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Sample records for hospital system based

  1. Hospital Based Customization of a Medical Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Marilyn A.; Ferguson, Julie C.

    1983-01-01

    A Medical Information System must be current if it is to be a viable adjunct to patient care within a hospital setting. Hospital-based customization provides a means of achieving this timeliness with maximum user satisfaction. It, however, requires a major commitment in personnel time as well as additional software and training expenses. The enhanced control of system modifications and overall flexibility in planning the change process result in enthusiastic support of this approach by many hospitals. The key factors for success include careful selection of local personnel with adequate vendor support, extensive QA control, thorough auditing/validation and direct user involvement.

  2. Integrating knowledge based functionality in commercial hospital information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M L; Ganslandt, T; Eich, H P; Lang, K; Ohmann, C; Prokosch, H U

    2000-01-01

    Successful integration of knowledge-based functions in the electronic patient record depends on direct and context-sensitive accessibility and availability to clinicians and must suit their workflow. In this paper we describe an exemplary integration of an existing standalone scoring system for acute abdominal pain into two different commercial hospital information systems using Java/Corba technolgy.

  3. An Expert System-Based Approach to Hospitality Company Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Balfe, Andrew; O'Connor, Peter; McDonnell, Ciaran

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a prototype Expert System-based Analysis and Diagnostic (ESAD) package for the Hotel and Catering Industry. This computerised tool aids the hospitality manager in methodically scrutinising the hotel unit and environment, combining key information with systematic reasoning. The system searches through its extensive knowledge base, investigating complicated relationships. The number of possibilities considered is increased which will broaden the depth and...

  4. Performance Based Supplementary Payment System at University Hospitals in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahit YÝÐÝT

    2017-06-01

    Results: The result of the analysis has revealed that PBSP system encourage physicians who would like to receive financial incentives. PBSP system supports the individual performance, reduces waiting times in patients, increases revenues and decreases expenditures and increases in efficiency of department. However, this payment system increases work load, number of examinations and provokes the conflict among personals. Conclusions: University hospitals are academic institutions that perform important missions such as research, medical education and health services provision. Therefore, PBSP system should be revised so as to encourage performing these missions at university hospitals. There is also shortage of financial resources at the university hospitals. This situation leads to less additional payments to physicians. [J Contemp Med 2017; 7(2.000: 126-131

  5. [Hospital information system performance for road traffic accidents analysis in a hospital recruitment based area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannot, A-S; Fauconnier, J

    2013-06-01

    Road traffic accidents in France are mainly analyzed through reports completed by the security forces (police and gendarmerie). But the hospital information systems can also identify road traffic accidents via specific documentary codes of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). The aim of this study was therefore to determine whether hospital stays consecutive to road traffic accident were truly identified by these documentary codes in a facility that collects data routinely and to study the consistency of results from hospital information systems and from security forces during the 2002-2008 period. We retrieved all patients for whom a documentary code for road traffic accident was entered in 2002-2008. We manually checked the concordance of documentary code for road traffic accident and trauma origin in 350 patient files. The number of accidents in the Grenoble area was then inferred by combining with hospitalization regional data and compared to the number of persons injured by traffic accidents declared by the security force. These hospital information systems successfully report road traffic accidents with 96% sensitivity (95%CI: [92%, 100%]) and 97% specificity (95%CI: [95%, 99%]). The decrease in road traffic accidents observed was significantly less than that observed was significantly lower than that observed in the data from the security force (45% for security force data against 27% for hospital data). Overall, this study shows that hospital information systems are a powerful tool for studying road traffic accidents morbidity in hospital and are complementary to security force data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. 78 FR 10579 - TRICARE Revision to CHAMPUS DRG-Based Payment System, Pricing of Hospital Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... 0720-AB58 TRICARE Revision to CHAMPUS DRG-Based Payment System, Pricing of Hospital Claims AGENCY... change TRICARE's current regulatory provision for hospital claims priced under the DRG-based payment... under the DRG- based payment system from the beneficiary's date of admission, to pricing such claims...

  7. A Classification System for Hospital-Based Infection Outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S. Ganney

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of infection within semi-closed environments such as hospitals, whether inherent in the environment (such as Clostridium difficile (C.Diff or Methicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA or imported from the wider community (such as Norwalk-like viruses (NLVs, are difficult to manage. As part of our work on modelling such outbreaks, we have developed a classification system to describe the impact of a particular outbreak upon an organization. This classification system may then be used in comparing appropriate computer models to real outbreaks, as well as in comparing different real outbreaks in, for example, the comparison of differing management and containment techniques and strategies. Data from NLV outbreaks in the Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust (the Trust over several previous years are analysed and classified, both for infection within staff (where the end of infection date may not be known and within patients (where it generally is known. A classification system consisting of seven elements is described, along with a goodness-of-fit method for comparing a new classification to previously known ones, for use in evaluating a simulation against history and thereby determining how ‘realistic’ (or otherwise it is.

  8. A classification system for hospital-based infection outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganney, Paul S; Madeo, Maurice; Phillips, Roger

    2010-12-01

    Outbreaks of infection within semi-closed environments such as hospitals, whether inherent in the environment (such as Clostridium difficile (C.Diff) or Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or imported from the wider community (such as Norwalk-like viruses (NLVs)), are difficult to manage. As part of our work on modelling such outbreaks, we have developed a classification system to describe the impact of a particular outbreak upon an organization. This classification system may then be used in comparing appropriate computer models to real outbreaks, as well as in comparing different real outbreaks in, for example, the comparison of differing management and containment techniques and strategies. Data from NLV outbreaks in the Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust (the Trust) over several previous years are analysed and classified, both for infection within staff (where the end of infection date may not be known) and within patients (where it generally is known). A classification system consisting of seven elements is described, along with a goodness-of-fit method for comparing a new classification to previously known ones, for use in evaluating a simulation against history and thereby determining how 'realistic' (or otherwise) it is.

  9. Electronic health systems: challenges faced by hospital-based providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agno, Christina Farala; Guo, Kristina L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss specific challenges faced by hospitals adopting the use of electronic medical records and implementing electronic health record (EHR) systems. Challenges include user and information technology support; ease of technical use and software interface capabilities; compliance; and financial, legal, workforce training, and development issues. Electronic health records are essential to preventing medical errors, increasing consumer trust and use of the health system, and improving quality and overall efficiency. Government efforts are focused on ways to accelerate the adoption and use of EHRs as a means of facilitating data sharing, protecting health information privacy and security, quickly identifying emerging public health threats, and reducing medical errors and health care costs and increasing quality of care. This article will discuss physician and nonphysician staff training before, during, and after implementation; the effective use of EHR systems' technical features; the selection of a capable and secure EHR system; and the development of collaborative system implementation. Strategies that are necessary to help health care providers achieve successful implementation of EHR systems will be addressed.

  10. A Hospital Nursing Adverse Events Reporting System Project: An Approach Based on the Systems Development Life Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yingjuan; Ball, Marion

    2017-01-01

    Based on the System Development Life Cycle, a hospital based nursing adverse event reporting system was developed and implemented which integrated with the current Hospital Information System (HIS). Besides the potitive outcomes in terms of timeliness and efficiency, this approach has brought an enormous change in how the nurses report, analyze and respond to the adverse events.

  11. Exploring information systems outsourcing in U.S. hospital-based health care delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, Mark L

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the factors associated with outsourcing of information systems (IS) in hospital-based health care delivery systems, and to determine if there is a difference in IS outsourcing activity based on the strategic value of the outsourced functions. IS sourcing behavior is conceptualized as a case of vertical integration. A synthesis of strategic management theory (SMT) and transaction cost economics (TCE) serves as the theoretical framework. The sample consists of 1,365 hospital-based health care delivery systems that own 3,452 hospitals operating in 2004. The findings indicate that neither TCE nor SMT predicted outsourcing better than the other did. The findings also suggest that health care delivery system managers may not be considering significant factors when making sourcing decisions, including the relative strategic value of the functions they are outsourcing. It is consistent with previous literature to suggest that the high cost of IS may be the main factor driving the outsourcing decision.

  12. Design of the Hospital Integrated Information Management System Based on Cloud Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijing, L; Jin, Y

    2015-12-01

    At present, the outdated information management style cannot meet the needs of hospital management, and has become the bottleneck of hospital's management and development. In order to improve the integrated management of information, hospitals have increased their investment in integrated information management systems. On account of the lack of reasonable and scientific design, some hospital integrated information management systems have common problems, such as unfriendly interface, poor portability and maintainability, low security and efficiency, lack of interactivity and information sharing. To solve the problem, this paper carries out the research and design of a hospital information management system based on cloud platform, which can realize the optimized integration of hospital information resources and save money.

  13. Physician practice management companies: implications for hospital-based integrated delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, L R; Robinson, J C

    1997-01-01

    Physician practice management companies (PPMCs) are one of the most visible entrants into the industry of managing physician practices, and anywhere from 100-150 are already in operation. Although PPMCs and hospital-based integrated delivery systems (IDSs) differ from each other in many ways, they share a number of common features, including the pursuit of capitation contracts from payors. As a result, PPMCs pose a growing, direct threat to hospital systems in competing for managed care contracts that cover physician service. PPMCs also provide an alternative to hospital-based IDSs at the local market level for physician group consolidation. This article looks at the structure, operation, and strategy of PPMCs and examines what implications their growth will have for hospital-based IDSs.

  14. A KPI framework for process-based benchmarking of hospital information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Franziska; Winter, Alfred

    2011-01-01

    Benchmarking is a major topic for monitoring, directing and elucidating the performance of hospital information systems (HIS). Current approaches neglect the outcome of the processes that are supported by the HIS and their contribution to the hospital's strategic goals. We suggest to benchmark HIS based on clinical documentation processes and their outcome. A framework consisting of a general process model and outcome criteria for clinical documentation processes is introduced.

  15. Criteria for the evaluation of a cloud-based hospital information system outsourcing provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Chinyao; Hsueh Chen, Ya

    2012-12-01

    As cloud computing technology has proliferated rapidly worldwide, there has been a trend toward adopting cloud-based hospital information systems (CHISs). This study examines the critical criteria for selecting the CHISs outsourcing provider. The fuzzy Delphi method (FDM) is used to evaluate the primary indicator collected from 188 useable responses at a working hospital in Taiwan. Moreover, the fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (FAHP) is employed to calculate the weights of these criteria and establish a fuzzy multi-criteria model of CHISs outsourcing provider selection from 42 experts. The results indicate that the five most critical criteria related to CHISs outsourcing provider selection are (1) system function, (2) service quality, (3) integration, (4) professionalism, and (5) economics. This study may contribute to understanding how cloud-based hospital systems can reinforce content design and offer a way to compete in the field by developing more appropriate systems.

  16. Cloud-based hospital information system as a service for grassroots healthcare institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qin; Han, Xiong; Ma, Xi-Kun; Xue, Yi-Feng; Chen, Yi-Jun; Li, Jing-Song

    2014-09-01

    Grassroots healthcare institutions (GHIs) are the smallest administrative levels of medical institutions, where most patients access health services. The latest report from the National Bureau of Statistics of China showed that 96.04 % of 950,297 medical institutions in China were at the grassroots level in 2012, including county-level hospitals, township central hospitals, community health service centers, and rural clinics. In developing countries, these institutions are facing challenges involving a shortage of funds and talent, inconsistent medical standards, inefficient information sharing, and difficulties in management during the adoption of health information technologies (HIT). Because of the necessity and gravity for GHIs, our aim is to provide hospital information services for GHIs using Cloud computing technologies and service modes. In this medical scenario, the computing resources are pooled by means of a Cloud-based Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) to serve multiple GHIs, with different hospital information systems dynamically assigned and reassigned according to demand. This paper is concerned with establishing a Cloud-based Hospital Information Service Center to provide hospital information software as a service (HI-SaaS) with the aim of providing GHIs with an attractive and high-performance medical information service. Compared with individually establishing all hospital information systems, this approach is more cost-effective and affordable for GHIs and does not compromise HIT performance.

  17. Pathways to DRG-based hospital payment systems in Japan, Korea, and Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annear, Peter Leslie; Kwon, Soonman; Lorenzoni, Luca; Duckett, Stephen; Huntington, Dale; Langenbrunner, John C; Murakami, Yuki; Shon, Changwoo; Xu, Ke

    2018-05-07

    Countries in Asia are working towards achieving universal health coverage while ensuring improved quality of care. One element is controlling hospital costs through payment reforms. In this paper we review experiences in using Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG) based hospital payments in three Asian countries and ask if there is an "Asian way to DRGs". We focus first on technical issues and follow with a discussion of implementation challenges and policy questions. We reviewed the literature and worked as an expert team to investigate existing documentation from Japan, Republic of Korea, and Thailand. We reviewed the design of case-based payment systems, their experience with implementation, evidence about impact on service delivery, and lessons drawn for the Asian region. We found that countries must first establish adequate infrastructure, human resource capacity and information management systems. Capping of volumes and prices is sometimes essential along with a high degree of hospital autonomy. Rather than introduce a complete classification system in one stroke, these countries have phased in DRGs, in some cases with hospitals volunteering to participate as a first step (Korea), and in others using a blend of different units for hospital payment, including length of stay, and fee-for-service (Japan). Case-based payment systems are not a panacea. Their value is dependent on their design and implementation and the capacity of the health system. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Hospital's activity-based financing system and manager-physician [corrected] interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crainich, David; Leleu, Hervé; Mauleon, Ana

    2011-10-01

    This paper examines the consequences of the introduction of an activity-based reimbursement system on the behavior of physicians and hospital's managers. We consider a private for-profit sector where both hospitals and physicians are initially paid on a fee-for-service basis. We show that the benefit of the introduction of an activity-based system depends on the type of interaction between managers and physicians (simultaneous or sequential decision-making games). It is shown that, under the activity-based system, a sequential interaction with physician leader could be beneficial for both agents in the private sector. We further model an endogenous timing game à la Hamilton and Slutsky (Games Econ Behav 2: 29-46, 1990) in which the type of interaction is determined endogenously. We show that, under the activity-based system, the sequential interaction with physician leader is the unique subgame perfect equilibrium.

  19. Policy trends and reforms in the German DRG-based hospital payment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Hitpaß, Uwe; Scheller-Kreinsen, David

    2015-03-01

    A central structural point in all DRG-based hospital payment systems is the conversion of relative weights into actual payments. In this context policy makers need to address (amongst other things) (a) how the price level of DRG-payments from one period to the following period is changed and (b) whether and how hospital payments based on DRGs are to be differentiated beyond patient characteristics, e.g. by organizational, regional or state-level factors. Both policy problems can be and in international comparison often are empirically addressed. In Germany relative weights are derived from a highly sophisticated empirical cost calculation, whereas the annual changes of DRG-based payments (base rates) as well as the differentiation of DRG-based hospital payments beyond patient characteristics are not empirically addressed. Rather a complex set of regulations and quasi-market negotiations are applied. There were over the last decade also timid attempts to foster the use of empirical data to address these points. However, these reforms failed to increase the fairness, transparency and rationality of the mechanism to convert relative weights into actual DRG-based hospital payments. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. A new costing model in hospital management: time-driven activity-based costing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öker, Figen; Özyapıcı, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Traditional cost systems cause cost distortions because they cannot meet the requirements of today's businesses. Therefore, a new and more effective cost system is needed. Consequently, time-driven activity-based costing system has emerged. The unit cost of supplying capacity and the time needed to perform an activity are the only 2 factors considered by the system. Furthermore, this system determines unused capacity by considering practical capacity. The purpose of this article is to emphasize the efficiency of the time-driven activity-based costing system and to display how it can be applied in a health care institution. A case study was conducted in a private hospital in Cyprus. Interviews and direct observations were used to collect the data. The case study revealed that the cost of unused capacity is allocated to both open and laparoscopic (closed) surgeries. Thus, by using the time-driven activity-based costing system, managers should eliminate the cost of unused capacity so as to obtain better results. Based on the results of the study, hospital management is better able to understand the costs of different surgeries. In addition, managers can easily notice the cost of unused capacity and decide how many employees to be dismissed or directed to other productive areas.

  1. TRICARE revision to CHAMPUS DRG-based payment system, pricing of hospital claims. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-21

    This Final rule changes TRICARE's current regulatory provision for inpatient hospital claims priced under the DRG-based payment system. Claims are currently priced by using the rates and weights that are in effect on a beneficiary's date of admission. This Final rule changes that provision to price such claims by using the rates and weights that are in effect on a beneficiary's date of discharge.

  2. [Document management systems to support quality management systems at university hospitals - an interview-based study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holderried, Martin; Bökel, Ann-Catrin; Ochsmann, Elke

    2018-05-01

    In order to save and control the processes and quality of medical services, a suitable steering system of all relevant documents is essential from the point of view of clinical quality management. Systems supporting an automated steering system of documents are called document management systems (DMS), and they also enter the healthcare sector. The use of DMS in the German healthcare sector has hardly been investigated so far. To close this knowledge gap, interviews were carried out with German university hospitals over a six-month period and subjected to a qualitative content analysis according to Mayring. In total, 25 university hospitals agreed to participate in this study, 19 of which have been working with a digital DMS for about six years on average. There was a great variety among the IT systems used. Document management and usability of the DMS as well as its integration into existing IT structures were key decision-making criteria for the selection of a digital DMS. In general, the long-term usability of the DMS is supported by regular evaluation of one's own requirements for the system, administration and training programs. In addition, DMS have a positive effect on patient safety and the quality of medical care. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  3. Evaluation of the in-hospital hemovigilance by introduction of the information technology-based system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihara, Harumi; Yamada, Chiaki; Furumaki, Hiroaki; Nagai, Seiya; Shibata, Hiroki; Ishizuka, Keiko; Watanabe, Hiroko; Kaneko, Makoto; Adachi, Miwa; Takeshita, Akihiro

    2015-12-01

    Hemovigilance is an important aspect of transfusion medicine. However, the frequency of the adverse reactions often varies using different reporters. Recently, we have employed a new information technology (IT)-based in-hospital hemovigilance system. Here, we evaluated changes in practice after implementation of an IT-based reporting system. We compared the rate of frequency and details of blood transfusion-related adverse reactions 3 years before and after introduction of the IT-based reporting system. Contents and severity of the adverse reactions were reported in a paper-based reporting system, but input by selecting items in an IT-based reporting system. The details of adverse reactions are immediately sent to the blood transfusion unit online. After we introduced the IT-based reporting system, the reported rate of transfusion-related adverse reactions increased approximately 10-fold from 0.20% to 2.18% (p introduction of an IT-based reporting system. © 2015 AABB.

  4. Hospital Value-Based Purchasing

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) is part of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) long-standing effort to link Medicares payment system to a...

  5. Analysis of the quality of hospital information systems in Isfahan teaching hospitals based on the DeLone and McLean model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghaeiannejad-Isfahani, Sakineh; Saeedbakhsh, Saeed; Jahanbakhsh, Maryam; Habibi, Mahboobeh

    2015-01-01

    Quality is one of the most important criteria for the success of an information system, which refers to its desirable features of the processing system itself. The aim of this study was the analysis of system quality of hospital information systems (HIS) in teaching hospitals of Isfahan based on the DeLone and McLean model. This research was an applied and analytical-descriptive study. It was performed in teaching hospitals of Isfahan in 2010. The research population consisted of the HIS's users, system designers and hospital information technology (IT) authorities who were selected by random sampling method from users' group (n = 228), and system designers and IT authorities (n = 52) using census method. The data collection tool was two researcher-designed questionnaires. Questionnaires' reliability was estimated by using Cronbach's alpha was calculated. It was 97.1% for the system designers and IT authorities' questionnaire and 92.3% for system users' questionnaire. Findings showed that the mean of system quality score in a variety of HIS and among different hospitals was significantly different and not the same (P value ≥ 0.05). In general, Kosar (new version) system and Rahavard Rayaneh system have dedicated the highest and the lowest mean scores to themselves. The system quality criterion overall mean was 59.6% for different HIS and 57.5% among different hospitals respectively. According to the results of the research, it can be stated that based on the applied model, the investigated systems were relatively desirable in terms of quality. Thus, in order to achieve a good optimal condition, it is necessary to pay particular attention to the improving factors of system quality, type of activity, type of specialty and hospital ownership type.

  6. Evaluation of a Web-based Error Reporting Surveillance System in a Large Iranian Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askarian, Mehrdad; Ghoreishi, Mahboobeh; Akbari Haghighinejad, Hourvash; Palenik, Charles John; Ghodsi, Maryam

    2017-08-01

    Proper reporting of medical errors helps healthcare providers learn from adverse incidents and improve patient safety. A well-designed and functioning confidential reporting system is an essential component to this process. There are many error reporting methods; however, web-based systems are often preferred because they can provide; comprehensive and more easily analyzed information. This study addresses the use of a web-based error reporting system. This interventional study involved the application of an in-house designed "voluntary web-based medical error reporting system." The system has been used since July 2014 in Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The rate and severity of errors reported during the year prior and a year after system launch were compared. The slope of the error report trend line was steep during the first 12 months (B = 105.727, P = 0.00). However, it slowed following launch of the web-based reporting system and was no longer statistically significant (B = 15.27, P = 0.81) by the end of the second year. Most recorded errors were no-harm laboratory types and were due to inattention. Usually, they were reported by nurses and other permanent employees. Most reported errors occurred during morning shifts. Using a standardized web-based error reporting system can be beneficial. This study reports on the performance of an in-house designed reporting system, which appeared to properly detect and analyze medical errors. The system also generated follow-up reports in a timely and accurate manner. Detection of near-miss errors could play a significant role in identifying areas of system defects.

  7. Design criteria for a data base management system for a PACS at Georgetown University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahey, F.H.; Wang, P.C.; Mun, S.K.; Choyke, P.L.; Benson, H.R.; Duerinckx, A.; Elliott, L.P.

    1986-01-01

    A major goal of a radiologic picture archival and communication system (PACS) is to increase the availability of the data to the users who require access to them. This is done by providing the data in a digital form which can be readily communicated and archived. In this manner, the PACS can be seen as a specific example of a data base managements system (DBMS). The PACS/DBMS should organize the data base in such a way as to provide its users with the data they require in a timely and efficient manner. The ability to integrate the variety of data into common data base should lead to a more complete and relevant representation of the available information. A PACS/DBMS is not only unique in the types of data contained in the data base and its different users but also in the volume of data that are entered into the system and transferred within the system each day. Consideration of these characteristics leads to the definition of functional criteria for the PACS/DBMS. This report discusses the criteria that will be used in the design of a DBMS for a PACS at Georgetown University Hospital. (Auth.)

  8. Charting a path forward: policy analysis of China's evolved DRG-based hospital payment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Shi, Jianwei; Yang, Beilei; Jin, Chunlin; Sun, Pengfei; Wu, Lingfang; Yu, Dehua; Xiong, Linping; Wang, Zhaoxin

    2017-09-01

    At present, the diagnosis-related groups-based prospective payment system (DRG-PPS) that has been implemented in China is merely a prototype called the simplified DRG-PPS, which is known as the 'ceiling price for a single disease'. Given that studies on the effects of a simplified DRG-PPS in China have usually been controversial, we aim to synthesize evidence examining whether DRGs can reduce medical costs and length of stay (LOS) in China. Data were searched from both Chinese [Wan Fang and China National Knowledge Infrastructure Database (CNKI)] and international databases (Web of Science and PubMed), as well as the official websites of Chinese health departments in the 2004-2016 period. Only studies with a design that included both experimental (with DRG-PPS implementation) and control groups (without DRG-PPS implementation) were included in the review. The studies were based on inpatient samples from public hospitals distributed in 12 provinces of mainland China. Among them, 80.95% (17/21) revealed that hospitalization costs could be reduced significantly, and 50.00% (8/16) indicated that length of stay could be decreased significantly. In addition, the government reports showed the enormous differences in pricing standards and LOS in various provinces, even for the same disease. We conclude that the simplified DRGs are useful in controlling hospitalization costs, but they fail to reduce LOS. Much work remains to be done in China to improve the simplified DRG-PPS. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  9. Rule Based Expert System for Monitoring Real Time Drug Supply in Hospital Using Radio Frequency Identification Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driandanu, Galih; Surarso, Bayu; Suryono

    2018-02-01

    A radio frequency identification (RFID) has obtained increasing attention with the emergence of various applications. This study aims to examine the implementation of rule based expert system supported by RFID technology into a monitoring information system of drug supply in a hospital. This research facilitates in monitoring the real time drug supply by using data sample from the hospital pharmacy. This system able to identify and count the number of drug and provide warning and report in real time. the conclusion is the rule based expert system and RFID technology can facilitate the performance in monitoring the drug supply quickly and precisely.

  10. Efficacy of computer-based endoscope cleaning and disinfection using a hospital management information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Caixia; Chen, Yuanyuan; Yang, Feng; Ren, Jie; Yu, Xin; Wang, Jiani; Sun, Siyu

    2016-08-01

    The present study aimed to assess the efficacy of computer-based endoscope cleaning and disinfection using a hospital management information system (HMIS). A total of 2,674 gastroscopes were eligible for inclusion in this study. For the processes of disinfection management, the gastroscopes were randomly divided into 2 groups: gastroscope disinfection HMIS (GD-HMIS) group and manual group. In the GD-HMIS group, an integrated circuit card (IC card) chip was installed to monitor and record endoscope cleaning and disinfection automatically and in real time, whereas the endoscope cleaning and disinfection in the manual group was recorded manually. The overall disinfection progresses for both groups were recorded, and the total operational time was calculated. For the GD-HMIS group, endoscope disinfection HMIS software was successfully developed. The time to complete a single session of cleaning and disinfecting on a gastroscope was 15.6 minutes (range, 14.3-17.2 minutes) for the GD-HMIS group and 21.3 minutes (range, 20.2-23.9 minutes) for the manual group. Failure to record information, such as the identification number of the endoscope, occasionally occurred in the manual group, which affected the accuracy and reliability of manual recording. Computer-based gastroscope cleaning and disinfection using a hospital management information system could monitor the process of gastroscope cleaning and disinfection in real time and improve the accuracy and reliability, thereby ensuring the quality of gastroscope cleaning and disinfection. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A reliable user authentication and key agreement scheme for Web-based Hospital-acquired Infection Surveillance Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen-Yu; Tseng, Yi-Ju; Chung, Yufang; Chen, Yee-Chun; Lai, Feipei

    2012-08-01

    With the rapid development of the Internet, both digitization and electronic orientation are required on various applications in the daily life. For hospital-acquired infection control, a Web-based Hospital-acquired Infection Surveillance System was implemented. Clinical data from different hospitals and systems were collected and analyzed. The hospital-acquired infection screening rules in this system utilized this information to detect different patterns of defined hospital-acquired infection. Moreover, these data were integrated into the user interface of a signal entry point to assist physicians and healthcare providers in making decisions. Based on Service-Oriented Architecture, web-service techniques which were suitable for integrating heterogeneous platforms, protocols, and applications, were used. In summary, this system simplifies the workflow of hospital infection control and improves the healthcare quality. However, it is probable for attackers to intercept the process of data transmission or access to the user interface. To tackle the illegal access and to prevent the information from being stolen during transmission over the insecure Internet, a password-based user authentication scheme is proposed for information integrity.

  12. The Use of Hospital Information Systems Data Base with Word Processing and Other Medical Records System Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Rusnak, James E.

    1982-01-01

    The approach frequently used to introduce computer technology into a hospital Medical Records Department is to implement a Word Processing System. Word processing is a form of computer system application that is intended to improve the department's productivity by improving the medical information transcription process. The effectiveness of the Word Processing System may be further enhanced by installing system facilities to provide access to data processing file information in the Hospital's...

  13. Impact of a DRG-based hospital financing system on quality and outcomes of care in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, D Z; Yuen, E J; Braga, M; Cicchetti, A; Rabinowitz, C; Laine, C; Gonnella, J S

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine potential changes in quality of care associated with a recent financing system implementation in Italy: in 1995, hospital financing reform implemented in Italy included the introduction of a DRG-based hospital financing system with the goals of controlling the growth of hospital costs and making hospitals more accountable for their productivity. DATA SOURCES: Hospital discharge abstract data from 1993 through 1996 for all hospitals (N=32) in the Friuli-Venezia-Giulia region of Italy. Regional population data were used to calculate rates. STUDY DESIGN: Changes between 1993 and 1996 in hospital admissions, length of stay, mortality rates, severity of illness, and readmission rates were studied for nine common medical and surgical conditions: appendicitis, diabetes mellitus, colorectal cancer, cholecystitis, bronchitis/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), bacterial pneumonia, coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, and hip fracture. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The total number of ordinary hospital admissions decreased from 244,581 to 204,054 between 1993 and 1996, a population-based decrease of 17.3 percent (p<.001). The mean length of stay decreased from 9.1 days to 8.8 days, resulting in a 21.1 percent decrease in hospital bed days (p<.001). Day hospital use increased sevenfold from 16,871 encounters in 1993 to 108,517 encounters in 1996. The largest decrease in hospital admissions among study conditions was a 41 percent decrease for diabetes (from 2.25 per 1,000 in 1993 to 1.31 in 1996, p<.001). For eight of the nine conditions, severity of illness increased. Differences between severity-adjusted expected and observed in-hospital mortality rates were small. CONCLUSIONS: Observed trends showed a decrease in ordinary hospital admissions, an increase in day hospital admissions, and a greater severity of illness among hospitalized patients. There was little or no change in mortality and readmission rates. Administrative data can be used

  14. Design of security scheme of the radiotherapy planning administration system based on the hospital information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Yongzhi; Zhao Jinzao

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To design a security scheme of radiotherapy planning administration system. Methods: Power Builder 9i language was used to program the system through the model of client-server machine. Oracle 9i was used as the database server. Results In this system, user registration management, user login management, application-level functions of control, database access control, and audit trail were designed to provide system security. Conclusions: As a prototype for the security analysis and protection of this scheme provides security of the system, application system, important data and message, which ensures the system work normally. (authors)

  15. Analysis and design of hospital management information system based on UML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lin; Zhao, Huifang; You, Shi Jun; Ge, Wenyong

    2018-05-01

    With the rapid development of computer technology, computer information management system has been utilized in many industries. Hospital Information System (HIS) is in favor of providing data for directors, lightening the workload for the medical workers, and improving the workers efficiency. According to the HIS demand analysis and system design, this paper focus on utilizing unified modeling language (UML) models to establish the use case diagram, class diagram, sequence chart and collaboration diagram, and satisfying the demands of the daily patient visit, inpatient, drug management and other relevant operations. At last, the paper summarizes the problems of the system and puts forward an outlook of the HIS system.

  16. Defining Reported Errors on Web-based Reporting System Using ICPS From Nine Units in a Korean University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul-Hoon Kim, DDS, PhD

    2009-12-01

    Conclusion: The web-based error reporting system using ICPS proved to be an easy, feasible system for hospitals in Korea. This system will be helpful for inducing general agreement upon errors within clinical nursing practice and bring more attention to any errors made or near misses. Also, it will be able to ameliorate the punitive culture for errors and transform error reporting into a habit for healthcare providers.

  17. The definition, selection and implementation of a new Clinical Information System to prepare the hospital for the electronic future : an example of project-based education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spil, Antonius A.M.; van de Meeberg, Henk J.; Sikkel, Nicolaas

    The software supplier of a large hospital has been taken over. The hospital gets notice that the central hospital information system (HIS) will no longer be maintained, starting next year. This problem, not uncommon in business today, is used as a real-life case in a project-based course for first

  18. A study on periodontal disease and systemic disease relationship a hospital based study in Bangalore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhvinder Singh Oberoi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodontal deterioration has been reported to be associated with various systemic conditions like Cardiovascular disease, Diabetes, Respiratory disease, Liver cirrhosis, Bacterial Pneumonia, Nutritional deficiencies and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Aim: To assess the periodontal disease among patients with systemic disease/conditions. Materials and Method: A total of 500 patients with systemic disease/conditions (Diabetes, Cardiovascular disease, Respiratory disease and Renal disease and 500-age and gender matched controls without systemic disease/conditions were selected from the Government Hospitals in Bangalore City. The medical conditions were recorded and the periodontal status of the study population was assessed using the CPITN index. Results: The prevalence of CPITN Code 4 was found to be more among the patients with systemic disease/conditions (46.2%. The mean number of sextants with CPITN code 3 and 4 were more among the patients with systemic disease/conditions. The prevalence of CPITN code was found to be more among the patients with Respiratory disease whereas the mean number of sextants was found to be more among the patients with Diabetes, Cardiovascular and Renal disease. Conclusion: It may be concluded that the systemic diseases/conditions are associated with higher severity of periodontal disease.

  19. Aetiologies of central nervous system infection in Viet Nam: a prospective provincial hospital-based descriptive surveillance study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nghia Ho Dang Trung

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases of the central nervous system (CNS remain common and life-threatening, especially in developing countries. Knowledge of the aetiological agents responsible for these infections is essential to guide empiric therapy and develop a rational public health policy. To date most data has come from patients admitted to tertiary referral hospitals in Asia and there is limited aetiological data at the provincial hospital level where most patients are seen.We conducted a prospective Provincial Hospital-based descriptive surveillance study in adults and children at thirteen hospitals in central and southern Viet Nam between August 2007-April 2010. The pathogens of CNS infection were confirmed in CSF and blood samples by using classical microbiology, molecular diagnostics and serology.We recruited 1241 patients with clinically suspected infection of the CNS. An aetiological agent was identified in 640/1241 (52% of the patients. The most common pathogens were Streptococcus suis serotype 2 in patients older than 14 years of age (147/617, 24% and Japanese encephalitis virus in patients less than 14 years old (142/624, 23%. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was confirmed in 34/617 (6% adult patients and 11/624 (2% paediatric patients. The acute case fatality rate (CFR during hospital admission was 73/617 (12% in adults and to 42/624 (7% in children.Zoonotic bacterial and viral pathogens are the most common causes of CNS infection in adults and children in Viet Nam.

  20. Factors Affecting Acceptance of Hospital Information Systems Based on Extended Technology Acceptance Model: A Case Study in Three Paraclinical Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadri, Hamed; Rahimi, Bahlol; Lotfnezhad Afshar, Hadi; Samadbeik, Mahnaz; Garavand, Ali

    2018-04-01

     Regardless of the acceptance of users, information and communication systems can be considered as a health intervention designed to improve the care delivered to patients. This study aimed to determine the adoption and use of the extended Technology Acceptance Model (TAM2) by the users of hospital information system (HIS) in paraclinical departments including laboratory, radiology, and nutrition and to investigate the key factors of adoption and use of these systems.  A standard questionnaire was used to collect the data from nearly 253 users of these systems in paraclinical departments of eight university hospitals in two different cities of Iran. A total of 202 questionnaires including valid responses were used in this study (105 in Urmia and 97 in Khorramabad). The data were processed using LISREL and SPSS software and statistical analysis technique was based on the structural equation modeling (SEM).  It was found that the original TAM constructs had a significant impact on the staffs' behavioral intention to adopt HIS in paraclinical departments. The results of this study indicated that cognitive instrumental processes (job relevance, output quality, result demonstrability, and perceived ease of use), except for result demonstrability, were significant predictors of intention to use, whereas the result revealed no significant relationship between social influence processes (subjective norm, voluntariness, and image) and the users' behavioral intention to use the system.  The results confirmed that several factors in the TAM2 that were important in previous studies were not significant in paraclinical departments and in government-owned hospitals. The users' behavior factors are essential for successful usage of the system and should be considered. It provides valuable information for hospital system providers and policy makers in understanding the adoption challenges as well as practical guidance for the successful implementation of information

  1. Burnout in hospital-based medical consultants in the New Zealand public health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgenor, Lois J; Spearing, Ruth L; Horn, Jacqueline; Beautrais, Annette L; Mulder, Roger T; Chen, Peggy

    2009-08-07

    To assess the prevalence and severity of burnout in hospital-based medical consultants, and investigate associated demographic and professional characteristics. Utilising standardised measures of burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory) and job satisfaction (Job Satisfaction Scale) this cross-sectional study recruited 267 consultants working in a large tertiary hospital in Christchurch, New Zealand. Seventy-one percent of all eligible participants were recruited. The prevalence of burnout in each of the three dimensions was as follows: High Emotional Exhaustion=29.7%; High Depersonalisation=24.4%; Low Personal Accomplishment=31.2%. One in five consultants was assessed as having high overall burnout. Considered against the psychometric norms for medical workers, significantly more consultants than expected reported low Emotional Exhaustion (p<0.001) and low Depersonalisation (p<0.01). Working longer hours (p<0.01), lower job satisfaction (p<0.001), and shorter time in the current job (p<0.05) independently increased the risk of high Emotional Exhaustion. Working longer hours (p<0.05) and lower job satisfaction (p<.01) independently increased the risk of high Depersonalisation. Longer time in the same job increased the risk of low Personal Accomplishment (p<0.05). Longer hours worked (p<0.05), shorter vocational experience as a consultant (p<0.05), and lower job satisfaction (p<0.001) independently increased the risk of high overall burnout. An unexpected proportion of consultants experience robust emotional well-being and healthy work engagement. However, for those experiencing high burnout, by severity or dimension, working long hours and low job satisfaction appear to be particularly contributory factors. Whilst remedial interventions should target the minority who experience significant burnout, studies using robust research designs are required to assess the meaningful clinical utility of these. The challenge remains to determine the optimal organisational practices

  2. The architecture of enterprise hospital information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong; Li, Haomin; Zhao, Chenhui; An, Jiye

    2005-01-01

    Because of the complexity of the hospital environment, there exist a lot of medical information systems from different vendors with incompatible structures. In order to establish an enterprise hospital information system, the integration among these heterogeneous systems must be considered. Complete integration should cover three aspects: data integration, function integration and workflow integration. However most of the previous design of architecture did not accomplish such a complete integration. This article offers an architecture design of the enterprise hospital information system based on the concept of digital neural network system in hospital. It covers all three aspects of integration, and eventually achieves the target of one virtual data center with Enterprise Viewer for users of different roles. The initial implementation of the architecture in the 5-year Digital Hospital Project in Huzhou Central hospital of Zhejiang Province is also described.

  3. Hospital payment systems based on diagnosis-related groups: experiences in low- and middle-income countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenbecher, Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective This paper provides a comprehensive overview of hospital payment systems based on diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) in low- and middle-income countries. It also explores design and implementation issues and the related challenges countries face. Methods A literature research for papers on DRG-based payment systems in low- and middle-income countries was conducted in English, French and Spanish through Pubmed, the Pan American Health Organization’s Regional Library of Medicine and Google. Findings Twelve low- and middle-income countries have DRG-based payment systems and another 17 are in the piloting or exploratory stage. Countries have chosen from a wide range of imported and self-developed DRG models and most have adapted such models to their specific contexts. All countries have set expenditure ceilings. In general, systems were piloted before being implemented. The need to meet certain requirements in terms of coding standardization, data availability and information technology made implementation difficult. Private sector providers have not been fully integrated, but most countries have managed to delink hospital financing from public finance budgeting. Conclusion Although more evidence on the impact of DRG-based payment systems is needed, our findings suggest that (i) the greater portion of health-care financing should be public rather than private; (ii) it is advisable to pilot systems first and to establish expenditure ceilings; (iii) countries that import an existing variant of a DRG-based system should be mindful of the need for adaptation; and (iv) countries should promote the cooperation of providers for appropriate data generation and claims management. PMID:24115798

  4. Optimized biofilm-based systems for removal of pharmaceuticals from hospital waste water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik R; Chhetri, Ravi; Hansen, Kamilla

    Discharge of hospital wastewater is of increasing concern, as hospitals are identified as chemical pollution source due to pharmaceutical content. This project seeks to develop the most efficient and economically feasible technology to remove pharmaceuticals from wastewater, regardless of the poi...

  5. A Web-Based, Hospital-Wide Health Care-Associated Bloodstream Infection Surveillance and Classification System: Development and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yi-Ju; Wu, Jung-Hsuan; Lin, Hui-Chi; Chen, Ming-Yuan; Ping, Xiao-Ou; Sun, Chun-Chuan; Shang, Rung-Ji; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Chen, Yee-Chun; Lai, Feipei; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2015-09-21

    Surveillance of health care-associated infections is an essential component of infection prevention programs, but conventional systems are labor intensive and performance dependent. To develop an automatic surveillance and classification system for health care-associated bloodstream infection (HABSI), and to evaluate its performance by comparing it with a conventional infection control personnel (ICP)-based surveillance system. We developed a Web-based system that was integrated into the medical information system of a 2200-bed teaching hospital in Taiwan. The system automatically detects and classifies HABSIs. In this study, the number of computer-detected HABSIs correlated closely with the number of HABSIs detected by ICP by department (n=20; r=.999 Psystem performed excellently with regard to sensitivity (98.16%), specificity (99.96%), positive predictive value (95.81%), and negative predictive value (99.98%). The system enabled decreasing the delay in confirmation of HABSI cases, on average, by 29 days. This system provides reliable and objective HABSI data for quality indicators, improving the delay caused by a conventional surveillance system.

  6. A smartphone-based system for the automated management of point-of-care test results in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Dasom; Shin, Soo-Yong; Seo, Dong-Woo; Joo, Segyeong; Huh, Soo-Jin

    2015-04-01

    Managing test results is an important issue in hospitals because of the increasing use of point-of-care testing (POCT). Here, we propose a smartphone-based system for automatically managing POCT test results. We developed the system to provide convenience to the medical staffs. The system recognizes the patient identification or prescription number of the test by reading barcodes and provides a countdown to indicate when the results will be ready. When the countdown in finished, a picture of the test result is transferred to the electronic medical record server using the Health Level 7 protocol. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) kits were selected in this research because HIV is a life-threatening infectious virus, especially for the medical staff who treat undiagnosed patients. The performance of the system was verified from a survey of the users. The performance of the system was tested at the emergency room (ER) for 10 months using commercially available POCT kits for detecting HIV. The survey showed that, in total, 80% and 0% of users reported positive or negative feedback, respectively. The staff also reported that the system reduced total processing time by approximately 32 min, in addition to reducing workload. The developed automated management system was successfully tested at an ER for 10 months. The survey results show that the system is effective and that medical staff members who used the system are satisfied with using the system at the ER.

  7. Demonstration of Advanced Technologies for Multi-Load Washers in Hospitality and Healthcare -- Ozone Based Laundry Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Brian K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Parker, Graham B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Petersen, Joseph M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sullivan, Greg [Efficiency Solutions, LLC (United States); Goetzler, W. [Navigant Consulting, Inc. (United States); Sutherland, T. A. [Navigant Consulting, Inc. (United States); Foley, K. J. [Navigant Consulting, Inc. (United States)

    2014-08-14

    The objective of this demonstration project was to evaluate market-ready retrofit technologies for reducing the energy and water use of multi-load washers in healthcare and hospitality facilities. Specifically, this project evaluated laundry wastewater recycling technology in the hospitality sector and ozone laundry technology in both the healthcare and hospitality sectors. This report documents the demonstration of ozone laundry system installations at the Charleston Place Hotel in Charleston, South Carolina, and the Rogerson House assisted living facility in Boston, Massachusetts.

  8. Neurologic continuum of care: Evidence-based model of a post-hospital system of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Frank D; Horn, Gordon J

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing need for a well-organized continuum of post-hospital rehabilitative care to reduce long term disability resulting from acquired brain injury. This study examined the effectiveness of four levels of post-hospital care (active neurorehabilitation, neurobehavioral intensive, day treatment, and supported living) and the functional variables most important to their success. Participants were 1276 adults with acquired brain injury who were being treated in one of the four program levels. A Repeated Measures MANOVA was used to evaluate change from admission to discharge on the Mayo Portland Adaptability Inventory-4 T-scores. Regression analyses were used to identify predictors of outcome. Statistical improvement on the MPAI-4 was observed at each program level. Self-care and Initiation were the strongest predictors of outcome. The results support the effectiveness of a continuum of care for acquired brain injury individuals beyond hospitalization and acute in-hospital rehabilitation. It is particularly noteworthy that reduction in disability was achieved for all levels of programming even with participants whose onset to admission exceeded 7 years post-injury.

  9. Advantages of a Web-Based Real-Time Bed-Management System for Hospital Admission Monitoring in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedian, Somayeh; Bitaraf, Ehsan; Askari, Marjan

    2018-01-01

    Lack of up-to-date information of hospitals beds, specifically in emergencies, is a significant problem in many large countries; The Ministry of Health and Medical Education of Iran (MOHME) designed and implemented a dynamic system that reports the status of beds in 2012. This system created great opportunities for national bed management, including real-time hospital admission monitoring, especially for emergency departments, ICUs and CCUs. Therefore, an additional online system was planned to be implemented for monitoring hospital admissions, including a national alert system. Prior to the design of this system, a study was done using literature study and expert opinion to investigate the advantages and features that this monitoring system was required to have. We used the MoSCoW method to prioritize the requirements of the system. This system was designed to have the following advantages, among other things: the hospitals as well as government should be able to track the patients, manage patient distribution in healthcare centers, and make policy for supplying extra beds. It should also be possible for the hospitals executive board, as well as the government, to monitor the performance of the hospitals regarding patient admissions (i.e., the rate of rejection of patients with severe conditions).

  10. Impact of a Local Low-Cost Ward-Based Response System in a Canadian Tertiary Care Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Blotsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Medical emergency teams (METs or rapid response teams (RRTs facilitate early intervention for clinically deteriorating hospitalized patients. In healthcare systems where financial resources and intensivist availability are limited, the establishment of such teams can prove challenging. Objectives. A low-cost, ward-based response system was implemented on a medical clinical teaching unit in a Montreal tertiary care hospital. A prospective before/after study was undertaken to examine the system’s impact on time to intervention, code blue rates, and ICU transfer rates. Results. Ninety-five calls were placed for 82 patients. Median time from patient decompensation to intervention was 5 min (IQR 1–10, compared to 3.4 hours (IQR 0.6–12.4 before system implementation (p<0.001. Total number of ICU admissions from the CTU was reduced from 4.8/1000 patient days (±2.2 before intervention to 3.3/1000 patient days (±1.4 after intervention (IRR: 0.82, p=0.04 (CI 95%: 0.69–0.99. CTU code blue rates decreased from 2.2/1000 patient days (±1.6 before intervention to 1.2/1000 patient days (±1.3 after intervention (IRR: 0.51, p=0.02 (CI 95%: 0.30–0.89. Conclusion. Our local ward-based response system achieved a significant reduction in the time of patient decompensation to initial intervention, in CTU code blue rates, and in CTU to ICU transfers without necessitating additional usage of financial or human resources.

  11. Evaluation of hospital information systems of the teaching hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, based on the American College of Physicians Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Emami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hospital information system (HIS is a computerized system used for management of hospital information as an electronic device and has an indispensible role in the field of qualified healthcare services. Nevertheless, compared to other industrial and commercial systems, this information system is lagged in using the information technology and applying the controlling standards for satisfying the customers. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate HIS, identify its strength and weak points, and improve it in the teaching hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Method: The present descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in the 8 teaching hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences which used HIS in 2011. The study data were collected through interview and direct observation using the criteria of American Physician College check-list. Finally, SPSS statistical software was used to analyze the data through descriptive statistics. Results: The study results showed that laboratory and medical records had respectively the most %43.5 and the least %21.03 conformity to the criteria of American College of Physicians. Also, Faghihi and Zeinabiye hospitals respectively had the most %41.8 and the least %25.2 conformity to the American College of Physicians’ criteria. In pharmacy, data entrance mechanism and presentation of reports had complete conformity to the scales of American College of Physicians, while drug interactions showed no conformity. In laboratory, data entrance mechanism had complete conformity to the above-mentioned criteria and keeping the test history had %87.5 conformity. The possibility of receiving information from centers out of laboratory had no conformity to the desired criteria. In the radiology department, data entrance mechanism had complete conformity to the above-mentioned criteria and keeping the test history had %87.5 conformity. Besides, the possibility

  12. Acceptance model of a Hospital Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handayani, P W; Hidayanto, A N; Pinem, A A; Hapsari, I C; Sandhyaduhita, P I; Budi, I

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a model of Hospital Information System (HIS) user acceptance focusing on human, technological, and organizational characteristics for supporting government eHealth programs. This model was then tested to see which hospital type in Indonesia would benefit from the model to resolve problems related to HIS user acceptance. This study used qualitative and quantitative approaches with case studies at four privately owned hospitals and three government-owned hospitals, which are general hospitals in Indonesia. The respondents involved in this study are low-level and mid-level hospital management officers, doctors, nurses, and administrative staff who work at medical record, inpatient, outpatient, emergency, pharmacy, and information technology units. Data was processed using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) and AMOS 21.0. The study concludes that non-technological factors, such as human characteristics (i.e. compatibility, information security expectancy, and self-efficacy), and organizational characteristics (i.e. management support, facilitating conditions, and user involvement) which have level of significance of p<0.05, significantly influenced users' opinions of both the ease of use and the benefits of the HIS. This study found that different factors may affect the acceptance of each user in each type of hospital regarding the use of HIS. Finally, this model is best suited for government-owned hospitals. Based on the results of this study, hospital management and IT developers should have more understanding on the non-technological factors to better plan for HIS implementation. Support from management is critical to the sustainability of HIS implementation to ensure HIS is easy to use and provides benefits to the users as well as hospitals. Finally, this study could assist hospital management and IT developers, as well as researchers, to understand the obstacles faced by hospitals in implementing HIS. Copyright © 2016

  13. The Incidence of Primary Systemic Vasculitis in Jerusalem: A 20-year Hospital-based Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesher, Gideon; Ben-Chetrit, Eli; Mazal, Bracha; Breuer, Gabriel S

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of primary systemic vasculitides varies among different geographic regions and ethnic origins. The aim of this study was to examine the incidence rates of vasculitides in the Jerusalem Jewish population, and to examine possible trends in incidence rates over a 20-year period. The clinical databases of inpatients at the 2 medical centers in Jerusalem were searched for patients with vasculitis diagnosed between 1990-2009. Individual records were then reviewed by one of the authors. The significance of trends in incidence rates throughout the study period was evaluated by Pearson correlation coefficient. The average annual incidence rate of polyarteritis nodosa was 3.6/million adults (95% CI 1.6-4.7). Incidence rates did not change significantly during this period (r = 0.39, p = 0.088). The incidence of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) was 4.1 (2.2-5.9) for the whole period, during which it increased significantly (r = 0.53, p Jerusalem are in the lower range of global incidence rates. While GPA and MPA incidence are increasing, GCA incidence is decreasing.

  14. Thrombus-in-Transit: A Case for a Multidisciplinary Hospital-Based Pulmonary Embolism System of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Anthony J; Knight, Stephen W; McLean, Katherine Zanyk; Bork, Susan; Kurz, Michael C; Sawyer, Kelly N

    2016-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism, including pulmonary embolism (PE), is a common disease identified in the emergency department that carries significant morbidity and mortality. In its most severe form, PE is fulminant and characterized by cardiac arrest and death. In the midst of risk-stratifying PE by using echocardiography to assess right ventricular function, thrombus-in-transit (free-floating clot in the right atrium or ventricle) may be seen. We present a case of a 49-year-old man diagnosed with an acute saddle PE who was incidentally found to have a thrombus-in-transit and patent foramen ovale and required open thrombectomy. Identification of these additional potentially life-threatening features was possible only due to our availability of risk-stratification resources, specifically bedside echocardiography. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Albeit rare, with a reported incidence estimated at 4%, the presence of thrombus-in-transit may change emergent clinical management. A multidisciplinary team of resources should be considered emergently as part of a hospital-based PE system of care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A multicenter hospital-based diagnosis study of automated breast ultrasound system in detecting breast cancer among Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Lin, Xi; Tan, Yanjuan; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Hui; Feng, Ruimei; Tang, Guoxue; Zhou, Xiang; Li, Anhua; Qiao, Youlin

    2018-04-01

    The automated breast ultrasound system (ABUS) is a potential method for breast cancer detection; however, its diagnostic performance remains unclear. We conducted a hospital-based multicenter diagnostic study to evaluate the clinical performance of the ABUS for breast cancer detection by comparing it to handheld ultrasound (HHUS) and mammography (MG). Eligible participants underwent HHUS and ABUS testing; women aged 40-69 years additionally underwent MG. Images were interpreted using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS). Women in the BI-RADS categories 1-2 were considered negative. Women classified as BI-RADS 3 underwent magnetic resonance imaging to distinguish true- and false-negative results. Core aspiration or surgical biopsy was performed in women classified as BI-RADS 4-5, followed by a pathological diagnosis. Kappa values and agreement rates were calculated between ABUS, HHUS and MG. A total of 1,973 women were included in the final analysis. Of these, 1,353 (68.6%) and 620 (31.4%) were classified as BI-RADS categories 1-3 and 4-5, respectively. In the older age group, the agreement rate and Kappa value between the ABUS and HHUS were 94.0% and 0.860 (P<0.001), respectively; they were 89.2% and 0.735 (P<0.001) between the ABUS and MG, respectively. Regarding consistency between imaging and pathology results, 78.6% of women classified as BI-RADS 4-5 based on the ABUS were diagnosed with precancerous lesions or cancer; which was 7.2% higher than that of women based on HHUS. For BI-RADS 1-2, the false-negative rates of the ABUS and HHUS were almost identical and were much lower than those of MG. We observed a good diagnostic reliability for the ABUS. Considering its performance for breast cancer detection in women with high-density breasts and its lower operator dependence, the ABUS is a promising option for breast cancer detection in China.

