % of ST22-MRSA-IV isolates from patients. Epidemiological evidence suggested cross-transmission among 44\\/92 patients (48 %) but molecular typing confirmed probable cross-transmission in only 11 instances (13 %, 11\\/88), with the majority of cross-transmission (64 %; 7\\/11) occurring on one ward. In the setting of highly clonal endemic MRSA, the combination of local epidemiology, PFGE, spa and dru typing provided valuable insights into MRSA transmission.

  19. The Difference in Effectiveness of 70% and 0.5% Chlorine to ReduceThe Germ Number on Stethoscope’s Membrane Experimental research at stethoscope in Baitul Izah Ward of Sultan Agung Islamic Hospital Semarang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heny Pramita

    2011-06-01

    Design and Methods: This was an experimental research with the Post Test Only Control Group Design using 18 stethoscopes divided into 3 groups randomly. Group A was the control group (aquabidest, group B were treated with 70% alcohol treatment, and group C was treated with 0.5% chlorine. The research samples were the stethoscopes used to treat patient in Baitul Izah ward of Islamic Hospital of Sultan Agung Semarang. The data on the germ amount was analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: There was a significant difference between aquabidest group and 70% alcohol group (p0.05, nevertheless, there was no significant difference between the 70% alcohol group and 0.5% chlorine group ( 0.652. Conclusion: There was no difference in the effectiveness between 70% alcohol and 0.5% chlorine to reduce the number of germ on the stethoscope’s membrane (Sains Medika, 3(1:63-68.

  20. Autonomia profissional dos professores

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra, Teresa P.; Veiga, Feliciano

    2007-01-01

    Este estudo pretendeu analisar as representações dos professores acerca da sua autonomia em contexto escolar, com recurso a uma amostra de 203 professores de ambos os sexos, pertencentes a escolas dos distritos de Lisboa, Setúbal, Leiria e Aveiro. Utilizou-se a Escala de Autonomia Profissional dos Professores (EAPP).

  1. Effectiveness of an alcohol-based hand hygiene programme in reducing nosocomial infections in the Urology Ward of Binh Dan Hospital, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kim V; Nguyen, Phuong Tran My; Jones, Stephanie L

    2008-10-01

    To determine the effectiveness of hand hygiene in a developing healthcare setting in reducing nosocomial infections (NIs). Prospective study measuring NI rates in a urology ward in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, before and after implementation of a hand hygiene programme with an alcohol-based decontaminant, and compliance rates of medical staff and carers with hand hygiene using standardised observation sheets. Incidence of NIs fell by 84%, from 13.1% to 2.1%, after implementation of the hand hygiene programme. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase production was detected in 38.2%-50% of Enterobacteriaceae isolated from clinical samples. Length of patient stay and cost to the patient for antibiotics were reduced after implementation of the hand hygiene programme. The hand hygiene programme was effective in reducing incidence of NIs, leading to shorter inpatient stays and reduced treatment costs. Such programmes with measurable outcomes can be implemented at minimal cost in developing health contexts and should be promoted in all healthcare settings.

  2. Comparing Efficacy of Implementing Two Teaching Methods Contract Learning and Traditional Instruction on Clinical Skills of Nursing Students in Psychiatric Wards of Hospitals of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamileh Mohtashami

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: A learning contract is defined as a written agreement between teacher and student which makes explicit what a learner will do to achieve specified learning outcomes.Learning contracts have been used as a teaching and learning strategy for both undergraduate and graduate nursing students in many countries.Methods : This research is a quasi-experimental study that compares effect of two different teaching methods , Contract learning and traditional on clinical skills for a group of nursing students who were in fourth year of study in a pre-registration bachelor of nursing degree program in Tehran . A learning contract was implemented as a learning tool in the students clinical placement in psychiatric nursing .Data were connected from questionnaires , interviews and clinical evaluation papers with students .Results : The results showed that students agreed that there was an increase in students autonomy and motivation in learning with the use of learning contract . It also increased the sharing between students and clinical instructors.Conclusion : According to the findings of this study , contract learning is considered beneficial to students learning and has the potential to be used in clinical learning .Key words : NURSING STUDENTS, LEARNING CONTRACTS , TRADITIONAL METHOD , MOTIVATION , AUTONOMY, PSYCHIATRIC WARDS .

  3. Doctor Ward's Accidental Terrarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, David R.

    1996-01-01

    Presents the story of the accidental invention of the Wardian case, or terrarium, by Nathaniel Bagshaw Ward. Advocates the use of this story in teaching precollege biology as an illustration of how a chance event can lead to a major scientific advancement and as an example of the common occurrence of multiple discovery in botany. Contains 34…

  4. Prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders in hospitalized patients at the dermatology clinical ward of a university hospital Prevalência de depressão e ansiedade em pacientes hospitalizados na enfermaria da clínica de dermatologia de um hospital universitário

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rita Polo Gascón

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders in hospitalized patients at the dermatology ward at a university hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders in hospitalized patients at the dermatology ward at a university hospital in São Paulo. METHOD: A total of 75 patients, men and women, aged between 18 and 76 years, took part in the research. The study employed a descriptive, cross sectional and correlational method. The data was collected by means of a social demographic questionnaire and the PRIME-MD. RESULTS: It was found that 45.3 percent of the subjects presented with depressive symptoms, and 52 percent presented with symptoms of anxiety and that this survey showed moderate and high significant correlations (pFUNDAMENTOS: O presente estudo teve como objetivo verificar a freqüência de depressão e ansiedade em pacientes internados na Divisão da Clínica de Dermatologia de um hospital universitário de São Paulo. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a prevalência de depressão e ansiedade em pacientes hospitalizados na enfermaria da clínica de dermatologia de um hospital universitário em São Paulo. MÉTODO: Participaram da pesquisa 75 sujeitos, homens e mulheres, entre 18 e 76 anos. O delineamento do estudo foi transversal e descritivo. Os instrumentos utilizados foram Entrevista Sócio Demográfica e PRIME-MD. RESULTADOS: Identificou-se a presença de depressão em 45,3% e de ansiedade em 52% dos pacientes avaliados. CONCLUSÃO: Verificou-se correlação moderada e altamente significativa (p<0,01; r =0,616 para os índices de depressão e ansiedade, que pode evidenciar a relação entre adoecimento físico e psíquico muito encontrada na literatura.

  5. 'End of life could be on any ward really': A qualitative study of hospital volunteers' end-of-life care training needs and learning preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighton, Lisa Jane; Koffman, Jonathan; Robinson, Vicky; Khan, Shaheen A; George, Rob; Burman, Rachel; Selman, Lucy Ellen

    2017-10-01

    Over half of all deaths in Europe occur in hospital, a location associated with many complaints. Initiatives to improve inpatient end-of-life care are therefore a priority. In England, over 78,000 volunteers provide a potentially cost-effective resource to hospitals. Many work with people who are dying and their families, yet little is known about their training in end-of-life care. To explore hospital volunteers' end-of-life care training needs and learning preferences, and the acceptability of training evaluation methods. Qualitative focus groups. Volunteers from a large teaching hospital were purposively sampled. Five focus groups were conducted with 25 hospital volunteers (aged 19-80 years). Four themes emerged as follows: preparation for the volunteering role, training needs, training preferences and evaluation preferences. Many described encounters with patients with life-threatening illness and their families. Perceived training needs in end-of-life care included communication skills, grief and bereavement, spiritual diversity, common symptoms, and self-care. Volunteers valued learning from peers and end-of-life care specialists using interactive teaching methods including real-case examples and role plays. A chance to 'refresh' training at a later date was suggested to enhance learning. Evaluation through self-reports or observations were acceptable, but ratings by patients, families and staff were thought to be pragmatically unsuitable owing to sporadic contact with each. Gaps in end-of-life care training for hospital volunteers indicate scope to maximise on this resource. This evidence will inform development of training and evaluations which could better enable volunteers to make positive, cost-effective contributions to end-of-life care in hospitals.

  6. ‘End of life could be on any ward really’: A qualitative study of hospital volunteers’ end-of-life care training needs and learning preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighton, Lisa Jane; Koffman, Jonathan; Robinson, Vicky; Khan, Shaheen A; George, Rob; Burman, Rachel; Selman, Lucy Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Over half of all deaths in Europe occur in hospital, a location associated with many complaints. Initiatives to improve inpatient end-of-life care are therefore a priority. In England, over 78,000 volunteers provide a potentially cost-effective resource to hospitals. Many work with people who are dying and their families, yet little is known about their training in end-of-life care. Aims: To explore hospital volunteers’ end-of-life care training needs and learning preferences, and the acceptability of training evaluation methods. Design: Qualitative focus groups. Setting/participants: Volunteers from a large teaching hospital were purposively sampled. Results: Five focus groups were conducted with 25 hospital volunteers (aged 19–80 years). Four themes emerged as follows: preparation for the volunteering role, training needs, training preferences and evaluation preferences. Many described encounters with patients with life-threatening illness and their families. Perceived training needs in end-of-life care included communication skills, grief and bereavement, spiritual diversity, common symptoms, and self-care. Volunteers valued learning from peers and end-of-life care specialists using interactive teaching methods including real-case examples and role plays. A chance to ‘refresh’ training at a later date was suggested to enhance learning. Evaluation through self-reports or observations were acceptable, but ratings by patients, families and staff were thought to be pragmatically unsuitable owing to sporadic contact with each. Conclusion: Gaps in end-of-life care training for hospital volunteers indicate scope to maximise on this resource. This evidence will inform development of training and evaluations which could better enable volunteers to make positive, cost-effective contributions to end-of-life care in hospitals. PMID:28056642

  7. Risk Factors for Death in Bangladeshi Children Under 5 Years of Age Hospitalized for Diarrhea and Severe Respiratory Distress in an Urban Critical Care Ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Tahmina; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Sarmin, Monira; Shahrin, Lubaba; Afroze, Farzana; Sharifuzzaman; Akhter, Shamima; Shahunja, K M; Shahid, Abu Sadat Mohammad Sayeem Bin; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer

    2017-01-01

    Children with diarrhea hospitalized for respiratory distress often have fatal outcome in resource-limited settings, although data are lacking on risk factors for death in such children. We sought to evaluate clinical predictors for death in such children. In this prospective cohort study, we enrolled under-5 children with diarrhea admitted with severe respiratory distress to the intensive care unit of Dhaka Hospital of International Centre for Diarhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, from September 2014 through September 2015. We compared clinical and laboratory characteristics between study children those who died (n = 29) and those who survived (n = 62). In logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, the independent predictors for death in children hospitalized for diarrhea and severe respiratory distress were severe sepsis and hypoglycemia ( P < .05 for all). Thus, recognition of these simple parameters may help clinicians identify children with diarrhea at risk of deaths in order to initiate prompt management for the better outcome, especially in resource-poor settings.

  8. Discharged from a mental health admission ward: is it safe to go home? A review on the negative outcomes of psychiatric hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loch AA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Alexandre Andrade LochLaboratory of Neurosciences, Department and Institute of Psychiatry, University of São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Before psychiatry emerged as a medical discipline, hospitalizing individuals with mental disorders was more of a social stigmatizing act than a therapeutic act. After the birth of the mental health disciplines, psychiatric hospitalization was legitimized and has proven to be indispensable, preventing suicides and helping individuals in need. However, despite more than a century passing since this legitimization occurred, psychiatric hospitalization remains a controversial issue. There is the question of possible negative outcomes after a psychiatric admission ceases to take its protective effect, and even of whether the psychiatric admission itself is related to a negative setback after discharge. This review aims to summarize some of the most important negative outcomes after discharge from a psychiatric institution. These experiences were organized into two groups: those after a brief psychiatric hospitalization, and those after a long-stay admission. The author further suggests possible ways to minimize these adversities, emphasizing the need of awareness related to this important issue.Keywords: suicide, stigma, rehabilitation, relapse, rehospitalisation

  9. Increasing the frequency of hand washing by healthcare workers does not lead to commensurate reductions in staphylococcal infection in a hospital ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerr Kevin G

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hand hygiene is generally considered to be the most important measure that can be applied to prevent the spread of healthcare-associated infection (HAI. Continuous emphasis on this intervention has lead to the widespread opinion that HAI rates can be greatly reduced by increased hand hygiene compliance alone. However, this assumes that the effectiveness of hand hygiene is not constrained by other factors and that improved compliance in excess of a given level, in itself, will result in a commensurate reduction in the incidence of HAI. However, several researchers have found the law of diminishing returns to apply to hand hygiene, with the greatest benefits occurring in the first 20% or so of compliance, and others have demonstrated that poor cohorting of nursing staff profoundly influences the effectiveness of hand hygiene measures. Collectively, these findings raise intriguing questions about the extent to which increasing compliance alone can further reduce rates of HAI. Methods In order to investigate these issues further, we constructed a deterministic Ross-Macdonald model and applied it to a hypothetical general medical ward. In this model the transmission of staphylococcal infection was assumed to occur after contact with the transiently colonized hands of HCWs, who, in turn, acquire contamination only by touching colonized patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of imperfect hand cleansing on the transmission of staphylococcal infection and to identify, whether there is a limit, above which further hand hygiene compliance is unlikely to be of benefit. Results The model demonstrated that if transmission is solely via the hands of HCWs, it should, under most circumstances, be possible to prevent outbreaks of staphylococcal infection from occurring at a hand cleansing frequencies Conclusion Although our study confirmed hand hygiene to be an effective control measure, it demonstrated that the law of

  10. The diagnosis, prevalence and outcome of delirium in a cohort of older people with mental health problems on general hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittamore, Kathy H; Goldberg, Sarah E; Gladman, John R F; Bradshaw, Lucy E; Jones, Rob G; Harwood, Rowan H

    2014-01-01

    This paper aimed to measure the prevalence and outcomes of delirium for patients over 70 admitted to a general hospital for acute medical care and to assess the validity of the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 (DRS-R-98) in this setting. Prospective study in a British acute general hospital providing sole emergency medical services for its locality. We screened consecutive patients over 70 with an unplanned emergency hospital admission and recruited a cohort of 249 patients likely to have mental health problems. They were assessed for health status at baseline and followed over 6 months. A sub-sample of 93 participants was assessed clinically for delirium. 27% (95% confidence interval (CI) 23-31) of all older medical patients admitted to hospital had DRS-diagnosed delirium, and 41% (95% CI 37-45) had dementia (including 19% with co-morbid delirium and dementia). Compared with clinician diagnosis, DRS-R-98 sensitivity was at least 0.75, specificity 0.71. Compared with reversible cognitive impairment, sensitivity was at least 0.50, specificity 0.67. DRS-diagnosed delirium was associated with cognitive impairment, mood, behavioural and psychological symptoms, activities of daily living, and number of drugs prescribed, supporting construct validity. Of those with DRS-diagnosed delirium, 37% died within 6 months (relative risk 1.4, 95% CI 0.97-2.2), 43% had reversible cognitive impairment, but only 25% had clinically important recovery in activities of daily living. Behavioural and psychological symptoms were common and mostly resolved, but new symptoms frequently developed. Delirium is common. Some, but not all, features are reversible. DRS-R-98 has reasonable validity in populations where co-morbid dementia is prevalent. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Risk Factors for Death in Bangladeshi Children Under 5 Years of Age Hospitalized for Diarrhea and Severe Respiratory Distress in an Urban Critical Care Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahmina Alam MBBS

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Children with diarrhea hospitalized for respiratory distress often have fatal outcome in resource-limited settings, although data are lacking on risk factors for death in such children. We sought to evaluate clinical predictors for death in such children. In this prospective cohort study, we enrolled under-5 children with diarrhea admitted with severe respiratory distress to the intensive care unit of Dhaka Hospital of International Centre for Diarhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, from September 2014 through September 2015. We compared clinical and laboratory characteristics between study children those who died (n = 29 and those who survived (n = 62. In logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, the independent predictors for death in children hospitalized for diarrhea and severe respiratory distress were severe sepsis and hypoglycemia (P < .05 for all. Thus, recognition of these simple parameters may help clinicians identify children with diarrhea at risk of deaths in order to initiate prompt management for the better outcome, especially in resource-poor settings.

  12. Hand decontamination practices in paediatric wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Jelly

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine and describe hand decontamination practices of health care professionals in the paediatric wards of an academic hospital in Johannesburg. The purpose was addressed within a survey design and through the use of descriptive and comparative methods. Data were collected through direct observation conducted with the use of a researcher-administered checklist. A sample of sixtysix health professionals was obtained through convenience sampling.

  13. Ergonomics in the psychiatric ward towards workers or patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvana, Salerno; Laura, Forcella; Ursula, Di Fabio; Irene, Figà Talamanca; Paolo, Boscolo

    2012-01-01

    Patient's aggressive behavior is one of the major problem in the psychiatric ward. Here we present the preliminary results of a psychiatric ward case-study, of a public hospital in the Chieti province, in order to plan ergonomic improvement. We applied the Method of Organizational Congruencies in the psychiatric ward in order to study the relationship between organized hospital work and nurses wellbeing in a 24 hour shifts. We observed 58 main phases in the three work shifts. The technical actions are mainly those of any hospital wards (shift briefing, preparing and administering drugs, recording data on clinical charts, etc.). We found important differences mainly due to the nurses overcontrol activities on the patients behavior (preventing suicides or self destructive behavior), the occurrence of restraint procedure towards patients, the pollution due to patient's cigarette smoke. The fear of patient's self destructive behavior or other aggressive behaviour are the main cognitive and social aspects of this hospital ward. Nurses working in this psychiatric ward have to accept: locked doors, poor and polluted environment, restraint procedure with high risk of aggression and no availability of mental health care programs. A new interdisciplinary concept for ergonomics in psychiatry setting may represent a challenge for both nurses and patients and the community.

  14. Multi-Criteria Knapsack Problem for Disease Selection in an Observation Ward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lurkittikul, N; Kittithreerapronchai, O

    2014-01-01

    The aging population and the introduction of Thailand universal healthcare have increased inpatients and outpatients to public hospitals, particularly to a hospital that provides special and comprehensive health services. Many inpatient wards have experienced large influx of inpatients as the hospitals have to admit all patients regardless their conditions. These overcrowding wards cause stress to medical staffs, block access between medical departments, hospital-acquired infections, and ineffective uses of resources. One way to manage such inundated inpatient is to select some patients whose conditions require less clinical attention or whose lengths of stay are predictable and short and, then, place them at an observation ward. This intermediate ward increases turnover of beds and reduces unnecessary paperwork as patients are considered to be outpatients. In this article, we studied inpatient data of a tertiary care hospital in which an observation ward was considered to alleviate the overcrowding problem at Internal Medicine Department. The analysis of data showed that the hospital can balance inpatient flow by managing a group of patients who is admitted because of treatments ordered by its special clinics. Having explored several alternatives, we suggested patient selection criteria and proposed a layout at an observation ward. The hospital should increase medical beds in a new building ward because the current observation ward can handle 27.3% of total short stay patients, while the observation ward is projected to handle 80% of total short stay patients

  15. Multi-Criteria Knapsack Problem for Disease Selection in an Observation Ward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurkittikul, N.; Kittithreerapronchai, O.

    2014-06-01

    The aging population and the introduction of Thailand universal healthcare have increased inpatients and outpatients to public hospitals, particularly to a hospital that provides special and comprehensive health services. Many inpatient wards have experienced large influx of inpatients as the hospitals have to admit all patients regardless their conditions. These overcrowding wards cause stress to medical staffs, block access between medical departments, hospital-acquired infections, and ineffective uses of resources. One way to manage such inundated inpatient is to select some patients whose conditions require less clinical attention or whose lengths of stay are predictable and short and, then, place them at an observation ward. This intermediate ward increases turnover of beds and reduces unnecessary paperwork as patients are considered to be outpatients. In this article, we studied inpatient data of a tertiary care hospital in which an observation ward was considered to alleviate the overcrowding problem at Internal Medicine Department. The analysis of data showed that the hospital can balance inpatient flow by managing a group of patients who is admitted because of treatments ordered by its special clinics. Having explored several alternatives, we suggested patient selection criteria and proposed a layout at an observation ward. The hospital should increase medical beds in a new building ward because the current observation ward can handle 27.3% of total short stay patients, while the observation ward is projected to handle 80% of total short stay patients.

  16. Detection and Typing of Human Papilloma Virus DNA by PCR in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma in E.N.T. Ward of Ahwaz Imam Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nikakhlagh

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Nowadays, epidemiological and experimental evidences in western countries consistently support an etiological role for human papillomavirus (HPV in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. The role of HPV in the etiology of head and neck SCC in developing countries such as Iran has not been investigated. The purpose of the present study was to investigate HPV DNA in the head and neck cancer by polymerase chain reaction (PCR in patients referred to Imam Khomeini Hospital Ahwaz.Materials & Methods: In this prospective cross sectional study 176 patients with SCC of head and neck who admitted in Ahwaz Imam Khomeini Hospital were evaluated with PCR for HPV DNA and compared to 176 control samples with benign pathology. Results: In this study 7 specimens (3.97% of the case group were positive for HPV DNA that include HPV 16(3 cases ,18(2 cases ,57(1 case, 33 (1case and only 1 specimen (0.57% of the control group was positive that include HPV 6 ( P value<0.001Conclusion: This study demonstrates the presence of HPVs in the SCC of head and neck. Further studies are needed to evaluate larger population in Ahwaz for the presence and types of HPV.

  17. Splitting Ward identity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safari, Mahmoud [Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Particles and Accelerators, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Within the background-field framework we present a path integral derivation of the splitting Ward identity for the one-particle irreducible effective action in the presence of an infrared regulator, and make connection with earlier works on the subject. The approach is general in the sense that it does not rely on how the splitting is performed. This identity is then used to address the problem of background dependence of the effective action at an arbitrary energy scale. We next introduce the modified master equation and emphasize its role in constraining the effective action. Finally, application to general gauge theories within the geometric approach is discussed. (orig.)

  18. Splitting Ward identity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safari, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Within the background-field framework we present a path integral derivation of the splitting Ward identity for the one-particle irreducible effective action in the presence of an infrared regulator, and make connection with earlier works on the subject. The approach is general in the sense that it does not rely on how the splitting is performed. This identity is then used to address the problem of background dependence of the effective action at an arbitrary energy scale. We next introduce the modified master equation and emphasize its role in constraining the effective action. Finally, application to general gauge theories within the geometric approach is discussed. (orig.)

  19. The effect of an interactive follow-up program on ostomy adjustment of inpatients after their discharge from surgical wards of the hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Yaser; Moeini, Mahin; Yousefi, Hojatollah

    2018-04-07

    Ostomy patients suffer from many physical and mental problems, which can be solved to a large extent with the help of education and follow-up programs. These follow-ups can be done in person or on the telephone by the nurses, or even, by sending a text message that is an easier way for the patients to adapt to their condition. This study aimed to investigate the effect of an interactive follow-up program on the adjustment of ostomy inpatients after being discharged. This study is a clinical trial, conducted on 64 ostomy patients who were discharged from the surgical wards of the hospital affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Subjects in the experimental group participated in a 6-week follow-up program via text message. The information about the patients were collected by Olbrisch Ostomy Adjustment Scale. The obtained results have suggested that 34.4% of the patients in the experimental group and 28.1% of the patients in the control group were female. Before the intervention, comparing the mean score of ostomy adjustment and its dimensions in the two groups showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). However, a significant difference was observed between the two groups immediately after the intervention (P  0.05). The findings of this study suggested that using SMS can be considered as a proper tool or method for following up the ostomy patients.

  20. EFFECT OF WARM WATER COMPRESS THERAPY ON THE INCIDENCE OF HYPEREMIA IN PHLEBITIS PATIENTS AT THE INPATIENT WARD OF BRIGJEND H. HASAN BASRI GENERAL HOSPITAL KANDANGAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Hidayah

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study aims to determine the effect of warm water compress therapy on the incidence of hyperemia in 40 patients with phlebitis at the Inpatient Installation of H. Hasan Basry General Hospital Kandangan. Research method used quasi-experimental with two group; control and intervention. The control group was untreated phlebitis, while the intervention group was a phlebitis patient treated with warm water compresses. Data collection was collected by measuring the redness diameter before and after warm compress therapy. The result showed that the mean of intervention group diameter before treatment 49.3 mm and after treatment 40.2 mm. The mean diameter of control group before treatment 48.1 mm and after treatment 46.4 mm. The mean diameter of intervention group was decreased 9.1 mm and 1.7 mm in the control group. Statistically result test show that there was a significant difference of mean hyperemia diameter between intervention and control group (p<0.05. Statistically result test also shows that there was a significant difference of mean hyperemia between pre- and post-treatment with warm water (p<0.05. It was concluded that the warm compress therapy could decreased the incidence of hyperemia in phlebitis patients.

  1. Clinical characteristics of very old patients hospitalized in internal medicine wards for heart failure: a sub-analysis of the FADOI-CONFINE Study Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Biagi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of chronic heart failure are increasing worldwide, as is the number of very old patients (>85 years affected by this disease. The aim of this sub-analysis of the multicenter, observational CONFINE study was to detect clinical and therapeutic peculiarities in patients with chronic heart failure aged >85 years. We recruited patients admitted with a diagnosis of chronic heart failure and present in the hospital in five index days, in 91 Units of Internal Medicine. The patients’ clinical characteristics, functional and cognitive status, and the management of the heart failure were analyzed. A total of 1444 subjects were evaluated, of whom 329 (23.1% were over 85 years old. Signs and symptoms of chronic heart failure were more common in very old patients, as were severe renal insufficiency, anemia, disability and cognitive impairment. The present survey found important age-related differences (concomitant diseases, cognitive status among patients with chronic heart failure, as well as different therapeutic strategies and clinical outcome for patients over 85 years old. Since these patients are usually excluded from clinical trials and their management remains empirical, specific studies focused on the treatment of very old patients with chronic heart failure are needed.

  2. Determinants of maternal near miss among women in public hospital maternity wards in Northern Ethiopia: A facility based case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejene Ermias Mekango

    Full Text Available In Ethiopia, 20,000 women die each year from complications related to pregnancy, childbirth and post-partum. For every woman that dies, 20 more experience injury, infection, disease, or disability. "Maternal near miss" (MNM, defined by the World Health Organization (WHO as a woman who nearly dies, but survives a complication during pregnancy, childbirth or within 42 days of a termination, is a proxy indicator of maternal mortality and quality of obstetric care. In Ethiopia, few studies have examined MNM. This study aims to identify determinants of MNM among a small population of women in Tigray, Ethiopia.Unmatched case-control study was conducted in hospitals in Tigray Region, Northern Ethiopia, from January 30-March 30, 2016. The sample included 103 cases and 205 controls recruited from among women seeking obstetric care at six (6 public hospitals. Clients with life-threatening obstetric complications, including hemorrhage, hypertensive diseases of pregnancy, dystocia, infection, and anemia or clinical signs of severe anemia (in women without hemorrhage were taken as cases and those with normal obstetric outcomes were controls. Cases were selected based on proportion to size allocation while systematic sampling was employed for controls. Binary and multiple variable logistic regression ("odds ratio" analyses were calculated at 95% CI.Roughly 90% of cases and controls were married and 25% experienced their first pregnancy before the age of 16 years. About two-thirds of controls and 45.6% of cases had gestational ages between 37-41 weeks. Among cases, severe obstetric hemorrhage (44.7%, hypertensive disorders (38.8%, dystocia (17.5%, sepsis (9.7% and severe anemia (2.9% were leading causes of MNM. Histories of chronic maternal medical problems like hypertension, diabetes were reported in 55.3% of cases and 33.2% of controls. Women with no formal education [AOR = 3.2;95%CI:1.24, 8.12], being less than 16 years of age at first pregnancy [AOR = 2

  3. Methadone Overdose and Its Complications in Patients Admitted to the Toxicology Emergency Ward of Baharloo Hospital of Tehran in 2011-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Behnoush

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: To date, studies on methadone overdose in adults have not been reported in Iran. Hence, this study was performed to determine the frequency of methadone overdose and its associated complications in Baharloo Hospital of Tehran between August 2011 and August 2012. Methods: This cross-sectional study was done on 390 cases. All patients with methadone overdoses and positive urine screen test for methadone were included in this case study through census method. Demographic data and overdose complications, such as loss of consciousness, respiratory complications, arrhythmia, hemodynamic disturbances, and QTC interval, were recorded in the questionnaire. Data were analyzed by SPSS software and Kolmogorov Smirnov, t-test, and Chi-square tests were used for data analysis. Results: Overall, 84.1% of the samples were male and the mean age of the samples was 35.53±11.25 years (range: 15-84 years. Mean of the methadone dose used in current admissions was 96.13±52.34 mg. Concomitant drug abuse and concomitant uses of medications were seen in 25.9% and 36.9% of the patients, respectively. Respiratory depression, pulmonary edema, pneumonia, aspiration, and arrhythmia were seen in 87.9%, 26.2%, 3.3%, 7.4%, and 15.4% of the patients, respectively. There were significant differences between concomitant medications, duration of methadone use, and QTc interval prolongation and arrhythmia (P<0.05. Conclusion: Based on the findings of the present study, initial screening of ECG changes and QT interval prolongation as well as arrhythmias should be considered in patients on methadone therapy and concurrent drug abuse and co-administration of medications that lead to QT prolongation should be avoided in them.

  4. Ward identities at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOlivo, J.C.; Torres, M.; Tututi, E.

    1996-01-01

    The Ward identities for QED at finite temperature are derived using the functional real-time formalism. They are verified by an explicit one-loop calculation. An effective causal vertex is constructed which satisfy the Ward identity with the associated retarded self-energy. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  5. Happy Birthday Professor Telegdi

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Professor Telegdi, pictured with Luciano Maiani and Alexander Skrinsky, receiving the medal of foreign member of the Russian Academy of Sciences in June 2000. Professor Valentine Telegdi celebrated his 80th birthday on Friday, 11th January. A brilliant American physicist of Hungarian origin, Professor Telegdi was a professor at the University of Chicago, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETHZ) and the California Institute of Technology and took part in many CERN experiments, of which NA10 and L3 were the most recent. He served as Chairman of CERN's Scientific Policy Committee from 1981 to 1983. A member of numerous scientific academies, he shared the prestigious Wolf Prize with Maurice Goldhaber in 1991 in recognition of their separate seminal contributions to nuclear and particle physics, particularly those concerning weak interactions involving leptons.

  6. As His Day in Court Arrives, Ward Churchill Is Depicted in Sharply Different Lights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The trial in Ward Churchill's lawsuit against the University of Colorado got under way here last week with lawyers for the opposing sides painting starkly different pictures of both the controversial ethnic-studies professor and the circumstances surrounding his dismissal by the university in 2007. In delivering their opening remarks in a crowded…

  7. Developing skills in clinical leadership for ward sisters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Katherine; Phillips, Natasha

    The Francis report has called for a strengthening of the ward sister's role. It recommends that sisters should operate in a supervisory capacity and should not be office bound. Effective ward leadership has been recognised as being vital to high-quality patient care and experience, resource management and interprofessional working. However, there is evidence that ward sisters are ill equipped to lead effectively and lack confidence in their ability to do so. University College London Hospitals Foundation Trust has recognised that the job has become almost impossible in increasingly large and complex organisations. Ward sisters spend less than 40% of their time on clinical leadership and the trust is undertaking a number of initiatives to support them in this role.

  8. Determination of Relative Frequency of HBS Ag, HCV and HIV Antibodies Serum Markers among Admitted Intravenous Drug Users in Infectious Disease Ward of Razi Hospital in Ahvaz, 2004-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolrasool Nikkhooy

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intravenous drug users as a serious health problem in communities have economical and social effects as well as health and hygienic complications. Viral infections may be transmitted through drug injection by shared syringes among users. The aim of this study has been to determine the relative frequency of HBV, HCV and HIV infection’s markers as epidemiological data in Ahvaz. Materials & Methods: This retrospective cross sectional study was conducted on IV drug users (IVDUs who were admitted in infectious diseases ward of Razi Ahvaz Hospital in 2004-2005. The collected data of serum markers of these patients were coded, and statistical analyses were conducted. Results: 1890 patients were evaluated and 258 patients were IVDUs (14.6%. 154 patients (59.98% were tested for anti HCV-Ab of whom 65 patients were HCV-Ab positive (42.2%. 205 patients (79.45% were tested for anti HIV-Ab of whom 38 patients were HIV-Ab positive (18.53%. 67 patients (25.96% were tested for HBs-Ag of whom 15 patients were HBs-Ag positive (22.67%. 12 patients (4.65% were tested for anti HBc-Ab of whom 8 patients were HBc-Ab positive (66.66%. Conclusion: In this study, high infection rate relates to different causes such as increasing consumes of opium substances and recent differences in fumigated opium substances pattern toward injecting drug use in society level, which increases the prevalence of these infections, The present study determined some critical information about the prevalence of serum markers HBS Ag, HCV and HIV antibodies among intravenous drug users in southwestern of Iran.