  16. Hospital Prices Increase in California, Especially Among Hospitals in the Largest Multi-hospital Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn A. Melnick PhD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A surge in hospital consolidation is fueling formation of ever larger multi-hospital systems throughout the United States. This article examines hospital prices in California over time with a focus on hospitals in the largest multi-hospital systems. Our data show that hospital prices in California grew substantially (+76% per hospital admission across all hospitals and all services between 2004 and 2013 and that prices at hospitals that are members of the largest, multi-hospital systems grew substantially more (113% than prices paid to all other California hospitals (70%. Prices were similar in both groups at the start of the period (approximately $9200 per admission. By the end of the period, prices at hospitals in the largest systems exceeded prices at other California hospitals by almost $4000 per patient admission. Our study findings are potentially useful to policy makers across the country for several reasons. Our data measure actual prices for a large sample of hospitals over a long period of time in California. California experienced its wave of consolidation much earlier than the rest of the country and as such our findings may provide some insights into what may happen across the United States from hospital consolidation including growth of large, multi-hospital systems now forming in the rest of the rest of the country.

  17. Hospital System Performance within Veterans Affairs

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Strategic Analytics for Improvement and Learning Value Model or SAIL, is a system for summarizing hospital system performance within Veterans Health Administration...

  18. Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) Lim...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) Limited Data Set This file contains select claim level data and is derived from 2010 hospital outpatient PPS...

  19. An OAIS-Based Hospital Information System on the Cloud: Analysis of a NoSQL Column-Oriented Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celesti, Antonio; Fazio, Maria; Romano, Agata; Bramanti, Alessia; Bramanti, Placido; Villari, Massimo

    2018-05-01

    The Open Archive Information System (OAIS) is a reference model for organizing people and resources in a system, and it is already adopted in care centers and medical systems to efficiently manage clinical data, medical personnel, and patients. Archival storage systems are typically implemented using traditional relational database systems, but the relation-oriented technology strongly limits the efficiency in the management of huge amount of patients' clinical data, especially in emerging cloud-based, that are distributed. In this paper, we present an OAIS healthcare architecture useful to manage a huge amount of HL7 clinical documents in a scalable way. Specifically, it is based on a NoSQL column-oriented Data Base Management System deployed in the cloud, thus to benefit from a big tables and wide rows available over a virtual distributed infrastructure. We developed a prototype of the proposed architecture at the IRCCS, and we evaluated its efficiency in a real case of study.

  20. Implementing an evidence-based computerized decision support system to improve patient care in a general hospital: the CODES study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moja, Lorenzo; Polo Friz, Hernan; Capobussi, Matteo; Kwag, Koren; Banzi, Rita; Ruggiero, Francesca; González-Lorenzo, Marien; Liberati, Elisa Giulia; Mangia, Massimo; Nyberg, Peter; Kunnamo, Ilkka; Cimminiello, Claudio; Vighi, Giuseppe; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Bonovas, Stefanos

    2016-07-07

    Computerized decision support systems (CDSSs) are information technology-based software that provide health professionals with actionable, patient-specific recommendations or guidelines for disease diagnosis, treatment, and management at the point-of-care. These messages are intelligently filtered to enhance the health and clinical care of patients. CDSSs may be integrated with patient electronic health records (EHRs) and evidence-based knowledge. We designed a pragmatic randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of patient-specific, evidence-based reminders generated at the point-of-care by a multi-specialty decision support system on clinical practice and the quality of care. We will include all the patients admitted to the internal medicine department of one large general hospital. The primary outcome is the rate at which medical problems, which are detected by the decision support software and reported through the reminders, are resolved (i.e., resolution rates). Secondary outcomes are resolution rates for reminders specific to venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention, in-hospital all causes and VTE-related mortality, and the length of hospital stay during the study period. The adoption of CDSSs is likely to increase across healthcare systems due to growing concerns about the quality of medical care and discrepancy between real and ideal practice, continuous demands for a meaningful use of health information technology, and the increasing use of and familiarity with advanced technology among new generations of physicians. The results of our study will contribute to the current understanding of the effectiveness of CDSSs in primary care and hospital settings, thereby informing future research and healthcare policy questions related to the feasibility and value of CDSS use in healthcare systems. This trial is seconded by a specialty trial randomizing patients in an oncology setting (ONCO-CODES). ClinicalTrials.gov, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2

  1. Impact of a Patient Navigator Program on Hospital-Based and Outpatient Utilization Over 180 Days in a Safety-Net Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Richard B; Zhang, Fang; Vialle-Valentin, Catherine E; Galbraith, Alison A; Burns, Marguerite E; Larochelle, Marc R; Ross-Degnan, Dennis

    2017-09-01

    With emerging global payment structures, medical systems need to understand longer-term impacts of care transition strategies. To determine the effect of a care transition program using patient navigators (PNs) on health service utilization among high-risk safety-net patients over a 180-day period. Randomized controlled trial conducted October 2011 through April 2013. Patients admitted to the general medicine service with ≥1 readmission risk factor: (1) age ≥ 60; (2) in-network inpatient admission within prior 6 months; (3) index length of stay ≥ 3 days; or (4) admission diagnosis of heart failure or (5) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The analytic sample included 739 intervention patients, 1182 controls. Through hospital visits and 30 days of post-discharge telephone outreach, PNs provided coaching and assistance with medications, appointments, transportation, communication with primary care, and self-care. Primary outcomes: (1) hospital-based utilization, a composite of ED visits and hospital admissions; (2) hospital admissions; (3) ED visits; and (4) outpatient visits. We evaluated outcomes following an index discharge, stratified by patient age (≥ 60 and safety-net patients differentially impacted patients based on age, and among younger patients, outcomes varied over time. Our findings highlight the importance for future research to evaluate care transition programs among different subpopulations and over longer time periods.

  2. Use of and attitudes to a hospital information system by medical secretaries, nurses and physicians deprived of the paper-based medical record: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsen Tom H

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most hospitals keep and update their paper-based medical records after introducing an electronic medical record or a hospital information system (HIS. This case report describes a HIS in a hospital where the paper-based medical records are scanned and eliminated. To evaluate the HIS comprehensively, the perspectives of medical secretaries and nurses are described as well as that of physicians. Methods We have used questionnaires and interviews to assess and compare frequency of use of the HIS for essential tasks, task performance and user satisfaction among medical secretaries, nurses and physicians. Results The medical secretaries use the HIS much more than the nurses and the physicians, and they consider that the electronic HIS greatly has simplified their work. The work of nurses and physicians has also become simplified, but they find less satisfaction with the system, particularly with the use of scanned document images. Conclusions Although the basis for reference is limited, the results support the assertion that replacing the paper-based medical record primarily benefits the medical secretaries, and to a lesser degree the nurses and the physicians. The varying results in the different employee groups emphasize the need for a multidisciplinary approach when evaluating a HIS.

  3. A Computerized Hospital Patient Information Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, Eldon D.

    1982-01-01

    The information processing needs of a hospital are many, with varying degrees of complexity. The prime concern in providing an integrated hospital information management system lies in the ability to process the data relating to the single entity for which every hospital functions - the patient. This paper examines the PRIMIS computer system developed to accommodate hospital needs with respect to a central patient registry, inpatients (i.e., Admission/Transfer/Discharge), and out-patients. Finally, the potential for expansion to permit the incorporation of more hospital functions within PRIMIS is examined.

  4. Integrated processing of ECG's in a hospital information system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helder, J.C.; Schram, P.H.; Verwey, H.; Meijler, F.L.; Robles de Medina, E.O.

    The ECG handling in the University Hospital of Utrecht is composed by a system consisting of acquisition and storage of ECG signals, computer analysis, data management, and storage of readings in a patient data base. The last two modules are part of a Hospital Information System (HIS). The modular

  5. 78 FR 15882 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and... Register entitled ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals...

  6. Smart information system for gachon university gil hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Kyun; Jung, Eun Young; Jeong, Byung Hui; Moon, Byung Chan; Kang, Hyung Wook; Tchah, Hann; Han, Gi Seong; Cheng, Woo Sung; Lee, Young Ho

    2012-03-01

    In this research, the hospital information system of Gachon University Gil hospital is introduced and a future strategy for hospital information systems is proposed. This research introduces the development conditions of hospital information system at Gachon University Gil hospital, information about the development of the enterprise resource planning (ERP), a medical service process improvement system, and the personal health record (PHR) system. The medical service process and work efficiency were improved through the medical service process improvement system, which is the most common hospital information system at Gachon University Gil hospital and which includes an emergency medical service system, an online evaluation system and a round support system. Gachon University Gil hospital developed medical service improvement systems to increase work efficiency of medical team and optimized the systems to prove the availability of high-quality medical services for patients and their families. The PHR-based personalized health care solution is under development and will provide higher quality medical service for more patients in the future.

  7. Exploration of the financing and management model of a children's critical disease security system in China based on the implementation of Shanghai Children Hospital Care Aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-ruo; Wen, Zhao-jun; Chen, Sai-juan; Chen, Zhu

    2011-03-01

    This study is designed to serve as a reference for the establishment of health security systems for children’s critical diseases. Through analysis of the operation of Shanghai Children Hospital Care Aid (SCHCA), this study explored the financing model and management of a children’s critical disease healthcare system and analyzed the possibility of expanding this system to other areas. It is found that a premium as low as RMB 7 per capita per year under SCHCA can provide high-level security for children’s critical diseases. With the good experience in Shanghai and based on the current basic medical insurance system for urban residents and the new rural cooperative medical scheme (NRCMS), it is necessary and feasible to build a health security system for children’s critical diseases at the national level.

  8. A study on building data warehouse of hospital information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Wu, Tao; Chen, Mu; Zhou, Bin; Xu, Wei-guo

    2011-08-01

    Existing hospital information systems with simple statistical functions cannot meet current management needs. It is well known that hospital resources are distributed with private property rights among hospitals, such as in the case of the regional coordination of medical services. In this study, to integrate and make full use of medical data effectively, we propose a data warehouse modeling method for the hospital information system. The method can also be employed for a distributed-hospital medical service system. To ensure that hospital information supports the diverse needs of health care, the framework of the hospital information system has three layers: datacenter layer, system-function layer, and user-interface layer. This paper discusses the role of a data warehouse management system in handling hospital information from the establishment of the data theme to the design of a data model to the establishment of a data warehouse. Online analytical processing tools assist user-friendly multidimensional analysis from a number of different angles to extract the required data and information. Use of the data warehouse improves online analytical processing and mitigates deficiencies in the decision support system. The hospital information system based on a data warehouse effectively employs statistical analysis and data mining technology to handle massive quantities of historical data, and summarizes from clinical and hospital information for decision making. This paper proposes the use of a data warehouse for a hospital information system, specifically a data warehouse for the theme of hospital information to determine latitude, modeling and so on. The processing of patient information is given as an example that demonstrates the usefulness of this method in the case of hospital information management. Data warehouse technology is an evolving technology, and more and more decision support information extracted by data mining and with decision-making technology is

  9. Competency Based Hospital Radiopharmacy Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Quality management systems in nuclear medicine are vital to a high level of nuclear medicine (NM) practice. Trained and competent staffs are essential for achieving high standards and growth in NM. One of the key bottlenecks for NM is the shortfall in human resources, especially of radiopharmacists. There is an acute shortage in most Member States and in some countries an absence of nationally registered pharmacists with radiopharmacy experience. Most nuclear medicine facilities operate their radiopharmacies (commonly referred to as the hot laboratories) with the support of technologists and radiographers. Recent surveys have found the level of training amongst technologists to be extremely variable. Most had little or no training in hot laboratory practices. The survey also indicated the poor state of hot laboratories in many countries. Basic quality systems in the hot laboratory could be improved significantly with better training. This competency-based education manual is designed with those radiopharmacy practitioners in mind. This competency-based trainer's manual provides trainers in each of the IAEA regions with the essentials of a training programme for all radiopharmacy practitioners. The competency-based training is a two week programme followed up with three months of practice achievements. The syllabus provides a standardized approach to lectures, practical sessions, and interactive workshops focusing on critical aspects of hot laboratory practices. The trainers, with the assistance of this manual, can deliver essential skills, competencies, and underpinning knowledge to operate safely and effectively in their hot laboratory. The course focuses on simple but practical steps that could be undertaken to improve staff performance. In addition, a basic framework of quality management principles related to radiopharmacy practices is also covered. Further, the syllabus can be adapted to the particular needs and characteristics of any training centre, country

  10. WebBio, a web-based management and analysis system for patient data of biological products in hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying-Hao; Kuo, Chen-Chun; Huang, Yaw-Bin

    2011-08-01

    We selected HTML, PHP and JavaScript as the programming languages to build "WebBio", a web-based system for patient data of biological products and used MySQL as database. WebBio is based on the PHP-MySQL suite and is run by Apache server on Linux machine. WebBio provides the functions of data management, searching function and data analysis for 20 kinds of biological products (plasma expanders, human immunoglobulin and hematological products). There are two particular features in WebBio: (1) pharmacists can rapidly find out whose patients used contaminated products for medication safety, and (2) the statistics charts for a specific product can be automatically generated to reduce pharmacist's work loading. WebBio has successfully turned traditional paper work into web-based data management.

  11. 77 FR 4908 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal... the final rule entitled ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2012 Rates...

  12. 77 FR 65495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and... Federal Register entitled ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates...

  13. 75 FR 60640 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...; RIN 0938-AP33 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Changes and FY 2011 Rates; Provider... Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective...

  14. Digestive system complications among hospitalized children with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    least common complication, occurring in one (3.3%) of the cases studied. Conclusion: Acute ... Keywords: Acute abdominal crisis, children, haemoglobin, hospitalization, multi-systemic ... improvement of the management of such children.

  15. Participatory simulation in hospital work system design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Simone Nyholm

    When ergonomic considerations are integrated into the design of work systems, both overall system performance and employee well-being improve. A central part of integrating ergonomics in work system design is to benefit from emplo y-ees’ knowledge of existing work systems. Participatory simulation...... (PS) is a method to access employee knowledge; namely employees are involved in the simulation and design of their own future work systems through the exploration of models representing work system designs. However, only a few studies have investigated PS and the elements of the method. Yet...... understanding the elements is essential when analyzing and planning PS in research and practice. This PhD study investigates PS and the method elements in the context of the Danish hospital sector, where PS is applied in the renewal and design of public hospitals and the work systems within the hospitals...

  16. Quality Management Systems Implementation Compared With Organizational Maturity in Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Tayebeh; Jafari, Mehdi; Maleki, Mohammad Reza; Naghdi, Seyran; Ghiasvand, Hesam

    2015-07-27

    A quality management system can provide a framework for continuous improvement in order to increase the probability of customers and other stakeholders' satisfaction. The test maturity model helps organizations to assess the degree of maturity in implementing effective and sustained quality management systems; plan based on the current realities of the organization and prioritize their improvement programs. We aim to investigate and compare the level of organizational maturity in hospitals with the status of quality management systems implementation. This analytical cross sectional study was conducted among hospital administrators and quality experts working in hospitals with over 200 beds located in Tehran. In the first step, 32 hospitals were selected and then 96 employees working in the selected hospitals were studied. The data were gathered using the implementation checklist of quality management systems and the organization maturity questionnaire derived from ISO 10014. The content validity was calculated using Lawshe method and the reliability was estimated using test - retest method and calculation of Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data using SPSS 18 software. According to the table, the mean score of organizational maturity among hospitals in the first stage of quality management systems implementation was equal to those in the third stage and hypothesis was rejected (p-value = 0.093). In general, there is no significant difference in the organizational maturity between the first and third level hospitals (in terms of implementation of quality management systems). Overall, the findings of the study show that there is no significant difference in the organizational maturity between the hospitals in different levels of the quality management systems implementation and in fact, the maturity of the organizations cannot be attributed to the implementation of such systems. As a result, hospitals

  17. Record of hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions: validation of the hospital information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehem, Tania Cristina Morais Santa Barbara; de Oliveira, Maria Regina Fernandes; Ciosak, Suely Itsuko; Egry, Emiko Yoshikawa

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of the Unified Health System's Hospital Information System for the appropriate recording of hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions. The hospital information system records for conditions which are sensitive to ambulatory care, and for those which are not, were considered for analysis, taking the medical records as the gold standard. Through simple random sampling, a sample of 816 medical records was defined and selected by means of a list of random numbers using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. The sensitivity was 81.89%, specificity was 95.19%, the positive predictive value was 77.61% and the negative predictive value was 96.27%. In the study setting, the Hospital Information System (SIH) was more specific than sensitive, with nearly 20% of care sensitive conditions not detected. There are no validation studies in Brazil of the Hospital Information System records for the hospitalizations which are sensitive to primary health care. These results are relevant when one considers that this system is one of the bases for assessment of the effectiveness of primary health care.

  18. Record of hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions: validation of the hospital information system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Cristina Morais Santa Barbara Rehem

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to estimate the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of the Unified Health System's Hospital Information System for the appropriate recording of hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions. METHOD: the hospital information system records for conditions which are sensitive to ambulatory care, and for those which are not, were considered for analysis, taking the medical records as the gold standard. Through simple random sampling, a sample of 816 medical records was defined and selected by means of a list of random numbers using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. RESULT: the sensitivity was 81.89%, specificity was 95.19%, the positive predictive value was 77.61% and the negative predictive value was 96.27%. In the study setting, the Hospital Information System (SIH was more specific than sensitive, with nearly 20% of care sensitive conditions not detected. CONCLUSION: there are no validation studies in Brazil of the Hospital Information System records for the hospitalizations which are sensitive to primary health care. These results are relevant when one considers that this system is one of the bases for assessment of the effectiveness of primary health care.

  19. Patient flow based allocation of hospital resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissers, J M

    1995-01-01

    The current practice of allocating resources within a hospital introduces peaks and troughs in the workloads of departments and leads therefore to loss of capacity. This happens when requirements for capacity coordination are not adequately taken into account in the decision making process of allocating resources to specialties. The first part of this research involved an analysis of the hospital's production system on dependencies between resources, resulting in a number of capacity coordination requirements that need to be fulfilled for optimized resource utilization. The second, modelling, part of the study involved the development of a framework for resource management decision making, of a set of computer models to support hospital managerial decision making on resource allocation issues in various parts of the hospital, and of an implementation strategy for the application of the models to concrete hospital settings. The third part of the study was devoted to a number of case-studies, illustrating the use of the models when applied in various resource management projects, such as a reorganization of an operating theatre timetable, or the development of a master plan for activities of a group of general surgeons serving two locations of a merged hospital system. The paper summarizes the main findings of the study and concludes with a discussion of results obtained with the new allocation procedure and with recommendations for future research.

  20. A Novel Health Information Technology Communication System to Increase Caregiver Activation in the Context of Hospital-Based Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Molly; Hanauer, David A; Kaziunas, Elizabeth; Ackerman, Mark S; Derry, Holly; Forringer, Rachel; Miller, Kristen; O'Reilly, Dennis; An, Lawrence; Tewari, Muneesh; Choi, Sung Won

    2015-10-27

    Pediatric hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), commonly referred to as blood and marrow transplantation (BMT), is an intense treatment modality that requires the involvement of engaged caregivers during the patient's (child's) prolonged hospitalization. The ubiquity of electronic health records (EHRs) and a trend toward patient-centered care could allow a novel health information technology (IT) system to increase parental engagement. The paucity of research on acute care, hospital-based (inpatient) health IT applications for patients or caregivers provides an opportunity for testing the feasibility of such applications. The pediatric BMT population represents an ideal patient group to conduct an evaluation due to the lengthy inpatient stays and a heightened need for patient activation. The primary objective of this study is to assess the feasibility of implementing the BMT Roadmap in caregivers as an intervention during their child's inpatient hospitalization. The BMT Roadmap is an inpatient portal prototype optimized for tablet with a user-centered design. It integrates patient-specific laboratory and medication data from the EHR in real-time and provides support in terms of discharge goals, home care education, and other components. Feasibility will be proven if (1) the BMT Roadmap functions and can be managed by the study team without unexpected effort, (2) the system is accessed by users at a defined minimum threshold, and (3) the qualitative and quantitative research conducted provides quality data that address the perceived usefulness of the BMT Roadmap and could inform a study in a larger sample size. This will be a single-arm, nonrandomized feasibility study. We aim to enroll 10 adult caregivers (age ≥ 18 years) of pediatric patients (aged 0-25 years) undergoing autologous (self-donor) or allogeneic (alternative donor) BMT. Assenting minors (aged 10-18) will also be invited to participate. Recruitment of study participants will take place in the

  1. 78 FR 38679 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ... Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Proposed... Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and... regarding MS-DRG classifications and new technology add-on payments. Eva Fung (410) 786-7539, for...

  2. Implementation of quality management systems: the role of hospital (management) boards.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botje, D.; Klazinga, N.S.; Suñol, R.; Wagner, C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Hospitals are putting tremendous efforts in implementing evidence-based management systems and organisational innovations for patient-centred care. Having a hospital quality management system is a prerequisite to successfully implement these innovations. Previous studies showed that the

  3. Towards elicitation of users requirements for hospital information system: from a care process modelling technique to a web based collaborative tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staccini, Pascal M; Joubert, Michel; Quaranta, Jean-Francois; Fieschi, Marius

    2002-01-01

    Growing attention is being given to the use of process modeling methodology for user requirements elicitation. In the analysis phase of hospital information systems, the usefulness of care-process models has been investigated to evaluate the conceptual applicability and practical understandability by clinical staff and members of users teams. Nevertheless, there still remains a gap between users and analysts in their mutual ability to share conceptual views and vocabulary, keeping the meaning of clinical context while providing elements for analysis. One of the solutions for filling this gap is to consider the process model itself in the role of a hub as a centralized means of facilitating communication between team members. Starting with a robust and descriptive technique for process modeling called IDEF0/SADT, we refined the basic data model by extracting concepts from ISO 9000 process analysis and from enterprise ontology. We defined a web-based architecture to serve as a collaborative tool and implemented it using an object-oriented database. The prospects of such a tool are discussed notably regarding to its ability to generate data dictionaries and to be used as a navigation tool through the medium of hospital-wide documentation.

  4. Demographic Factors and Hospital Size Predict Patient Satisfaction Variance- Implications for Hospital Value-Based Purchasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Daniel C.; Ornstein, Katherine; Holcombe, Randall F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (HVBP) incentivizes quality performance based healthcare by linking payments directly to patient satisfaction scores obtained from Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) surveys. Lower HCAHPS scores appear to cluster in heterogeneous population dense areas and could bias CMS reimbursement. Objective Assess nonrandom variation in patient satisfaction as determined by HCAHPS. Design Multivariate regression modeling was performed for individual dimensions of HCAHPS and aggregate scores. Standardized partial regression coefficients assessed strengths of predictors. Weighted Individual (hospital) Patient Satisfaction Adjusted Score (WIPSAS) utilized four highly predictive variables and hospitals were re-ranked accordingly. Setting 3,907 HVBP-participating hospitals. Patients 934,800 patient surveys, by most conservative estimate. Measurements 3,144 county demographics (U.S. Census), and HCAHPS. Results Hospital size and primary language (‘non-English speaking’) most strongly predicted unfavorable HCAHPS scores while education and white ethnicity most strongly predicted favorable HCAHPS scores. The average adjusted patient satisfaction scores calculated by WIPSAS approximated the national average of HCAHPS scores. However, WIPSAS changed hospital rankings by variable amounts depending on the strength of the predictive variables in the hospitals’ locations. Structural and demographic characteristics that predict lower scores were accounted for by WIPSAS that also improved rankings of many safety-net hospitals and academic medical centers in diverse areas. Conclusions Demographic and structural factors (e.g., hospital beds) predict patient satisfaction scores even after CMS adjustments. CMS should consider WIPSAS or a similar adjustment to account for the severity of patient satisfaction inequities that hospitals could strive to correct. PMID:25940305

  5. Maturity of hospital information systems: Most important influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal Carvalho, João; Rocha, Álvaro; Abreu, António

    2017-07-01

    Maturity models facilitate organizational management, including information systems management, with hospital organizations no exception. This article puts forth a study carried out with a group of experts in the field of hospital information systems management with a view to identifying the main influencing factors to be included in an encompassing maturity model for hospital information systems management. This study is based on the results of a literature review, which identified maturity models in the health field and relevant influencing factors. The development of this model is justified to the extent that the available maturity models for the hospital information systems management field reveal multiple limitations, including lack of detail, absence of tools to determine their maturity and lack of characterization for stages of maturity structured by different influencing factors.

  6. Hospital Quality Systems - working mechanisms unraveled.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoten, S. van; Groenewegen, P.; Wagner, C.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Quality systems were implemented in healthcare institutions to assure and improve the quality of care. Despite the fact that all Dutch hospitals have implemented a quality system, incidents persist to surface. How could this be explained? The current research was set out to gain thorough

  7. A Comparative Study of Activity-Based Costing vs. Current Pricing System for Pathology Examinations at Okmeydani Training and Research Hospital, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enver YARIKKAYA

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To provide real cost data for pathology examinations by using activity-based costing method, in order to provide means to departments, health administrators and the social security institution to achieve improvements in financial planning, quality and cost control. Material and Method: The cost of the histopathological examinations, which were accepted by the Department of Pathology at Okmeydanı Training and Research Hospital during August 2014, was calculated using the activity-based costing method. The costs were compared with the amounts specified in the Healthcare Implementation Notification Tariff and the conventional volume-based costing. Results: Most pathology examinations listed within a given band in the Healthcare Implementation Notification Tariff show variations in unit costs. The study found that the costs of 77.4% of the examinations were higher than the prices listed in the Healthcare Implementation Notification Tariff. Conclusion: The pathology examination tariffs specified in the Healthcare Implementation Notification do not reflect the real costs of the examinations. The costs that are calculated using the activity-based costing system may vary according to the service types and levels of health care institutions. However, the main parameters of the method used in the study reflect the necessity of a more accurate banding of pathology examinations. The banding specified by the Healthcare Implementation Notification Tariff needs to be revised to reflect the real costs in Turkey.

  8. A Comparative Study of Activity-Based Costing vs. Current Pricing System for Pathology Examinations at Okmeydani Training and Research Hospital, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarikkaya, Enver; Özekinci, Selver; Sargan, Aytül; Durmuş, Şenay Erdoğan; Yildiz, Fetin Rüştü

    2017-01-01

    To provide real cost data for pathology examinations by using activity-based costing method, in order to provide means to departments, health administrators and the social security institution to achieve improvements in financial planning, quality and cost control. The cost of the histopathological examinations, which were accepted by the Department of Pathology at Okmeydanı Training and Research Hospital during August 2014, was calculated using the activity-based costing method. The costs were compared with the amounts specified in the Healthcare Implementation Notification Tariff and the conventional volume-based costing. Most pathology examinations listed within a given band in the Healthcare Implementation Notification Tariff show variations in unit costs. The study found that the costs of 77.4% of the examinations were higher than the prices listed in the Healthcare Implementation Notification Tariff. The pathology examination tariffs specified in the Healthcare Implementation Notification do not reflect the real costs of the examinations. The costs that are calculated using the activity-based costing system may vary according to the service types and levels of health care institutions. However, the main parameters of the method used in the study reflect the necessity of a more accurate banding of pathology examinations. The banding specified by the Healthcare Implementation Notification Tariff needs to be revised to reflect the real costs in Turkey.

  9. The assessment of Picture Archiving and Communication System based on Canadian Infoway PACS Opinion Survey in Teaching Hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Bahador

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Today the use of information technology in accordance with the rapid environmental changes and flexibility acquisition is necessary and unavoidable. Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS is one of the medical information technology used in health facilities. PACS provides the images archive and transmission possibility electronically in different units of the teaching and treatment centers. This study aimed to assess the PACS system in teaching hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences based on a survey of Canadian Infoway. Method: This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed on 53 individuals selected through Two-Stage Stratified Random Sampling. The study population consisted of 156 PACS users in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences hospitals which were equipped with the PACS system in 2015. Data were collected by the valid and reliable customized questionnaire of Canadian Infoway. The reliability was measured by a pilot study on 25 PACS users; Cronbach’s Alpha was estimated 0.78. Data were analyzed using SPSS 18. Also, frequency, mean, standard deviation were used. Results: The results are presented in three sections: environment (Background Variables, benefits and challenges of PACS. As to the system availability, 20.8% of the users in the clinic, 75.5% in the diagnostic imaging department, only 3.8% in offices had access to the PACS. As to system accessibility, 49.1% of the users just had access to tests, 5.7% only to the reports, and 45.3% to both reports and tests. With respect to benefits of PACS, the mean was 4.16 (SD: 0.5 (five-point scale 1-5 estimated, and in challenges, the mean was 3.48(SD: 0.5 (five-point scale 1-5. Conclusion: The results showed that although PACS could eliminate many restrictions concerning the use of radiology images and films, there were challenges in this regard. Users are recommended to have access to PACS in all clinics, physicians’ offices, and diagnostic

  10. 75 FR 34614 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and Fiscal Year 2010 Rates and to the Long- Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Rate Year 2010 Rates... Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and Fiscal Year 2010 Rates and to the Long-Term Care...

  11. 77 FR 63751 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... [CMS-1588-F2] RIN 0938-AR12 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates..., 2012 Federal Register entitled ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for...

  12. Aetiologies of Central Nervous System Infection in Viet Nam: A Prospective Provincial Hospital-Based Descriptive Surveillance Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho Dang Trung, Nghia; Le Thi Phuong, Tu; Wolbers, Marcel; Nguyen van Minh, Hoang; Nguyen Thanh, Vinh; van, Minh Pham; Thieu, Nga Tran Vu; van, Tan Le; Song, Diep To; Thi, Phuong Le; Thi Phuong, Thao Nguyen; van, Cong Bui; Tang, Vu; Ngoc Anh, Tuan Hoang; Nguyen, Dong; Trung, Tien Phan; Thi Nam, Lien Nguyen; Kiem, Hao Tran; Thi Thanh, Tam Nguyen; Campbell, James; Caws, Maxine; Day, Jeremy; de Jong, Menno D.; van Vinh, Chau Nguyen; van Doorn, H. Rogier; Tinh, Hien Tran; Farrar, Jeremy; Schultsz, Constance; Loi, Tran Quoc; Son, Nguyen Truong; Bay, Phan Van Be; Tham, Nguyen Thi Hong; Phuong, Le Thi; Tri, Le Trung; Binh, Nguyen Thi Nguyet; Du, Doan Cong; Thao, Nguyen Thi Phuong; Tien, Truong Thi My; La, Tran Thi Phi; Cong, Bui Van; Diep, Pham Ngoc; Dong, Duong Phuoc; Lanh, Tran Thi Mong; Dom, Pham Van; Dung, Tran Quang; Tri, Phan Nhut; Ho, Tang Thi; Tai, Nguyen Anh; Luc, Quach Van; Phuoc, Dinh Xuan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Infectious diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) remain common and life-threatening, especially in developing countries. Knowledge of the aetiological agents responsible for these infections is essential to guide empiric therapy and develop a rational public health policy. To date

  13. Using a New Measurement to Evaluate Pain Relief Among Cancer Inpatients with Clinically Significant Pain Based on a Nursing Information System: A Three-Year Hospital-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Yun; Chu, Chi-Ming; Sung, Chun-Sung; Ho, Shung-Tai; Wu, Yi-Syuan; Liang, Chun-Yu; Wang, Kwua-Yun

    2016-11-01

    Developing a new measurement index is the first step in evaluating pain relief outcomes. Although the percentage difference in pain intensity (%PID) is the most popular indicator, this indicator does not take into account the goal of pain relief. Therefore, the aims of this study were to develop a pain relief index (PRI) for outcome evaluation and to examine the index using demographic characteristics of cancer inpatients with clinically significant pain. Retrospective cohort study. A national hospital. All cancer inpatients. Pain intensity was assessed using a numerical rating scale, a faces pain scale or the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) Behavioral Tool. Using a nursing information system, a pain score database containing data from 2011 through 2013 was analyzed. Cancer patients representing 93,812 hospitalizations were considered in this study. We focused on cancer patients for whom the worst pain intensity (WPI) was ≥ 4 points. PRI values of -62.02% to -72.55% were observed in the WPI ≥ 7 and 4 ≤ WPI ≤ 6 groups. Significant (P 65 years old, those who were admitted to the medicine or gynecology and those who had a hospital stay > 30 days. This hospital-based study demonstrated that the PRI is an effective and valid measure for evaluating outcome data using an electronic nursing information system. We will further define the meaningful range of percentage difference in PRI from various perspectives. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. [Development of Hospital Equipment Maintenance Information System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhixin

    2015-11-01

    Hospital equipment maintenance information system plays an important role in improving medical treatment quality and efficiency. By requirement analysis of hospital equipment maintenance, the system function diagram is drawed. According to analysis of input and output data, tables and reports in connection with equipment maintenance process, relationships between entity and attribute is found out, and E-R diagram is drawed and relational database table is established. Software development should meet actual process requirement of maintenance and have a friendly user interface and flexible operation. The software can analyze failure cause by statistical analysis.

  15. Acceptability of picture archiving and communication system (PACS) among hospital healthcare personnel based on a unified theory of acceptance and use of technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Mehrabi, Nahid; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas; Sadeghi, Mojtaba

    2017-09-01

    The picture archiving and communication system (PACS) is a healthcare system technology which manages medical images and integrates equipment through a network. There are some theories about the use and acceptance of technology by people to describe the behavior and attitudes of end users towards information technologies. We investigated the influential factors on users' acceptance of PACS in the military hospitals of Tehran. In this applied analytical and cross-sectional study, 151 healthcare employees of military hospitals who had experience in using the PACS system were investigated. Participants were selected by census. The following variables were considered: performance expectancy, efforts expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions and behavioral intention. Data were gathered using a questionnaire. Its validity and reliability were approved by a panel of experts and was piloted with 30 hospital healthcare staff (Cronbach's alpha =0.91). Spearman correlation coefficient and multiple linear regression analysis were used in analyzing the data. Expected performance, efforts expectancy, social impact and facilitating conditions had a significant relationship with behavioral intention. The multiple regression analysis indicated that only performance expectancy can predict the user's behavioral intentions to use PACS technology. Performance and effort expectancies are quite influential in accepting the use of PACS in hospitals. All healthcare personnel should become aware that using such technology is necessary in a hospital. Knowing the influencing factors that affect the acceptance of using new technology can help in improving its use, especially in a healthcare system. This can improve the offered healthcare services' quality.

  16. An energy saving system for hospital laundries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsanis, J.S.; Tsarabaris, P.T.; Polykrati, A.D.; Proios, A.N. [National Technical Univ. of Athens, Athens (Greece). School of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Koufakis, E.I. [Public Power Corp. S.A., Crete (Greece)

    2009-07-01

    Hospital laundries are one of the largest consumers of water and electrical and thermal energy. This paper examined the energy savings achieved by a system using the hot wastewater from the washing process. Hospital laundries consume thermal energy using steam, which is produced in boilers by burning diesel oil or natural gas. Electrical energy for the mechanical drives, ventilation and also the lighting required in the laundry area are big consumers of energy. The paper presented the proposed system and discussed the parameters of the system and system dimensioning. The paper also provided and discussed an interpretation of steam and energy savings. The proposed system was considered to be economically viable, simple in its construction, installation and operation. From the application of the suggested system, the cost savings resulted in a satisfactory payback period for the capital invested of approximately three to five years. 14 refs., 4 tabs., 2 figs.

  17. Mount Sinai Hospital's approach to Ontario's Health System Funding Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalk, Tyler; Lau, Davina; Morgan, Matthew; Dietrich, Sandra; Beduz, Mary Agnes; Bell, Chaim M

    2014-01-01

    In April 2012, the Ontario government introduced Health System Funding Reform (HSFR), a transformational shift in how hospitals are funded. Mount Sinai Hospital recognized that moving from global funding to a "patient-based" model would have substantial operational and clinical implications. Adjusting to the new funding environment was set as a top corporate priority, serving as the strategic basis for re-examining and redesigning operations to further improve both quality and efficiency. Two years into HSFR, this article outlines Mount Sinai Hospital's approach and highlights key lessons learned. Copyright © 2014 Longwoods Publishing.

  18. Trust-based or performance-based management: a study of employment contracting in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Inger Johanne

    2011-01-01

    Hospitals are frequently changing managerial practices due to numerous public sector reforms taking place. In general, these reforms include the making and monitoring of contracts that regulate relations between the hospitals and their professional staffs. The aim of this paper is to discuss some main characteristics of the contracts that regulate the perceived relations between physicians as employees and the public hospital as employer. The theoretical framework is based on a contract theory approach. The empirical data is based on survey data from full-time employed physicians in the medical and surgical divisions in one of the largest university hospitals in Norway. This study shows that perceived obligations and psychological contracts indicate high degree of relational contracts between the hospital and the physicians. These socio-cultural elements should be recognized as important mechanisms of coordination and communication when policy makers and hospital managers are designing hospital management control systems. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Quality management system in hospital radiopharmacy laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poch, Carolina; Rabiller, Graciela; Basualdo, Daniel A.; El Tamer, Elias A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: 1) To determine the necessary conditions for increasing the complexity of the Radiopharmacy Laboratory and reach an operational level defined by the IAEA as 3a (Operational Guidance on Hospital Radiopharmacy). Our aim is that, within a framework of quality, last generation radiopharmaceuticals can be used, by sophisticated techniques such as labeling with bifunctional chelating agents, like HYNIC; 2) Consequently, we decided to implement a Quality Management System (QMS) in the field of Hospital Radiopharmacy in order to guarantee the safe and effective preparation and handling of radiopharmaceuticals for the diagnosis of patients, based on recommendations of the IAEA. Procedure For the implementation of the QMS, the sector of Radiopharmacy was capacitated in the application of ISO 9001. In a first stage it had begun with the formulation of the main documents and their enumeration. According to the recommendations of the IAEA Operational Guide, this year we proceeded to the optimization of the documents produced in the first stage and formulation of new documents essential to the improvement of work in the Radiopharmacy Laboratory. Results: Corrections were made to the performed procedures, and new ones were composed such as: Reception of raw materials, Control dose calibrator (Activity meter), General procedure of dosage, Procedure for decontamination, for Using the bio safety cabinet, for Cleaning the hot laboratory, etc. The Quality Controls were added to each of the Work Instructions of radiopharmaceuticals to be undertaken and how and when to carry out, with their respective references. Records were modified and new ones incorporated, in order to ensure traceability of the results before and after injection. Finally, the require documentation has been completed with the addition of the Staff Training Plan, and other records such as Nonconformance and Corrective and Preventive Actions. Conclusion: With the application of a QMS correctly implemented

  20. Efficiency and hospital effectiveness in improving Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amin, Mona; Makarem, Suzanne C; Rosko, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Efficiency has emerged as a central goal to the operations of health care organizations. There are two competing perspectives on the relationship between efficiency and organizational performance. Some argue that organizational slack is a waste and that efficiency contributes to organizational performance, whereas others maintain that slack acts as a buffer, allowing organizations to adapt to environmental demands and contributing to organizational performance. As value-based purchasing becomes more prevalent, health care organizations are incented to become more efficient and, at the same time, improve their patients' experiences and outcomes. Unused slack resources might facilitate the timely implementation of these improvements. Building on previous research on organizational slack and inertia, we test whether efficiency and other organizational factors predict organizational effectiveness in improving Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) ratings. We rely on data from the American Hospital Association and HCAHPS. We estimate hospital cost-efficiency by Stochastic Frontier Analysis and use regression analysis to determine whether efficiency, competition, hospital size, and other organizational factors are significant predictors of hospital effectiveness. Our findings indicate that efficiency and hospital size have a significant negative association with organizational ability to improve HCAHPS ratings. Although achieving organizational efficiency is necessary for health care organizations, given the changes that are currently occurring in the U.S. health care system, it is important for health care managers to maintain a certain level of slack to respond to environmental demands and have the resources needed to improve their performance.

  1. Hospital managers need management information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S; Freeman, J R

    1976-01-01

    A new hospital director seeking to bring his institution to the brink of solvency found himself with ten pounds of data but no "information"--at least, not the kind of information he could use as a basis for management decisions. What he needed was a system that would not only present data, but the meaning of the data. Such a system is the integrated MIS.

  2. Hospital System Readmissions: A Care Cycle Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody Mullen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hospital readmission rates can be used as an indicator of the quality of health care services and can highlight high-priority research areas to ensure better health. A readmission is defined as when a patient is discharged from an acute care hospital and is admitted back to an acute care hospital in a set amount of days, with 30 days being the current national standard. On average, 19.6% of Medicare patients are readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of discharge and 56.1% within a year (Jencks, Williams, & Coleman, 2009. The hypothesis of this study was that the discharge location, or where a patient went immediately after discharge, would not have a significant effect on readmissions. A data set with all admission records was obtained from a major health provider. These data contain all hospital patients’ demographic and diagnosis information. General, women’s, and children’s hospitals were looked at from a system perspective to study the discharge location of patients as well as the effects of patient demographics on discharge location. By using a z-significance test in Microsoft Excel and SAS 9.2, it was discovered that patients discharged to home have a significantly lower likelihood of readmission. Generally, patients who are discharged to an extended care or intermediate care facility or patients with home health carerelated services had a significantly higher likelihood of being readmitted. The findings may indicate a possible need for an institution-to-institution intervention as well as institution-to-patient intervention. Future work will develop potential interventions in partnership with hospital staff.

  3. [Hospital organizational analysis based on the Mintzberg model: the case of Sheikh Zayed Hospital, Rabat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhloufi, Imane; Saadi, Janad; El Hiki, Lahcen; El Hassani, Amine

    2012-01-01

    The new system of hospital governance requires health institutions to develop new managerial, financial and social skills beyond their public service duties. As part of this new approach, the organizational modernization of hospitals involves introducing good management practices. However, managing the transition requires taking into account the specificities of existing organizational systems. Organizational systems are generally difficult to model and involve diverse and sometimes competing interests, concerns, habits, languages, cultures, tools and representations. This explains the high failure rate observed in hospital development projects at an organizational level. A number of organizational theories from a range of disciplines (sociology, biology, history, etc.) have examined the question of organization in hospitals. The many theories developed in this area are not incompatible. Rather, they form a set of useful tools for the analysis of organizational management. The purpose of this study was to conduct an organizational analysis of Sheikh Zayed Hospital (Rabat) based on the Mintzberg model as a prerequisite for the development and implementation of a restructuring plan.

  4. Study of Development for RFID System to Hospital Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung Kwon; Sung, Myung-Whun

    2015-01-01

    RFID/USN develops information systems for anytime, anywhere to anybody access Electronic Medical Records (EMR). The goal of the present study is to develop a RFID/USN-based information system for the hospital environment. First, unable to recognize, second, able to recognize as a pursuit of place and suppose the time of medical examination. A retrospective analysis of 235 RFID monitoring results, from four ENT ambulatory clinics of Seoul National University Hospital were extracted by a reader program and monitoring of RFID tag (2006.11.16~2006.12.16). RFID detection for sensing reader of this study has been put into representing "place" and "spending time" of patients for medical history taking and examination. Through the RFID of detection for specific place and spending time of medical examination, RFID/USN develops information system progressing in the EMR of hospital system.

  5. Information Systems Evaluation: A Study in Hospital Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laís Coelho Ayala

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Given increasing demand for timely and accurate information to support decision making, hospitals, a particularly complex type of service organization, have increasingly resorted to a wide range of tools such as the Clinical Information Systems (CIS. However, research has shown that such systems do not always meet hospital managers’ needs, and assessment processes are necessary both before and after CIS implementation. Aiming to identify whether the CIS do meet hospital managers’ information needs and do fit in the specificities of such organizations, this paper reports on the assessment of four CIS based on the perspective of their users in four hospitals in the Metropolitan Region of Belo Horizonte, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The data was collected by means of semi-structured interviews and non-obtrusive observation. On the one hand, the result shows that the four organizations have difficulties in using their systems, such as accessibility problems, inadequate training and system underutilization. On the other hand, they also benefit from such systems, as they make processes faster and enable information control. One can say that the results from this research contribute to a better understanding of evaluating information systems in hospitals. Managers of such organizations can benefit from these results when seeking to evaluate and improve their information systens.

  6. Sociotechnical factors influencing unsafe use of hospital information systems: A qualitative study in Malaysian government hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahuddin, Lizawati; Ismail, Zuraini; Hashim, Ummi Rabaah; Raja Ikram, Raja Rina; Ismail, Nor Haslinda; Naim Mohayat, Mohd Hariz

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study is to identify factors influencing unsafe use of hospital information systems in Malaysian government hospitals. Semi-structured interviews with 31 medical doctors in three Malaysian government hospitals implementing total hospital information systems were conducted between March and May 2015. A thematic qualitative analysis was performed on the resultant data to deduce the relevant themes. A total of five themes emerged as the factors influencing unsafe use of a hospital information system: (1) knowledge, (2) system quality, (3) task stressor, (4) organization resources, and (5) teamwork. These qualitative findings highlight that factors influencing unsafe use of a hospital information system originate from multidimensional sociotechnical aspects. Unsafe use of a hospital information system could possibly lead to the incidence of errors and thus raises safety risks to the patients. Hence, multiple interventions (e.g. technology systems and teamwork) are required in shaping high-quality hospital information system use.

  7. [Relationship between cost systems and hospital expenditure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cornejo, Beatriz; Pérez-Méndez, José A

    To analyze the relationship between the degree of development of hospital cost systems (CS) implemented by the regional health services (RHS) and the variation in unit cost of hospitals in Spanish National Health Service (NHS) between 2010 and 2013 and to identify other explanatory factors of this variation. A database of NHS hospitals was constructed from exclusively public sources. Using a multilevel regression model, explaining factors of the variation in unit cost (cost per weighted unit of activity [WAU]) of a sample of 170 hospitals were analyzed. The variables representative of the degree of development of CS are associated in a negative and significant way with the variation of the cost per WAU. It is observed that if a high-level development CS is used the cost variation per WAU would be reduced by close to 3.2%. There is also a negative and significant relationship between the variation in the cost per WAU and the variations in the percentage of high technology and the hospital occupancy rate. On the other hand, the variations in the average cost of personnel and in the number of workers per 100 beds are associated in a positive and significant way with the variation of the cost per WAU. In the period analysed, during which the main health expenditure adjustment was made, the control in hospital unit cost is associated not only with spending cuts but also with aspects related to their management, such as the implementation of more developed CS. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. 42 CFR 419.20 - Hospitals subject to the hospital outpatient prospective payment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... prospective payment system. 419.20 Section 419.20 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM FOR HOSPITAL... Outpatient Prospective Payment System § 419.20 Hospitals subject to the hospital outpatient prospective...

  9. STUDY ON WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS IN HOSPITALS OF IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Majlesi Nasr, A. R. Yazdanbakhsh

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, water resources shortage is one of the most important issues for environmental engineers and managers as well as its conservation due to population growth and ever-increasing water demands. Besides, hospital wastewater has the same quality as municipal wastewater, but may also potentially contain various hazardous components. In this paper, physical and chemical specifications of produced wastewater in hospitals of Iran were investigated experiments. Results were compared with the effluent parameters of wastewater standards of Iranian Department of the Environment. 70 governmental hospitals from different provinces of Iran were selected by purposive (non-random sampling method. For data analysis, SPSS and EXCEL softwares were applied. The findings of the study showed that 52% of the surveyed hospitals were not equipped and 48% were equipped with wastewater treatment systems. The mean of Biochemical Oxygen Demand, Chemical Oxygen Demand and Total Suspended Solids of the effluent of wastewater treatment systems were reported as 113, 188 and 99 mg/L respectively. Comparison of the indicators between effluents of wastewater treatment systems and the standards of Departments of the Environment, showed the inefficiency in these systems and it was concluded that despite the recent improvements in hospital wastewater treatment systems, they should be upgraded based on the remarks in this paper.

  10. Timing of surgery for hip fracture and in-hospital mortality: a retrospective population-based cohort study in the Spanish National Health System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Librero Julián

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the benefits or otherwise of early hip fracture repair is a long-running controversy with studies showing contradictory results, this practice is being adopted as a quality indicator in several health care organizations. The aim of this study is to analyze the association between early hip fracture repair and in-hospital mortality in elderly people attending public hospitals in the Spanish National Health System and, additionally, to explore factors associated with the decision to perform early hip fracture repair. Methods A cohort of 56,500 patients of 60-years-old and over, hospitalized for hip fracture during the period 2002 to 2005 in all the public hospitals in 8 Spanish regions, were followed up using administrative databases to identify the time to surgical repair and in-hospital mortality. We used a multivariate logistic regression model to analyze the relationship between the timing of surgery ( Results Early surgery was performed on 25% of the patients. In the unadjusted analysis early surgery showed an absolute difference in risk of mortality of 0.57 (from 4.42% to 3.85%. However, patients undergoing delayed surgery were older and had higher comorbidity and severity of illness. Timeliness for surgery was not found to be related to in-hospital mortality once confounding factors such as age, sex, chronic comorbidities as well as the severity of illness were controlled for in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions Older age, male gender, higher chronic comorbidity and higher severity measured by the Risk Mortality Index were associated with higher mortality, but the time to surgery was not.

  11. The impact of health system reform plan on the hospital\\'s performance indicators of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Dadgar

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: The health system  reform plan has been positive changes in indicators of hospital performance. Therefore, while considering the current trend of continuous improvement, the continuity of the project was advised based on the results of this study.

  12. Towards elicitation of users requirements for hospital information system: from a care process modelling technique to a web based collaborative tool.

    OpenAIRE

    Staccini, Pascal M.; Joubert, Michel; Quaranta, Jean-Francois; Fieschi, Marius

    2002-01-01

    Growing attention is being given to the use of process modeling methodology for user requirements elicitation. In the analysis phase of hospital information systems, the usefulness of care-process models has been investigated to evaluate the conceptual applicability and practical understandability by clinical staff and members of users teams. Nevertheless, there still remains a gap between users and analysts in their mutual ability to share conceptual views and vocabulary, keeping the meaning...

  13. Availability of software services for a hospital information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, N

    1998-03-01

    Hospital information systems (HISs) are becoming more important and covering more parts in daily hospital operations as order-entry systems become popular and electronic charts are introduced. Thus, HISs today need to be able to provide necessary services for hospital operations for a 24-h day, 365 days a year. The provision of services discussed here does not simply mean the availability of computers, in which all that matters is that the computer is functioning. It means the provision of necessary information for hospital operations by the computer software, and we will call it the availability of software services. HISs these days are mostly client-server systems. To increase availability of software services in these systems, it is not enough to just use system structures that are highly reliable in existing host-centred systems. Four main components which support availability of software services are network systems, client computers, server computers, and application software. In this paper, we suggest how to structure these four components to provide the minimum requested software services even if a part of the system stops to function. The network system should be double-protected in stratus using Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) as its base network. Client computers should be fat clients with as much application logic as possible, and reference information which do not require frequent updates (master files, for example) should be replicated in clients. It would be best if all server computers could be double-protected. However, if that is physically impossible, one database file should be made accessible by several server computers. Still, at least the basic patients' information and the latest clinical records should be double-protected physically. Application software should be tested carefully before introduction. Different versions of the application software should always be kept and managed in case the new version has problems. If a hospital

  14. Development of a Hospital Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    4~4and overused statement but true nonrAýheless. Arid, if some- "thing is information fur one and not Cor another, what is it for the latter? It is...scheduling your projects, fantastic! Keep doing itl If you schedule your projects according to a combination of your horoscope , the stock market, and...hospital functions. It is true that knowledge of the tools used in the Systems Development Life Cycle can allow one to go into 4.. any setting and

  15. Implementation of an advanced clinical and administrative hospital information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegoda, P R; Dyro, J F

    1986-01-01

    Over the last six years since University Hospital opened, the University Hospital Information System (UHIS) has continued to evolve to what is today an advanced administrative and clinical information system. At University Hospital UHIS is the way of conducting business. A wide range of patient care applications are operational including Patient Registration, ADT for Inpatient/Outpatient/Emergency Room visits, Advanced Order Entry/Result Reporting, Medical Records, Lab Automated Data Acquisition/Quality Control, Pharmacy, Radiology, Dietary, Respiratory Therapy, ECG, EEG, Cardiology, Physical/Occupational Therapy and Nursing. These systems and numerous financial systems have been installed in a highly tuned, efficient computer system. All applications are real-time, on-line, and data base oriented. Each system is provided with multiple data security levels, forward file recovery, and dynamic transaction backout of in-flight tasks. Sensitive medical information is safeguarded by job function passwords, identification codes, need-to-know master screens and terminal keylocks. University Hospital has an IBM 3083 CPU with five 3380 disk drives, four dual density tape drives, and a 3705 network controller. The network of 300 terminals and 100 printers is connected to the computer center by an RF broadband cable. The software is configured around the IBM/MVS operating system using CICS as the telecommunication monitor, IMS as the data base management system and PCS/ADS as the application enabling tool. The most extensive clinical system added to UHIS is the Physiological Monitoring/Patient Data Management System with serves 92 critical care beds. In keeping with the Hospital's philosophy of integrated computing, the PMS/PDMS with its network of minicomputers was linked to the UHIS system. In a pilot program, remote access to UHIS through the IBM personal computer has been implemented in several physician offices in the local community, further extending the communications

  16. 78 FR 27485 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... Readmission 5. MDC 8 (Diseases and Disorders of the Musculoskeletal System and Connective Tissue) a. Reverse... hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are..., (410) 786-2261, PPS-Exempt Cancer Hospital Quality Reporting Issues. Allison Lee, (410) 786-8691 and...