  9. Interview with Professor Mark Wilcox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Mark Wilcox speaks to Georgia Patey, Commissioning Editor: Professor Mark Wilcox is a Consultant Microbiologist and Head of Microbiology at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals (Leeds, UK), the Professor of Medical Microbiology at the University of Leeds (Leeds, UK), and is the Lead on Clostridium difficile and the Head of the UK C. difficile Reference Laboratory for Public Health England (PHE). He was the Director of Infection Prevention (4 years), Infection Control Doctor (8 years) and Clinical Director of Pathology (6 years) at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals. He is Chair of PHE's Rapid Review Panel (reviews utility of infection prevention and control products for National Health Service), Deputy Chair of the UK Department of Health's Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare Associated Infection Committee and a member of PHE's HCAI/AR Programme Board. He is a member of UK/European/US working groups on C. difficile infection. He has provided clinical advice as part of the FDA/EMA submissions for the approval of multiple novel antimicrobial agents. He heads a healthcare-associated infection research team at University of Leeds, comprising approximately 30 doctors, scientists and nurses; projects include multiple aspects of C. difficile infection, diagnostics, antimicrobial resistance and the clinical development of new antimicrobial agents. He has authored more than 400 publications, and is the coeditor of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (5th/6th/7th Editions, 15 December 2007).

  10. Illustrated & Dissected: Professor Richard Sawdon Smith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This Alternative Gallery feature introduces the photographic artist Professor Richard Sawdon Smith. Professor Sawdon Smith's work stems around a fascination with representations of anatomy that have been fuelled by his experience as a hospital patient. The work has allowed him to explore ideas through the use of medical illustrations which include early anatomical drawings, personal medical photography and facial modelling. The work highlights how such imagery can be used in the context of a patient seeking understanding and acceptance of ill health and disease using the body as a canvas on which to translate the experience.

  11. Perfil das infecções do trato urinário em idosos hospitalizados na Unidade de Geriatria do Hospital São Lucas da PUCRS = Urinary tract infections profile of the hospitalized elderly in a Geriatric Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallacorte, Roberta Rigo

    2007-01-01

    Conclusões: Escherichia coli foi o germe mais associado a infecções do trato urinário nos idosos hospitalizados na Unidade de Geriatria do Hospital São Lucas da PUCRS. Nessa população, a taxa de resistência bacteriana a fluorquinolonas foi elevada

  12. Ward identities for conformal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzarini, S.; Stora, R.

    1988-01-01

    Ward identities which express the symmetry of conformal models are treated. Diffeomorphism invariance or locally holomorphic coordinate transformations are used. Diffeomorphism invariance is then understood in terms of Riemannian geometry. Two different sets of Ward identities expressing diffeomorphism invariance in a conformally invariant way are found for the free bosonic string. Using a geometrical argument, the correct invariance for a large class of conformal models is given

  13. Professor Michael Levitt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma-Louise Davies

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Professor Michael Levitt (Stanford University, USA won the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems—computational tools which can calculate the course of chemical reactions. Professor Levitt was born in Pretoria, South Africa; he came to the UK on a summer vacation aged 16, where he decided to stay and study for his A‑levels. His interest in the physics of living systems drove him to study biophysics at King’s College London, before securing a PhD position at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge. In the interim year between his degree and beginning his PhD, Professor Levitt worked at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, where he met his future wife. They married later that year and moved to Cambridge, where their three children were born. After completing his PhD, he spent time working in Israel, Cambridge, the Salk Institute and Stanford (both California. Since 1986, he has split his time between Israel and California. Outside of science, he is a keen hiker and he is well-known to have attended the eclectic ‘Burning Man’ Festival in California.[1] Professor Levitt visited the University of Warwick to speak at the Computational Molecular Science Annual Conference in March 2015. In this interview, Dr Gemma-Louise Davies, an Institute of Advanced Study Global Research Fellow, spoke to Professor Levitt about the importance of Interdisciplinarity in his field, role models in Academia, and his plans for the future. Image: Professor Michael Levitt (left with Dr Scott Habershon (right, organiser of the 2015 Computational Molecular Science Annual Conference during his visit to the University of Warwick in March 2015. [1] ‘Burning Man’ is a unique annual festival dedicated to community, art, music, self-expression and self-reliance. Tens of thousands of people flock to this temporary metropolis built in the Californian desert.

  14. Professor Torben Larsen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    2013-01-01

    En samling af væsentlige artikler, og diskussion, om stormflod skrevet af professor Torben Larsen, Aalborg Universitet. Torben Larsen diskuterer i artiklerne et forslag om at lukke Thyborøn Kanal for at mindske risikoen for stormflod og oversvømmelse langs Limfjordens byer.......En samling af væsentlige artikler, og diskussion, om stormflod skrevet af professor Torben Larsen, Aalborg Universitet. Torben Larsen diskuterer i artiklerne et forslag om at lukke Thyborøn Kanal for at mindske risikoen for stormflod og oversvømmelse langs Limfjordens byer....

  15. [Poison cases and types of poisons based on data obtained of patients hospitalized from 1995-2009 with acute poisoning in the second internal ward in a multi-profile provincial hospital in Tarnow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lata, Stanisław; Janiszewski, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    The thesis presents a short history and organization of an acute poisoning centre in the1995 functioning within the internal diseases department in a multi-profile provincial hospital. The data show the number of patients treated beetween 1995-2009 an the types of toxic substances that caused poisoning. The conclusions presented refer to the role of the centre to help people suffering from acute poisoning within the city of Tarnow.

  16. Prévenir le risque infectieux à l’hôpital ? Preventing the infection risk in hospital?Anthropological reflections on hospital hygiene in a medical ward in Niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugénie d’Alessandro

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available En Afrique, la maîtrise du risque infectieux en milieu hospitalier reste une question cruciale. Bien souvent, les analyses se limitent à une évaluation des décalages entre des normes techniques et des pratiques hospitalières. L’insuffisance des connaissances théoriques est régulièrement invoquée, conduisant à un cycle de formation-évaluation qui semble largement voué à l’échec. Une approche anthropologique peut aider à la résolution de ces problèmes. En proposant une lecture des dimensions sociales et culturelles des risques sanitaires, le rôle de l’anthropologue est d’élargir la compréhension de ces dysfonctionnements. Il s’agit de penser l’hôpital comme un espace où s’articulent diverses dimensions sociales, éthiques, médicales et techniques. Témoignant de cet apport complémentaire dans le champ de la santé, de nouvelles pistes émergent d’une enquête menée à l’Hôpital National de Niamey. D’abord, la superposition d’espaces techniques et sociaux se traduit par une confusion dans les gestes. Les obligations sociales brouillent alors les chaînes gestuelles techniques. Ensuite, la prégnance d’un héritage historique définit un certain mode de délivrance des biens publics dont les manifestations se retrouvent dans le quotidien d’un hôpital. Enfin, des « mondes sensibles » différents et les normes techniques élaborées dans le contexte de la médecine moderne deviennent des abstractions en l’absence de correspondances perceptives. Ici, l’anthropologie jette un pont interdisciplinaire entre les préoccupations de santé publique et les questions d’économie morale et décisionnelle.In Africa, controlling infectious diseases in hospitals remains a major issue. So far, most analyses have assessed the gap between technical norms and hospital practices. These surveys commonly enlighten a lack of theoretical knowledge and, therefore, come up with cycles of training-assessing which

  17. Do-not-resuscitate policy on acute geriatric wards in Flanders, Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gendt, de C.; Bilsen, J.J.; Stichele, van der R.; Lambert, M.; Noortgate, N. Den; Deliens, L.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the historical development and status of a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) policy on acute geriatric wards in Flanders, Belgium, and to compare it with the international situation. DESIGN: Structured mail questionnaires. SETTING: All 94 acute geriatric wards in hospitals in Flanders

  18. Professor Tiina Tasmuth Helsingis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Tervisekasvatuse õppetooli professor Tiina Tasmuth osales 11.-14. juunini Helsingis toimunud rahvusvahelise konverentsi "2nd Psycho-Social Impacts of Breast Cancer" töös ning esines ettekandega teemal "Chronic post-treatment symptoms in patients with breast cancer" : [täistekst

  19. Professor Kalkman retires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, Pieter

    1991-01-01

    On 13 December 1990 Prof. Dr. Cornelis (Kees) Kalkman retired from the positions of Professor of Plant Systematics and Scientific Director of the Rijksherbarium/ Hortus Botanicus by presenting his valedictory lecture to the academic community of Leiden University and the assembled Dutch Botanical

  20. Professor Wolfgang Panofsky

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Professor Wolfgang panofsky, who died on September 24 aged 88, was a particle physicists and director of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre (SLAC) in California; with Jack Steinberger, he was the first to isolate the neutral pi meson, one of the subatomic particles which had been predicted by theoretical scientists to account for the strng force which binds the nuclei of atoms." (1 page)

  1. Evaluation of Pharmacists' Participation in Post-Admission Ward ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The study evaluates pharmacist's perception of and participation in post-admission ward rounds, at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH). Method: All the 60 pharmacists covering various units of pharmaceutical services were administered a forty-two element structured questionnaire. Fifty (83.3%) ...

  2. Professor Camillo Negro's Neuropathological Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiò, Adriano; Gianetto, Claudia; Dagna, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Camillo Negro, Professor in Neurology at the University of Torino, was a pioneer of scientific film. From 1906 to 1908, with the help of his assistant Giuseppe Roasenda and in collaboration with Roberto Omegna, one of the most experienced cinematographers in Italy, he filmed some of his patients for scientific and educational purposes. During the war years, he continued his scientific film project at the Military Hospital in Torino, filming shell-shocked soldiers. In autumn 2011, the Museo Nazionale del Cinema, in partnership with the Faculty of Neurosciences of the University of Torino, presented a new critical edition of the neuropathological films directed by Negro. The Museum's collection also includes 16 mm footage probably filmed in 1930 by Doctor Fedele Negro, Camillo's son. One of these films is devoted to celebrating the effects of the so-called "Bulgarian cure" on Parkinson's disease.

  3. Clostridium Difficile Infection in the Nephrology Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Dudzicz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is currently the most frequently identified pathogen causing antibiotic-associated diarrhea and the main cause of nosocomial diarrhea. In recent years, increases incidence of infection, severe infection, recurrent infection and mortality from Clostridium difficile infection (CDI have been observed. This may be a consequence of excessive antibiotic use and spread of the hypervirulent epidemic BI/NAP1/027 strain of Clostridium difficile. The main risk factors for CDI are: antibiotic therapy, previous hospitalizations and number of comorbid conditions. Prevention of CDI mainly is focused in two directions: reducing the exposure of patients to the disease pathogen by intensifying hygiene measures, and reducing the impact of risk factors. A meta-analyses of clinical studies (observational, cohort and case control showed significantly higher risk of CDI and CDI recurrence in patients with chronic kidney disease and increased mortality risk in chronic kidney disease patients with CDI comparing those without CDI. Increased risk of CDI in patients with chronic kidney disease can be caused by: frequent antibiotic therapy associated with numerous infections resulting in intestinal microflora dysfunction, frequent hospitalizations, older age of the patients and an impaired immune system. Among preventative measures against CDI, the use of probiotics were also studied. In patients hospitalized in nephrology ward highly significant reduction of the CDI incidence was observed after the introduction of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v as CDI prophylaxis. Therefore, the use of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v seems to be a promising method of CDI prevention in chronic kidney disease patients hospitalized in nephrology ward.

  4. Dynamic isolation technologies in negative pressure isolation wards

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Zhonglin

    2017-01-01

    This book presents novel design principles and technologies for dynamic isolation based on experimental studies. These approaches have now become the local standard in Beijing and are currently being promoted for use nationwide. Further, the book provides details of measures and guidelines for the design process. Departing from the traditional understanding that isolation wards should be designed with high negative pressure, airtight doors and fresh air, it establishes the basis for designing biological clean rooms, including isolation wards, using a simple and convenient scientific approach. This book is intended for designers, engineers, researchers, hospital management staff and graduate students in heating ventilation air conditioning (HVAC), air cleaning technologies and related areas.

  5. Professor og DMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaas, Eigil

    2010-01-01

    Det er koldt, og det har det været længe. Sammen med sneen har det en selvforstærkende effekt på vintervejret, forklarer professor og meteorolog. Kulde: - Det er koldt, fordi vinden kommer fra et sted, hvor det er koldt. Det er den enkle forklaring på, at Danmark og store dele af Europa lige nu...... oplever meget lave temperaturer - og for Danmarks vedkommende en usædvanlig lang periode med vintervejr. Forklaringen kommer fra professor Eigil Kaas fra Niels Bohr Instituttet ved Københavns Universitet. Han forklarer til jp.dk, at vintervejret dog er betinget af den mere eller mindre tilfældige måde...

  6. Professor Alex Callinicos

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Saqer

    2016-01-01

    Professor Alex Callinicos is a renowned social theorist and scholar of international political economy. He conducts research on Marx and Marxism, European social and political theory, contemporary political philosophy, critical theory, historiography, and international political economy. His work provides invaluable insights on issues of race and racism, social justice, the Third Way, imperialism, austerity, and EU politics, among many other fascinating contemporary issues. Alex studied Philo...

  7. Maintenance of Clinical Expertise and Clinical Research by the Clinical Professors at Gifu Pharmaceutical University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachi, Tomoya; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; Teramachi, Hitomi

    2017-01-01

    The clinical professors at Gifu Pharmaceutical University (GPU) provide pharmaceutical services at GPU Pharmacy, Gifu University Hospital, and Gifu Municipal Hospital to keep their clinical skills up-to-date; they also perform clinical research in collaboration with many clinical institutes. The Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacy is part of the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, to which the clinical professors belong, and is composed of three clinical professors (a professor, an associate professor, and an assistant professor). The professor administers the GPU Pharmacy as its director, while the associate professor and assistant professor provide pharmaceutical services to patients at Gifu Municipal Hospital, and also provide practical training for students in the GPU Pharmacy. Collectively, they have performed research on such topics as medication education for students, clinical communication education, and analysis of clinical big data. They have also conducted research in collaboration with clinical institutes, hospitals, and pharmacies. Here, we introduce the collaborative research between the Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacy and Gifu Municipal Hospital. These studies include "Risk factors contributing to urinary protein expression resulting from bevacizumab combination chemotherapy", "Hyponatremia and hypokalemia as risk factors for falls", "Economic evaluation of adjustments of levofloxacin dosage by dispensing pharmacists for patients with renal dysfunction", and "Effect of patient education upon discharge for use of a medication notebook on purchasing over-the-counter drugs and health foods". In this symposium, we would like to demonstrate one model of the association and collaborative research between these clinical professors and clinical institutes.

  8. Health Service Quality Based On Dabholkar Dimension At Ward Room Of Internal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Supriyanto, Stefanus; Rahmawati, Alfi Febriana

    2013-01-01

    The NDR average at ward room of internal disease of Bojonegoro General Hospital during 2009-2011 was 58,6 ‰ (more than standard < 25 ‰). This research was aimed to analyze the importance and satisfaction rating of health service quality based on Dabholkar dimension. It used observational approach with cross sectional design. Interview was conducted to 37 patients in internal disease ward room of Bojonegoro General Hospital which selected by simple random sampling. This study found some issues...

  9. Postoperative pneumonia-prevention program for the inpatient surgical ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, Sherry M; Martin, Molinda; Yoon, Jung K; Bech, Fritz

    2010-04-01

    Postoperative pneumonia can lead to increased morbidity, length of hospital stay, and costs. Pneumonia-prevention programs have been successfully implemented in ICU settings, but no program exists for surgical ward patients. A pilot prevention program was designed and implemented based on literature review. The program consisted of education of physicians and ward staff and a standardized postoperative electronic order set consisting of incentive spirometer, chlorhexidine oral hygiene, ambulation, and head-of-bed elevation. Quarterly staff meetings discussed the results of and compliance with the program. The intervention commenced in April 2007. Baseline incidence of inpatient ward pneumonia was calculated from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database for fiscal year (FY) 2006 and FY 2007. Postintervention incidence was calculated in the same manner from FY 2007 through FY 2008. Any patient who contracted pneumonia in the ICU was excluded from analysis. There was a significant decrease in ward pneumonia incidence from 0.78% in the preintervention group compared with 0.18% in the postintervention group (p = 0.006), representing an 81% decrease in incidence from 2006 to 2008. The pneumonia-prevention program was very successful in diminishing postoperative pneumonia on the surgical ward. There was a highly statistically significant 4-fold decrease in pneumonia incidence after program implementation. The interventions were not costly but did require ongoing communication and cooperation between physician and nursing leadership to achieve compliance with the measures. This program has great potential for dissemination to hospital surgical wards and could decrease inpatient postoperative pneumonias. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Severe psychosomatic illness in children: effect on a pediatric ward's staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialkov, M J; Miller, J A

    1981-12-01

    Observations of a pediatric ward's response to the repeated hospitalization of an asthmatic child revealed a close parallel to the transactional patterns described in families of children with psychosomatic illnesses. Characteristics of such families include enmeshment, overprotectiveness, rigidity and resistance to change, lack of conflict resolution, and use of the child's sick role to relieve tension and discomfort within the family. In this article we have attempted to demonstrate the similarity of responses between these families and groups of hospital ward personnel. Resolution of the ward personnel's internal conflict was followed by changes in the coping abilities of the staff, with a successful outcome for a second child with a similar clinical condition.

  11. Superconformal Ward identities and the supertorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundberg, J.; Nakayama, R.

    1987-12-01

    We derive superconformal Ward identities in the context of superspace supergravity. From these Ward identities we extract operator product expansions and the case of a supertorus is studied in some detail. (orig.)

  12. History of Higher Education: Educational Reform and the Emergence of the Nursing Professorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby, Jane

    1999-01-01

    In the late 19th century, visionary leaders pursued liberal education for nurses, moving nursing education from hospitals to universities. The nursing professorate might never have developed had nursing education remained under the jurisdiction of hospitals. (SK)

  13. Professor Stewart's incredible numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Ian Stewart explores the astonishing properties of numbers from 1 to10 to zero and infinity, including one figure that, if you wrote it out, would span the universe. He looks at every kind of number you can think of - real, imaginary, rational, irrational, positive and negative - along with several you might have thought you couldn't think of. He explains the insights of the ancient mathematicians, shows how numbers have evolved through the ages, and reveals the way numerical theory enables everyday life. Under Professor Stewart's guidance you will discover the mathematics of codes,

  14. Nurse rostering at a Danish ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæklund, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers a nurse rostering problem from a ward at a Danish hospital.  The problem is highly constrained and comprises a large set of different constraints. A branch-and-price method for solving the problem exactly is proposed. The master problem is to assign schedules to the nurses......, and its linear relaxation is solved by means of column generation. The pricing sub-problem is to generate feasible schedules for the nurses and -- as a couple of different constraints including several special Danish regulations have to be observed -- is solved by constraint programming. A number...... of specific algorithms for handling these constraints are proposed. The method is very flexible regarding the rules a schedule should comply with, which is a key concern when creating solution methods for nurse rostering problems.  Computational tests show that optimal solutions can be found for instances...

  15. Professor Alex Callinicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Saqer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Professor Alex Callinicos is a renowned social theorist and scholar of international political economy. He conducts research on Marx and Marxism, European social and political theory, contemporary political philosophy, critical theory, historiography, and international political economy. His work provides invaluable insights on issues of race and racism, social justice, the Third Way, imperialism, austerity, and EU politics, among many other fascinating contemporary issues. Alex studied Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at Balliol College, Oxford, and Philosophy of Science at the London School of Economics before writing a DPhil on Marx's Capital, also at Balliol. He was a Junior Research Fellow in Contemporary Social Thought at St Peter's College, Oxford from 1979 to 1981, after which he taught social and political theory at the Department of Politics at the University of York until 2005, when he moved to King's College London. Alex is currently the Professor of European Studies at King's and editor of International Socialism. Alex has been an active contributor to the development of the movement for another globalization, participating in the World Social Forum and an animator of the European Social Forum. Among his best known books are The Revolutionary Ideas of Karl Marx (1983, Against Postmodernism (1990, Social Theory (1999, An Anti-Capitalist Manifesto (2003, The Resources of Critique (2006, Imperialism and Global Political Economy (2009. His most recent book is entitled Deciphering Capital: Marx’s Capital and its Destiny (2014.

  16. Opening the black box in nursing work and management practice: the role of ward managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Keith; Wilkinson, Adrian; Kellner, Ashlea

    2015-03-01

    This paper aims to identify and explore key obstacles preventing ward managers from effectively performing the human resource management (HRM) responsibilities required in their role. In the context of increasing costs and the decentralisation of responsibility to ward level, the relevance of the ward manager role within the 'black box' between human resource management and firm performance is becoming increasingly pertinent. This paper presents an intensive case study including 37 interviews across all levels of a hospital where senior management attempted to shift to a high performance model of human resource management. The findings indicated that ward managers played a critical role in maintaining and improving employee performance, although they were restricted from effectively performing their responsibilities due to budget pressure and limited managerial skill development. Our findings support the contention that hospitals would benefit from focusing on the critical role of the ward manager as the central locus of influence in high performance human resource management (HPHRM) systems. Investment into high performance human resource management is discouraged if the hospital cannot adequately enable ward managers who are responsible for implementation. Introduction of managerial skills training to potential and existing ward managers is critical. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. [Professor Jan Witold Moll (1912-1990): a creator of Poznań thoracosurgery, a pioneer of cardiosurgery in Poland, on the 10th anniversary of his death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysiak, M

    2000-01-01

    The theme of his work concerns studies on the professional career of Professor Moll and on his pioneering achievement in the fields of thoracosurgery and cardiosurgery. He worked in the Surgical Ward of the Joseph Struś Town Hospital 8/12 Szkolna St. in Poznań. During the period 1945-1958 he performed, in addition to other operations, 804 resections of lung tissue. He was also the author of the first Polish edition of "The techniques of lung tissue resection" (1957). His experience in this field lead him to cardiosurgery and on the 1st of June 1958 he took up the position of Head of the II Clinic of the Medical Academy in Lódź. In 1975 he became Head of the Cardiosurgery Clinic and it was there that he carried out the first heart transplantation in Poland, on the 4th of January 1969, 13 months after Christian Barnard.

  18. Becoming 'ward smart' medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Beth; Wallace, Deirdre; Mangera, Zaheer; Gill, Deborah

    2017-10-01

    A small number of medical students elect to work as health care assistants (HCAs) during or prior to their undergraduate training. There is a significant body of evidence in the literature regarding the impact of HCA experience on student nurses; however, little research has examined the effects of such experience on medical students. All fourth-year medical students with self-declared experience as HCAs from a single UK medical school were invited to participate in focus groups to explore their experiences and perceptions. Ten students from the year group took part. Participants felt that their experience as HCAs enhanced their learning in the workplace through becoming 'ward smart', helping them to become socialised into the world of health care, providing early meaningful and humanised patient interaction, and increasing their understanding of multidisciplinary team (MDT) members' roles. Little research has examined the effects of [HCA] experience on medical students DISCUSSION: Becoming 'ward smart' and developing a sense of belonging are central to maximising learning in, from and through work on the ward. Experience as a HCA provides a range of learning and social opportunities for medical students, and legitimises their participation within clinical communities. HCA experience also seems to benefit in the 'hard to reach' dimensions of medical training: empathy; humanisation of patient care; professional socialisation; and providing a sense of belonging within health care environments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  19. Reviving post-take surgical ward round teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Force, Jade; Thomas, Ian; Buckley, Frances

    2014-04-01

    Learning in the clinical environment is an important feature of medical education. Ward-round teaching leads to relevant, applied and lasting learning of knowledge, skills and attitudes; however, on fast-paced ward rounds in specialties such as general surgery, the student experience is often suboptimal, and teaching can be overlooked. Clinical teaching fellows (CTFs) are postgraduate doctors ranging from foundation year-2 (FY2) level through to specialty trainees, who have elected to spend up to 2 years out of the programme to teach medical undergraduates. This article explores whether CTFs can successfully support the regular delivery of undergraduate medical teaching on the busy post-take surgical ward round (PTSWR). The CTFs at Raigmore Hospital, Inverness, planned and facilitated weekly, structured teaching sessions to accompany the PTSWR. This educational intervention was evaluated using pre- and post-intervention student questionnaires. The questionnaires focused on student enjoyment and depth of learning using Likert scales and free-text components. Students were also asked about barriers to learning on typical PTSWRs. The consultant surgeons leading on these rounds were issued separate questionnaires, to gauge their evaluation of CTF support. The main barrier to effective undergraduate ward round teaching was a lack of time on the part of clinical staff. Ward rounds accompanied by CTF support significantly increased student enjoyment (p student satisfaction, and was welcomed by clinical staff. CTF support could be widened to other busy ward rounds, e.g. acute medical takes, to enhance student learning and reduce the teaching burden on clinical faculty staff. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Respiratory support in oncology ward setting: a prospective descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Seema; Bhatnagar, Sushma; Gupta, Deepak; Goyal, Gaurav Nirvani; Agrawal, Ravi; Jain, Roopesh; Chauhan, Himanshu

    2009-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation in cancer patients is a critical issue The present prospective descriptive study was designed (1) to assess the patient population needing respirator support in ward setting at a premier state-run oncology institute in India, (2) to observe and analyze the course of their disease while on respirator, and (3) to coordinate better quality of life measures in cancer patients at the institute based on the present study's outcomes. Beginning from March 2005 to March 2006, all cancer patients who were connected to respirator in the wards were enrolled in the current study. Our anesthesiology department at the cancer institute also has primary responsibility for airway management and mechanical ventilation in high dependency units of oncology wards. Preventilation variables in cancer patients were assessed to judge the futility of mechanical ventilation in ward setting. Subsequently, patients were observed for disease course while on respirator. Final outcome with its etio-pathogenesis was correlated with predicted futility of mechanical ventilation. Over a period of 1 year, 132 (46 men and 86 women) cancer patients with median age 40 years (range 1-75 years) were connected to respirator in oncology wards. Based on the preventilation variables and indications for respirator support, right prediction of medical futility and hospital discharge was made in 77% of patients. Underestimation and overestimation of survival to hospital discharge was made in 10% cases and 13% cases, respectively. Based on preventilation variables, prediction of outcome in cancer patients needing respirator support can be made in 77% cases. This high probability of prediction can be used to educate patients, and their families and primary physicians, for well-informed and documented advance directives, formulated and regularly revised DNAR policies, and judicious use of respirator support for better quality-of-life outcomes.

  1. Recommendations for the safety preparation of sterile medicines in medical wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M.ª Martín de Rosales Cabrera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop a recommendations guide about the preparation of sterile medicines in medical wards, and to figure out the current situation of different Spanish hospitals, regarding the preparation of sterile medicines outside the pharmacy. Methods: The autors reviewed the available international guidelines in order to summarize the main quality recommendations. To know about the current situation in Spanish hospitals, a 30 questions survey was designed and spread to 500 different hospitals. Answers were analysed with Survey monkey® platform in the period February-July 2012. Results: Based on the literature review, the authors agreed a recommendations list for the safe preparation of sterile medicines in medical wards, which was structured in 8 sections. Regarding the survey results, 8.4% of the hospitals answered, showing a great variability among centres in the quality requirements for sterile compounding outside the pharmacy. It should be pointed out the lack of assigned areas for drug preparation in wards, the lack of protocols to discern which kind of medicines can be compounded in wards as well as the poor recommendations about garment and aseptic technique. Conclusions: The authors confirm the absence of qualified practice standards to be applied in the preparation of sterile medicines in medical wards, as well as the great variability of diary practice. The implementation of quality and safety recommendations in the preparation of sterile medicines in medical wards may contribute to improve patient safety.

  2. Hacking the hospital environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Kirsten A; Boisen, Anne Bank; Thomsen, Stine Legarth

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a need for youth-friendly hospital environments as the ward environment may affect both patient satisfaction and health outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To involve young people in designing youth-friendly ward environment. METHODS: We arranged a design competition lasting 42 h (Hackathon...

  3. Food hygiene on the wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuer, Walter

    2007-09-13

    A PROBLEM THAT IS OFTEN OVERLOOKED OR SIMPLY NOT GIVEN ENOUGH ATTENTION: the food served to patients from the kitchen is not sterile. If food is allowed to stand at room temperature for a long time, both in the case of food cooked for lunch and of food intended for supper which has been previously chilled, there is the possibility of massive spore germination or of dangerous toxin formation. Therefore regulations on how to handle food and beverages (e.g. tea) must be set out in the infection control policy, and checks carried out to monitor compliance with the rules relating to temperature checks, duration and type of storage, need for reheating, etc. Making staff aware of the issues involved is of paramount importance. These include monitoring hygiene standards in the ward kitchen, formulation of a cleaning policy, periodic bacteriological checks (not only of workstations but also of the dishwasher results), whenever possible the use of disposable cloths for working surfaces and equipment, changing cleaning cloths at least once daily and hygienic hand disinfection before and after handing out food. Foodstuffs brought in by visitors represent a special hygienic and organizational problem because in many cases they already have a high baseline microbial count. Visitors must be made aware that, for example, slices of cake left in the patient's room and often eaten only hours later can pose a risk of infection.In summary, the following principles of food hygiene must be observed on the wards:Maintenance of the cold-hot chainNot only reheat food, but ensure it is well heated throughout Avoid situations giving rise to spore germination in foodstuffs brought in by visitorsCleanliness and minimal contamination of kitchen worktopsCleanliness of crockery and kitchen towels Do not allow food to stand at room temperature for a long time, in particular desserts and confectionery A standard policy must be enforced to define the hygienic status and organization for food

  4. The evaluation of a hostel ward. A controlled study using modified cost-benefit analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, C; Bridges, K; Goldberg, D; Lowson, K; Sterling, C; Faragher, B

    1987-12-01

    A controlled modified cost-benefit evaluation of a hostel ward caring for new long-stay patients is described and results are presented for the first two years. In some respects the residents of the hostel ward had fewer psychotic impairments than those remaining on the wards of the district general hospital, mainly because the latter seem to continue to acquire such defects, while the former have remained relatively unchanged. The hostel ward residents also develop superior domestic skills, use more facilities in the community, and are more likely to be engaged in constructive activities than controls. These advantages were not purchased at a price, since the cost of providing this form of care for these patients has cost less than care provided by the district general hospital.

  5. Post natal use of analgesics: comparisons between conventional postnatal wards and a maternity hotel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordeng, Hedvig; Eskild, Anne; Nesheim, Britt-Ingjerd

    2010-04-01

    To investigate factors related to analgesic use after delivery, and especially whether rates of analgesic use were different in a midwife-managed maternity hotel as compared to conventional postnatal wards. One maternity hotel and two conventional postnatal wards at Ullevål University Hospital in Oslo, Norway. Data were obtained from hospital records for 804 women with vaginal deliveries. Postnatal analgesic use. Overall, approximately half the women used analgesics after vaginal delivery in both conventional postnatal wards and maternity hotel. The factors that were significantly associated with use of analgesics postnatally in multivariate analysis were multiparity, having a non-Western ethnicity, smoking in pregnancy, younger age, instrumental delivery, analgesic use during labour, maternal complications post partum, and duration of postnatal stay 4 days or more. The use of analgesics is determined by socio-demographic and obstetric factors rather than the organisation of the ward.

  6. Simulation for ward processes of surgical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucher, Philip H; Darzi, Ara; Aggarwal, Rajesh

    2013-07-01

    The role of simulation in surgical education, initially confined to technical skills and procedural tasks, increasingly includes training nontechnical skills including communication, crisis management, and teamwork. Research suggests that many preventable adverse events can be attributed to nontechnical error occurring within a ward context. Ward rounds represent the primary point of interaction between patient and physician but take place without formalized training or assessment. The simulated ward should provide an environment in which processes of perioperative care can be performed safely and realistically, allowing multidisciplinary assessment and training of full ward rounds. We review existing literature and describe our experience in setting up our ward simulator. We examine the facilities, equipment, cost, and personnel required for establishing a surgical ward simulator and consider the scenario development, assessment, and feedback tools necessary to integrate it into a surgical curriculum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Canonical ward identities in generalized QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ziping

    1995-01-01

    The canonical Ward identities for a system with singular higher-order Lagrangian are derived and some application to the generalized QCD are given. The new relations of the Ward identities for gauge ghost field proper vertices are obtained which differ from the usual Ward-Takahashi identities arising from BRS invariance. The expressions for PCAC and generalized PCAC of AVV vertices are also obtained

  8. Professor Igor Yevseyev: In Memoriam Professor Igor Yevseyev: In Memoriam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Dear readers and authors, June 3, 2012 will mark five months since Professor Igor Yevseyev, Deputy Editor-in-Chief of both journals Laser Physics and Laser Physics Letters passed away, suddenly and unexpectedly. He was 67. Born in Moscow, he entered one of the world's best schools of physics, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI). With this renowned educational and research institution he bonded an alliance for his entire life, starting as an undergraduate student in the Department of Theoretical Physics and later continued as graduate student, assistant professor, associated professor, and full professor in the same department, a rare accomplishment of a person. All those years he retained the love of his life—the love for physics. He worked tirelessly as a teacher and scholar in this captivating field of knowledge. Professor Yevseyev was one of the founders of the international journal of Laser Physics in 1990, the first academic English language journal published in the former USSR. Later, in 2004, the second journal, Laser Physics Letters was brought to the forum of global laser physics community. The idea behind this new title was Professor Yevseyev's initiative to reach the readers and participants with new pioneering and break-through research results more rapidly. His leadership and indefatigable dedication to the quality of published materials made it possible that this journal reached international recognition in a few short years. Still, in order to attract even more attention of potential contributors and readers, Professor Yevseyev originally proposed to conduct the International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS) on the annual basis. Since 1992 the Workshop has been conducted every year, each year in a different country. As in all previous years, Professor Yevseyev was the key organizer of this year's workshop in Calgary, Canada. Sadly, this workshop will take place without him. Editorial Board

  9. Frequency of nursing tasks in medical and surgical wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, Barbara; Bell, Cheryl; Johnston, Derek; Jones, Martyn; Schofield, Pat; Allan, Julia; Ricketts, Ian; Morrison, Kenny; Johnston, Marie

    2013-09-01

    To explore the frequency of different nursing tasks in medical and surgical wards. The time nurses spend on direct patient care is important for both patients and nurses. However, little is known about the time nurses spend on various nursing tasks. A real-time, repeated measures design conducted amongst 67 (n = 39 medical, n = 28 surgical) UK hospital nurses. Between September 2011 and August 2012 participants completed an electronic diary version of a classification of nursing tasks (WOMBAT) during shifts. A total of 961 real-time measures of nursing task were obtained. Direct patient care [median = 37.5%, interquartile range = 27.8], indirect care (median = 11.1%, interquartile range = 19.4) and medication (median = 11.1%, interquartile range = 18.8) were most commonly reported. Participants were interrupted in 62% of entries (interquartile range = 35), reported adequate time in 78% (interquartile range = 31) and adequate resources in 89% (interquartile range = 36). Ward-related tasks were significantly more frequent on medical wards than surgical wards but otherwise there were no significant differences. Nurses spend the highest proportion of time in direct patient care and majority of this on core nursing activities. Interruptions to tasks are common. Nurses tend to report adequate time/resources. The frequency of nursing tasks is similar in medical and surgical wards. Nurse managers should review the level of interruptions to nurses' work and ensure appropriate levels of supervision. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of Hospitals for 50 states and Washington D.C. , Puerto Rico and US territories. The dataset only includes hospital facilities and...

  11. Wanted: More Squares Among Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William H.

    1969-01-01

    Professors who see the world and life in a context of sincerely held religious beliefs should be given the same tolerance and understanding which atheists and agnostics used to demand for themselves. (AD)

  12. The College Professor's Professional Liability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Walter S.; Rubin, Harvey W.

    1977-01-01

    The growing number of professional liability suits against professors warrants a close examination of the need for and provisions of available insurance coverage. The evolution of tort liability, the question of negligence, and the professional liability policy are discussed. (LBH)

  13. Professor Igor Yevseyev: In Memoriam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Dear readers and authors, June 3, 2012 will mark five months since Professor Igor Yevseyev, Deputy Editor-in-Chief of both journals Laser Physics and Laser Physics Letters passed away, suddenly and unexpectedly. He was 67. Born in Moscow, he entered one of the world's best schools of physics, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI). With this renowned educational and research institution he bonded an alliance for his entire life, starting as an undergraduate student in the Department of Theoretical Physics and later continued as graduate student, assistant professor, associated professor, and full professor in the same department, a rare accomplishment of a person. All those years he retained the love of his life—the love for physics. He worked tirelessly as a teacher and scholar in this captivating field of knowledge. Professor Yevseyev was one of the founders of the international journal of Laser Physics in 1990, the first academic English language journal published in the former USSR. Later, in 2004, the second journal, Laser Physics Letters was brought to the forum of global laser physics community. The idea behind this new title was Professor Yevseyev's initiative to reach the readers and participants with new pioneering and break-through research results more rapidly. His leadership and indefatigable dedication to the quality of published materials made it possible that this journal reached international recognition in a few short years. Still, in order to attract even more attention of potential contributors and readers, Professor Yevseyev originally proposed to conduct the International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS) on the annual basis. Since 1992 the Workshop has been conducted every year, each year in a different country. As in all previous years, Professor Yevseyev was the key organizer of this year's workshop in Calgary, Canada. Sadly, this workshop will take place without him. Editorial Board

  14. Geriatric consultation services-are wards more effective than teams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Ian D; Kurrle, Susan

    2013-02-22

    Geriatric consultation teams are one of the models for bringing comprehensive geriatric assessment to vulnerable and frail older people in the acute care hospital setting. While ward-based comprehensive geriatric assessment has been established as effective with reference to improving functional status and other outcomes, the team-based variant remains unproven for outcomes other than mortality in the medium term, as shown in a recent study published in BMC Medicine by Deschodt and colleagues. Further research might establish the effectiveness of the team-based model but, for current clinical practice, the emphasis should be on streaming older people with complex problems needing multidisciplinary assessment and treatment to ward-based models of comprehensive geriatric assessment.

  15. Drug dispensing errors in a ward stock system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Ejdrup

    2010-01-01

    . Multivariable analysis showed that surgical and psychiatric settings were more susceptible to involvement in dispensing errors and that polypharmacy was a risk factor. In this ward stock system, dispensing errors are relatively common, they depend on speciality and are associated with polypharmacy......The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of drug dispensing errors in a traditional ward stock system operated by nurses and to investigate the effect of potential contributing factors. This was a descriptive study conducted in a teaching hospital from January 2005 to June 2007. In five....... These results indicate that strategies to reduce dispensing errors should address polypharmacy and focus on high-risk units. This should, however, be substantiated by a future trial....

  16. Análise da aplicabilidade de três instrumentos de avaliação de dor em distintas unidades de atendimento: ambulatório, enfermaria e urgência Analysis of the applicability of different pain questionnaires in three hospital settings: outpatient clinic, ward and emergency unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eduardo Martinez

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a aplicabilidade dos instrumentos de avaliação de dor em três ambientes hospitalares. METODOLOGIA: Foram estudados 60 pacientes com dor musculoesquelética atendidos no Conjunto Hospitalar de Sorocaba: enfermaria da Ortopedia, ambulatório de Reumatologia e Unidade Regional de Emergência (Pronto-socorro. QUESTIONÁRIOS: Inventário breve de dor (BPI; questionário McGill de Dor (MPQ; escala visual analógica para dor (EVA. RESULTADOS: Na urgência, houve um predomínio do gênero masculino com média de idade de 35 anos. No ambulatório, foram entrevistados 18 homens com idade média de 42 anos e duas mulheres com idade média de 55 anos. Na enfermaria, predominavam os homens com idade média de 30,7 anos. No pronto-socorro e na enfermaria, a duração foi menor para a EVA e maior para o MPQ. A duração para a EVA foi menor e não diferiu com relação aos locais. Na enfermaria e no pronto-socorro, a preferência dos pacientes recaiu pelo BPI sendo que, na enfermaria, a EVA foi segunda opção. No ambulatório, a preferência dos pacientes recaiu sobre o BPI (80% seguido do MPQ e os entrevistadores se dividiram igualmente entre esses mesmos questionários. No pronto-socorro, a preferência dos entrevistadores foi pelo BPI (40%, os restantes foram divididos igualmente. Houve uma prevalência maior de concordância do que de discordância das preferências entre pacientes e entrevistadores. CONCLUSÃO: Os instrumentos multidimensionais para avaliação da dor têm limitações em sua aplicabilidade no cotidiano da assistência hospitalar à saúdeOBJECTIVE: To assess the applicability of pain assessment instruments in three hospital settings. METHODOLOGY: This study comprised 60 patients with musculoskeletal pain cared for at the Conjunto Hospitalar de Sorocaba: orthopedic ward, Rheumatology outpatient clinic, and orthopedic emergency unit. QUESTIONNAIRES: Brief Pain Inventory (BPI; McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ; Visual

  17. The management pattern carried out in a cataract surgery day ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing; Fang, Xiaoqun; Wu, Suhong

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the management practice and process of a cataract surgery day ward. From January to December in 2012, a portion of the cataract patients were evaluated for the pattern of day ward management. Methods were as follows: 1) Establish the cataract day ward. 2) Enroll the patients who met the following criteria: voluntary, local residents or outsiders who stayed in a hotel near the hospital, accompanied by family, and who had simple senile cataract without any systemic major diseases. 3) Establish the hospitalization process. 4) Analyze the nursing process. After cataract day surgery, the patients were followed for 2 hours and completed a questionnaire about their needs and sentiments. A total of 3971 cases were observed in this study; 49 cases were switched to a normal pattern of hospitalization because of operative complications, 1 case had a strong desire to switch to a normal pattern of hospitalization because of ocular discomfort, 8 cases went back to the hospital for treatment because of ocular pain, and 52 cases called on the phone to seek help. Overall, 3820 cases(96.2%) returned on time the next day to visit the doctor. No patients showed severe postoperative complications and 98% expressed great satisfaction with the day ward process. Only 200 cases expressed great concern about not knowing how to deal with postoperative pain, the changes in condition outside the hospital, the therapeutic effects, and the problem of expense reimburse-ment. Day ward cataract surgery is an efficient and safe mode, and has the potential to relieve the demand for inpatient beds and to ensure timely treatment of the patients. In addition, it helps the patients enjoy health care at public expense, reserving reimbursement for those who need to be hospitalized. Nurses should pay more attention to systemic evaluation of the patients, health education, and psychological guidance, and keep in close communication with doctors, which is the key to ensure the safety of day ward

  18. [A diagnostic algorithm and treatment procedure in disordered vital functions in newborns admitted to a resuscitation ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostreĭkov, I F; Podkopaev, V N; Moiseev, D B; Karpysheva, E V; Markova, L A; Sizov, S V

    1997-01-01

    Total mortality decreased by 2.5 times in the wards for intensive care of the newborns in the Tushino Pediatric Hospital in 1996 and is now 7.6%. Such results are due to a complex of measures, one such measure being the development and introduction of an algorithm for the diagnosis and treatment of newborns hospitalized in intensive care wards. The algorithm facilitates the work of the staff, helps earlier diagnose a disease, and, hence, carry out timely scientifically based therapy.

  19. Patients' feelings about ward nursing regimes and involvement in rule construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, J

    2006-10-01

    This study compared two acute psychiatric ward nursing regimes, focusing on ward rules as a means of investigating the relationship between the flexibility/inflexibility of the regimes and patient outcomes. Previous studies identified an association between ward rules and patient aggression. A link between absconding and nurses' attitudes towards rule enforcement has also been explored. However, an in-depth exploration of ward rules from the perspective of nurses and patients had not been undertaken previously. The study aimed to discover the content of rules within acute psychiatric wards; to explore patients' responses to the rules; to evaluate the impact of rules and rule enforcement on nurse-patient relationships and on ward events; and to investigate the relationship between ward rules, ward atmosphere and ward design. The relevance of sociological theory emerged from the data analysis. During this process, the results were moved up to another conceptual level to represent the meaning of lived experience at the level of theory. For example, nurses' descriptions of their feelings in relation to rule enforcement were merged as role ambivalence. This concept was supported by examples from the transcripts. Other possible explanations for the data and the connections between them were checked by returning to each text unit in the cluster and ensuring that it fitted with the emergent theory. The design centred on a comparative interview study of 30 patients and 30 nurses within two acute psychiatric wards in different hospitals. Non-participant observations provided a context for the interview data. Measures of the Ward Atmosphere Scale, the Hospital-Hostel Practices Profile, ward incidents and levels of as required (PRN) medication were obtained. The analysis of the quantitative data was assisted by spss, and the qualitative analysis by QSR *NUDIST. Thematic and interpretative phenomenological methods were used in the analysis of the qualitative data. A series of

  20. Job satisfaction in mainland China: comparing critical care nurses and general ward nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aihua; Tao, Hong; Ellenbecker, Carol Hall; Liu, Xiaohong

    2013-08-01

    To explore the level of nurses' job satisfaction and compare the differences between critical care nurses and general ward nurses in Mainland China. Hospitals continue to experience high nurse turnover. Job satisfaction is a key factor to retain skilled nurses. The differences in job satisfaction among critical care nurses and general ward nurses are unknown. A cross-sectional design was selected for this descriptive correlation study. Cross-sectional study of critical care nurses (n = 446) and general ward nurses (n = 1118) in 9 general hospitals by means of questionnaires that included the Chinese Nurses Job Satisfaction Scale and demographic scale. The data were collected from June 2010-November 2010. Chinese nurses had moderate levels of job satisfaction, were satisfied with co-workers and family/work balance; and dissatisfied with pay and professional promotion. Critical care nurses were younger; less educated and had less job tenure when compared with nurses working on general wards. Critical care nurses were significantly less satisfied than general ward nurses with many aspects of their job. Levels of nurses' job satisfaction can be improved. The lower job satisfaction of critical care nurses compared with general ward nurses should warn the healthcare administrators and managers of potentially increasing the critical care nurses turn over. Innovative and adaptable managerial interventions need to be taken to improve critical care nurse' job satisfaction and retain skilled nurse. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Student Evaluations of College Professors: Are Female and Male Professors Rated Differently?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basow, Susan A.; Silberg, Nancy T.

    1987-01-01

    Over 1,000 undergraduates evaluated 16 male and female professors in terms of teaching effectiveness and sex-typed characteristics. Male students gave female professors significantly poorer ratings than male professors on the six teaching evaluation measures. Female students evaluated female professors less favorably than male professors on three…

  2. PREFACE: Special section on Computational Fluid Dynamics—in memory of Professor Kunio Kuwahara Special section on Computational Fluid Dynamics—in memory of Professor Kunio Kuwahara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Katsuya

    2011-08-01

    This issue includes a special section on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in memory of the late Professor Kunio Kuwahara, who passed away on 15 September 2008, at the age of 66. In this special section, five articles are included that are based on the lectures and discussions at `The 7th International Nobeyama Workshop on CFD: To the Memory of Professor Kuwahara' held in Tokyo on 23 and 24 September 2009. Professor Kuwahara started his research in fluid dynamics under Professor Imai at the University of Tokyo. His first paper was published in 1969 with the title 'Steady Viscous Flow within Circular Boundary', with Professor Imai. In this paper, he combined theoretical and numerical methods in fluid dynamics. Since that time, he made significant and seminal contributions to computational fluid dynamics. He undertook pioneering numerical studies on the vortex method in 1970s. From then to the early nineties, he developed numerical analyses on a variety of three-dimensional unsteady phenomena of incompressible and compressible fluid flows and/or complex fluid flows using his own supercomputers with academic and industrial co-workers and members of his private research institute, ICFD in Tokyo. In addition, a number of senior and young researchers of fluid mechanics around the world were invited to ICFD and the Nobeyama workshops, which were held near his villa, and they intensively discussed new frontier problems of fluid physics and fluid engineering at Professor Kuwahara's kind hospitality. At the memorial Nobeyama workshop held in 2009, 24 overseas speakers presented their papers, including the talks of Dr J P Boris (Naval Research Laboratory), Dr E S Oran (Naval Research Laboratory), Professor Z J Wang (Iowa State University), Dr M Meinke (RWTH Aachen), Professor K Ghia (University of Cincinnati), Professor U Ghia (University of Cincinnati), Professor F Hussain (University of Houston), Professor M Farge (École Normale Superieure), Professor J Y Yong (National

  3. Second Order Ideal-Ward Continuity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipan Hazarika

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the paper is to introduce a concept of second order ideal-ward continuity in the sense that a function f is second order ideal-ward continuous if I-limn→∞Δ2f(xn=0 whenever I-limn→∞Δ2xn=0 and a concept of second order ideal-ward compactness in the sense that a subset E of R is second order ideal-ward compact if any sequence x=(xn of points in E has a subsequence z=(zk=(xnk of the sequence x such that I-limk→∞Δ2zk=0 where Δ2zk=zk+2-2zk+1+zk. We investigate the impact of changing the definition of convergence of sequences on the structure of ideal-ward continuity in the sense of second order ideal-ward continuity and compactness of sets in the sense of second order ideal-ward compactness and prove related theorems.

  4. Teaching Ethos of Reference Professors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jules Marcel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The present article discusses the teaching ethos of professors who are recognized for their good practice as trainers. The aim of our study is to analyze the influences of such professors’ professional constitution, as well as the explicit and/or tacit teaching knowledge they mobilize in their teaching practices. Based on Shulman, Gauthier, Tardif and Polanyi, we conducted interviews with three professors described by their students as reference. They were also observed in their classes, in the context of an undergraduate program in pedagogy at a public university. Data show similarities between the practices of the investigated professors, as well as a consistent description of their didactics, which is marked by intellective, moral, emotional and behavioral features.

  5. Nursing on the medical ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Judith M

    2004-12-01

    This paper considers some issues confronting contemporary medical nursing and draws upon psychoanalytic theories to investigate some seemingly straightforward and taken-for-granted areas of medical nursing work. I am arguing that the everyday work of medical nurses in caring for patients is concerned with bringing order to and placing boundaries around inherently unsettled and destabilized circumstances. I am also arguing that how nurses manage and organize their work in this regard stems from traditional practices that tend to be taken for granted and not explicitly thought about. It is therefore difficult for nurses to consider changing these practices that often have negative consequences for the nurses. I want to examine the impact upon nurses of the consequences of three taken-for-granted nursing practices: (i) the tendency of nurses to confine their reactions to what is going on so as to present a caring self; (ii) the tendency of nurses in their everyday talk to patients to confine, limit and minimize meaning; and (iii) the tensions and ambiguities that emerge for nurses in the policing function they perform in confining patients to the bed or the ward. Negative consequences on nurses of these practices potentially include stress and confusion regarding their ability to care for patients; an undervaluing of nursing skills; and a deterioration in the nurse-patient relationship. Clinical supervision for medical nurses is proposed as a means of facilitating greater understanding of the nature of nurses' relationships with patients and the complex dimensions of their medical nursing role.

  6. Redox Pioneer: Professor Vadim N. Gladyshev.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Dolph L

    2016-07-01

    Professor Vadim N. Gladyshev is recognized here as a Redox Pioneer, because he has published an article on antioxidant/redox biology that has been cited more than 1000 times and 29 articles that have been cited more than 100 times. Gladyshev is world renowned for his characterization of the human selenoproteome encoded by 25 genes, identification of the majority of known selenoprotein genes in the three domains of life, and discoveries related to thiol oxidoreductases and mechanisms of redox control. Gladyshev's first faculty position was in the Department of Biochemistry, the University of Nebraska. There, he was a Charles Bessey Professor and Director of the Redox Biology Center. He then moved to the Department of Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, where he is Professor of Medicine and Director of the Center for Redox Medicine. His discoveries in redox biology relate to selenoenzymes, such as methionine sulfoxide reductases and thioredoxin reductases, and various thiol oxidoreductases. He is responsible for the genome-wide identification of catalytic redox-active cysteines and for advancing our understanding of the general use of cysteines by proteins. In addition, Gladyshev has characterized hydrogen peroxide metabolism and signaling and regulation of protein function by methionine-R-sulfoxidation. He has also made important contributions in the areas of aging and lifespan control and pioneered applications of comparative genomics in redox biology, selenium biology, and aging. Gladyshev's discoveries have had a profound impact on redox biology and the role of redox control in health and disease. He is a true Redox Pioneer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 1-9.

  7. Medical academia clinical experiences of Ward Round Teaching curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghani, Fariba; Arabshahi, Seyed Kamran Soltani; Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Alavi, Mousa; Omid, Athar

    2014-01-01

    Medical students spend most of their time in hospital wards and it is necessary to study clinical educational opportunities. This study was aimed to explore faculty members' experience on Ward Round Teaching content. This qualitative study was conducted by purposive sampling with the maximum variation of major clinical departments faculty members in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (n = 9). Data gathering was based on deep and semi-structured interviews. Data gathering continued till data saturation. Data was analyzed through the Collaizzi method and validated. Strategies to ensure trustworthiness of data (credibility, dependability, conformability, transferability) were employed (Guba and Lincoln). Basic codes extracted from the analyzed data were categorized into two main themes and related subthemes, including (1) tangible teachings (analytic intelligence, technical intelligence, legal duties) and (2) implied teachings (professionalism, professional discipline, professional difficulties). Ward round teaching is a valuable opportunity for learners to learn not only patient care aspects but also ethical values. By appropriate planning, opportunities can be used to teach capabilities that are expected of general practitioners.

  8. Medical academia clinical experiences of Ward Round Teaching curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Haghani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical students spend most of their time in hospital wards and it is necessary to study clinical educational opportunities. This study was aimed to explore faculty members′ experience on Ward Round Teaching content. Methods and Materials: This qualitative study was conducted by purposive sampling with the maximum variation of major clinical departments faculty members in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (n = 9. Data gathering was based on deep and semi-structured interviews. Data gathering continued till data saturation.Data was analyzed through the Collaizzi method and validated. Strategies to ensure trustworthiness of data (credibility, dependability, conformability, transferability were employed (Guba and Lincoln. Results: Basic codes extracted from the analyzed data were categorized into two main themes and related subthemes, including (1 tangible teachings (analytic intelligence, technical intelligence, legal duties and (2 implied teachings (professionalism, professional discipline, professional difficulties. Conclusion: Ward round teaching is a valuable opportunity for learners to learn not only patient care aspects but also ethical values. By appropriate planning, opportunities can be used to teach capabilities that are expected of general practitioners.

  9. ATLANTIC and beyond: an interview with Professor Azfar Zaman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Azfar; Wu, Wing

    2015-01-01

    Professor Azfar Zaman speaks to Wing Wu, Commissioning Editor: Professor Azfar Zaman is a Consultant Interventional Cardiologist at Freeman Hospital and Professor of Cardiology at Newcastle University. Following graduation at Leeds Medical School, he completed postgraduate training in cardiology at regional centres in Leeds, London and Cardiff. Prior to his appointment in Newcastle upon Tyne, he was a Fulbright Scholar and British Heart Foundation International Fellow at Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, USA. He is the Clinical Lead for Coronary Intervention and Director of the Cardiac Catheter Laboratories. In 2012, he was appointed Specialty Group Lead for Cardiovascular Research and has an interest in clinical research, with a particular interest in atherothrombosis in diabetes and clinical trials.

  10. Barriers to nurse-patient communication in cardiac surgery wards: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafipour, Vida; Mohammad, Eesa; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2014-08-15

    An appropriate and effective nurse-patient communication is of the most important aspect of caring. The formation and continuation of such a relationship depends on various factors such as the conditions and context of communication and a mutual understanding between the two. A review of the literature shows that little research is carried out on identification of such barriers in hospital wards between the patients and the healthcare staff. The present study was therefore conducted to explore the experiences of nurses and patients on communication barriers in hospital cardiac surgery wards. This qualitative research was carried out using a content analysis method (Graneheim & Lundman, 2004). The participants were selected by a purposeful sampling and consist of 10 nurses and 11 patients from the cardiac surgery wards of three teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Data was gathered by unstructured interviews. All interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Findings were emerged in three main themes including job dissatisfaction (with the sub-themes of workload tension and decreased motivation), routine-centered care (with the sub-themes of habitual interventions, routinized and technical interventions, and objective supervision), and distrust in competency of nurses (with the sub-themes of cultural contrast, less responsible nurses, and their apathy towards the patients). Compared to other studies, our findings identified different types of communication barriers depending on the nursing settings. These findings can be used by the ward clinical nursing managers at cardiac surgery wards to improve the quality of nursing care.

  11. Shielding estimation for nuclear medicine therapy ward: our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skopljak-Beganovic, A.; Kucukalic-Selimovic, E.; Beganovic, A.; Drljevic, A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study was to calculate and estimate the shielding thickness for a new Nuclear Medicine Therapy Ward. Parameters available for shielding calculation were: ground plan of the ward, radionuclides planned for use, maximum administered activity of I-131, maximum delivered activity of I-131 to the ward per week, average time spent in the hospital after the treatment. The most hazardous and most commonly used radioisotope is I-131. The target dose that needs to be met for occupationally exposed workers is 0.3 mSv per year. There are several factors that could be changed in order to achieve this value: distance from the source, shielding thickness, angle of incidence, occupational and usage factors. The maximum dose rate at 1 meter from the thyroid gland of the patient was considered to be 100 mSv/h. The distances and incidence angles could not be changed since these vales were predetermined in the ground plan. Different usage and occupational factors were used for different rooms in the ward. We used occupational factor 1 for the bed and 1/6 for the bathroom, and usage factor 1 for nurses' room and patient room and 1/6 for the corridors, etc. The easiest way of calculating dose attenuation in material was by introducing the HVL and TVL for broad beams. TVL and HVL were taken from the graph.The results show that shielding thickness should be in the range of 3 mmPb for room doors to 30 mmPb for the wall adjacent to the nurse's office. Most of the walls are 20 mmPb thick. These values were calculated using conservative assumptions and are more then enough to protect staff, patients and public from external radiation. If the construction cannot support the weight of lead some rearrangements regarding patient positions could be made. (author)

  12. Exploring ward nurses' perceptions of continuing education in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govranos, Melissa; Newton, Jennifer M

    2014-04-01

    Health care systems demand that nurses are flexible skilful workers who maintain currency and competency in order to deliver safe effective patient centered care. Nurses must continually build best practice into their care and acquire lifelong learning. Often this learning is acquired within the work environment and is facilitated by the clinical nurse educator. Understanding clinical nurses' values and needs of continuing education is necessary to ensure appropriate education service delivery and thus enhance patient care. To explore clinical ward-based nurses' values and perceptions towards continuing education and what factors impact on continuing education in the ward. A case study approach was utilized. A major teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A range of clinical nursing staff (n=23). Four focus groups and six semi-structured individual interviews were undertaken. Focus group interviews explored participants' values and perceptions on continuing education through a values clarification tool. Thematic analysis of interviews was undertaken to identify themes and cluster data. Three central themes: 'culture and attitudes', 'what is learning?' and 'being there-being seen', emerged reflecting staffs' values and perceptions of education and learning in the workplace. Multiple factors influence ward nurses' ability and motivation to incorporate lifelong learning into their practice. Despite variance in nurses' values and perceptions of CE in clinical environments, CE was perceived as important. Nurses yearned for changes to facilitate lifelong learning and cultivate a learning culture. Clinical nurse educators need to be cognizant of adult learners' characteristics such as values, beliefs, needs and potential barriers, to effectively facilitate support in a challenging and complex learning environment. Organizational support is essential so ward managers in conjunction with educational departments can promote and sustain continuing education, lifelong

  13. Ward nurses' knowledge of computed tomography scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, M A; Nayeemuddin, M; Christie, M

    Patients benefit from and are reassured by advance information on procedures that they are to undergo. Ward nurses should have adequate knowledge of radiological investigations to ensure proper patient preparation and good interdepartmental communication to avoid delays and cancellations. This study was conducted to assess the ward nurses' knowledge of the process of computed tomography (CT) scanning. One hundred and twenty qualified nurses were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding CT scanning. The findings revealed a suboptimal level of awareness about the process. This is probably due to lack of formal teaching for nurses on the wards in regards the different radiological procedures and patient preparation. There is a strong case for better educational talks on rapidly changing radiological techniques for ward staff to ensure high-quality patient care.

  14. Professors of the New Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robin

    2000-01-01

    Profiles four professors who epitomize the increasing influence of academe on new technology-driven Internet business: a start-up maven, Steven Kaplan; a social psychologist, Michael Ray; a cyberlawyer, David Post; and an e-commerce expert, Andrew B. Whinston. (DB)

  15. [Airborne Fungal Aerosol Concentration and Distribution Characteristics in Air- Conditioned Wards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua-ling; Feng, He-hua; Fang, Zi-liang; Wang, Ben-dong; Li, Dan

    2015-04-01

    The effects of airborne fungus on human health in the hospital environment are related to not only their genera and concentrations, but also their particle sizes and distribution characteristics. Moreover, the mechanisms of aerosols with different particle sizes on human health are different. Fungal samples were obtained in medicine wards of Chongqing using a six-stage sampler. The airborne fungal concentrations, genera and size distributions of all the sampling wards were investigated and identified in detail. Results showed that airborne fungal concentrations were not correlated to the diseases or personnel density, but were related to seasons, temperature, and relative humidity. The size distribution rule had roughly the same for testing wards in winter and summer. The size distributions were not related with diseases and seasons, the percentage of airborne fungal concentrations increased gradually from stage I to stage III, and then decreased dramatically from stage V to stage VI, in general, the size of airborne fungi was a normal distribution. There was no markedly difference for median diameter of airborne fungi which was less 3.19 μm in these wards. There were similar dominant genera in all wards. They were Aspergillus spp, Penicillium spp and Alternaria spp. Therefore, attention should be paid to improve the filtration efficiency of particle size of 1.1-4.7 μm for air conditioning system of wards. It also should be targeted to choose appropriate antibacterial methods and equipment for daily hygiene and air conditioning system operation management.

  16. Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullins, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The challenge could be briefly seen in these terms: hospitals as places for treatment where there’s a technology focus and hospitals for healing where there’s a human focus. In the 60s - 70s wave of new hospital building, an emphasis on technology can be seen. It’s time to move from the technology...... focus. It is not enough to consider only the factors of function within architecture, hygiene, economy and logistics. We also need to look at aspects of aesthetics, bringing nature into the building, art, color, acoustics, volume and space as we perceive them. Contemporary methods and advances...... placed, accessible, provided with plenty of greenery, and maximize sensory impressions, providing sounds, smells, sight and the possibility to be touched. This is a very well documented area I can say. Hygiene, in terms of architecture can give attention to hand wash facilities and their positioning...

  17. Sleep quality and mood in mothers and fathers accommodated in the family-centred paediatric ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelhoff, Charlotte; Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla; Mörelius, Evalotte

    2018-02-01

    To describe sleep quality and mood in parents accommodated with their sick child in a family-centred paediatric ward. Secondary aims were to compare mothers' and fathers' sleep quality and mood in the paediatric ward and to compare the parents' sleep quality and mood between the paediatric ward and in a daily-life home setting after discharge. Frequent interruptions, ward noise and anxiety affect parents' sleep quality and mood negatively when accommodated with their sick child in paediatric wards. Poor sleep quality and negative mood decrease the parents' ability to sustain attention and focus, and to care for their sick child. This was a prospective and descriptive study. Eighty-two parents (61 mothers and 21 fathers) with children (median age 6.25 years) admitted to six paediatric wards participated in the study. Uppsala Sleep Inventory, a sleep diary and the Mood Adjective Checklist were used to measure sleep quality and mood. The parents had a good sleep quality in the paediatric ward even though they had more nocturnal awakenings compared to home. Moreover, they were less alert, less interested and had reduced concentration, and were more tired, dull and passive in the hospital than at home after discharge. Vital sign checks, noises made by the staff and medical treatment were given reasons influencing sleep. Poor sleep quality correlated with negative mood. Parents' sleep quality in family-centred paediatric care is good. However, the habitual sleep efficacy before admittance to the hospital is lower than expected and needs to be further investigated. The healthcare professionals should acknowledge parents' sleep and mood when they are accommodated with their sick child. Further should care at night be scheduled and sleep promoted for the parents to maintain health and well-being in the family. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. ICT Use by Journalism Professors in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Elias Said

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses how journalism professors at Colombian universities use information and communications technologies (ICT) in their teaching. Survey data was obtained during the first trimester of 2009 from 63 professors in journalism departments and from a total of 865 professors who are affiliated with journalism departments at 29…

  19. Social influence on 5-year survival in a longitudinal chemotherapy ward co-presence network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienert, Jeffrey; Marcum, Christopher Steven; Finney, John; Reed-Tsochas, Felix; Koehly, Laura

    2017-09-01

    Chemotherapy is often administered in openly designed hospital wards, where the possibility of patient-patient social influence on health exists. Previous research found that social relationships influence cancer patient's health; however, we have yet to understand social influence among patients receiving chemotherapy in the hospital. We investigate the influence of co-presence in a chemotherapy ward. We use data on 4,691 cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy in Oxfordshire, United Kingdom who average 59.8 years of age, and 44% are Male. We construct a network of patients where edges exist when patients are co-present in the ward, weighted by both patients' time in the ward. Social influence is based on total weighted co-presence with focal patients' immediate neighbors, considering neighbors' 5-year mortality. Generalized estimating equations evaluated the effect of neighbors' 5-year mortality on focal patient's 5-year mortality. Each 1,000-unit increase in weighted co-presence with a patient who dies within 5 years increases a patient's mortality odds by 42% ( β = 0.357, CI:0.204,0.510). Each 1,000-unit increase in co-presence with a patient surviving 5 years reduces a patient's odds of dying by 30% ( β = -0.344, CI:-0.538,0.149). Our results suggest that social influence occurs in chemotherapy wards, and thus may need to be considered in chemotherapy delivery.