  17. Is mobile teleconsulting equivalent to hospital-based telestroke services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, Heinrich J; Boy, Sandra; Jankovits, Ralf; Pilz, Philipp; Klucken, Jochen; Fehm, Nando P; Schenkel, Johannes

    2008-12-01

    Telemedicine is increasingly used to provide acute stroke expertise for hospitals without full-time neurological services. Teleconsulting through mobile laptop computers may offer more flexibility compared with hospital-based services, but concerns about quality and technical reliability remain. We conducted a controlled trial, allocating hospital-based or mobile teleconsulting in a shift-by-shift sequence and evaluating technical parameters, acceptability, and impact on immediate clinical decisions. Both types of telemedicine workstations were equipped with DICOM (Digital-Imaging-and-Communications-in-Medicine) viewer and videoconference software. The laptop connected by asymmetrical broadband UMTS (Universal-Mobile-Telecommunication-Systems) technology with a one-way spoke-to-hub video transmission, whereas the hospital-based device used landline symmetrical telecommunication, including a 2-way videoconference. One hundred twenty-seven hospital-based and 96 mobile teleconsultations were conducted within 2 months without any technical breakdown. The rates per allocated time were similar with 3.8 and 4.0 per day. No significant differences were found for durations of videoconference (mean: 11+/-3 versus 10+/-3 minutes, P=0.07), DICOM download (3+/-3 versus 4+/-3 minutes, P=0.19), and total duration of teleconsultations (44+/-19 versus 45+/-21 minutes, P=0.98). Technical quality of mobile teleconsultations was rated worse on both sides, but this did not affect the ability to make remote clinical decisions like initiating thrombolysis (17% versus 13% of all, P=0.32). Teleconsultation using a laptop workstation and broadband mobile telecommunication was technically stable and allowed remote clinical decision-making. There remain disadvantages regarding videoconference quality on the hub side and lack of video transmission to the spoke side.

  18. Non-VA Hospital System (NVH)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) pays for care provided to VA beneficiaries in non-VA hospitals through its contract hospitalization program as mandated by...

  19. Demographic factors and hospital size predict patient satisfaction variance--implications for hospital value-based purchasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Daniel C; Ornstein, Katherine A; Holcombe, Randall F

    2015-08-01

    Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (HVBP) incentivizes quality performance-based healthcare by linking payments directly to patient satisfaction scores obtained from Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) surveys. Lower HCAHPS scores appear to cluster in heterogeneous population-dense areas and could bias Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) reimbursement. Assess nonrandom variation in patient satisfaction as determined by HCAHPS. Multivariate regression modeling was performed for individual dimensions of HCAHPS and aggregate scores. Standardized partial regression coefficients assessed strengths of predictors. Weighted Individual (hospital) Patient Satisfaction Adjusted Score (WIPSAS) utilized 4 highly predictive variables, and hospitals were reranked accordingly. A total of 3907 HVBP-participating hospitals. There were 934,800 patient surveys by the most conservative estimate. A total of 3144 county demographics (US Census) and HCAHPS surveys. Hospital size and primary language (non-English speaking) most strongly predicted unfavorable HCAHPS scores, whereas education and white ethnicity most strongly predicted favorable HCAHPS scores. The average adjusted patient satisfaction scores calculated by WIPSAS approximated the national average of HCAHPS scores. However, WIPSAS changed hospital rankings by variable amounts depending on the strength of the predictive variables in the hospitals' locations. Structural and demographic characteristics that predict lower scores were accounted for by WIPSAS that also improved rankings of many safety-net hospitals and academic medical centers in diverse areas. Demographic and structural factors (eg, hospital beds) predict patient satisfaction scores even after CMS adjustments. CMS should consider WIPSAS or a similar adjustment to account for the severity of patient satisfaction inequities that hospitals could strive to correct. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  20. Activity-based costing and its application in a Turkish university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yereli, Ayşe Necef

    2009-03-01

    Resource management in hospitals is of increasing importance in today's global economy. Traditional accounting systems have become inadequate for managing hospital resources and accurately determining service costs. Conversely, the activity-based costing approach to hospital accounting is an effective cost management model that determines costs and evaluates financial performance across departments. Obtaining costs that are more accurate can enable hospitals to analyze and interpret costing decisions and make more accurate budgeting decisions. Traditional and activity-based costing approaches were compared using a cost analysis of gall bladder surgeries in the general surgery department of one university hospital in Manisa, Turkey. Copyright (c) AORN, Inc, 2009.

  1. Improvements in Patient Acceptance by Hospitals Following the Introduction of a Smartphone App for the Emergency Medical Service System: A Population-Based Before-and-After Observational Study in Osaka City, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Yusuke; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Iwami, Taku; Kawamura, Takashi; Izawa, Junichi; Gibo, Koichiro; Komukai, Sho; Hayashida, Sumito; Kiguchi, Takeyuki; Ohnishi, Mitsuo; Ogura, Hiroshi; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2017-09-11

    Recently, the number of ambulance dispatches has been increasing in Japan, and it is therefore difficult for hospitals to accept emergency patients smoothly and appropriately because of the limited hospital capacity. To facilitate the process of requesting patient transport and hospital acceptance, an emergency information system using information technology (IT) has been built and introduced in various communities. However, its effectiveness has not been thoroughly revealed. We introduced a smartphone app system in 2013 that enables emergency medical service (EMS) personnel to share information among themselves regarding on-scene ambulances and the hospital situation. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of introducing this smartphone app on the EMS system in Osaka City, Japan. This retrospective study analyzed the population-based ambulance records of Osaka Municipal Fire Department. The study period was 6 years, from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2015. We enrolled emergency patients for whom on-scene EMS personnel conducted hospital selection. The main endpoint was the difficulty experienced in gaining hospital acceptance at the scene. The definition of difficulty was making ≥5 phone calls by EMS personnel at the scene to hospitals until a decision to transport was determined. The smartphone app was introduced in January 2013, and we compared the patients treated from 2010 to 2012 (control group) with those treated from 2013 to 2015 (smartphone app group) using an interrupted time-series analysis to assess the effects of introducing this smartphone app. A total of 600,526 emergency patients for whom EMS personnel selected hospitals were eligible for our analysis. There were 300,131 emergency patients in the control group (50.00%, 300,313/600,526) from 2010 to 2012 and 300,395 emergency patients in the smartphone app group (50.00%, 300,395/600,526) from 2013 to 2015. The rate of difficulty in hospital acceptance was 14.19% (42,585/300,131) in the

  2. Managerial innovation in the hospital: an analysis of the diffusion of hospital cost-accounting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counte, M A; Glandon, G L

    1988-01-01

    Currently much interest is focused on the uses of cost-accounting systems within the hospital industry. Proponents frequently contend that such systems will help hospitals successfully adapt to new methods of financial reimbursement because they are essential to a number of major management functions, including competitive bidding, cost management, pricing, and profitability assessment. This article reports the results of a study conducted to examine the extent to which hospitals in a major market are actually beginning to use standard cost-accounting systems and identify factors that either aid or hinder the diffusion of these methods. Chief financial officers from 94 hospitals (83 percent response rate) participated in the study during the summer of 1986 where less than half of the hospitals (43 percent) had recently purchased a cost-accounting system. Detailed information about the interface of cost-accounting systems with other application systems and their specific management uses is reported.

  3. [Monitoring evaluation system for high-specialty hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo Dolci, Germán; Aguirre Gas, Héctor G; Robledo Galván, Héctor

    2011-01-01

    Hospital evaluation is a fundamental process to identify medical units' objective compliance, to analyze efficiency of resource use and allocation, institutional values and mission alignment, patient safety and quality standards, contributions to research and medical education, and the degree of coordination among medical units and the health system as a whole. We propose an evaluation system for highly specialized regional hospitals through the monitoring of performance indicators. The following are established as base thematic elements in the construction of indicators: safe facilities and equipment, financial situation, human resources management, policy management, organizational climate, clinical activity, quality and patient safety, continuity of care, patients' and providers' rights and obligations, teaching, research, social responsibility, coordination mechanisms. Monitoring refers to the planned and systematic evaluation of valid and reliable indicators, aimed at identifying problems and opportunity areas. Moreover, evaluation is a powerful tool to strengthen decision-making and accountability in medical units.

  4. Hospital and Pre-Hospital Triage Systems in Disaster and Normal Conditions; a Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Safari

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Triage is a priority classification system based on the severity of problem to do the best therapeutic proceedings for patients in the less time. A triage system should be performed in a way which can make a decision with high accuracy and in the least time for each patient. Simplicity and reliability of the performance are the most important features of a standard triage system. An appropriate triage causes to increase the quality of health care services and patients’ satisfaction rate, decrease the waiting time as well as mortality rate, and increase the yield and efficiency of emergency wards along with reducing the related expenses. Considering to the above statements, in the present study the history of triage formation was evaluated and categorizing of all triage systems regarding prehospital and hospital as well as triage in normal and critical conditions were assessed, too.

  5. Moving Towards the Age-friendly Hospital: A Paradigm Shift for the Hospital-based Care of the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Allen R; Larente, Nadine; Morais, Jose A

    2011-12-01

    Care of the older adult in the acute care hospital is becoming more challenging. Patients 65 years and older account for 35% of hospital discharges and 45% of hospital days. Up to one-third of the hospitalized frail elderly loses independent functioning in one or more activities of daily living as a result of the 'hostile environment' that is present in the acute hospitals. A critical deficit of health care workers with expertise and experience in the care of the elderly also jeopardizes successful care delivery in the acute hospital setting. We propose a paradigm shift in the culture and practice of event-driven acute hospital-based care of the elderly which we call the Age-friendly Hospital concept. Guiding principles include: a favourable physical environment; zero tolerance for ageism throughout the organization; an integrated process to develop comprehensive services using the geriatric approach; assistance with appropriateness decision-making and fostering links between the hospital and the community. Our current proposed strategy is to focus on delirium management as a hospital-wide condition that both requires and highlights the Geriatric Medicine specialist as an expert of content, for program development and of evaluation. The Age-friendly Hospital concept we propose may lead the way to enable hospitals in the fast-moving health care system to deliver high-quality care without jeopardizing risk-benefit, function, and quality of life balances for the frail elderly. Recruitment and retention of skilled health care professionals would benefit from this positive 'branding' of an institution. Convincing hospital management and managing change are significant challenges, especially with competing priorities in a fiscal environment with limited funding. The implementation of a hospital-wide delirium management program is an example of an intervention that embodies many of the principles in the Age-friendly Hospital concept. It is important to change the way

  6. The utilization of activity-based cost accounting in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmett, Dennis; Forget, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Healthcare costs are being examined on all fronts. Healthcare accounts for 11% of the gross national product and will continue to rise as the "babyboomers" reach retirement age. While ascertaining costs is important, most research shows that costing methods have not been implemented in hospitals. This study is concerned with the use of costing methods; particularly activity-based cost accounting. A mail survey of CFOs was undertaken to determine the type of cost accounting method they use. In addition, they were asked whether they were aware of activity-based cost accounting and whether they had implemented it or were planning to implement it. Only 71.8% were aware of it and only 4.7% had implemented it. In addition, only 52% of all hospitals report using any cost accounting systems. Education needs to ensure that all healthcare executives are cognizant of activity-based accounting and its importance in determining costs. Only by determining costs can hospitals strive to contain them.

  7. [The development of hospital medical supplies information management system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shaoping; Gu, Hongqing; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Qiang

    2010-05-01

    The information management of medical materials by using high-tech computer, in order to improve the efficiency of the consumption of medical supplies, hospital supplies and develop a new technology way to manage the hospital and material support. Using C # NET, JAVA techniques to develop procedures for the establishment of hospital material management information system, set the various management modules, production of various statistical reports, standard operating procedures. The system is convenient, functional and strong, fluent statistical functions. It can always fully grasp and understand the whole hospital supplies run dynamic information, as a modern and effective tool for hospital materials management.

  8. A simulation model of hospital management based on cost accounting analysis according to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Koji; Sato, Junzo; Guo, Jinqiu; Takada, Akira; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2004-12-01

    Since a little before 2000, hospital cost accounting has been increasingly performed at Japanese national university hospitals. At Kumamoto University Hospital, for instance, departmental costs have been analyzed since 2000. And, since 2003, the cost balance has been obtained according to certain diseases for the preparation of Diagnosis-Related Groups and Prospective Payment System. On the basis of these experiences, we have constructed a simulation model of hospital management. This program has worked correctly at repeated trials and with satisfactory speed. Although there has been room for improvement of detailed accounts and cost accounting engine, the basic model has proved satisfactory. We have constructed a hospital management model based on the financial data of an existing hospital. We will later improve this program from the viewpoint of construction and using more various data of hospital management. A prospective outlook may be obtained for the practical application of this hospital management model.

  9. Target marketing for the hospital-based wellness center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangelosi, J D

    1997-01-01

    The American population is aging, medical technology is advancing, and life expectancies are on the rise. At the same time hospitals are looking for additional sources of income due to the pressures of government regulations and managed care. One of the options for hospitals looking for additional sources of income is the hospital-based but free-standing comprehensive wellness and fitness center. Such centers go beyond the facilities, programs and services offered by traditional health and fitness centers. In addition to physical fitness programs, hospital-based wellness centers offer programs in CPR, nutrition, weight control and many other programs of interest to an aging but active American populace. This research documents the hospital industry, wellness industry and the prospects of success or failure for he hospital attempting such a venture. The focus of the research is the experience of a particular hospital with regard to the programs, facilities and services deemed most important by its target market.

  10. Picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) for hospitals, a survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haar Romeny, B.M. ter; Graaf, C.N. de; Waes, P.F.G.M. van; Rijk, P.P. van; Helder, J.C.; Valk, J.P.J. de

    1985-01-01

    In this article a survey is given for Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS). Several aspects of PACS are treated, as image management, the introduction of the system, expenses etc. Special reference is made to the component parts of PACS: image stations, memory, network, software and coupling to the hospital information system. The introduction of PACS in Dutch hospitals is described. (Auth.)

  11. Integrating hospital information systems in healthcare institutions: a mediation architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Azami, Ikram; Cherkaoui Malki, Mohammed Ouçamah; Tahon, Christian

    2012-10-01

    Many studies have examined the integration of information systems into healthcare institutions, leading to several standards in the healthcare domain (CORBAmed: Common Object Request Broker Architecture in Medicine; HL7: Health Level Seven International; DICOM: Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine; and IHE: Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise). Due to the existence of a wide diversity of heterogeneous systems, three essential factors are necessary to fully integrate a system: data, functions and workflow. However, most of the previous studies have dealt with only one or two of these factors and this makes the system integration unsatisfactory. In this paper, we propose a flexible, scalable architecture for Hospital Information Systems (HIS). Our main purpose is to provide a practical solution to insure HIS interoperability so that healthcare institutions can communicate without being obliged to change their local information systems and without altering the tasks of the healthcare professionals. Our architecture is a mediation architecture with 3 levels: 1) a database level, 2) a middleware level and 3) a user interface level. The mediation is based on two central components: the Mediator and the Adapter. Using the XML format allows us to establish a structured, secured exchange of healthcare data. The notion of medical ontology is introduced to solve semantic conflicts and to unify the language used for the exchange. Our mediation architecture provides an effective, promising model that promotes the integration of hospital information systems that are autonomous, heterogeneous, semantically interoperable and platform-independent.

  12. The implementation of DRG-based hospital reimbursement in Switzerland: A population-based perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busato, André; von Below, Georg

    2010-10-16

    Switzerland introduces a DRG (Diagnosis Related Groups) based system for hospital financing in 2012 in order to increase efficiency and transparency of Swiss health care. DRG-based hospital reimbursement is not simultaneously realized in all Swiss cantons and several cantons already implemented DRG-based financing irrespective of the national agenda, a setting that provides an opportunity to compare the situation in different cantons. Effects of introducing DRGs anticipated for providers and insurers are relatively well known but it remains less clear what effects DRGs will have on served populations. The objective of the study is therefore to analyze differences of volume and major quality indicators of care between areas with or without DRG-based hospital reimbursement from a population based perspective. Small area analysis of all hospitalizations in acute care hospitals and of all consultations reimbursed by mandatory basic health insurance for physicians in own practice during 2003-2007. The results show fewer hospitalizations and a relocation of resources to outpatient care in areas with DRG reimbursement. Overall burden of disease expressed as per capita DRG cost weights was almost identical between the two types of hospital reimbursement and no distinct temporal differences were detected in this respect. But the results show considerably higher 90-day rehospitalization rates in DRG areas. The study provides evidence of both desired and harmful effects related to the implementation of DRGs. Systematic monitoring of outcomes and quality of care are therefore essential elements to maintain in the Swiss health system after DRG's are implemented on a nationwide basis in 2012.

  13. The interRAI Acute Care instrument incorporated in an eHealth system for standardized and web-based geriatric assessment: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in the acute hospital setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The interRAI Acute Care instrument is a multidimensional geriatric assessment system intended to determine a hospitalized older persons’ medical, psychosocial and functional capacity and needs. Its objective is to develop an overall plan for treatment and long-term follow-up based on a common set of standardized items that can be used in various care settings. A Belgian web-based software system (BelRAI-software) was developed to enable clinicians to interpret the output and to communicate the patients’ data across wards and care organizations. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the (dis)advantages of the implementation of the interRAI Acute Care instrument as a comprehensive geriatric assessment instrument in an acute hospital context. Methods In a cross-sectional multicenter study on four geriatric wards in three acute hospitals, trained clinical staff (nurses, occupational therapists, social workers, and geriatricians) assessed 410 inpatients in routine clinical practice. The BelRAI-system was evaluated by focus groups, observations, and questionnaires. The Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats were mapped (SWOT-analysis) and validated by the participants. Results The primary strengths of the BelRAI-system were a structured overview of the patients’ condition early after admission and the promotion of multidisciplinary assessment. Our study was a first attempt to transfer standardized data between home care organizations, nursing homes and hospitals and a way to centralize medical, allied health professionals and nursing data. With the BelRAI-software, privacy of data is guaranteed. Weaknesses are the time-consuming character of the process and the overlap with other assessment instruments or (electronic) registration forms. There is room for improving the user-friendliness and the efficiency of the software, which needs hospital-specific adaptations. Opportunities are a timely and systematic problem detection and continuity of

  14. Computerized system for hospital engineering service management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centeno, C A; Gonzalez, E A; Cagnolo, F J; Olmos, C E

    2007-01-01

    When a Hospital Engineering Service (HES) is implemented within a health care environment, the idea is to improve service conditions and costs as well as to provide timely responses to equipment preventive maintenance and infrastructure requirements. An HES must, within the shortest possible period of time, meet the above requirements at the cost necessary to provide the service quality sought. In many cases there is a lack of minimal materials and staff who are qualified to attain the objectives that have been set. Therefore, external assistance becomes necessary. In this context, actions are often taken which, because they are not recorded, cannot be assessed in order to evaluate the HES. Since all action taken is appraised from the purely economic point of view, in the final analysis the contributions from staff remain invisible. This situation works against the possibility of quantifying the convenience of possessing an internal HES. The software support system we have developed here is oriented toward providing all the necessary data to address this issue

  15. Reliability Electrical Power System of Hospital as Cold Standby System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grabski Franciszek

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The probabilistic model of a hospital electrical power system consisting of mains, an emergency power system and the automatic transfer switch with the generator starter are discussed in this paper. The reliability model is semi-Markov process describing two different units renewable cold standby system and switch. The embedded Semi-Markov processes concept is applied for description of the system evolution. Time to failure of the system is represented by a random variable denoting the first passage time of the process from the given state to the subset of states. The appropriate theorems of the Semi-Markov processes theory allow us to evaluate the reliability function and some reliability characteristics.

  16. How Should Disaster Base Hospitals Prepare for Dialysis Therapy after Earthquakes? Introduction of Double Water Piping Circuits Provided by Well Water System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegaya, Naoki; Seki, George; Ohta, Nobutaka

    2016-01-01

    After earthquakes, continuing dialysis for patients with ESRD and patients suffering from crush syndrome is the serious problem. In this paper, we analyzed the failure of the provision of dialysis services observed in recent disasters and discussed how to prepare for disasters to continue dialysis therapy. Japan has frequently experienced devastating earthquakes. A lot of dialysis centers could not continue dialysis treatment owing to damage caused by these earthquakes. The survey by Japanese Society for Dialysis Treatment (JSDT) after the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011 showed that failure of lifelines such as electric power and water supply was the leading cause of the malfunction of dialysis treatment. Our hospital is located in Shizuoka Prefecture, where one of the biggest earthquakes is predicted to occur in the near future. In addition to reconstructing earthquake-resistant buildings and facilities, we therefore have adopted double electric and water lifelines by introducing emergency generators and well water supply systems. It is very important to inform politicians, bureaucrats, and local water departments that dialysis treatment, a life sustaining therapy for patients with end stage renal diseases, requires a large amount of water. We cannot prevent an earthquake but can curb the extent of a disaster by preparing for earthquakes.

  17. Application of Kanban System on a hospital pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitka, Eleftheria

    2015-01-01

    This is a brief overview of principles, views and methods, of the Kanban System for the pharmacy of a general hospital. The main goal is the reduction of stores managed by the pharmacy, as well as improvement of the mode of operation. Solutions to problems, such as inadequate storage space, the delay in serving patients or clinics and the expiration of various pharmaceutical formulations, stored for so long time, are provided. The philosophy behind the Kanban procurement System and specifically its applicability to a pharmacy underperforming in terms of efficiency, in Greece, are described. Based on the analysis of stock requirement, item stock prices and demand, it is concluded that a significant percentage of the stocked drugs can be procured using the Kanban System. Significant cost savings and operational advantages following the Kanban System will take place. The challenging endeavor is the analysis, design and application of a system that supports the proposed procurement method. Hospital pharmacies in Greece and in other countries that face an economic crisis may largely benefit after using the Kanban System.

  18. Mining of hospital laboratory information systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søeby, Karen; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Werge, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    of hospital laboratory data as a source of information, we analyzed enzymatic plasma creatinine as a model analyte in two large pediatric hospital samples. Methods: Plasma creatinine measurements from 9700 children aged 0-18 years were obtained from hospital laboratory databases and partitioned into high...... in creatinine levels at different time points after birth and around the early teens, which challenges the establishment and usefulness of reference intervals in those age groups. Conclusions: The study documents that hospital laboratory data may inform on the developmental aspects of creatinine, on periods...... with pronounced heterogeneity and valid reference intervals. Furthermore, part of the heterogeneity in creatinine distribution is likely due to differences in biological and chronological age of children and should be considered when using age-specific reference intervals....

  19. Impacts of Hospitals' Innovativeness on Information System Outsourcing Decisions

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jae Sung

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of hospitals' innovativeness on outsourcing decision-making regarding four information system (IS) functions, namely, software programs, network maintenance, hardware systems, and PC/printer maintenance. Methods Using the 2011 roster of the Korean Hospital Association, this study selected 311 general hospitals as a study population. After identifying the managers who were in charge of outsourcing, this study administered questio...

  20. Capital Investment by Independent and System-Affiliated Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Nathan W; Smith, Dean G; Wheeler, John R C

    2015-01-01

    Capital expenditures are a critical part of hospitals' efforts to maintain quality of patient care and financial stability. Over the past 20 years, finding capital to fund these expenditures has become increasingly challenging for hospitals, particularly independent hospitals. Independent hospitals struggling to find ways to fund necessary capital investment are often advised that their best strategy is to join a multi-hospital system. There is scant empirical evidence to support the idea that system membership improves independent hospitals' ability to make capital expenditures. Using data from the American Hospital Association and Medicare Cost Reports, we use difference-in-difference methods to examine changes in capital expenditures for independent hospitals that joined multi-hospital systems between 1997 and 2008. We find that in the first 5 years after acquisition, capital expenditures increase by an average of almost $16,000 per bed annually, as compared with non-acquired hospitals. In later years, the difference in capital expenditure is smaller and not statistically significant. Our results do not suggest that increases in capital expenditures vary by asset age or the size of the acquiring system. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Health systems: changes in hospital efficiency and profitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchner, Vera Antonia; Hinz, Vera; Schreyögg, Jonas

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates potential changes in hospital performance after health system entry, while differentiating between hospital technical and cost efficiency and hospital profitability. In the first stage we obtained (bootstrapped) data envelopment analysis (DEA) efficiency scores. Then, genetic matching is used as a novel matching procedure in this context along with a difference-in-difference approach within a panel regression framework. With the genetic matching procedure, independent and health system hospitals are matched along a number of environmental and organizational characteristics. The results show that health system entry increases hospital technical and cost efficiency by between 0.6 and 3.4 % in four alternative post-entry periods, indicating that health system entry has not a transitory but rather a permanent effect on hospital efficiency. Regarding hospital profitability, the results reveal an increase in hospital profitability only 1 year after health system entry, and the estimations suggest that this effect is a transitional phenomenon. Overall, health system entry may serve as an appropriate management instrument for decision makers to increase hospital performance.

  2. Implementation of a program for type 2 diabetes based on the Chronic Care Model in a hospital-centered health care system: "the Belgian experience"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Royen Paul

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most research publications on Chronic Care Model (CCM implementation originate from organizations or countries with a well-structured primary health care system. Information about efforts made in countries with a less well-organized primary health care system is scarce. In 2003, the Belgian National Institute for Health and Disability Insurance commissioned a pilot study to explore how care for type 2 diabetes patients could be organized in a more efficient way in the Belgian healthcare setting, a setting where the organisational framework for chronic care is mainly hospital-centered. Methods Process evaluation of an action research project (2003–2007 guided by the CCM in a well-defined geographical area with 76,826 inhabitants and an estimated number of 2,300 type 2 diabetes patients. In consultation with the region a program for type 2 diabetes patients was developed. The degree of implementation of the CCM in the region was assessed using the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care survey (ACIC. A multimethod approach was used to evaluate the implementation process. The resulting data were triangulated in order to identify the main facilitators and barriers encountered during the implementation process. Results The overall ACIC score improved from 1.45 (limited support at the start of the study to 5.5 (basic support at the end of the study. The establishment of a local steering group and the appointment of a program manager were crucial steps in strengthening primary care. The willingness of a group of well-trained and motivated care providers to invest in quality improvement was an important facilitator. Important barriers were the complexity of the intervention, the lack of quality data, inadequate information technology support, the lack of commitment procedures and the uncertainty about sustainable funding. Conclusion Guided by the CCM, this study highlights the opportunities and the bottlenecks for adapting chronic care

  3. An automated, broad-based, near real-time public health surveillance system using presentations to hospital Emergency Departments in New South Wales, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu Clayton

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a climate of concern over bioterrorism threats and emergent diseases, public health authorities are trialling more timely surveillance systems. The 2003 Rugby World Cup (RWC provided an opportunity to test the viability of a near real-time syndromic surveillance system in metropolitan Sydney, Australia. We describe the development and early results of this largely automated system that used data routinely collected in Emergency Departments (EDs. Methods Twelve of 49 EDs in the Sydney metropolitan area automatically transmitted surveillance data from their existing information systems to a central database in near real-time. Information captured for each ED visit included patient demographic details, presenting problem and nursing assessment entered as free-text at triage time, physician-assigned provisional diagnosis codes, and status at departure from the ED. Both diagnoses from the EDs and triage text were used to assign syndrome categories. The text information was automatically classified into one or more of 26 syndrome categories using automated "naïve Bayes" text categorisation techniques. Automated processes were used to analyse both diagnosis and free text-based syndrome data and to produce web-based statistical summaries for daily review. An adjusted cumulative sum (cusum was used to assess the statistical significance of trends. Results During the RWC the system did not identify any major public health threats associated with the tournament, mass gatherings or the influx of visitors. This was consistent with evidence from other sources, although two known outbreaks were already in progress before the tournament. Limited baseline in early monitoring prevented the system from automatically identifying these ongoing outbreaks. Data capture was invisible to clinical staff in EDs and did not add to their workload. Conclusion We have demonstrated the feasibility and potential utility of syndromic surveillance using

  4. Admission rates in a general practitioner-based versus a hospital specialist based, hospital-at-home model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Christian Backer; Ankersen, Ejnar Skytte; Lindberg, Mats J

    2018-01-01

    . CONCLUSIONS: The GP based HaH model was more effective than the hospital specialist model in avoiding hospital admissions within 7 days among elderly patients with an acute medical condition with no differences in mental or physical recovery rates or deaths between the two models. REGISTRATION: No. NCT......BACKGROUND: Hospital at home (HaH) is an alternative to acute admission for elderly patients. It is unclear if should be cared for a primarily by a hospital intern specialist or by the patient's own general practitioner (GP). The study assessed whether a GP based model was more effective than...... Denmark, including + 65 years old patients with an acute medical condition that required acute hospital in-patient care. The patients were randomly assigned to hospital specialist based model or GP model of HaH care. Five physical and cognitive performance tests were performed at inclusion and after 7...

  5. Impacts of Hospitals' Innovativeness on Information System Outsourcing Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of hospitals' innovativeness on outsourcing decision-making regarding four information system (IS) functions, namely, software programs, network maintenance, hardware systems, and PC/printer maintenance. Methods Using the 2011 roster of the Korean Hospital Association, this study selected 311 general hospitals as a study population. After identifying the managers who were in charge of outsourcing, this study administered questionnaires. A total of 103 hospitals responded. Results Of the responding hospitals, 55.34% outsourced at least one IS function, whereas 88.35% outsourced at least one managerial function. IS outsourcing was motivated by the need for outside experts, but other managerial functions were outsourced for cost savings. Innovative and early adopter hospitals were 4.52 and 4.91 times more likely to outsource IS functions related with work processes (i.e., software and network maintenance) than early and late majority hospitals, respectively. IT outsourcing effectiveness significantly influenced the outsourcing decisions regarding four IS functions. Hospitals that had perceived more risks of outsourcing significantly preferred non-outsourcing on their hardware systems, but the risks of outsourcing were not significant for outsourcing decisions regarding the other IS functions. Hospitals' innovativeness also significantly explained the quantity of innovation adoptions. Innovative and early adopter hospitals did more outsourcing than early and late majority hospitals. Conclusions Hospitals' innovativeness influences decision-making regarding outsourcing. Innovative hospitals are more likely to outsource their work-process-related IS functions. Thus, organizational traits, especially hospitals' innovativeness, should be considered as a key success factor for IS management. PMID:24872912

  6. Impacts of hospitals' innovativeness on information system outsourcing decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Sung

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of hospitals' innovativeness on outsourcing decision-making regarding four information system (IS) functions, namely, software programs, network maintenance, hardware systems, and PC/printer maintenance. Using the 2011 roster of the Korean Hospital Association, this study selected 311 general hospitals as a study population. After identifying the managers who were in charge of outsourcing, this study administered questionnaires. A total of 103 hospitals responded. Of the responding hospitals, 55.34% outsourced at least one IS function, whereas 88.35% outsourced at least one managerial function. IS outsourcing was motivated by the need for outside experts, but other managerial functions were outsourced for cost savings. Innovative and early adopter hospitals were 4.52 and 4.91 times more likely to outsource IS functions related with work processes (i.e., software and network maintenance) than early and late majority hospitals, respectively. IT outsourcing effectiveness significantly influenced the outsourcing decisions regarding four IS functions. Hospitals that had perceived more risks of outsourcing significantly preferred non-outsourcing on their hardware systems, but the risks of outsourcing were not significant for outsourcing decisions regarding the other IS functions. Hospitals' innovativeness also significantly explained the quantity of innovation adoptions. Innovative and early adopter hospitals did more outsourcing than early and late majority hospitals. Hospitals' innovativeness influences decision-making regarding outsourcing. Innovative hospitals are more likely to outsource their work-process-related IS functions. Thus, organizational traits, especially hospitals' innovativeness, should be considered as a key success factor for IS management.

  7. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Eva Helena; Kjaergaard, H; Schmiegelow, K

    2012-01-01

    , as it decreased the strain on the family and the ill child, maintained normality and an ordinary everyday life and fulfilled the need for safety and security. According to family members of children with cancer, hospital-based home care support enhanced their quality of life during the child's cancer trajectory......The study aims to describe the experiences of a hospital-based home care programme in the families of children with cancer. Fourteen parents, representing 10 families, were interviewed about their experiences of a hospital-based home care programme during a 4-month period in 2009 at a university...... hospital in Denmark. Five children participated in all or part of the interview. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. The findings indicate that hospital-based home care enabled the families to remain intact throughout the course of treatment...

  8. Evaluation of a Cyber Security System for Hospital Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faysel, Mohammad A

    2015-01-01

    Most of the cyber security systems use simulated data in evaluating their detection capabilities. The proposed cyber security system utilizes real hospital network connections. It uses a probabilistic data mining algorithm to detect anomalous events and takes appropriate response in real-time. On an evaluation using real-world hospital network data consisting of incoming network connections collected for a 24-hour period, the proposed system detected 15 unusual connections which were undetected by a commercial intrusion prevention system for the same network connections. Evaluation of the proposed system shows a potential to secure protected patient health information on a hospital network.

  9. Information security risk management for computerized health information systems in hospitals: a case study of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Javad; Sadoughi, Farahnaz

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, hospitals in Iran - similar to those in other countries - have experienced growing use of computerized health information systems (CHISs), which play a significant role in the operations of hospitals. But, the major challenge of CHIS use is information security. This study attempts to evaluate CHIS information security risk management at hospitals of Iran. This applied study is a descriptive and cross-sectional research that has been conducted in 2015. The data were collected from 551 hospitals of Iran. Based on literature review, experts' opinion, and observations at five hospitals, our intensive questionnaire was designed to assess security risk management for CHISs at the concerned hospitals, which was then sent to all hospitals in Iran by the Ministry of Health. Sixty-nine percent of the studied hospitals pursue information security policies and procedures in conformity with Iran Hospitals Accreditation Standards. At some hospitals, risk identification, risk evaluation, and risk estimation, as well as risk treatment, are unstructured without any specified approach or methodology. There is no significant structured approach to risk management at the studied hospitals. Information security risk management is not followed by Iran's hospitals and their information security policies. This problem can cause a large number of challenges for their CHIS security in future. Therefore, Iran's Ministry of Health should develop practical policies to improve information security risk management in the hospitals of Iran.

  10. Information security risk management for computerized health information systems in hospitals: a case study of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Javad; Sadoughi, Farahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent years, hospitals in Iran – similar to those in other countries – have experienced growing use of computerized health information systems (CHISs), which play a significant role in the operations of hospitals. But, the major challenge of CHIS use is information security. This study attempts to evaluate CHIS information security risk management at hospitals of Iran. Materials and methods This applied study is a descriptive and cross-sectional research that has been conducted in 2015. The data were collected from 551 hospitals of Iran. Based on literature review, experts’ opinion, and observations at five hospitals, our intensive questionnaire was designed to assess security risk management for CHISs at the concerned hospitals, which was then sent to all hospitals in Iran by the Ministry of Health. Results Sixty-nine percent of the studied hospitals pursue information security policies and procedures in conformity with Iran Hospitals Accreditation Standards. At some hospitals, risk identification, risk evaluation, and risk estimation, as well as risk treatment, are unstructured without any specified approach or methodology. There is no significant structured approach to risk management at the studied hospitals. Conclusion Information security risk management is not followed by Iran’s hospitals and their information security policies. This problem can cause a large number of challenges for their CHIS security in future. Therefore, Iran’s Ministry of Health should develop practical policies to improve information security risk management in the hospitals of Iran. PMID:27313481

  11. Three-tiered integration of PACS and HIS toward next generation total hospital information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Lee, D H; Choi, J W; Cho, H I; Kang, H S; Yeon, K M; Han, M C

    1998-01-01

    The Seoul National University Hospital (SNUH) started a project to innovate the hospital information facilities. This project includes installation of high speed hospital network, development of new HIS, OCS (order communication system), RIS and PACS. This project aims at the implementation of the first total hospital information system by seamlessly integrating these systems together. To achieve this goal, we took three-tiered systems integration approach: network level, database level, and workstation level integration. There are 3 loops of networks in SNUH: proprietary star network for host computer based HIS, Ethernet based hospital LAN for OCS and RIS, and ATM based network for PACS. They are linked together at the backbone level to allow high speed communication between these systems. We have developed special communication modules for each system that allow data interchange between different databases and computer platforms. We have also developed an integrated workstation in which both the OCS and PACS application programs run on a single computer in an integrated manner allowing the clinical users to access and display radiological images as well as textual clinical information within a single user environment. A study is in progress toward a total hospital information system in SNUH by seamlessly integrating the main hospital information resources such as HIS, OCS, and PACS. With the three-tiered systems integration approach, we could successfully integrate the systems from the network level to the user application level.

  12. Hidden Costs of Hospital Based Delivery from Two Tertiary Hospitals in Western Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Jeevan; Kaehler, Nils; Marahatta, Sujan Babu; Mishra, Shiva Raj; Subedi, Sudarshan; Adhikari, Bipin

    2016-01-01

    Hospital based delivery has been an expensive experience for poor households because of hidden costs which are usually unaccounted in hospital costs. The main aim of this study was to estimate the hidden costs of hospital based delivery and determine the factors associated with the hidden costs. A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted among 384 post-partum mothers with their husbands/house heads during the discharge time in Manipal Teaching Hospital and Western Regional Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal. A face to face interview with each respondent was conducted using a structured questionnaire. Hidden costs were calculated based on the price rate of the market during the time of the study. The total hidden costs for normal delivery and C-section delivery were 243.4 USD (US Dollar) and 321.6 USD respectively. Of the total maternity care expenditures; higher mean expenditures were found for food & drinking (53.07%), clothes (9.8%) and transport (7.3%). For postpartum women with their husband or house head, the total mean opportunity cost of "days of work loss" were 84.1 USD and 81.9 USD for normal delivery and C-section respectively. Factors such as literate mother (p = 0.007), employed house head (p = 0.011), monthly family income more than 25,000 NRs (Nepalese Rupees) (p = 0.014), private hospital as a place of delivery (p = 0.0001), C-section as a mode of delivery (p = 0.0001), longer duration (>5days) of stay in hospital (p = 0.0001), longer distance (>15km) from house to hospital (p = 0.0001) and longer travel time (>240 minutes) from house to hospital (p = 0.007) showed a significant association with the higher hidden costs (>25000 NRs). Experiences of hidden costs on hospital based delivery and opportunity costs of days of work loss were found high. Several socio-demographic factors, delivery related factors (place and mode of delivery, length of stay, distance from hospital and travel time) were associated with hidden costs. Hidden costs can be a

  13. Hidden Costs of Hospital Based Delivery from Two Tertiary Hospitals in Western Nepal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeevan Acharya

    Full Text Available Hospital based delivery has been an expensive experience for poor households because of hidden costs which are usually unaccounted in hospital costs. The main aim of this study was to estimate the hidden costs of hospital based delivery and determine the factors associated with the hidden costs.A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted among 384 post-partum mothers with their husbands/house heads during the discharge time in Manipal Teaching Hospital and Western Regional Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal. A face to face interview with each respondent was conducted using a structured questionnaire. Hidden costs were calculated based on the price rate of the market during the time of the study.The total hidden costs for normal delivery and C-section delivery were 243.4 USD (US Dollar and 321.6 USD respectively. Of the total maternity care expenditures; higher mean expenditures were found for food & drinking (53.07%, clothes (9.8% and transport (7.3%. For postpartum women with their husband or house head, the total mean opportunity cost of "days of work loss" were 84.1 USD and 81.9 USD for normal delivery and C-section respectively. Factors such as literate mother (p = 0.007, employed house head (p = 0.011, monthly family income more than 25,000 NRs (Nepalese Rupees (p = 0.014, private hospital as a place of delivery (p = 0.0001, C-section as a mode of delivery (p = 0.0001, longer duration (>5days of stay in hospital (p = 0.0001, longer distance (>15km from house to hospital (p = 0.0001 and longer travel time (>240 minutes from house to hospital (p = 0.007 showed a significant association with the higher hidden costs (>25000 NRs.Experiences of hidden costs on hospital based delivery and opportunity costs of days of work loss were found high. Several socio-demographic factors, delivery related factors (place and mode of delivery, length of stay, distance from hospital and travel time were associated with hidden costs. Hidden costs can be a

  14. Competency Based Hospital Radiopharmacy Training. Additional Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Quality management systems in nuclear medicine are vital to a high level of nuclear medicine (NM) practice. Trained and competent staffs are essential for achieving high standards and growth in NM. One of the key bottlenecks for NM is the shortfall in human resources, especially of radiopharmacists. There is an acute shortage in most Member States and in some countries an absence of nationally registered pharmacists with radiopharmacy experience. Most nuclear medicine facilities operate their radiopharmacies (commonly referred to as the hot laboratories) with the support of technologists and radiographers. Recent surveys have found the level of training amongst technologists to be extremely variable. Most had little or no training in hot laboratory practices. The survey also indicated the poor state of hot laboratories in many countries. Basic quality systems in the hot laboratory could be improved significantly with better training. This competency-based education manual is designed with those radiopharmacy practitioners in mind. This competency-based trainer's manual provides trainers in each of the IAEA regions with the essentials of a training programme for all radiopharmacy practitioners. The competency-based training is a two week programme followed up with three months of practice achievements. The syllabus provides a standardized approach to lectures, practical sessions, and interactive workshops focusing on critical aspects of hot laboratory practices. The trainers, with the assistance of this manual, can deliver essential skills, competencies, and underpinning knowledge to operate safely and effectively in their hot laboratory. The course focuses on simple but practical steps that could be undertaken to improve staff performance. In addition, a basic framework of quality management principles related to radiopharmacy practices is also covered. Further, the syllabus can be adapted to the particular needs and characteristics of any training centre, country

  15. Recognition of medical errors' reporting system dimensions in educational hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H; Mohammadinia, Leila; Tavakoli, Nahid; Ghalriz, Parvin; Haghshenas, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays medical errors are one of the serious issues in the health-care system and carry to account of the patient's safety threat. The most important step for achieving safety promotion is identifying errors and their causes in order to recognize, correct and omit them. Concerning about repeating medical errors and harms, which were received via theses errors concluded to designing and establishing medical error reporting systems for hospitals and centers that are presenting therapeutic services. The aim of this study is the recognition of medical errors' reporting system dimensions in educational hospitals. This research is a descriptive-analytical and qualities' study, which has been carried out in Shahid Beheshti educational therapeutic center in Isfahan during 2012. In this study, relevant information was collected through 15 face to face interviews. That each of interviews take place in about 1hr and creation of five focused discussion groups through 45 min for each section, they were composed of Metron, educational supervisor, health officer, health education, and all of the head nurses. Concluded data interviews and discussion sessions were coded, then achieved results were extracted in the presence of clear-sighted persons and after their feedback perception, they were categorized. In order to make sure of information correctness, tables were presented to the research's interviewers and final the corrections were confirmed based on their view. The extracted information from interviews and discussion groups have been divided into nine main categories after content analyzing and subject coding and their subsets have been completely expressed. Achieved dimensions are composed of nine domains of medical error concept, error cases according to nurses' prospection, medical error reporting barriers, employees' motivational factors for error reporting, purposes of medical error reporting system, error reporting's challenges and opportunities, a desired system

  16. Balanced scorecard-based performance evaluation of Chinese county hospitals in underdeveloped areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongda; Chen, He; Feng, Jun; Qin, Xianjing; Wang, Xuan; Liang, Shenglin; Zhao, Jinmin; Feng, Qiming

    2018-05-01

    Objective Since the Guangxi government implemented public county hospital reform in 2009, there have been no studies of county hospitals in this underdeveloped area of China. This study aimed to establish an evaluation indicator system for Guangxi county hospitals and to generate recommendations for hospital development and policymaking. Methods A performance evaluation indicator system was developed based on balanced scorecard theory. Opinions were elicited from 25 experts from administrative units, universities and hospitals and the Delphi method was used to modify the performance indicators. The indicator system and the Topsis method were used to evaluate the performance of five county hospitals randomly selected from the same batch of 2015 Guangxi reform pilots. Results There were 4 first-level indicators, 9 second-level indicators and 36 third-level indicators in the final performance evaluation indicator system that showed good consistency, validity and reliability. The performance rank of the hospitals was B > E > A > C > D. Conclusions The performance evaluation indicator system established using the balanced scorecard is practical and scientific. Analysis of the results based on this indicator system identified several factors affecting hospital performance, such as resource utilisation efficiency, medical service price, personnel structure and doctor-patient relationships.

  17. Hospital information system institutionalization processes in indonesian public, government-owned and privately owned hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handayani, P W; Hidayanto, A N; Ayuningtyas, Dumilah; Budi, Indra

    2016-11-01

    The Hospital Information System (HIS) could help hospitals as a public entity to provide optimal health services. One of the main challenges of HIS implementation is an institutional change. Using institutional theory as the analytical lens, this study aims to explain the institutionalization of HIS as an instance of e-health initiatives in Indonesia. Furthermore, this paper aims for hospital management and researchers to improve the understanding of the social forces that influence hospital personnel's HIS acceptance within an organizational context. We use case studies from four public, government-owned hospitals and four privately owned (public and specialty) hospitals to explain the HIS institutionalization process by exploring the three concepts of institutional theory: institutional isomorphism, institutional logic, and institutional entrepreneurship. This study reveals that differences exist between public, government-owned and private hospitals with regard to the institutionalization process: public, government-owned hospitals' management is more motivated to implement HIS to comply with the regulations, while private hospitals' management views HIS as an urgent requirement that must be achieved. The study findings also reveal that various institutional isomorphism mechanisms and forms of institutional logic emerge during the process. Finally, three factors-self-efficacy, social influence, and management support-have a significant influence on the individual acceptance of HIS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Longitudinal analysis on the development of hospital quality management systems in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dückers, M.; Makai, P.; Vos, L.; Groenewegen, P.; Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Many changes have been initiated in the Dutch hospital sector to optimize health-care delivery: national agenda-setting, increased competition and transparency, a new system of hospital reimbursement based on diagnosis-treatment combinations, intensified monitoring of quality and a

  19. Use of closed systems in the Hospital Pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Forte Pérez-Minayo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the setting of the increasing use of closed systems for reconstitution and preparation of these drugs, we intend to analyze the correct use of these systems in the Hospital Pharmacy, with the objective to minimize the risks of exposure not only for those professionals directly involved, but also for all the staff in the unit, taking also into account efficiency criteria. Method: Since some systems protect against aerosol formation but not from vapours, we decided to review which cytostatics should be prepared using an awl with an air inlet valve, in order to implement a new working procedure. We reviewed the formulations available in our hospital, with the following criteria: method of administration, excipients, and potential hazard for the staff handling them. We measured the diameters of the vials. We selected drugs with Level 1 Risk and also those including alcohol-based excipients, which could generate vapours. Outcomes: Out of the 66 reviewed formulations, we concluded that 11 drugs should be reconstituted with this type of awl: busulfan, cabazitaxel, carmustine, cyclophosphamide, eribulin, etoposide, fotemustine, melphalan, paclitaxel, temsirolimus and thiotepa; these represented an 18% of the total volume of formulations. Conclusions: The selection of healthcare products must be done at the Hospital Pharmacy, because the use of a system with an air valve inlet only for those drugs selected led to an outcome of savings and a more efficient use of materials. In our experience, we confirmed that the use of the needle could only be avoided when the awl could adapt to the different formulations of cytostatics, and this is only possible when different types of awls are available. Besides, connections were only really closed when a single awl was used for each vial. The change in working methodology when handling these drugs, as a result of this study, will allow us to start different studies about environmental contamination as a

  20. 基于KPI在医院行政后勤部门的绩效考核管理体系构建%The Construction of Performance Appraisal Management System in the Hospital based on the KPI Administrative Departments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范艺馨; 续小霞; 张茹雪; 白靖平

    2015-01-01

    Performance appraisal has become a hot issue. How to carry out the performance appraisal,improve the work efficiency, promote the innovation in health service management,standard administrative behavior in the health functions of the administrative organs and institutions has become a major problem in the development of the hospital. A 3 armour hospital in xinjiang sets up logistics department performance appraisal to the administration management system from the BSC′s financial,customer,internal business and learning growth four aspects based on the KPI,so as to provide reference for other hospitals performance reform.%绩效考核已经成为热点问题。如何在卫生行政机关及事业单位职能部门开展绩效考核,提高工作效率,推进卫生事业管理创新,规范行政行为,已经成为医院发展中的重大难题。新疆某三甲医院主要从BSC的财务、客户、内部运营和学习成长4个方面出发,基于KPI建立针对行政后勤部门绩效考核管理体系,以期为其他医院绩效改革提供参考。

  1. A pancreaticoduodenectomy risk model derived from 8575 cases from a national single-race population (Japanese) using a web-based data entry system: the 30-day and in-hospital mortality rates for pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Wataru; Miyata, Hiroaki; Gotoh, Mitsukazu; Hirai, Ichiro; Kenjo, Akira; Kitagawa, Yuko; Shimada, Mitsuo; Baba, Hideo; Tomita, Naohiro; Nakagoe, Tohru; Sugihara, Kenichi; Mori, Masaki

    2014-04-01

    To create a mortality risk model after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) using a Web-based national database system. PD is a major gastroenterological surgery with relatively high mortality. Many studies have reported factors to analyze short-term outcomes. After initiation of National Clinical Database, approximately 1.2 million surgical cases from more than 3500 Japanese hospitals were collected through a Web-based data entry system. After data cleanup, 8575 PD patients (mean age, 68.2 years) recorded in 2011 from 1167 hospitals were analyzed using variables and definitions almost identical to those of American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. The 30-day postoperative and in-hospital mortality rates were 1.2% and 2.8% (103 and 239 patients), respectively. Thirteen significant risk factors for in-hospital mortality were identified: age, respiratory distress, activities of daily living within 30 days before surgery, angina, weight loss of more than 10%, American Society of Anesthesiologists class of greater than 3, Brinkman index of more than 400, body mass index of more than 25 kg/m, white blood cell count of more than 11,000 cells per microliter, platelet count of less than 120,000 per microliter, prothrombin time/international normalized ratio of more than 1.1, activated partial thromboplastin time of more than 40 seconds, and serum creatinine levels of more than 3.0 mg/dL. Five variables, including male sex, emergency surgery, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bleeding disorders, and serum urea nitrogen levels of less than 8.0 mg/dL, were independent variables in the 30-day mortality group. The overall PD complication rate was 40.0%. Grade B and C pancreatic fistulas in the International Study Group on Pancreatic Fistula occurred in 13.2% cases. The 30-day and in-hospital mortality rates for pancreatic cancer were significantly lower than those for nonpancreatic cancer. We conducted the reported risk stratification study for PD

  2. Implementation of a radiology information system in an University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Paulo Mazzoncini de Azevedo; Santos, Antonio Carlos; Elias Junior, Jorge; Trad, Clovis Simao; Goes, Wilson Moraes; Castro, Carlos Roberto de

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a radiology information system (RIS) developed and in the process of implementation in an University Hospital (Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirao Preto - Universidade de Sao Paulo) which integrates a plan for a 'filmless' radiology facility. (author)

  3. Capital Investment by Independent and System-Affiliated Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Nathan W.; Smith, Dean G.; Wheeler, John R. C.

    2015-01-01

    Capital expenditures are a critical part of hospitals’ efforts to maintain quality of patient care and financial stability. Over the past 20 years, finding capital to fund these expenditures has become increasingly challenging for hospitals, particularly independent hospitals. Independent hospitals struggling to find ways to fund necessary capital investment are often advised that their best strategy is to join a multi-hospital system. There is scant empirical evidence to support the idea that system membership improves independent hospitals’ ability to make capital expenditures. Using data from the American Hospital Association and Medicare Cost Reports, we use difference-in-difference methods to examine changes in capital expenditures for independent hospitals that joined multi-hospital systems between 1997 and 2008. We find that in the first 5 years after acquisition, capital expenditures increase by an average of almost $16 000 per bed annually, as compared with non-acquired hospitals. In later years, the difference in capital expenditure is smaller and not statistically significant. Our results do not suggest that increases in capital expenditures vary by asset age or the size of the acquiring system. PMID:26105571

  4. [Hospital clinical engineer orientation and function in the maintenance system of hospital medical equipment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Zheng, Yunxin; He, Dehua; Jiang, Ruiyao; Chen, Ying; Jing, Wei

    2012-03-01

    The quantity of medical equipment in hospital rise quickly recent year. It provides the comprehensive support to the clinical service. The maintenance of medical equipment becomes more important than before. It is necessary to study on the orientation and function of clinical engineer in medical equipment maintenance system. Refer to three grade health care system, the community doctors which is called General practitioner, play an important role as the gatekeeper of health care system to triage and cost control. The paper suggests that hospital clinical engineer should play similar role as the gatekeeper of medical equipment maintenance system which composed by hospital clinical engineer, manufacture engineer and third party engineer. The hospital clinical engineer should be responsible of guard a pass of medical equipment maintenance quality and cost control. As the gatekeeper, hospital clinical engineer should take the responsibility of "General engineer" and pay more attention to safety and health of medical equipment. The responsibility description and future transition? development of clinical engineer as "General Engineer" is discussed. More attention should be recommended to the team building of hospital clinical engineer as "General Engineer".