  20. Pattern of Morbidity and Mortality in a Children's Ward – the Awka ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of morbidity and mortality in children in a hospital setting is essential because it serves as a guide to what happens in the larger society. By these findings, health facilities could be modified and improved upon for better management of those cases. To document the pattern of morbidity and mortality in children's ward ...

  1. The effect of multi-professional education on the recognition and outcome of patients at risk on general wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrmann, L.; Perner, A.; Klausen, T.W.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of multi-professional full-scale simulation-based education of staff on the mortality and staff awareness of patients at risk on general wards. DESIGN, SETTINGS AND PATIENTS: A prospective before-and-after study conducted on four general wards...... at Herlev Hospital, Denmark. In the pre-intervention period (June-July 2006) and post-intervention period (November-December 2007), all patients on the wards had vital signs measured in the evening by study personnel, who also asked nursing staff questions about patients with abnormal vital signs...

  2. Nosocomial transmission of Ebola virus disease on pediatric and maternity wards: Bombali and Tonkolili, Sierra Leone, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Angela C; Walker, Tiffany A; Redd, John; Sugerman, David; McFadden, Jevon; Singh, Tushar; Jasperse, Joseph; Kamara, Brima Osaio; Sesay, Tom; McAuley, James; Kilmarx, Peter H

    2016-03-01

    In the largest Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in history, nosocomial transmission of EVD increased spread of the disease. We report on 2 instances in Sierra Leone where patients unknowingly infected with EVD were admitted to a general hospital ward (1 pediatric ward and 1 maternity ward), exposing health care workers, caregivers, and other patients to EVD. Both patients died on the general wards, and were later confirmed as being infected with EVD. We initiated contact tracing and assessed risk factors for secondary infections to guide containment recommendations. We reviewed medical records to establish the index patients' symptom onset. Health care workers, patients, and caregivers were interviewed to determine exposures and personal protective equipment (PPE) use. Contacts were monitored daily for EVD symptoms. Those who experienced EVD symptoms were isolated and tested. Eighty-two contacts were identified: 64 health care workers, 7 caregivers, 4 patients, 4 newborns, and 3 children of patients. Seven contacts became symptomatic and tested positive for EVD: 2 health care workers (1 nurse and 1 hospital cleaner), 2 caregivers, 2 newborns, and 1 patient. The infected nurse placed an intravenous catheter in the pediatric index patient with only short gloves PPE and the hospital cleaner cleaned the operating room of the maternity ward index patient wearing short gloves PPE. The maternity ward index patient's caregiver and newborn were exposed to her body fluids. The infected patient and her newborn shared the ward and latrine with the maternity ward index patient. Hospital staff members did not use adequate PPE. Caregivers were not offered PPE. Delayed recognition of EVD and inadequate PPE likely led to exposures and secondary infections. Earlier recognition of EVD and adequate PPE might have reduced direct contact with body fluids. Limiting nonhealth-care worker contact, improving access to PPE, and enhancing screening methods for pregnant women, children

  3. Professor dr hab. Maria Lisiewska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Stasińska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the biography and scientific achievements of Professor Maria Lisiewska. She earned master’s degree and Ph.D. in natural sciences from Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań. After earning her doctoral degree, she stayed at Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań and conducted her thrilling research on mycology and taught until now. Prof. Maria Lisiewska is an author of many books, articles, and other scholarly reports.

  4. Anomalous N=2 superconformal Ward identities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketov, Sergei V.

    2000-01-01

    The N=2 superconformal Ward identities and their anomalies are discussed in N=2 superspace (including N=2 harmonic superspace), at the level of the low-energy effective action (LEEA) in four-dimensional N=2 supersymmetric field theories. The (first) chiral N=2 supergravity compensator is related to the known N=2 anomalous Ward identity in the N=2 (abelian) vector mulitplet sector. As regards the hypermultiplet LEEA given by the N=2 non-linear sigma-model (NLSM), a new anomalous N=2 superconformal Ward identity is found, whose existence is related to the (second) analytic compensator in N=2 supergravity. The celebrated solution of Seiberg and Witten is known to obey the (first) anomalous Ward identity in the Coulomb branch. We find a few solutions to the new anomalous Ward identity, after making certain assumptions about unbroken internal symmetries. Amongst the N=2 NLSM target space metrics governing the hypermultiplet LEEA are the SU(2)-Yang-Mills-Higgs monopole moduli-space metrics that can be encoded in terms of the spectral curves (Riemann surfaces), similarly to the Seiberg-Witten-type solutions. After a dimensional reduction to three spacetime dimensions (3d), our results support the mirror symmetry between the Coulomb and Higgs branches in 3d, N=4 gauge theories

  5. Comparative study of the prevalence of sepsis in patients admitted to dermatology and internal medicine wards*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Luiz Maurício Costa; Diniz, Michelle dos Santos; Diniz, Lorena dos Santos; Machado-Pinto, Jackson; Silva, Francisco Chagas Lima

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sepsis is a common cause of morbidity and mortality among hospitalized patients. The prevalence of this condition has increased significantly in different parts of the world. Patients admitted to dermatology wards often have severe loss of skin barrier and use systemic corticosteroids, which favor the development of sepsis. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the prevalence of sepsis among patients admitted to a dermatology ward compared to that among patients admitted to an internal medicine ward. METHODS It is a cross-sectional, observational, comparative study that was conducted at Hospital Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte. Data were collected from all patients admitted to four hospital beds at the dermatology and internal medicine wards between July 2008 and July 2009. Medical records were analyzed for the occurrence of sepsis, dermatologic diagnoses, comorbidities, types of pathogens and most commonly used antibiotics. RESULTS We analyzed 185 medical records. The prevalence of sepsis was 7.6% among patients admitted to the dermatology ward and 2.2% (p = 0.10) among those admitted to the internal medicine ward. Patients with comorbidities, diabetes mellitus and cancer did not show a higher incidence of sepsis. The main agent found was Staphylococcus aureus, and the most commonly used antibiotics were ciprofloxacin and oxacillin. There was a significant association between sepsis and the use of systemic corticosteroids (p <0.001). CONCLUSION It becomes clear that epidemiological studies on sepsis should be performed more extensively and accurately in Brazil so that efforts to prevent and treat this serious disease can be made more effectively. PMID:24173179

  6. Ward nurses' experiences of the discharge process between intensive care unit and general ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppi, Wivica; Proos, Matilda; Olausson, Sepideh

    2018-05-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) discharges are challenging practices that carry risks for patients. Despite the existing body of knowledge, there are still difficulties in clinical practice concerning unplanned ICU discharges, specifically where there is no step-down unit. The aim of this study was to explore general ward nurses' experiences of caring for patients being discharged from an ICU. Data were collected from focus groups and in-depth interviews with a total of 16 nurses from three different hospitals in Sweden. An inductive qualitative design was chosen. The analysis revealed three themes that reflect the challenges in nursing former ICU patients: a vulnerable patient, nurses' powerlessness and organizational structure. The nurses described the challenge of nursing a fragile patient based on several aspects. They expressed feeling unrealistic demands when caring for a fragile former ICU patient. The demands were related to their own profession and knowledge regarding how to care for this group of patients. The organizational structure had an impact on how the nurses' caring practice could be realized. This evoked ethical concerns that the nurses had to cope with as the organization's care guidelines did not always favour the patients. The structure of the organization and its leadership appear to have a significant impact on the nurses' ability to offer patients the care they need. This study sheds light on the need for extended outreach services and intermediate care in order to meet the needs of patients after the intensive care period. © 2018 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  7. Improving the communication between teams managing boarded patients on a surgical specialty ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvaneswaralingam, Shobitha; Ross, Daniella

    2016-01-01

    Transferring patients from the ward of their specialty or consultant is described as boarding. 1 Boarding patients is becoming increasingly prevalent due to greater pressure on hospital capacity. This practice compromises patient safety through delayed investigations, prolonged hospital stays, and increased risk of hospital-acquired infections. 1 2 We evaluated how regularly boarded patients were reviewed, and how effectively information regarding their management was communicated from their primary specialty to ward staff. We aimed to improve the frequency of patient reviews by ensuring that each patient was reviewed every weekday and increase communication between primary specialty, and medical and nursing teams by 20% from baseline during the data collection period. The project was based in the Otolaryngology ward in Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, where there was a high prevalence of boarded patients. Baseline data showed a clear deficit in communication between the primary specialty and ward staff with only 31% of patient reviews being communicated to ward doctors. We designed and implemented a communication tool, in the form of a sticker, to be inserted into patients' medical notes for use by the primary specialty. Implementation of the sticker improved communication between teams as stickers were completed in 93% of instances. In 88% of patient reviews, the junior doctor was informed of the management plan, showing a large increase from baseline. Through PDSA cycles, we aimed to increase the sustainability and reliability of the sticker; however, we faced challenges with sustainability of sticker insertion. We aim to engage more stakeholders to raise awareness of the problem, brainstorm solutions together, and review the production and implementation of stickers with senior hospital management to discuss the potential use of this tool within practice. There is potentially a large scope for utilisation of this communication tool on a local level, which we hope

  8. Perfil do usuário de crack e fatores relacionados à criminalidade em unidade de internação para desintoxicação no Hospital Psiquiátrico São Pedro de Porto Alegre (RS Profile of crack users and factors related to criminality at the detoxication ward at Hospital Psiquiátrico São Pedro, Porto Alegre, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Fabiano Guimarães

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O presente estudo transversal foi realizado com usuários de crack do sexo masculino internados na Unidade de Desintoxicação do Hospital Psiquiátrico São Pedro de Porto Alegre (RS no período de março a dezembro de 2007. O objetivo do presente estudo foi identificar o perfil sociodemográfico e de consumo de substâncias psicoativas e a presença de conduta anti-social, sintomas de ansiedade e de depressão em usuários de crack internados na Unidade de Desintoxicação do Hospital Psiquiátrico São Pedro de Porto Alegre (RS, bem como verificar fatores associados à criminalidade nessa clientela. MÉTODO: Trinta sujeitos participaram do estudo, e os instrumentos utilizados foram: questionário sociodemográfico e de avaliação do consumo de substâncias psicoativas e de antecedentes criminais com 55 questões, Mini-Exame do Estado Mental, Inventário Beck de Ansiedade, Inventário Beck de Depressão, Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence e Escala Analógico-Visual de Fissura. RESULTADOS: Os principais resultados apontam para uma população de adultos jovens, de cor/raça branca, com idade média de 27,3 anos e em situação de subemprego ou desemprego. A presença de antecedentes criminais foi observada em 40% da amostra e está associada a maior fissura (U = 58,00; p = 0,035, a mais sintomas de ansiedade (U = 56,50; p = 0,028 e de depressão (U = 47,00; p = 0,009. CONCLUSÕES: É freqüente a presença de antecedentes criminais em dependentes de crack e esta variável está relacionada a mais ansiedade, depressão e fissura. Estudos deste tipo permitem ampliar o conhecimento da população atendida, para delinear de forma mais efetiva o plano terapêutico para esta clientela.INTRODUCTION: This cross-sectional study was carried out with 30 crack users admitted at the male detoxication ward at Hospital Psiquiátrico São Pedro, in Porto Alegre, Brazil, from March to December, 2007. The objective of the present study was

  9. A Study about The Quality of Nursing Services a Hospitals’ Ward, Mojokerto

    OpenAIRE

    Muhith, Abdul; Nurwidji, Nurwidji

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays, the trend of hospital visits in Mojokerto is declining. It can caused by man (nurses), such as the quality of nursing services hasn’t been conducted optimally. This study was aimed to analyze the quality of nursing services at hospitals’ ward at Mojokerto. Method: This was explanatory research with survey method and cross sectional approach. The population were nurses and patients who undergo hospitalization minimally in three days at RSU. Dr. Wahidin Sudiro Husodo and...

  10. Hepatitis B antigen HB Ag examination by radioimmunological method in a hemodialysis ward

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opatrny, K; Karlicek, V; Topolcan, O; Farnik, J [Karlova Universita, Plzen (Czechoslovakia). Lekarska Fakulta; Kulich, V [Transfuzni oddeleni FN, Plzen (Czechoslovakia)

    1975-11-07

    The results are reported of regular examinations for the so-called Australian antigen of patients, medical personnel, and of equipment and working surfaces in the hemodialysis ward of the Plzen university hospital using the Ling and Overby method by the Ausria-125 and Ausria II kits by Abbott. It was found that the radioimmunological method was more sensitive than methods previously used and that it allowed for early ascertainment of contamination, thus reducing nosocomial and professional infections and reducing the occurrence of the disease in the ward.

  11. Medical ward round competence in internal medicine - an interview study towards an interprofessional development of an Entrustable Professional Activity (EPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfel, Teresa; Beltermann, Esther; Lottspeich, Christian; Vietz, Elisa; Fischer, Martin R; Schmidmaier, Ralf

    2016-07-11

    The medical ward round is a central but complex activity that is of relevance from the first day of work. However, difficulties for young doctors have been reported. Instruction of ward round competence in medical curricula is hampered by the lack of a standardized description of the procedure. This paper aims to identify and describe physicians' tasks and relevant competences for conducting a medical ward round on the first day of professional work. A review of recent literature revealed known important aspects of medical ward rounds. These were used for the development of a semi-structured interview schedule. Medical ward round experts working at different hospitals were interviewed. The sample consisted of 14 ward physicians (M = 8.82 years of work experience) and 12 nurses (M = 14.55 years of work experience) working in different specializations of internal medicine. All interviews were audiotaped, fully transcribed, and analyzed using an inductive-deductive coding scheme. Nine fields of competences with 18 related sub-competences and 62 observable tasks were identified as relevant for conducting a medical ward round. Over 70 % of the experts named communication, collaborative clinical reasoning and organization as essential competences. Deeper analysis further unveiled the importance of self-management, management of difficult situations, error management and teamwork. The study is the first to picture ward round competences and related tasks in detail and to define an EPA "Conducting an internal medicine ward round" based on systematic interprofessional expert interviews. It thus provides a basis for integration of ward round competences in the medical curricula in an evidence based manner and gives a framework for the development of instructional intervention studies and comparative studies in other medical fields.

  12. Professor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    DEBAT: Land og by hænger uløseligt sammen - både i forhold til fødevareproduktion og -distribuering – men også i forhold til vores fælles natur. Når vi bor i byerne, er vi tæt forbundet og afhængige af de tjenester, som landbruget bidrager med – fødevarer, sikring af rent grundvand, bioenergi, re...

  13. professores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Isabel Rodrigues Magalhães

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of classroom practices focused on scientific literacy as animportant outcome of schooling forces the re-thinking of science teacher’sformation. In this sense, this paper reports a study which involved theconception, development, implement and evaluation of an in-service program(IP focused on the Science — Technology — Society (STS education alongwith critical thinking (CT [STS/CT]. From the obtained results it was concludedthat the in-service program contributed for the teachers to (reconstructconceptions about Science, Technology and Society, to (reconstructknowledge related to the STS orientation and critical thinking and to promotetheir pre-disposition to implement STS/CTdidactic and pedagogic practices

  14. Geometrical formulation of the conformal Ward identity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachkachi, M.

    2002-08-01

    In this paper we use deep ideas in complex geometry that proved to be very powerful in unveiling the Polyakov measure on the moduli space of Riemann surfaces and lead to obtain the partition function of perturbative string theory for 2, 3, 4 loops. Indeed, a geometrical interpretation of the conformal Ward identity in two dimensional conformal field theory is proposed: the conformal anomaly is interpreted as a deformation of the complex structure of the basic Riemann surface. This point of view is in line with the modern trend of geometric quantizations that are based on deformations of classical structures. Then, we solve the conformal Ward identity by using this geometrical formalism. (author)

  15. Developing a general ward nursing dashboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Margot; Hogg, Maggie; Leach, Stuart; Penman, Mags; Friel, Susan

    2014-12-15

    The seventh and final article in the series on Leading Better Care explores some of the challenges in clinical practice relating to the use of data and making information meaningful to senior charge nurses and ward sisters. It describes the collaborative approach taken by NHS Lanarkshire, which involved nursing staff, programme leads and the eHealth team in the development of a general ward nursing dashboard as a means of ensuring safe, effective person-centred care. The article also illustrates how this web-based data-reporting programme is used to support clinical practice.

  16. Ward identities of higher order Virasoro algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zha Chaozeng; Dolate, S.

    1994-11-01

    The general formulations of primary fields versus quasi-primary ones in the context of high order Virasoro algebra (HOVA) and the corresponding Ward identity are explored. The primary fields of conformal spins up to 8 are given in terms of quasi-primary fields, and the general features of the higher order expressions are also discussed. It is observed that the local fields, either primary of quasi-primary, carry the same numbers of central charges, and not all the primary fields contribute to the anomalies in the Ward identities. (author). 6 refs

  17. Implementation of an Electronic Checklist to Improve Patient Handover From Ward to Operating Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münter, Kristine H; Møller, Thea P; Østergaard, Doris

    2017-01-01

    risk factors. The aim of this study was to describe the implementation process and completion rate of a new preoperative, ward-to-OR checklist. Our goal was a 90% fulfillment. METHOD: This study is a prospective, observational study in a Danish University Hospital including all patients undergoing......OBJECTIVE: Research has identified numerous safety risks in perioperative patient handover. In handover from ward to operating room (OR), patients are often transferred by a third person. This adds to the risk of loss of important information and of caregivers in the OR not identifying possible...... surgery in 2013. The checklist was a screen page with 27 checkboxes of information relevant for a safe handover. The checklist should be completed in the ward before handover to the OR and should be checked in the OR before receiving the patient. The Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycle method was used...

  18. Participatory Action Research in clinical nursing practice in a medical ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjerholt, Mette; Wagner, Lis; Lindhardt, Tove

    2016-01-01

    Background: Action research with a participatory approach (PAR) was used as research design in a medical ward but stopped midway because of lack of active actor participation in the actions. Aim: To describe challenges and barriers influencing lack of participation. Setting: A medical hospital ward......, Denmark. Participants were healthcare staff. Methods: Field observations, interviews, logbook. Data were analysed using content analysis methods. Findings: Multiple factors influenced lack of actor participation. The causes were complex and included: organizational framework, significance/meaning, actor...... roles, responsibility. Conclusion: Before using PAR it is crucial to investigate if the organization and the participants at all levels are suited and agree to participate actively. The findings indicate, that to carry out PAR in a busy medical ward, it is necessary to evaluate whether the necessary...

  19. Validation of a checklist to assess ward round performance in internal medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Kirsten; Ringsted, Charlotte; Dolmans, Diana

    2004-01-01

    and construct validity of the task-specific checklist. METHODS: To determine content validity, a questionnaire was mailed to 295 internists. They were requested to give their opinion on the relevance of each item included on the checklist and to indicate the comprehensiveness of the checklist. To determine...... construct validity, an observer assessed 4 groups of doctors during performance of a complete ward round (n = 32). The nurse who accompanied the doctor on rounds made a global assessment of the performance. RESULTS: The response rate to the questionnaire was 80.7%. The respondents found that all 10 items......BACKGROUND: Ward rounds are an essential responsibility for doctors in hospital settings. Tools for guiding and assessing trainees' performance of ward rounds are needed. A checklist was developed for that purpose for use with trainees in internal medicine. OBJECTIVE: To assess the content...

  20. 'Supermentoring' of assistant professors' teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Ole

    Aarhus University offers a mandatory pedagogical training program for assistant professors, required in order to obtain tenure at a Danish university. At Business and Social Sciences, this program is supplemented by voluntary observation and (first of all formative) supervision of the assistant...... professors’ teaching practice. This offer is given is (i) because many young university teachers face problems putting pedagogical theory into practice – even though the program mentioned is practice-oriented, and (ii) because many of them (partly due to (i)) lack self-confidence as to teaching...

  1. Entrevista com professor Bertrand Badie

    OpenAIRE

    Mere Marques Aveiro, Thais

    2015-01-01

    Bertrand Badie é cientista político, professor na Sciences Po, Paris, pesquisador do CERI (Centro de Estudos e Pesquisas Internacionais), codiretor da coleção L’etat du monde, publicada anualmente desde 2010 e coeditor da Enciclopédia Internacional de Ciência Política. Entre 2002 e 2005, foi Diretor do Centro de Estudos Internacionais sobre a paz e resoluções de conflitos. Por dez anos (1994 –2003), foi Diretor das publicações da Sciences Po.Desde 2000, ministra o Curso Espaço Mundial que, a ...

  2. Ensino baseado em simulação na formação continuada de médicos: análise das percepções de alunos e professores de um Hospital do Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Sá Simões Dourado

    Full Text Available Nos últimos anos, o ensino baseado em simulação (EBS tem sido cada vez mais utilizado na educação em saúde e especialmente na educação médica. Este estudo teve como objetivo investigar as potencialidades e desafios do EBS no contexto de um curso de formação continuada de médicos: Curso em Ressuscitação Cardiopulmonar (RCP Avançado. A coleta de dados foi realizada por meio de observação de campo, entrevistas com professores e aplicação de questionários aos alunos do curso. Para análise das percepções dos participantes, adotou-se a análise de conteúdo temática. Os resultados apontaram quatro principais potencialidades e desafios do EBS para a formação médica: articulação entre teoria e prática; o erro como oportunidade de aprendizagem; relação entre mundo virtual e mundo real; fortalecimento do trabalho em equipe. Acredita-se que este trabalho possa contribuir com a discussão acerca da utilização do EBS na educação médica, assim como indicar pontos favoráveis e desafios de sua implementação, revelando a importância de pesquisas que aprofundem as questões pedagógicas envolvidas no percurso de aplicação desta metodologia.

  3. Incident Reporting in Mashhad Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davoodi R

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this study, our aim was to evaluate and classify the voluntary error reports in the hospitals of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. Patients have the right to receive health care in accordance to the best standards. Health care carries a risk of harm for patient safety, and with respect to today’s stressful systems with a large number of patients, it would be inevitable. The meaning of risk management is to predict adverse events and reduce their occurrence.Materials and Methods: A voluntary medical error reporting form was designed and approved by the clinical governance team of Mashhad Medical University. They were then distributed inside hospitals in the way in which everyone (health providers and patients could access them easily. The forms were collected and classified monthly in all wards. Classification was performed on the base of type, outcome and reporter. Data gathering took place from spring to autumn 2012. The data was analyzed by the SPSS software. Results: 2500 errors were extracted from 1000 voluntary error reporting forms of the 12 hospitals of Mashhad Medical University. The most frequent error type was treatment errors (36% related to drug administration, standard procedures and surgical events. Conclusions: Error reporting as a basic activity has an important role in discovering pitfalls of the health care system. To promote the reporting culture, its non punitive base must become clear for all professors and staff members, because this kind of reporting could lead to fewer medical errors and higher staff awareness about probable errors.

  4. Does doctors’ workload impact supervision and ward activities of final-year students? A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celebi Nora

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospital doctors face constantly increasing workloads. Besides caring for patients, their duties also comprise the education of future colleagues. The aim of this study was to objectively investigate whether the workload arising from increased patient care interferes with student supervision and is associated with more non-medical activities of final-year medical students. Methods A total of 54 final-year students were asked to keep a diary of their daily activities over a three-week period at the beginning of their internship in Internal Medicine. Students categorized their activities – both medical and non-medical - according to whether they had: (1 only watched, (2 assisted the ward resident, (3 performed the activity themselves under supervision of the ward resident, or (4 performed the activity without supervision. The activities reported on a particular day were matched with a ward specific workload-index derived from the hospital information system, including the number of patients treated on the corresponding ward on that day, a correction factor according to the patient comorbidity complexity level (PCCL, and the number of admissions and discharges. Both students and ward residents were blinded to the study question. Results A total of 32 diaries (59 %, 442 recorded working days were handed back. Overall, the students reported 1.2 ± 1.3 supervised, 1.8 ±1.6 medical and 3.6 ± 1.7 non-medical activities per day. The more supervised activities were reported, the more the number of reported medical activities increased (p  Conclusions There was a significant association between ward doctors’ supervision of students and the number of medical activities performed by medical students. The workload had no significant effect on supervision or the number of medical or non-medical activities of final-year students.

  5. Doctors' and nurses' perceptions of a ward-based pharmacist in rural northern Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölander, Maria; Gustafsson, Maria; Gallego, Gisselle

    2017-08-01

    Background This project is part of the prospective quasi experimental proof-of-concept investigation of clinical pharmacist intervention study to reduce drug-related problems among people admitted to a ward in a rural hospital in northern Sweden. Objective To explore doctors' and nurses' perceptions and expectations of having a ward-based pharmacist providing clinical pharmacy services. Setting Medical ward in a rural hospital in northern Sweden. Method Eighteen face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of doctors and nurses working on the ward where the clinical pharmacy service was due to be implemented. Semi-structured interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. Main outcome measure Perceptions and expectations of nurses and doctors. Results Doctors and nurses had limited experience of working with pharmacists. Most had a vague idea of what pharmacists can contribute within a ward setting. Participants, mainly nurses, suggested inventory and drug distribution roles, but few were aware of the pharmacists' skills and clinical competence. Different views were expressed on whether the new clinical pharmacy service would have an impact on workload. However, most participants took a positive view of having a ward-based pharmacist. Conclusion This study provided an opportunity to explore doctors' and nurses' expectations of the role of clinical pharmacists before a clinical pharmacy service was implemented. To successfully implement a clinical pharmacy service, roles, clinical competence and responsibilities should be clearly described. Furthermore, it is important to focus on collaborative working relationships between doctors, nurses and pharmacists.

  6. Ward identities for amplitudes with reggeized gluons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartles, J.; Vacca, G.P.

    2012-05-01

    Starting from the effective action of high energy QCD we derive Ward identities for Green's functions of reggeized gluons. They follow from the gauge invariance of the effective action, and allow to derive new representations of amplitudes containing physical particles as well as reggeized gluons. We explicitly demonstrate their validity for the BFKL kernel, and we present a new derivation of the kernel.

  7. Medication reconciliation and prescribing reviews by pharmacy technicians in a geriatric ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buck, Thomas Croft; Gronkjaer, Louise Smed; Duckert, Marie-Louise

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Incomplete medication histories obtained on hospital admission are responsible for more than 25% of prescribing errors. This study aimed to evaluate whether pharmacy technicians can assist hospital physicians' in obtaining medication histories by performing medication reconciliation an...... reconciliation and focused medication reviews. Further randomized, controlled studies including a larger number of patients are required to elucidate whether these observations are of significance and of importance for securing patient safety....... and prescribing reviews. A secondary aim was to evaluate whether the interventions made by pharmacy technicians could reduce the time spent by the nurses on administration of medications to the patients. METHODS: This observational study was conducted over a 7 week period in the geriatric ward at Odense...... University Hospital, Denmark. Two pharmacy technicians conducted medication reconciliation and prescribing reviews at the time of patients' admission to the ward. The reviews were conducted according to standard operating procedures developed by a clinical pharmacist and approved by the Head of the Geriatric...

  8. A multisource feedback tool to assess ward round leadership skills of senior paediatric trainees: (1) Development of tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayana, Indumathy; Wall, David; Bindal, Taruna; Goodyear, Helen M

    2015-05-01

    Leading a ward round is an essential skill for hospital consultants and senior trainees but is rarely assessed during training. To investigate the key attributes for ward round leadership and to use these results to develop a multisource feedback (MSF) tool to assess the ward round leadership skills of senior specialist trainees. A panel of experts comprising four senior paediatric consultants and two nurse managers were interviewed from May to August 2009. From analysis of the interview transcripts, 10 key themes emerged. A structured questionnaire based on the key themes was designed and sent electronically to paediatric consultants, nurses and trainees at a large university hospital (June-October 2010). 81 consultants, nurses and trainees responded to the survey. The internal consistency of this tool was high (Cronbach's α 0.95). Factor analysis showed that five factors accounted for 72% of variance. The five key areas for ward round leadership were communication skills, preparation and organisation, teaching and enthusiasm, team working and punctuality; communication was the most important key theme. A MSF tool for ward round leadership skills was developed with these areas as five domains. We believe that this tool will add to the current assessment tools available by providing feedback about ward round leadership skills. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Learning to participate while shifting location in a hospital ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Malene

    2015-01-01

    of the development of a professional identity for the students as they learn to become competent practitioners or members (Sacks, 1989; Schegloff, 2007) in the field of nursing. The present study shows how students and their clinical supervisors move through different locations when students are introduced to new...... practices and interactions with patients: Instruction before interaction with patient takes place in the guardroom, the interaction with the patient takes place in the patient’s room and the assessment of the performed task takes place in the guard room again. Thus different kinds of routinized...... participation and interaction emerge that are connected to the different locations. Participation is thus understood in two ways: 1) Learning to participate as a competent practitioner with a patient is learned not just in situ by the patient’s side but also by 2) participating in interaction with the clinical...

  10. Nursing safety management in onco-hematology pediatric wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelle Miranda da Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at identifying how safety management is applied by nurses to manage the nursing care, and at analyzing their challenges in onco-hematology pediatric wards. Descriptive and qualitative research, conducted at the Instituto Estadual de Hematologia Arthur de Siqueira Cavalcanti, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in August 2013. Six nurses were interviewed, and the content analysis was used. The key aspects relate to the importance of training and continuing education, teamwork, with the challenges in the care of hospitalized children and particularities of the disease, and the systematization, use of instruments and protocols. For child safety, the relationship between the administration and support is critical to the quality of care.

  11. Barriers to Nurse-Patient Communication in Cardiac Surgery Wards: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafipour, Vida; Mohammad, Eesa; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2014-01-01

    Background: An appropriate and effective nurse-patient communication is of the most important aspect of caring. The formation and continuation of such a relationship depends on various factors such as the conditions and context of communication and a mutual understanding between the two. A review of the literature shows that little research is carried out on identification of such barriers in hospital wards between the patients and the healthcare staff. Objectives: The present study was therefore conducted to explore the experiences of nurses and patients on communication barriers in hospital cardiac surgery wards. Design and Methods: This qualitative research was carried out using a content analysis method (Graneheim & Lundman, 2004). The participants were selected by a purposeful sampling and consist of 10 nurses and 11 patients from the cardiac surgery wards of three teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Data was gathered by unstructured interviews. All interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Results: Findings were emerged in three main themes including job dissatisfaction (with the sub-themes of workload tension and decreased motivation), routine-centered care (with the sub-themes of habitual interventions, routinized and technical interventions, and objective supervision), and distrust in competency of nurses (with the sub-themes of cultural contrast, less responsible nurses, and their apathy towards the patients). Conclusions: Compared to other studies, our findings identified different types of communication barriers depending on the nursing settings. These findings can be used by the ward clinical nursing managers at cardiac surgery wards to improve the quality of nursing care. PMID:25363126

  12. 25 CFR 117.23 - Transactions between guardian and ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transactions between guardian and ward. 117.23 Section... COMPETENCY § 117.23 Transactions between guardian and ward. Business dealings between the guardian and his ward involving the sale or purchase of any property, real or personal, by the guardian to or from the...