  5. Home-based intermediate care program vs hospitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Catherine Deri; Hogg, William E.; Lemelin, Jacques; Dahrouge, Simone; Martin, Carmel; Viner, Gary S.; Saginur, Raphael

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore whether a home-based intermediate care program in a large Canadian city lowers the cost of care and to look at whether such home-based programs could be a solution to the increasing demands on Canadian hospitals. DESIGN Single-arm study with historical controls. SETTING Department of Family Medicine at the Ottawa Hospital (Civic campus) in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS Patients requiring hospitalization for acute care. Participants were matched with historical controls based on case-mix, most responsible diagnosis, and level of complexity. INTERVENTIONS Placement in the home-based intermediate care program. Daily home visits from the nurse practitioner and 24-hour access to care by telephone. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Multivariate regression models were used to estimate the effect of the program on 5 outcomes: length of stay in hospital, cost of care substituted for hospitalization (Canadian dollars), readmission for a related diagnosis, readmission for any diagnosis, and costs incurred by community home-care services for patients following discharge from hospital. RESULTS The outcomes of 43 hospital admissions were matched with those of 363 controls. Patients enrolled in the program stayed longer in hospital (coefficient 3.3 days, P costs of home-based care were not significantly different from the costs of hospitalization (coefficient -$501, P = .11). CONCLUSION While estimated cost savings were not statistically significant, the limitations of our study suggest that we underestimated these savings. In particular, the economic inefficiencies of a small immature program and the inability to control for certain factors when selecting historical controls affected our results. Further research is needed to determine the economic effect of mature home-based programs. PMID:18208958

  6. Does family-based treatment reduce the need for hospitalization in adolescent anorexia nervosa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, James; Agras, W Stewart; Bryson, S W; Brandt, Harry; Halmi, Katherine A; Kaye, Walter; Wilfley, Denise; Woodside, Blake; Pajarito, Sarah; Jo, Booil

    2016-09-01

    We examined the timing and number of days of hospitalization during the course of treatment, hospitalization effects on outcome, and predictors and moderators of the use of hospitalization in adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN). Data used in this study were collected from 158 adolescents (ages 12 to 18 years of age) who met DSM-IVTR criteria for AN (exclusive of the amenorrhea criteria) randomized to receive either Family Based Treatment (FBT) or Systemic Family Therapy (SyFT) in a 7 site study. The trajectory of hospital day use is similar in the first 5 weeks irrespective of treatment allocation. However, days of hospitalization continued to increase throughout SyFT but leveled off in FBT after ∼5 weeks of treatment. Early hospitalization was a negative predictor for improvements in percent weight change for both treatment groups (t(1)=2.6, p = 0.011). Co-morbid psychopathology predicted early hospital use in both treatments. Higher levels of eating related obsessions and depression moderated hospitalization rates suggesting that FBT reduces early hospitalization rates compared to SyFT for these subgroups. These data support and extend findings from previous studies by identifying patterns of hospital use, and predictors and moderators of treatment effect for early hospitalization use in adolescent AN. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.(Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:891-894). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Factors Affecting Successful Implementation of Hospital Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzandipur, Mehrdad; Jeddi, Fatemeh Rangraz; Azimi, Esmaeil

    2016-02-01

    Today, the use of information systems in health environments, like any other fields, is necessary and organizational managers are convinced to use these systems. However, managers' satisfaction is not the only factor in successfully implementing these systems and failed information technology projects (IT) are reported despite the consent of the directors. Therefore, this study aims to determine the factors affecting the successful implementation of a hospital information system. The study was carried out as a descriptive method in 20 clinical hospitals that the hospital information system (HIS) was conducted in them. The clinical and paraclinical users of mentioned hospitals are the study group. 400 people were chosen as samples in scientific method and the data was collected using a questionnaire consisted of three main human, managerial and organizational, and technological factors, by questionnaire and interview. Then the data was scored in Likert scale (score of 1 to 5) and were analyzed using the SPSS software. About 75 percent of the population were female, with average work experience of 10 years and the mean age was 30 years. The human factors affecting the success of hospital information system implementation achieved the mean score of 3.5, both organizational and managerial factors 2.9 and technological factors the mean of 3. Human factors including computer skills, perceiving usefulness and perceiving the ease of a hospital information system use are more effective on the acceptance and successful implementation of hospital information systems; then the technological factors play a greater role. It is recommended that for the successful implementation of hospital information systems, most of these factors to be considered.

  8. Hospital-based school for children with chronic illness in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Der-Fang; Tsai, Tsuen-Chiuan; Su, Yu-Tsun; Lin, Chi-Wei

    2015-10-01

    To provide educational support and avoid unwanted damage that may impede learning for children with chronic illness, the learning environment should be friendly and safe. There is a need to establish schools inside hospitals, however, which may be neglected in a highly efficient health care system. A study was conducted to identify hospital-based schools for sick children in Taiwan, and to explore the barriers for implementation. The data were collected by structured telephone interview and retrieval of hospital web information. The study targeted social workers and nurses in the pediatric wards of 29 hospitals, plus officials from the Education Bureau in Taiwan. The interviewers inquired about the availability of a formal educational program inside hospitals and the barriers (if any) in providing educational supports. Taiwan has only one hospital-based informal school and eight hospitals with rotating bedside teachers. Education inside hospitals occurs mostly through voluntary teaching in informal education models. Information about special educational resources has not been widely distributed to patients and health care providers. Professional personnel in Taiwan are not well aware of the needs to establish a hospital-based school. The educational needs of children with chronic illness can be easily neglected even in an industrialized country. The establishment of policy and the enrichment of professional education on advocacy are necessary to eliminate educational inequities and benefit sick children. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Performance: Do Organizational and Market Characteristics Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Aaron; Edwardson, Nick; Zhao, Mei

    The hospital value-based purchasing (HVBP) program of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services challenges hospitals to deliver high-quality care or face a reduction in Medicare payments. How do different organizational structures and market characteristics enable or inhibit successful transition to this new model of value-based care? To address that question, this study employs an institutional theory lens to test whether certain organizational structures and market characteristics mediate hospitals' ability to perform across HVBP domains.Data from the 2014 American Hospital Association Annual Survey Database, Area Health Resource File, the Medicare Hospital Compare Database, and the association between external environment and hospital performance are assessed through multiple regression analysis. Results indicate that hospitals that belong to a system are more likely than independent hospitals to score highly on the domains associated with the HVBP incentive arrangement. However, varying and sometimes counterintuitive market influences bring different dimensions to the HVBP program. A hospital's ability to score well in this new value arrangement may be heavily based on the organization's ability to learn from others, implement change, and apply the appropriate amount of control in various markets.

  10. [Newly Designed Water Treatment Systems for Hospital Effluent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Takashi

    2018-01-01

     Pharmaceuticals are indispensable to contemporary life. Recently, the emerging problem of pharmaceutical-based pollution of river environments, including drinking water sources and lakes, has begun to receive significant attention worldwide. Because pharmaceuticals are designed to perform specific physiological functions in targeted regions of the human body, there is increasing concern regarding their toxic effects, even at low concentrations, on aquatic ecosystems and human health, via residues in drinking water. Pharmaceuticals are consistently employed in hospitals to treat disease; and Japan, one of the most advanced countries in medical treatment, ranks second worldwide in the quantity of pharmaceuticals employed. Therefore, the development of technologies that minimize or lessen the related environmental risks for clinical effluent is an important task as well as that for sewage treatment plants (STPs). However, there has been limited research on clinical effluent, and much remains to be elucidated. In light of this, we are investigating the occurrence of pharmaceuticals, and the development of water treatment systems for clinical effluent. This review discusses the current research on clinical effluent and the development of advanced water treatment systems targeted at hospital effluent, and explores strategies for future environmental risk assessment and risk management.

  11. Performance of interventional procedures in a day-hospital system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Jae Ik; Park, Auh Whan; Cho, Hye Seon; Park, Eun Hee; Choi, Gap Suk; Lee, Seon Ju; Kim, Yong Woo; Juhn, Je Ryang

    2007-01-01

    We wanted to describe the practice and results of applying the day-hospital system in an interventional radiology clinic. From Oct. 2004 to Dec. 2005, the day-hospital system was applied to various interventional procedures with using a part of the recovery room of an angiography suite as a facility for hospital admission. The study included 91 cases in 73 patients. The source of the patient referral, the procedures, hospital courses and complications were analyzed and questionnaire surveys were conducted for the available 55 patients. Among the patients, 70% (n=64) were referred form other departments, 5% (n=5) from other hospitals, 5% (n=4) were new patients and 20% (n=18) were re-admissions. The procedures included gastrointestinal, biliary, urinary, hemodialysis related-and implantable port related interventions. 96% (n=87) of the patients were successfully discharged in a day and admission to the general ward was only 4% (n=4). Minor complications occurred after discharges in 3% (n=3). The questionnaire survey revealed that 96% (n=53) of the patients were satisfied with the service and they were not anxious after discharge. Most of common interventional procedures were safely done under the day-hospital system with the patients being highly satisfied. The day-hospital system can be a good tool for establishing admitting privileges for an interventional radiology clinic

  12. Hospital incident command system (HICS performance in Iran; decision making during disasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djalali Ahmadreza

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospitals are cornerstones for health care in a community and must continue to function in the face of a disaster. The Hospital Incident Command System (HICS is a method by which the hospital operates when an emergency is declared. Hospitals are often ill equipped to evaluate the strengths and vulnerabilities of their own management systems before the occurrence of an actual disaster. The main objective of this study was to measure the decision making performance according to HICS job actions sheets using tabletop exercises. Methods This observational study was conducted between May 1st 2008 and August 31st 2009. Twenty three Iranian hospitals were included. A tabletop exercise was developed for each hospital which in turn was based on the highest probable risk. The job action sheets of the HICS were used as measurements of performance. Each indicator was considered as 1, 2 or 3 in accordance with the HICS. Fair performance was determined as Results None of the participating hospitals had a hospital disaster management plan. The performance according to HICS was intermediate for 83% (n = 19 of the participating hospitals. No hospital had a high level of performance. The performance level for the individual sections was intermediate or fair, except for the logistic and finance sections which demonstrated a higher level of performance. The public hospitals had overall higher performances than university hospitals (P = 0.04. Conclusions The decision making performance in the Iranian hospitals, as measured during table top exercises and using the indicators proposed by HICS was intermediate to poor. In addition, this study demonstrates that the HICS job action sheets can be used as a template for measuring the hospital response. Simulations can be used to assess preparedness, but the correlation with outcome remains to be studied.

  13. Incidences and variations of hospital acquired venous thromboembolism in Australian hospitals: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assareh, Hassan; Chen, Jack; Ou, Lixin; Hillman, Ken; Flabouris, Arthas

    2016-09-22

    Data on hospital-acquired venous thromboembolism (HA-VTE) incidence, case fatality rate and variation amongst patient groups and health providers is lacking. We aim to explore HA-VTE incidences, associated mortality, trends and variations across all acute hospitals in New South Wales (NSW)-Australia. A population-based study using all admitted patients (aged 18-90 with a length of stay of at least two days and not transferred to another acute care facility) in 104 NSW acute public and private hospitals during 2002-2009. Poisson mixed models were used to derive adjusted rate ratios (IRR) in presence of patient and hospital characteristics. Amongst, 3,331,677 patients, the incidence of HA-VTE was 11.45 per 1000 patients and one in ten who developed HA-VTE died in hospital. HA-VTE incidence, initially rose, but subsequently declined, whereas case fatality rate consistently declined by 22 % over the study period. Surgical patients were 128 % (IRR = 2.28, 95 % CI: 2.19-2.38) more likely to develop HA-VTE, but had similar case fatality rates compared to medical patients. Private hospitals, in comparison to public hospitals had a higher incidence of HA-VTE (IRR = 1.76; 95 % CI: 1.42-2.18) for medical patients. However, they had a similar incidence (IRR = 0.91; 95 % CI: 0.75-1.11), but a lower mortality (IRR = 0.59; 95 % CI: 0.47-0.75) amongst surgical patients. Smaller public hospitals had a lower HA-VTE incidence rate compared to larger hospitals (IRR  1.71). Hospitals with a lower reported HA-VTE incidence tended to have a higher HA-VTE case fatality rate. Despite the decline in HA-VTE incidence and case fatality, there were large variations in incidents between medical and surgical patients, public and private hospitals, and different hospital groups. The causes of such differences warrant further investigation and may provide potential for targeted interventions and quality improvement initiatives.

  14. Introduction of voluntary environmental management systems into the Spanish hospital network: current state (2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio García Vicente

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hospitals produce vast amounts of waste and are large consumers of energy and natural resources. However, do they worry about environmental health? With this question in mind, and in order to approach hospital environmental practices, the introduction into the Spanish hospital network of the most accepted certified environmental management systems (CEMS, such as ISO 14001 and EMAS, was evaluated so as to obtain a point of reference for environmental practices in our National Health System as no up-to-date, specific official register exists. To this end, a list of hospitals by Spanish Autonomous Community having CEMS in force in 2015 was drawn up using official databases, evaluating information and conducting fieldwork. We found that 18.9 % of hospitals had CEMS (ISO 14001 in all cases: 149 out of 787 hospitals, in the National Hospitals Catalogue, especially in Madrid (40 and Andalusia (37. Eighty-one of the certified hospitals are private. Only 23 had EMAS: 12 are public and 11 private. The resulting “map” shows the main references in order for the need to offer citizens a balance between healthcare and environmental friendliness, to be compared and envisaged based on hospital activity, considering hospitals socially responsible, environmentally friendly organisations, that seek leadership in the field of environmental sustainability together with other sectors (environmental, engineering, industrial.

  15. Hospital information systems: experience at the fully digitized Seoul National University Bundang Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Hwang, Hee; Jheon, Sanghoon

    2016-08-01

    The different levels of health information technology (IT) adoption and its integration into hospital workflow can affect the maximization of the benefits of using of health IT. We aimed at sharing our experiences and the journey to the successful adoption of health IT over 13 years at a tertiary university hospital in South Korea. The integrated system of comprehensive applications for direct care, support care, and smart care has been implemented with the latest IT and a rich user information platform, achieving the fully digitized hospital. The users experience design methodology, barcode and radio-frequency identification (RFID) technologies, smartphone and mobile technologies, and data analytics were integrated into hospital workflow. Applications for user-centered electronic medical record (EMR) and clinical decision support (CDS), closed loop medication administration (CLMA), mobile EMR and dashboard system for care coordination, clinical data warehouse (CDW) system, and patient engagement solutions were designed and developed to improve quality of care, work efficiency, and patient safety. We believe that comprehensive electronic health record systems and patient-centered smart hospital applications will go a long way in ensuring seamless patient care and experience.

  16. An analysis of the adoption of managerial innovation: cost accounting systems in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glandon, G L; Counte, M A

    1995-11-01

    The adoption of new medical technologies has received significant attention in the hospital industry, in part, because of its observed relation to hospital cost increases. However, few comprehensive studies exist regarding the adoption of non-medical technologies in the hospital setting. This paper develops and tests a model of the adoption of a managerial innovation, new to the hospital industry, that of cost accounting systems based upon standard costs. The conceptual model hypothesizes that four organizational context factors (size, complexity, ownership and slack resources) and two environmental factors (payor mix and interorganizational dependency) influence hospital adoption of cost accounting systems. Based on responses to a mail survey of hospitals in the Chicago area and AHA annual survey information for 1986, a sample of 92 hospitals was analyzed. Greater hospital size, complexity, slack resources, and interorganizational dependency all were associated with adoption. Payor mix had no significant influence and the hospital ownership variables had a mixed influence. The logistic regression model was significant overall and explained over 15% of the variance in the adoption decision.

  17. DYSELECTROLYTEMIA IN ELDERLY: A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanushree

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Dyselectrolytemia is a common problem affecting elderly hospitalised patients. Although hypo/hypernatremia is the most common electrolyte abnormality found in elderly, abnormalities in other electrolytes may also occur in various settings. Information regarding the pattern of electrolyte abnormalities in elderly is lacking in this part of the country. With this background the following case control study was taken up with the following aims and objectives. OBJECTIVES • To study the various patterns of dyselectrolytemia in elderly and compare them with young. • To evaluate and compare the various aetiological factors and comorbid conditions involved in the occurrence of electrolyte abnormalities in these groups of patients. RESULTS The mean age of the study population was 66.174 years (SD- 6.512 years and of the control group was 41.94 years (SD - 10.924 years. Hyponatraemia was the most common electrolyte abnormality encountered in both the groups (57% vs. 60%, p- 0.61. The incidence of hyperkalaemia was significantly higher in the older age group (19.5% vs. 11.5%, p-0.03. Also, in the elderly, the presence of abnormalities in more than one electrolyte level was significantly higher than the young (25.5% vs. 14%, p -0.005. The average length of hospital stay in the elderly was 10.05 days (SD- 4.40 days whereas in the young was 6.35 days (SD- 3.27 days, p <0.0001. The mortality rate was also significantly higher in the elderly group (16% vs. 3.5%, p<0.0001. CONCLUSION Dyselectrolytemia is a common pathological condition encountered in the elderly population which is associated with a very high morbidity and mortality when compared with the young. Hence, elderly patients particularly with associated comorbid conditions should be screened routinely for the presence of associated electrolyte disturbances.

  18. Changing patient classification system for hospital reimbursement in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, Ciprian-Paul; Chiriac, Delia Nona; Vladescu, Cristian

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of the change in the diagnosis-related group (DRG) system on patient morbidity and hospital financial performance in the Romanian public health care system. Three variables were assessed before and after the classification switch in July 2007: clinical outcomes, the case mix index, and hospital budgets, using the database of the National School of Public Health and Health Services Management, which contains data regularly received from hospitals reimbursed through the Romanian DRG scheme (291 in 2009). The lack of a Romanian system for the calculation of cost-weights imposed the necessity to use an imported system, which was criticized by some clinicians for not accurately reflecting resource consumption in Romanian hospitals. The new DRG classification system allowed a more accurate clinical classification. However, it also exposed a lack of physicians' knowledge on diagnosing and coding procedures, which led to incorrect coding. Consequently, the reported hospital morbidity changed after the DRG switch, reflecting an increase in the national case-mix index of 25% in 2009 (compared with 2007). Since hospitals received the same reimbursement over the first two years after the classification switch, the new DRG system led them sometimes to change patients' diagnoses in order to receive more funding. Lack of oversight of hospital coding and reporting to the national reimbursement scheme allowed the increase in the case-mix index. The complexity of the new classification system requires more resources (human and financial), better monitoring and evaluation, and improved legislation in order to achieve better hospital resource allocation and more efficient patient care.

  19. A Multi-Modal Digital Game-Based Learning Environment for Hospitalized Children with Chronic Illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jui-Chih; Tsuei, Mengping

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the digital game-based learning for children with chronic illnesses in the hospital settings. The design-based research and qualitative methods were applied. Three eight-year-old children with leukemia participated in this study. In the first phase, the multi-user game-based learning system was developed and…

  20. Challenges of using Hospital Information Systems by nurses: comparing academic and non-academic hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian, Leila; Dorosti, Nafise; Khajouei, Reza; Gohari, Sadrieh Hajesmaeel

    2017-06-01

    Hospital Information Systems (HIS) are used for easy access to information, improvement of documentation and reducing errors. Nonetheless, using these systems is faced with some barriers and obstacles. This study identifies the challenges and the obstacles of using these systems in the academic and non-academic hospitals in Kerman. This is a cross-sectional study which was carried out in 2015. The statistical population in this study consisted of the nurses who had been working in the academic and non-academic hospitals in Kerman. A questionnaire consisting of two sections was used. The first section consisted of the demographic information of the participants and the second section comprised 34 questions about the challenges of HIS use. Data were analyzed by the descriptive and statistical analysis (t-test, and ANOVA) using SPSS 19 software. The most common and important challenges in the academic hospitals were about human environment factors, particularly "negative attitude of society toward using HIS". In the non-academic hospitals, the most common and important challenges were related to human factors, and among them, "no incentive to use system" was the main factor. The results of the t-test method revealed that there was a significant relationship between gender and the mean score of challenges related to the organizational environment category in the academic hospitals and between familiarity with HIS and mean score of human environment factors (pinformation systems are the factors related to the human environment and the human factors. The results of this study can bring a good perspective to the policy makers and the managers regarding obstacles of using HISs from the nurses' perspective, so that they can solve their problems and can successfully implement these systems.

  1. Impact of 2015 earthquakes on a local hospital in Nepal: A prospective hospital-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Samita; Risnes, Kari; Uleberg, Oddvar; Rogne, Tormod; Shrestha, Sanu Krishna; Nygaard, Øystein Petter; Koju, Rajendra; Solligård, Erik

    2018-01-01

    Natural disasters pose a great challenge to the health systems and individual health facilities. In low-resource settings, disaster preparedness systems are often limited and not been well described. Two devastating earthquakes hit Nepal within a 17-days period in 2015. This study aims to describe the burden and distribution of emergency cases to a local hospital. This is a prospective observational study of patients presenting to a local hospital for a period of 21 days following the earthquake on April 25, 2015. Demographic and clinical information was prospectively registered for all patients in the systematic emergency registry. Systematic telephone interviews were conducted in a random sample of the patients 90 days after admission to the hospital. A total of 2,003 emergency patients were registered during the period. The average daily number of emergency patients during the first five days was almost five times higher (n = 150) than the pre-incident daily average (n = 35). The majority of injuries were fractures (58%), 348 (56%) in the lower extremities. A total of 345 surgical procedures were performed and the hospital treated 111 patients with severe injuries related to the earthquake (compartment syndrome, crush injury, and internal injury). Among those with follow-up interviews, over 90% reported that they had been severely affected by the earthquakes; complete house damage, living in temporary shelter, or loss of close family member. The hospital experienced a very high caseload during the first days, and the majority of patients needed orthopaedic services. The proportion of severely injured and in-hospital deaths were relatively low, probably indicating that the most severely injured did not reach the hospital in time. The experiences underline the need for robust and easily available local health services that can respond to disasters.

  2. Hospital charitable lotteries: taking a gamble on systems thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Jennifer

    2013-12-01

    The presence of lotteries can be witnessed worldwide. Charitable lotteries are often portrayed as 'good works', and recently, hospitals have utilized them as a popular fundraising vehicle to raise necessary funds to help achieve organizational goals and objectives. Research indicates that lotteries contribute to gambling-related harms; however, research into charitable lotteries has been underdeveloped. Both the gambling and the health care industries are complex and evolving, consisting of many interacting stakeholders with often different and competing interests. This article seeks to present systems thinking as a conceptual framework to help fill the gap in understanding the use of gambling within hospitals and its possible benefits and unforeseen negative consequences. Addressing the gap in knowledge is important to help inform decision making aimed at reducing gambling-related harms. This article proposes how the school of systems thinking, specifically framing hospitals as complex adaptive systems and system dynamics modelling, can be utilized to understand the policy implications of the adoption of lotteries as a revenue source for hospitals. Hospitals have a duty to care, inform and protect. Hospital charitable lotteries have become big business; however, its incorporation into critical funding strategies needs to be carefully understood. Systems thinking theory and methodologies provide an integrated approach to examine this dynamic and evolving fundraising initiative. Findings from this article can inform the development of action strategies, including policy development at multiple levels. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Comparative analytics of infusion pump data across multiple hospital systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlin, Ann Christine; Malloy, William X; Arthur, Karen J; Gaston, Cindy; Young, James; Fernando, Sudheera; Fernando, Ruchith

    2015-02-15

    A Web-based analytics system for conducting inhouse evaluations and cross-facility comparisons of alert data generated by smart infusion pumps is described. The Infusion Pump Informatics (IPI) project, a collaborative effort led by research scientists at Purdue University, was launched in 2009 to provide advanced analytics and tools for workflow analyses to assist hospitals in determining the significance of smart-pump alerts and reducing nuisance alerts. The IPI system allows facility-specific analyses of alert patterns and trends, as well as cross-facility comparisons of alert data uploaded by more than 55 participating institutions using different types of smart pumps. Tools accessible through the IPI portal include (1) charts displaying aggregated or breakout data on the top drugs associated with alerts, numbers of alerts per device or care area, and override-to-alert ratios, (2) investigative reports that can be used to characterize and analyze pump-programming errors in a variety of ways (e.g., by drug, by infusion type, by time of day), and (3) "drill-down" workflow analytics enabling users to evaluate alert patterns—both internally and in relation to patterns at other hospitals—in a quick and efficient stepwise fashion. The formation of the IPI analytics system to support a community of hospitals has been successful in providing sophisticated tools for member facilities to review, investigate, and efficiently analyze smart-pump alert data, not only within a member facility but also across other member facilities, to further enhance smart pump drug library design. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Comprehensive Program to Reduce Rates of Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcers in a System of Community Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englebright, Jane; Westcott, Ruth; McManus, Kathryn; Kleja, Kacie; Helm, Colleen; Korwek, Kimberly M; Perlin, Jonathan B

    2018-03-01

    The prevention of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (PrUs) has significant consequences for patient outcomes and the cost of care. Providers are challenged with evaluating available evidence and best practices, then implementing programs and motivating change in various facility environments. In a large system of community hospitals, the Reducing Hospital Acquired-PrUs Program was developed to provide a toolkit of best practices, timely and appropriate data for focusing efforts, and continuous implementation support. Baseline data on PrU rates helped focus efforts on the most vulnerable patients and care situations. Facilities were empowered to use and adapt available resources to meet local needs and to share best practices for implementation across the system. Outcomes were measured by the rate of hospital-acquired PrUs, as gathered from patient discharge records. The rate of hospital-acquired stage III and IV PrUs decreased 66.3% between 2011 and 2013. Of the 149 participating facilities, 40 (27%) had zero hospital-acquired stage III and IV PrUs and 77 (52%) had a reduction in their PrU rate. Rates of all PrUs documented as present on admission did not change during this period. A comparison of different strategies used by the most successful facilities illustrated the necessity of facility-level flexibility and recognition of local workflows and patient demographics. Driven by the combination of a repository of evidence-based tools and best practices, readily available data on PrU rates, and local flexibility with processes, the Reducing Hospital Acquired-PrUs Program represents the successful operationalization of improvement in a wide variety of facilities.

  5. Is There a Relationship Between Value-Based Purchasing and Hospital Profitability? An Exploratory Study of Missouri Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jason S; Broom, Kevin D; Counte, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Recent US legislation is attempting to transition inpatient Medicare payments to a value-based purchasing (VBP) program. The VBP program is a pay-for-performance (P4P) system that incentivizes hospitals to improve patient satisfaction, health outcomes, and adherence to clinical protocols while simultaneously holding down costs. Our study evaluates (1) the impact of financial performance on the VBP adjustments and (2) whether there is a correlation between the VBP adjustment and the financial performance of Missouri hospitals that opted into the program. While upward and downward adjustments to the inpatient base rate may be related to hospital financial performance, prior financial performance may also be related to the adjustments. Financial health may allow facilities to invest and position the hospital for favorable future P4P adjustments. The results of our analysis indicate the VBP adjustment to the inpatient base rate is very small (±0.18%), clustered around zero, and is not correlated with financial performance. We also find that financial performance and improvement in the years prior to the adjustment are not related to the VBP adjustment or its respective components. This suggests that CMS is avoiding penalizing less profitable facilities, but the adjustment is also so small and tightly clustered around zero that it is failing to provide an adequate incentive to hospitals. The costs of improving patient satisfaction, clinical process adherence, health care outcomes, and efficiency above that of peers coupled with the growing number of metrics being used to calculate the VBP adjustments call into question the financial incentives of the hospital VBP program.

  6. A hospital-based cost minimization study of the potential financial impact on the UK health care system of introduction of iron isomaltoside 1000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Bhandari

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Sunil BhandariDepartment of Renal Medicine, Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals National Health Service Trust and Hull York Medical School, Kingston upon Hull, UKBackground: The clinical need to be able to administer high doses of intravenous iron conveniently in a single rapid infusion has been addressed by the recent introduction of ferric carboxymaltose and subsequently iron isomaltoside 1000. Neither requires a test dose. Ferric carboxymaltose can be administered at 15 mg/kg body weight to a maximum dose of 1000 mg, whereas iron isomaltoside 1000 can be administered at 20 mg/kg body weight. The ability to give high doses of iron is important in the context of managing iron deficiency anemia in a number of clinical conditions where demands for iron are high (including chronic blood loss associated with inflammatory bowel disease, menorrhagia, and chronic kidney disease. It is also an important component in the strategy as an alternative to a blood transfusion. Affordability is a key issue for health services.Methods: This study was a comparative analysis of the costs of administering the newly available intravenous iron formulations against standard practice (blood transfusion, intravenous iron sucrose by considering the cost of this treatment option plus nursing costs associated with administration, equipment for administration, and patient transportation in the secondary care (hospital setting across three dosage levels (600 mg, 1000 mg, and 1600 mg.Results and conclusion: The analysis indicates that the use of iron isomaltoside 1000 results in a net saving when compared with iron sucrose, blood, and ferric carboxymaltose. At 600 mg and 1000 mg doses, it is cheaper than low-molecular-weight iron dextran but more expensive at a dose of 1600 mg. However, it takes six hours to administer low-molecular-weight iron dextran at this dose level, which is inconvenient and reduces patient throughput (productivity.Keywords: iron isomaltoside 1000, iron

  7. Evaluation of the medical records system in an upcoming teaching hospital-a project for improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B Deepak; Kumari, C M Vinaya; Sharada, M S; Mangala, M S

    2012-08-01

    The medical records system of an upcoming teaching hospital in a developing nation was evaluated for its accessibility, completeness, physician satisfaction, presence of any lacunae, suggestion of necessary steps for improvisation and to emphasize the importance of Medical records system in education and research work. The salient aspects of the medical records department were evaluated based on a questionnaire which was evaluated by a team of 40 participants-30 doctors, 5 personnel from Medical Records Department and 5 from staff of Hospital administration. Most of the physicians (65%) were partly satisfied with the existing medical record system. 92.5% were of the opinion that upgradation of the present system is necessary. The need of the hour in the present teaching hospital is the implementation of a hospital-wide patient registration and medical records re-engineering process in the form of electronic medical records system and regular review by the audit commission.

  8. Nurse Staffing Calculation in the Emergency Department - Performance-Oriented Calculation Based on the Manchester Triage System at the University Hospital Bonn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo Gräff

    Full Text Available To date, there are no valid statistics regarding the number of full time staff necessary for nursing care in emergency departments in Europe.Staff requirement calculations were performed using state-of-the art procedures which take both fluctuating patient volume and individual staff shortfall rates into consideration. In a longitudinal observational study, the average nursing staff engagement time per patient was assessed for 503 patients. For this purpose, a full-time staffing calculation was estimated based on the five priority levels of the Manchester Triage System (MTS, taking into account specific workload fluctuations (50th-95th percentiles.Patients classified to the MTS category red (n = 35 required the most engagement time with an average of 97.93 min per patient. On weighted average, for orange MTS category patients (n = 118, nursing staff were required for 85.07 min, for patients in the yellow MTS category (n = 181, 40.95 min, while the two MTS categories with the least acute patients, green (n = 129 and blue (n = 40 required 23.18 min and 14.99 min engagement time per patient, respectively. Individual staff shortfall due to sick days and vacation time was 20.87% of the total working hours. When extrapolating this to 21,899 (2010 emergency patients, 67-123 emergency patients (50-95% percentile per month can be seen by one nurse. The calculated full time staffing requirement depending on the percentiles was 14.8 to 27.1.Performance-oriented staff planning offers an objective instrument for calculation of the full-time nursing staff required in emergency departments.

  9. The Research and Exploration of the Integration Platform of Hospital Information System Based on Ensemble%基于Ensemble的医院信息系统集成平台的研究与探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹茂诚; 陈旭; 何及夫; 牛启润

    2012-01-01

    目的:在医院内部信息系统集成方面,传统点对点接口通信模式存在系统耦合度高,系统整体稳定性和安全性难以预测和控制等隐患.不同业务系统之间难以实现数据交换与资源共享.如何打造一个稳定、高效、安全、可管理的集成平台,以满足不断变化的应用需求是一个亟待解决的问题.方法:将Ensemble集成平台技术引入到医院信息化建设中进行研究是一项非常有意义的工作,在分析传统点对点接口通信模式不足的基础上,文章结合Ensemble集成平台技术,建立了以病人为中心的统一视图,实现了跨平台的数据交换与共享.结果:通过Ensemble集成平台技术建立了以患者就诊流程为核心的内部信息共享交互平台,实现了全院数据交换与共享,消除了“信息孤岛”,实现了新业务应用的快速部署.结论:Ensemble集成平台技术为医院业务变革提供了灵活的、快速实施和部署的系统架构,实现了医疗信息的交换与共享,优化了服务流程,提高了医院运营效率,满足了医院信息化可持续发展.%Objective: In the integration of hospital internal information system, the traditional point to point interface of communication mode exist high coupling of systems, also have many hidden trouble in the stability and safety of global system that are hard to foresee and control. It is difficult to exchange data and share resource in different business systems. How to build a stable, efficient, safety and control integration to meet the changing application requirements is a problem to be solved imperatively. Methods: Introducing integration platform of ensemble into hospital information construction is a significant and valuable work, based on the deficiency of traditional point to point interface of communication mode, combined with integration platform of ensemble, contribute to build "patient-centered" unified view, realize the data exchange and resource

  10. Determinants of quality management systems implementation in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardhani, Viera; Utarini, Adi; van Dijk, Jitse Pieter; Post, Doeke; Groothoff, Johan Willem

    2009-03-01

    To identify the problems and facilitating factors in the implementation of quality management system (QMS) in hospitals through a systematic review. A search strategy was performed on the Medline database for articles written in English published between 1992 and early 2006. Using the thesaurus terms 'Total Quality Management' and 'Quality Assurance Health Care', combined with the term 'hospital' and 'implement*', we identified 533 publications. The screening process was based on empirical articles describing organization-wide QMS implementation. Fourteen empirical articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were reviewed in this paper. An organization culture emphasizing standards and values associated with affiliation, teamwork and innovation, assumption of change and risk taking, play as the key success factor in QMS implementation. This culture needs to be supported by sufficient technical competence to apply a scientific problem-solving approach. A clear distribution of QMS function within the organizational structure is more important than establishing a formal quality structure. In addition to management leadership, physician involvement also plays an important role in implementing QMS. Six supporting and limiting factors determining QMS implementation are identified in this review. These are the organization culture, design, leadership for quality, physician involvement, quality structure and technical competence.

  11. What happens in hospitals does not stay in hospitals: antibiotic-resistant bacteria in hospital wastewater systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocquet, D; Muller, A; Bertrand, X

    2016-08-01

    Hospitals are hotspots for antimicrobial-resistant bacteria (ARB) and play a major role in both their emergence and spread. Large numbers of these ARB will be ejected from hospitals via wastewater systems. In this review, we present quantitative and qualitative data of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli, vancomycin-resistant enterococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in hospital wastewaters compared to community wastewaters. We also discuss the fate of these ARB in wastewater treatment plants and in the downstream environment. Published studies have shown that hospital effluents contain ARB, the burden of these bacteria being dependent on their local prevalence. The large amounts of antimicrobials rejected in wastewater exert a continuous selective pressure. Only a few countries recommend the primary treatment of hospital effluents before their discharge into the main wastewater flow for treatment in municipal wastewater treatment plants. Despite the lack of conclusive data, some studies suggest that treatment could favour the ARB, notably ESBL-producing E. coli. Moreover, treatment plants are described as hotspots for the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes between bacterial species. Consequently, large amounts of ARB are released in the environment, but it is unclear whether this release contributes to the global epidemiology of these pathogens. It is reasonable, nevertheless, to postulate that it plays a role in the worldwide progression of antibiotic resistance. Antimicrobial resistance should now be seen as an 'environmental pollutant', and new wastewater treatment processes must be assessed for their capability in eliminating ARB, especially from hospital effluents. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Value-based purchasing and hospital acquired conditions: are we seeing improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Aaron; Zhao, Mei; Haley, D Rob

    2014-12-01

    To determine if the Value-Based Purchasing Performance Scoring system correlates with hospital acquired condition quality indicators. This study utilizes the following secondary data sources: the American Hospital Association (AHA) annual survey and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) Value-Based Purchasing and Hospital Acquired Conditions databases. Zero-inflated negative binomial regression was used to examine the effect of CMS total performance score on counts of hospital acquired conditions. Hospital structure variables including size, ownership, teaching status, payer mix, case mix, and location were utilized as control variables. The secondary data sources were merged into a single database using Stata 10. Total performance scores, which are used to determine if hospitals should receive incentive money, do not correlate well with quality outcome in the form of hospital acquired conditions. Value-based purchasing does not appear to correlate with improved quality and patient safety as indicated by Hospital Acquired Condition (HAC) scores. This leads us to believe that either the total performance score does not measure what it should, or the quality outcome measurements do not reflect the quality of the total performance scores measure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An Evaluation of the Management Information System and Technology in Hospitals (GESITI/Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio José Balloni

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The research project "Management of System and Information Technology in Hospitals" (GESITI/Hospitals has the purpose of mapping out the management of Information Systems (IS and Information Technology (IT in hospitals. By applying a multifocal prospective questionnaire in hospitals, the research aims to identify the hospitals need and demand, prospecting for unfolding, and generate a public integrated research report for supporting public and/or private decisions-makings. The ultimate result from this GESITI/Health research project should be a significant improvement on the hospital management and on the decisions-makings, which must reflect on peoples more satisfied regarding a better health care. Therefore, this paper aims to publish the main ideas of the GESITI/Health project i.e., its "Methodology & original Prospective Questionnaire (PQ". The methodology used is the Interpretative (or Introspective. About the PQ, we do not known, up to this date, who have developed a multifocal broad field tool -the PQ-, aiming wide hospitals management-. From 2010-16 the "methodology and PQ" have been implemented by about forty -40- universities -and increasing-, from Brazil and Abroad and, forty local research reports were generated. A book, published by the Brazilian Minister of Health [1], presents the results of a pilot project carried out by nineteen -19- out of these forty -40- universities, to know: sixteen Brazilian, one Mexican, one Argentina, one from Slovakia and one from Portugal. The chapter 25 of this book [1.A] presents an integrated research from all nineteen chapters -an integrated research report-. Finally, in the oral presentation, we will briefly present the "Methodology and the PQ" presented in this paper and, also, we will present an integrated comparative analyzes -main results got with the field application of the PQ- regarding the case studies accomplished by the universities from Brazil and Abroad.

  14. Association between value-based purchasing score and hospital characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borah Bijan J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medicare hospital Value-based purchasing (VBP program that links Medicare payments to quality of care will become effective from 2013. It is unclear whether specific hospital characteristics are associated with a hospital’s VBP score, and consequently incentive payments. The objective of the study was to assess the association of hospital characteristics with (i the mean VBP score, and (ii specific percentiles of the VBP score distribution. The secondary objective was to quantify the associations of hospital characteristics with the VBP score components: clinical process of care (CPC score and patient satisfaction score. Methods Observational analysis that used data from three sources: Medicare Hospital Compare Database, American Hospital Association 2010 Annual Survey and Medicare Impact File. The final study sample included 2,491 U.S. acute care hospitals eligible for the VBP program. The association of hospital characteristics with the mean VBP score and specific VBP score percentiles were assessed by ordinary least square (OLS regression and quantile regression (QR, respectively. Results VBP score had substantial variations, with mean score of 30 and 60 in the first and fourth quartiles of the VBP score distribution. For-profit status (vs. non-profit, smaller bed size (vs. 100–199 beds, East South Central region (vs. New England region and the report of specific CPC measures (discharge instructions, timely provision of antibiotics and beta blockers, and serum glucose controls in cardiac surgery patients were positively associated with mean VBP scores (p Conclusions Although hospitals serving the poor and the elderly are more likely to score lower under the VBP program, the correlation appears small. Profit status, geographic regions, number and type of CPC measures reported explain the most variation among scores.

  15. Using an evidence-based approach for system selection at a large academic medical center: lessons learned in selecting an ambulatory EMR at Mount Sinai Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannry, Joseph; Mukani, Sonia; Myers, Kristin

    2006-01-01

    The experience of Mount Sinai Hospital is representative of the challenges and problems facing large academic medical centers in selecting an ambulatory EMR. The facility successfully revived a stalled process in a challenging financial climate, using a framework of science and rigorous investigation. The process incorporated several innovations: 1) There was a thorough review of medical informatics literature to develop a mission statement, determine practical objectives and guide the demonstration process; 2) The process involved rigorous investigation of vendor statements, industry statements and other institution's views of vendors; 3) The initiative focused on user-centric selection, and the survey instrument was scientifically and specifically designed to assess user feedback; 4) There was scientific analysis of validated findings and survey results at all steering meetings; 5) The process included an assessment of vendors' ability to support research by identifying funded and published research; 6) Selection involved meticulous total cost of ownership analysis to assess and compare real costs of implementing a vendor solution; and finally, 7) There were iterative meetings with stakeholders, executives and users to understand needs, address concerns and communicate the vision.

  16. Hospital accounting and information systems: a critical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintosh, N B

    1991-01-01

    Public sector organisations seem to be caught up in the global wave of 'neo-Thatcherism'. As such, they are being held 'accountable' today by their respective government finance departments for the costs and benefits of the services they provide to the general public. As the public purse tightens, hospitals (and related health service units) more and more compete with other public sector organisations (old-age pensions and services, post-secondary education, day-care centres, port authorities, unemployment insurance, parks and recreation, elite sport programs, aboriginal peoples aid and development, and so on) for a diminishing piece of what seems a smaller and smaller pie. In this 'fight-for-funding', hospitals seem particularly vulnerable. Sky-rocketing costs, public resentment of doctors' high income and a deliberate restriction and limiting of medical school places, among other things, contribute to general public antagonism. The message for hospitals is that cost-effective accountability will loom large when hospitals come begging at the public trough. Even left-wing politicians today seem to be heeding the words of free-market economists like Freedman of Chicago. 'Privatisation' is the constant threat for those deemed inefficient. As a consequence, hospital administrators around the world, caught up in this trend, seem to be stampeding to 'boot-up' some kind of new accounting information system. For example, at my own university hospital (Queen's University, Kingston, Canada), the hospital administrators are in the process of introducing a version of the Johns Hopkins Hospital (Baltimore, Maryland) case-mix-loading cost-accumulation system. In other parts of the world they are known by other fancy names such as 'patient-costing', 'diagnosis-related-groups' (or DRGs). Trendy accounting systems seem to be the order of the day, a sort of panacea for the current plague of problems hospitals face. As the new systems become operational, however, traditional

  17. Process-based organization design and hospital efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Antonio; Kuntz, Ludwig

    2007-01-01

    The central idea of process-based organization design is that organizing a firm around core business processes leads to cost reductions and quality improvements. We investigated theoretically and empirically whether the implementation of a process-based organization design is advisable in hospitals. The data came from a database compiled by the Statistical Office of the German federal state of Rheinland-Pfalz and from a written questionnaire, which was sent to the chief executive officers (CEOs) of all 92 hospitals in this federal state. We used data envelopment analysis (DEA) to measure hospital efficiency, and factor analysis and regression analysis to test our hypothesis. Our principal finding is that a high degree of process-based organization has a moderate but significant positive effect on the efficiency of hospitals. The main implication is that hospitals should implement a process-based organization to improve their efficiency. However, to actually achieve positive effects on efficiency, it is of paramount importance to observe some implementation rules, in particular to mobilize physician participation and to create an adequate organizational culture.

  18. SELECTING A MANAGEMENT SYSTEM HOSPITAL BY A METHOD MULTICRITERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitorino, Sidney L.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this report is to assess how the multi-criteria method Analytic Hierarchy Process [HP] can help a hospital complex to choose a more suitable management system, known as Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP. The choice coated is very complex due to the novelty of the process of choosing and conflicts generated between areas that did not have a single view of organizational needs, generating a lot of pressure in the department responsible for implementing systems. To assist in this process, he was hired an expert consultant in decision-making and AHP, which in its role of facilitator, contributed to the criteria for system selection were defined, and the choice to occur within a consensual process. We used the study of a single case, based on two indepth interviews with the consultant and the project manager, and documents generated by the advisory and the tool that supported the method. The results of this analysis showed that the method could effectively collaborate in the system acquisition process, but knowledge of the problems of employees and senior management support, it was not used in new decisions of the organization. We conclude that this method contributed to the consensus in the procurement process, team commitment and engagement of those involved.

  19. Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of Hospitals for 50 states and Washington D.C. , Puerto Rico and US territories. The dataset only includes hospital facilities and...

  20. 76 FR 41178 - Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment...; Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2012 Rates'' which appeared in the...

  1. A hospital-based cost minimization study of the potential financial impact on the UK health care system of introduction of iron isomaltoside 1000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    The clinical need to be able to administer high doses of intravenous iron conveniently in a single rapid infusion has been addressed by the recent introduction of ferric carboxymaltose and subsequently iron isomaltoside 1000. Neither requires a test dose. Ferric carboxymaltose can be administered at 15 mg/kg body weight to a maximum dose of 1000 mg, whereas iron isomaltoside 1000 can be administered at 20 mg/kg body weight. The ability to give high doses of iron is important in the context of managing iron deficiency anemia in a number of clinical conditions where demands for iron are high (including chronic blood loss associated with inflammatory bowel disease, menorrhagia, and chronic kidney disease). It is also an important component in the strategy as an alternative to a blood transfusion. Affordability is a key issue for health services. This study was a comparative analysis of the costs of administering the newly available intravenous iron formulations against standard practice (blood transfusion, intravenous iron sucrose) by considering the cost of this treatment option plus nursing costs associated with administration, equipment for administration, and patient transportation in the secondary care (hospital) setting across three dosage levels (600 mg, 1000 mg, and 1600 mg). The analysis indicates that the use of iron isomaltoside 1000 results in a net saving when compared with iron sucrose, blood, and ferric carboxymaltose. At 600 mg and 1000 mg doses, it is cheaper than low-molecular-weight iron dextran but more expensive at a dose of 1600 mg. However, it takes six hours to administer low-molecular-weight iron dextran at this dose level, which is inconvenient and reduces patient throughput (productivity).

  2. New indicators based on personnel cost for management efficiency in a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yoshiaki; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu

    2011-08-01

    A simple and fair benchmarking system or financial indicators for use on the clinical department level have been lacking to evaluate the management efficiency and activity of each clinical department or division of a hospital. New financial indicators have therefore been developed based on personnel costs. Indicator 1: The ratio of marginal profit after personnel cost per personnel cost (RMP). Indicator 2: The ratio of investment (=indirect cost) per personnel cost (RIP). The difference between RMP and RIP demonstrates the operation profit in US Dollars for personnel cost (OPP). A turning point in profitability similar to the break-even point (BEP) and break-even ratio (BER) could be also defined by the combination of the RMP and RIP. The merits of these two indicators are not only the ability to indicate the relationship between the medical profit and the investments in the hospital, but also the capability to demonstrate such indicators as BEP, BER and OPP on a single graph. The two indicators were applied to the hospitals in the National Hospital Organization and to the clinical department in one hospital. Using these two indicators, it was possible to evaluate the management efficiency and medical activity not only in the whole hospital but also in each department and DPC/DRG group. This will be of use to a manager of a hospital in checking the management efficiency of his/her hospital despite the variations among hospitals, departments and divisions.

  3. Hospital employs TQM principles to rework its evaluation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burda, D

    1992-02-24

    One Kansas hospital has taken the traditional employee evaluation process--with all its performance criteria, point systems and rankings--and turned it on its head. The new system employs total quality management principles and promotes personal development, education and teamwork. And everyone gets the same raise.

  4. Is the Australian hospital system adequately prepared for terrorism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Fitzgerald, Mark; Kossmann, Thomas; Pearce, Andrew; Joseph, Anthony; Joseph, Andrew; Tan, Gim; Gardner, Michele; Shapira, Shmuel

    Australian hospitals need to be prepared to deal with mass casualties from terrorist strikes, including bomb blasts and chemical, biological and radiation injury. Injuries from bomb explosions are more severe than those commonly seen in Australian hospitals. In disasters involving mass casualties in urban areas, many of the injured make their own way to hospital, often arriving before the more seriously injured casualties. Major hospitals in Australia should plan for large numbers of undifferentiated and potentially contaminated casualties arriving with minimal warning. It is critical that experienced and trained senior medical officers perform the triage of casualties in emergency departments, with frequent reassessment to detect missed injuries (especially pulmonary blast injury). Hospitals require well developed standard operating procedures for mass casualty events, reinforced by regular drills. Preparing for a major event includes training staff in major incident management, setting up an operational/control unit, nominating key personnel, ensuring there is an efficient intra-hospital communication system, and enhancing links with other emergency services and hospitals.

  5. Intranet technology in hospital information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, J J

    1997-01-01

    The clinical information system architecture at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York is being incorporated into an intranet using Internet and World Wide Web protocols. The result is an Enterprise-Wide Web which provides more flexibility for access to specific patient information and general medical knowledge. Critical aspects of the architecture include a central data repository and a vocabulary server. The new architecture provides ways of displaying patient information in summary, graphical, and multimedia forms. Using customized links called Infobuttons, we provide access to on-line information resources available on the World Wide Web. Our experience to date has raised a number of interesting issues about the use of this technology for health care systems.

  6. A technology ecosystem perspective on hospital management information systems: lessons from the health literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Christopher A; Standing, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Hospital managers have a large range of information needs including quality metrics, financial reports, access information needs, educational, resourcing and decision support needs. Currently these needs involve interactions by managers with numerous disparate systems, both electronic such as SAP, Oracle Financials, PAS' (patient administration systems) like HOMER, and relevant websites; and paper-based systems. Hospital management information systems (HMIS) can be thought of sitting within a Technology Ecosystem (TE). In addition, Hospital Management Information Systems (HMIS) could benefit from a broader and deeper TE model, and the HMIS environment may in fact represents its own TE (the HMTE). This research will examine lessons from the health literature in relation to some of these issues, and propose an extension to the base model of a TE.

  7. Hospital information system utilization in Iran: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Abbasi Moghadam

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hospital information system (HIS should ideally allow different forms of data to be stored and used for decision making by clinicians and managers alike. This system has been developed since the early 1980's, and many hospitals gradually converted from an unrelated system into an integrated one. In successful implementation of HIS plans, the role of human factors, either individually or as a group, is expected to be very important and decisive. In this phenomenological qualitative research, in-depth personal interviews were conducted with the hospital's senior managers, and discussions were conducted in six to eight member focus groups. To include participants for interviews, purposive sampling was used in an Iranian hospital among doctors, nurses and other healthcare providers who had experience in using HIS. Data collection continued until saturation stage. The meetings took about 90 to 120 minutes, in which the participants were asked about discovering needs as well as facilitating and inhibiting factors regarding HIS application. Two members of the research team independently analyzed the interview transcripts.  As a result, problems in HIS isolation were reported to be related to the following: software, hardware, manpower, management and training. About the last point, it was stated that adequate continuing professional development programs did not exist for proper use of computers in the hospital. To achieve the ultimate goal of HISs (e.g. increasing patient satisfaction and decreasing hospital costs, it is necessary to create basic changes in the training system, and to get feedback from hospital personnel. Other steps include addressing software and hardware shortcomings as well as moving towards reinforcing the facilitating factors and refraining from inhibiting ones discovered in this study.

  8. Longitudinal analysis on utilization of medical document management system in a hospital with EPR implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwata, Shigeki; Yamada, Hitomi; Park, Keunsik

    2011-01-01

    Document management systems (DMS) have widespread in major hospitals in Japan as a platform to digitize the paper-based records being out of coverage by EPR. This study aimed to examine longitudinal trends of actual use of DMS in a hospital in which EPR had been in operation, which would be conducive to planning the further information management system in the hospital. Degrees of utilization of electronic documents and templates with DMS were analyzed based on data extracted from a university-affiliated hospital with EPR. As a result, it was found that the number of electronic documents as well as scanned documents circulating at the hospital tended to increase. The result indicated that replacement of paper-based documents with electronic documents did not occur. Therefore it was anticipated that the need for DMS would continue to increase in the hospital. The methods used this study to analyze the trend of DMS utilization would be applicable to other hospitals with with a variety of DMS implementation, such as electronic storage by scanning documents or paper preservation that is compatible with EPR.

  9. Hospital branding in Italy: A pilot study based on the case method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Annamaria

    2017-01-01

    The article investigates if, and in affirmative case how, Italian hospitals are managing corporate brand communication. Thanks to results of qualitative research, this article offers insights on Italian hospital branding. The pilot study based in the case method is to be considered a starting point for wider investigations on this topic, and it is useful for managers and practitioners who want to understand the role of corporate brand in hospital communication management and to connect health care professionals with the audience in a meaningful way in those countries in which the health care system is a mix of both public and private institutions.

  10. HOSPITAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS: A STUDY OF ELECTRONIC PATIENT RECORDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Luiz Cortês

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The importance of patient records, also known as medical records, is related to different needs and objectives, as they constitute permanent documents on the health of patients. With the advancement of information technologies and systems, patient records can be stored in databases, resulting in a positive impact on patient care. Based on these considerations, a research question that arises is “what are the benefits and problems that can be seen with the use of electronic versions of medical records?” This question leads to the formulation of the following hypothesis: although problems can be identified during the process of using electronic record systems, the benefits outweigh the difficulties, thereby justifying their use. To respond to the question and test the presented hypothesis, a research study was developed with users of the same electronic record system, consisting of doctors, nurses, and administrative personnel in three hospitals located in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. The results show that, despite some problems in their usage, the benefits of electronic patient records outweigh possible disadvantages.

  11. Tripartite Evolutionary Game Analysis on Selection Behavior of Trans-Regional Hospitals and Patients in Telemedicine System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxuan Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study applies the game theory to the discussion and analysis of trans-regional Telemedicine System, builds the game model of the selection strategies of trans-regional hospitals and patients and analyzes evolving paths, equilibrium states and influencing factors of the three parties. It is derived that medical insurance reimbursement proportion of specialized hospitals, government support for general hospitals and medical expenses in specialized hospitals, operating costs of general hospitals are the influential factors in the Telemedicine System. Finally, a numerical stimulation is conducted with Matlapb based on the data from ligChina Health and Family Planning Statistical Yearbook 2015l/ig.

  12. Is the system really the solution? Operating costs in hospital systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Lawton Robert; McCullough, Jeffrey S; Wholey, Douglas R; Kruse, Gregory; Kralovec, Peter; Muller, Ralph

    2015-06-01

    Hospital system formation has recently accelerated. Executives emphasize scale economies that lower operating costs, a claim unsupported in academic research. Do systems achieve lower costs than freestanding facilities, and, if so, which system types? We test hypotheses about the relationship of cost with membership in systems, larger systems, and centralized and local hub-and-spoke systems. We also test whether these relationships have changed over time. Examining 4,000 U.S. hospitals during 1998 to 2010, we find no evidence that system members exhibit lower costs. However, members of smaller systems are lower cost than larger systems, and hospitals in centralized systems are lower cost than everyone else. There is no evidence that the system's spatial configuration is associated with cost, although national system hospitals exhibit higher costs. Finally, these results hold over time. We conclude that while systems in general may not be the solution to lower costs, some types of systems are. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Activity-based computing for medical work in hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind

    2009-01-01

    principles, the Java-based implementation of the ABC Framework, and an experimental evaluation together with a group of hospital clinicians. The article contributes to the growing research on support for human activities, mobility, collaboration, and context-aware computing. The ABC Framework presents...

  14. Smoking habits in lung cancer patients: a hospital based case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This retrospective, hospital based case-control study was designed to investigate the cigarette smoking history, the relationship between cigarette smoking and the risk of lung cancer in KHMC-Jordan. Six hundred cases with lung cancer (576 males, 24 females) and 600 controls were included in the study. The majority of ...

  15. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Helena; Hallström, Inger; Kjaergaard, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    Hospital-based home care (HBHC) is widely applied in Pediatric Oncology. We reviewed the potential effect of HBHC on children's physical health and risk of adverse events, parental and child satisfaction, quality of life of children and their parents, and costs. A search of PubMed, CINAHL...

  16. Conversations with the community: the Methodist Hospital System's experience with social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelle, Denny; Rose, Clare L

    2011-01-01

    The Methodist Hospital System has maintained a social media presence on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube since 2009. After initial unofficial excursions into the world of social media, we discovered that social media can be a useful tool to extend a conversation with our patients and the community at large and share our hospital's culture with a larger base of like-minded people. But with this new power comes a heightened responsibility--platforms that can potentially reach millions of viewers and readers also provide a potential for misuse that can jeopardize patient privacy and place hospitals at risk. Because of their unique restrictions, even hospitals that use the tools regularly have much left to learn about social media. With constant monitoring and stewardship and a commitment to educating staff, hospitals can effectively use social media tools for marketing and education.

  17. Is it good to be too light? Birth weight thresholds in hospital reimbursement systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Simon; Wichert, Sebastian; Wuppermann, Amelie

    2018-02-02

    Birth weight manipulation has been documented in per-case hospital reimbursement systems, in which hospitals receive more money for otherwise equal newborns with birth weight just below compared to just above specific birth weight thresholds. As hospitals receive more money for cases with weight below the thresholds, having a (reported) weight below a threshold could benefit the newborn. Also, these reimbursement thresholds overlap with diagnostic thresholds that have been shown to affect the quantity and quality of care that newborns receive. Based on the universe of hospital births in Germany from the years 2005-2011, we investigate whether weight below reimbursement relevant thresholds triggers different quantity and quality of care. We find that this is not the case, suggesting that hospitals' financial incentives with respect to birth weight do not directly impact the care that newborns receive. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Converting Radiology Operations in a Six-Hospital Healthcare System from Film-Based to Digital: Another Leadership Role for the Diagnostic Medical Physicist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arreola, Manuel M.; Rill, Lynn N.

    2004-01-01

    As medical facilities across the United States continue to convert their radiology operations from film-based to digital environments, partially accomplished and failed endeavors are frequent because of the lack of competent and knowledgeable leadership. The diagnostic medical physicist is, without a doubt, in a privileged position to take such a leadership role, not only because of her/his understanding of the basics principles of new imaging modalities, but also because of her/his inherent participation in workflow design and educational/training activities. A well-structured approach by the physicist will certainly lead the project to a successful completion, opening, in turn, new opportunities for the medical physicist to become an active participant in the decision-making process for an institution

  19. Converting Radiology Operations in a Six-Hospital Healthcare System from Film-Based to Digital: Another Leadership Role for the Diagnostic Medical Physicist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreola, Manuel M.; Rill, Lynn N.

    2004-09-01

    As medical facilities across the United States continue to convert their radiology operations from film-based to digital environments, partially accomplished and failed endeavors are frequent because of the lack of competent and knowledgeable leadership. The diagnostic medical physicist is, without a doubt, in a privileged position to take such a leadership role, not only because of her/his understanding of the basics principles of new imaging modalities, but also because of her/his inherent participation in workflow design and educational/training activities. A well-structured approach by the physicist will certainly lead the project to a successful completion, opening, in turn, new opportunities for the medical physicist to become an active participant in the decision-making process for an institution.

  20. Combined PACS and intranet information system in a University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiss, D.; Pfluger, T.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Hahn, K.; Koenig, A.; Endres, S.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The Department of Radiology at the University Hospital Innenstadt Munich provides all clinical departments of a large university hospital with several radiology units at different locations. During the last four years all units have been fully digitalized with a stepwise installation of a PACS. The PACS also processes images from the Nuclear Medicine Department. Methods: As image modalities, archive systems and review workstations, we use devices from multiple vendors, which are integrated into a consistent system using the DICOM standard. The hospital has developed its own RIS and an intranet information system, which provides access to all reports and images from radiology for all clinical departments inside the hospital. Additionally, other clinical information such as laboratory results or ECG examinations are available through the system. Results: After one year of operation, the system succeeded in the clinical routine work as the primary source for radiological reports and images as well as for laboratory values. Conclusion: The advantages of digitalization were, besides reduction of film cost, especially optimizations of work flow with access to digital images from every where at any time. (orig.) [de

  1. A Trial of Nursing Cost Accounting using Nursing Practice Data on a Hospital Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahira, Akiko; Tada, Kazuko; Ishima, Masatoshi; Nagao, Hidenori; Miyamoto, Tadashi; Nakagawa, Yoshiaki; Takemura, Tadamasa

    2015-01-01

    Hospital administration is very important and many hospitals carry out activity-based costing under comprehensive medicine. However, nursing cost is unclear, because nursing practice is expanding both quantitatively and qualitatively and it is difficult to grasp all nursing practices, and nursing cost is calculated in many cases comprehensively. On the other hand, a nursing information system (NIS) is implemented in many hospitals in Japan and we are beginning to get nursing practical data. In this paper, we propose a nursing cost accounting model and we simulate a cost by nursing contribution using NIS data.

  2. A European benchmarking system to evaluate in-hospital mortality rates in acute coronary syndrome: the EURHOBOP project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dégano, Irene R; Subirana, Isaac; Torre, Marina; Grau, María; Vila, Joan; Fusco, Danilo; Kirchberger, Inge; Ferrières, Jean; Malmivaara, Antti; Azevedo, Ana; Meisinger, Christa; Bongard, Vanina; Farmakis, Dimitros; Davoli, Marina; Häkkinen, Unto; Araújo, Carla; Lekakis, John; Elosua, Roberto; Marrugat, Jaume

    2015-03-01

    Hospital performance models in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are useful to assess patient management. While models are available for individual countries, mainly US, cross-European performance models are lacking. Thus, we aimed to develop a system to benchmark European hospitals in AMI and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), based on predicted in-hospital mortality. We used the EURopean HOspital Benchmarking by Outcomes in ACS Processes (EURHOBOP) cohort to develop the models, which included 11,631 AMI patients and 8276 acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients who underwent PCI. Models were validated with a cohort of 55,955 European ACS patients. Multilevel logistic regression was used to predict in-hospital mortality in European hospitals for AMI and PCI. Administrative and clinical models were constructed with patient- and hospital-level covariates, as well as hospital- and country-based random effects. Internal cross-validation and external validation showed good discrimination at the patient level and good calibration at the hospital level, based on the C-index (0.736-0.819) and the concordance correlation coefficient (55.4%-80.3%). Mortality ratios (MRs) showed excellent concordance between administrative and clinical models (97.5% for AMI and 91.6% for PCI). Exclusion of transfers and hospital stays ≤1day did not affect in-hospital mortality prediction in sensitivity analyses, as shown by MR concordance (80.9%-85.4%). Models were used to develop a benchmarking system to compare in-hospital mortality rates of European hospitals with similar characteristics. The developed system, based on the EURHOBOP models, is a simple and reliable tool to compare in-hospital mortality rates between European hospitals in AMI and PCI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessment of esophageal involvement in systemic sclerosis and morphea (localized scleroderma) by clinical, endoscopic, manometric and pH metric features: a prospective comparative hospital based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Tasleem; Masood, Qazi; Singh, Jaswinder; Hassan, Iffat

    2015-02-15

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a generalized disorder of unknown etiology affecting the connective tissue of the body. It affects the skin and various internal organs. Gastrointestinal tract involvement is seen in almost 90% of the patients. Esophagus is the most frequently affected part of the gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal motility disturbance classically manifests as a reduced lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) and loss of distal esophageal body peristalsis. Consequently, SSc patients may be complicated by erosive esophagitis and eventually by Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Morphea, also known as localized scleroderma, is characterized by predominant skin involvement, with occasional involvement of subjacent muscles and usually sparing the internal organs. The involvement of esophagus in morphea has been studied very scarcely. The proposed study will investigate the esophageal involvement in the two forms of scleroderma (systemic and localized), compare the same and address any need of upper gastrointestinal evaluation in morphea (localized scleroderma) patients. 56 and 31 newly and already diagnosed cases of SSc and morphea respectively were taken up for the study. All the patients were inquired about the dyspeptic symptoms (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation and/or dysphagia). Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, esophageal manometry and 24-hour pH monitoring were done in 52, 47 and 41 patients of SSc; and 28, 25 and 20 patients of morphea respectively. Esophageal symptoms were present in 39 cases (69.6%) of SSc which were mild in 22 (39.3%), moderate in 14 (25%), severe in three (5.3%); while only four cases (7.1%) of morphea had esophageal symptoms all of which were mild in severity. Reflux esophagitis was seen in 17 cases (32.7%) of SSc and only two cases (7.14%) of morphea. Manometric abnormalities were seen in 32 cases (68.1%) of SSc and none in morphea. Ambulatory 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring documented abnormal reflux in

  4. The new strategic orientation in innovating hospitality logistics system

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Stipanović; Elena Rudan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – This paper investigates ways how to innovate logistics processes in the hospitality industry aimed at achieving spatio - temporal transformation of resource base into competitive advantages based on innovation and quality. Economic goal of modern logistics based on knowledge is to provide a unique experience for tourists at minimum cost in order to multiply operational profit. Operational profit has to be largely reinvested in the new strategic orientations as well as in new inta...

  5. Microcomputer-based workforce scheduling for hospital porters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C K

    1999-01-01

    This paper focuses on labour scheduling for hospital porters who are the major workforce providing routine cleansing of wards, transportation and messenger services. Generating an equitable monthly roster for porters while meeting the daily minimum demand is a tedious task scheduled manually by a supervisor. In considering a variety of constraints and goals, a manual schedule was usually produced in seven to ten days. To be in line with the strategic goal of scientific management of an acute care regional hospital in Hong Kong, a microcomputer-based algorithm was developed to schedule the monthly roster. The algorithm, coded in Digital Visual Fortran 5.0 Professional, could generate a monthly roster in seconds. Implementation has been carried out since September 1998 and the results proved to be useful to hospital administrators and porters. This paper discusses both the technical and human issues involved during the computerization process.

  6. Prevalence and Prognosis of Cerebrovascular Accidents and its Subtypes Among Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Isfahan, Iran: A Hospital Clinic-based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatnia, Mohammad; Sayed-Bonakdar, Zahra; Mohammad-Sharifi, Ghasem; Sarrami, Amir Hossein

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and prognosis of cerebrovascular accident (CVA) and its subtypes among Iranian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In a cross-sectional study, medical records of 575 SLE patients were reviewed. The patients developing CVA in their course of disease were extracted. In these patients, data about demographic features, lupus anti bodies, duration of the disease until CVA, CVA manifestation(s) and follow-up duration were gathered. In the next step, patients with any kinds of CVA were summoned to Neurology clinic to identify the grade of disability in each patient with CVA. We identified 38 patients with CVA of which 6 (15.8%) were men and 32 (84.2%) were women. The most common subtype of CVA was small vessels thrombosis (21.05%) among the study patients and hemi paresis was the most prevalent initial presentation (39.47%). In 11 (28.9%) patients, SLE was initiated with CVA and in 3 (7.9%) patients CVA had happened in the 1(st) year of SLE. Anti-phospholipid antibodies (APLA) were positive in 29 (76.3%) patients. Mean modified Rankin Scale in patient with positive and negative serology for APLA was 0.93 ± 1.11 and 0.22 ± 0.66 respectively (P = 0.006). Our study shows that 6.6% of Iranian SLE patients have CVA during their course of the disease. Small vessels thrombosis is the most common CVA subtype and hemi paresis is the most prevalent initial presentation. Moreover, we showed that the prognosis of CVA in Iranian SLE patients is not unfavorable.

  7. Information system maturity and the hospitality enterprise performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Garbin Pranicevic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to empirically evaluate the relationship between the maturity of hotels’ information systems and their performance. This study uses customized models of information system (IS maturity and hotel performance measurement. Since we wanted to include the intangible aspects of performance, we opted for an adapted application of the Balanced Scorecard model. In the empirical part of the paper, fundamental constructs of the model are verified, while the individual items are further evaluated by employing discriminant analysis to distinguish hotels with relatively low and high performance levels. The findings demonstrate the existence of a significant and positive relationship between IS maturity and two dimensions of performance in the hospitality industry – process quality and guest relationships. The level of employee development and financial performance do not seem to be related to IS maturity. Although representative, the sample is relatively small, and the primary data were collected in a single country. The paper provides a framework of IS maturity items in the hospitality industry which seem to contribute to hotels’ business performances. As such, it can serve as a practical framework relevant for IT management in tourism and hospitality. The paper addresses a topic already discussed in a range of industries, although it does not seem to have been empirically evaluated by many studies of the tourism and hospitality industry. In addition, a new theoretical model of IT maturity in tourism and hospitality is proposed.

  8. New compliance management system of the University Hospital Frankfurt, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Irmscher, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    The meaning of Corporate Governance is all values and principles guiding or regulating good and responsible business management. Clearly defined roles and responsibilities for managing compliance, risks and checks is the prerequisite for the latter. For that reason, a compliance management system was set up at the University Hospital Frankfurt in 2015.

  9. Determinants of quality management systems implementation in hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wardhani, Viera; Utarini, Adi; van Dijk, Jitse Pieter; Post, Doeke; Groothoff, Johan Willem

    Objective: To identify the problems and facilitating factors in the implementation of quality management system (QMS) in hospitals through a systematic review. Method: A search strategy was pet-formed on the Medline database for articles written in English published between 1992 and early 2006.

  10. Networking Hospital ePrescribing: A Systemic View of Digitalization of Medicines' Use in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtner, Valentina; Hibberd, Ralph; Cornford, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Medicine management is at the core of hospital care and digitalization of prescribing and administration of medicines is often the focus of attention of health IT programs. This may be conveyed to the public in terms of the elimination of paper-based drug charts and increased readability of doctors' prescriptions. Based on analysis of documents about hospital medicines supply and use (including systems' implementation) in the UK, in this conceptual paper electronic prescribing and administration are repositioned as only one aspect of an important wider transformation in medicine management in hospital settings, involving, for example, procurement, dispensing, auditing, waste management, research and safety vigilance. Approaching digitalization from a systemic perspective has the potential to uncover the wider implications of this transformation for patients, the organization and the wider health care system.

  11. Hospital medication errors in a pharmacovigilance system in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Enrique Machado-Alba

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: this study analyzes the medication errors reported to a pharmacovigilance system by 26 hospitals for patients in the healthcare system of Colombia. Methods: this retrospective study analyzed the medication errors reported to a systematized database between 1 January 2008 and 12 September 2013. The medication is dispensed by the company Audifarma S.A. to hospitals and clinics around Colombia. Data were classified according to the taxonomy of the National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention (NCC MERP. The data analysis was performed using SPSS 22.0 for Windows, considering p-values < 0.05 significant. Results: there were 9 062 medication errors in 45 hospital pharmacies. Real errors accounted for 51.9% (n = 4 707, of which 12.0% (n = 567 reached the patient (Categories C to I and caused harm (Categories E to I to 17 subjects (0.36%. The main process involved in errors that occurred (categories B to I was prescription (n = 1 758, 37.3%, followed by dispensation (n = 1 737, 36.9%, transcription (n = 970, 20.6% and administration (n = 242, 5.1%. The errors in the administration process were 45.2 times more likely to reach the patient (CI 95%: 20.2–100.9. Conclusions: medication error reporting systems and prevention strategies should be widespread in hospital settings, prioritizing efforts to address the administration process.

  12. EPICS based DAQ system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Weixing; Chen Yongzhong; Zhou Weimin; Ye Kairong; Liu Dekang

    2002-01-01

    EPICS is the most popular developing platform to build control system and beam diagnostic system in modern physics experiment facilities. An EPICS based data acquisition system was built in Redhat 6.2 operation system. The system is successfully used in the beam position monitor mapping, it improves the mapping process a lot

  13. Hospital-based ocular emergencies: epidemiology, treatment, and visual outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Cindy A; Rogers-Martel, Melanie; Golas, Liliya; Chepurny, Anna; Martel, James B; Martel, Joseph R

    2014-03-01

    Ocular trauma is recognized as the leading cause of unilateral blindness. However, few studies to date have focused on the clinical features of hospital-based ocular emergencies. Effectiveness of trauma centers in treating ocular emergencies was compared with treatment in traditional community hospital emergency departments. Demographics, causes, and nature of ocular emergencies, as well as visual outcome in community hospitals emergency departments and trauma centers, were also examined. Records of 1027 patients with ocular emergencies seen between July 2007 and November 2010 at 3 community hospitals emergency departments and 2 hospitals with level II trauma centers were retrospectively examined. Unpaired t test and Pearson χ(2) test were used to determine statistical significance. The incidence of patients requiring ophthalmic intervention was 77.2 per 100 000 in the community hospitals and 208.9 per 100 000 in the trauma centers. Rates of ocular emergencies were higher in middle-aged, white men. Orbital fractures were found in 86% of all orbital contusion cases in trauma centers, whereas 66.7% of patients with fall injuries and open globe diagnoses resulted in legal blindness. The middle-aged, white men are more vulnerable to ocular injuries caused mainly by motor vehicle accidents. The ability of trauma centers to provide comparable increases in vision outcomes, despite treating more severe ocular emergencies, demonstrates the effectiveness of trauma centers. Patients diagnosed as having orbital contusions or who have fall injuries deserve careful evaluation because they are more likely to have more severe sight-threatening injuries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Is the Colombian health system reform improving the performance of public hospitals in Bogotá?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPake, Barbara; Yepes, Francisco Jose; Lake, Sally; Sanchez, Luz Helena

    2003-06-01

    Many countries are experimenting with public hospital reform - both increasing the managerial autonomy with which hospitals conduct their affairs, and separating 'purchaser' and 'provider' sides of the health system, thus increasing the degree of market pressure brought to bear on hospitals. Evidence suggesting that such reform will improve hospital performance is weak. From a theoretical perspective, it is not clear why public hospitals should be expected to behave like firms and seek to maximize profits as this model requires. Empirically, there is very slight evidence that such reforms may improve efficiency, and reason to be concerned about their equity implications. In Colombia, an ambitious reform programme includes among its measures the attempt to universalize a segmented health system, the creation of a purchaser-provider split and the transformation of public hospitals into 'autonomous state entities'. By design, the Colombian reform programme avoids the forces that produce equity losses in other developing countries. This paper reports the results of a study that has tried to track hospital performance in other dimensions in the post-reform period in Bogotá. Trends in hospital inputs, production and productivity, quality and patient satisfaction are presented, and qualitative data based on interviews with hospital workers are analyzed. The evidence we have been able to collect is capable of providing only a partial response to the study question. There is some evidence of increased activity and productivity and sustained quality despite declining staffing levels. Qualitative data suggest that hospital workers have noticed considerable changes, which include greater responsiveness to patients but also a heavier administrative burden. It is difficult to attribute specific causality to all of the changes measured and this reflects the inherent difficulty of judging the effects of large-scale reform programmes as well as weaknesses and gaps in the data

  15. Application of the Activity-Based Costing Method for Unit-Cost Calculation in a Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javid, Mahdi; Hadian, Mohammad; Ghaderi, Hossein; Ghaffari, Shahram; Salehi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Choosing an appropriate accounting system for hospital has always been a challenge for hospital managers. Traditional cost system (TCS) causes cost distortions in hospital. Activity-based costing (ABC) method is a new and more effective cost system. Objective: This study aimed to compare ABC with TCS method in calculating the unit cost of medical services and to assess its applicability in Kashani Hospital, Shahrekord City, Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on accounting data of Kashani Hospital in 2013. Data on accounting reports of 2012 and other relevant sources at the end of 2012 were included. To apply ABC method, the hospital was divided into several cost centers and five cost categories were defined: wage, equipment, space, material, and overhead costs. Then activity centers were defined. ABC method was performed into two phases. First, the total costs of cost centers were assigned to activities by using related cost factors. Then the costs of activities were divided to cost objects by using cost drivers. After determining the cost of objects, the cost price of medical services was calculated and compared with those obtained from TCS. Results: The Kashani Hospital had 81 physicians, 306 nurses, and 328 beds with the mean occupancy rate of 67.4% during 2012. Unit cost of medical services, cost price of occupancy bed per day, and cost per outpatient service were calculated. The total unit costs by ABC and TCS were respectively 187.95 and 137.70 USD, showing 50.34 USD more unit cost by ABC method. ABC method represented more accurate information on the major cost components. Conclusion: By utilizing ABC, hospital managers have a valuable accounting system that provides a true insight into the organizational costs of their department. PMID:26234974

  16. Application of the Activity-Based Costing Method for Unit-Cost Calculation in a Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javid, Mahdi; Hadian, Mohammad; Ghaderi, Hossein; Ghaffari, Shahram; Salehi, Masoud

    2015-05-17

    Choosing an appropriate accounting system for hospital has always been a challenge for hospital managers. Traditional cost system (TCS) causes cost distortions in hospital. Activity-based costing (ABC) method is a new and more effective cost system. This study aimed to compare ABC with TCS method in calculating the unit cost of medical services and to assess its applicability in Kashani Hospital, Shahrekord City, Iran.‎ This cross-sectional study was performed on accounting data of Kashani Hospital in 2013. Data on accounting reports of 2012 and other relevant sources at the end of 2012 were included. To apply ABC method, the hospital was divided into several cost centers and five cost categories were defined: wage, equipment, space, material, and overhead costs. Then activity centers were defined. ABC method was performed into two phases. First, the total costs of cost centers were assigned to activities by using related cost factors. Then the costs of activities were divided to cost objects by using cost drivers. After determining the cost of objects, the cost price of medical services was calculated and compared with those obtained from TCS.‎ The Kashani Hospital had 81 physicians, 306 nurses, and 328 beds with the mean occupancy rate of 67.4% during 2012. Unit cost of medical services, cost price of occupancy bed per day, and cost per outpatient service were calculated. The total unit costs by ABC and TCS were respectively 187.95 and 137.70 USD, showing 50.34 USD more unit cost by ABC method. ABC method represented more accurate information on the major cost components. By utilizing ABC, hospital managers have a valuable accounting system that provides a true insight into the organizational costs of their department.

  17. Front-Line Physicians' Satisfaction with Information Systems in Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Junttila, Kristiina; Salanterä, Sanna

    2018-01-01

    Day-to-day operations management in hospital units is difficult due to continuously varying situations, several actors involved and a vast number of information systems in use. The aim of this study was to describe front-line physicians' satisfaction with existing information systems needed to support the day-to-day operations management in hospitals. A cross-sectional survey was used and data chosen with stratified random sampling were collected in nine hospitals. Data were analyzed with descriptive and inferential statistical methods. The response rate was 65 % (n = 111). The physicians reported that information systems support their decision making to some extent, but they do not improve access to information nor are they tailored for physicians. The respondents also reported that they need to use several information systems to support decision making and that they would prefer one information system to access important information. Improved information access would better support physicians' decision making and has the potential to improve the quality of decisions and speed up the decision making process.

  18. RFID-based information visibility for hospital operations: exploring its positive effects using discrete event simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamoah, Daniel A; Sharda, Ramesh; Rude, Howard N; Doran, Derek

    2016-10-12

    Long queues and wait times often occur at hospitals and affect smooth delivery of health services. To improve hospital operations, prior studies have developed scheduling techniques to minimize patient wait times. However, these studies lack in demonstrating how such techniques respond to real-time information needs of hospitals and efficiently manage wait times. This article presents a multi-method study on the positive impact of providing real-time scheduling information to patients using the RFID technology. Using a simulation methodology, we present a generic scenario, which can be mapped to real-life situations, where patients can select the order of laboratory services. The study shows that information visibility offered by RFID technology results in decreased wait times and improves resource utilization. We also discuss the applicability of the results based on field interviews granted by hospital clinicians and administrators on the perceived barriers and benefits of an RFID system.

  19. Lifestyle behaviours and weight among hospital-based nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapka, Jane M; Lemon, Stephenie C; Magner, Robert P; Hale, Janet

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to (i) describe the weight, weight-related perceptions and lifestyle behaviours of hospital-based nurses, and (ii) explore the relationship of demographic, health, weight and job characteristics with lifestyle behaviours. The obesity epidemic is widely documented. Worksite initiatives have been advocated. Nurses represent an important part of the hospital workforce and serve as role models when caring for patients. A sample of 194 nurses from six hospitals participated in anthropometric measurements and self-administered surveys. The majority of nurses were overweight and obese, and some were not actively involved in weight management behaviours. Self-reported health, diet and physical activity behaviours were low, although variable by gender, age and shift. Reports of co-worker norms supported low levels of healthy behaviours. Findings reinforce the need to address the hospital environment and culture as well as individual behaviours for obesity control. Nurse managers have an opportunity to consider interventions that promote a climate favourable to improved health habits by facilitating and supporting healthy lifestyle choices (nutrition and physical activity) and environmental changes. Such efforts have the potential to increase productivity and morale and decrease work-related disabilities and improve quality of life.

  20. A novel system to tackle hospital acquired pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renganathan, B S; Preejith, S P; Nagaiyan, Sridhar; Joseph, Jayaraj; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2016-08-01

    Hospital acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) is a major problem that affects around one in twenty patients who are admitted in hospital with sudden illness. These ulcers often occur when patients have limited mobility and cannot change positions in bed on their own. Traditionally, the occurrence of HAPUs has been minimized by turning the patient every 2 hours to alternating lateral and supine positions, and by using pressure redistributing mattresses. In many healthcare facilities, such a patient repositioning schedule is not always maintained owing to low caregiver compliance to turning protocols. Difficulty in monitoring patient position continuously, lack of turn reminders/alerts and suboptimal caregiver staffing ratio increases the occurrence of HAPUs. A novel method to address the need for improved pressure ulcer prevention is presented. The proposed method consists of a wearable device which continuously monitors the patient's position and communicates wirelessly with a tablet which enables alerts to be sent to the caregiver when a patient turn is due in accordance with the protocol adopted by the hospital. The patient's position is continuously monitored and the turning procedure carried out is logged and updated on the hospital's cloud system, thereby enabling centralized monitoring. Under a controlled setting, system was able to continuously monitor patient's position and can accurately detect standard patient positions.

  1. Analysis of the quality of hospital information systems Audit Trails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Correia, Ricardo; Boldt, Isabel; Lapão, Luís; Santos-Pereira, Cátia; Rodrigues, Pedro Pereira; Ferreira, Ana Margarida; Freitas, Alberto

    2013-08-06

    Audit Trails (AT) are fundamental to information security in order to guarantee access traceability but can also be used to improve Health information System's (HIS) quality namely to assess how they are used or misused. This paper aims at analysing the existence and quality of AT, describing scenarios in hospitals and making some recommendations to improve the quality of information. The responsibles of HIS for eight Portuguese hospitals were contacted in order to arrange an interview about the importance of AT and to collect audit trail data from their HIS. Five institutions agreed to participate in this study; four of them accepted to be interviewed, and four sent AT data. The interviews were performed in 2011 and audit trail data sent in 2011 and 2012. Each AT was evaluated and compared in relation to data quality standards, namely for completeness, comprehensibility, traceability among others. Only one of the AT had enough information for us to apply a consistency evaluation by modelling user behaviour. The interviewees in these hospitals only knew a few AT (average of 1 AT per hospital in an estimate of 21 existing HIS), although they all recognize some advantages of analysing AT. Four hospitals sent a total of 7 AT - 2 from Radiology Information System (RIS), 2 from Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), 3 from Patient Records. Three of the AT were understandable and three of the AT were complete. The AT from the patient records are better structured and more complete than the RIS/PACS. Existing AT do not have enough quality to guarantee traceability or be used in HIS improvement. Its quality reflects the importance given to them by the CIO of healthcare institutions. Existing standards (e.g. ASTM:E2147, ISO/TS 18308:2004, ISO/IEC 27001:2006) are still not broadly used in Portugal.

  2. Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Program: Hospital-Based Stroke Outpatient Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Danielle; Janzen, Shannon; McIntyre, Amanda; Vermeer, Julianne; Britt, Eileen; Teasell, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Few studies have considered the effectiveness of outpatient rehabilitation programs for stroke patients. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a hospital-based interdisciplinary outpatient stroke rehabilitation program with respect to physical functioning, mobility, and balance. The Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Program provides a hospital-based interdisciplinary approach to stroke rehabilitation in Southwestern Ontario. Outcome measures from physiotherapy and occupational therapy sessions were available at intake and discharge from the program. A series of paired sample t-tests were performed to assess patient changes between time points for each outcome measure. A total of 271 patients met the inclusion criteria for analysis (56.1% male; mean age = 62.9 ± 13.9 years). Significant improvements were found between admission and discharge for the Functional Independence Measure, grip strength, Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment, two-minute walk test, maximum walk test, Timed Up and Go, Berg Balance Scale, and one-legged stance (P rehabilitation program was effective at improving the physical functioning, mobility, and balance of individuals after a stroke. A hospital-based, stroke-specific rehabilitation program should be considered when patients continue to experience deficits after inpatient rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A new framework for assessing hospital crisis management based on resilience engineering approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirali, Gh A; Azadian, Sh; Saki, A

    2016-06-14

    In recent years, an increasing number of natural and man-made disasters have exposed many people and properties to various disasters. This has resulted in approximately 75,000 deaths worldwide every year due to disasters. Crisis management is becoming increasingly important to cope effectively with the magnitude and potential damage resulting from disasters. Hospitals, as the final point in the rescue chain, have a key role in the crisis management and need to be resilient against disasters. The purpose of this paper is to present a new framework for assessing the crisis management based on resilience principles in hospital infrastructure of a developing country. A questionnaire was developed and completed by 310 staff (nurses and managers) of eight hospitals in Iran. The findings indicate that the eight hospitals included in the study have moderate conditions in general, while hospitals X3, X4, and X7 have poor conditions in the crisis management. Consequently, it seems that the crisis management system was not resilient in all these hospitals in general. Using resilience engineering in assessing crisis management can improve and develop the ability of the hospitals' management to cope with any type of disaster.

  4. Effects of scanning and eliminating paper-based medical records on hospital physicians' clinical work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laerum, Hallvard; Karlsen, Tom H; Faxvaag, Arild

    2003-01-01

    It is not automatically given that the paper-based medical record can be eliminated after the introduction of an electronic medical record (EMR) in a hospital. Many keep and update the paper-based counterpart, and this limits the use of the EMR system. The authors have evaluated the physicians' clinical work practices and attitudes toward a system in a hospital that has eliminated the paper-based counterpart using scanning technology. Combined open-ended interviews (8 physicians) and cross-sectional survey (70 physicians) were conducted and compared with reference data from a previous national survey (69 physicians from six hospitals). The hospitals in the reference group were using the same EMR system without the scanning module. The questionnaire (English translation available as an online data supplement at ) covered frequency of use of the EMR system for 19 defined tasks, ease of performing them, and user satisfaction. The interviews were open-ended. The physicians routinely used the system for nine of 11 tasks regarding retrieval of patient data, which the majority of the physicians found more easily performed than before. However, 22% to 25% of the physicians found retrieval of patient data more difficult, particularly among internists (33%). Overall, the physicians were equally satisfied with the part of the system handling the regular electronic data as that of the physicians in the reference group. They were, however, much less satisfied with the use of scanned document images than that of regular electronic data, using the former less frequently than the latter. Scanning and elimination of the paper-based medical record is feasible, but the scanned document images should be considered an intermediate stage toward fully electronic medical records. To our knowledge, this is the first assessment from a hospital in the process of completing such a scanning project.

  5. Workarounds to hospital electronic prescribing systems: a qualitative study in English hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Kathrin M; Mozaffar, Hajar; Lee, Lisa; Williams, Robin; Sheikh, Aziz

    2017-07-01

    Concerns with the usability of electronic prescribing (ePrescribing) systems can lead to the development of workarounds by users. To investigate the types of workarounds users employed, the underlying reasons offered and implications for care provision and patient safety. We collected a large qualitative data set, comprising interviews, observations and project documents, as part of an evaluation of ePrescribing systems in five English hospitals, which we conceptualised as case studies. Data were collected at up to three different time points throughout implementation and adoption. Thematic analysis involving deductive and inductive approaches was facilitated by NVivo 10. Our data set consisted of 173 interviews, 24 rounds of observation and 17 documents. Participating hospitals were at various stages of implementing a range of systems with differing functionalities. We identified two types of workarounds: informal and formal. The former were informal practices employed by users not approved by management, which were introduced because of perceived changes to professional roles, issues with system usability and performance and challenges relating to the inaccessibility of hardware. The latter were formalised practices that were promoted by management and occurred when systems posed threats to patient safety and organisational functioning. Both types of workarounds involved using paper and other software systems as intermediaries, which often created new risks relating to a lack of efficient transfer of real-time information between different users. Assessing formal and informal workarounds employed by users should be part of routine organisational implementation strategies of major health information technology initiatives. Workarounds can create new risks and present new opportunities for improvement in system design and integration. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Performance evaluation of public hospital information systems by the information system success model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyoung Won; Bae, Sung-Kwon; Ryu, Ji-Hye; Kim, Kyeong Na; An, Chang-Ho; Chae, Young Moon

    2015-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the performance of the newly developed information system (IS) implemented on July 1, 2014 at three public hospitals in Korea. User satisfaction scores of twelve key performance indicators of six IS success factors based on the DeLone and McLean IS Success Model were utilized to evaluate IS performance before and after the newly developed system was introduced. All scores increased after system introduction except for the completeness of medical records and impact on the clinical environment. The relationships among six IS factors were also analyzed to identify the important factors influencing three IS success factors (Intention to Use, User Satisfaction, and Net Benefits). All relationships were significant except for the relationships among Service Quality, Intention to Use, and Net Benefits. The results suggest that hospitals should not only focus on systems and information quality; rather, they should also continuously improve service quality to improve user satisfaction and eventually reach full the potential of IS performance.

  7. Biodegradation of pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater by a hybrid biofilm and activated sludge system (Hybas)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escola Casas, Monica; Chhetri, Ravi Kumar; Ooi, Gordon Tze Hoong

    2015-01-01

    TM is a hybrid process, based on the integrated fixed-film activated sludge technology, where plastic carriers for biofilm growth are suspended within activated sludge. To investigate the potential of a hybrid system for the removal of pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater a pilot plant consisting of a series...

  8. Hospital food service: a comparative analysis of two foodservice systems at a Danish Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Lise; René, Michael; Kristensen, Marianne Boll

    2016-01-01

    meals from BTS and the dietary intake was measured. After implementation of CCP on the wards, dietary intake was measured on 56 patients. Intake at mealtimes was assessed through a visual portion size assessment method and intake in-between meals was measured using a self-reported dietary record......% of the protein requirements on CCP compared to 33 % on BTS (p=0,216). Conclusions A new foodservice system (CCP) which increases availability and choice of food 24/7 does not show a significant improvement of energy and protein intake in hospitalized patients and patients at nutritional risk. However, further...

  9. Models of governance in multihospital systems. Implications for hospital and system-level decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlock, L L; Alexander, J A

    1986-12-01

    This study utilizes data from a national survey of 159 multihospital systems in order to describe the types of governance structures currently being utilized, and to compare the policy making process for various types of decisions in systems with different approaches to governance. Survey results indicate that multihospital systems most often use one of three governance models. Forty-one percent of the systems (including 33% of system hospitals) use a parent holding company model in which there is a system-wide corporate governing board and separate governing boards for each member hospital. Twenty-two percent of systems in the sample (but 47% of all system hospitals) utilize what we have termed a modified parent holding company model in which there is one system-wide governing board, but advisory boards are substituted for governing boards at the local hospital level. Twenty-three percent of the sampled systems (including 11% of system hospitals) use a corporate model in which there is one system-wide governing board but no other governing or advisory boards at either the divisional, regional or local hospital levels. A comparison of systems using these three governance approaches found significant variation in terms of system size, ownership and the geographic proximity of member hospitals. In order to examine the relationship between alternative approaches to governance and patterns of decision-making, the three model types were compared with respect to the percentages of systems reporting that local boards, corporate management and/or system-wide corporate boards have responsibility for decision-making in a number of specific issue areas. Study results indicate that, regardless of model type, corporate boards are most likely to have responsibility for decisions regarding the transfer, pledging and sale of assets; the formation of new companies; purchase of assets greater than $100,000; changes in hospital bylaws; and the appointment of local board members. In

  10. Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullins, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The challenge could be briefly seen in these terms: hospitals as places for treatment where there’s a technology focus and hospitals for healing where there’s a human focus. In the 60s - 70s wave of new hospital building, an emphasis on technology can be seen. It’s time to move from the technology...... focus. It is not enough to consider only the factors of function within architecture, hygiene, economy and logistics. We also need to look at aspects of aesthetics, bringing nature into the building, art, color, acoustics, volume and space as we perceive them. Contemporary methods and advances...... placed, accessible, provided with plenty of greenery, and maximize sensory impressions, providing sounds, smells, sight and the possibility to be touched. This is a very well documented area I can say. Hygiene, in terms of architecture can give attention to hand wash facilities and their positioning...

  11. Review of Application Development and the Patient Encounter Concept within the University of Iowa Hospital Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, James R.; Wood, David E.

    1982-01-01

    The logical structure of the patient data base supporting the University of Iowa Hospital Information System has produced significant management reporting capabilities. A technique is discussed for grouping information concerning the services provided by the hospital during each Patient Encounter that allows subsequent analysis by Medical Episode and Financial Account. The implementation of this data organization structure is discussed in the context of the 13 major health care applications implemented at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics.

  12. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Eva Helena; Kjaergaard, Hanne; Johansen, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess the feasibility and psychosocial impact of a hospital-based home care (HBHC) program for children with cancer. PROCEDURE: A HBHC program was carried out with 51 children (0-18 years) with cancer to assess its feasibility in terms of satisfaction, care preferences, safety...... children and 43 parents in the home care group, and 47 children and 66 parents receiving standard hospital care. RESULTS: All parents in the HBHC program were satisfied and preferred home care. There were no serious adverse events associated with HBHC, and costs did not increase. When adjusting for age......, gender, diagnosis and time since diagnosis, we found significant higher HRQOL scores in parent-reported physical health (P = 0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.2-19.5) and worry (P = 0.04; 95% CI: -0.4-20.6) in the home-care group indicating better physical health and less worry for children...

  13. Hydrogel based occlusion systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, F.A.; Jackson, N.; Dubruel, P.; Adesanya, K.; Embrechts, A.; Mendes, E.; Neves, H.P.; Herijgers, P.; Verbrugghe, Y.; Shacham, Y.; Engel, L.; Krylov, V.

    2013-01-01

    A hydrogel based occlusion system, a method for occluding vessels, appendages or aneurysms, and a method for hydrogel synthesis are disclosed. The hydrogel based occlusion system includes a hydrogel having a shrunken and a swollen state and a delivery tool configured to deliver the hydrogel to a

  14. Performance Analysis of Hospital Information System of the National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung Mi; Boo, Eun Hee; Kim, Jung A; Yoon, Soo Jin; Kim, Seong Woo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the qualitative and quantitative performances of the newly developed information system which was implemented on November 4, 2011 at the National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital. Methods Registration waiting time and changes in the satisfaction scores for the key performance indicators (KPI) before and after the introduction of the system were compared; and the economic effects of the system were analyzed by using the information economics approach. Results After the introduction of the system, the waiting time for registration was reduced by 20%, and the waiting time at the internal medicine department was reduced by 15%. The benefit-to-cost ratio was increased to 1.34 when all intangible benefits were included in the economic analysis. Conclusions The economic impact and target satisfaction rates increased due to the introduction of the new system. The results were proven by the quantitative and qualitative analyses carried out in this study. This study was conducted only seven months after the introduction of the system. As such, a follow-up study should be carried out in the future when the system stabilizes. PMID:23115744

  15. [Nordic accident classification system used in the Danish National Hospital Registration System to register causes of severe traumatic brain injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engberg, Aase Worsaa; Penninga, Elisabeth Irene; Teasdale, Thomas William

    2007-11-05

    The purpose was to illustrate the use of the accident classification system worked out by the Nordic Medico-Statistical Committee (NOMESCO). In particular, registration of causes of severe traumatic brain injury according to the system as part of the Danish National Hospital Registration System was studied. The study comprised 117 patients with very severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) admitted to the Brain Injury Unit of the University Hospital in Hvidovre, Copenhagen, from 1 October 2000 to 30 September 2002. Prospective NOMESCO coding at discharge was compared to independent retrospective coding based on hospital records, and to coding from other wards in the Danish National Hospital Registration System. Furthermore, sets of codes in the Danish National Hospital Registration System for consecutive admissions after a particular accident were compared. Identical results of prospective and independent retrospective coding were found for 65% of 588 single codes, and complete sets of codes for the same accident were identical only in 28% of cases. Sets of codes for the first admission in a hospital course corresponded to retrospective coding at the end of the course in only 17% of cases. Accident code sets from different wards, based on the same injury, were identical in only 7% of cases. Prospective coding by the NOMESCO accident classification system proved problematic, both with regard to correctness and completeness. The system--although logical--seems too complicated compared to the resources invested in the coding. The results of this investigation stress the need for better management and for better instruction to those who carry out the registration.

  16. Depiction of Trends in Administrative Healthcare Data from Hospital Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalankesh, Leila R; Pourasghar, Faramarz; Jafarabadi, Mohammad Asghari; Khanehdan, Negar

    2015-06-01

    administrative healthcare data are among main components of hospital information system. Such data can be analyzed and deployed for a variety of purposes. The principal aim of this research was to depict trends of administrative healthcare data from HIS in a general hospital from March 2011 to March 2014. data set used for this research was extracted from the SQL database of the hospital information system in Razi general hospital located in Marand. The data were saved as CSV (Comma Separated Values) in order to facilitate data cleaning and analysis. The variables of data set included patient's age, gender, final diagnosis, final diagnosis code based on ICD-10 classification system, date of hospitalization, date of discharge, LOS(Length of Stay), ward, and survival status of the patient. Data were analyzed and visualized after applying appropriate cleansing and preparing techniques. morbidity showed a constant trend over three years. Pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium were the leading category of final diagnosis (about 32.8 %). The diseases of the circulatory system were the second class accounting for 13 percent of the hospitalization cases. The diseases of the digestive system had the third rank (10%). Patients aged between 14 and 44 constituted a higher proportion of total cases. Diseases of the circulatory system was the most common class of diseases among elderly patients (age≥65). The highest rate of mortality was observed among patients with final diagnosis of the circulatory system diseases followed by those with diseases of the respiratory system, and neoplasms. Mortality rate for the ICU and the CCU patients were 62% and 33% respectively. The longest average of LOS (7.3 days) was observed among patients hospitalized in the ICU while patients in the Obstetrics and Gynecology ward had the shortest average of LOS (2.4 days). Multiple regression analysis revealed that LOS was correlated with variables of surgery, gender, and type of payment, ward, the

  17. HOSPITAL KANBAN SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION: EVALUATING SATISFACTION OF NURSING PERSONNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguilar-Escobar, Víctor G.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Literature on healthcare supply chain management has shown that the kanban system can provide significant benefits. However, very few benefits have been empirically demonstrated and the extent of each remains unknown. This study aims to measure nurses’ satisfaction with kanban systems in logistics of medical consumables and assesses possible advantages and differences among user groups through an anonymous survey at Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena of Seville, Spain. Treatment of responses included an exploratory factor analysis, and a CAPTCA analysis. The results showed a high level of satisfaction for each aspect of the kanban system. Moreover, it highlighted the differences of opinion between groups of individuals according to workplace, nursing units, job category, seniority, age and kanban training. The exploratory factor analysis revealed that two factors underlie the collected assessments: the inherent advantages of a kanban system, and the logistics system performance as a whole. Thus, hospital managers should promote the implementation of kanban systems, since it increases nurses’ satisfaction and provides significant benefits.

  18. Development of hospital data warehouse for cost analysis of DPC based on medical costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranaga, F; Kumamoto, I; Uto, Y

    2007-01-01

    To develop a data warehouse system for cost analysis, based on the categories of the diagnosis procedure combination (DPC) system, in which medical costs were estimated by DPC category and factors influencing the balance between costs and fees. We developed a data warehouse system for cost analysis using data from the hospital central data warehouse system. The balance data of patients who were discharged from Kagoshima University Hospital from April 2003 to March 2005 were determined in terms of medical procedure, cost per day and patient admission in order to conduct a drill-down analysis. To evaluate this system, we analyzed cash flow by DPC category of patients who were categorized as having malignant tumors and whose DPC category was reevaluated in 2004. The percentages of medical expenses were highest in patients with acute leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and particularly in patients with malignant tumors of the liver and intrahepatic bile duct. Imaging tests degraded the percentages of medical expenses in Kagoshima University Hospital. These results suggested that cost analysis by patient is important for hospital administration in the inclusive evaluation system using a case-mix index such as DPC.

  19. Status of costing hospital nursing work within Australian casemix activity-based funding policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, Liza

    2012-02-01

    Australia has a long history of patient level costing initiated when casemix funding was implemented in several states in the early 1990s. Australia includes, to some extent, hospital payment based on nursing intensity adopted within casemix funding policy and the Diagnostic Related Group system. Costing of hospital nursing services in Australia has not changed significantly in the last few decades despite widespread introduction of casemix funding policy at the state level. Recent Commonwealth of Australia National Health Reform presents change to the management of the delivery of health care including health-care costing. There is agreement for all Australian jurisdictions to progress to casemix-based activity funding. Within this context, nurse costing infrastructure presents contemporary issues and challenges. An assessment is made of the progress of costing nursing services within casemix funding models in Australian hospitals. Valid and reliable Australian-refined nursing service weights might overcome present cost deficiencies and limitations. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Impact of the Local Public Hospital Reform on the Efficiency of Medium-Sized Hospitals in Japan: An Improved Slacks-Based Measure Data Envelopment Analysis Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Tone, Kaoru; Lu, Yingzhe

    2018-04-01

    To assess the change in efficiency and total factor productivity (TFP) of the local public hospitals in Japan after the local public hospital reform launched in late 2007, which was aimed at improving the financial capability and operational efficiency of hospitals. Secondary data were collected from the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications on 213 eligible medium-sized hospitals, each operating 100-400 beds from FY2006 to FY2011. The improved slacks-based measure nonoriented data envelopment analysis models (Quasi-Max SBM nonoriented DEA models) were used to estimate dynamic efficiency score and Malmquist Index. The dynamic efficiency measure indicated an efficiency gain in the first several years of the reform and then was followed by a decrease. Malmquist Index analysis showed a significant decline in the TFP between 2006 and 2011. The financial improvement of medium-sized hospitals was not associated with enhancement of efficiency. Hospital efficiency was not significantly different among ownership structure and law-application system groups, but it was significantly affected by hospital location. The results indicate a need for region-tailored health care policies and for a more comprehensive reform to overcome the systemic constraints that might contribute to the decline of the TFP. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  1. Hospitalization flow in the public and private systems in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Juan Stuardo Yazlle; Monteiro, Rosane Aparecida; Moreira, Marizélia Leão

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the migration flows of demand for public and private hospital care among the health regions of the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil.METHODS Study based on a database of hospitalizations in the public and private systems of the state of Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, in 2006. We analyzed data from 17 health regions of the state, considering people hospitalized in their own health region and those who migrated outwards (emigration) or came from other regions (immigration). The index of migration effectiveness of patients from both systems was estimated. The coverage (hospitalization coefficient) was analyzed in relation to the number of inpatient beds per population and the indexes of migration effectiveness.RESULTS The index of migration effectiveness applied to the hospital care demand flow allowed characterizing health regions with flow balance, with high emigration of public and private patients, and with high attraction of public and private patients.CONCLUSIONS There are differences in hospital care access and opportunities among health regions in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

  2. System-Level Shared Governance Structures and Processes in Healthcare Systems With Magnet®-Designated Hospitals: A Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Carlisa M; Hayne, Arlene N

    The purpose was to identify and describe structures and processes of best practices for system-level shared governance in healthcare systems. Currently, more than 64.6% of US community hospitals are part of a system. System chief nurse executives (SCNEs) are challenged to establish leadership structures and processes that effectively and efficiently disseminate best practices for patients and staff across complex organizations, geographically dispersed locations, and populations. Eleven US healthcare SCNEs from the American Nurses Credentialing Center's repository of Magnet®-designated facilities participated in a 35-multiquestion interview based on Kanter's Theory of Organizational Empowerment. Most SCNEs reported the presence of more than 50% of the empowerment structures and processes in system-level shared governance. Despite the difficulties and complexities of growing health systems, SCNEs have replicated empowerment characteristics of hospital shared governance structures and processes at the system level.

  3. Automated Epileptic Seizure Detection Based on Wearable ECG and PPG in a Hospital Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandecasteele, Kaat; De Cooman, Thomas; Gu, Ying; Cleeren, Evy; Claes, Kasper; Paesschen, Wim Van; Huffel, Sabine Van; Hunyadi, Borbála

    2017-10-13

    Electrocardiography has added value to automatically detect seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients. The wired hospital system is not suited for a long-term seizure detection system at home. To address this need, the performance of two wearable devices, based on electrocardiography (ECG) and photoplethysmography (PPG), are compared with hospital ECG using an existing seizure detection algorithm. This algorithm classifies the seizures on the basis of heart rate features, extracted from the heart rate increase. The algorithm was applied to recordings of 11 patients in a hospital setting with 701 h capturing 47 (fronto-)temporal lobe seizures. The sensitivities of the hospital system, the wearable ECG device and the wearable PPG device were respectively 57%, 70% and 32%, with corresponding false alarms per hour of 1.92, 2.11 and 1.80. Whereas seizure detection performance using the wrist-worn PPG device was considerably lower, the performance using the wearable ECG is proven to be similar to that of the hospital ECG.

  4. Automated Epileptic Seizure Detection Based on Wearable ECG and PPG in a Hospital Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaat Vandecasteele

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Electrocardiography has added value to automatically detect seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE patients. The wired hospital system is not suited for a long-term seizure detection system at home. To address this need, the performance of two wearable devices, based on electrocardiography (ECG and photoplethysmography (PPG, are compared with hospital ECG using an existing seizure detection algorithm. This algorithm classifies the seizures on the basis of heart rate features, extracted from the heart rate increase. The algorithm was applied to recordings of 11 patients in a hospital setting with 701 h capturing 47 (fronto-temporal lobe seizures. The sensitivities of the hospital system, the wearable ECG device and the wearable PPG device were respectively 57%, 70% and 32%, with corresponding false alarms per hour of 1.92, 2.11 and 1.80. Whereas seizure detection performance using the wrist-worn PPG device was considerably lower, the performance using the wearable ECG is proven to be similar to that of the hospital ECG.