  13. Professor Gender, Age, and "Hotness" in Influencing College Students' Generation and Interpretation of Professor Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohr-Preston, Sara L.; Boswell, Stefanie S.; McCaleb, Kayla; Robertson, Deanna

    2016-01-01

    A sample of 230 undergraduate psychology students rated their expectations of a bogus professor (who was randomly designated a man or woman and "hot" versus "not hot") based on ratings and comments found on RateMyProfessors.com. Five professor qualities were derived using principal components analysis: dedication,…

  14. Cross-year peer tutoring on internal medicine wards: results of a qualitative focus group analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krautter M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Markus Krautter,1 Sven Andreesen,2 Nadja Köhl-Hackert,2 Katja Hoffmann,3 Wolfgang Herzog,2 Christoph Nikendei2 1Department of Nephrology, University of Heidelberg, 2Department of General Internal Medicine and Psychosomatics, University of Heidelberg Medical Hospital, 3Department of General Practice and Health Services Research, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany Background: Peer-assisted learning (PAL has become a well-accepted teaching method within medical education. However, descriptions of on-ward PAL programs are rare. A focus group analysis of a newly established PAL program on an internal medicine ward was conducted to provide insights into PAL teaching from a student perspective.Purpose: To provide insights into students' experiences regarding their on-ward training with and without accompanying PAL tutors.Methods: A total of N=168 medical students in their sixth semester participated in the investigation (intervention group: N=88; control group: N=80. The intervention group took part in the PAL program, while the control group received standard on-ward training. There were seven focus groups with N=43 participants (intervention group: four focus groups, N=28 participants; control group: three focus groups, N=15 participants. The discussions were analyzed using content analysis.Results: The intervention group emphasized the role of the tutors as competent and well-trained teachers, most beneficial in supervising clinical skills. Tutors motivate students, help them to integrate into the ward team, and provide a non-fear-based working relationship whereby students' anxiety regarding working on ward decreases. The control group had to rely on autodidactic learning strategies when neither supervising physicians nor final-year students were available.Conclusion: On-ward PAL programs represent a particularly valuable tool for students' support in training clinical competencies on ward. The tutor–student working alliance

  15. Caracterização de idosos internados em enfermaria de pronto-socorro quanto à vulnerabilidade social e programática Caracterización de los ancianos internados en enfermería de urgencias sobre la vulnerabilidad social y programática Characterization of older individuals hospitalized in an emergency ward as regards social and programmatic vulnerability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellen Cristina Sthal

    2010-12-01

    en la enfermedad, atendiendo a sus vulnerabilidades y respetando su autonomía y dignidad.The increase in elderly population will result in major socioeconomic changes, which will directly affect the health care sector. The study aimed characterizes hospitalized older individuals as regards social and programmatic vulnerability. It is a quantitative study performed at the Ward for Adult Patients at the Emergency Unit of the Botucatu University Hospital - UNESP. Data were collected from May to October, 2009 by means of interviews and information from patients' charts. The sample consisted of 71 individuals whose mean age was 74.30 years. Most of them lived with a relative and were assisted by a health care service, but only eight were members of a community association or participated in other forms of social leisure. Integrated care to older persons must urgently become a reality, and an individual approach focused on the person rather than on one's disease must be utilized, paying attention to older patients' vulnerabilities and respecting their autonomy and dignity.

  16. Observations on Professor Hayek's Plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig von Mises

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This memorandum was written at the request of Henry Hazlitt to provide Mises’s comments on and concerns about F.A. Hayek’s initial proposals for what became the Mont Pèlerin Society. Mises stresses that those who favor liberty and freedom and oppose totalitarianism must also oppose interventionism. The memo argues that those who fought and lost against the rising tide of totalitarianism at the turn of the 20th Century lost their battles because they settled for middle-of-the-road policies that conceded considerable ground to the socialists. The weak point in Professor Hayek’s plan is that it relies upon the cooperation of many men who are today’s middle-of-the-roaders. As interventionists, they may not be the hoped-for intellectual pioneers to inspire people to build a freer world.

  17. The Professors behind the MOOC Hype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolowich, Steve

    2013-01-01

    The largest-ever survey of professors who have taught MOOCs, or massive open online courses, shows that the process is time-consuming, but, according to the instructors, often successful. Nearly half of the professors felt their online courses were as rigorous academically as the versions they taught in the classroom. The survey, conducted by "The…

  18. Professor Nukem - et eksperiment med oplevelsesbaseret forskningsformidling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil; Thorhauge, Anne Mette

    2007-01-01

    Professor Nukem er resultatet af et forskningsprojekt om oplevelsesbaseret forskningsformidling der har form som et computerspil med tilhørende website, hvor brugeren interaktivt kan engagere sig i forskning omkring sociale og kulturelle aspekter ved computerspil. Professor Nukem kan spilles på...

  19. Professor Kodi Husimi promoted accelerator projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Ken

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of my article is to describe how deeply Professor Husimi devoted himself to promote large accelerator projects in Japan, as the establishment of National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK), Photon Factory and TRISTAN, in which I myself was deeply involved. In addition, some topics related that I was a student of Professor Husimi are also reported. (author)

  20. The Reluctant Professor: Implications for University Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Edgar H.

    1973-01-01

    Stating the belief that most analyses of the university fail to deal realistically with the role of the professor, the author's purpose is to show why it is difficult and possible undesirable to involve professors deeply in issues of university government. (Author/JB)

  1. Ward-Takahashi identities in quantum electrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishijima, K; Sasaki, R [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1975-03-01

    The Ward-Takahashi identities are derived for connected Green's functions in quantum electrodynamics without recourse to equal-time commutation relations, field equations and the Feynman-Dyson perturbation expansions. The argument is based on the dispersion formulation of field theories and only finite expressions are used throughout this derivation. These identities are shown to be consequences of the subtraction conditions imposed upon the 2-, 3- and 4-point Green's functions.

  2. Ward Valley transfer stalled by Babbitt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt announced on November 24 that he would not authorize the land transfer for the proposed low-level waste disposal site at Ward Valley, California, until a legal challenge to the facility's license and environmental impact statement is resolved. Even if the matter is resolved quickly, there exists the possibility that yet another hearing will be held on the project, even though state courts in California have stated flatly that no such hearings are required

  3. Ward Valley transfer stalled by Babbitt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt announced on November 24 that he would not authorize the land transfer for the proposed low-level waste disposal site at Ward Valley, California, until a legal challenge to the facility's license and environmental impact statement is resolved. Even if the matter is resolved quickly, there exists the possibility that yet another hearing will be held on the project, even though state courts in California have stated flatly that no such hearings are required.

  4. Service audit of a forensic rehabilitation ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Susan; Gudjonsson, Gisli H; Needham-Bennett, Humphrey; Chick, Kay

    2009-10-01

    An open forensic rehabilitation ward provides an important link bridging the gap between secure and community provisions. This paper provides an audit of such a service by examining the records of an open forensic rehabilitation ward over a five-year period from 1 June 2000 until 31 May 2005. During the audit period there were 51 admissions, involving 45 different patients, and 50 discharges. The majority of the patients came from secure unit facilities, acute psychiatric wards or home. Thirty-nine patients were discharged either into hostels (66%) or their home (12%). The majority of patients (80%) had on admission a primary diagnosis of either schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Most had an extensive forensic history. The focus of their admission was to assess and treat their mental illness/disorder and offending behaviour and this was successful as the majority of patients were transferred to a community placement after a mean of 15 months. It is essential that there is a well-integrated care pathway for forensic patients, involving constructive liaison with generic services and a well-structured treatment programme which integrates the key principles of the 'recovery model' approach to care.

  5. The medication process in a psychatric hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Lisby, Marianne; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2013-01-01

    in the wards collecting dispensed drugs; and (3) chart reviews. All errors, except errors in discharge summaries, were assessed for potential consequences by two clinical pharmacologists. SETTING: Three psychiatric wards with adult patients at Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark, from January 2010-April 2010...

  6. Remembering for tomorrow: Professor Mansour Ali Haseeb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Mustafa Abdalla M

    2013-01-01

    This is a highlight of the obituary ceremony in tribute to Professor Mansour Ali Haseeb (1910 - 1973), organized by the Medical Students Association of the Faculty of Medicine, the University of Khartoum (U of K). Professor Haseeb has been the first Sudanese Professor and first Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. He was an outstanding humane teacher, mentor and researcher, and was awarded the international Dr. Shousha Foundation Prize and Medal by the WHO. He was also an active citizen in public life and became Mayor of Omdurman City. The obituary ceremony reflected the feelings of the medical community and included speeches by Professor Abdalla El Tayeb, President of U of K; the Dean, Faculty of Medicine; the Late Professor Haseeb's colleagues and students, His family representative, and an elegy poem.

  7. Safety and security in acute admission psychiatric wards in Ireland and London: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowman, Seamus; Bowers, Len

    2009-05-01

    The comparative element of this study is to describe safety and security measures in psychiatric acute admission wards in the Republic of Ireland and London; to describe differences and similarities in terms of safety and security patterns in the Republic of Ireland and London; and to make recommendations on safety and security to mental health services management and psychiatric nurses. Violence is a serious problem in psychiatric services and staff experience significant psychological reactions to being assaulted. Health and Safety Authorities in the UK and Ireland have expressed concern about violence and assault in healthcare, however, there remains a lack of clarity on matters of procedure and policy pertaining to safety and security in psychiatric hospitals. A descriptive survey research design was employed. Questionnaires were circulated to all acute wards in London and in Ireland and the resulting data compared. A total of 124 psychiatric wards from London and 43 wards from Ireland were included in this study and response rates of 70% (London) and 86% (Ireland) were obtained. Differences and similarities in safety and security practices were identified between London and Ireland, with Irish wards having generally higher and more intensive levels of security. There is a lack of coherent policy and procedure in safety and security measures across psychiatric acute admission wards in the Republic of Ireland and London. Given the trends in European Union (EU) regulation, there is a strong argument for the publication of acceptable minimum guidelines for safety and security in mental health services across the EU. There must be a concerted effort to ensure that all policy and procedure in safety and security is founded on evidence and best practice. Mental health managers must establish a review of work safety and security procedures and practices. Risk assessment and environmental audits of all mental health clinical environments should be mandatory.

  8. Sodium serum levels in hypoalbuminemic adults at general medical wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunha Daniel Ferreira da

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoalbuminemia may cause interstitial edema and hemodilution, which we hypothesized may influence serum sodium levels. Our purpose was to compare serum sodium levels of hospitalized adults with or without hypoalbuminemia. All sodium and albumin serum levels of 142 adults hospitalized at general medical wards over a six-month period were searched at a University Hospital mainframe computer. Relevant laboratory data and clinical details were also registered. Hypoalbuminemia was defined by serum albumin concentration < 3.3 g/dl Fisher, Mann-Whitney, and Student's t tests were applied to compare groups with or without hypoalbuminemia. Ninety-nine patients, classified as hypoalbuminemic, had lower blood hemoglobin (10.68 ± 2.62 vs. 13.54 ± 2.41, and sodium (135.1 ± 6.44 vs. 139.9 ± 4.76mEq/l and albumin (2.74 ± 0.35 vs. 3.58 ± 0.28g/dl serum levels than non-hypoalbuminemic (n=43. Pearson's coefficient showed a significant direct correlation between albumin and sodium serum levels (r=0.40 and between serum albumin and blood hemoglobin concentration (r=0.46. Our results suggest that hypoalbuminemic adults have lower serum sodium levels than those without hypoalbuminemia, a phenomenon that may be at least partially attributed to body water retention associated with acute phase response syndrome.

  9. Differences in selected medical care parameters in rheumatic disease ward patients of different ages of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Pobrotyn

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Rheumatic diseases are becoming more and more common in Poland with the ageing of the population. Nearly 18% of the total hospital admissions in Poland result from rheumatic diseases, which was equivalent to 350 thousand cases in the year 2008. These diseases tend to last for many decades, decreasing both the quality of life and income of the patients as well as increasing the medical institutions’ workload and society’s financial burden. The aim of the study was to determine whether the medical care parameters in a rheumatic disease hospital ward show any significant differences among different patient age groups – especially such that would support taking them into account as a basis for adjusting the financial coverage level of medical services. Material and methods : Data on hospitalizations at the Rheumatic Diseases Ward of Wroclaw University Hospital in Wroclaw in the years 2009–2015 were analyzed, taking into account the age groups, number of hospital admissions, their duration and causes. Relevant statistical data analysis was performed. Discussion: The study revealed that the number of old patients hospitalized at the rheumatic diseases ward increased over the last 6 years and that such statistically significant differences do exist: on average the old patients not only tend to stay much longer at the hospital, but also suffer from a different and more diverse spectrum of diseases in comparison to their younger counterparts. Conclusions : The detected differences in medical care parameters support the need for more individualized medical care and increased cost of the hospital stay in the case of older patients. Consequently, those factors justify the necessity to increase the value of medical services in the case of old patients, possibly also taking into account the variation between age subgroups.

  10. The effects of introducing a clinical pharmacist on orthopaedic wards in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buck, Thomas Croft; Brandstrup, Lene; Brandslund, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects and cost effects of introducing clinical pharmacists on hospital wards. METHODS: Comparative prospective study on four orthopaedic surgical wards in two hospitals. The primary effect variables were 10 target areas widely considered to be indicators of good...... prescription practice. Prescriptions not following good practice in these intervention areas were defined as "sub-optimal prescriptions," and then discussed between a physician and a clinical pharmacist. The primary parameter was the difference in the number of days with a sub-optimal prescription (Mann......-Whitney test). RESULTS: On an average 20% of all the patients had a sub-optimal prescription. Of these, 70% were changed by the physician after intervention by the clinical pharmacist. There was a statistically significant difference in the duration of days in treatment with a sub-optimal prescription. Where...

  11. Improving the Quality of Ward-based Surgical Care With a Human Factors Intervention Bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Maximilian J; Arora, Sonal; King, Dominic; Darzi, Ara

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the impact of a human factors intervention bundle on the quality of ward-based surgical care in a UK hospital. Improving the culture of a surgical team is a difficult task. Engagement with stakeholders before intervention is key. Studies have shown that appropriate supervision can enhance surgical ward safety. A pre-post intervention study was conducted. The intervention bundle consisted of twice-daily attending ward rounds, a "chief resident of the week" available at all times on the ward, an escalation of care protocol and team contact cards. Twenty-seven junior and senior surgeons completed validated questionnaires assessing supervision, escalation of care, and safety culture pre and post-intervention along with interviews to further explore the impact of the intervention. Patient outcomes pre and postintervention were also analyzed. Questionnaires revealed significant improvements in supervision postintervention (senior median pre 5 vs post 7, P = 0.002 and junior 4 vs 6, P = 0.039) and senior surgeon approachability (junior 5 vs 6, P = 0.047). Both groups agreed that they would feel safer as a patient in their hospital postintervention (senior 3 vs 4.5, P = 0.021 and junior 3 vs 4, P = 0.034). The interviews confirmed that the safety culture of the department had improved. There were no differences in inpatient mortality, cardiac arrest, reoperation, or readmission rates pre and postintervention. Improving supervision and introducing clear protocols can improve safety culture on the surgical ward. Future work should evaluate the effect these measures have on patient outcomes in multiple institutions.

  12. Establishing female-only areas in psychiatry wards to improve safety and quality of care for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Jayashri; Gavrilidis, Emmy; Lee, Stuart; Van Rheenen, Tamsyn E; Grigg, Jasmin; Hayes, Emily; Lee, Adeline; Ong, Roy; Seeary, Amy; Andersen, Shelley; Worsley, Rosie; Keppich-Arnold, Sandra; Stafrace, Simon

    2014-12-01

    Our aim was to assess the impact of creating a female-only area within a mixed-gender inpatient psychiatry service, on female patient safety and experience of care. The Alfred hospital reconfigured one of its two psychiatry wards to include a female-only area. Documented incidents compromising the safety of women on each ward in the 6 months following the refurbishment were compared. Further, a questionnaire assessing perceived safety and experience of care was administered to female inpatients on both wards, and staff feedback was also obtained. The occurrence of documented incidents compromising females' safety was found to be significantly lower on the ward containing a female-only area. Women staying on this ward rated their perceived safety and experience of care significantly more positively than women staying where no such gender segregation was available. Further, the female-only area was identified by the majority of surveyed staff to provide a safer environment for female patients. Establishing female-only areas in psychiatry wards is an effective way to improve the safety and experience of care for female patients. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  13. iPad use at the bedside: a tool for engaging patients in care processes during ward rounds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysari, M T; Adams, K; Lehnbom, E C; Westbrook, J I; Day, R O

    2014-10-01

    Previous work has examined the impact of technology on information sharing and communication between doctors and patients in general practice consultations, but very few studies have explored this in hospital settings. To assess if, and how, senior clinicians use an iPad to share information (e.g. patient test results) with patients during ward rounds and to explore patients' and doctors' experiences of information sharing events. Ten senior doctors were shadowed on ward rounds on general wards during interactions with 525 patients over 77.3 h, seven senior doctors were interviewed and 180 patients completed a short survey. Doctors reported that information sharing with patients is critical to the delivery of high-quality healthcare, but were not seen to use the iPad to share information with patients on ward rounds. Patients did not think the iPad had impacted on their engagement with doctors on rounds. Ward rounds were observed to follow set routines and patient interactions were brief. Although the iPad potentially creates new opportunities for information sharing and patient engagement, the ward round may not present the most appropriate context for this to be done. © 2014 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  14. Characteristics of aggression among psychiatric inpatients by ward type in Japan: Using the Staff Observation Aggression Scale - Revised (SOAS-R).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Makiko; Noda, Toshie; Sugiyama, Naoya; Yoshihama, Fumihiro; Miyake, Michi; Ito, Hiroto

    2017-12-01

    Aggressive behaviour by psychiatric patients is a serious issue in clinical practice, and adequate management of such behaviour is required, with careful evaluation of the factors causing the aggression. To examine the characteristics of aggressive incidents by ward type, a cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted for 6 months between April 2012 and June 2013 using the Staff Observation Aggression Scale - Revised, Japanese version (SOAS-R) in 30 wards across 20 Japanese psychiatric hospitals. Participating wards were categorized into three types based on the Japanese medical reimbursement system: emergency psychiatric, acute psychiatric, and standard wards (common in Japan, mostly treating non-acute patients). On analyzing the 443 incidents reported, results showed significant differences in SOAS-R responses by ward type. In acute and emergency psychiatric wards, staff members were the most common target of aggression. In acute psychiatric wards, staff requiring patients to take medication was the most common provocation, and verbal aggression was the most commonly used means. In emergency psychiatric wards, victims felt threatened. In contrast, in standard wards, both the target and provocation of aggression were most commonly other patients, hands were used, victims reported experiencing physical pain, and seclusion was applied to stop their behaviour. These findings suggest that ward environment was an important factor influencing aggressive behaviour. Ensuring the quality and safety of psychiatric care requires understanding the characteristics of incidents that staff are likely to encounter in each ward type, as well as implementing efforts to deal with the incidents adequately and improve the treatment environment. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  15. Disruption of parent participation: nurses' strategies to manage parents on children's wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Imelda

    2008-12-01

    To investigate parent participation in the hospitalized child's care from the perspectives of children, parents and nurses. Parent participation in the hospitalized child's care has been increasingly promoted in paediatric nursing for many years because it ameliorates the adverse aspects of hospitalization, avoids parental separation and contributes to quality care for sick children. Parent participation is assumed to be unproblematic but evidence exists that nurses often have difficulty caring for parents. Using grounded method, data were collected through in-depth interviews, questionnaires and observation with 12 nurses from four paediatric wards in two hospitals in England. The dominant process appeared to be the socialization of parents to their role on the ward through inclusionary and exclusionary tactics. Nurses controlled the nature of parents' participation and parents had to 'toe the line'. Although participation was presented as optional, parents were presented with no course other than acceptance. Parents were expected to stay with their child, behave properly and be involved in care. When parents did not adhere to these norms, they caused disruption to the order and routine of the ward. Compliance or non-compliance to the set of norms and rules was followed by reward or punishment. The nurses' dependence on parents' active participation in the organization and delivery of the work suggests that parent participation as it is practised is clearly about administrative efficiency, not consumer empowerment. Organizational and managerial issues must be examined to ensure that nurses are adequately prepared and resourced to support parents on the ward. Continuing assessment of parents' expectations though a structured assessment tool would help reduce misunderstandings and conflict. Nurses should assess the situational context before relying on subjective impressions and assumptions about parents' participation in care.

  16. Fall prediction according to nurses' clinical judgment: differences between medical, surgical, and geriatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milisen, Koen; Coussement, Joke; Flamaing, Johan; Vlaeyen, Ellen; Schwendimann, René; Dejaeger, Eddy; Surmont, Kurt; Boonen, Steven

    2012-06-01

    To assess the value of nurses' clinical judgment (NCJ) in predicting hospital inpatient falls. Prospective multicenter study. Six Belgian hospitals. Two thousand four hundred seventy participants (mean age 67.6 ± 18.3; female, 55.7%) on four surgical (n = 812, 32.9%), eight geriatric (n = 666, 27.0%), and four general medical wards (n = 992, 40.1%) were included upon admission. All participants were hospitalized for at least 48 hours. Within 24 hours after admission, nurses gave their judgment on the question "Do you think your patient is at high risk for falling?" Nurses were not trained in assessing fall risk. Falls were documented on a standardized incident report form. During hospitalization, 143 (5.8%) participants experienced one or more falls, accounting for 202 falls and corresponding to an overall rate of 7.9 falls per 1,000 patient days. NCJ of participant's risk of falling had high sensitivity (78-92%) with high negative predictive value (94-100%) but low positive predictive value (4-17%). Although false-negative rates were low (8-22%) for all departments and age groups, false-positive rates were high (55-74%), except on surgical and general medical wards and in participants younger than 75. This analysis, based on multicenter data and a large sample size, suggests that NCJ can be recommended on surgical and general medical wards and in individuals younger than 75, but on geriatric wards and in participants aged 75 and older, NCJ overestimates risk of falling and is thus not recommended because expensive comprehensive fall-prevention measures would be implemented in a large number of individuals who do not need it. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  17. PROFESSORES: IMAGENS DO FUTURO PRESENTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitê Alves Bezerra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ao observar a comunidade portuguesa que busca compreender a historicidade das formas e dos processos de escolarização por meio do estabelecimento de intenso diálogo com outras comunidades, é impossível não dar destaque à figura de António Manuel Seixas Nóvoa. Nascido em Lisboa no ano de 1954, aos 18 anos inicia o curso de Ciências da Educação na Universidade de Lisboa. Após lecionar em importantes universidades tais como Paris V, Oxford e Columbia University, atualmente acumula as posições de reitor da Universidade de Lisboa e professor catedrático da Faculdade de Psicologia e de Ciências da Educação na Instituição. Nóvoa tem se destacado à frente de debates internacionais a respeito da história da educação e educação comparada.

  18. Job satisfaction and intent to leave among psychiatric nurses: closed versus open wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Alexander; Kagan, Ilya

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate: (a) the association between socio-demographic variables, job satisfaction and intent to leave among hospital psychiatric nurses, and (b) the differences in the above between psychiatric nurses working on closed and open wards. After receiving ethical approval, a convenience sample of 52 (70% of total nursing staff) was drawn from psychiatric nurses in a large Israeli psychiatric hospital (95% response rate). The sample completed anonymously a self-administered structured questionnaire. A negative correlation was found between job satisfaction and intent to leave and between age, all categories of seniority, and intent to leave. Closed-ward nurses reported a higher intent to leave psychiatric nursing. Nurses under 35 reported a significantly higher intent to leave psychiatric nursing than nurses over 35. Job satisfaction was significantly higher among full-time nurses than part-time. Psychiatric hospitals need to pay attention to all factors associated with workers' readiness to leave. Given the widespread shortage of nurses, it is especially important that they address the relatively low job satisfaction of both younger and part-time nurses, and the particular stresses that closed-ward nurses work under. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. In Conversation with: Professor Liz Thomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Nelson

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Editors Karen Nelson, John Clarke and Sally Kift interview Professor Liz Thomas,  Director of the Widening Participation Research Centre at Edge Hill University.  She is also Lead Adviser Retention and Success at the Higher Education Academy, England.   Professor Thomas was one of the keynote speakers at the 15th International First Year in Higher Education Conference held in Brisbane, Australia from the 26th – 29th of June, 2012.  Professor Thomas joined the Journal Editors at the conclusion of the main conference program to explore some of the key themes raised in her address.  

  20. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork.

  1. Choosing a commode for the ward environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinger, C; Pain, H; Pascoe, J; Gore, S

    The choice of appropriate equipment to promote patient independence and enhance nursing care is of major concern to the nurse in the ward environment. This article reports on a recent evaluation of specialist commodes, (Ballinger et al, 1994), with reference to the programme funded by the Medical Devices Agency, Department of Health, under whose auspices the project was carried out. The results of user evaluations and technical tests of six mobile commodes are presented, the preferred model being the Mayfair commode supplied by Carters (J&A) Ltd. The article concludes by identifying a number of important considerations to bear in mind when selecting a commode.

  2. Clinical assessment and treatment in paediatric wards in the north-east of the United Republic of Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reyburn, Hugh; Mwakasungula, Emmanuel; Chonya, Semkini

    2008-01-01

    ; appropriate feeds were not present in any of the hospitals. A diagnosis of HIV-AIDS was made in only two cases while approximately 5% children admitted were expected to be infected with HIV in this area. CONCLUSION: Clinical assessment of children admitted to paediatric wards is disturbingly poor...

  3. Rationale for a home dialysis virtual ward: design and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Michael E; Bargman, Joanne M; Copland, Michael; Hladunewich, Michelle; Tennankore, Karthik K; Levin, Adeera; Oliver, Matthew; Pauly, Robert P; Perl, Jeffrey; Zimmerman, Deborah; Chan, Christopher T

    2014-02-14

    Home-based renal replacement therapy (RRT) [peritoneal dialysis (PD) and home hemodialysis (HHD)] offers independent quality of life and clinical advantages compared to conventional in-center hemodialysis. However, follow-up may be less complete for home dialysis patients following a change in care settings such as post hospitalization. We aim to implement a Home Dialysis Virtual Ward (HDVW) strategy, which is targeted to minimize gaps of care. The HDVW Pilot Study will enroll consecutive PD and HHD patients who fulfilled any one of our inclusion criteria: 1. following discharge from hospital, 2. after interventional procedure(s), 3. prescription of anti-microbial agents, or 4. following completion of home dialysis training. Clinician-led telephone interviews are performed weekly for 2 weeks until VW discharge. Case-mix (modified Charlson Comorbidity Index), symptoms (the modified Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale) and patient satisfaction are assessed serially. The number of VW interventions relating to eight pre-specified domains will be measured. Adverse events such as re-hospitalization and health-services utilization will be ascertained through telephone follow-up after discharge from the VW at 2, 4, 12 weeks. The VW re-hospitalization rate will be compared with a contemporary cohort (matched for age, gender, renal replacement therapy and co-morbidities). Our protocol has been approved by research ethics board (UHN: 12-5397-AE). Written informed consent for participation in the study will be obtained from participants. This report serves as a blueprint for the design and implementation of a novel health service delivery model for home dialysis patients. The major goal of the HDVW initiative is to provide appropriate and effective supports to medically complex patients in a targeted window of vulnerability. (NCT01912001).

  4. Drawing Hospital Foodscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen; Fisker, Anna Marie; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    This poster presents a series of drawings depicting the initial considerations made with the Ph.D. project for an improved ‘Interior Design for Food’ in a Danish hospital ward. The project concerns a study on the ontological and symbolic interrelationship possibly existing between food...

  5. Turning university professors into competent learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stefanova, Eliza; Ilieva, Miroslava; Nikolova, Nikolina; Stefanov, Krassen

    2008-01-01

    Stefanova, E., Ilieva, M., Nikolova, N, & Stefanov, K. (2008). Turning university professors into competent learners. In H. W. Sligte & R. Koper (Eds.), Proceedings of the 4th TENCompetence Open Workshop. Empowering Learners for Lifelong Competence Development: pedagogical, organisational and

  6. Lifelong learning: Science professors need leadership training

    OpenAIRE

    Leiserson, Charles E.; McVinney, Chuck

    2015-01-01

    Education does not stop. Professors must update and develop their technical skills throughout their careers. But as they progress, few take the time — or are offered the opportunity — to become educated in how to be an effective leader.

  7. The role of the ward manager in promoting patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnock, David

    In this article the role of the ward manager in promoting patient safety is explored. The background to the development of the patient safety agenda is briefly discussed and the relationship between quality and safety is illustrated. The pivotal importance of the role of the ward manager in delivering services to patients is underlined and literature on patient safety is examined to identify what a ward manager can do to make care safer. Possible actions of the ward manager to improve safety discussed in the literature are structured around the Leadership Framework. This framework identifies seven domains for the leadership of service delivery. Ward managers use their personal qualities, and network and work within teams, while managing performance and facilitating innovation, change and measurement for improvement. The challenge of promoting patient safety for ward managers is briefly explored and recommendations for further research are made.

  8. [Specificity of the anaerobic bacterial infections in the surgical and orthopedic wards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierzkowska, Marta; Majewska, Anna; Sawicka-Grzelak, Anna; Młynarczyk, Andrzej; Ładomirska-Pestkowska, Katarzvna; Młynarczyk, Grazyna

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the contribution strictly anaerobic bacteria in the etiology of infections in patients on surgery and orthopedic wards. We examined 159 samples taken from patients hospitalized in surgical wards and 179 clinical specimens taken from orthopedic patients. Clinical strains of obligate anaerobes were identified by API 20A biochemical tests (ATB Expression, bioMerieux S.A., France). Susceptibility of the clinical strains was examined by ATB ANA (bioMerieux S.A., France) system. The MIC values were determined by the gradient diffusion method, Etest (AB BIODISK, Sweden i bioMerieux S.A., France). Gram-negative bacteria predominant in the samples taken from surgical patients, Most frequently we isolated rods of the genus Bacteroides (26%): B. fragilis, B. ovatus/B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. distasonis. In 44 samples (28%) we identified only anaerobic bacteria. Multibacterial isolations, with the participation of anaerobic and aerobic flora, dominated among patients in the study. Overall 238 strictly anaerobic bacteria were cultured from patients hospitalized in orthopedic wards. Gram-positive bacteria accounted for 78%. The most frequently were isolated Peptostreptococcus (56%), Propionibacterium (10%) species. In this study all Bacteroides strains were resistant to penicillin G. Some species were resistant to clindamycin, as well. Overall 40% of Bacteroides strains taken from surgical and 50% isolated from orthopedic wards showed no sensitivity to this antibiotic. A similar phenomenon was observed among bacteria of the genus Prevotella. In samples taken from orthopedic patients we observed the predominance of Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria. Some of them were part of the normal flora but they should not be excluded as an etiology agents of infection. The specimens taken from patients treated in surgical wards showed the presence of a mixed microflora, which included aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, primarily Gram-negative rods

  9. Professor dr hab. Anna Maria Bujakiewicz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kujawa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the biography and scientific achievements of Professor Anna Bujakiewicz. After receiving her master’s degree and doctorate in biology and mycology from Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Professor Bujakiewicz continued her exciting research and teaching on mycology at her Alma Mater Posnaniensis for more than 50 years. Her publications in this field include many books, articles, and other scholarly reports.

  10. The transition from staff nurse to ward leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Caroline; Al-Sadoon, Tara; Hemmings, Laura; Jackson, Karen; Mulligan, Paul

    Moving from the staff nurse to ward sister role involves acquiring a range of skills to lead and motivate a team and ensure standards of care are high. Recognising new ward sisters' need for support, a trust developed a training programme to enable them to develop the necessary skills and provide mutual support. This article discusses the development of the programme and offers the reflections of three ward sisters who participated in it.

  11. The chiral Ward-Takahashi identity in the ladder approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugo, Taichiro; Mitchard, M.G.

    1992-01-01

    We show that the ladder approximation to the Schwinger-Dyson and Bethe-Salpeter equations preserves the Ward-Takahashi identity for the axial vector vertex if and only if we use the gluon momentum as the argument of the running coupling constant. However, in the usual Landau gauge this is inconsistent with the vector Ward identity. We propose a new method for making the ladder approximation scheme consistent with both vector and axial vector Ward identities. (orig.)

  12. 'It's a matter of patient safety': understanding challenges in everyday clinical practice for achieving good care on the surgical ward - a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangland, Eva; Nyberg, Berit; Yngman-Uhlin, Pia

    2017-06-01

    Surgical care plays an important role in the acute hospital's delivery of safe, high-quality patient care. Although demands for effectiveness are high in surgical wards quality of care and patient safety must also be secured. It is therefore necessary to identify the challenges and barriers linked to quality of care and patient safety with a focus on this specific setting. To explore situations and processes that support or hinder good safe patient care on the surgical ward. This qualitative study was based on a strategic sample of 10 department and ward leaders in three hospitals and six surgical wards in Sweden. Repeated reflective interviews were analysed using systematic text condensation. Four themes described the leaders' view of a complex healthcare setting that demands effectiveness and efficiency in moving patients quickly through the healthcare system. Quality of care and patient safety were often hampered factors such as a shift of care level, with critically ill patients cared for without reorganisation of nurses' competencies on the surgical ward. There is a gap between what is described in written documents and what is or can be performed in clinical practice to achieve good care and safe care on the surgical ward. A shift in levels of care on the surgical ward without reallocation of the necessary competencies at the patient's bedside show consequences for quality of care and patient safety. This means that surgical wards should consider reviewing their organisation and implementing more advanced nursing roles in direct patient care on all shifts. The ethical issues and the moral stress on nurses who lack the resources and competence to deliver good care according to professional values need to be made more explicit as a part of the patient safety agenda in the surgical ward. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  13. [The relative's need of participation in the care plan in a general medicine ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artioli, Giovanna; Finotto, Stefano; Paverelli, Luisa; Carpanoni, Marika; Casadei, Elena Turroni

    2006-01-01

    All the scientific literature agrees on the fact that the shelter in hospital is a delicate moment for the patient. Also for relatives the shelter in hospital of their dear one is not of easy management, often they are excluded, insecure, alone and with a frankly uncertain role. The purpose of this study is to explore the role and the needs perceived from the relatives of an in-patient in a general medicine unit and to explore which role and which needs of the relatives are perceived from the nurses of a same ward. The sample of the study consisted of 49 relatives of in-patients in the ward of Medicina III dell'Azienda Ospedaliera di Reggio Emilia and of 18 nurses of the same ward. It was found that information is the most important need expressed by the relatives and that for the nurses is hard to satisfy it. Moreover, the nurses haven't a clear idea of the relative's role and they are inclined to exclude them from the care project.

  14. Nurses' personal and ward accountability and missed nursing care: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srulovici, Einav; Drach-Zahavy, Anat

    2017-10-01

    Missed nursing care is considered an act of omission with potentially detrimental consequences for patients, nurses, and organizations. Although the theoretical conceptualization of missed nursing care specifies nurses' values, attitudes, and perceptions of their work environment as its core antecedents, empirical studies have mainly focused on nurses' socio-demographic and professional attributes. Furthermore, assessment of missed nursing care has been mainly based on same-source methods. This study aimed to test the joint effects of personal and ward accountability on missed nursing care, by using both focal (the nurse whose missed nursing care is examined) and incoming (the nurse responsible for the same patients at the subsequent shift) nurses' assessments of missed nursing care. A cross-sectional design, where nurses were nested in wards. A total of 172 focal and 123 incoming nurses from 32 nursing wards in eight hospitals. Missed nursing care was assessed with the 22-item MISSCARE survey using two sources: focal and incoming nurses. Personal and ward accountability were assessed by the focal nurse with two 19-item scales. Nurses' socio-demographics and ward and shift characteristics were also collected. Mixed linear models were used as the analysis strategy. Focal and incoming nurses reported occasional missed nursing care of the focal nurse (Mean=1.87, SD=0.71 and Mean=2.09, SD=0.84, respectively; r=0.55, ppersonal socio-demographic characteristics, higher personal accountability was significantly associated with decreased missed care (β=-0.29, p0.05). The interaction effect was significant (β=-0.31, ppersonal accountability and missed nursing care. Similar patterns were obtained for the incoming nurses' assessment of focal nurse's missed care. Use of focal and incoming nurses' missed nursing care assessments limited the common source bias and strengthened our findings. Personal and ward accountability are significant values, which are associated with

  15. Pressure ulcers in palliative ward patients: hyponatremia and low blood pressure as indicators of risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternal, Danuta; Wilczyński, Krzysztof; Szewieczek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Prevention strategies for pressure ulcer formation remain critical in patients with an advanced illness. We analyzed factors associated with the development of pressure ulcers in patients hospitalized in a palliative care ward setting. This study was a retrospective analysis of 329 consecutive patients with a mean age (± standard deviation) of 70.4±11.8 years (range: 30-96 years, median 70.0 years; 55.3% women), who were admitted to the Palliative Care Department between July 2012 and May 2014. Patients were hospitalized for mean of 24.8±31.4 days (1-310 days, median 14 days). A total of 256 patients (77.8%) died in the ward and 73 patients (22.2%) were discharged. Two hundred and six patients (62.6%) did not develop pressure ulcers during their stay in the ward, 84 patients (25.5%) were admitted with pressure ulcers, and 39 patients (11.9%) developed pressure ulcers in the ward. Four factors assessed at admission appear to predict the development of pressure ulcers in the multivariate logistic regression model: Waterlow score (odds ratio [OR] =1.140, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.057-1.229, P =0.001), transfer from other hospital wards (OR =2.938, 95% CI =1.339-6.448, P =0.007), hemoglobin level (OR =0.814, 95% CI =0.693-0.956, P =0.012), and systolic blood pressure (OR =0.976, 95% CI =0.955-0.997, P =0.023). Five other factors assessed during hospitalization appear to be associated with pressure ulcer development: mean evening body temperature (OR =3.830, 95% CI =1.729-8.486, P =0.001), mean Waterlow score (OR =1.194, 95% CI =1.092-1.306, P pressure (OR =0.956, 95% CI =0.929-0.984, P =0.003), and the lowest recorded hemoglobin level (OR =0.803, 95% CI =0.672-0.960, P =0.016). Hyponatremia and low blood pressure may contribute to the formation of pressure ulcers in patients with an advanced illness.

  16. The understanding of the special administration of nursing care in the intervention ward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Jianyu; Tian Ye; Wang Junlan

    2009-01-01

    Because of the particularity of the interventional therapy,that is,the interventional management covers a large scope in clinical application and involves the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases of multiple systems and organs,the clinical interventional practice has really brought an unprecedented challenge for the administration of the nursing care in the intervention ward. In our hospital, independent nursing group for the intervention ward was established two years ago. For the past two years, we have constantly groped and summarized the reasonable and effect administration of interventional nursing care. Pertinent administrative measures, such as nurse training, strengthening of communication with physicians and focusing on key links in nursing care and promptly finding out the weak points in clinical work, have effectively improved the quality of clinical nursing, in this way the clinical nursing practice has been integrated into the interventional therapy and the safe and high-quality nursing service has been provided to the patients. (authors)

  17. Relatives' view on collaboration with nurses in acute wards: development and testing of a new measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Tove; Nyberg, Per; Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Collaboration between relatives and nurses in acute care settings is sparsely investigated, and that mostly from nurses' point of view. Feasible and valid instruments are needed for assessing collaboration, its prerequisites and outcome. OBJECTIVES: To develop and test an instrument...... to assess, from the relatives' perspective, collaboration between relatives of frail elderly patients and nurses in acute hospital wards, as well as prerequisites for, and outcome of, collaboration. DESIGN: Instrument development and psychometric testing. SETTING: Acute medical and geriatric wards......, item-to-total correlation and item-to-item correlation. Systematic internal dropout was investigated. RESULTS: A five-factor solution labelled "influence on decisions", "quality of contact with nurses", "trust and its prerequisites", "achieved information level" and "influence on discharge" showed...

  18. Admission of people with dementia to psychiatric hospitals in Japan: factors that can shorten their hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Takako; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Osaki, Tohmi; Kajita, Hiroyuki; Yotsumoto, Kayano; Kawamata, Toshio

    2017-11-01

    People exhibiting serious behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia are usually voluntarily or involuntarily committed to psychiatric hospitals for treatment. In Japan, the average hospital stay for individuals with dementia is about 2 years. Ideally, individuals should be discharged once their symptoms have subsided. However, we see cases in Japan where individuals remain institutionalized long after behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia are no longer apparent. This study will attempt to identify factors contributing to shorter stays in psychiatric hospitals for dementia patients. Questionnaires consisting of 17 items were mailed to 121 psychiatric hospitals with dementia treatment wards in western Japan. Out of 121 hospitals that received the questionnaires, 45 hospitals returned them. The total number of new patient admissions at all 45 hospitals during the month of August 2014 was 1428, including 384 dementia patients (26.9%). The average length of stay in the dementia wards in August 2014 was 482.7 days. Our findings revealed that the rate of discharge after 2 months was 35.4% for the dementia wards. In addition, we found that the average stay in hospitals charging or planning to charge the rehabilitation fee to dementia patients was significantly shorter than in hospitals not charging the rehabilitation fee. In Japan, dementia patients account for over 25% of new admissions to psychiatric hospitals with dementia wards. The average length of stay in a psychiatric hospital dementia ward is more than 1 year. A discharge after fewer than 2 months is exceedingly rare for those in a dementia ward compared with dementia patients in other wards. If institutions focus on rehabilitation, it may be possible to shorten the stay of dementia patients in psychiatric hospitals. © 2017 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  19. The iota(1440) and QCD ward identities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    Anomalous Ward identities for QCD are analyzed with contributions of all known pseudoscalar mesons, including the glueball candidate iota(1440). Implications for the standard resolution of the U/sub A/(1) problem are examined by imposing the important and crucial constraint of positivity for the topological susceptibility chi/sub t/. The pure Yang-Mills susceptibility chi/sub t//sup YM/ - a quantity relevant in quenched lattice calculations - is shown to increase quite considerably in the presence of the iota, while chi/sub t/ is reduced and may even vanish. Axial couplings are consistent with the suppression expected for a singlet glueball, and give a small width for iota → 2y less than 3 keV

  20. Superconformal Ward identities and their solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nirschl, M.; Osborn, H.

    2005-01-01

    Superconformal Ward identities are derived for the four point functions of chiral primary BPS operators for N=2,4 superconformal symmetry in four dimensions. Manipulations of arbitrary tensorial fields are simplified by introducing a null vector so that the four point functions depend on two internal R-symmetry invariants as well as two conformal invariants. The solutions of these identities are interpreted in terms of the operator product expansion and are shown to accommodate long supermultiplets with free scale dimensions and also short and semi-short multiplets with protected dimensions. The decomposition into R-symmetry representations is achieved by an expansion in terms of two variable harmonic polynomials which can be expressed also in terms of Legendre polynomials. Crossing symmetry conditions on the four point functions are also discussed

  1. Vacuum Ward identities for higher genera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamolodchikov, A.B.

    1989-01-01

    The minimal models of two-dimensional conformal field theory are considered on surfaces with nontrivial topology. Due to degeneration of the vacuum module in these models, the stress tensor components satisfy special equations of motion - the vacuum Ward identities. It is shown that these identities can be written in the form of partial differential equations on the moduli space, satisfied by the partition function of the theory. Some examples are written down explicitly in the case of torus and g=2 surface, represented as a double-fold covering of a sphere. For the simplest minimal theory M(2/5), equations are closed on hyperelliptic surface of any genus and the situation is governed by the other minimal model M(3/10). (orig.)

  2. [Professor V.V. Shmeleva--an army doctor, scientist, and teacher].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emel'yanova, N A

    2015-01-01

    This article is dedicated to the life and work (research, medical, educational) of V.V. Shmeleva, professor and Great Patriotic War participant. She was the head of ophthalmology department at the City Clinical Hospital No 67 and promoted the implementation of cataract cryoextraction into clinical practice. As a professor at the Order of Lenin Central Institute of Advanced Medical Training she was engaged in postgraduate training of ophthalmologists. V.V. Shmeleva is the author of Cataract monograph and many scientific articles. She was also the senior secretary of the Vestnik oftal'mologii journal for more than 25 years.

  3. Accounting Professor Qualification in Digital Age: A Perception Study on Brazilian Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendruscolo, Maria Ivanice; Behar, Patrícia Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    This papers aims at analyzing the perception of Accounting professors about the necessary qualifications in Accounting undergraduate courses. The contribution of this study is to theoretically discuss the education of Accounting professors, with empirical data, because Accounting teaching requires specific competencies in the digital area. The…

  4. Labour ward midwives' perceptions of stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackin, P; Sinclair, M

    1998-05-01

    This exploratory study set out to examine labour ward midwives' perceptions of stress. It utilized a combination of two self-report questionnaires, one devised by McGrath et al. and the GHQ12. Additional qualitative data were collected by asking midwives to produce narratives about recent stressful events. A convenience sample of the 43 midwives formed the study population and a response rate of 77% was achieved. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and qualitative narratives were explored for content analysis. Midwives in this study demonstrated their awareness of stress in their working and personal lives and many took active steps to redress the negative effects with exercise, hobbies and talking with colleagues. However, the study revealed that 78% of the midwives indicated that having insufficient time to perform their duties was very stressful, paralleled by their perceived inability to influence work-based decisions. The study revealed that both medical and midwifery colleagues frustrated their endeavours to change an unsatisfactory condition. The GHQ12 revealed 30% of the midwives had scores above the threshold level of 2 indicating psychiatric morbidity and this is of major concern. The narratives revealed that lack of communication between the professionals about decision making was a major source of stress and as a result of this study efforts to improve multidisciplinary communication through the development of journal clubs and planned social activities is under consideration by the unit. Overall, the findings from this study highlight stress as a potential, occupational health problem in the working lives of some labour ward midwives.

  5. Satisfaction among accounting professors in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamires Sousa Araújo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of satisfaction among accounting professors in Brazil throughout their careers. The research is classified as descriptive and used a quantitative approach to data analysis. 641 valid responses were obtained from professors from all regions of Brazil. The results show that a feeling of satisfaction prevails among accounting course professors, as most of them “like the profession” and, in general, "are satisfied with it”. It was found that levels of satisfaction are higher among individuals with more experience, in that in their first years in the job (one to three years, professors have lower satisfaction rates; the highest levels of satisfaction are found in the final stage (over 35 years. The main factor that influences satisfaction is personal fulfillment (teaching work and relationship with students. It was also possible to identify that positive feelings about teaching predominate (67.3% compared to negative ones (32.7%. These results show the need for greater attention to be paid in the early years of the career in order to avoid a "reality clash". They also show the need for other studies to investigate how the phases in the life cycle of accounting professors are characterized.

  6. Dr. Rudolph Binion: professor, mentor, psychohistorian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szaluta, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    As the title of my paper indicates, Dr. Rudolph Binion was my professor, mentor, and a leading psychohistorian. My paper in memoriam to Rudolph Binion is intended as both a retrospective and an introspective account of my relationship with him, as he had a pivotal influence on me when he was my professor at Columbia University. His help and influence continued after I left graduate school. In my paper I also deal with the enormous stresses of navigating through graduate school, for those students whose goal was to earn the Ph.D. degree. Some examinations were dreaded, For Example The "Examination in Subjects," popularly called the "Oral Exam." The "incubation" period was long indeed, frequently averaging nearly ten years, and it was an ordeal, as the rate of attrition was very high. There is then also the question of "ego strength" and that of "transference" toward the professor. Graduate school is indeed a long and strenuous challenge. I took a seminar in modern French history, a requirement for the Master's degree with Professor Binion, which was consequential for me, as he taught me to be objective in writing history. Professor Binion was a demanding and outstanding teacher.

  7. The housekeeper and the professor a novel

    CERN Document Server

    Ogawa, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    He is a brilliant math Professor with a peculiar problem—ever since a traumatic head injury, he has lived with only eighty minutes of short-term memory. She is an astute young Housekeeper—with a ten-year-old son—who is hired to care for the Professor. And every morning, as the Professor and the Housekeeper are introduced to each other anew, a strange and beautiful relationship blossoms between them. Though he cannot hold memories for long (his brain is like a tape that begins to erase itself every eighty minutes), the Professor's mind is still alive with elegant equations from the past. And the numbers, in all of their articulate order, reveal a sheltering and poetic world to both the Housekeeper and her young son. The Professor is capable of discovering connections between the simplest of quantities—like the Housekeeper's shoe size—and the universe at large, drawing their lives ever closer and more profoundly together, even as his memory slips away. Yoko Ogawa's The Housekeeper and the Professo...

  8. Views of pharmacists on involvement in ward rounds in selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pharmacist participation in ward rounds is of increasing interest for better pharmaceutical care, yet most pharmacists do not engage in this activity. Objective: The objective was to obtain public sector pharmacistsf views and perceptions on their involvement in ward rounds. Method: A rapid assessment was ...

  9. Team Ward Rounds for Quality Improvement in Patient-Centred ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper we describe a clinical practice change for evaluation and continuous quality improvement of in-patient services in our ACE unit, such as daily geriatrics (multi disciplinary) team ward rounds preceding traditional ward rounds by other managing teams. The geriatrics team rounds enabled the identification of ...

  10. The proposal of Paediatric Virology and its perspectives: An interview with Professor of Paediatrics Maria Theodoridou.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammas, Ioannis N; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2017-10-01

    Professor Maria Theodoridou, Emeritus Professor of Paediatrics at the University of Athens, is one of the few paediatricians in Greece, who have experienced almost all the infectious diseases of the second half of the 20th century and their severe consequences, prior to the widespread adoption of immunisations. A milestone during her career was the establishment of a specialised National Reference Unit for the care of paediatric patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) at the 'Aghia Sophia' Children's Hospital in Athens, Greece. According to Professor Theodoridou, training on the prevention, management and treatment of neonatal and paediatric viral infections represents a new educational challenge for both community as well as hospital-based paediatric health professionals. The debate of the potential strategically principal role of Paediatric Virology subspecialists in the primary, secondary and tertiary clinical practice is definitely necessary and needs further discussion and evaluation, she adds. She describes the difficulties that Greece, a country under a long-standing financial crisis, faces for the hospital-based management of paediatric viral infections and refers to the future advances, which are expected in the field of diagnosis and treatment of viral infections in neonates and children. In the context of the 3rd Workshop on Paediatric Virology, which will be held in Athens on October 7th, 2017, Professor Theodoridou will focus on the immigration crisis and vaccination policy.

  11. Effects of Transferring to the Rehabilitation Ward on Long-Term Mortality Rate of First-Time Stroke Survivors: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Min; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chen, Pau-Chung

    2017-12-01

    To assess the long-term health outcomes of acute stroke survivors transferred to the rehabilitation ward. Long-term mortality rates of first-time stroke survivors during hospitalization were compared among the following sets of patients: patients transferred to the rehabilitation ward, patients receiving rehabilitation without being transferred to the rehabilitation ward, and patients receiving no rehabilitation. Retrospective cohort study. Patients (N = 11,419) with stroke from 2005 to 2008 were initially assessed for eligibility. After propensity score matching, 390 first-time stroke survivors were included. None. Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to assess differences in 5-year poststroke mortality rates. Based on adjusted hazard ratios (HRs), the patients receiving rehabilitation without being transferred to the rehabilitation ward (adjusted HR, 2.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36-3.57) and patients receiving no rehabilitation (adjusted HR, 4.00; 95% CI, 2.55-6.27) had significantly higher mortality risk than the patients transferred to the rehabilitation ward. Mortality rate of the stroke survivors was affected by age ≥65 years (compared with age stroke (adjusted HR, 1.55), stroke severity (Stroke Severity Index [SSI] score≥20, compared with SSI scorestroke survivors transferred to the rehabilitation ward had a 5-year mortality rate 2.2 times lower than those who received rehabilitation without transfer to the rehabilitation ward and 4 times lower than those who received no rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of alcohol-dependent patients at a gastroenterological and a psychiatric ward according to the Lesch alcoholism typology: implications for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyssoki, Benjamin; Steindl-Munda, Petra; Ferenci, Peter; Walter, Henriette; Höfer, Peter; Blüml, Victor; Friedrich, Fabian; Kogoj, Dagmar; Lesch, Otto M

    2010-01-01

    To assess the clinical and biological status of alcohol-dependent patients admitted to a psychiatric or a gastroenterological ward, assessing and comparing dimensions important for prescribing treatment for withdrawal and relapse prevention. Eighty patients, alcohol-dependent according to international classification of diseases tenth revision and diagnostic and statistical manual, text revised, version IV, admitted to the Vienna General Hospital between January 2005 and  November 2006, were examined, of whom 44 were admitted to the psychiatric ward and 36 to the gastroenterological ward. Dimensions of alcohol dependence were assessed using a computerized structured interview, the Lesch alcoholism typology (LAT). Biological markers and the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score defined the severity of alcohol-related physical disturbances. As might be expected, gastroenterological patients had more advanced physical diseases than psychiatric patients, and affective disorders and suicidal tendencies were significantly commoner among the psychiatric patients. Thus, LAT Type II patients were overrepresented at the gastroenterological ward and LAT Type III patients at the psychiatric ward. The severity of somatic diseases and psychiatric disorders as well as the distribution of the four types according to Lesch differ between alcohol-dependent patients admitted to a psychiatric ward or a gastroenterological ward. Regarding the positive long-term outcome, different evidence-based medical treatment approaches for withdrawal and relapse prevention are needed for these patients.

  13. Utilizing distributional analytics and electronic records to assess timeliness of inpatient blood glucose monitoring in non-critical care wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular and timely monitoring of blood glucose (BG levels in hospitalized patients with diabetes mellitus is crucial to optimizing inpatient glycaemic control. However, methods to quantify timeliness as a measurement of quality of care are lacking. We propose an analytical approach that utilizes BG measurements from electronic records to assess adherence to an inpatient BG monitoring protocol in hospital wards. Methods We applied our proposed analytical approach to electronic records obtained from 24 non-critical care wards in November and December 2013 from a tertiary care hospital in Singapore. We applied distributional analytics to evaluate daily adherence to BG monitoring timings. A one-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov (1S-KS test was performed to test daily BG timings against non-adherence represented by the uniform distribution. This test was performed among wards with high power, determined through simulation. The 1S-KS test was coupled with visualization via the cumulative distribution function (cdf plot and a two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov (2S-KS test, enabling comparison of the BG timing distributions between two consecutive days. We also applied mixture modelling to identify the key features in daily BG timings. Results We found that 11 out of the 24 wards had high power. Among these wards, 1S-KS test with cdf plots indicated adherence to BG monitoring protocols. Integrating both 1S-KS and 2S-KS information within a moving window consisting of two consecutive days did not suggest frequent potential change from or towards non-adherence to protocol. From mixture modelling among wards with high power, we consistently identified four components with high concentration of BG measurements taken before mealtimes and around bedtime. This agnostic analysis provided additional evidence that the wards were adherent to BG monitoring protocols. Conclusions We demonstrated the utility of our proposed analytical approach as a monitoring

  14. Nursing Education Trial Using a Virtual Nightingale Ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Keiko; Iwata, Naomi; Kodama, Hiromi; Hagiwara, Tomoko; Takai, Kiyako; Sasaki, Yoko; Nagata, Yoshie; Matsumoto, Maki

    2017-01-01

    Nursing department students are expected to correctly grasp the entire concept of nursing through their education. The authors created a movie of a Nightingale ward (virtual ward, hereafter) with an architectural computer design software for education. The students' reaction to the virtual ward was categorized into three viewpoints: that of nurses, of patients, and of nurses and patients in common. Most of the reactions in each viewpoint were: "easy to observe patients" in the nurses' viewpoint; "no privacy" in the patients' viewpoint; and "wide room" in the common viewpoint, respectively. These reactions show the effectiveness of using a virtual ward in nursing education. Because these reactions are characteristics of a Nightingale ward, and even students, who have generally less experiences, recognized these characteristics from the both viewpoints of nurses and patients.

  15. Enabling coordination within medical settings: case of a maternity ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouzi LEZZAR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study evaluates the planning process issues in healthcare institutions that can be considered as a high risk environment. Most recent healthcare research has focused on methods mainly based on communication, rather than collaboration supports. Material Methods: We followed then a collaborative-based planning approach which constitutes an evolution of planning environment toward new shared workspaces supporting collaboration. Our work led us first, to analyse the related tasks in an Algerian maternity ward in order to highlight the vital collaborative medical tasks that need to be modelled. Results: the paper summaries basic design concepts of our collaborative planning system that is designed to make group interaction support flexible for care coordination and continuity. Conclusion: after development and test of our collaborative planning system, we noticed that our collaborative and planning system can increase awareness and hence decrease coordination breakdowns, reduce costs of information collecting and sharing. All these factors constitute a crucial aspect of an efficient management of a hospital.

  16. ENSAIO: HOMENAGEM AO PROFESSOR REINIER ROZESTRATEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio C. R. Tupinambá

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de uma homenagem póstuma ao Professor Doutor Reinier Rozestraten. O texto apresenta, suscintamente, o percurso acadêmico do nomeado professor, em especial a sua passagem pela Psicologia do Trânsito. Paralelamente discorre sobre sua principal obra na área, que, de certo modo introduz o discurso psicológico sobre o comportamento de trânsito em perspectiva nacional, juntamente com sua preocupação em imprimir um caráter científico ao tema e introduzi-lo no contexto da academia e na sociedade em perspectivas teórica e prática. A obra escolhida é considerada um marco para o estabelecimento teórico da disciplina da psicologia do trânsito no Brasil. A homenagem foi originalmente escrita por ocasião dos cinco anos de falecimento do professor Reinier.

  17. [Professor Andelko Wolf, MD, PhD. (1922-2007), eminent epidemiologist and dermatovenerologist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Franjo; Peris, Zdravko

    2009-01-01

    Professor Andelko Wolf graduated medicine from the University of Zagreb School of Medicine in 1947. First he specialised in epidemiology and became head of the Brucellosis Centre in Rijeka for the Istria region. Later he also specialised in dermatovenerology at the Department for Skin and Venereal diseases in Rijeka. He passed the specialty board exam in dermatovenerology in 1958 and became teaching assistant. In 1973, he became assistant professor and in 1981 full professor. At the Department he founded the Laboratory for Mycology and allergology. Later he focused on occupational skin diseases and photodermatology. His doctoral thesis was on the action of light on the skin. He chaired the Clinic and was a member of various Hospital and Medical School committees. He was an excellent clinician undergraduate and graduate student teacher in Rijeka and Zagreb. He published around eighty papers on dermatology, but also on the necessity to reform medical studies.

  18. Kai Adolf Jensen, professor i almindelig patologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels

    2016-01-01

    for the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine production and supervised many young scientists’ doctoral theses on the aspects of tuberculosis. He became internationally recognized, and he revealed an important scientific fraud in the laboratory of the Austrian professor Ernst Löwenstein (1878-1950), who claimed that he...... could detect M. tuberculosis in blood cultures as a cause of a multitude of diseases. He was a pioneer in eradication of bovine tuberculosis in Denmark which became the first country in the world where this happened. Kai Adolf Jensen held the position as professor of general pathology from 1940 to 1965...

  19. Professor Stewart's casebook of mathematical mysteries

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Like its wildly popular predecessors Cabinet of Mathematical Curiosities and Hoard of Mathematical Treasures, Professor Stewart's brand-new book is a miscellany of over 150 mathematical curios and conundrums, packed with trademark humour and numerous illustrations. In addition to the fascinating formulae and thrilling theorems familiar to Professor Stewart's fans, the Casebook follows the adventures of the not-so-great detective Hemlock Soames and his sidekick Dr John Watsup (immortalised in the phrase 'Watsup, Doc?'). By a remarkable coincidence they live at 222B Baker Street, just a

  20. Professor: Danmarkskanon skal give plads til mangfoldighed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Garbi

    2016-01-01

    DEBAT: Danmark har igennem størstedelen af sin historie været et flerkulturelt land. Vi kan derfor ikke diskutere danske værdier til en Danmarkskanon uden at kaste et blik på globale strømninger og vores mangfoldige fortid, skriver Garbi Schmidt, professor ved RUC......DEBAT: Danmark har igennem størstedelen af sin historie været et flerkulturelt land. Vi kan derfor ikke diskutere danske værdier til en Danmarkskanon uden at kaste et blik på globale strømninger og vores mangfoldige fortid, skriver Garbi Schmidt, professor ved RUC...

  1. In memory of Professor Jan Mazurkiewicz in the 70th anniversary of his death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perzyńska-Starkiewicz Aneta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reminisces about the life and career of Jan Mazurkiewicz, one of the most outstanding Polish psychiatrists – the author of Psychophysiological Theory, an original conception of mental disease based on the theory of evolution and dissolution of the nervous system developed by the Englishneurologist John Hughlings Jackson. Professor Jan Mazurkiewicz was an active organizer of psychiatric care. He was co-founder and director of hospitals in Kochanówka and Kobierzyn. He held the rank of Associate Professor at the John Casimir University in Lviv and the position of Professor at the Jagiellonian University in Cracow. From 1919 until his death in 1947, Professor Jan Mazurkiewicz was the head of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Warsaw. For twenty three years, starting from 1924, he was the president of the Polish Psychiatric Association. The Mazurkiewicz's Psychopathological Theory provides a natural model of development of the highest psychic functions. Damage to a higher evolutionary level of the nervous system leads to the activation of the previously suppressed lower levels, transformed by the pathogen into psychopathological symptoms. Mazurkiewicz's scientific thought was adopted and developed by his student andthen, collaborator, Professor Mieczysław Kaczyński, who was later to become the head of the Department of Psychiatry in Lublin. This work discusses the research conducted at Lublin's Department of Psychiatry which expands on Mazurkiewicz's theory

  2. Professor in Residence: An Innovative Academic-Practice Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinic, Katherine; Kowalski, Mildred Ortu; Silverstein, Wendy

    2017-12-01

    This article describes an academic-practice partnership between an American Nurses Credentialing Center Magnet ® -designated hospital and an academic nurse educator that has increased the hospital's capacity for research, evidence-based practice, and support for nurses continuing their education. Through close collaboration with the full-time nurse researcher and members of the nursing education department, the professor in residence consults with clinical staff to support completion of research and evidence-based practice projects. The collaboration also has resulted in the development of a formal year-long mentoring program for clinical nurses in the area of evidence-based practice. Individual support and academic consults are offered to nurses enrolled in school to promote advancement of nurses' educational level. This collaboration has been beneficial for both the hospital and the university, increasing the capacity for scholarly activities for nurses in the hospital and serving as a forum for ongoing faculty practice and scholarship. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(12):552-556. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Homage to Professor Hans-Åke Gustafsson

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    It was with deep sadness that we learned of the death of Professor Hans-Åke Gustafsson, an internationally recognized scientist, beloved colleague and friend. He passed away on Wednesday January 13th at the Lund University Hospital, surrounded by his loved ones, after a short battle against cancer. This is a great loss for all of us in ALICE and the whole heavy ion community. Hans-Åke, Professor at Lund University, was one of the pioneers of heavy ion physics with relativistic beams since its very beginning. He started his research at CERN, as a fellow at the ISOLDE ion beam facility, and immediately after, in the early 1980 joined the Plastic Ball collaboration at the Bevalac. One of the seminal papers of the field on the discovery of collective flow in relativistic nuclear collisions, co-authored by Hans-Åke, Hans Gutbrod and colleagues, stems from this period. From that point on he was always at the forefront of research with relativistic nuclear beams, being for three de...

  4. Team climate and attitudes toward information and communication technology among nurses on acute psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Marita; Anttila, Minna; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Katajisto, Jouko; Välimäki, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the association of team climate with attitudes toward information and communication technology among nursing staff working on acute psychiatric wards. Background: Implementation of ICT applications in nursing practice brings new operating models to work environments, which may affect experienced team climate on hospital wards. Method: Descriptive survey was used as a study design. Team climate was measured by the Finnish modification of the Team Climate Inventory, and attitudes toward ICT by Burkes' questionnaire. The nursing staff (N = 181, n = 146) on nine acute psychiatric wards participated in the study. Results: It is not self-evident that experienced team climate associates with attitudes toward ICT, but there are some positive relationships between perceived team climate and ICT attitudes. The study showed that nurses' motivation to use ICT had statistically significant connections with experienced team climate, participative safety (p = 0.021), support for innovation (p = 0.042) and task orientation (p = 0.042). Conclusion: The results suggest that asserting team climate and supporting innovative operations may lead to more positive attitudes toward ICT. It is, in particular, possible to influence nurses' motivation to use ICT. More attention should be paid to psychosocial factors such as group education and co-operation at work when ICT applications are implemented in nursing.

  5. Determination of Noise Level and Its Sources in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Neonatal Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Jahangir Blourchian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Neonatal intensive care units (NICU different sound intensities and frequencies are produced from different sources, which may exert undesirable physiological effects on the infants. The aim of this study was to determine the noise level and its sources in the NICU and neonatal ward of Al-Zahra Hospital of Rasht, Iran. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, the intensity of the sounds generated by the internal and external sources in the NICU and neonatal ward was measured using a sound level meter device. The sound produced by each of the sources was individually calculated. Data were analyzed performing descriptive and analytical statistics, using SPSS version 19. Results: The mean noise levels in six rooms and a hallway during morning, afternoon and night shifts with the electromechanical devices turned on were 61.67±4.5, 61.32±4.32 and 60.71±4.56 dB, respectively. Moreover, with the devices tuned off the mean noise levels during morning, afternoon and evening shifts were 64.97±2.6, 60.6±1.29 and 57.91±4.73 dB, respectively. The differences between the mean noise levels in the neonatal wards (standard noise level=45 dB during each shift with the electromechanical devices turned on and off were statistically significant (P=0.002 and P

  6. Final Comments from Professors George and Beane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beane, James; George, Paul S.