  5. Australian Hospital-Based Nurse Educators' Perceptions of Their Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Karleen

    2018-06-01

    This article presents the findings from a phenomenological study that explored the understandings of Australian hospital-based nurse educators' experiences of their role. Purposive sampling resulted in 11 nurse educators from four large metropolitan hospitals within an Australian jurisdiction. The participants were asked how they understand their role and translate that understanding into practice. Thematic analysis identified four themes representative of nurse educators' understanding of their role: Becoming an Educator, Capability Building, Panacea, and Tension. A coherent picture emerged from subthemes highlighting that nurse educators were undervalued and value is added. Being undervalued and value adding are translated into nurse educator practice as resilience, being educationally literate, investing, and having a presence. This article identifies a gap in knowledge related to understanding the nurse educator role and informs recruitment and subsequent retention of nurses into nurse educator roles at a time when the nursing workforce in Australia and internationally is about to experience a major shortfall. Findings are specific to the Australian context and are not necessarily generalizable to other hospital jurisdictions. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2018;49(6):274-281. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Financial Performance of Hospitals in the Mississippi Delta Region Under the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program and Hospital Value-based Purchasing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsueh-Fen; Karim, Saleema; Wan, Fei; Nevola, Adrienne; Morris, Michael E; Bird, T Mac; Tilford, J Mick

    2017-11-01

    Previous studies showed that the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP) and the Hospital Value-based Purchasing Program (HVBP) disproportionately penalized hospitals caring for the poor. The Mississippi Delta Region (Delta Region) is among the most socioeconomically disadvantaged areas in the United States. The financial performance of hospitals in the Delta Region under both HRRP and HVBP remains unclear. To compare the differences in financial performance under both HRRP and HVBP between hospitals in the Delta Region (Delta hospitals) and others in the nation (non-Delta hospitals). We used a 7-year panel dataset and applied difference-in-difference models to examine operating and total margin between Delta and non-Delta hospitals in 3 time periods: preperiod (2008-2010); postperiod 1 (2011-2012); and postperiod 2 (2013-2014). The Delta hospitals had a 0.89% and 4.24% reduction in operating margin in postperiods 1 and 2, respectively, whereas the non-Delta hospitals had 1.13% and 1% increases in operating margin in postperiods 1 and 2, respectively. The disparity in total margins also widened as Delta hospitals had a 1.98% increase in postperiod 1, but a 0.30% reduction in postperiod 2, whereas non-Delta hospitals had 1.27% and 2.28% increases in postperiods 1 and 2, respectively. The gap in financial performance between Delta and non-Delta hospitals widened following the implementation of HRRP and HVBP. Policy makers should modify these 2 programs to ensure that resources are not moved from the communities that need them most.

  7. Hospital information system: reusability, designing, modelling, recommendations for implementing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huet, B

    1998-01-01

    The aims of this paper are to precise some essential conditions for building reuse models for hospital information systems (HIS) and to present an application for hospital clinical laboratories. Reusability is a general trend in software, however reuse can involve a more or less part of design, classes, programs; consequently, a project involving reusability must be precisely defined. In the introduction it is seen trends in software, the stakes of reuse models for HIS and the special use case constituted with a HIS. The main three parts of this paper are: 1) Designing a reuse model (which objects are common to several information systems?) 2) A reuse model for hospital clinical laboratories (a genspec object model is presented for all laboratories: biochemistry, bacteriology, parasitology, pharmacology, ...) 3) Recommendations for generating plug-compatible software components (a reuse model can be implemented as a framework, concrete factors that increase reusability are presented). In conclusion reusability is a subtle exercise of which project must be previously and carefully defined.

  8. Assessment of pharmacy information system performance in selected hospitals in isfahan city during 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqaeian Nejad Isfahani, Sakineh; Mirzaeian, Razieh; Habibi, Mahbobe

    2013-01-01

    In supporting a therapeutic approach and medication therapy management, pharmacy information system acts as one of the central pillars of information system. This ensures that medication therapy is being supported and evaluated with an optimal level of safety and quality similar to other treatments and services. This research aims to evaluate the performance of pharmacy information system in three types of teaching, private and social affiliated hospitals. The present study is an applied, descriptive and analytical study which was conducted on the pharmacy information system in use in the selected hospitals. The research population included all the users of pharmacy information systems in the selected hospitals. The research sample is the same as the research population. Researchers collected data using a self-designed checklist developed following the guidelines of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Australia pharmaceutical Society and Therapeutic guidelines of the Drug Commission of the German Medical Association. The checklist validity was assessed by research supervisors and pharmacy information system pharmacists and users. To collect data besides observation, the questionnaires were distributed among pharmacy information system pharmacists and users. Finally, the analysis of the data was performed using the SPSS software. Pharmacy information system was found to be semi-automated in 16 hospitals and automated in 3 ones. Regarding the standards in the guidelines issued by the Society of Pharmacists, the highest rank in observing the input standards belonged to the Social Services associated hospitals with a mean score of 32.75. While teaching hospitals gained the highest score both in processing standards with a mean score of 29.15 and output standards with a mean score of 43.95, and the private hospitals had the lowest mean scores of 23.32, 17.78, 24.25 in input, process and output standards respectively. Based on the findings, the studied

  9. Simple Scoring System to Predict In-Hospital Mortality After Surgery for Infective Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Giuseppe; Perrotti, Andrea; Obadia, Jean-François; Duval, Xavier; Iung, Bernard; Alla, François; Chirouze, Catherine; Selton-Suty, Christine; Hoen, Bruno; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Delahaye, François; Tattevin, Pierre; Le Moing, Vincent; Pappalardo, Aniello; Chocron, Sidney

    2017-07-20

    Aspecific scoring systems are used to predict the risk of death postsurgery in patients with infective endocarditis (IE). The purpose of the present study was both to analyze the risk factors for in-hospital death, which complicates surgery for IE, and to create a mortality risk score based on the results of this analysis. Outcomes of 361 consecutive patients (mean age, 59.1±15.4 years) who had undergone surgery for IE in 8 European centers of cardiac surgery were recorded prospectively, and a risk factor analysis (multivariable logistic regression) for in-hospital death was performed. The discriminatory power of a new predictive scoring system was assessed with the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Score validation procedures were carried out. Fifty-six (15.5%) patients died postsurgery. BMI >27 kg/m 2 (odds ratio [OR], 1.79; P =0.049), estimated glomerular filtration rate 55 mm Hg (OR, 1.78; P =0.032), and critical state (OR, 2.37; P =0.017) were independent predictors of in-hospital death. A scoring system was devised to predict in-hospital death postsurgery for IE (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.780; 95% CI, 0.734-0.822). The score performed better than 5 of 6 scoring systems for in-hospital death after cardiac surgery that were considered. A simple scoring system based on risk factors for in-hospital death was specifically created to predict mortality risk postsurgery in patients with IE. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  10. Proton Radiation Therapy in the Hospital Environment: Conception, Development, and Operation of the Initial Hospital-Based Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, James M.; Slater, Jerry D.; Wroe, Andrew J.

    The world's first hospital-based proton treatment center opened at Loma Linda University Medical Center in 1990, following two decades of development. Patients' needs were the driving force behind its conception, development, and execution; the primary needs were delivery of effective conformal doses of ionizing radiation and avoidance of normal tissue to the maximum extent possible. The facility includes a proton synchrotron and delivery system developed in collaboration with physicists and engineers at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and from other high-energy-physics laboratories worldwide. The system, operated and maintained by Loma Linda personnel, was designed to be safe, reliable, flexible in utilization, efficient in use, and upgradeable to meet demands of changing patient needs and advances in technology. Since the facility opened, nearly 14,000 adults and children have been treated for a wide range of cancers and other diseases. Ongoing research is expanding the applications of proton therapy, while reducing costs.

  11. Key performance indicators in hospital based on balanced scorecard model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Rahimi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Performance measurement is receiving increasing verification all over the world. Nowadays in a lot of organizations, irrespective of their type or size, performance evaluation is the main concern and a key issue for top administrators. The purpose of this study is to organize suitable key performance indicators (KPIs for hospitals’ performance evaluation based on the balanced scorecard (BSC. Method: This is a mixed method study. In order to identify the hospital’s performance indicators (HPI, first related literature was reviewed and then the experts’ panel and Delphi method were used. In this study, two rounds were needed for the desired level of consensus. The experts rated the importance of the indicators, on a five-point Likert scale. In the consensus calculation, the consensus percentage was calculated by classifying the values 1-3 as not important (0 and 4-5 to (1 as important. Simple additive weighting technique was used to rank the indicators and select hospital’s KPIs. The data were analyzed by Excel 2010 software. Results: About 218 indicators were obtained from a review of selected literature. Through internal expert panel, 77 indicators were selected. Finally, 22 were selected for KPIs of hospitals. Ten indicators were selected in internal process perspective and 5, 4, and 3 indicators in finance, learning and growth, and customer, respectively. Conclusion: This model can be a useful tool for evaluating and comparing the performance of hospitals. However, this model is flexible and can be adjusted according to differences in the target hospitals. This study can be beneficial for hospital administrators and it can help them to change their perspective about performance evaluation.

  12. Installation and testing of a hospital-based cyclotron for radiation therapy and isotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almond, P.R.; Marbach, J.R.; Otte, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    A hospital based cyclotron is under installation at The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Hospital in Houston. This machine will be used for the production of radioactive isotopes and for the generation of neutrons for the radiotherapy treatment of cancer. It is a Cyclotron Corporation CP-42 negative proton accelerator. For neutron production the protons are transported through an isocentrically mounted beam transport system that can be rotated around the patient. The shielding requirements of this facility will be described as will the initial measurements on the characteristics of the neutron beam

  13. Intra-hospital use of a telepathology system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongürü, O; Celasun, B

    2000-01-01

    Utilization of telepathology systems to cover distant geographical areas has increased recently. However, the potential usefulness of similar systems for closer distances does not seem to be widely appreciated. In this study, we present data on the use of a simple telepathology system connecting the pathology department and the intra-operative consultation room within the operating theaters of the hospital. Ninety-eight frozen section cases from a past period have been re-evaluated using a real-time setup. Forty-eight of the cases have been re-evaluated in the customary fashion; allowing both ends to communicate and cooperate freely. Fifty of the cases, however, were evaluated by the consultant while the operating room end behaved like a robot; moving the stage of the microscope, changing and focusing the objectives. The deferral rate was lower than the original frozen section evaluations. Overall, the sensitivity was 100%, specificity 98%, negative predictive value 96, 5% and positive predictive value 100%. No significant difference was found for the diagnostic performances between the cooperative and robotic simulation methods.Our results strengthen the belief that telepathology is a valuable tool in offering pathology services to remote areas. The far side of a hospital building can also be a remote area and a low cost system can be helpful for intraoperative consultations. Educational value of such a system is also commendable.

  14. Evaluation of aviation-based safety team training in a hospital in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Korne, Dirk F; Van Wijngaarden, Jeroen D H; Van Dyck, Cathy; Hiddema, U Francis; Klazinga, Niek S

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the implementation of a broad-scale team resource management (TRM) program on safety culture in a Dutch eye hospital, detailing the program's content and procedures. Aviation-based TRM training is recognized as a useful approach to increase patient safety, but little is known about how it affects safety culture. Pre- and post-assessments of the hospitals' safety culture was based on interviews with ophthalmologists, anesthesiologists, residents, nurses, and support staff. Interim observations were made at training sessions and in daily hospital practice. The program consisted of safety audits of processes and (team) activities, interactive classroom training sessions by aviation experts, a flight simulator session, and video recording of team activities with subsequent feedback. Medical professionals considered aviation experts inspiring role models and respected their non-hierarchical external perspective and focus on medical-technical issues. The post-assessment showed that ophthalmologists and other hospital staff had become increasingly aware of safety issues. The multidisciplinary approach promoted social (team) orientation that replaced the former functionally-oriented culture. The number of reported near-incidents greatly increased; the number of wrong-side surgeries stabilized to a minimum after an initial substantial reduction. The study was observational and the hospital's variety of efforts to improve safety culture prevented us from establishing a causal relation between improvement and any one specific intervention. Aviation-based TRM training can be a useful to stimulate safety culture in hospitals. Safety and quality improvements are not single treatment interventions but complex socio-technical interventions. A multidisciplinary system approach and focus on "team" instead of "profession" seems both necessary and difficult in hospital care.

  15. Validation of hospital register-based diagnosis of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wermuth, Lene; Lassen, Christina Funch; Himmerslev, Liselotte

    2012-01-01

    Denmark has a long-standing tradition of maintaining one of the world's largest health science specialized register data bases as the National Hospital Register (NHR). To estimate the prevalence and incidence of diseases, the correctness of the diagnoses recorded is critical. Parkinson's disease...... (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and only 75-80% of patients with parkinsonism will have idiopathic PD (iPD). It is necessary to follow patients in order to determine if some of them will develop other neurodegenerative diseases and a one-time-only diagnostic code for iPD reported in the register...

  16. Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems: An Ethical Leadership Dilemma to Satisfy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Llewellyn E; Tallman, Erin

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the parameters and the dynamics of Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) that create an ethical leadership dilemma to satisfy patients in the hospital setting while still ensuring appropriate care for quality clinical outcomes. Under the Affordable Care Act, hospitals and health care systems are in a high-stakes struggle of winners and losers based on HCAHPS scores. This high-stakes struggle creates unintended consequences of an ethical dilemma of doing what is right for the patient versus doing whatever it takes to please the patient in order to achieve high scores of satisfaction that are tied to better reimbursements. This article also reports the results of a national survey of 500 chief executive officers by the authors about the attitudes and frustrations of chief executive officers confronting the wild unrest caused by HCAHPS.

  17. Multiple physical signs detection and decision support system for hospitalized older adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baig, Mirza Mansoor; GholamHosseini, Hamid; Connolly, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Health monitoring systems have rapidly evolved during the past two decades and have the potential to change the way healthcare is currently delivered. Smart monitoring systems automate patient monitoring tasks and thereby improve patient workflow management. Moreover, expert systems have the potential to assist clinicians and improve their performance by accurately executing repetitive tasks, to which humans are ill-suited. Clinicians working in hospital wards are responsible for conducting a multitude of tasks which require constant vigilance, and thus the need for a smart decision support system has arisen. In particular, wireless patient monitoring systems are emerging as a low cost, reliable and accurate means of healthcare delivery.Vital signs monitoring systems are rapidly becoming part of today’s healthcare delivery. The paradigm has shifted from traditional and manual recording to computer-based electronic records and, further, to handheld devices as versatile and innovative healthcare monitoring systems. The current study focuses on interpreting multiple physical signs and early warning for hospitalized older adults so that severe consequences can be minimized. Data from a total of 30 patients have been collated in New Zealand hospitals under local and national ethics approvals. The system records blood pressure, heart rate (pulse), oxygen saturation (SpO2), ear temperature and blood glucose levels from hospitalized patients and transfers this information to a web-based software application for remote monitoring and further interpretation. Ultimately, this system is aimed to achieve a high level of agreement with clinicians’ interpretation when assessing specific physical signs such as bradycardia, tachycardia, hypertension, hypotension, hypoxaemia, fever and hypothermia to generate early warnings. The performance of the vital signs interpretation system was validated through off-line as well as real-time tests with a high level of agreement between

  18. Hospital accreditation, reimbursement and case mix: links and insights for contractual systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Walid; Khalife, Jade; El-Jardali, Fadi; Romanos, Jenny; Harb, Hilda; Hamadeh, Ghassan; Dimassi, Hani

    2013-12-05

    Resource consumption is a widely used proxy for severity of illness, and is often measured through a case-mix index (CMI) based on Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs), which is commonly linked to payment. For countries that do not have DRGs it has been suggested to use CMIs derived from International Classification of Diseases (ICD). Our research objective was to use ICD-derived case-mix to evaluate whether or not the current accreditation-based hospital reimbursement system in Lebanon is appropriate. Our study population included medical admissions to 122 hospitals contracted with the Lebanese Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) between June 2011 and May 2012. Applying ICD-derived CMI on principal diagnosis cost (CMI-ICDC) using weighing similar to that used in Medicare DRG CMI, analyses were made by hospital accreditation, ownership and size. We examined two measures of 30-day re-admission rate. Further analysis was done to examine correlation between principal diagnosis CMI and surgical procedure cost CMI (CMI-CPTC), and three proxy measures on surgical complexity, case complexity and surgical proportion. Hospitals belonging to the highest accreditation category had a higher CMI than others, but no difference was found in CMI among the three other categories. Private hospitals had a higher CMI than public hospitals, and those more than 100 beds had a higher CMI than smaller hospitals. Re-admissions rates were higher in accreditation category C hospitals than category D hospitals. CMI-ICDC was fairly correlated with CMI-CPTC, and somehow correlated with the proposed proxies. Our results indicate that the current link between accreditation and reimbursement rate is not appropriate, and leads to unfairness and inefficiency in the system. Some proxy measures are correlated with case-mix but are not good substitutes for it. Policy implications of our findings propose the necessity for changing the current reimbursement system by including case mix and outcome indicators in

  19. SCM: a practical tool to implement hospital-based syndromic surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chuchu; Li, Zhongjie; Fu, Yifei; Lan, Yajia; Zhu, Weiping; Zhou, Dinglun; Zhang, Honglong; Lai, Shengjie; Buckeridge, David L; Sun, Qiao; Yang, Weizhong

    2016-06-18

    Syndromic surveillance has been widely used for the early warning of infectious disease outbreaks, especially in mass gatherings, but the collection of electronic data on symptoms in hospitals is one of the fundamental challenges that must be overcome during operating a syndromic surveillance system. The objective of our study is to describe and evaluate the implementation of a symptom-clicking-module (SCM) as a part of the enhanced hospital-based syndromic surveillance during the 41st World Exposition in Shanghai, China, 2010. The SCM, including 25 targeted symptoms, was embedded in the sentinels' Hospital Information Systems (HIS). The clinicians used SCM to record these information of all the visiting patients, and data were collated and transmitted automatically in daily batches. The symptoms were categorized into seven targeted syndromes using pre-defined criteria, and statistical algorithms were applied to detect temporal aberrations in the data series. SCM was deployed successfully in each sentinel hospital and was operated during the 184-day surveillance period. A total of 1,730,797 patient encounters were recorded by SCM, and 6.1 % (105,352 visits) met the criteria of the seven targeted syndromes. Acute respiratory and gastrointestinal syndromes were reported most frequently, accounted for 92.1 % of reports in all syndromes, and the aggregated time-series presented an obvious day-of-week variation over the study period. In total, 191 aberration signals were triggered, and none of them were identified as outbreaks after verification and field investigation. SCM has acted as a practical tool for recording symptoms in the hospital-based enhanced syndromic surveillance system during the 41st World Exposition in Shanghai, in the context of without a preexisting electronic tool to collect syndromic data in the HIS of the sentinel hospitals.

  20. Assessing the Performance of Imaging Health Systems in Five Selected Hospitals in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Kawooya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The first objective of the study was to develop an index termed as the ′Imaging Coverage′ (IC, for measuring the performance of the imaging health systems. This index together with the Hospital-Based Utilization (HBU would then be calculated for five Ugandan hospitals. Second, was to relate the financial resources and existing health policy to the performance of the imaging systems. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey employing the triangulation methodology, conducted in Mulago National Referral Hospital. The qualitative study used cluster sampling, in-depth interviews, focus group discussions, and self-administered questionnaires to explore the non-measurable aspects of the imaging systems′ performances. Results: The IC developed and tested as an index for the imaging system′s performance was 36%. General X-rays had the best IC followed by ultrasound. The Hospital-Based Utilization for the five selected hospitals was 186 per thousand and was the highest for general radiography followed by ultrasound. Conclusion: The IC for the five selected hospitals was 36% and the HBU was 186 per thousand, reflecting low performance levels, largely attributable to inadequate funding. There were shortfalls in imaging requisitions and inefficiencies in the imaging systems, financing, and health policy. Although the proportion of inappropriate imaging was small, reducing this inappropriateness even further would lead to a significant total saving, which could be channeled into investigating more patients. Financial resources stood out as the major limitation in attaining the desired performance and there is a need to increase budget funding so as to improve the performance of the imaging health systems.

  1. Implementation of integrated heterogeneous electronic electrocardiography data into Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumrin, Piyapong; Chumpoo, Pitupoom

    2016-03-01

    Electrocardiography is one of the most important non-invasive diagnostic tools for diagnosing coronary heart disease. The electrocardiography information system in Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital required a massive manual labor effort. In this article, we propose an approach toward the integration of heterogeneous electrocardiography data and the implementation of an integrated electrocardiography information system into the existing Hospital Information System. The system integrates different electrocardiography formats into a consistent electrocardiography rendering by using Java software. The interface acts as middleware to seamlessly integrate different electrocardiography formats. Instead of using a common electrocardiography protocol, we applied a central format based on Java classes for mapping different electrocardiography formats which contains a specific parser for each electrocardiography format to acquire the same information. Our observations showed that the new system improved the effectiveness of data management, work flow, and data quality; increased the availability of information; and finally improved quality of care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Controlling nosocomial infection based on structure of hospital social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Taro; Masuda, Naoki

    2008-10-07

    Nosocomial infection (i.e. infection in healthcare facilities) raises a serious public health problem, as implied by the existence of pathogens characteristic to healthcare facilities such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and hospital-mediated outbreaks of influenza and severe acute respiratory syndrome. For general communities, epidemic modeling based on social networks is being recognized as a useful tool. However, disease propagation may occur in a healthcare facility in a manner different from that in a urban community setting due to different network architecture. We simulate stochastic susceptible-infected-recovered dynamics on social networks, which are based on observations in a hospital in Tokyo, to explore effective containment strategies against nosocomial infection. The observed social networks in the hospital have hierarchical and modular structure in which dense substructure such as departments, wards, and rooms, are globally but only loosely connected, and do not reveal extremely right-skewed distributions of the number of contacts per individual. We show that healthcare workers, particularly medical doctors, are main vectors (i.e. transmitters) of diseases on these networks. Intervention methods that restrict interaction between medical doctors and their visits to different wards shrink the final epidemic size more than intervention methods that directly protect patients, such as isolating patients in single rooms. By the same token, vaccinating doctors with priority rather than patients or nurses is more effective. Finally, vaccinating individuals with large betweenness centrality (frequency of mediating connection between pairs of individuals along the shortest paths) is superior to vaccinating ones with large connectedness to others or randomly chosen individuals, which was suggested by previous model studies.

  3. 78 FR 50495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... Connective Tissue) a. Reverse Shoulder Procedures b. Total Ankle Replacement Procedures 6. MDC 15 (Newborns... specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric... Issues. James Poyer, (410) 786-2261, PPS-Exempt Cancer Hospital Quality Reporting Issues. Allison Lee...

  4. Collaboration between physicians and a hospital-based palliative care team in a general acute-care hospital in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishikitani Mariko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continual collaboration between physicians and hospital-based palliative care teams represents a very important contributor to focusing on patients' symptoms and maintaining their quality of life during all stages of their illness. However, the traditionally late introduction of palliative care has caused misconceptions about hospital-based palliative care teams (PCTs among patients and general physicians in Japan. The objective of this study is to identify the factors related to physicians' attitudes toward continual collaboration with hospital-based PCTs. Methods This cross-sectional anonymous questionnaire-based survey was conducted to clarify physicians' attitudes toward continual collaboration with PCTs and to describe the factors that contribute to such attitudes. We surveyed 339 full-time physicians, including interns, employed in a general acute-care hospital in an urban area in Japan; the response rate was 53% (N = 155. We assessed the basic characteristics, experience, knowledge, and education of respondents. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the main factors affecting the physicians' attitudes toward PCTs. Results We found that the physicians who were aware of the World Health Organization (WHO analgesic ladder were 6.7 times (OR = 6.7, 95% CI = 1.98-25.79 more likely to want to treat and care for their patients in collaboration with the hospital-based PCTs than were those physicians without such awareness. Conclusion Basic knowledge of palliative care is important in promoting physicians' positive attitudes toward collaboration with hospital-based PCTs.

  5. Case Mix Management Systems: An Opportunity to Integrate Medical Records and Financial Management System Data Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusnak, James E.

    1987-01-01

    Due to previous systems selections, many hospitals (health care facilities) are faced with the problem of fragmented data bases containing clinical, demographic and financial information. Projects to select and implement a Case Mix Management System (CMMS) provide an opportunity to reduce the number of separate physical files and to migrate towards systems with an integrated data base. The number of CMMS candidate systems is often restricted due to data base and system interface issues. The hospital must insure the CMMS project provides a means to implement an integrated on-line hospital information data base for use by departments in operating under a DRG-based Prospective Payment System. This paper presents guidelines for use in selecting a Case Mix Mangement System to meet the hospital's financial and operations planning, budgeting, marketing, and other management needs, while considering the data base implications of the implementation.

  6. Hospital distribution in a metropolitan city: assessment by a geographical information system grid modelling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Soo Lee

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Grid models were used to assess urban hospital distribution in Seoul, the capital of South Korea. A geographical information system (GIS based analytical model was developed and applied to assess the situation in a metropolitan area with a population exceeding 10 million. Secondary data for this analysis were obtained from multiple sources: the Korean Statistical Information Service, the Korean Hospital Association and the Statistical Geographical Information System. A grid of cells measuring 1 × 1 km was superimposed on the city map and a set of variables related to population, economy, mobility and housing were identified and measured for each cell. Socio-demographic variables were included to reflect the characteristics of each area. Analytical models were then developed using GIS software with the number of hospitals as the dependent variable. Applying multiple linear regression and geographically weighted regression models, three factors (highway and major arterial road areas; number of subway entrances; and row house areas were statistically significant in explaining the variance of hospital distribution for each cell. The overall results show that GIS is a useful tool for analysing and understanding location strategies. This approach appears a useful source of information for decision-makers concerned with the distribution of hospitals and other health care centres in a city.

  7. Hospital-Based Coalition to Improve Regional Surge Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Learning

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surge capacity for optimization of access to hospital beds is a limiting factor in response to catastrophic events. Medical facilities, communication tools, manpower, and resource reserves exist to respond to these events. However, these factors may not be optimally functioning to generate an effective and efficient surge response. The objective was to improve the function of these factors.Methods: Regional healthcare facilities and supporting local emergency response agencies developed a coalition (the Healthcare Facilities Partnership of South Central Pennsylvania; HCFP¬SCPA to increase regional surge capacity and emergency preparedness for healthcare facilities. The coalition focused on 6 objectives: (1 increase awareness of capabilities and assets, (2 develop and pilot test advanced planning and exercising of plans in the region, (3 augment written medical mutual aid agreements, (4 develop and strengthen partnership relationships, (5 ensure National Incident Management System compliance, and (6 develop and test a plan for effective utilization of volunteer healthcare professionals.Results: In comparison to baseline measurements, the coalition improved existing areas covered under all 6 objectives documented during a 24-month evaluation period. Enhanced communications between the hospital coalition, and real-time exercises, were used to provide evidence of improved preparedness for putative mass casualty incidents.Conclusion: The HCFP-SCPA successfully increased preparedness and surge capacity through a partnership of regional healthcare facilities and emergency response agencies.

  8. Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (HVBP) – Total Performance Score

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospitals participating in the Hospital VBP Program and their Clinical Process of Care domain scores, Patient Experience of Care dimension scores, and...

  9. Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (HVBP) – Heart Failure Scores

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospitals participating in the Hospital VBP Program and their performance rates and scores for the Clinical Process of Care Heart Failure measures.

  10. Assessing Performance of Botswana’s Public Hospital System: The Use of the World Health Organization Health System Performance Assessment Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onalenna Seitio-Kgokgwe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Very few studies have assessed performance of Botswana public hospitals. We draw from a large research study assessing performance of the Botswana Ministry of Health (MoH to evaluate the performance of public hospital system using the World Health Organization Health Systems Performance Assessment Framework (WHO HSPAF. We aimed to evaluate performance of Botswana public hospital system; relate findings of the assessment to the potential for improvements in hospital performance; and determine the usefulness of the WHO HSPAF in assessing performance of hospital systems in a developing country. Methods This article is based on data collected from document analysis, 54 key informants comprising senior managers and staff of the MoH (N= 40 and senior officers from stakeholder organizations (N= 14, and surveys of 42 hospital managers and 389 health workers. Data from documents and transcripts were analyzed using content and thematic analysis while data analysis for surveys was descriptive determining proportions and percentages. Results The organizational structure of the Botswana’s public hospital system, authority and decision-making are highly centralized. Overall physical access to health services is high. However, challenges in the distribution of facilities and inpatient beds create inequities and inefficiencies. Capacity of the hospitals to deliver services is limited by inadequate resources. There are significant challenges with the quality of care. Conclusion While Botswana invested considerably in building hospitals around the country resulting in high physical access to services, the organization and governance of the hospital system, and inadequate resources limit service delivery. The ongoing efforts to decentralize management of hospitals to district level entities should be expedited. The WHO HSPAF enabled us to conduct a comprehensive assessment of the public hospital system. Though relatively new, this approach proved

  11. Urinary incontinence: hospital-based prevalence and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Nojomi

    2008-02-01

    trauma, constipation, chronic illnesses (specially diabetes, and gynecologic and other pelvic surgeries.

  12. KEY WORDS: Urinary incontinence, prevalence, risk factors, hospital-based.
  13. [Current status of "hospital-clinic" and "hospital-pharmacy" cooperation for inhalation therapy -based on hospital surveys throughout Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Chie; Momose, Yasuyuki; Horie, Takeo; Komase, Yuko; Niimi, Akio; Dobashi, Kunio; Fujimoto, Keisaku; Tohda, Yuuji; Ohta, Ken; Adachi, Mitsuru

    2014-02-01

    The "zero death from asthma strategy" in the medical treatment for bronchial asthma has been promoted by the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare from 2006, and it indicates that medical and non-medical specialists, as well as pharmacists, should cooperate, and strives to build cooperation which is suited the actual conditions of an area. It is also important for COPD. Although hospitals in some areas cooperate with clinics and pharmacies, the overall concept of cooperation appears to be absent in most Japanese hospitals. A questionnaire was administered in early March, 2012 to 477 allergology institutions, and was authorized by an educational establishment. Among 246 replies from the institutions, cooperation between hospitals and clinics was carried out by 98 institutions (39.8%) specializing in bronchial asthma, and in 64 institutions (37.2%) specializing in COPD. However, cooperation tools were used in only 37 of these institutions (15.0%). The ability to fill prescriptions outside the hospital was available in 209 institutions (85.0%). One-hundred and seventeen institutions (47.6%) replied that they have no tools for hospital-pharmacy cooperation. Direct indications were written in prescriptions by 82 institutions (33.3). In order to build inter-regional association and to equalize medical treatment, we suggest that developing tools and organization for cooperation between health professionals who treat patients with bronchial asthma and COPD is necessary.

  14. Evaluation of a Hospital-Based Pneumonia Nurse Navigator Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldon, Lisa E; McDonough, Kelly; Turner, Barbara; Simmons, Leigh Ann

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a hospital-based pneumonia nurse navigator program. This study used a retrospective, formative evaluation. Data of patients admitted from January 2012 through December 2014 to a large community hospital with a primary or secondary diagnosis of pneumonia, excluding aspiration pneumonia, were used. Data included patient demographics, diagnoses, insurance coverage, core measures, average length of stay (ALOS), disposition, readmission rate, financial outcomes, and patient barriers to care were collected. Descriptive statistics and parametric testing were used to analyze data. Core measure performance was sustained at the 90th percentile 2 years after the implementation of the navigator program. The ALOS did not decrease to established benchmarks; however, the SD for ALOS decreased by nearly half after implementation of the navigator program, suggesting the program decreased the number and length of extended stays. Charges per case decreased by 21% from 2012 to 2014. Variable costs decreased by 4% over a 2-year period, which increased net profit per case by 5%. Average readmission payments increased by 8% from 2012 to 2014, and the net revenue per case increased by 8.3%. The pneumonia nurse navigator program may improve core measures, reduce ALOS, and increase net revenue. Future evaluations are necessary to substantiate these findings and optimize the cost and quality performance of navigator programs.

  15. Hospitalization resource use and costs before and after TIA and stroke: results from a population-based cohort study (OXVASC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luengo-Fernandez, Ramon; Silver, Louise E; Gutnikov, Sergei A; Gray, Alastair M; Rothwell, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    High hospitalization rates, prolonged length of stay, and increased risks of subsequent events mean a steep increase in health care usage after stroke. No study, however, has examined to what extent increased costs after transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke are due to hospitalizations for the initial event, recurrent events, and/or nonvascular hospitalizations, and how costs compare with the year prior to the event. We studied patients in a population-based cohort study (Oxford Vascular Study) in the United Kingdom from 2003 to 2007. Hospitalization and cost details were obtained from patients' individualized Hospital Episode Statistics records. A total of 295 incident TIA and 439 incident stroke patients were included. For patients with stroke, average costs increased from £1437 in the year pre-event to £6629 in the year post-event (PTIA, costs increased from £876 1 year before the event to £2410 in the year post-event (PTIA incurred nonsignificantly higher costs due to hospitalizations linked to subsequent vascular events (£774) than for hospitalizations linked to the index TIA (£720). Hospital costs increased after TIA or stroke, primarily because of increased initial cerebrovascular hospitalizations. The finding that costs due to nonvascular diagnoses also increased after TIA or stroke appears, in part, to be explained by the miscoding of TIA/stroke-related hospitalizations in electronic information systems. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pattern of congenital malformations in newborn: a hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed El Koumi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Birth defects, encountered frequently by pediatricians, are important causes of childhood morbidity and mortality. Birth defects can be classified based on their severity, pathogenic mechanism or whether they involve a single system or multiple systems. This hospital based prospective descriptive study highlights the prevalence of congenital anomalies (CAs in one year, among liveborn neonates delivered in a university hospital. Design and methods: All women giving birth to babies were included. Demographic details, associated risk factors and the type of CAs in babies were recorded. Diagnosis of CAs was based on clinical evaluation, radiographic examination and chromosomal analysis of newborn whenever recommended. Results: The overall incidence of CAs among liveborn neonates was 2.5%, as most of the cases were referred to Zagazig University Hospital for delivery. The musculoskeletal system (23% was the most commonly involved; followed by central nervous system (20.3%. Involvement of more than one system was observed in (28.6% cases. Out of the maternal and fetal risk factors, parental consanguinity, maternal undernutrition and obesity, positive history of an anomaly in the family, low birth weight(LBW, and prematurity were significantly associated with higher frequency of CAs(p <0.05, with non-significant differences for maternal age and the sex of the neonates. Conclusion : The current study highlighted the point prevalence of congenital anomalies in one year in zagazig university hospital in Egypt. The present study revealed a high prevalence of congenital anomalies in our locality and stressed upon the importance of carrying out a thorough clinical examination of all neonates at birth.

  17. Reimbursement in hospital-based vascular surgery: Physician and practice perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, Jennifer L; Zwolak, Robert M; Goodney, Philip P; Rutherford, Gretchen A; Powell, Richard J

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine change in value of a vascular surgery division to the health care system during 6 years at a hospital-based academic practice and to compare physician vs hospital revenue earned during this period. Total revenue generated by the vascular surgery service line at an academic medical center from 2010 through 2015 was evaluated. Total revenue was measured as the sum of physician (professional) and hospital (technical) net revenue for all vascular-related patient care. Adjustments were made for work performed, case complexity, and inflation. To reflect the effect of these variables, net revenue was indexed to work relative value units (wRVUs), case mix index, and consumer price index, which adjusted for work, case complexity, and inflation, respectively. Differences in physician and hospital net revenue were compared over time. Physician work, measured in RVUs per year, increased by 4%; case complexity, assessed with case mix index, increased by 10% for the 6-year measurement period. Despite stability in payer mix at 64% to 69% Medicare, both physician and hospital vascular-related revenue/wRVU decreased during this period. Unadjusted professional revenue/wRVU declined by 14.1% (P = .09); when considering case complexity, physician revenue/wRVU declined by 20.6% (P = .09). Taking into account both case complexity and inflation, physician revenue declined by 27.0% (P = .04). Comparatively, hospital revenue for vascular surgery services decreased by 13.8% (P = .07) when adjusting for unit work, complexity, and inflation. At medical centers where vascular surgeons are hospital based, vascular care reimbursement decreased substantially from 2010 to 2015 when case complexity and inflation were considered. Physician reimbursement (professional fees) decreased at a significantly greater rate than hospital reimbursement for vascular care. This trend has significant implications for salaried vascular surgeons in hospital-based

  18. Can hospital-based doctors change their working hours? Evidence from Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, R; Hall, J

    2014-07-01

    To explore factors predicting hospital-based doctors' desire to work less, and then their success in making that change. Consecutive waves of an Australian longitudinal survey of doctors (Medicine in Australia-Balancing Employment and Life). There were 6285 and 6337 hospital-based completers in the two waves, consisting of specialists, hospital-based non-specialists and specialist registrars. Forty-eight per cent stated a preference to reduce hours. Predictive characteristics were being female and working more than 40 h/week (both P less likely to state the preference. Factors associated with not wanting to reduce working hours were being in excellent health and being satisfied with work (both P working hours, only 32% successfully managed to do so in the subsequent year (defined by a reduction of at least 5 h/week). Predictors of successfully reducing hours were being older, female and working more than 40 h/week (all P hours and then their subsequent success in doing so. Designing policies that seek to reduce attrition may alleviate some of the ongoing pressures in the Australian hospital system. © 2014 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  19. A queueing theory based model for business continuity in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniati, R; Cecconi, G; Dori, F; Frosini, F; Iadanza, E; Biffi Gentili, G; Niccolini, F; Gusinu, R

    2013-01-01

    Clinical activities can be seen as results of precise and defined events' succession where every single phase is characterized by a waiting time which includes working duration and possible delay. Technology makes part of this process. For a proper business continuity management, planning the minimum number of devices according to the working load only is not enough. A risk analysis on the whole process should be carried out in order to define which interventions and extra purchase have to be made. Markov models and reliability engineering approaches can be used for evaluating the possible interventions and to protect the whole system from technology failures. The following paper reports a case study on the application of the proposed integrated model, including risk analysis approach and queuing theory model, for defining the proper number of device which are essential to guarantee medical activity and comply the business continuity management requirements in hospitals.

  20. The effects of for-profit multihospital system ownership on hospital financial and operating performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, J R; McCue, M J

    1990-11-01

    The financial and operating performance of independent not-for-profit hospitals acquired by US for-profit multi-hospital systems in 10 Southern states between the years 1978 and 1982 was explored. The impact of system ownership on acquired hospitals was investigated by comparing the average financial performance of hospitals in the two years immediately prior to acquisition to the average for 1984 and 1985 and by comparing changes in the performance of acquired hospitals with changes in matched independent facilities. Findings suggest that for-profit multi-hospital systems were able to improve many of the financial and operating problems of acquired facilities. In comparison to independent not-for-profit hospitals, acquired hospitals were found to increase access to long-term debt, make improvements to plant and equipment, improve profitability, and increase efficiency to a greater extent. Prices in acquired hospitals rose more than those in independents and liquidity decreased to a greater extent.

  21. Does marriage protect against hospitalization with pneumonia? A population-based case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mor A

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Anil Mor, Sinna P Ulrichsen, Elisabeth Svensson, Klara Berencsi, Reimar W Thomsen Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Background: To reduce the increasing burden of pneumonia hospitalizations, we need to understand their determinants. Being married may decrease the risk of severe infections, due to better social support and healthier lifestyle. Patients and methods: In this population-based case-control study, we identified all adult patients with a first-time pneumonia-related hospitalization between 1994 and 2008 in Northern Denmark. For each case, ten sex- and age-matched population controls were selected from Denmark's Civil Registration System. We performed conditional logistic regression analysis to estimate the odds ratios (ORs for pneumonia hospitalization among persons who were divorced, widowed, or never married, as compared with married persons, adjusting for age, sex, 19 different comorbidities, alcoholism-related conditions, immunosuppressant use, urbanization, and living with small children. Results: The study included 67,162 patients with a pneumonia-related hospitalization and 671,620 matched population controls. Compared with controls, the pneumonia patients were more likely to be divorced (10% versus 7% or never married (13% versus 11%. Divorced and never-married patients were much more likely to have previous diagnoses of alcoholism-related conditions (18% and 11%, respectively compared with married (3% and widowed (6% patients. The adjusted OR for pneumonia-related hospitalization was increased, at 1.29 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.25-1.33 among divorced; 1.15 (95% CI: 1.12-1.17 among widowed; and 1.33 (95% CI: 1.29-1.37 among never-married individuals as compared with those who were married. Conclusion: Married individuals have a decreased risk of being hospitalized with pneumonia compared with never-married, divorced, and widowed patients

  1. A hospital based autopsy study of 50 cases at combined military hospital (cmh), sialkot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asif, N.

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the pattern of deaths on autopsy carried out on Armed Forces personnel in CMH Sialkot. Study Design: Retrospective analytical study Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital Sialkot (CMH), from 2009 to 2012 Materials and Methods: In a total of fifty (50) cases detailed postmortems were carried out and gross features on external examination and different systemic examinations were recorded. Histopathology of various organs was done in all cases. Chemical and toxicological examination of various abdominal viscera was carried out in all sudden and suspicious deaths. Results: Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) was most common cause of death (38%) followed by road traffic accidents (14%) and electrocution (8%). Sudden adult death syndrome accounted for 4 cases of deaths. Other causes were drowning, cerebral malaria, heat stroke, gunshot wounds, myocarditis, brain hemorrhage, meningitis and diabetic ketoacidosis. Most of these cases were young soldiers (n=30) followed by Non-Commissioned Officers (n=17). Conclusion: A large number of our young soldiers dying of heart problems is an alarming situation. Awareness among the troops of various risk factors is most important. Precautionary measures against preventable causes should be taken. (author)

  2. Reforming reimbursement of public hospitals in Greece during the economic crisis: Implementation of a DRG system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyzos, Nikolaos; Karanikas, Haralampos; Thireos, Eleftherios; Kastanioti, Catherine; Kontodimopoulos, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Until recently, in-patient NHS hospital care in Greece was reimbursed via an anachronistic and under-priced retrospective per diem system, which has been held primarily responsible for continuous budget deficits. The purpose of this paper is to present the efforts of the Ministry of Health (MoH) to implement a new DRG-based payment system. As in many countries, the decision was to adopt a patient classification from abroad and to refine it for use in Greece with national data. Pricing was achieved with a combination of activity-based costing with data from selected Greek hospitals, and "imported" cost weights. Data collection, IT support and monitoring are provided via ESY.net, a web-based facility developed and implemented by the MoH. After an initial pilot testing of the classification in 20 hospitals, complete DRG reimbursement data was reported by 113 hospitals (85% of total) for the fourth quarter of 2011. The recorded monthly increase in patient discharges billed with the new system and in revenue implies increasing adaptability by the hospitals. However, the unfavorable inlier vs. outlier distribution of discharges and revenue observed in some health regions signifies the need for corrective actions. The importance of this reimbursement reform is discussed in light of the current crisis faced by the Greek economy. There is yet much to be done and many projects are currently in progress to support this effort; however the first cost containment results are encouraging. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Use of a geographic information system to identify differences in automated external defibrillator installation in urban areas with similar incidence of public out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a retrospective registry-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredman, David; Haas, Jan; Ban, Yifang; Jonsson, Martin; Svensson, Leif; Djarv, Therese; Hollenberg, Jacob; Nordberg, Per; Ringh, Mattias; Claesson, Andreas

    2017-06-02

    Early defibrillation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is of importance to improve survival. In many countries the number of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) is increasing, but the use is low. Guidelines suggest that AEDs should be installed in densely populated areas and in locations with many visitors. Attempts have been made to identify optimal AED locations based on the incidence of OHCA using geographical information systems (GIS), but often on small datasets and the studies are seldom reproduced. The aim of this paper is to investigate if the distribution of public AEDs follows the incident locations of public OHCAs in urban areas of Stockholm County, Sweden. OHCA data were obtained from the Swedish Register for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and AED data were obtained from the Swedish AED Register. Urban areas in Stockholm County were objectively classified according to the pan-European digital mapping tool, Urban Atlas (UA). Furthermore, we reclassified and divided the UA land cover data into three classes (residential, non-residential and other areas). GIS software was used to spatially join and relate public AED and OHCA data and perform computations on relations and distance. Between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2014 a total of 804 OHCAs occurred in public locations in Stockholm County and by December 2013 there were 1828 AEDs available. The incidence of public OHCAs was similar in residential (47.3%) and non-residential areas (43.4%). Fewer AEDs were present in residential areas than in non-residential areas (29.4% vs 68.8%). In residential areas the median distance between OHCAs and AEDs was significantly greater than in non-residential areas (288 m vs 188 m, p<0.001). The majority of public OHCAs occurred in areas classified in UA as 'residential areas' with limited AED accessibility. These areas need to be targeted for AED installation and international guidelines need to take geographical location into account when suggesting

  4. Improving hospital cost accounting with activity-based costing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Y C

    1993-01-01

    In this article, activity-based costing, an approach that has proved to be an improvement over the conventional costing system in product costing, is introduced. By combining activity-based costing with standard costing, health care administrators can better plan and control the costs of health services provided while ensuring that the organization's bottom line is healthy.

  5. Reorganization of a hospital catering system increases food intake in patients with inadequate intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freil, M; Nielsen, MA; Blitz, B

    2006-01-01

    Background : Low food intake is a frequent problem in undernourished hospital patients. Objective: To study whether a reorganization of a hospital catering system enabling patients to choose their evening meal individually, in combination with an increase in the energy density of the food....... Conclusions: Reorganization of a hospital catering system can increase energy and protein intake and reduce waste substantially....

  6. Pervasive Computing Support for Hospitals: An Overview of the Activity-Based Computing Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Bardram, Jakob E

    2007-01-01

    The activity-based computing project researched pervasive computing support for clinical hospital work. Such technologies have potential for supporting the mobile, collaborative, and disruptive use of heterogeneous embedded devices in a hospital......The activity-based computing project researched pervasive computing support for clinical hospital work. Such technologies have potential for supporting the mobile, collaborative, and disruptive use of heterogeneous embedded devices in a hospital...

  7. Performance of freestanding inpatient rehabilitation hospitals before and after the rehabilitation prospective payment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jon M; McCue, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Inpatient rehabilitation hospitals provide important services to patients to restore physical and cognitive functioning. Historically, these hospitals have been reimbursed by Medicare under a cost-based system; but in 2002, Medicare implemented a rehabilitation prospective payment system (PPS). Despite the implementation of a PPS for rehabilitation, there is limited published research that addresses the operating and financial performance of these hospitals. We examined operating and financial performance in the pre- and post-PPS periods for for-profit and nonprofit freestanding inpatient rehabilitation hospitals to test for pre- and post-PPS differences within the ownership groups. We identified freestanding inpatient rehabilitation hospitals from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Health Care Cost Report Information System database for the first two fiscal years under PPS. We excluded facilities that had fiscal years less than 270 days, facilities with missing data, and government facilities. We computed average values for performance variables for the facilities in the two consecutive fiscal years post-PPS. For the pre-PPS period, we collected data on these same facilities and, once facilities with missing data and fiscal years less than 270 days were excluded, computed average values for the two consecutive fiscal years pre-PPS. Our final sample of 140 inpatient rehabilitation facilities was composed of 44 nonprofit hospitals and 96 for-profit hospitals both pre- and post-PPS. We utilized a pairwise comparison test (t-test comparison) to measure the significance of differences on each performance variable between pre- and post-PPS periods within each ownership group. Findings show that both nonprofit and for-profit freestanding inpatient rehabilitation hospitals reduced length of stay, increased discharges, and increased profitability. Within the for-profit ownership group, the percentage of Medicare discharges increased and operating expense per

  8. Economic analysis of cloud-based desktop virtualization implementation at a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Kim, Seok; Kim, Taeki; Baek, Rong-Min; Suh, Chang Suk; Chung, Chin Youb; Hwang, Hee

    2012-10-30

    Cloud-based desktop virtualization infrastructure (VDI) is known as providing simplified management of application and desktop, efficient management of physical resources, and rapid service deployment, as well as connection to the computer environment at anytime, anywhere with any device. However, the economic validity of investing in the adoption of the system at a hospital has not been established. This study computed the actual investment cost of the hospital-wide VDI implementation at the 910-bed Seoul National University Bundang Hospital in Korea and the resulting effects (i.e., reductions in PC errors and difficulties, application and operating system update time, and account management time). Return on investment (ROI), net present value (NPV), and internal rate of return (IRR) indexes used for corporate investment decision-making were used for the economic analysis of VDI implementation. The results of five-year cost-benefit analysis given for 400 Virtual Machines (VMs; i.e., 1,100 users in the case of SNUBH) showed that the break-even point was reached in the fourth year of the investment. At that point, the ROI was 122.6%, the NPV was approximately US$192,000, and the IRR showed an investment validity of 10.8%. From our sensitivity analysis to changing the number of VMs (in terms of number of users), the greater the number of adopted VMs was the more investable the system was. This study confirms that the emerging VDI can have an economic impact on hospital information system (HIS) operation and utilization in a tertiary hospital setting.

  9. Economic analysis of cloud-based desktop virtualization implementation at a hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo Sooyoung

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cloud-based desktop virtualization infrastructure (VDI is known as providing simplified management of application and desktop, efficient management of physical resources, and rapid service deployment, as well as connection to the computer environment at anytime, anywhere with anydevice. However, the economic validity of investing in the adoption of the system at a hospital has not been established. Methods This study computed the actual investment cost of the hospital-wide VDI implementation at the 910-bed Seoul National University Bundang Hospital in Korea and the resulting effects (i.e., reductions in PC errors and difficulties, application and operating system update time, and account management time. Return on investment (ROI, net present value (NPV, and internal rate of return (IRR indexes used for corporate investment decision-making were used for the economic analysis of VDI implementation. Results The results of five-year cost-benefit analysis given for 400 Virtual Machines (VMs; i.e., 1,100 users in the case of SNUBH showed that the break-even point was reached in the fourth year of the investment. At that point, the ROI was 122.6%, the NPV was approximately US$192,000, and the IRR showed an investment validity of 10.8%. From our sensitivity analysis to changing the number of VMs (in terms of number of users, the greater the number of adopted VMs was the more investable the system was. Conclusions This study confirms that the emerging VDI can have an economic impact on hospital information system (HIS operation and utilization in a tertiary hospital setting.

  10. Pre-hospital care after a seizure: Evidence base and United Kingdom management guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Andrew; Taylor, Louise; Reuber, Markus; Grünewald, Richard A; Parkinson, Martin; Dickson, Jon M

    2015-01-01

    Seizures are a common presentation to pre-hospital emergency services and they generate significant healthcare costs. This article summarises the United Kingdom (UK) Ambulance Service guidelines for the management of seizures and explores the extent to which these guidelines are evidence-based. Summary of the Clinical Practice Guidelines of the UK Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee relating to the management of seizures. Review of the literature relating to pre-hospital management of seizure emergencies. Much standard practice relating to the emergency out of hospital management of patients with seizures is drawn from generic Advanced Life Support (ALS) guidelines although many patients do not need ALS during or after a seizure and the benefit of many ALS interventions in seizure patients remains to be established. The majority of studies identified pertain to medical treatment of status epilepticus. These papers show that benzodiazepines are safe and effective but it is not possible to draw definitive conclusions about the best medication or the optimal route of administration. The evidence base for current pre-hospital guidelines for seizure emergencies is incomplete. A large proportion of patients are transported to hospital after a seizure but many of these may be suitable for home management. However, there is very little research into alternative care pathways or criteria that could be used to help paramedics avoid transport to hospital. More research is needed to improve care for people after a seizure and to improve the cost-effectiveness of the healthcare systems within which they are treated. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Problems facing the radiologist tendering for a hospital wide PACS system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilling, John

    1999-01-01

    As PACS becomes a reality the practical difficulties of installing the new technology become evident. The practical issues of developing a strategy, understanding the market, writing a business case, and an outline based specification are considered. The complexities of European procurement, the evaluation of responses, the contracting process and the problems of implementation, training, assessing the benefits and foreseeing the problems are covered. Provided there is careful attention to detail a hospital can expect to implement a successful PACS system

  12. Etiologic Agents of Central Nervous System Infections among Febrile Hospitalized Patients in the Country of Georgia

    OpenAIRE

    Akhvlediani, Tamar; Bautista, Christian T.; Shakarishvili, Roman; Tsertsvadze, Tengiz; Imnadze, Paata; Tatishvili, Nana; Davitashvili, Tamar; Samkharadze, Tamar; Chlikadze, Rusudan; Dvali, Natia; Dzigua, Lela; Karchava, Mariam; Gatserelia, Lana; Macharashvili, Nino; Kvirkvelia, Nana

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: There is a large spectrum of viral, bacterial, fungal, and prion pathogens that cause central nervous system (CNS) infections. As such, identification of the etiological agent requires multiple laboratory tests and accurate diagnosis requires clinical and epidemiological information. This hospital-based study aimed to determine the main causes of acute meningitis and encephalitis and enhance laboratory capacity for CNS infection diagnosis. METHODS: Children and adults patients cli...