    1996-01-01

    Concludes this journal focus section on curriculum integration with transcripts of questions asked by conference attendees and answers by Professors Beane and George. Areas addressed included experience levels with children and teachers, studies that point to the failure of curriculum integration, and how teachers can continue curriculum…

  7. Professor Jacques Cortes prantsuse keele lektoraadis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Juuni alguses külastas filoloogiateaduskonna romaani-germaani filoloogia osakonda Roueni ülikooli professor Jacques Cortes (Prantsusmaa). Ta korraldas 4. õa üliõpilastele prantsuse keele intensiivkursuse ja võttis vastu eksami ning kohtus prantsuse keele lektoraadi õppejõududega : [täistekst

  8. Russel Nye: The Professor in Public Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungiville, Maurice

    1995-01-01

    A discussion of the influence of Russel Nye, a college English professor at Michigan State University and journalist, focuses on the values that shaped his teaching, scholarship, and writing and his defense of democratic values, especially in education. It is concluded that Nye's experience suggests that public service can be a source of personal…

  9. Interview met professor Joan Wallach Scott

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, Greetje; Tijhoff, Esmeralda

    2012-01-01

    Joan Scott, professor at the School of Social Science in the Institute for Avanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey (USA), was the keynote speaker at the conference 'Uitsluitend emancipatie' in de Beurs van Berlage in Amsterdam in October 2012. An interview on gender, history, feminism and her book

  10. String theorist takes over as Lucasian Professor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2009-11-01

    String theorist Michael Green will be the next Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge University. Green, 63, will succeed Stephen Hawking, who held the chair from 1980 before retiring last month at the age of 67 and taking up a distinguished research chair at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Canada (see above).

  11. Professor Brand Advocacy: Do Brand Relationships Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jillapalli, Ravi K.; Wilcox, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The trend among students to advocate their professors online continues to generate interest within marketing academia. Brand advocacy in products and services has played a vital role in marketing. However, no known research to date has embraced the idea of brand advocacy in marketing education. This research builds on the recent human brand…

  12. CFA or CFP: A Guide for Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Ronald L.

    2011-01-01

    The CFA Institute and the CFP Board of Standards provide professional certifications in the field of finance. In this paper, I provide my experience with the CFA and CFP programs in order to give other professors some insight into the process of attaining the designations. I hope to provide answers to some of the questions that other faculty…

  13. Reflections of a Latino Associate Professor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peguero, Anthony A.

    2018-01-01

    The following reflection essay is about my experiences as a Latino Associate Professor who focuses on criminology, youth violence, juvenile justice, and the associated disparities with race, ethnicity, and immigration. I reflect about the "race and justice" job market, pursuing and establishing a Latina/o Criminology working group, often…

  14. Leisure and the Retired Professor: Occupation Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Lorraine; Kolarik, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Little attention has been given to the leisure activities of retired professors, whose activity patterns in retirement may be different from those of other occupational groups because of their lifetime commitment to work. This interview study uses both quantitative and qualitative data to investigate: (a) the leisure and professional activities of…

  15. Congenital cataract screening in maternity wards is effective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, Gunilla; Bizjajeva, Svetlana; Haargaard, Birgitte

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study which eye-screening protocol prevails in Swedish maternity/neonatal wards, evaluate efficacy in a prospective study, and compare results with earlier Swedish retrospective results. METHODS: Surveys were sent in 2006 to maternity/neonatal and women's health departments regarding...... with earlier retrospective results was performed. RESULTS: Eye screening is routine protocol at a rate of 90% of Swedish maternity wards. Sixty-one children were included in the study. An increase was shown in case referrals from maternity wards compared to ten years ago (64% versus 50%). Detection...

  16. Analysis of Ward identities in supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sajid; Bergner, Georg; Gerber, Henning; Montvay, Istvan; Münster, Gernot; Piemonte, Stefano; Scior, Philipp

    2018-05-01

    In numerical investigations of supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory on a lattice, the supersymmetric Ward identities are valuable for finding the critical value of the hopping parameter and for examining the size of supersymmetry breaking by the lattice discretisation. In this article we present an improved method for the numerical analysis of supersymmetric Ward identities, which takes into account the correlations between the various observables involved. We present the first complete analysis of supersymmetric Ward identities in N=1 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory with gauge group SU(3). The results indicate that lattice artefacts scale to zero as O(a^2) towards the continuum limit in agreement with theoretical expectations.

  17. Parvovirus B19 infection in hospital workers: community or hospital acquisition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, S F; Török, T J; Thorp, J A; Hedrick, J; Erdman, D D; Zaki, S R; Hinkle, C J; Bayer, W L; Anderson, L J

    1995-10-01

    A suspected nosocomial outbreak of parvovirus B19 infection in a maternity ward was investigated in February 1994. Questionnaires were administered and sera collected from maternity ward staff (n = 91), other ward staff in the same hospital (n = 101), and maternity ward staff at a nearby hospital (n = 81). Blood donors (n = 265) were used as community controls. Recent infection (parvovirus B19 IgM positivity) in susceptible persons (parvovirus B19 IgG-negative or IgM-positive) was common among all 4 groups (23%-30%). This high rate of recent infection occurred during a large community outbreak of fifth disease. Environmental samples collected from a room where a stillborn parvovirus B19-infected fetus was delivered were positive for parvovirus B19 DNA. Thus, this suspected nosocomial outbreak actually reflected transmission outside the hospital, but contaminated environmental surfaces were identified as one potential source for transmission of parvovirus B19.

  18. Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections in internal medicine wards: old and new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Marco; Concia, Ercole; Giusti, Massimo; Mazzone, Antonino; Santini, Claudio; Stefani, Stefania; Violi, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a common cause of hospital admission among elderly patients, and traditionally have been divided into complicated and uncomplicated SSTIs. In 2010, the FDA provided a new classification of these infections, and a new category of disease, named acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), has been proposed as an independent clinical entity. ABSSSIs include three entities: cellulitis and erysipelas, wound infections, and major cutaneous abscesses This paper revises the epidemiology of SSTIs and ABSSSIs with regard to etiologies, diagnostic techniques, and clinical presentation in the hospital settings. Particular attention is owed to frail patients with multiple comorbidities and underlying significant disease states, hospitalized on internal medicine wards or residing in nursing homes, who appear to be at increased risk of infection due to multi-drug resistant pathogens and treatment failures. Management of ABSSSIs and SSTIs, including evaluation of the hemodynamic state, surgical intervention and treatment with appropriate antibiotic therapy are extensively discussed.

  19. Development of Geospatial Map Based Portal for Delimitation of Mcd Wards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A. Kumar Chandra; Kumar, P.; Sharma, P. Kumar

    2017-09-01

    The Geospatial Delhi Limited (GSDL), a Govt. of NCT of Delhi Company formed in order to provide the geospatial information of National Capital Territory of Delhi (NCTD) to the Government of National Capital Territory of Delhi (GNCTD) and its organs such as DDA, MCD, DJB, State Election Department, DMRC etc., for the benefit of all citizens of Government of National Capital Territory of Delhi (GNCTD). This paper describes the development of Geospatial Map based Portal for Delimitation of MCD Wards (GMPDW) and election of 3 Municipal Corporations of NCT of Delhi. The portal has been developed as a map based spatial decision support system (SDSS) for delimitation of MCD Wards and draw of peripheral wards boundaries to planning and management of MCD Election process of State Election Commission, and as an MCD election related information searching tools (Polling Station, MCD Wards and Assembly constituency etc.,) for the citizens of NCTD. The GMPDW is based on Client-Server architecture model. It has been developed using Arc GIS Server 10.0 with .NET (pronounced dot net) technology. The GMPDW is scalable to enterprise SDSS with enterprise Geo Database & Virtual Private Network (VPN) connectivity. Spatial data to GMPDW includes Enumeration Block (EB) and Enumeration Blocks Group (EBG) boundaries of Citizens of Delhi, Assembly Constituency, Parliamentary Constituency, Election District, Landmark locations of Polling Stations & basic amenities (Police Stations, Hospitals, Schools and Fire Stations etc.). GMPDW could help achieve not only the desired transparency and easiness in planning process but also facilitates through efficient & effective tools for management of MCD election. It enables a faster response to the changing ground realities in the development planning, owing to its in-built scientific approach and open-ended design.

  20. Supervisors' pedagogical role at a clinical education ward - an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silén, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Clinical practice is essential for health care students. The supervisor's role and how supervision should be organized are challenging issues for educators and clinicians. Clinical education wards have been established to meet these challenges and they are units with a pedagogical framework facilitating students' training in real clinical settings. Supervisors support students to link together theoretical and practical knowledge and skills. From students' perspectives, clinical education wards have shown potential to enhance students' learning. Thus there is a need for deeper understanding of supervisors' pedagogical role in this context. We explored supervisors' approaches to students' learning at a clinical education ward where students are encouraged to independently take care of patients. An ethnographic approach was used to study encounters between patients, students and supervisors. The setting was a clinical education ward for nursing students at a university hospital. Ten observations with ten patients, 11 students and five supervisors were included in the study. After each observation, individual follow-up interviews with all participants and a group interview with supervisors were conducted. Data were analysed using an ethnographic approach. Supervisors' pedagogical role has to do with balancing patient care and student learning. The students were given independence, which created pedagogical challenges for the supervisors. They handled these challenges by collaborating as a supervisory team and taking different acts of supervision such as allowing students their independence, being there for students and by applying patient-centredness. The supervisors' pedagogical role was perceived as to facilitate students' learning as a team. Supervisors were both patient- and student-centred by making a nursing care plan for the patients and a learning plan for the students. The plans were guided by clinical and pedagogical guidelines, individually adjusted and

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF GEOSPATIAL MAP BASED PORTAL FOR DELIMITATION OF MCD WARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kumar Chandra Gupta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Geospatial Delhi Limited (GSDL, a Govt. of NCT of Delhi Company formed in order to provide the geospatial information of National Capital Territory of Delhi (NCTD to the Government of National Capital Territory of Delhi (GNCTD and its organs such as DDA, MCD, DJB, State Election Department, DMRC etc., for the benefit of all citizens of Government of National Capital Territory of Delhi (GNCTD. This paper describes the development of Geospatial Map based Portal for Delimitation of MCD Wards (GMPDW and election of 3 Municipal Corporations of NCT of Delhi. The portal has been developed as a map based spatial decision support system (SDSS for delimitation of MCD Wards and draw of peripheral wards boundaries to planning and management of MCD Election process of State Election Commission, and as an MCD election related information searching tools (Polling Station, MCD Wards and Assembly constituency etc., for the citizens of NCTD. The GMPDW is based on Client-Server architecture model. It has been developed using Arc GIS Server 10.0 with .NET (pronounced dot net technology. The GMPDW is scalable to enterprise SDSS with enterprise Geo Database & Virtual Private Network (VPN connectivity. Spatial data to GMPDW includes Enumeration Block (EB and Enumeration Blocks Group (EBG boundaries of Citizens of Delhi, Assembly Constituency, Parliamentary Constituency, Election District, Landmark locations of Polling Stations & basic amenities (Police Stations, Hospitals, Schools and Fire Stations etc.. GMPDW could help achieve not only the desired transparency and easiness in planning process but also facilitates through efficient & effective tools for management of MCD election. It enables a faster response to the changing ground realities in the development planning, owing to its in-built scientific approach and open-ended design.

  2. Severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: management with noninvasive ventilation on a general medicine ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirio Fiorino

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent evidence suggests that, with a well-trained staff, severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD with moderate respiratory acidosis (pH > 7.3 can be successfully treated with noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV on a general respiratory care ward. We conducted an open prospective study to evaluate the efficacy of this approach on a general medicine ward. Material and methods: This study population consisted in 27 patients admitted to a general medicine ward (median nurse:patient ratio 1:12 December 1, 2004 May 31, 2006 for acute COPD exacerbation with hypercapnic respiratory failure and acidosis (arterial pH < 7.34, PaC02 > 45 mmHg. All received assist-mode NIMV (average 12 h / day via oronasal masks (inspiratory pressure 10-25 cm H2O, expiratory pressure 4-6 cm H2O to maintain O2 saturation at 90-95%. Treatment was supervised by an experienced pulmonologist, who had also provided specific training in NIMV for medical and nursing staffs (90-day course followed by periodic refresher sessions. Arterial blood pressure, O2 saturation, and respiratory rate were continuously monitored during NIMV. Based on baseline arterial pH, the COPD was classified as moderate (7.25-7.34 or severe (< 7.25. Results: In patients with moderate and severe COPD, significant improvements were seen in arterial pH after 2 (p < 0.05 and 24 h (p< 0.05 of NIMV and in the PaC02 after 24 hours (p < 0.05. Four (15% of the 27 patients died during the study hospitalization (in-hospital mortality 15%, in 2 cases due to NIMV failure. For the other 23, mean long-term survival was 14.5 months (95% CI 10.2 to 18.8, and no significant differences were found between the moderate and severe groups. Over half (61% the patients were alive 1 year after admission. Conclusions: NIMV can be a cost-effective option for management of moderate or severe COPD on a general medicine ward. Its proper use requires: close monitoring of ventilated subjects

  3. Theoretical model for the UV disinfection system in the operating ward of PZU 'Filip Vtori'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilkov, Marjan

    2010-01-01

    Here we investigate the theoretical modeling of an UV disinfection system for the operating ward in PZU 'FILIP VTORI'. As nocosomial infections pose a serious threat to patients everywhere in the world, here the disinfection of the air and the surfaces is modeled and discussed. The surfaces are disinfected with direct illumination of open UV after hours system, UV curtains, overhead disinfection, floor disinfection and disinfection of the incoming air through the ventilation/air-condition system. From the results it can be seen that the concentrations of bacteria, fungi and viruses drop significantly which in turn should give a significant drop in a number of hospital acquired infections.(Author)

  4. Handing over patients from the ICU to the general ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Gitte; Bitsch Hansen, Tina; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To explore nursing practice and perception of engaging in communicative interaction when handing over multi-morbid patients from the ICU to general medical or surgical wards. BACKGROUND: Communication failures impose risks to patient safety. ICU and general ward nurses communicate in writing...... focused ethnography was applied to the study. METHODS: Participant observation of 22 clinical situations of handing over patients from the ICU to general wards was conducted in November and December 2015, followed by five focus group interviews, three interviews with general ward nurses and two with ICU...... towards patient status and the handing over process" emerged from observation notes. From transcribed focus group interviews, the theme "Balancing and negotiating when passing on, consuming and adapting knowledge" was identified. CONCLUSION: A lack of shared goals regarding handing over patients from...

  5. audit of blood transfusion practices in the paediatric medical ward

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-01

    Jan 1, 2013 ... AUDIT OF BLOOD TRANSFUSION PRACTICES IN THE PAEDIATRIC MEDICAL WARD OF A TERTIARY ..... services and even where available, beneficiaries have ... due to lack of existence of quality assurance protocol.

  6. The N=2 supersymmetric Ward-identities on harmonic superspace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lhallabi, T.

    1986-09-01

    The quantization of N=2 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory coupled to matter hypermultiplet has been done in the harmonic superspace, by requiring BRS and anti-BRS invariance. Also the corresponding Ward-identities have been derived. (author)

  7. Weather Augmented Risk Determination (WARD) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niknejad, M.; Mazdiyasni, O.; Momtaz, F.; AghaKouchak, A.

    2017-12-01

    Extreme climatic events have direct and indirect impacts on society, economy and the environment. Based on the United States Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) data, over one third of the U.S. GDP can be considered as weather-sensitive involving some degree of weather risk. This expands from a local scale concrete foundation construction to large scale transportation systems. Extreme and unexpected weather conditions have always been considered as one of the probable risks to human health, productivity and activities. The construction industry is a large sector of the economy, and is also greatly influenced by weather-related risks including work stoppage and low labor productivity. Identification and quantification of these risks, and providing mitigation of their effects are always the concerns of construction project managers. In addition to severe weather conditions' destructive effects, seasonal changes in weather conditions can also have negative impacts on human health. Work stoppage and reduced labor productivity can be caused by precipitation, wind, temperature, relative humidity and other weather conditions. Historical and project-specific weather information can improve better project management and mitigation planning, and ultimately reduce the risk of weather-related conditions. This paper proposes new software for project-specific user-defined data analysis that offers (a) probability of work stoppage and the estimated project length considering weather conditions; (b) information on reduced labor productivity and its impacts on project duration; and (c) probabilistic information on the project timeline based on both weather-related work stoppage and labor productivity. The software (WARD System) is designed such that it can be integrated into the already available project management tools. While the system and presented application focuses on the construction industry, the developed software is general and can be used for any application that involves

  8. Hypoglycaemia monitoring in a medical receiving ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that current care for diabetes inpatients remains inadequate and that greater attention is required for high quality management. In this project the aspect of hypoglycaemia was studied in a busy medical receiving ward at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. A large proportion of inpatients have diabetes and episodes of hypoglycaemia experienced by this population can delay discharge and indeed be detrimental to health. Thus it is important from both an organisational and patient perspective to manage this population well. In this project BM machine data was analysed to identify patients who were hypoglycaemic. These patients were then tracked down to study the subsequent management and compared this against recommended guidance. Following this an intervention was made to promote identification, management, documentation, and prevention of hypoglycaemia. This was deliberately a simple intervention involving discussions with staff and provision of basic documented guidance next to every BM machine. In the first phase 17 patients were identified and in a second and third phase 16 patients each time were further identified. Patients in the study were both type 1 and type 2 diabetics. Initial results in phase I were compared to results in phase II and III respectively. This intervention produced significant improvements in management with correct monitoring of low BMs (i.e. upon identification of low BM repeat within 1 hour) improving from 47% to 100% (for Phase II and III). Also, recording of preventative measures of hypoglycaemia improved from 35% to 88% and 94% with an improvement from 24% to 69% and 75% in recording of treatment given if needed. In conclusion, the study successfully demonstrated that simple measures can significantly improve the quality care of inpatient diabetic patients in relation to hypoglycaemia management.

  9. Categorization of Quantum Mechanics Problems by Professors and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the categorization of 20 quantum mechanics problems by physics professors and undergraduate students from two honours-level quantum mechanics courses. Professors and students were asked to categorize the problems based upon similarity of solution. We also had individual discussions with professors who categorized the problems. Faculty…

  10. 22 CFR 62.20 - Professors and research scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Professors and research scholars. 62.20 Section... Specific Program Provisions § 62.20 Professors and research scholars. (a) Introduction. These regulations govern Exchange Visitor Program participants in the categories of professor and research scholar, except...

  11. Variables That Can Affect Student Ratings of Their Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotlieb, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Attribution theory was applied to help predict the results of an experiment that examined the effects of three independent variables on students' ratings of their professors. The dependent variables were students' perceptions of whether the professor caused the students' grades and student satisfaction with their professor. The results suggest…

  12. E-Mail from Professor Enhances Student Motivation and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Angela M.; Wilson, Janie H.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, professors use the first day of class to build rapport. However, current technology allows professors to contact students prior to the first day of class. This study assessed how the receipt of a welcoming e-mail from a female professor 1 week before the first day of class affected student motivation and attitudes toward the…

  13. The ward round--patient experiences and barriers to participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenne, Christine Leo; Skytt, Bernice

    2014-06-01

    Patients' participation is essential to their well-being and sense of coherence, as well as to their understanding of and adherence to prescribed treatments. Ward rounds serve as a forum for sharing information between patient and caregiver. The purpose of the ward round is to obtain information and plan medical and nursing care through staff-patient communication. The aim and objective of this study was to investigate patients' experiences during the ward round and their ability to participate in their care. The study was qualitative and descriptive in design. Fourteen inpatients at a cardiovascular ward were interviewed. Qualitative content analysis was used for the analysis. The ethics of scientific work were adhered to. Each study participant gave his/her informed consent based on verbal and written information. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee at Uppsala University. The analysis revealed one theme and three subthemes related to patients' experiences of ward rounds. The main theme was handling of information from the daily ward round while waiting for private consultation. The subthemes were making the best of the short time spent on ward rounds; encountering traditional roles and taking comfort in staff competency; and being able to choose the degree to which one participates in the decision-making process. Several aspects of traditional ward round routines could be improved in regard to the two-way information exchange process between caregivers and patient. Patients' and caregivers' ability to communicate their goals and the environment in which the communication occurs are of great importance. The information provided by nurses is easier to understand than that provided by physicians. The atmosphere must be open; the patient should be treated with empathy by staff; and patients' right to participate must be acknowledged by all healthcare professionals involved. © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  14. Ward identities for scale and special conformal transformations in inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, Nilay; Shukla, Ashish; Trivedi, Sandip P.

    2016-01-01

    We derive the general Ward identities for scale and special conformal transformations in theories of single field inflation. Our analysis is model independent and based on symmetry considerations alone. The identities we obtain are valid to all orders in the slow roll expansion. For special conformal transformations, the Ward identities include a term which is non-linear in the fields that arises due to a compensating spatial reparametrization. Some observational consequences are also discussed.

  15. The Productive Ward program™: a longitudinal multilevel study of nurse perceived practice environment, burnout, and nurse-reported quality of care and job outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bogaert, Peter; Van heusden, Danny; Somers, Annemie; Tegenbos, Muriel; Wouters, Kristien; Van der Straeten, Johnny; Van Aken, Paul; Havens, Donna Sullivan

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of The Productive Ward-Releasing Time to Care™ program implemented in a hospital transformation process on nurse perception related to practice environment, burnout, quality of care, and job outcomes. To address the continuously evolving complex challenges of patient care, high-performance nursing care is necessary. A longitudinal survey design was used to conduct a study in a 600-bed acute care university hospital with 3 measurement periods: T0: base line in 2006, T1 in 2011, and T2 in 2013. As part of the hospital transformation process, the productive ward program was introduced between T1 and T2. Relevant impact on nurse-physician relations, nurse management, hospital management-organizational support, nurse-reported quality of care, and job outcomes were identified. Hospital strategies and policies should be aligned with daily practices so that engaged and committed staff can promote excellent outcomes.

  16. Environmental scan of infection prevention and control practices for containment of hospital-acquired infectious disease outbreaks in acute care hospital settings across Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, Wrechelle; Geransar, Rose; Clayden, Nancy; Jones, Jessica; de Grood, Jill; Joffe, Mark; Taylor, Geoffrey; Missaghi, Bayan; Pearce, Craig; Ghali, William; Conly, John

    2017-10-01

    Ward closure is a method of controlling hospital-acquired infectious diseases outbreaks and is often coupled with other practices. However, the value and efficacy of ward closures remains uncertain. To understand the current practices and perceptions with respect to ward closure for hospital-acquired infectious disease outbreaks in acute care hospital settings across Canada. A Web-based environmental scan survey was developed by a team of infection prevention and control (IPC) experts and distributed to 235 IPC professionals at acute care sites across Canada. Data were analyzed using a mixed-methods approach of descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. A total of 110 completed responses showed that 70% of sites reported at least 1 outbreak during 2013, 44% of these sites reported the use of ward closure. Ward closure was considered an "appropriate," "sometimes appropriate," or "not appropriate" strategy to control outbreaks by 50%, 45%, and 5% of participants, respectively. System capacity issues and overall risk assessment were main factors influencing the decision to close hospital wards following an outbreak. Results suggest the use of ward closure for containment of hospital-acquired infectious disease outbreaks in Canadian acute care health settings is mixed, with outbreak control methods varying. The successful implementation of ward closure was dependent on overall support for the IPC team within hospital administration. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Venous thromboprophylaxis in general surgery ward admissions: strategies for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galante, Mariana; Languasco, Agustín; Gotta, Daniel; Bell, Soledad; Lancelotti, Tomás; Knaze, Viktoria; Saubidet, Cristián Lopez; Grand, Beatriz; Milberg, Matías

    2012-12-01

    To estimate the adherence to institutional venous thromboprophylaxis clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) in general surgery patients and to assess the effectiveness of a multi-strategy improvement intervention. A prospective before-after study. Two teaching hospitals located in the city of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Prescriptions belonging to patients admitted to the general surgery wards were evaluated. A multi-strategy intervention that included (i) simplification of institutional CPGs for venous thromboprophylaxis using a single drug at a single dose, based on the American College of Chest Physicians recommendations, (ii) distribution of pocket cards with an algorithm for the implementation of new recommendations to both, physicians and nurses, working in the general surgery units, (iii) educational talks, (iv) paper-based reminders and (v) audit and feedback. The adherence of the venous thromboprophylaxis prescription to the institutional recommendations. The prescriptions of 100 admitted patients before and 90 after the intervention were included in the analysis. The initial rate of adherence was 31%. After the intervention this rate rose to 71.1% (P< 0.001). The major improvement observed was the reduction in omitted prophylaxis in patients at risk of venous thromboembolism from 45 to 13.3% (P< 0.001). In the adjusted model, prescribing compliance with CPGs was five times more likely during the second stage than during the first stage (OR = 5.60, 95% CI = 2.92-10.74). Simple and economical interventions such as those described in this study can improve general surgeons compliance with the institutional and international guidelines, thus assuring patient safety and quality of health care.

  18. [Nosocomial infection/colonization of the respiratory tract caused by Acinetobacter baumannii in an Internal Medicine ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas Coronas, J; Cabezas Fernández, T; Alvarez-Ossorio García de Soria, R; Rogado González, M C; Delgado Fernández, M; Díez García, F

    2002-10-01

    To present the epidemiology of the outbreak and the description of patients with infection or colonization of the respiratory tract caused by A. baumannii in an Internal Medicine ward. 20 consecutively patients hospitalized in the Internal Medicine ward were studied during 18 months with isolation of multiresistant A. baumanni in respiratory tract specimens with or without clinical signs of infection. Starting on an index case, that was a patient coming from other hospital with diagnosis of nosocomial Acinetobacter pneumonia, we detected 20 patients. The age of the patients ranged from 48 to 95 years, with a mean of 71.4 years. Eighty percent were males. The clinical features were similar: advanced age, with chronic diseases (35 percent diabetics, 45 percent with chronic lung diseases), and use of broad-spectrum antibiotics agents, fundamentally third generation cephalosporin (70 percent), clarithromycin (55 percent) and quinolones (30 percent). 75 percent of patients were in the same ward. Eight (40 percent) of the patients with chronic lung diseases were subjects with COPD, two with asthma and chronic glucocorticoids treatment, and one with a sleep apnea. In four cases the isolation was considered a colonization. The mean stay was 26.15 days, and the mortality 40 percent. The nosocomial infection caused by Acinetobacter baumannii is responsible of a high morbi-mortality between the patients hospitalized in an Internal Medicine ward, and produce an increase in length of stay. It is necessary a combination of control measures to prevent the transmission in the hospital and the outbreak of new multiresistant strains.

  19. [Professor WU Zhongchao's experience of penetration needling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Wang, Bing; Zhou, Yu

    2016-08-12

    Professor WU Zhongchao has unique application of penetration needling in clinical treatment. Professor WU applies penetration needling along meridians, and the methods of penetration needling include self-meridian penetration, exterior-interior meridian penetration, identical-name meridian penetration, different meridian penetration. The meridian differentiation is performed according to different TCM syndromes, locations and natures of diseases and acupoint nature, so as to make a comprehensive assessment. The qi movement during acupuncture is focused. In addition, attention is paid on anatomy and long-needle penetration; the sequence and direction of acupuncture is essential, and the reinforcing and reducing methods have great originality, presented with holding, waiting, pressing and vibrating. Based on classical acupoint, the acupoint of penetration needling is flexible, forming unique combination of acupoints.

  20. Professor Andrzej Nespiak (1921-1981

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Majewski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The biography of a professor of the Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Botany of the Medical Academy in Wrocław, who was formerly an investigator of the Agricultural Academy in Wrocław. He worked on mycorhiza, the participation of Macromycetes in forest communities and the use of fungi for synthesis of some organic compounds, he was also the author of the Polish flora of the genus Cortinarius (1975,1981 and Inocybe (manuscript.

  1. Professor Andrzej Nespiak (1921-1981)

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasz Majewski

    2014-01-01

    The biography of a professor of the Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Botany of the Medical Academy in Wrocław, who was formerly an investigator of the Agricultural Academy in Wrocław. He worked on mycorhiza, the participation of Macromycetes in forest communities and the use of fungi for synthesis of some organic compounds, he was also the author of the Polish flora of the genus Cortinarius (1975,1981) and Inocybe (manuscript).

  2. [Homage to Professor Dr. Nicasio Etchepareborda].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    During a solemn academic act, de Main Classroom of the Facultad de Odontologia de Buenos Aires was named after Prof. Dr. Nicasio Etchepareborda. He has been the first professor at the Escuela de Odontologia and its organizer, after having obtained his Dentistry degree at the Dental School of Paris, in 1882. The new school was founded in 1891, and its activities began the following year.

  3. 31 July 2014 - Professor M. Kastner

    CERN Multimedia

    Egli, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    MIT Faculty Member Donner Professor of Physics Massachusetts Institute of Technology United States of America, Prof. M. Kastner visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Beams Department M. Solfaroli Camillocci, LHC superconducting magnet assembly hall visit with L. Rossi and R. Principe, LHC Computing Grid Project presentation and computer centre visit with I. Bird and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  4. Interaction between Nurses and Hospitalized Drug Users in Somatic Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappel, Nanna

    Background: In spite of the fact that the Danish society has defined equal right of all citizens to contributions of the heath care system, groups of citizens feel stigmatized and do not experience easy access to the health care system. The purpose of this research project is to examine...

  5. Work process of nursing professors 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Giordano, Denisse; Felli, Vanda Elisa Andres

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze the work process of nursing professors. Method: descriptive, exploratory and qualitative study, developed with a focus on critical epidemiology, carried out at a School of Nursing in Chile. The research subjects consist of 17 nursing professors, with whom individual semi-structured interviews were carried out and nine participated in a focus group. The Ethics Committee approved this study. Results: 88.2% were female, mean age of 42 years, 47% were married, 94% were Chilean, average length of service in the institution of 2.8 years, and 23.5% had a master’s degree. Regarding the work process, the students were the work object, the tools used were the knowledge and the experience as a nurse, and the work environment was considered good. Regarding the form of work organization, 76% have a 44-hour workweek, the wage was considered inadequate and the workload was higher than foreseen in the contract. The dialectic of the nursing work process is evidenced, demonstrating the contradiction between the low wages and labor overload and the narratives reporting a good work environment, personal fulfillment and transcendence that goes far beyond work. Conclusions: the work process allows describing the work components of the nursing professors, which are consistent with the results of the literature and show the dialectic of the nursing work process. PMID:29211193

  6. Professor Witold Nowicki - a greatly spirited pathologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincewicz, A; Szepietowska, A; Sulkowski, S

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a complete overview of the scientific, professional and social activity of a great Polish pathologist, Witold Nowicki (1878-1941), from mainly Polish-written, original sources with a major impact on mostly his own publications. The biographical commemoration of this eminent professor is not only due to the fact that he provided a profound microscopic characterization of pneumatosis cystoides in 1909 and 1924. Nowicki greatly influenced the development of anatomical pathology in Poland, having authored over 82 publications, with special reference to tuberculosis, lung cancer, sarcomatous carcinomas, scleroma and others. However, the first of all his merits for the readership of Polish pathologists was his textbook titled Anatomical Pathology, which was a basic pathology manual in pre-war Poland. Witold Nowicki - as the head of the academic pathological anatomy department and former dean of the medical faculty - was shot with other professors by Nazi Germans in the Wuleckie hills in Lvov during World War Two. Professor Nowicki was described as being "small in size but great in spirit" by one of his associates, and remains an outstanding example of a meticulous pathologist, a patient tutor and a great social activist to follow.