  13. THE IMPACT OF HOSPITAL BASED INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT OF CHILDHOOD ILLNESS TRAINING ON PEDIATRIC NURSE COMPETENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitri Haryanti

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although the WHO strategy integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI for primary care has been implemented in over 100 countries, there is less global experience with hospital-based IMCI training. Until recently, no training had been done in Indonesia, and globally there has been limited experience of the role of IMCI in rebuilding health systems after complex emergencies. Objective: We aimed to examine the effect of hospital-based IMCI training on pedicatric nurse competency and explore the perception of Indonesian doctors, nurse managers and paediatricians about IMCI training and its development in West Aceh, a region that was severely affected by the South-Asian tsunami in December 2004. Methods: This study used stepped wedge design. Training was conducted for 39 nurses staff, 13 midwifes, 6 Head nurses, 5 manager of nurses, 5 doctors, 1 paediatricians, and 3 support facilities (nutritionist, pharmacist, laboratory in Cut Nyak Dien (CND Hospital in Meulaboh, West Aceh, Indonesia. The IMCI training was developed based on the WHO Pocketbook of Hospital Care for Children. A nurses competency questionnaire was used based on the guideline of assessment of the quality of child health services at the first level reference hospitals in districts / municipalities issued by the Ministry of Health in 2007. A linear mixed model was used for data analysis. Results: The hospital based IMCI training improved the competences of nurses paediatric in assessing emergency signs of the sick children, management of cough and difficulty breathing, diarrhoea, fever, nutritional problems, supportive care, monitoring, discharge planning and follow up. The assessment highlighted several problems in adaptation process of material training, training process and implementation in an environment soon after a major disaster. Conclusion: Hospital based IMCI training can be implemented in a setting after major disasters or internal conflict as part of a

  14. Are hospitals ready to response to disasters? Challenges, opportunities and strategies of Hospital Emergency Incident Command System (HEICS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Atighechian, Golrokh; Shams, Lida; Haghshenas, Abbas

    2011-08-01

    Applying an effective management system in emergency incidents provides maximum efficiency with using minimum facilities and human resources. Hospital Emergency Incident Command System (HEICS) is one of the most reliable emergency incident command systems to make hospitals more efficient and to increase patient safety. This research was to study requirements, barriers, and strategies of HEICS in hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS). This was a qualitative research carried out in Isfahan Province, Iran during 2008-09. The study population included senior hospital managers of IUMS and key informants in emergency incident management across Isfahan Province. Sampling method was in non-random purposeful form and snowball technique was used. The research instrument for data collection was semi-structured interview; collected data was analyzed by Colaizzi Technique. Findings of study were categorized into three general categories including requirements (organizational and sub-organizational), barriers (internal and external) of HEICS establishment, and providing short, mid and long term strategies. These categories are explained in details in the main text. Regarding the existing barriers in establishment of HEICS, it is recommended that responsible authorities in different levels of health care system prepare necessary conditions for implementing such system as soon as possible via encouraging and supporting systems. This paper may help health policy makers to get reasonable framework and have comprehensive view for establishing HEICS in hospitals. It is necessary to consider requirements and viewpoints of stakeholders before any health policy making or planning.

  15. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and fiscal year 2013 rates; hospitals' resident caps for graduate medical education payment purposes; quality reporting requirements for specific providers and for ambulatory surgical centers. final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2012, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2012. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes made by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2012, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are implementing changes relating to determining a hospital's full-time equivalent (FTE) resident cap for the purpose of graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We also are establishing new administrative, data completeness, and extraordinary circumstance waivers or extension requests requirements, as well as a reconsideration process, for quality reporting by ambulatory surgical centers

  16. [Introduction of hospital information system and anesthesia information management system into the perianesthetic practice at Osaka City University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Motoko; Tanaka, Katsuaki; Hagiwara, Chie; Ikenaga, Kazutake; Yoshioka, Miwako; Asada, Akira

    2011-06-01

    Recently, the hospital information systems (HIS) and anesthesia information management systems (AIMS) have been rapidly improved and have been introduced into the clinical practice in Japan drastically; however, few reports have detailed their influences on clinical practice. We here report our experience. We introduced HIS (EGMAIN-EX, Fujitsu Co., Ltd.) in our preoperative evaluation clinic and in the postoperative care unit. AIMS (ORSYS, Philips Electronics Japan) was introduced almost only to the intraoperative management. It became easy for us to acquire patient's information and to share it with the medical staffs in the other departments. However, we had to invest large human resources for the introduction and maintenance of the HIS and the AIMS. Though AIMS is more useful in anesthetic management than HIS, it seems to be more suitable for coordination with the medical staffs in the other departments to use HIS for perioperative management than to use AIMS.

  17. Computer Based Expert Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, James D.; Ferrara, Joseph M.

    1985-01-01

    Claims knowledge-based expert computer systems can meet needs of rural schools for affordable expert advice and support and will play an important role in the future of rural education. Describes potential applications in prediction, interpretation, diagnosis, remediation, planning, monitoring, and instruction. (NEC)

  18. Applied patent RFID systems for building reacting HEPA air ventilation system in hospital operation rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jesun; Pai, Jar-Yuan; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2012-12-01

    RFID technology, an automatic identification and data capture technology to provide identification, tracing, security and so on, was widely applied to healthcare industry in these years. Employing HEPA ventilation system in hospital is a way to ensure healthful indoor air quality to protect patients and healthcare workers against hospital-acquired infections. However, the system consumes lots of electricity which cost a lot. This study aims to apply the RFID technology to offer a unique medical staff and patient identification, and reacting HEPA air ventilation system in order to reduce the cost, save energy and prevent the prevalence of hospital-acquired infection. The system, reacting HEPA air ventilation system, contains RFID tags (for medical staffs and patients), sensor, and reacting system which receives the information regarding the number of medical staff and the status of the surgery, and controls the air volume of the HEPA air ventilation system accordingly. A pilot program was carried out in a unit of operation rooms of a medical center with 1,500 beds located in central Taiwan from Jan to Aug 2010. The results found the air ventilation system was able to function much more efficiently with less energy consumed. Furthermore, the indoor air quality could still keep qualified and hospital-acquired infection or other occupational diseases could be prevented.

  19. Hospital Malnutrition: Prevalence, Identification and Impact on Patients and the Healthcare System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Lisa A.; Gout, Belinda S.; Crowe, Timothy C.

    2011-01-01

    Malnutrition is a debilitating and highly prevalent condition in the acute hospital setting, with Australian and international studies reporting rates of approximately 40%. Malnutrition is associated with many adverse outcomes including depression of the immune system, impaired wound healing, muscle wasting, longer lengths of hospital stay, higher treatment costs and increased mortality. Referral rates for dietetic assessment and treatment of malnourished patients have proven to be suboptimal, thereby increasing the likelihood of developing such aforementioned complications. Nutrition risk screening using a validated tool is a simple technique to rapidly identify patients at risk of malnutrition, and provides a basis for prompt dietetic referrals. In Australia, nutrition screening upon hospital admission is not mandatory, which is of concern knowing that malnutrition remains under-reported and often poorly documented. Unidentified malnutrition not only heightens the risk of adverse complications for patients, but can potentially result in foregone reimbursements to the hospital through casemix-based funding schemes. It is strongly recommended that mandatory nutrition screening be widely adopted in line with published best-practice guidelines to effectively target and reduce the incidence of hospital malnutrition. PMID:21556200

  20. How CEOs use management information systems for strategy implementation in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo-Gil, David; Hartmann, Frank

    2007-04-01

    Institutional and market changes seem to force hospitals across the Western world to revitalize their corporate strategies towards more cost efficiency on the one hand, and more flexibility towards customer demands on the other hand. Hospitals, however, apparently differ in the extent to which they are able to implement such strategies effectively. This paper explores whether these different levels of effectiveness depend on how hospitals' top managers' use of the available management information systems (MIS). Based on data obtained from the 218 CEOs of public hospitals in Spain, we analyze how CEOs' professional and educational backgrounds affect their use of MIS, and how the use of the MIS subsequently supports or inhibits the implementation of these strategic goals. The results indicate that CEOs with a predominant clinical background focus more on non-financial information for decision-making and prefer an interactive style of using MIS, which together support flexibility strategies. CEOs with a predominant administrative background seem more effective in establishing cost-reduction strategies, through their larger inclination to emphasize financial information in combination with a diagnostic use of the MIS. Implications for the strategic management of hospitals are outlined.

  1. Hospital Malnutrition: Prevalence, Identification and Impact on Patients and the Healthcare System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy C. Crowe

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition is a debilitating and highly prevalent condition in the acute hospital setting, with Australian and international studies reporting rates of approximately 40%. Malnutrition is associated with many adverse outcomes including depression of the immune system, impaired wound healing, muscle wasting, longer lengths of hospital stay, higher treatment costs and increased mortality. Referral rates for dietetic assessment and treatment of malnourished patients have proven to be suboptimal, thereby increasing the likelihood of developing such aforementioned complications. Nutrition risk screening using a validated tool is a simple technique to rapidly identify patients at risk of malnutrition, and provides a basis for prompt dietetic referrals. In Australia, nutrition screening upon hospital admission is not mandatory, which is of concern knowing that malnutrition remains under-reported and often poorly documented. Unidentified malnutrition not only heightens the risk of adverse complications for patients, but can potentially result in foregone reimbursements to the hospital through casemix-based funding schemes. It is strongly recommended that mandatory nutrition screening be widely adopted in line with published best-practice guidelines to effectively target and reduce the incidence of hospital malnutrition.

  2. Reorganization of a hospital catering system increases food intake in patients with inadequate intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freil, M.; Nielsen, M. A.; Biltz, C.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Low food intake is a frequent problem in undernourished hospital patients. Objective: To study whether a reorganization of a hospital catering system enabling patients to choose their evening meal individually, in combination with an increase in the energy density of the food, increases......: Reorganization of a hospital catering system can increase energy and protein intake and reduce waste substantially. Keywords: hospital food; nutritional risk; undernutrition...

  3. The proton therapy system for Massachusetts General Hospital's Northeast Proton Therapy Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jongen, Y.

    1996-01-01

    In 1989, two companies, Ion Beam Applications in Belgium (IBA) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries in Japan (SHI) started to design proton therapy equipments based on cyclotrons. In 1991, SHI and IBA decided to join their development efforts in this field. In 1993, the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), pioneer in the field of proton therapy, launched an international request for proposals for the procurement of an in-hospital proton therapy facility. The 18 may 1994, the contract was signed with a team of industries led by IBA, including also SHI and General Atomics (GA) of California. The proposed system is based on a fixed energy, isochronous cyclotron, followed by an energy degrader and an energy selection system. The variable energy beam can be rapidly switched in any one of three treatment rooms. Two rooms are equipped with large isocentric gantries and robotic patient positioners allowing to direct the proton beam within the patient from any direction. The third room is equipped with fixed horizontal beam. The complete system is computer controlled by a distributed network of computers, programmable logic controllers and workstations. This computer control allows to change the energy in one treatment room is less than two second, a performance matching or exceeding the flexibility offered by synchrotrons. The system is now built and undergoing factory tests. The beam has been accelerated to full energy in the cyclotron, and beam extraction tests are underway. Installation in the hospital building will take place in 1997. (author)

  4. Hospital-based surveillance of enteric parasites in Kolkata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Mrinmoy

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diarrhoea is the second leading cause of illness and death in developing countries and the second commonest cause of death due to infectious diseases among children under five in such countries. Parasites, as well as bacterial and viral pathogens, are important causes of diarrhoea. However, parasitic infections are sometimes overlooked, leading after a period of time to an uncertain aetiology. In this paper we report the prevalence of Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica and Cryptosporidium sp. in and around Kolkata. Findings A hospital-based laboratory surveillance study was conducted among the patients admitted between November 2007 and October 2008 to the Infectious Diseases (ID Hospital (Population = 1103 with diarrhoeal complaints. Of the 1103 samples collected, 147 were positive for Giardia lamblia, 84 for Cryptosporidium sp. and 51 for Entamoeba histolytica. For all these parasites there was a high rate of mixed infection with common enteric viruses and bacteria such as Rotavirus, Vibrio cholerae and Shigella sp. There were also cases of co-infection with all other diarrheogenic pathogens. The age group ≥ 5 years had the highest prevalence of parasites whereas the age group >5 – 10 years was predominantly infected with Giardia lamblia (p =10 – 20 years could also be considered at risk for G. lamblia (p = 0.009; OR = 2.231; 95% CI = 1.223 – 4.067. Month-wise occurrence data showed an endemic presence of G. lamblia whereas Cryptosporidium sp. and E. histolytica occurred sporadically. The GIS study revealed that parasites were more prevalent in areas such as Tangra, Tiljala and Rajarhat, which are mainly slum areas. Because most of the population surveyed was in the lower income group, consumption of contaminated water and food could be the major underlying cause of parasitic infestations. Conclusion This study provides important information on the occurrence and distribution of three important intestinal

  5. Hospitalization Rate and Population-Based Incidence of Hospitalization for Community-Acquired Pneumonia Among Children in Suzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Wei; Shi, Ting; Zhang, Xiyan; Xue, Jian; Wang, Yin; Yu, Jia; Huang, Yukai; Lin, Sheng; Zhao, Genming; Tian, Jianmei; Zhang, Tao

    2018-03-22

    Data on hospitalization burden of CAP in children is very limited in China. This study aimed to estimate the hospitalization rate and population-based incidence of hospitalization of CAP for children <15 years of age in Suzhou, China. This was a retrospective study of children hospitalized in Soochow University Affiliated Children's Hospital (SCH) from January 2010 to December 2014. Children who were residents of downtown Suzhou, 29 days to <15 years of age, with discharge diagnosis codes (ICD-10) including J09 to J18 and J20 to J22 were included. All-cause clinical community-acquired pneumonia (CCAP) and radiographically confirmed pneumonia (RCAP) were identified based on individual medical chart review. The hospitalization rate (HR) and population-based cumulative incidence of hospitalization (HI) were calculated. Among 184,734 children <15 years old admitted to SCH during the study period, 31,302 children were identified as having CCAP, and 24,218 (77.4%) children confirmed as having RCAP. CCAP hospitalization occurred year round and peaked during winter and early spring. The overall HRs for CCAP and RCAP were 189.0 (95%CI, 187.1-190.9) and 146.2 (95%CI, 144-148) per 1,000 hospitalizations respectively, and the HIs per 100,000 children annually were CCAP, 3,235.8 (95%CI, 3207.3-3264.2) and RCAP, 2,503.5 (95%CI, 2,478.3-2,528.6). For children <5 years old, the HR for CCAP was 248.4 (95%CI, 245.9-250.9) and RCAP 194.0 (95%CI, 191.4-196.3) per 1,000 hospitalizations; the HI for CCAP was 6,956.2 (95%CI: 6,892.8-7,019.6) and 5,431.9 (95%CI: 5,375.4-5,488.4) per 100,000 children for RCAP. The highest HR and HI were observed in children 29 days to <6 months old: HR for CCAP was 407.4 (95%CI: 400.9-413.9) per 1,000 hospitalizations and HI for CCAP was 11,203.7 (95%CI: 11,026.8-11,380.6) per 100,000 children annually. There is a considerable burden of CAP among children <15 years of age in Suzhou, particularly among children 29 days to <6 months of age and during winter

  6. Understanding the context of balanced scorecard implementation: a hospital-based case study in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, Fauziah; Lalji, Sabrina Nh; Abbas, Farhat; Jafri, Sm Wasim; Razzak, Junaid A; Nabi, Naheed; Jahan, Firdous; Ajmal, Agha; Petzold, Max; Brommels, Mats; Tomson, Goran

    2011-03-31

    As a response to a changing operating environment, healthcare administrators are implementing modern management tools in their organizations. The balanced scorecard (BSC) is considered a viable tool in high-income countries to improve hospital performance. The BSC has not been applied to hospital settings in low-income countries nor has the context for implementation been examined. This study explored contextual perspectives in relation to BSC implementation in a Pakistani hospital. Four clinical units of this hospital were involved in the BSC implementation based on their willingness to participate. Implementation included sensitization of units towards the BSC, developing specialty specific BSCs and reporting of performance based on the BSC during administrative meetings. Pettigrew and Whipp's context (why), process (how) and content (what) framework of strategic change was used to guide data collection and analysis. Data collection methods included quantitative tools (a validated culture assessment questionnaire) and qualitative approaches including key informant interviews and participant observation. Method triangulation provided common and contrasting results between the four units. A participatory culture, supportive leadership, financial and non-financial incentives, the presentation of clear direction by integrating support for the BSC in policies, resources, and routine activities emerged as desirable attributes for BSC implementation. The two units that lagged behind were more involved in direct inpatient care and carried a considerable clinical workload. Role clarification and consensus about the purpose and benefits of the BSC were noted as key strategies for overcoming implementation challenges in two clinical units that were relatively ahead in BSC implementation. It was noted that, rather than seeking to replace existing information systems, initiatives such as the BSC could be readily adopted if they are built on existing infrastructures and data

  7. Cooperation between Japanese and Cambodian Dietitians in Setting up a Hospital Diet Management System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Koung Ry; Saito, Shino; Kusama, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Cambodia faces a considerably high percentage of the stunted under 5 (Unicef, 2014). Despite the National Nutrition Strategy Launched by the Ministry of Health in cooperation with development partners, nutrition improvement projects have not always been effective. It is generally said these issues are addressed in many other developing nations, and the literature largely documented that successful nutrition programmes are community-based programmes because of their sustainability and the intensive communications between health workers and beneficiaries. Learning from the past experiences, the Foundation for International Development/Relief organized a project team with a Cambodian dietitian and an experienced Japanese dietitian to implement a hospital diet programme for children from April 2006 to March 2014 in the National Pediatric Hospital (NPH) in Cambodia. The project has two objectives: establishing a hospital diet management system, and developing the capacity of NPH staff. Hospital food menus were created paying particular attention to Cambodian culture, eating habits and accessibility to the ingredients for the purpose of continuous supply. We have also put emphasis on the communication between dietitians and family members of the children to let them understand the importance of a nutritious diet. After 8 y of project implementation, the hospital diet management system was established providing 7 types of menu with nutritious diets. The final evaluation of the project showed that NPH staff have the intention to continue hospital food supply with their acquired knowledge and capacity. In practice, a Cambodian dietitian currently takes the initiative for a continuous nutritional diet in NPH. The key to this success is the collaboration between Japanese dietitians with experience and Cambodian dietitians with knowledge of Cambodian eating habits. Taking our experience into account, it is highly recommended to educate Cambodian dietitians, as they are

  8. Comparative analysis of the current payment system for hospital services in Serbia and projected payments under diagnostic related groups system in urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Uroš; Soldatović, Ivan; Vuković, Dejana; Milićević, Milena Šantrić; Stjepanović, Mihailo; Kojić, Dejan; Argirović, Aleksandar; Vukotić, Vinka

    2015-03-01

    Global budget per calendar year is a traditional method of funding hospitals in Serbia. Diagnose related groups (DGR) is a method of hospital payment based on classification of patients into groups with clinically similar problems and similar utilization of hospital resources. The aim of this study was to compare current methods of hospital services payment with the projected costs by DRG payment method in urology. The data were obtained from the information system used in the Clinical Hospital Center "Dr. Dragiša Mišović"--Dedinje in Belgrade, Serbia. The implemented hospital information system was the main criterion for selection of healthcare institutions. The study included 994 randomly selected patients treated surgically and conservatively in 2012. Average costs under the current payment method were slightly higher than those projected by DRG, however, the variability was twice as high (54,111 ± 69,789 compared to 53,434 ± 32,509, p payment method as well as with the projected one by DRG was observed in relation to the number of days of hospitalization (ρ = 0.842, p payment system (β = 0.843, p payment system (β = 0.737, p payment method and the pro- jected DRG payment methods (β = 0.501, p Payment under the DRG system is administratively more complex because it requires detailed and standardized coding of diagnoses and procedures, as well as the information on the average consumption of resources (costs) per DRG. Given that aggregate costs of treatment under two hospital payment methods compared in the study are not significantly different, the focus on minor surgeries both under the current hospital payment method and under the introduced DRG system would be far more cost-effective for a hospital as great variations in treatment performance (reductions of days of hospitalization and complications), and consequently invoiced amounts would be reduced.

  9. Development and piloting of the Fiji Injury Surveillance in Hospitals System (TRIP Project-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainiqolo, I; Kafoa, B; McCaig, E; Kool, B; McIntyre, R; Ameratunga, S

    2013-01-01

    Whilst more than 90% of injury related deaths are estimated to occur in low-and-middle-income countries (LMICs), the epidemiology of fatal and hospitalised injuries in Pacific Island Countries has received scant attention. This study describes the development and piloting of a population-based trauma registry in Fiji to address this gap in knowledge. The Fiji Injury Surveillance in Hospitals (FISH) system was an active surveillance system designed to identify injuries resulting in death or a hospital admission in Viti Levu, Fiji. During the pilot conducted over five months in 2005, Accident and Emergency registers, admission folders and morgue registers from 8 of Viti Levu's 12 hospitals, and an additional 3 hospitals in other parts of the country were reviewed by hospital staff and medical students to identify cases and extract a minimum data set that included demographic factors; the mechanism, nature and context of injury; substance use; and discharge outcomes. The system was audited to identify and redress difficulties with data quality in a manner that also supported local capacity development and training in injury surveillance and data management. This pilot study demonstrated the potential to collect high quality data on injuries that can pose a significant threat to life in Fiji using a mechanism that also increased the capability of health professionals to recognise the significance of injury as a public health issue. The injury surveillance system piloted provides the opportunity to inform national injury control strategies in Fiji and increase the capacity for injury prevention and more focused research addressing risk factors in the local context. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. System for radiation emergency medicine. Activities of tertiary radiation emergency hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Kenji; Tanigawa, Koichi; Hosoi, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    Japanese system for radiation emergency medicine is primarily built up by Cabinet Nuclear Safety Commission in 2001 based on previous Tokai JCO Accident (1999) and is composed from the primary, secondary and tertiary medical organizations. This paper describes mainly about roles and actions of the tertiary facilities at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident and tasks to be improved in future. The primary and secondary organizations in the system above are set up in the prefectures with or neighboring the nuclear facility, and tertiary ones, in two parts of western and eastern Japan. The western organization is in Hiroshima University having its cooperating 7 hospitals, and is responsible for such patients as exposed to high dose external radiation, having serious complication, and difficult to treat in the primary/secondary hospitals. The eastern is in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) with 6 cooperating hospitals and responsible for patients with internal radiation exposure difficult to treat, with contaminated body surface with difficulty in decontamination and/or with causable of secondary contamination, and difficult to treat in the secondary hospitals. The tertiary organizations have made efforts for the education and training of medical staff, for network construction among the primary, secondary and other medicare facilities, for establishment of transferring system of patients, and for participation to the international network by global organizations like Response Assistance Network (RANET) in International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and Radiation Emergency Preparedness and Network (REMPAN) in World Health Organization (WHO). At the Fukushima Accident, staffs of the two tertiary hospitals began to conduct medicare on site (Mar. 12-) and learned following tasks to be improved in future: the early definition of medicare and its network system, and Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ); urgent evacuation of residents weak to disaster like elderly

  11. Current nursing practice by hospital-based stoma specialist nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Jennie

    Nurses frequently care for patients who have stomas. A common complication is sore peristomal skin (skin around the stoma). The study aim was to answer the research question: what is the current nursing practice for peristomal skin problems among UK stoma specialist nurses? The question was explored through investigation of descriptions, treatments and opinions of peristomal skin problems. Results were examined to ascertain if practice reflects the literature and if care was evidence-based. A questionnaire was posted in September 2009 to the stoma care nurses in all UK NHS hospitals (n=596). The proportion of completed or partially completed questionnaires was 15% (89 of 596). Most of the responding nurses held a stoma-related qualification (86%), a degree (55%) and had specialised in stoma care for over 5 years (67%). Respondents used erythema to describe sore skin (80%). Stoma powder (98%) and convex appliances (98%) were the most commonly used treatments. The most common cause of sore skin was appliance leakage (61%). The study population was deemed suitably qualified and experienced to answer the research question. Many responses were reflected in the literature (predominantly opinion articles), reflecting a degree of reliability and validity. It could be concluded that stoma specialist nurses can accurately assess and use stoma accessories to treat sore skin, but due to the paucity of research, the care cannot be defined as evidence-based. More research is needed to determine universally accepted definitions and treatments for sore peristomal skin.

  12. [Public health impact of a remote diagnosis system implemented in regional and district hospitals in Paraguay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, Pedro; Velázquez, Miguel; Benítez, Gualberto; Ortellado, José; Rivas, Ronald; Barrios, Antonio; Hilario, Enrique

    2017-06-08

    Determine the viability of a remote diagnosis system implemented to provide health care to remote and scattered populations in Paraguay. The study was conducted in all regional and general hospitals in Paraguay, and in the main district hospitals in the country's 18 health regions. Clinical data, tomographic images, sonography, and electrocardiograms (ECGs) of patients who needed a diagnosis by a specialized physician were entered into the system. This information was sent to specialists in diagnostic imaging and in cardiology for remote diagnosis and the report was then forwarded to the hospitals connected to the system. The cost-benefit and impact of the remote diagnosis tool was analyzed from the perspective of the National Health System. Between January 2014 and May 2015, a total of 34 096 remote diagnoses were made in 25 hospitals in the Ministry of Health's telemedicine system. The average unit cost of remote diagnosis was US$2.6 per ECG, tomography, and sonography, while the unit cost of "face-to-face" diagnosis was US$11.8 per ECG, US$68.6 per tomography, and US$21.5 per sonography. As a result of remote diagnosis, unit costs were 4.5 times lower for ECGs; 26.4 times lower for tomography, and 8.3 times lower for sonography. In monetary terms, implementation of the remote diagnosis system during the 16 months of the study led to average savings of US$2 420 037. Paraguay has a remote diagnosis system for electrocardiography, tomography, and sonography, using low-cost information and communications technologies (ICTs) based on free software that is scalable to other types of remote diagnostic studies of interest for public health. Implementation of remote diagnosis helped to strengthen the integrated network of health services and programs, enabling professionals to optimize their time and productivity, while improving quality, increasing access and equity, and reducing costs.

  13. Effect of hospital volume on processes of breast cancer care: A National Cancer Data Base study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Tina W F; Pezzin, Liliana E; Li, Jianing; Sparapani, Rodney; Laud, Purushuttom W; Nattinger, Ann B

    2017-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine variations in delivery of several breast cancer processes of care that are correlated with lower mortality and disease recurrence, and to determine the extent to which hospital volume explains this variation. Women who were diagnosed with stage I-III unilateral breast cancer between 2007 and 2011 were identified within the National Cancer Data Base. Multiple logistic regression models were developed to determine whether hospital volume was independently associated with each of 10 individual process of care measures addressing diagnosis and treatment, and 2 composite measures assessing appropriateness of systemic treatment (chemotherapy and hormonal therapy) and locoregional treatment (margin status and radiation therapy). Among 573,571 women treated at 1755 different hospitals, 38%, 51%, and 10% were treated at high-, medium-, and low-volume hospitals, respectively. On multivariate analysis controlling for patient sociodemographic characteristics, treatment year and geographic location, hospital volume was a significant predictor for cancer diagnosis by initial biopsy (medium volume: odds ratio [OR] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-1.25; high volume: OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.14-1.49), negative surgical margins (medium volume: OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.06-1.24; high volume: OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.13-1.44), and appropriate locoregional treatment (medium volume: OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.07-1.17; high volume: OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.09-1.24). Diagnosis of breast cancer before initial surgery, negative surgical margins and appropriate use of radiation therapy may partially explain the volume-survival relationship. Dissemination of these processes of care to a broader group of hospitals could potentially improve the overall quality of care and outcomes of breast cancer survivors. Cancer 2017;123:957-66. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  14. Does autonomy for public hospitals in developing countries increase performance? Evidence-based case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geyndt, Willy

    2017-04-01

    Governments in middle and low income countries have sought ways for the past decades to make their public hospitals more performing. The objectives of this assessment are to: (a) synthesize the experience of eleven countries at granting autonomy to their public hospitals and the obstacles encountered; (b) deduce which autonomy policies have or have not been effective documenting successes and failures; and (c) propose evidence-based recommendations to policy makers. Data for five countries are derived from the author's participation in the autonomy process augmented by current updates provided by national colleagues. Data for the other six countries are derived from publications available in the literature. Policies granting autonomy to public hospitals have had limited success. In all cases Boards of Directors have been created. Governance of autonomized hospitals by Boards however is obstructed by the resistance of central level entities to have their authority diminished. The Ministry of Finance tends to maintain control over revenues and expenditures. The Public Service Commission resists abdicating its role to hire, promote, transfer and dismiss government employees. The Ministry of Health attempts to keep its authority to appoint hospital staff, procure medical supplies and equipment; it may do so directly or indirectly by selecting and appointing Board members. Management information systems continue to collect activity measures to be aggregated at the national level for statistical purposes and do not provide financial and clinical data useful for decision making by the Boards and by senior management. Decentralizing decision making to the operational level has had limited success. Stakeholders at the central level devise strategies to maintain their power. Two main obstacles are delegating authority over human resources and finances that are sine qua non conditions for governing and increasing the performance of public hospitals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  15. 76 FR 13292 - Medicare Program: Changes to the Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System and CY 2011...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    ... Prospective Payment System and CY 2011 Payment Rates; Changes to the Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment System..., 2010, entitled ``Medicare Program: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System and CY 2011 Payment Rates; Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment System and CY 2011 Payment Rates; Payments to Hospitals for...

  16. Planning Study Hospital, Cape Town The Hospital Information at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tile HOspital Information Plan- ning Study ... Hospital, and based on. the Business Systems Plan- ... technology can be of considerable benefit in dealing with these issues. .... coherenr, flexible information systems with a minimum of data.

  17. Assessment of hospital-based adult triage at emergency receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted in 6 of the 7 hospitals in the region. ... gency department, the rest receive emergency patients/perform triage from .... gional Referral Hospital (government facility) with emer- ... sionals who were involved in daily initial management of ..... for receiving emergency cases can be complex especially.

  18. Short Communication - Hospital-Based Mortality in Federal Capital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cause-specific mortality data are important to monitor trends in mortality over time. Medical records provide reliable documentation of the causes of deaths occurring in hospitals. This study describes all causes of mortality reported at hospitals in the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) of Nigeria. Methods: Deaths ...

  19. Evaluating hospital information systems from the point of view of the medical records section users in Medical-Educational Hospitals of Kermanshah 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, S; Sarmad, A; Mohammadi, M; Cheleie, M; Amiri, S; Zardoei Golanbary, S H

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating hospital information systems leads to the improvement and devotion based on the users' needs, especially the medical records section users in hospitals, which are in contact with this system from the moment the patient enters the hospital until his/ her release and after that. The present research aimed to evaluate the hospital information systems from the point of view of the medical record section employees. Materials and method : The current research was applicative-descriptive analytical and the research society included 70 users of the medical history section in the educational-medical centers of Kermanshah city. The data-gathering tool was the 10th part of 9241/ 10 Isometric standard questionnaire of evaluating hospital information systems, with 75 specific questions in 7 bases, with the five spectra Likertt scale, its conceptual admissibility being confirmed in previous researches. 22 SPSS statistical software analyzed its permanency in the present study, which was also confirmed by Cronbach's's alpha test, which equaled to 0.89, and the data. Findings : The highest level of the employees' satisfaction, based on gained scores median, was respectively the incompatibility with the users' expectations, measuring 3.55, self-description measuring 3.54 and controllability - 3.51, which in total presented the average scores of 3.39, the lowest level of satisfaction being related to useful learning , whose value was 3.19. Discussion and conclusion : Hospital information systems' users believe that it is more desirable that the existing systems are based on the measures and consider them proper for making them non-governmental and useful for undesired learning. Considering the long distance of the existing information systems with the desired performance, it is essential that "these systems pay more attention to a more complete and deeper recognition and awareness of users' opinions and requirements in their road. The movement and development is to

  20. [Assessment and comparison of hospital operating efficiency under different management systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-18

    descent of SE in the commission hospitals was larger than that in the municipal hospitals. There are significant differences in the operation efficiency between different management systems and the main factors associated with operation efficiency are the technological and management level. Given scale efficiency status and macroeconomic medical policies, the commission hospitals and the municipal hospitals require further adjusting the distribution of medical resources, and it is of great significance for all the commission hospitals and the municipal hospitals to improve the management level and resource integration capability.

  1. A techno-economic assessment of grid connected photovoltaic system for hospital building in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mat Isa, Normazlina; Tan, Chee Wei; Yatim, AHM

    2017-07-01

    Conventionally, electricity in hospital building are supplied by the utility grid which uses mix fuel including coal and gas. Due to enhancement in renewable technology, many building shall moving forward to install their own PV panel along with the grid to employ the advantages of the renewable energy. This paper present an analysis of grid connected photovoltaic (GCPV) system for hospital building in Malaysia. A discussion is emphasized on the economic analysis based on Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) and total Net Present Post (TNPC) in regards with the annual interest rate. The analysis is performed using Hybrid Optimization Model for Electric Renewables (HOMER) software which give optimization and sensitivity analysis result. An optimization result followed by the sensitivity analysis also being discuss in this article thus the impact of the grid connected PV system has be evaluated. In addition, the benefit from Net Metering (NeM) mechanism also discussed.

  2. Factors for change in maternal and perinatal audit systems in Dar es Salaam hospitals, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyamtema, Angelo S; Urassa, David P; Pembe, Andrea B; Kisanga, Felix; van Roosmalen, Jos

    2010-06-03

    Effective maternal and perinatal audits are associated with improved quality of care and reduction of severe adverse outcome. Although audits at the level of care were formally introduced in Tanzania around 25 years ago, little information is available about their existence, performance, and practical barriers to their implementation. This study assessed the structure, process and impacts of maternal and perinatal death audit systems in clinical practice and presents a detailed account on how they could be improved. A cross sectional descriptive study was conducted in eight major hospitals in Dar es Salaam in January 2009. An in-depth interview guide was used for 29 health managers and members of the audit committees to investigate the existence, structure, process and outcome of such audits in clinical practice. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to interview 30 health care providers in the maternity wards to assess their awareness, attitude and practice towards audit systems. The 2007 institutional pregnancy outcome records were reviewed. Overall hospital based maternal mortality ratio was 218/100,000 live births (range: 0 - 385) and perinatal mortality rate was 44/1000 births (range: 17 - 147). Maternal and perinatal audit systems existed only in 4 and 3 hospitals respectively, and key decision makers did not take part in audit committees. Sixty percent of care providers were not aware of even a single action which had ever been implemented in their hospitals because of audit recommendations. There were neither records of the key decision points, action plan, nor regular analysis of the audit reports in any of the facilities where such audit systems existed. Maternal and perinatal audit systems in these institutions are poorly established in structure and process; and are less effective to improve the quality of care. Fundamental changes are urgently needed for successful audit systems in these institutions.

  3. Op weg naar een accreditatiesysteem van Nederlandse ziekenhuizen [Towards an accreditation system of Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gennip, E.M.S.J. van; Linnebank, F.; Sillevis Smitt, P.A.E.; Geldof, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    The development of the Netherlands system for accreditation of hospitals started in 1989 in the Pilotproject Accreditation (PACE). This resulted in the establishment of the Netherlands Institute for Accreditation of Hospitals (NIAH) early 1999, by the Dutch Association of Hospitals, the Dutch

  4. Nurses' information retrieval skills in psychiatric hospitals - are the requirements for evidence-based practice fulfilled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Marita; Välimäki, Maritta; Hätönen, Heli

    2010-01-01

    Nursing professionals have long recognized the importance to practice of research and the value of research evidence. Nurses still do not use research findings in practice. The purpose of this paper was to describe nurses' skills in using literature databases and the Internet in psychiatric hospitals and associations of nurses' gender, age, and job position with their information retrieval skills. The study was carried out in 2004 among nursing staff (N=183) on nine acute psychiatric wards in two psychiatric hospitals in Finland (n=180, response rate 98%). The Finnish version of the European Computer Driving Licence test (ECDL) was used as a data collection instrument. The study showed that there were clear deficits in information retrieval skills among nurses working in psychiatric hospitals. Thus, nurses' competence does not support the realization of evidence-based practice in the hospitals. Therefore, it is important to increase nurses' information retrieval skills by tailoring continuing education modules. It would be also advisable to develop centralized systems for the internal dissemination of research findings for the use of nursing staff.

  5. Hospital-based expert model for health technology procurement planning in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniati, R; Cecconi, G; Frosini, F; Dori, F; Regolini, J; Iadanza, E; Biffi Gentili, G

    2014-01-01

    Although in the last years technology innovation in healthcare brought big improvements in care level and patient quality of life, hospital complexity and management cost became higher. For this reason, necessity of planning for medical equipment procurement within hospitals is getting more and more important in order to sustainable provide appropriate technology for both routine activity and innovative procedures. In order to support hospital decision makers for technology procurement planning, an expert model was designed as reported in the following paper. It combines the most widely used approaches for technology evaluation by taking into consideration Health Technology Assessment (HTA) and Medical Equipment Replacement Model (MERM). The designing phases include a first definition of prioritization algorithms, then the weighting process through experts' interviews and a final step for the model validation that included both statistical testing and comparison with real decisions. In conclusion, the designed model was able to provide a semi-automated tool that through the use of multidisciplinary information is able to prioritize different requests of technology acquisition in hospitals. Validation outcomes improved the model accuracy and created different "user profiles" according to the specific needs of decision makers.

  6. A system dynamics approach for hospital waste management in a city in a developing country: the case of Nablus, Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khatib, Issam A; Eleyan, Derar; Garfield, Joy

    2016-09-01

    Hospitals and health centers provide a variety of healthcare services and normally generate hazardous waste as well as general waste. General waste has a similar nature to that of municipal solid waste and therefore could be disposed of in municipal landfills. However, hazardous waste poses risks to public health, unless it is properly managed. The hospital waste management system encompasses many factors, i.e., number of beds, number of employees, level of service, population, birth rate, fertility rate, and not in my back yard (NIMBY) syndrome. Therefore, this management system requires a comprehensive analysis to determine the role of each factor and its influence on the whole system. In this research, a hospital waste management simulation model is presented based on the system dynamics technique to determine the interaction among these factors in the system using a software package, ithink. This model is used to estimate waste segregation as this is important in the hospital waste management system to minimize risk to public health. Real data has been obtained from a case study of the city of Nablus, Palestine to validate the model. The model exhibits wastes generated from three types of hospitals (private, charitable, and government) by considering the number of both inpatients and outpatients depending on the population of the city under study. The model also offers the facility to compare the total waste generated among these different types of hospitals and anticipate and predict the future generated waste both infectious and non-infectious and the treatment cost incurred.

  7. A personalized mobile patient guide system for a patient-centered smart hospital: Lessons learned from a usability test and satisfaction survey in a tertiary university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Jung, Se Young; Kim, Seok; Kim, Eunhye; Lee, Kee-Hyuck; Chung, Eunja; Hwang, Hee

    2016-07-01

    The present study focused on the design, implementation, and evaluation of a personalized mobile patient guide system that utilizes smart phones, indoor navigation technology and a hospital information system (HIS) to address the difficulties that outpatients face in finding hospital facilities, recognizing their daily treatment schedule, and accessing personalized medical and administrative information. The present study was conducted in a fully digitized tertiary university hospital in South Korea. We developed a real-time location-based outpatient guide system that consists of Bluetooth access points (APs) for indoor navigation, an Android-based guide application, a guide server, and interfaces with the HIS. A total of 33 subjects and 43 outpatients participated in the usability test (UT) and the satisfaction survey, respectively. We confirmed that the indoor navigation feature can be applied to outpatient departments with precision using a position error test. The participants in the UT completed each scenario with an average success rate of 67.4%. According to the results, we addressed the problems and made improvements to the user interface by providing users with context-based guidance information. The satisfaction rating of the system was high, with an average score of 4.0 out of 5.0, showing its utility as a patient-centered hospital service. The innovative mobile patient guide system for outpatients is feasible and can be successfully implemented to provide personalized information with high satisfaction. Additionally, the issues identified and lessons learned from our experiences regarding task scheduling, indoor navigation, and usability should be considered when developing the system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Microbial air purity in hospitals. Operating theatres with air conditioning system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogulski, Adam; Szczotko, Maciej

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to show the influence of air conditioning control for microbial contamination of air inside the operating theatres equipped with correctly working air-conditioning system. This work was based on the results of bacteria and fungi concentration in hospital air obtained since 2001. Assays of microbial air purity conducted on atmospheric air in parallel with indoor air demonstrated that air filters applied in air-conditioning systems worked correctly in every case. To show the problem of fluctuation of bacteria concentration more precisely, every sequences of single results from successive measure series were examined independently.

  9. 76 FR 39006 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Value-Based Purchasing Program; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... and 480 [CMS-3239-CN] RIN 0938-AQ55 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Value-Based Purchasing... Value-Based Purchasing Program.'' DATES: Effective Date: These corrections are effective on July 1, 2011... for the hospital value-based purchasing program. Therefore, in section III. 6. and 7. of this notice...

  10. The Role of Hospital Information Systems in Universal Health Coverage Monitoring in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karara, Gustave; Verbeke, Frank; Nyssen, Marc

    2015-01-01

    In this retrospective study, the authors monitored the patient health coverage in 6 Rwandan hospitals in the period between 2011 and 2014. Among the 6 hospitals, 2 are third level hospitals, 2 district hospitals and 2 private hospitals. Patient insurance and financial data were extracted and analyzed from OpenClinic GA, an open source hospital information system (HIS) used in those 6 hospitals. The percentage of patients who had no health insurer globally decreased from 35% in 2011 to 15% in 2014. The rate of health insurance coverage in hospitals varied between 75% in private hospitals and 84% in public hospitals. The amounts paid by the patients for health services decreased in private hospitals to 25% of the total costs in 2014 (-7.4%) and vary between 14% and 19% in public hospitals. Although the number of insured patients has increased and the patient share decreased over the four years of study, the patients' out-of-pocket payments increased especially for in-patients. This study emphasizes the value of integrated hospital information systems for this kind of health economics research in developing countries.

  11. The deployment of information systems and information technology in field hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Ian R J; Naguib, Raouf N G

    2010-01-01

    Information systems and related technologies continue to develop and have become an integral part of healthcare provision and hospital care in particular. Field hospitals typically operate in the most austere and difficult of conditions and have yet to fully exploit related technologies. This paper addresses those aspects of healthcare informatics, healthcare knowledge management and lean healthcare that can be applied to field hospitals, with a view to improving patient care. The aim is to provide a vision for the deployment of information systems and information technology in field hospitals, using the British Army's field hospital as a representative model.

  12. Comparing systems for costing hospital treatments. The case of stable angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jytte; Skjoldborg, Ulla Slothuus

    2004-03-01

    This paper demonstrates the basic properties in the systems most commonly considered for costing treatments in the Danish hospitals. The differences between the traditional charge system, the DRG system and the ABC system are analysed, and difficulties encountered in comparing these systems are discussed. A sample of patients diagnosed with stable angina pectoris (SAP) at Odense University Hospital was used to compare the three systems when costing an entire treatment path, costing single hospitalisations and studying the effects of length of stay. Furthermore, it is illustrated that the main idea behind each system is reflected in how the systems over- or underestimate costs. Implications when managing the hospitals, particularly reimbursement, are discussed.

  13. Hospital-Based Acute Care After Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: Implications for Quality Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimba, Roman; Laughlin, Richard T; Krishnamurthy, Anil; Ross, Joseph S; Fox, Justin P

    2016-03-01

    Although hospital readmissions are being adopted as a quality measure after total hip or knee arthroplasty, they may fail accurately capture the patient's postdischarge experience. We studied 272,853 discharges from 517 hospitals to determine hospital emergency department (ED) visit and readmission rates. The hospital-level, 30-day, risk-standardized ED visit (median = 5.6% [2.4%-13.7%]) and hospital readmission (5.0% [2.6%-9.2%]) rates were similar and varied widely. A hospital's risk-standardized ED visit rate did not correlate with its readmission rate (r = -0.03, P = .50). If ED visits were included in a broader "readmission" measure, 246 (47.6%) hospitals would change perceived performance groups. Including ED visits in a broader, hospital-based, acute care measure may be warranted to better describe postdischarge health care utilization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Variations in renal morphometry: A hospital-based Indian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjeet S Rathore

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Our study revealed that there exist differences in various morphometric parameters of the kidney and ureter in different subsets of the Indian population attending our hospital as compared with the standard values quoted in the world literature.

  15. Actuarial assessment of violence risk in hospital-based partner assault clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, N Zoe; Harris, Grant T; Holder, Norah

    2008-12-01

    Hospital-based partner assault clinics are a relatively recent addition to the community response to partner violence. In this study, 66% of 111 women attending hospital clinics for partner assault were physically injured and 43% reported death threats. Few concurrently used other services (shelters or police) and most relied on female friends and relatives for help. Many participants who currently lived with the perpetrator were contemplating leaving but only a third had made plans to do so. Participants faced an unusually high risk of future assault, according to both victim interview using the ODARA actuarial risk assessment and their own perceptions. Findings imply an important role for partner assault clinics and the feasibility of the victim service sector's using the same actuarial risk assessments as the criminal justice system.

  16. Inertial Sensor-Based Robust Gait Analysis in Non-Hospital Settings for Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Tunca

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The gold standards for gait analysis are instrumented walkways and marker-based motion capture systems, which require costly infrastructure and are only available in hospitals and specialized gait clinics. Even though the completeness and the accuracy of these systems are unquestionable, a mobile and pervasive gait analysis alternative suitable for non-hospital settings is a clinical necessity. Using inertial sensors for gait analysis has been well explored in the literature with promising results. However, the majority of the existing work does not consider realistic conditions where data collection and sensor placement imperfections are imminent. Moreover, some of the underlying assumptions of the existing work are not compatible with pathological gait, decreasing the accuracy. To overcome these challenges, we propose a foot-mounted inertial sensor-based gait analysis system that extends the well-established zero-velocity update and Kalman filtering methodology. Our system copes with various cases of data collection difficulties and relaxes some of the assumptions invalid for pathological gait (e.g., the assumption of observing a heel strike during a gait cycle. The system is able to extract a rich set of standard gait metrics, including stride length, cadence, cycle time, stance time, swing time, stance ratio, speed, maximum/minimum clearance and turning rate. We validated the spatio-temporal accuracy of the proposed system by comparing the stride length and swing time output with an IR depth-camera-based reference system on a dataset comprised of 22 subjects. Furthermore, to highlight the clinical applicability of the system, we present a clinical discussion of the extracted metrics on a disjoint dataset of 17 subjects with various neurological conditions.

  17. 42 CFR 412.20 - Hospital services subject to the prospective payment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... payment systems. 412.20 Section 412.20 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Hospital Services Subject to and Excluded From the Prospective Payment Systems for Inpatient...

  18. 42 CFR 419.21 - Hospital outpatient services subject to the outpatient prospective payment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... outpatient prospective payment system. 419.21 Section 419.21 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM... Excluded From the Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System § 419.21 Hospital outpatient services...

  19. Technology based Education System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kant Hiran, Kamal; Doshi, Ruchi; Henten, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Abstract - Education plays a very important role for the development of the country. Education has multiple dimensions from schooling to higher education and research. In all these domains, there is invariably a need for technology based teaching and learning tools are highly demanded in the acad......Abstract - Education plays a very important role for the development of the country. Education has multiple dimensions from schooling to higher education and research. In all these domains, there is invariably a need for technology based teaching and learning tools are highly demanded...... in the academic institutions. Thus, there is a need of comprehensive technology support system to cater the demands of all educational actors. Cloud Computing is one such comprehensive and user-friendly technology support environment that is the need of an hour. Cloud computing is the emerging technology that has...

  20. Performance evaluation of hospitals that provide care in the public health system, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Marcelo Cristiano de Azevedo; da Cruz, Lucila Pedroso; Kishima, Vanessa Chaer; Pollara, Wilson Modesto; de Lira, Antônio Carlos Onofre; Couttolenc, Bernard François

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze if size, administrative level, legal status, type of unit and educational activity influence the hospital network performance in providing services to the Brazilian Unified Health System. METHODS This cross-sectional study evaluated data from the Hospital Information System and the Cadastro Nacional de Estabelecimentos de Saúde (National Registry of Health Facilities), 2012, in Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. We calculated performance indicators, such as: the ratio of hospital employees per bed; mean amount paid for admission; bed occupancy rate; average length of stay; bed turnover index and hospital mortality rate. Data were expressed as mean and standard deviation. The groups were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni correction. RESULTS The hospital occupancy rate in small hospitals was lower than in medium, big and special-sized hospitals. Higher hospital occupancy rate and bed turnover index were observed in hospitals that include education in their activities. The hospital mortality rate was lower in specialized hospitals compared to general ones, despite their higher proportion of highly complex admissions. We found no differences between hospitals in the direct and indirect administration for most of the indicators analyzed. CONCLUSIONS The study indicated the importance of the scale effect on efficiency, and larger hospitals had a higher performance. Hospitals that include education in their activities had a higher operating performance, albeit with associated importance of using human resources and highly complex structures. Specialized hospitals had a significantly lower rate of mortality than general hospitals, indicating the positive effect of the volume of procedures and technology used on clinical outcomes. The analysis related to the administrative level and legal status did not show any significant performance differences between the categories of public hospitals.

  1. Performance evaluation of hospitals that provide care in the public health system, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cristiano de Azevedo Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze if size, administrative level, legal status, type of unit and educational activity influence the hospital network performance in providing services to the Brazilian Unified Health System.METHODS This cross-sectional study evaluated data from the Hospital Information System and the Cadastro Nacional de Estabelecimentos de Saúde (National Registry of Health Facilities, 2012, in Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. We calculated performance indicators, such as: the ratio of hospital employees per bed; mean amount paid for admission; bed occupancy rate; average length of stay; bed turnover index and hospital mortality rate. Data were expressed as mean and standard deviation. The groups were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA and Bonferroni correction.RESULTS The hospital occupancy rate in small hospitals was lower than in medium, big and special-sized hospitals. Higher hospital occupancy rate and bed turnover index were observed in hospitals that include education in their activities. The hospital mortality rate was lower in specialized hospitals compared to general ones, despite their higher proportion of highly complex admissions. We found no differences between hospitals in the direct and indirect administration for most of the indicators analyzed.CONCLUSIONS The study indicated the importance of the scale effect on efficiency, and larger hospitals had a higher performance. Hospitals that include education in their activities had a higher operating performance, albeit with associated importance of using human resources and highly complex structures. Specialized hospitals had a significantly lower rate of mortality than general hospitals, indicating the positive effect of the volume of procedures and technology used on clinical outcomes. The analysis related to the administrative level and legal status did not show any significant performance differences between the categories of public hospitals.

  2. Ranking Hospitals Based on Colon Surgery and Abdominal Hysterectomy Surgical Site Infection Outcomes: Impact of Limiting Surveillance to the Operative Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Avery, Taliser R; Platt, Richard; Kleinman, Ken; Huang, Susan S

    2018-03-16

    Hospital-specific surgical site infection (SSI) performance following colon surgery and abdominal hysterectomies can impact hospitals' relative rankings around quality metrics used to determine financial penalties. Current SSI surveillance largely focuses on SSI detected at the operative hospital. Retrospective cohort study to assess the impact on hospitals' relative SSI performance rankings when SSI detected at non-operative hospitals are included. We utilized data from a California statewide hospital registry to assess for evidence of SSI following colon surgery or abdominal hysterectomies performed 3/1/2011-11/30/2013 using previously validated claims-based SSI surveillance methods. Risk-adjusted hospital-specific rankings based on SSI detected at operative hospitals versus any California hospital were generated. Among 60,059 colon surgeries at 285 hospitals and 64,918 abdominal hysterectomies at 270 hospitals, 5,921 (9.9%) colon surgeries and 1,481 (2.3%) abdominal hysterectomies received a diagnosis code for SSI within the 30 days following surgery. 7.2% of colon surgery and 13.4% of abdominal hysterectomy SSI would have been missed by operative hospital surveillance alone. The proportion of individual hospital's SSI detected during hospitalizations at other hospitals varied widely. Including non-operative hospital SSI resulted in improved relative ranking of 11 (3.9%) colon surgery and 13 (4.8%) hysterectomy hospitals so that they were no longer in the worst performing quartile, mainly among hospitals with relatively high surgical volumes. Standard SSI surveillance that mainly focuses on infections detected at the operative hospital causes varying degrees of SSI under-estimation, leading to inaccurate assignment or avoidance of financial penalties for approximately one in eleven to sixteen hospitals.