  7. O professor_: de quem estamos falando mesmo?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos, Fabiane Konowaluk

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente texto procura abordar a temática relacionada à auto-imagem do professor, constatada através de uma enquete e da construção de um website que subsidiou o tensionamento com o real. Segundo Arroyo (2000, p. 124, “carregamos a função que exercemos, que somos e a imagem de professor(a que internalizamos”. Dessa forma, o tema em estudo segue, ainda hoje, sendo altamente significativo, pois não podemos esquecer os momentos históricos, políticos e sociais vivenciados pelos professores, buscando justamente explicações sobre como as questões de auto-imagem, o fazer e suas competências, suas possibilidades e limites e outros tantos fatores que estão a alterar seu comportamento. Arroyo (2000, p. 124 assinala que a auto-imagem docente é apreendida em múltiplos espaços e tempos, em múltiplas vivências, como resultado das condições psicológicas e sociais que afetam sua docência

  8. Nature and frequency of medication errors in a geriatric ward: an Indonesian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernawati DK

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Desak Ketut Ernawati,1,2 Ya Ping Lee,2 Jeffery David Hughes21Faculty of Medicine, Udayana University, Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia; 2School of Pharmacy and Curtin Health Innovation and Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, AustraliaPurpose: To determine the nature and frequency of medication errors during medication delivery processes in a public teaching hospital geriatric ward in Bali, Indonesia.Methods: A 20-week prospective study on medication errors occurring during the medication delivery process was conducted in a geriatric ward in a public teaching hospital in Bali, Indonesia. Participants selected were inpatients aged more than 60 years. Patients were excluded if they had a malignancy, were undergoing surgery, or receiving chemotherapy treatment. The occurrence of medication errors in prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, and administration were detected by the investigator providing in-hospital clinical pharmacy services.Results: Seven hundred and seventy drug orders and 7,662 drug doses were reviewed as part of the study. There were 1,563 medication errors detected among the 7,662 drug doses reviewed, representing an error rate of 20.4%. Administration errors were the most frequent medication errors identified (59%, followed by transcription errors (15%, dispensing errors (14%, and prescribing errors (7%. Errors in documentation were the most common form of administration errors. Of these errors, 2.4% were classified as potentially serious and 10.3% as potentially significant.Conclusion: Medication errors occurred in every stage of the medication delivery process, with administration errors being the most frequent. The majority of errors identified in the administration stage were related to documentation. Provision of in-hospital clinical pharmacy services could potentially play a significant role in detecting and preventing medication errors.Keywords: geriatric, medication errors, inpatients, medication delivery process

  9. Protocol for an exploration of knowledge sharing for improved discharge from a mental health ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Emma; Wright, Nicola; Waring, Justin; Gregoriou, Kyri; Chopra, Arun

    2014-10-01

    Strategies to reduce hospital admissions for mental health service users have received vast amounts of attention, yet the transfer of care from hospital to the community has been ignored. The discharge process is complex, messy, disjointed and inefficient, relying on cross-agency and organisational working. Focusing on one acute mental health admission ward, we will investigate whether the discharge process for people with severe mental health problems can be enhanced through the creation, implementation and utilisation of a knowledge sharing proforma that is used on their admission to the ward. The project uses qualitative interviews to understand the complex processes associated with being admitted and discharged from inpatient mental health wards. Practitioners will be asked to identify and map the relevant stakeholders involved in admission and discharge, and discuss any problems with the process. The study team will work with clinicians to develop a knowledge collection proforma, which will be piloted for 2 months. Qualitative interviews will be carried out to collect reflections on the experiences of using the tool, with data used for further refinement of the intervention. Baseline and repeat quantitative measures will be taken to illustrate any changes to length of stay and readmission rates achieved as a result of the study. A key issue is that participants are able to comment frankly on something that is a core part of their work, without fear or reprise. It is equally important that all participants are offered the opportunity to develop and coproduce the knowledge collection proforma, in order that the intervention produced is fit for purpose and usable in the real world, away from a research environment. The study has received ethical approval from Nottingham University Business School ethics committee, and has all appropriate National Health Service research governance clearances. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use

  10. Preventing hospital malnutrition: a survey on nutritional policies in an Italian University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annetta, M G; Pittiruti, M; De Rosa, S; Franchi, P; Pintaudi, G; Caricato, A; Antonelli, M

    2015-11-01

    A proper strategy for fighting hospital malnutrition should include nutritional screening of all hospitalized patients, adequate utilization of the Hospital facilities - such as Clinical Nutrition Services or Nutrition Teams - and an adequate algorithm for the adoption of proper nutrition support (oral, enteral or parenteral) with proper timing. The main aim of the present study was to investigate the current policies of different non-intensive wards of our institution (a 1100 beds University Hospital) in terms of prevention of hospital malnutrition. We conducted a one-day survey to verify the current policies of nutritional screening and the indication to nutritional support in adult patients, interviewing nurses and physicians of our non-intensive hospital wards. A total of 29 wards were considered, which sum up to 755 hospitalized patients. We found that nutritional screening at admission is routinely assessed only in 41% of wards and that oral nutrient intake is controlled regularly only in 72%. Indication to clinical nutrition support and specifically to artificial nutrition is not consistent with the current international guidelines. Only 14% of patients were receiving artificial nutrition at the moment of the survey and the majority of them were given parenteral nutrition rather than enteral feeding. Our survey confirmed that in large hospitals the main barriers to the fight against hospital malnutrition are the lack of knowledge and/or commitment by nurses and physicians as well as the lack of well-defined hospital policies on early nutritional screening, surveillance of nutritional status and indication to nutrition support.

  11. Quality of sleep for hospitalized patients in Rasoul-Akram hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari Jolfaei, Atefeh; Makvandi, Alena; Pazouki, Abdolreza

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disturbances have negative effects on medical conditions, mental health and cognitive performance. It was shown that about 60% of inpatients suffer from sleep problems. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between sleep quality and other factors in the inpatients of Rasoul-e-Akram hospital. In this cross-sectional study, all the hospitalized patients in twelve wards of Rasoul-e-Akram hospital during September 2012, were examined. Sleeping habits of 209 inpatients of different wards were assessed through the Persian version of Pittsburgh Sleep Questionnaire (PSQI). A self-designed 18- question questionnaire was conducted for all patients in order to assess their attitude to interior and atmosphere of wards. Content validity and test retest reliability were evaluated. The pain level was also measured by the visual analog scale (VAS) and scores analyzed by the statistical methods of frequency, percentage, chi-square and logistic regression. The mean of the total scores in PSQI was 8.8±4.8 and 70.8% of the patients were 'poor sleepers' (global PSQI> 5). Age and gender had no effect on the PSQI total score, but the number of roommates, type of the ward, hospitalization period, presence and severity of pain, taking sleep medication and attitude toward the overall atmosphere and interior of wards have caused deviation in scores. Sleep problems are quite frequent in medical inpatients. Pain management and modification of the ward interior and atmosphere can impact inpatients sleep quality.

  12. [The implementation of the week surgery in an orthopedic and urology ward and assessment of its impact].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulloni, Giovanna; Petrucco, Stefania; De Marc, Raffaella; Nazzi, Cheti; Petri, Roberto; Guarrera, Giovanni Maria

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of the week surgery in an orthopedic and urology ward and the assessment of its impact. The week surgery (WS) is one of the models organized according the intensity of care that allows the improvement of the appropriateness of the hospital admissions. To describe the implementation and the impact of the WS on costs and levels of care. The WS was gradually implemented in an orthopedic and urology ward. The planning of the surgeries was modified, the wards where patients would have been transferred during the week-end where identified, the nurses were supported by expert nurses to learn new skills and clinical pathways were implemented. The periods January-June 2012 and 2013 were compared identifying a set of indicators according to the health technology assessment method. The nurses were able to take vacations according to schedule; the cost of outsourcing services were reduced (-4.953 Euros) as well as those of consumables. The nursing care could be guaranteed employing less (-5) full-time nurses; the global clinical performance of the ward did not vary. Unfortunately several urology patients could not be discharged during the week-ends. A good planning of the surgeries according to the patients' length of staying, together with interventions to increase the staff-skill mix, and the clinical pathways allowed an effective and efficient implementation of the WS model without jeopardizing patients' safety.

  13. Ward social workers' views of what facilitates or hinders collaboration with specialist palliative care team social workers: A grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firn, Janice; Preston, Nancy; Walshe, Catherine

    2017-07-14

    Inpatient, generalist social workers in discharge planning roles work alongside specialist palliative care social workers to care for patients, often resulting in two social workers being concurrently involved in the same patient's care. Previous studies identifying components of effective collaboration, which impacts patient outcomes, care efficiency, professional job satisfaction, and healthcare costs, were conducted with nurses and physicians but not social workers. This study explores ward social workers' perceptions of what facilitates or hinders collaboration with palliative care social workers. Grounded theory was used to explore the research aim. In-depth qualitative interviews with masters trained ward social workers (n = 14) working in six hospitals located in the Midwest, United States were conducted between February 2014 and January 2015. A theoretical model of ward social workers' collaboration with palliative care social workers was developed. The emerging model of collaboration consists of: 1) trust, which is comprised of a) ability, b) benevolence, and c) integrity, 2) information sharing, and 3) role negotiation. Effective collaboration occurs when all elements of the model are present. Collaboration is facilitated when ward social workers' perceptions of trust are high, pertinent information is communicated in a time-sensitive manner, and a flexible approach to roles is taken. The theoretical model of collaboration can inform organisational policy and social work clinical practice guidelines, and may be of use to other healthcare professionals, as improvements in collaboration among healthcare providers may have a positive impact on patient outcomes.

  14. Certolizumab, an anti-TNF safe during pregancy? The CRIB Study results: an interview with Professor Xavier Mariette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariette, Xavier

    2017-09-01

    Professor Xavier Mariette, MD, PhD, has served as the Head of the Rheumatology Department of Bicêtre Hospital, Paris-Sud University since 1999, a role he took following 10 years of practice of clinical immunology. Professor Mariette has initiated a number of clinical research studies on biotherapies in autoimmune diseases. He is the head of the French RATIO (Research Axed on Tolerance of Biotherapy) observatory, collecting specific rare serious adverse events in patients treated with anti-TNF. He initiated the French AIR (Autoimmunity and Rituximab) and ORA (Orencia and Rheumatoid arthritis) registries of patients with autoimmune diseases treated with rituximab and abatacept. He initiated clinical trials in Sjögren's syndrome with infliximab, hydroxychloroquine and belimumab. Professor Mariette is involved in basic research, leading a group working on pathogeny of Sjögren's syndrome, relationships between innate immunity and B-cell activation in autoimmunity and the relationships between autoimmunity and lymphoma. Professor Mariette is also very interested in new ways of teaching. In 2007, he participated with other European Experts in the creation of the EULAR Web Course of Rheumatology in 2007. Professor Mariette has been the President of the Scientific Committee of the EULAR meeting, which took place in Berlin in 2012 and is in 2016 the elect Chair of the EULAR standing committee on investigative rheumatology. Professor Mariette is co-author of more than 430 publications referenced in PubMed with an H-index of 61.

  15. The Effects of Increasing the Capacity of Admission in Emergency Ward in increasing the Rate of Patient Acceptance at the Time of Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Geravandi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aim: The emergency ward at the time of a disaster is the most important ward for providing therapy service to the injured. The purpose of this research study was to study of the effects of increasing the capacity of admission in emergency ward in increasing the rate of patient acceptance at the time of crisis at Razi Educational Hospital, Ahvaz, Iran. Methods: The present interventional study was performed to determine role of the increase of capacity to emergency ward in increase rate of patient acceptance at the time of disaster. After one year a re-evaluation of the capacity of the emergency department was conducted. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: The results of this study showed that the capacity to accept patients was 16 injured in time of disasters at the emergency ward before reform measures. After performing reforms, this capacity increased to 42 patients. The findings also showed that the implementation of appropriate capacity building increased 2.6 times, thus led to increasing the readiness and service delivery in times of crisis and emergency department of the disaster. Conclusion: Based on the findings, it could be concluded that planning and action to be carried out in hospital emergency departments by the crisis committee increased the admission capacity of the injured during the crisis.

  16. Behavior observation of major noise sources in critical care wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hui; Kang, Jian; Mills, Gary H

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the behavior patterns of typical noise sources in critical care wards and relate their patterns to health care environment in which the sources adapt themselves in several different forms. An effective observation approach was designed for noise behavior in the critical care environment. Five descriptors have been identified for the behavior observations, namely, interval, frequency, duration, perceived loudness, and location. Both the single-bed and the multiple-bed wards at the selected Critical Care Department were randomly observed for 3 inconsecutive nights, from 11:30 pm to 7:00 am the following morning. The Matlab distribution fitting tool was applied afterward to plot several types of distributions and estimate the corresponding parameters. The lognormal distribution was considered the most appropriate statistical distribution for noise behaviors in terms of the interval and duration patterns. The turning of patients by staff was closely related to the increasing occurrences of noises. Among the observed noises, talking was identified with the highest frequency, shortest intervals, and the longest durations, followed by monitor alarms. The perceived loudness of talking in the nighttime wards was classified into 3 levels (raised, normal, and low). Most people engaged in verbal communication in the single-bed wards that occurred around the Entrance Zone, whereas talking in the multiple-bed wards was more likely to be situated in the Staff Work Zone. As expected, more occurrences of noises along with longer duration were observed in multiple-bed wards rather than single-bed wards. "Monitor plus ventilator alarms" was the most commonly observed combination of multiple noises. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Differences in antimicrobial consumption, prescribing and isolation rate of multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii on surgical and medical wards.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Zivanovic

    Full Text Available In order to provide guidance data for clinically rational use of an antibiotics consuption, prescribing and prevalence of multidrug resistant (MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii were monitored on the surgical (S and medical (M wards of the University Hospital Center "Dr. Dragisa Misovic-Dedinje" (Belgrade, Serbia, in the study period from 2012 to 2015. Appropriateness of antimicrobial use was evaluated using the Global-Prevalence Survey method designed by the University of Antwerp. The percentages of MDR pathogens relative to the total number of isolates of K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa were higher on the S (86.2% and 49.1% than on the M (63.2% and 36.9% wards. The percentage of MDR A. baumannii was not different between S (93.7% and M (79.5% wards. An overall antibiotics consumption (defined daily doses/100 bed-days during study was 369.7 and 261.5 on the S and M wards, respectively. A total of 225 prescriptions of antimicrobials were evaluated in138 adults admitted to wards on the day of the survey. The percentage of antimicrobials prescribed for prophylaxis on the M and S wards were 0% and 25%, respectively. Therapies were more frequently empiric (S, 86.8% and M, 80%. The percentages of medical errors on the S and M wards were 74.6% and 27.3%, respectively. The quality indicators for antibiotic prescribing on the S and M wards were as follows: the incorrect choice of antimicrobials (35.6% vs. 20.0%, inappropriate dose interval (70.6% vs. 16.9% or duration of therapy (72.5% vs. 23.1%, a non-documented stop/review data (73.6% vs. 16.9% and divergence from guidelines (71.9% vs. 23.1%. Treatment based on biomarkers was more common on the M wards as compared to the S wards. The increasing prevalence of MDR pathogens, a very high consumption and incorrect prescribing of antimicrobials need special attention, particularly on the S wards.

  18. [Comment on “Ward Off?”] Ward Valley Report deserves better coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, George A.

    Eos, Transactions, AGU, which is bannered as “The Newspaper of the Geophysical Sciences,” carried an “In Brief” article in the issue of May 23 that does a serious disservice to the geophysical sciences. It was written in a flip editorial style that questioned the usefulness of the Ward Valley report (Secretary Babbitt found it useful enough to act decisively) and the integrity of the NAS/NRC committee members who wrote it.The 17 committee members, most of whom are AGU members, studied the issues as a public service at the request of the NAS in response to Babbitt's request. They documented the evidence and conclusions thoroughly in a report of over 200 pages. Surely, scientific input is needed for decisions about complex issues in our society.

  19. AGGRESSION IN PSYCHIATRY - A QUALITATIVE STUDY FOCUSING ON THE CHARACTERIZATION AND PERCEPTION OF PATIENT AGGRESSION BY NURSES WORKING ON PSYCHIATRIC-WARDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FINNEMA, EJ; DASSEN, T; HALFENS, R

    The present study focuses on the characterization and perception of patient aggression by nurses working in a psychiatric hospital in The Netherlands. Data have been collected by interviewing nurses working on open and closed wards. The results have been compared and related to the existing

  20. Estimating the intensity of ward admission and its effect on emergency department access block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Cao, Jiguo; Gallagher, Marcus; Wiles, Janet

    2013-07-10

    Emergency department access block is an urgent problem faced by many public hospitals today. When access block occurs, patients in need of acute care cannot access inpatient wards within an optimal time frame. A widely held belief is that access block is the end product of a long causal chain, which involves poor discharge planning, insufficient bed capacity, and inadequate admission intensity to the wards. This paper studies the last link of the causal chain-the effect of admission intensity on access block, using data from a metropolitan hospital in Australia. We applied several modern statistical methods to analyze the data. First, we modeled the admission events as a nonhomogeneous Poisson process and estimated time-varying admission intensity with penalized regression splines. Next, we established a functional linear model to investigate the effect of the time-varying admission intensity on emergency department access block. Finally, we used functional principal component analysis to explore the variation in the daily time-varying admission intensities. The analyses suggest that improving admission practice during off-peak hours may have most impact on reducing the number of ED access blocks. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Glycemic control in the infectious diseases ward; role of clinical pharmacist interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsaei, Shadi; Karimzadeh, Iman; Elyasi, Sepideh; Hatamkhani, Shima; Khalili, Hossein

    2014-04-15

    Hyperglycemia is one of the most frequent metabolic complications in hospitalized patients. Increased risk of infection following hyperglycemia has been reported in hospitalized patients and infections may also cause insulin resistance which complicates the control of blood glucose level. In this study the impact of the clinical pharmacist interventions on the glycemic control in patients admitted to infectious diseases ward has been evaluated. We conducted a prospective, pre-post interventional study among patients with hyperglycemia. The clinical pharmacist-led multidisciplinary team managed the glycemic profile of patients according to an established insulin protocol commonly used in internal wards. Clinical pharmacists reviewed patients' medical charts for proper insulin administration, evaluated nurses' technique for insulin injection and blood glucose measurement, and educated patients about symptoms of hypoglycemia and the importance of adherence to different aspects of their glycemic management. The percentage of controlled random blood sugar increased from 13.8% in the pre-intervention to 22.3% in the post-intervention group (p value percentage of controlled fasting blood sugars in the post-intervention group was non-significantly higher than in the pre-intervention group. Pharmacists and additional health care providers from other departments such as nursing and dietary departments need to be devoted to glycemic control service. Collaborative practice agreement between physicians is necessary to promote this service and help to increase the use of such services in different settings for diabetes control.

  2. Etiologies of Prolonged Unconjugated Hyperbilirubinemia in Neonates Admitted to Neonatal Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kazem Sabzehei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Jaundice is a common condition among neonates. Prolonged unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia occurs when jaundice persists beyond two weeks in term neonates and three weeks in preterm neonates. This study aimed to determine the etiologies of prolonged unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in infants admitted to the neonatal ward of Besat Hospital in Hamadan, Iran. Methods: This study was conducted on all infants diagnosed with prolonged unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia during 2007-2012 in the neonatal ward of Besat Hospital in Hamadan, Iran. Demographic characteristics of infants, physical examination and laboratory findings were collected and analyzed to determine the etiologies of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Results: In total, 100 infants diagnosed with neonatal hyperbilirubinemia were enrolled in this study, including 49 male and 51 female neonates with mean age of 20±1 days and mean bilirubin level of 17.5±4.0 mg/dL. Main causes of hyperbilirubinemia were urinary tract infection, ABO incompatibility, hypothyroidism and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in 14%, 5%, 6% and 5% of neonates, respectively. Moreover, unknown etiologies, such as breastfeeding, were detected in 70% of the studied infants. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, determining the main causes of prolonged unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in neonates is of paramount importance. In the majority of cases, neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is associated with physiological factors, such as breastfeeding.

  3. Parkinson's disease and the quest for preclinical diagnosis: an interview with Professor Werner Poewe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poewe, Werner

    2017-10-01

    Werner Poewe speaks to Laura Dormer, Editorial Director: Professor Werner Poewe is Professor of Neurology and Director of the Department of Neurology at Innsbruck Medical University in Innsbruck, Austria. He held a Residency in Clinical Neurology and Psychiatry at the University of Innsbruck, Austria, from 1977 to 1984. From 1984 to 1985 he teamed up with Gerald Stern and Andrew Lees as a British Council Research Fellow at University College and Middlesex Hospital's Medical School in London to perform clinical studies into levodopa-induced dystonia and pharmacokinetics of levodopa in naive versus L-Dopa treated Parkinson's disease. Following his return to Austria, he held a position as Senior Lecturer in the Department of Neurology at the University of Innsbruck (1986-1989) after which he took over as Professor of Neurology and Acting Director of the Department of Neurology at Virchow Hospital of the Free University of Berlin (1990-1994). Professor Poewe's main research interests in the field of movement disorders are focused on differential and early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, its natural history and pharmacological treatment. He has been involved in the steering committees of numerous drug trials in different stages of Parkinson's disease for the past 20 years and has authored and coauthored more than 500 original articles and reviews in the field of movement disorders. Professor Poewe served as President of the Austrian Society of Neurology from 2002 to 2004 as well as President of the Austrian Parkinson's Disease Society from 1996 to 2009. He has been awarded honorary membership of the German Society of Neurology as well as the Japanese Society of Neurology. His awards include the Walther-Birkmayer-Prize of the Austrian PD Society, the Dingebauer-Prize of the German Neurological Society as well as the Research Excellence Award of Innsbruck Medical University. Professor Poewe served as President of the International Movement Disorder Society (MDS) from

  4. Queueing network model for obstetric patient flow in a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hideaki; Kanai, Yuta; Misue, Kazuo

    2016-03-03

    A queueing network is used to model the flow of patients in a hospital using the observed admission rate of patients and the histogram for the length of stay for patients in each ward. A complete log of orders for every movement of all patients from room to room covering two years was provided to us by the Medical Information Department of the University of Tsukuba Hospital in Japan. We focused on obstetric patients, who are generally hospitalized at random times throughout the year, and we analyzed the patient flow probabilistically. On admission, each obstetric patient is assigned to a bed in one of the two wards: one for normal delivery and the other for high-risk delivery. Then, the patient may be transferred between the two wards before discharge. We confirm Little's law of queueing theory for the patient flow in each ward. Next, we propose a new network model of M/G/ ∞ and M/M/ m queues to represent the flow of these patients, which is used to predict the probability distribution for the number of patients staying in each ward at the nightly census time. Although our model is a very rough and simplistic approximation of the real patient flow, the predicted probability distribution shows good agreement with the observed data. The proposed method can be used for capacity planning of hospital wards to predict future patient load in each ward.

  5. Visit of Professor Shigehiko Hasumi. President of Tokyo University, Japan, Professor Kazuo Okamoto, Head of Graduate School of Mathematical Sciences, Professor Toshiteru Matsuura, Head of Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    Visit of Professor Shigehiko Hasumi. President of Tokyo University, Japan, Professor Kazuo Okamoto, Head of Graduate School of Mathematical Sciences, Professor Toshiteru Matsuura, Head of Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

  6. Using Gamification Combined with Indoor Location to Improve Nurses' Hand Hygiene Compliance in an ICU Ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapão, Luís Velez; Marques, Rita; Gregório, João; Pinheiro, Fernando; Póvoa, Pedro; Mira da Silva, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare acquired infections are among the biggest unsolved problems in healthcare, implying an increasing number of deaths, extra-days of hospital stay and hospital costs. Performing hand hygiene is a simple and inexpensive prevention measure, but healthcare workers compliance with it is still far from optimal. Recognized hurdles are lack of time, forgetfulness, wrong technique and lack of motivation. This study aims at exploring gamification to promote nurses' HH compliance self-awareness and action. Real-time data collected from an indoor location system will provide feedback information to a group of nurses working in an ICU ward. In this paper both the research's motivation and methods is presented, along with the first round of results and its discussion.

  7. Nutritional predictors of mortality after discharge in elderly patients on a medical ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscemi, Silvio; Batsis, John A; Parrinello, Gaspare; Massenti, Fatima M; Rosafio, Giuseppe; Sciascia, Vittoria; Costa, Flavia; Pollina Addario, Sebastiano; Mendola, Serena; Barile, Anna M; Maniaci, Vincenza; Rini, Nadia; Caimi, Gregorio

    2016-07-01

    Malnutrition in elderly inpatients hospitalized on medical wards is a significant public health concern. The aim of this study was to investigate nutritional markers as mortality predictors following discharge in hospitalized medical elderly patients. This is a prospective observational cohort study with follow-up of 48 months. Two hundred and twenty-five individuals aged 60 and older admitted from the hospital emergency room in the past 48 h were investigated at the medical ward in the University hospital in Palermo (Italy). Anthropometric and clinical measurements, Mini-nutritional Assessment (MNA) questionnaire, bioelectrical (BIA) phase angle (PA), grip strength were obtained all within 48 h of admission. Mortality data were verified by means of mortality registry and analysed using Cox-proportional hazard models. Ninety (40%) participants died at the end of follow-up. There were significant relationships between PA, MNA score, age and gender on mortality. Patients in the lowest tertile of PA (< 4·6°) had higher mortality estimates [I vs II tertile: hazard ratio (HR) = 3·40; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2·01-5·77; II vs III tertile: HR = 3·83; 95% CI: 2·21-6·64; log-rank test: χ(2) = 43·6; P < 0·001]. Similarly, the survival curves demonstrated low MNA scores (< 22) were associated with higher mortality estimates (HR = 1·85; 95% CI: 1·22-2·81 χ(2) = 8·2; P = 0·004). The MNA and BIA-derived phase angle are reasonable tools to identify malnourished patients at high mortality risk and may represent useful markers in intervention trials in this high-risk subgroup. © 2016 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  8. Non-perturbative construction of the Luttinger-Ward functional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Potthoff

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available For a system of correlated electrons, the Luttinger-Ward functional provides a link between static thermodynamic quantities on the one hand and single-particle excitations on the other. The functional is useful in deriving several general properties of the system as well as in formulating the thermodynamically consistent approximations. Its original construction, however, is perturbative as it is based on the weak-coupling skeleton-diagram expansion. Here, it is shown that the Luttinger-Ward functional can be derived within a general functional-integral approach. This alternative and non-perturbative approach stresses the fact that the Luttinger-Ward functional is universal for a large class of models.

  9. Generalized on-shell ward identities in string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jen-Chi

    1994-01-01

    It is demonstrated that an infinite set of string-tree level on-shell Ward identities, which are valid to all σ-model loop orders, can be systematically constructed without referring to the string field theory. As examples, bosonic massive scattering amplitudes are calculated explicitly up to the second massive excited states. Ward identities satisfied by these amplitudes are derived by using zero-norm states in the spectrum. In particular, the inter-particle Ward identity generated by the D 2 xD 2' zero-norm state at the second massive level is demonstrated. The four physical propagating states of this mass level are then shown to form a large gauge multiplet. This result justifies our previous consideration on higher inter-spin symmetry from the generalized worldsheet σ-model point of view. (author)

  10. Generalized ward identities for non-local transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ziping; Li Ruijie

    2002-01-01

    Based on the phase-space generating functional of Green function for a system with a singular higher-order Lagrangian, the generalized canonical Ward identities under the local and non-local transformation in phase space for such a system have been derived. Starting from the configuration-space generating functional for a gauge-invariant system, the generalized Ward identities were deduced under the local, non-local and global transformation, respectively. The applications to the non-Abelian Chern-Simons theories with higher derivatives were given. Some relationships among the proper vertices have been deduced, in which one does not need to carry out the integration over canonical momenta in phase-space generating functional. The Ward-Takahashi identities for BRS transformation are also obtained

  11. Ward Identity and Scattering Amplitudes for Nonlinear Sigma Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Ian; Yin, Zhewei

    2018-02-01

    We present a Ward identity for nonlinear sigma models using generalized nonlinear shift symmetries, without introducing current algebra or coset space. The Ward identity constrains correlation functions of the sigma model such that the Adler's zero is guaranteed for S -matrix elements, and gives rise to a subleading single soft theorem that is valid at the quantum level and to all orders in the Goldstone decay constant. For tree amplitudes, the Ward identity leads to a novel Berends-Giele recursion relation as well as an explicit form of the subleading single soft factor. Furthermore, interactions of the cubic biadjoint scalar theory associated with the single soft limit, which was previously discovered using the Cachazo-He-Yuan representation of tree amplitudes, can be seen to emerge from matrix elements of conserved currents corresponding to the generalized shift symmetry.

  12. O fracasso escolar no discurso do professor

    OpenAIRE

    Piccirilli, Manoela de Souza Silva

    2014-01-01

    O fracasso escolar tem sido repetidamente abordado em pesquisas de diversas naturezas que buscam diferentes razões para sua ocorrência. Essa dissertação não pretende elaborar mais uma suposição do que venha a ser o fracasso escolar, mas analisar os sentidos deste no discurso de alguns professores de educação básica. Trata-se de um estudo qualitativo realizado sob a ótica da teoria-metodológica da Análise de Discurso de linha francesa a partir de Michel Pêcheux. O procedimento ...

  13. An Interview with Professor Roy Caldwell

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhary, Kuntal; Bhat, Prashant; Rosen, Jared; Naughton, Ida; Wang, Jingyan

    2013-01-01

    Envision the underwater world: vibrant coral, swaying seaweed, and lively creatures abound. However, the postcards and National Geographic covers that try to capture the beauty of this picturesque habitat can only represent it at one moment in time -- in reality, the landscape is hardly static, since many of its animals are capable of body modifications to change their shape and color. To understand the coloration and color vision of sea creatures, UC Berkeley Professor Roy L. Caldwell resear...

  14. Crisis management on surgical wards: a simulation-based approach to enhancing technical, teamwork, and patient interaction skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sonal; Hull, Louise; Fitzpatrick, Maureen; Sevdalis, Nick; Birnbach, David J

    2015-05-01

    To establish the efficacy of simulation-based training for improving residents' management of postoperative complications on a surgical ward. Effective postoperative care is a crucial determinant of patient outcome, yet trainees learn this through the Halstedian approach. Little evidence exists on the efficacy of simulation in this safety-critical environment. A pre-/postintervention design was employed with 185 residents from 5 hospitals. Residents participated in 2 simulated ward-based scenarios consisting of a deteriorating postoperative patient. A debriefing intervention was implemented between scenarios. Resident performance was evaluated by calibrated, blinded assessors using the validated Global Assessment Toolkit for Ward Care. This included an assessment of clinical skills (checklist of 35 tasks), team-working skills (score range 1-6 per skill), and physician-patient interaction skills. Excellent interrater reliability was achieved in all assessments (reliability 0.89-0.99, P pre = 73.7% vs post = 94.8%, P pre = 21.1% vs post = 84.2% P pre = 42.1% vs post = 100%, P pre = 36.8% vs post = 89.8%, P pre = 1.75 vs post = 3.43), leadership (pre = 2.43 vs post = 4.20), and decision-making skills (pre = 2.20 vs post = 3.81, P < 0.001). Finally, residents improved in all elements of interaction with patients: empathy, organization, and verbal and nonverbal expression (Ps < 0.001). The study provides evidence for the efficacy of ward-based team training using simulation. Such exercises should be formally incorporated into training curricula to enhance patient safety in the high-risk surgical ward environment.

  15. Mind the gap: the transition to hospital consultant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerman, Michiel

    2014-06-01

    Thesis defended on the 19th of December 2012 at the faculty of Medicine of the VU University Amsterdam. Promotors: Professor Fedde Scheele MD, PhD, (VUmc Amsterdam) and Professor Albert Scherpbier MD, PhD (University of Maastricht). Copromotors: Pim Teunissen, MD, PhD (University of Maastricht) and Carl Siegert MD, PhD (St. Lucas Andreas Hospital, Amsterdam).

  16. Developing non-technical ward-round skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Rachel; Mellanby, Edward; Dearden, Effie; Medjoub, Karima; Edgar, Simon

    2015-10-01

    Conducting clinical 'rounds' is one of the most onerous and important duties that every junior doctor is expected to perform. There is evidence that newly qualified doctors are not adequately prepared by their undergraduate experiences for this task. The aim of this study was to analyse the challenges pertaining to non-technical skills that students would face during ward rounds, and to create a model that facilitates the transition from medical student to doctor. A total of 217 final-year medical students completed a simulated ward round. Free-text responses were analysed using template analysis applying an a priori template developed from the literature by the research team. This drew on the generic categories of non-technical skills suggested by Flin et al. Ninety-seven per cent of students agreed or strongly agreed that the simulated ward round improved their insight into the challenges of ward rounds and their perceived ability to work efficiently as an active member of the ward round. The responding students (206) submitted written feedback describing the learning that they planned to use: 800 learning points were recorded, and all could be categorised into one of seven non-technical skills. Conducting clinical 'rounds' is one of the most onerous and important duties that every junior doctor is expected to perform We believe that improved task efficiency and insight into the challenges of the ward round gained by medical students will lead to an enhancement in performance during clinical rounds, and will have a positive impact on patient safety. We would suggest that undergraduate medical schools consider this model in the preparation for the clinical practice element of the curriculum. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Ward Identities for the 2PI effective action in QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinosa, Urko; Serreau, Julien

    2007-01-01

    We study the issue of symmetries and associated Ward-like identities in the context of two-particle-irreducible (2PI) functional techniques for abelian gauge theories. In the 2PI framework, the n-point proper vertices of the theory can be obtained in various different ways which, although equivalent in the exact theory, differ in general at finite approximation order. We derive generalized (2PI) Ward identities for these various n-point functions and show that such identities are exactly satisfied at any approximation order in 2PI QED. In particular, we show that 2PI-resummed vertex functions, i.e. field-derivatives of the so-called 2PI-resummed effective action, exactly satisfy standard Ward identities. We identify another set of n-point functions in the 2PI framework which exactly satisfy the standard Ward identities at any approximation order. These are obtained as field-derivatives of the two-point function φ, which defines the extremum of the 2PI effective action. We point out that the latter is not constrained by the underlying symmetry. As a consequence, the well-known fact that the corresponding gauge-field polarization tensor is not transverse in momentum space for generic approximations does not constitute a violation of (2PI) Ward identities. More generally, our analysis demonstrates that approximation schemes based on 2PI functional techniques respect all the Ward identities associated with the underlying abelian gauge symmetry. Our results apply to arbitrary linearly realized global sym