  3. The relationship between social capital and quality management systems in European hospitals: a quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Antje; Arah, Onyebuchi A; Dersarkissian, Maral; Thompson, Caroline A; Mannion, Russell; Wagner, Cordula; Ommen, Oliver; Sunol, Rosa; Pfaff, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Strategic leadership is an important organizational capability and is essential for quality improvement in hospital settings. Furthermore, the quality of leadership depends crucially on a common set of shared values and mutual trust between hospital management board members. According to the concept of social capital, these are essential requirements for successful cooperation and coordination within groups. We assume that social capital within hospital management boards is an important factor in the development of effective organizational systems for overseeing health care quality. We hypothesized that the degree of social capital within the hospital management board is associated with the effectiveness and maturity of the quality management system in European hospitals. We used a mixed-method approach to data collection and measurement in 188 hospitals in 7 European countries. For this analysis, we used responses from hospital managers. To test our hypothesis, we conducted a multilevel linear regression analysis of the association between social capital and the quality management system score at the hospital level, controlling for hospital ownership, teaching status, number of beds, number of board members, organizational culture, and country clustering. The average social capital score within a hospital management board was 3.3 (standard deviation: 0.5; range: 1-4) and the average hospital score for the quality management index was 19.2 (standard deviation: 4.5; range: 0-27). Higher social capital was associated with higher quality management system scores (regression coefficient: 1.41; standard error: 0.64, p=0.029). The results suggest that a higher degree of social capital exists in hospitals that exhibit higher maturity in their quality management systems. Although uncontrolled confounding and reverse causation cannot be completely ruled out, our new findings, along with the results of previous research, could have important implications for the work of

  4. The Relationship between Social Capital and Quality Management Systems in European Hospitals: A Quantitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Antje; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; DerSarkissian, Maral; Thompson, Caroline A.; Mannion, Russell; Wagner, Cordula; Ommen, Oliver; Sunol, Rosa; Pfaff, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Background Strategic leadership is an important organizational capability and is essential for quality improvement in hospital settings. Furthermore, the quality of leadership depends crucially on a common set of shared values and mutual trust between hospital management board members. According to the concept of social capital, these are essential requirements for successful cooperation and coordination within groups. Objectives We assume that social capital within hospital management boards is an important factor in the development of effective organizational systems for overseeing health care quality. We hypothesized that the degree of social capital within the hospital management board is associated with the effectiveness and maturity of the quality management system in European hospitals. Methods We used a mixed-method approach to data collection and measurement in 188 hospitals in 7 European countries. For this analysis, we used responses from hospital managers. To test our hypothesis, we conducted a multilevel linear regression analysis of the association between social capital and the quality management system score at the hospital level, controlling for hospital ownership, teaching status, number of beds, number of board members, organizational culture, and country clustering. Results The average social capital score within a hospital management board was 3.3 (standard deviation: 0.5; range: 1-4) and the average hospital score for the quality management index was 19.2 (standard deviation: 4.5; range: 0-27). Higher social capital was associated with higher quality management system scores (regression coefficient: 1.41; standard error: 0.64, p=0.029). Conclusion The results suggest that a higher degree of social capital exists in hospitals that exhibit higher maturity in their quality management systems. Although uncontrolled confounding and reverse causation cannot be completely ruled out, our new findings, along with the results of previous research, could

  5. Critical Factors Influencing Decision to Adopt Human Resource Information System (HRIS) in Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Golam Rabiul; Masum, Abdul Kadar Muhammad; Beh, Loo-See; Hong, Choong Seon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to explore factors influencing the management decisions to adopt human resource information system (HRIS) in the hospital industry of Bangladesh—an emerging developing country. To understand this issue, this paper integrates two prominent adoption theories—Human-Organization-Technology fit (HOT-fit) model and Technology-Organization-Environment (TOE) framework. Thirteen factors under four dimensions were investigated to explore their influence on HRIS adoption decisions in hospitals. Employing non-probability sampling method, a total of 550 copies of structured questionnaires were distributed among HR executives of 92 private hospitals in Bangladesh. Among the respondents, usable questionnaires were 383 that suggesting a valid response rate of 69.63%. We classify the sample into 3 core groups based on the HRIS initial implementation, namely adopters, prospectors, and laggards. The obtained results specify 5 most critical factors i.e. IT infrastructure, top management support, IT capabilities of staff, perceived cost, and competitive pressure. Moreover, the most significant dimension is technological dimension followed by organisational, human, and environmental among the proposed 4 dimensions. Lastly, the study found existence of significant differences in all factors across different adopting groups. The study results also expose constructive proposals to researchers, hospitals, and the government to enhance the likelihood of adopting HRIS. The present study has important implications in understanding HRIS implementation in developing countries. PMID:27494334

  6. Critical Factors Influencing Decision to Adopt Human Resource Information System (HRIS in Hospitals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Golam Rabiul Alam

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to explore factors influencing the management decisions to adopt human resource information system (HRIS in the hospital industry of Bangladesh-an emerging developing country. To understand this issue, this paper integrates two prominent adoption theories-Human-Organization-Technology fit (HOT-fit model and Technology-Organization-Environment (TOE framework. Thirteen factors under four dimensions were investigated to explore their influence on HRIS adoption decisions in hospitals. Employing non-probability sampling method, a total of 550 copies of structured questionnaires were distributed among HR executives of 92 private hospitals in Bangladesh. Among the respondents, usable questionnaires were 383 that suggesting a valid response rate of 69.63%. We classify the sample into 3 core groups based on the HRIS initial implementation, namely adopters, prospectors, and laggards. The obtained results specify 5 most critical factors i.e. IT infrastructure, top management support, IT capabilities of staff, perceived cost, and competitive pressure. Moreover, the most significant dimension is technological dimension followed by organisational, human, and environmental among the proposed 4 dimensions. Lastly, the study found existence of significant differences in all factors across different adopting groups. The study results also expose constructive proposals to researchers, hospitals, and the government to enhance the likelihood of adopting HRIS. The present study has important implications in understanding HRIS implementation in developing countries.

  7. Critical Factors Influencing Decision to Adopt Human Resource Information System (HRIS) in Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Golam Rabiul; Masum, Abdul Kadar Muhammad; Beh, Loo-See; Hong, Choong Seon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to explore factors influencing the management decisions to adopt human resource information system (HRIS) in the hospital industry of Bangladesh-an emerging developing country. To understand this issue, this paper integrates two prominent adoption theories-Human-Organization-Technology fit (HOT-fit) model and Technology-Organization-Environment (TOE) framework. Thirteen factors under four dimensions were investigated to explore their influence on HRIS adoption decisions in hospitals. Employing non-probability sampling method, a total of 550 copies of structured questionnaires were distributed among HR executives of 92 private hospitals in Bangladesh. Among the respondents, usable questionnaires were 383 that suggesting a valid response rate of 69.63%. We classify the sample into 3 core groups based on the HRIS initial implementation, namely adopters, prospectors, and laggards. The obtained results specify 5 most critical factors i.e. IT infrastructure, top management support, IT capabilities of staff, perceived cost, and competitive pressure. Moreover, the most significant dimension is technological dimension followed by organisational, human, and environmental among the proposed 4 dimensions. Lastly, the study found existence of significant differences in all factors across different adopting groups. The study results also expose constructive proposals to researchers, hospitals, and the government to enhance the likelihood of adopting HRIS. The present study has important implications in understanding HRIS implementation in developing countries.

  8. 42 CFR 412.73 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate based on a Federal fiscal year 1982 base period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR... System for Inpatient Operating Costs § 412.73 Determination of the hospital-specific rate based on a... under the Social Security Act as in effect on April 19, 1983. (e) DRG adjustment. The applicable...

  9. Are hospitals ready to response to disasters? Challenges, opportunities and strategies of Hospital Emergency Incident Command System (HEICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Yarmohammadian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Applying an effective management system in emergency incidents provides maximum efficiency with using minimum facilities and human resources. Hospital Emergency Incident Command System (HEICS is one of the most reliable emergency incident command systems to make hospitals more efficient and to increase patient safety. This research was to study requirements, barriers, and strategies of HEICS in hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS. Methods: This was a qualitative research carried out in Isfahan Province, Iran during 2008-09. The study population included senior hospital managers of IUMS and key informants in emergency incident management across Isfahan Province. Sampling method was in non-random purposeful form and snowball technique was used. The research in-strument for data collection was semi-structured interview; collected data was analyzed by Colaizzi Technique. Results: Findings of study were categorized into three general categories including requirements (organizational and sub-organizational, barriers (internal and external of HEICS establishment, and providing short, mid and long term strategies. These categories are explained in details in the main text. Conclusions: Regarding the existing barriers in establishment of HEICS, it is recommended that responsible authori-ties in different levels of health care system prepare necessary conditions for implementing such system as soon as possible via encouraging and supporting systems. This paper may help health policy makers to get reasonable frame-work and have comprehensive view for establishing HEICS in hospitals. It is necessary to consider requirements and viewpoints of stakeholders before any health policy making or planning.

  10. 77 FR 27869 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... Considered HAC Candidate: Iatrogenic Pneumothorax With Venous Catheterization 3. Present on Admission (POA.... History of Measures Adopted for the Hospital IQR Program b. Maintenance of Technical Specifications for...-Associated Infection (HAI) Measures (A) Proposed Central Line Associated Blood Stream Infections ((CLABSI...

  11. 77 FR 34326 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... identify outlier cases for both inpatient operating and inpatient capital related payments, which is... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 412... Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality...

  12. 77 FR 53257 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ... Estimated Net Savings for Current HACs g. Previously Considered Candidate HACs--RTI Analysis of Frequency of... Program 1. Background 2. Budget Neutrality Offset Amount for FY 2013 L. Hospital Routine Services... Program a. Administrative Requirements (1) Requirements Regarding QualityNet Account and Administrator for...

  13. Barriers to participation in a hospital-based falls assessment clinic programme: an interview study with older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evron, L.; Schultz-Larsen, K.; Fristrup, T.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To gain new knowledge about barriers to participation in hospital-based falls assessment. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 20 older people referred to falls assessment at a hospital-based clinic were conducted. A convenience sample of 10 refusers and 10 accepters was collected. Thos...... the findings of this study to a public health message, we have to consider moving the focus of falls prevention strategies from disease control to the domain of health promotion in order to engage older adults in preventive healthcare Udgivelsesdato: 2009/9......Aims: To gain new knowledge about barriers to participation in hospital-based falls assessment. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 20 older people referred to falls assessment at a hospital-based clinic were conducted. A convenience sample of 10 refusers and 10 accepters was collected. Those...... system taking over their life. Conclusions: This study indicates that older at-risk patients acknowledge their falls problem, but refuse to participate in hospital-based assessment programmes because they expect to lose their authority and to be caught up in the healthcare system. In order to transform...

  14. Barriers to participation in a hospital-based falls assessment clinic programme: an interview study with older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evron, Lotte; Schultz-Larsen, Kirsten; Fristrup, Tine

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To gain new knowledge about barriers to participation in hospital-based falls assessment. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 20 older people referred to falls assessment at a hospital-based clinic were conducted. A convenience sample of 10 refusers and 10 accepters was collected. Thos...... the findings of this study to a public health message, we have to consider moving the focus of falls prevention strategies from disease control to the domain of health promotion in order to engage older adults in preventive healthcare.......Aims: To gain new knowledge about barriers to participation in hospital-based falls assessment. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 20 older people referred to falls assessment at a hospital-based clinic were conducted. A convenience sample of 10 refusers and 10 accepters was collected. Those...... system taking over their life. Conclusions: This study indicates that older at-risk patients acknowledge their falls problem, but refuse to participate in hospital-based assessment programmes because they expect to lose their authority and to be caught up in the healthcare system. In order to transform...

  15. Noise Pollution Control System in the Hospital Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa Gallo, LM; Olivera, JM

    2016-04-01

    Problems related to environmental noise are not a new subject, but they became a major issue to solve because of the increasing, in complexity and intensity, of human activities due technological advances. Numerous international studies had dealt with the exposure of critical patients to noisy environment such as the Neonatal Intensive Care Units; their results show that there are difficulties in the organization in the developing brain, it can damage the delicate auditory structures and can cause biorhythm disorders, specially in preterm infants. The objective of this paper is to present the development and implementation of a control system that includes technical-management-training aspects to regulate the levels of specific noise sources in the neonatal hospitalization environment. For this purpose, there were applied different tools like: observations, surveys, procedures, an electronic control device and a training program for a Neonatal Service Unit. As a result, all noise sources were identified -some of them are eliminable-; all the service stable staff categories participated voluntarily; environmental noise measurements yielded values between 62.5 and 64.6 dBA and maximum were between 86.1 and 89.7 dBA; it was designed and installed a noise control device and the staff is being trained in noise reduction best practices.

  16. Noise Pollution Control System in the Hospital Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa Gallo, LM; Olivera, JM

    2016-01-01

    Problems related to environmental noise are not a new subject, but they became a major issue to solve because of the increasing, in complexity and intensity, of human activities due technological advances. Numerous international studies had dealt with the exposure of critical patients to noisy environment such as the Neonatal Intensive Care Units; their results show that there are difficulties in the organization in the developing brain, it can damage the delicate auditory structures and can cause biorhythm disorders, specially in preterm infants. The objective of this paper is to present the development and implementation of a control system that includes technical-management-training aspects to regulate the levels of specific noise sources in the neonatal hospitalization environment. For this purpose, there were applied different tools like: observations, surveys, procedures, an electronic control device and a training program for a Neonatal Service Unit. As a result, all noise sources were identified -some of them are eliminable-; all the service stable staff categories participated voluntarily; environmental noise measurements yielded values between 62.5 and 64.6 dBA and maximum were between 86.1 and 89.7 dBA; it was designed and installed a noise control device and the staff is being trained in noise reduction best practices. (paper)

  17. Retrospective hospital based surveillance of intussusception in children in a sentinel paediatric hospital: benefits and pitfalls for use in post-marketing surveillance of rotavirus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Johnsen, C; Justice, F; Donath, S; Bines, J E

    2012-04-27

    Evaluation of the safety of rotavirus vaccines, particularly with respect to the risk of intussusception, is recommended for countries planning to introduce rotavirus vaccines into the National Immunisation Program. However, as prospective studies are costly, require time to conduct and may be difficult to perform in some settings, retrospective hospital based surveillance at sentinel sites has been suggested as an option for surveillance for intussusception following introduction of rotavirus vaccines. To assess the value of retrospective hospital based surveillance to describe clinical and epidemiological features of intussusception in children aged <24 months and to investigate any temporal association between receipt of a rotavirus vaccine and intussusception. A retrospective chart review of all patients diagnosed with intussusception at Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia over an 8-year period including before and after rotavirus vaccine introduction into the National Immunisation Program, was conducted using patients identified by a medical record database (ICD-10-CM 56.1). Patient profile, clinical presentation, treatment and outcome were analysed along with records of immunisation status obtained using the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register. A 9% misclassification rate of discharge diagnosis of intussusception was identified on critical chart review. The incidence rate of intussusception at the Royal Children's Hospital over the study period was 1.91 per 10,000 infants <24 months (95% CI 1.65-2.20). Intestinal resection was required in 6.5% of infants (95% CI 3.6%, 11.0%). Intussusception occurred within 30 days after vaccination in 2 of 27 patients who had received at least 1 dose of a rotavirus vaccine. Valuable data on the incidence, clinical presentation and treatment outcomes of intussusception can be obtained from data retrieved from hospital medical records in a sentinel paediatric hospital using standardised methodology. However

  18. [Cost of hospitalization by the Activity Based Costing method in the neonatal department of Principal Hospital of Dakar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchamdja, T; Balaka, A; Tchandana, M; Agbétra, A

    2015-01-01

    To determine the cost of hospitalization per day in the neonatal department of Principal Hospital of Dakar. This prospective study took place during the month of July 2011 in the newborn unit. The activity-based costing method was used to analyze costs. During the study period, 52 newborns were hospitalized for a total of 590 days. The cost of the human resources during that month was 9,907,832 FCFA (US $ 19,815.66), the cost of depreciation of fixed assets was estimated at 571,952 FCFA (US $ 1143.90), and supplies at 112,084 FCFA (US $ 224.17). External services cost 386,753 FCFA (US $ 773.51) and support services 6,917,380.65 FCFA (US $ 13,834.7613). The monthly expenses incurred for the hospitalization of newborns totaled 17,896,002 FCFA (US $ 35,792), for a cost per patient per day of 30,332.20 FCFA (US $ 60.66) and an average cost of hospitalization 334,153.88 FCFA (US $ 668,31). This study is the first of its kind in Senegal and neighboring countries. By applying the ABC approach, we can obtain a more detailed and precise estimate of the cost of activities and services. Process improvements and corrective actions should make it possible to identify cost drivers, such as time.

  19. A Hospital Is Not Just a Factory, but a Complex Adaptive System-Implications for Perioperative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Aman; Islam, Salim D; Schwartz, Michael J; Cannesson, Maxime

    2017-07-01

    Many methods used to improve hospital and perioperative services productivity and quality of care have assumed that the hospital is essentially a factory, and therefore, that industrial engineering and manufacturing-derived redesign approaches such as Six Sigma and Lean can be applied to hospitals and perioperative services just as they have been applied in factories. However, a hospital is not merely a factory but also a complex adaptive system (CAS). The hospital CAS has many subsystems, with perioperative care being an important one for which concepts of factory redesign are frequently advocated. In this article, we argue that applying only factory approaches such as lean methodologies or process standardization to complex systems such as perioperative care could account for difficulties and/or failures in improving performance in care delivery. Within perioperative services, only noncomplex/low-variance surgical episodes are amenable to manufacturing-based redesign. On the other hand, complex surgery/high-variance cases and preoperative segmentation (the process of distinguishing between normal and complex cases) can be viewed as CAS-like. These systems tend to self-organize, often resist or react unpredictably to attempts at control, and therefore require application of CAS principles to modify system behavior. We describe 2 examples of perioperative redesign to illustrate the concepts outlined above. These examples present complementary and contrasting cases from 2 leading delivery systems. The Mayo Clinic example illustrates the application of manufacturing-based redesign principles to a factory-like (high-volume, low-risk, and mature practice) clinical program, while the Kaiser Permanente example illustrates the application of both manufacturing-based and self-organization-based approaches to programs and processes that are not factory-like but CAS-like. In this article, we describe how factory-like processes and CAS can coexist within a hospital and how

  20. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and Fiscal Year 2014 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; hospital conditions of participation; payment policies related to patient status. Final rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2013. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes that were applied to the LTCH PPS by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these updates and statutory changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or have revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. In addition, we are revising the conditions of participation (CoPs) for hospitals relating to the

  1. An inexpensive, interdisciplinary, methodology to conduct an impact study of homeless persons on hospital based services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, R David; Regier, Michael; Brown, Zachary; Davis, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    Homelessness is a primary concern for community health. Scientific literature on homelessness is wide ranging and diverse. One opportunity to add to existing literature is the development and testing of affordable, easily implemented methods for measuring the impact of homeless on the healthcare system. Such methodological approaches rely on the strengths in a multidisciplinary approach, including providers, both healthcare and homeless services and applied clinical researchers. This paper is a proof of concept for a methodology which is easily adaptable nationwide, given the mandated implementation of homeless management information systems in the United States and other countries; medical billing systems by hospitals; and research methods of researchers. Adaptation is independent of geographic region, budget restraints, specific agency skill sets, and many other factors that impact the application of a consistent methodological science based approach to assess and address homelessness. We conducted a secondary data analysis merging data from homeless utilization and hospital case based data. These data detailed care utilization among homeless persons in a small, Appalachian city in the United States. In our sample of 269 persons who received at least one hospital based service and one homeless service between July 1, 2012 and June 30, 2013, the total billed costs were $5,979,463 with 10 people costing more than one-third ($1,957,469) of the total. Those persons were primarily men, living in an emergency shelter, with pre-existing disabling conditions. We theorize that targeted services, including Housing First, would be an effective intervention. This is proposed in a future study.

  2. CLINICAL SURFACES - Activity-Based Computing for Distributed Multi-Display Environments in Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardram, Jakob E.; Bunde-Pedersen, Jonathan; Doryab, Afsaneh; Sørensen, Steffen

    A multi-display environment (MDE) is made up of co-located and networked personal and public devices that form an integrated workspace enabling co-located group work. Traditionally, MDEs have, however, mainly been designed to support a single “smart room”, and have had little sense of the tasks and activities that the MDE is being used for. This paper presents a novel approach to support activity-based computing in distributed MDEs, where displays are physically distributed across a large building. CLINICAL SURFACES was designed for clinical work in hospitals, and enables context-sensitive retrieval and browsing of patient data on public displays. We present the design and implementation of CLINICAL SURFACES, and report from an evaluation of the system at a large hospital. The evaluation shows that using distributed public displays to support activity-based computing inside a hospital is very useful for clinical work, and that the apparent contradiction between maintaining privacy of medical data in a public display environment can be mitigated by the use of CLINICAL SURFACES.

  3. The Integration of Hospitals: The Transition from a System to a System of Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    insolvency from uncompensated care, bad debt and charity care which continue to rise at an alarming rate. Public and nonprofit hospitals typically use...poor. Rooted in this tradition of charity , the public hospital traces its ancestry to the development of cities and community efforts to shelter and...effects. An astounding number of hospitals saw an increase in bad debt, charity care combined with an increase number of patients using government

  4. CE: Original research: hospital system barriers to rapid response team activation: a cognitive work analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaten, Jane Saucedo

    2015-02-01

    The goal of rapid response team (RRT) activation in acute care facilities is to decrease mortality from preventable complications, but such efforts have been only moderately successful. Although recent research has shown decreased mortality when RRTs are activated more often, many hospitals have low activation rates. This has been linked to various hospital, team, and nursing factors. Yet there is a dearth of research examining how hospital systems shape nurses' behavior with regard to RRT activation. Making systemic constraints visible and modifying them may be the key to improving RRT activation rates and saving more lives. The purpose of this study was to use cognitive work analysis to describe factors within the hospital system that shape medical-surgical nurses' RRT activation behavior. Cognitive work analysis offers a framework for the study of complex sociotechnical systems. This framework was used as the organizing element of the study. Qualitative descriptive design was used to obtain data to fill the framework's five domains: resources, tasks, strategies, social systems, and worker competency. Data were obtained from interviews with 12 medical-surgical nurses and document review. Directed content analysis was used to place the obtained data into the framework's predefined domains. Many system factors affected participants' decisions to activate or not activate an RRT. Systemic constraints, especially in cases of subtle or gradual clinical changes, included a lack of adequate information, the availability of multiple strategies, the need to justify RRT activation, a scarcity of human resources, and informal hierarchical norms in the hospital culture. The most profound constraint was the need to justify the call. Justification was based on the objective or subjective nature of clinical changes, whether the nurse expected to be able to "handle" these changes, the presence or absence of a physician, and whether there was an expectation of support from the RRT

  5. An informatics approach to assess pediatric pharmacotherapy: design and implementation of a hospital drug utilization system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuppa, Athena; Vijayakumar, Sundararajan; Jayaraman, Bhuvana; Patel, Dimple; Narayan, Mahesh; Vijayakumar, Kalpana; Mondick, John T; Barrett, Jeffrey S

    2007-09-01

    Drug utilization in the inpatient setting can provide a mechanism to assess drug prescribing trends, efficiency, and cost-effectiveness of hospital formularies and examine subpopulations for which prescribing habits may be different. Such data can be used to correlate trends with time-dependent or seasonal changes in clinical event rates or the introduction of new pharmaceuticals. It is now possible to provide a robust, dynamic analysis of drug utilization in a large pediatric inpatient setting through the creation of a Web-based hospital drug utilization system that retrieves source data from our accounting database. The production implementation provides a dynamic and historical account of drug utilization at the authors' institution. The existing application can easily be extended to accommodate a multi-institution environment. The creation of a national or even global drug utilization network would facilitate the examination of geographical and/or socioeconomic influences in drug utilization and prescribing practices in general.

  6. No hospital left behind? Education policy lessons for value-based payment in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Kristin A; Ryan, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Value-based payment systems have been widely implemented in healthcare in an effort to improve the quality of care. However, these programs have not broadly improved quality, and some evidence suggests that they may increase inequities in care. No Child Left Behind is a parallel effort in education to address uneven achievement and inequalities. Yet, by penalizing the lowest performers, No Child Left Behind's approach to accountability has led to a number of unintended consequences. This article draws lessons from education policy, arguing that financial incentives should be designed to support the lowest performers to improve quality. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  7. Association of bond, market, operational, and financial factors with multi-hospital system bond issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, C E; McCue, M J; Hossack, J B

    2001-01-01

    Despite the growth of multi-hospital systems in the 1990s, their performance in the tax-exempt bond market has not been adequately evaluated. The purpose of this study is to compare bonds issued by multi-hospital systems to those issued by individual hospitals in terms of bond, market, operational, and financial characteristics. The study sample includes 2,078 newly issued, tax-exempt, revenue bonds between 1991 and 1997. The findings indicate that multi-hospital systems issued larger amounts of debt at a lower cost, were more likely to be insured, had higher debt service coverage and higher operating margins.

  8. Design of a robotic automation system for transportation of goods in hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özkil, Ali Gürcan; Sørensen, Torben; Fan, Zhun

    2007-01-01

    Hospitals face with heavy traffic of goods everyday, where transportation tasks are mainly carried by human. Analysis of the current situation of transportation in a typical hospital showed several transportation tasks are suitable for automation. This paper presents a system, consisting of a fleet...... of robot vehicles, automatic stations and smart containers for automation of transportation of goods in hospitals. Design of semi-autonomous robot vehicles, containers and stations are presented and the overall system architecture is described. Implementing such a system in an existing hospital showed...

  9. Studying Sensing-Based Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun

    2013-01-01

    Recent sensing-based systems involve a multitude of users, devices, and places. These types of systems challenge existing approaches for conducting valid system evaluations. Here, the author discusses such evaluation challenges and revisits existing system evaluation methodologies....

  10. Distribution of physicians and hospital beds based on Gini coefficient and Lorenz curve: A national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satar Rezaei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Inequality is prevalent in all sectors, particularly in distribution of and access to resources in the health sector. The aim of current study was to investigate the distribution of physicians and hospital beds in Iran in 2001, 2006 and 2011. Methods: This retrospective, cross-sectional study evaluated the distribution of physicians and hospital beds in 2001, 2006 and 2011 using Gini coefficient and Lorenz curve. The required data, including the number of physicians (general practitioners and specialists, number of hospital beds and number of hospitalized patients were obtained from the statistical yearbook of Iranian Statistical Center (ISC. The data analysis was performed by DASP software. Results: The Gini Coefficients for physicians and hospital beds based on population in 2001 were 0.19 and 0.16, and based on hospitalized patients, were 0.48 and 0.37, respectively. In 2006, these values were found to be 0.18 and 0.15 based on population, and 0.21 and 0.21 based on hospitalized patients, respectively. In 2011, however, the Gini coefficients were reported to be 0.16 and 0.13 based on population, and 0.47 and 0.37 based on hospitalized patients, respectively. Although distribution status had improved in 2011compared with 2001 in terms of population and number of hospitalized patients, there was more inequality in distribution based on the number of hospitalized patients than based on population. Conclusion: This study indicated that inequality in distribution of physicians and hospital beds was declined in 2011 compared with 2001. This distribution was based on the population, so it is suggested that, in allocation of resource, the health policymakers consider such need indices as the pattern of diseases and illness-prone areas, number of inpatients, and mortality.

  11. Comparing three methods for participatory simulation of hospital work systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Ole; Andersen, Simone Nyholm

    Summative Statement: This study compared three participatory simulation methods using different simulation objects: Low resolution table-top setup using Lego figures, full scale mock-ups, and blueprints using Lego figures. It was concluded the three objects by differences in fidelity and affordance...... scenarios using the objects. Results: Full scale mock-ups significantly addressed the local space and technology/tool elements of a work system. In contrast, the table-top simulation object addressed the organizational issues of the future work system. The blueprint based simulation addressed...

  12. The impact of HMOs on hospital-based uncompensated care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, K E; Seiber, E E; Florence, C S

    2001-06-01

    Managed care in general and HMOs in particular have become the vehicle of choice for controlling health care spending in the private sector. By several accounts, managed care has achieved its cost-containment objectives. At the same time, the percentage of Americans without health insurance coverage continues to rise. For-profit and not-for-profit hospitals have traditionally financed care for the uninsured from profits derived from patients with insurance. Thus the relationship between growth in managed care and HMOs, hospital "profits," and care for the uninsured represent an important policy question. Using national data over an eight-year period, we find that a ten-percentage point increase in managed care penetration is associated with a two-percentage point reduction in hospital total profit margin and a 0.6 percentage point decrease in uncompensated care.

  13. Views From the Pacific--Military Base Hospital Libraries in Hawaii and Guam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Priscilla L; Trafford, Mabel A; Hadley, Alice E

    2016-01-01

    Hospital libraries serving military bases offer a different perspective on library services. Two libraries located on islands in the Pacific Ocean provide services to active duty service men and women, including those deployed to other regions of the world. In addition, these hospital libraries serve service members' families living on the base, and often citizens from the surrounding communities.

  14. Low-birth-weight babies among hospital deliveries in Nepal: a hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koirala AK

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Arun K Koirala,1 Dharma N Bhatta2,3 1Administrative Department, Helping Hands Community Hospital, Chabahil, Kathmandu, 2Department of Public Health, Nobel College, Pokhara University, Kathmandu, Nepal; 3Epidemiology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, Thailand Background: Birth weight is an important indicator of a population’s health and is associated with numerous interrelated factors in the infant, mother, and physical environment. The objective of this study was to assess the proportion of low birth weight and identify the associated factors for low birth weight in a liveborn infant among the women in Morang, Nepal.Methods: A cross-sectional survey was carried out from December 2010 to March 2011 among 255 mothers who gave birth during the study period at the Koshi Zonal Hospital, Nepal. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire with face-to-face interviews. Data were analyzed through logistic regression and presented with crude and adjusted odds ratios (AORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs.Results: The study showed that the prevalence of low-birth-weight babies was 23.1% (95% CI: 17.9–28.1. The mean (standard deviation age of mothers was 23.23 (4.18 years. The proportion of low birth weight of previous baby was 3.9% (95% CI: 0.1–7.9, and 15.7% (95% CI: 11.5–20.5 of the respondents had preterm delivery. Nearly one-third (36.1%; 95% CI: 26.4–45.6 of the respondents had >2 years’ gap after the previous delivery. Nonformal employment (AOR: 2.14; 95% CI: 0.523–8.74, vegetarian diet (AOR: 1.47; 95% CI: 0.23–9.36, and no rest during pregnancy (AOR: 1.38; 95% CI: 0.41–4.39 were factors more likely to determine low birth weight. However, none of the variables showed a significant association between low birth weight and other dependent variables.Conclusion: Low birth weight is an important factor for perinatal morbidity and mortality and is a common problem in the developing world. The

  15. Home-Based versus Hospital-Based Rehabilitation Program after Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remedios López-Liria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To compare home-based rehabilitation with the standard hospital rehabilitation in terms of improving knee joint mobility and recovery of muscle strength and function in patients after a total knee replacement. Materials and Methods. A non-randomised controlled trial was conducted. Seventy-eight patients with a prosthetic knee were included in the study and allocated to either a home-based or hospital-based rehabilitation programme. Treatment included various exercises to restore strength and joint mobility and to improve patients’ functional capacity. The primary outcome of the trial was the treatment effectiveness measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC. Results. The groups did not significantly differ in the leg side (right/left or clinical characteristics (P>0.05. After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements (P<0.001 from the baseline values in the level of pain (visual analogue scale, the range of flexion-extension motion and muscle strength, disability (Barthel and WOMAC indices, balance, and walking. Conclusions. This study reveals that the rehabilitation treatments offered either at home or in hospital settings are equally effective.

  16. Plasmodium malariae Infection Associated with a High Burden of Anemia: A Hospital-Based Surveillance Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siobhan Langford

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium malariae is a slow-growing parasite with a wide geographic distribution. Although generally regarded as a benign cause of malaria, it has been associated with nephrotic syndrome, particularly in young children, and can persist in the host for years. Morbidity associated with P. malariae infection has received relatively little attention, and the risk of P. malariae-associated nephrotic syndrome is unknown.We used data from a very large hospital-based surveillance system incorporating information on clinical diagnoses, blood cell parameters and treatment to describe the demographic distribution, morbidity and mortality associated with P. malariae infection in southern Papua, Indonesia. Between April 2004 and December 2013 there were 1,054,674 patient presentations to Mitra Masyarakat Hospital of which 196,380 (18.6% were associated with malaria and 5,097 were with P. malariae infection (constituting 2.6% of all malaria cases. The proportion of malaria cases attributable to P. malariae increased with age from 0.9% for patients under one year old to 3.1% for patients older than 15 years. Overall, 8.5% of patients with P. malariae infection required admission to hospital and the median length of stay for these patients was 2.5 days (Interquartile Range: 2.0-4.0 days. Patients with P. malariae infection had a lower mean hemoglobin concentration (9.0 g/dL than patients with P. falciparum (9.5 g/dL, P. vivax (9.6g/dL and mixed species infections (9.3g/dL. There were four cases of nephrotic syndrome recorded in patients with P. malariae infection, three of which were in children younger than 5 years old, giving a risk in this age group of 0.47% (95% Confidence Interval; 0.10% to 1.4%. Overall, 2.4% (n = 16 of patients hospitalized with P. malariae infection subsequently died in hospital, similar to the proportions for the other endemic Plasmodium species (range: 0% for P. ovale to 1.6% for P. falciparum.Plasmodium malariae infection is

  17. First-Case Operating Room Delays: Patterns Across Urban Hospitals of a Single Health Care System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callie M. Cox Bauer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Operating room delays decrease health care system efficiency and increase costs. To improve operating room efficiency in our system, we retrospectively investigated delay frequencies, causes and costs. Methods: We studied all first-of-the-day nonemergent surgical cases performed at three high-volume urban hospitals of a large health system from July 2012 to November 2013. Times for patient flow from arrival to procedure start and documented reasons for delay were obtained from electronic medical records. Delay was defined as patient placement in the operating room later than scheduled surgery time. Effects of patient characteristics, late patient arrival to the hospital, number of planned procedures, years of surgeon experience, service department and hospital facility on odds of delay were examined using logistic regression. Results: Of 5,598 cases examined, 88% were delayed. Patients arrived late to the hospital (surgery in 65% of first cases. Mean time from arrival to scheduled surgery and in-room placement was 104.6 and 127.4 minutes, respectively. Mean delay time was 28.2 minutes. Nearly 60% of delayed cases had no documented reason for delay. For cases with documentation, causes included the physician (52%, anesthesia (15%, patient (13%, staff (9%, other sources (6% and facility (5%. Regression analysis revealed age, late arrival, department and facility as significant predictors of delay. Estimated delay costs, based on published figures and representing lost revenue, were $519,388. Conclusions: To improve operating room efficiency, multidisciplinary strategies are needed for increasing patient adherence to recommended arrival times, documentation of delay by medical staff and consistency in workflow patterns among facilities and departments.

  18. Talking about quality: exploring how 'quality' is conceptualized in European hospitals and healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiig, Siri; Aase, Karina; von Plessen, Christian; Burnett, Susan; Nunes, Francisco; Weggelaar, Anne Marie; Anderson-Gare, Boel; Calltorp, Johan; Fulop, Naomi

    2014-10-11

    Conceptualization of quality of care - in terms of what individuals, groups and organizations include in their meaning of quality, is an unexplored research area. It is important to understand how quality is conceptualised as a means to successfully implement improvement efforts and bridge potential disconnect in language about quality between system levels, professions, and clinical services. The aim is therefore to explore and compare conceptualization of quality among national bodies (macro level), senior hospital managers (meso level), and professional groups within clinical micro systems (micro level) in a cross-national study. This cross-national multi-level case study combines analysis of national policy documents and regulations at the macro level with semi-structured interviews (383) and non-participant observation (803 hours) of key meetings and shadowing of staff at the meso and micro levels in ten purposively sampled European hospitals (England, the Netherlands, Portugal, Sweden, and Norway). Fieldwork at the meso and micro levels was undertaken over a 12-month period (2011-2012) and different types of micro systems were included (maternity, oncology, orthopaedics, elderly care, intensive care, and geriatrics). The three quality dimensions clinical effectiveness, patient safety, and patient experience were incorporated in macro level policies in all countries. Senior hospital managers adopted a similar conceptualization, but also included efficiency and costs in their conceptualization of quality. 'Quality' in the forms of measuring indicators and performance management were dominant among senior hospital managers (with clinical and non-clinical background). The differential emphasis on the three quality dimensions was strongly linked to professional roles, personal ideas, and beliefs at the micro level. Clinical effectiveness was dominant among physicians (evidence-based approach), while patient experience was dominant among nurses (patient

  19. Activity-based costs of blood transfusions in surgical patients at four hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shander, Aryeh; Hofmann, Axel; Ozawa, Sherri; Theusinger, Oliver M; Gombotz, Hans; Spahn, Donat R

    2010-04-01

    Blood utilization has long been suspected to consume more health care resources than previously reported. Incomplete accounting for blood costs has the potential to misdirect programmatic decision making by health care systems. Determining the cost of supplying patients with blood transfusions requires an in-depth examination of the complex array of activities surrounding the decision to transfuse. To accurately determine the cost of blood in a surgical population from a health system perspective, an activity-based costing (ABC) model was constructed. Tasks and resource consumption (materials, labor, third-party services, capital) related to blood administration were identified prospectively at two US and two European hospitals. Process frequency (i.e., usage) data were captured retrospectively from each hospital and used to populate the ABC model. All major process steps, staff, and consumables to provide red blood cell (RBC) transfusions to surgical patients, including usage frequencies, and direct and indirect overhead costs contributed to per-RBC-unit costs between $522 and $1183 (mean, $761 +/- $294). These exceed previously reported estimates and were 3.2- to 4.8-fold higher than blood product acquisition costs. Annual expenditures on blood and transfusion-related activities, limited to surgical patients, ranged from $1.62 to $6.03 million per hospital and were largely related to the transfusion rate. Applicable to various hospital practices, the ABC model confirms that blood costs have been underestimated and that they are geographically variable and identifies opportunities for cost containment. Studies to determine whether more stringent control of blood utilization improves health care utilization and quality, and further reduces costs, are warranted.

  20. The Effect of Activating Early Warning System on Motahari Hospital Preparedness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Delshad

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the important aspects of hospital preparedness in disasters is its rapid early warning system. In this study, the activation of early warning system was evaluated under the monitoring of disasters workgroup of the Ministry of Health based on the national program of “hospitals preparedness in disasters” in Shahid Motahari Hospital.  Materials and Methods: The sample was composed of 801 adults exposed to the earthquake. Two months after the earthquake, all subjects were surveyed with measures administrated in a standard order as follows: demographic data sheet, disaster experiences scale (DES, general health questionnaire (GHQ, and symptom checklist 90-revised (SCL-90-R. Results: The results revealed that 23% of the survivors in the exposed group had ASD, 10% had anxiety symptoms, 7.5% depression, 4% MADD, 5% psychosomatic disorders, 10% phobia, 7% aggressive behavior, and 10% insomnia. Conclusion: This article has summarized the current status of information on mental disorders caused by experiencing or witnessing a life threatening severe earthquake. The experience of fear, helplessness, and panic during the earthquake, and the appraisal by the victims of serious psychological, social, as well as demographical consequences after the earthquake, were positively related to the subscale scores and the total score of GHQ, SCL-90-R, and DES.

  1. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2016 Rates; Revisions of Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers, Including Changes Related to the Electronic Health Record Incentive Program; Extensions of the Medicare-Dependent, Small Rural Hospital Program and the Low-Volume Payment Adjustment for Hospitals. Final rule; interim final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-17

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2016. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act), the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Reform(SGR) Act of 2013, the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, and other legislation. We also are addressing the update of the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2016.As an interim final rule with comment period, we are implementing the statutory extensions of the Medicare dependent,small rural hospital (MDH)Program and changes to the payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals under the IPPS.We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2016 and implementing certain statutory changes to the LTCH PPS under the Affordable Care Act and the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013 and the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014.In addition, we are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals,PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, and LTCHs) that are participating in Medicare, including related provisions for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals participating in the Medicare Electronic Health Record (EHR)Incentive Program. We also are updating policies relating to the

  2. 42 CFR 489.34 - Allowable charges: Hospitals participating in State reimbursement control systems or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... reimbursement control systems or demonstration projects. 489.34 Section 489.34 Public Health CENTERS FOR... CERTIFICATION PROVIDER AGREEMENTS AND SUPPLIER APPROVAL Allowable Charges § 489.34 Allowable charges: Hospitals participating in State reimbursement control systems or demonstration projects. A hospital receiving payment for...

  3. Employee reactions to the use of management control systems in hospitals: motivation vs. threat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Lopez-Valeiras

    2018-03-01

    Conclusions: The results obtained contribute to creating specific knowledge on the reactions of employees to the use of management control systems in hospitals. This information may be important in adapting management control systems to the characteristics of the hospital and its employees, which may in turn contribute to reducing dysfunctional worker behavior.

  4. Culinary and hospitality teaching as a research-based profession

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in Hospitality Management is co-published by NISC (Pty) Ltd and Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group. Copyright © NISC (Pty) .... in medical cases, law cases, or in the physical models of of ... provide teachers with the sort of concepts and insights that .... creation of strategic research plans, the selection of research.

  5. Sibling risk of anxiety disorders based on hospitalizations in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinjun; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2011-04-01

    This study used nationwide hospital records to examine sibling risk of any type of anxiety disorder in Sweden over a 40-year period. This study, carried out between 1 January 1968 and 31 December 2007, of the entire population of Sweden, linked information on family relationships from the nationwide Multi-Generation Register with information from the nationwide Swedish Hospital Discharge Register on first diagnosis of anxiety disorder. A total of 42,602 persons hospitalized for anxiety disorders and 2093 affected siblings were identified. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were calculated by comparing risk in siblings of persons hospitalized for anxiety disorders with risk in persons whose siblings had no hospital diagnosis of anxiety disorders. The sibling risk was 2.26, which was independent of sex and age differences between siblings. The SIR was highest in siblings sibling diagnosed with any anxiety disorder resulted in increased risks of a number of disorders; the highest increased risk was of social phobia (SIR 3.68, 95% confidence interval, 1.68-7.69). Risk of panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, mixed anxiety and depressive disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder was raised in female but not male siblings. Heritable effects likely play an important role in the cause of anxiety disorders, but the extent of their role remains to be established. Important contributions could be made by studies of gene-environment interactions that have sufficient sample sizes to produce reliable results. © 2011 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2011 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  6. Case Mix Management Systems: An Opportunity to Integrate Medical Records and Financial Management System Data Bases

    OpenAIRE

    Rusnak, James E.

    1987-01-01

    Due to previous systems selections, many hospitals (health care facilities) are faced with the problem of fragmented data bases containing clinical, demographic and financial information. Projects to select and implement a Case Mix Management System (CMMS) provide an opportunity to reduce the number of separate physical files and to migrate towards systems with an integrated data base. The number of CMMS candidate systems is often restricted due to data base and system interface issues. The h...

  7. Are Evidence-based Practices Associated With Effective Prevention of Hospital-acquired Pressure Ulcers in US Academic Medical Centers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, William V; Gibbons, Robert D; Valuck, Robert J; Makic, Mary B F; Mishra, Manish K; Pronovost, Peter J; Meltzer, David O

    2016-05-01

    In 2008, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) established nonpayment policies resulting from costliness of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) to hospitals. This prompted hospitals to adopt quality improvement (QI) interventions that increase use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) for HAPU prevention. To evaluate the longitudinal impact of CMS policy and QI adoption on HAPU rates. We characterized longitudinal adoption of 25 QI interventions that support EBPs through hospital leadership, staff, information technology, and performance and improvement. Quarterly counts of HAPU incidence and inpatient characteristics were collected from 55 University HealthSystem Consortium hospitals between 2007 and 2012. Mixed-effects regression models tested the longitudinal association of CMS policy, HAPU coding, and QI on HAPU rates. The models assumed level-2 random intercepts and random effects for CMS policy and EBP implementation to account for between-hospital variability in HAPU incidence. Controlling for all 25 QI interventions, specific updates to EBPs for HAPU prevention had a significant, though modest reduction on HAPU rates (-1.86 cases/quarter; P=0.002) and the effect of CMS nonpayment policy on HAPU prevention was much greater (-11.32 cases/quarter; P<0.001). HAPU rates were significantly lower after changes in CMS reimbursement. Reductions are associated with hospital-wide implementation of EBPs for HAPU prevention. Given that administrative data were used, it remains unknown whether these improvements were due to changes in coding or improved quality of care.

  8. Airflow and Contaminant Distribution in Hospital Wards with a Displacement Ventililation System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, H.; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Li, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Airflow and Contaminant Distribution in Hospital Wards with a Displacement Ventilalation System. The 2nd International Conference on Build Environment and Public Health, BEPH 2004, Shenzhen , China . ABSTRACT Displacement ventilation has not been considered to be an applicable system for hospital...... to accurately predict three-dimensional distribution of air velocity, temperature, and contaminant concentration in the ward. Indoor airflow in a displacement ventilation system involves a combination of different flow streams such as the gravity currents and thermal plumes. It is important to choose...... ventilation system in hospital wards. It is for this purpose that we study the performance of displacement ventilation in hospital wards as one of the steps to optimize the ventilation design. When the prospect of applying displacement ventilation system in a hospital ward is examined, it should be necessary...

  9. Prevalence of Legionella spp. in water systems of hospitals and hotels in South Western Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragou, K; Kokkinos, P; Gogos, C; Alamanos, Y; Vantarakis, A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of Legionella spp. in water systems of hospitals and hotels located in South Western Greece, to study the molecular epidemiology of the isolated strains and their possible association with bacterial contamination (total count and Pseudomonas aeruginosa), the water pH, and temperature. A prevalence survey for Legionella spp. by culturing techniques in water distribution systems of eight hospitals and nine hotels occurred in South Western Greece. Water sampling and microbiological analysis were carried out following the ISO methods. Legionella pneumophila was detected in 33% and 36% of the distribution systems of hospitals and hotels, respectively. Our survey results suggest a frequent prevalence of elevated concentrations of Legionella spp. in water systems of hospitals and hotels. Our investigation has confirmed the need to regularly monitor the microbiological condition of water systems in hospitals and hotels.

  10. Hospital-at-home Integrated Care Program for Older Patients With Orthopedic Processes: An Efficient Alternative to Usual Hospital-Based Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closa, Conxita; Mas, Miquel À; Santaeugènia, Sebastià J; Inzitari, Marco; Ribera, Aida; Gallofré, Miquel

    2017-09-01

    To compare outcomes and costs for patients with orthogeriatric conditions in a home-based integrated care program versus conventional hospital-based care. Quasi-experimental longitudinal study. An acute care hospital, an intermediate care hospital, and the community of an urban area in the North of Barcelona, in Southern Europe. In a 2-year period, we recruited 367 older patients attended at an orthopedic/traumatology unit in an acute hospital for fractures and/or arthroplasty. Patients were referred to a hospital-at-home integrated care unit or to standard hospital-based postacute orthogeriatric unit, based on their social support and availability of the resource. We compared home-based care versus hospital-based care for Relative Functional Gain (gain/loss of function measured by the Barthel Index), mean direct costs, and potential savings in terms of reduction of stay in the acute care hospital. No differences were found in Relative Functional Gain, median (Q25-Q75) = 0.92 (0.64-1.09) in the home-based group versus 0.93 (0.59-1) in the hospital-based group, P =.333. Total health service direct cost [mean (standard deviation)] was significantly lower for patients receiving home-based care: €7120 (3381) versus €12,149 (6322), P home-based care [10.1 (7)] than in patients discharged to the postacute orthogeriatric hospital-based unit [15.3 (12) days, P home integrated care program was suitable for managing older patients with orthopedic conditions who have good social support for home care. It provided clinical care comparable to the hospital-based model, and it seems to enable earlier acute hospital discharge and lower direct costs. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hospital based patient coordination for ethnic minority patients - a health technology assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodemann, Morten

    A cross diciplinary, cross specialty, cross sectoral hospital based approach to cultural management of ethnic minority patients is effective in creating more approprite patient flows, better quality of care and increases functional level of patients. Surprisingly the aggregated effect saves...... especially on public medicine expenses and social services. Ethnic minority patients can achieve increased empowerment & Equity in type and quality of hospital care through cross dicplinary cross specialty cultural case management & support between hospital departments and primary sectors...

  12. Understanding the context of balanced scorecard implementation: a hospital-based case study in pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajmal Agha

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a response to a changing operating environment, healthcare administrators are implementing modern management tools in their organizations. The balanced scorecard (BSC is considered a viable tool in high-income countries to improve hospital performance. The BSC has not been applied to hospital settings in low-income countries nor has the context for implementation been examined. This study explored contextual perspectives in relation to BSC implementation in a Pakistani hospital. Methods Four clinical units of this hospital were involved in the BSC implementation based on their willingness to participate. Implementation included sensitization of units towards the BSC, developing specialty specific BSCs and reporting of performance based on the BSC during administrative meetings. Pettigrew and Whipp's context (why, process (how and content (what framework of strategic change was used to guide data collection and analysis. Data collection methods included quantitative tools (a validated culture assessment questionnaire and qualitative approaches including key informant interviews and participant observation. Results Method triangulation provided common and contrasting results between the four units. A participatory culture, supportive leadership, financial and non-financial incentives, the presentation of clear direction by integrating support for the BSC in policies, resources, and routine activities emerged as desirable attributes for BSC implementation. The two units that lagged behind were more involved in direct inpatient care and carried a considerable clinical workload. Role clarification and consensus about the purpose and benefits of the BSC were noted as key strategies for overcoming implementation challenges in two clinical units that were relatively ahead in BSC implementation. It was noted that, rather than seeking to replace existing information systems, initiatives such as the BSC could be readily adopted if

  13. Implementing a nationwide criteria-based emergency medical dispatch system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel S; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Sørensen, Jan Nørtved

    2013-01-01

    A criteria-based nationwide Emergency Medical Dispatch (EMD) system was recently implemented in Denmark. We described the system and studied its ability to triage patients according to the severity of their condition by analysing hospital admission and case-fatality risks.......A criteria-based nationwide Emergency Medical Dispatch (EMD) system was recently implemented in Denmark. We described the system and studied its ability to triage patients according to the severity of their condition by analysing hospital admission and case-fatality risks....

  14. Radiology integration in a multi-hospital system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, D

    1999-01-01

    In 1989, Salt Lake City's Intermountain Health Care (IHC) began a process to reduce costs and streamline processes. Divided into four geographic regions, IHC consists of 24 hospitals and 100 clinics, a 400-member practitioner-physician group, and a staff of 23,000. IHC determined that three Salt Lake Valley hospitals, part of its Urban Central Region, must become one entity with shared management and a reduced staff to cover operations at all three hospitals. Management of the three radiology departments were charged with creating an integration process for the three hospitals. Two directors were selected to manage radiology and meet the outlined goals. Difficulty arose when one director needed to make changes in a facility managed by the other. The directors found that structuring by modality allowed them to plan for all three facilities, standardize equipment purchases and create integrated rather than departmental programs. As consolidation was taking place in top management, employees worried what the resulting changes meant for their jobs. Many were unfamiliar with the concepts of team structure and continuous quality improvement. Various courses and meetings were held to educate staff members and bring them up to new standards. Most successful were the meetings that allowed staff from different facilities to come together and share ideas. Although travel was an issue, these meetings quickly helped move the integration processes forward as peer relationships were developed. Employees were recruited for cross-training and new staff worked wherever needed. As they began to share data, the three hospitals identified best-practice and internal benchmarks. IHC is now ready to hire a single director to manage the radiology departments at the three Salt Lake Valley hospitals.

  15. [Evaluation of the capacity of the APR-DRG classification system to predict hospital mortality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, Maria Francesca; Lorenzoni, Luca; Addari, Piero; Nante, Nicola

    2002-01-01

    Inpatient mortality has increasingly been used as an hospital outcome measure. Comparing mortality rates across hospitals requires adjustment for patient risks before making inferences about quality of care based on patient outcomes. Therefore it is essential to dispose of well performing severity measures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the ability of the All Patient Refined DRG system to predict inpatient mortality for congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, pneumonia and ischemic stroke. Administrative records were used in this analysis. We used two statistics methods to assess the ability of the APR-DRG to predict mortality: the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (referred to as the c-statistic) and the Hosmer-Lemeshow test. The database for the study included 19,212 discharges for stroke, pneumonia, myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure from fifteen hospital participating in the Italian APR-DRG Project. A multivariate analysis was performed to predict mortality for each condition in study using age, sex and APR-DRG risk mortality subclass as independent variables. Inpatient mortality rate ranges from 9.7% (pneumonia) to 16.7% (stroke). Model discrimination, calculated using the c-statistic, was 0.91 for myocardial infarction, 0.68 for stroke, 0.78 for pneumonia and 0.71 for congestive heart failure. The model calibration assessed using the Hosmer-Leme-show test was quite good. The performance of the APR-DRG scheme when used on Italian hospital activity records is similar to that reported in literature and it seems to improve by adding age and sex to the model. The APR-DRG system does not completely capture the effects of these variables. In some cases, the better performance might be due to the inclusion of specific complications in the risk-of-mortality subclass assignment.

  16. The Economic Standpoint of Referral System at Using Tertiary Hospital Services in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samad Rouhani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Although, economically, referral systems make utilization of health facilities at different levels sound, in many countries caretakers often bypass primary care facilities that are regularly costlier for caretakers and health care systems. The main objective of the current study was to assess the utilization of hospital services with more emphasis on economic point of view.  Materials and methods: The present study was a facility-based cross-sectional study. A researcher developed questionnaire was used to collect the data. The samples were randomly selected and interviewed on their consent. SPSS Software was also used to analyze the collected data through Chi-2, correlation, and t-test. Results: Just 29.4 percent of the attendees to the hospital were carrying out a referral slip from their family medicine. Five variables including type of care, type of attending, appointment arrangement, satisfaction with family medicine, and vising family medicine were statistically analyzed and found significantly related to carrying referral slip. Conclusion: Because of dysfunction of referral system, Iran’s health care system was found to be far from achieving economic advantages of a referral based DHS. It is actually an inappropriate use of limited health resources in a country like Iran that seriously suffers from shortage of financial and health system resources. This is likely due to deficiencies in the components of its referral system, therefore, a full revision of current reforms and appropriate remedies for deficiencies in the components of referral system was found to be in top priority in Iran.

  17. Organizational culture based on the example of an Estonian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saame, Iisi; Reino, Anne; Vadi, Maaja

    2011-01-01

    The concept of organisational culture (also referred to later as OC) is one of the approaches in modern organisational analysis exploring the values, attitudes and beliefs behind human behaviour in the workplace. OC as a social phenomenon is considered to be important for the sustainability of every organisation. In the service sector, OC may affect the nature and quality of the services provided. The aim of this paper is twofold: on the one hand, to highlight the patterns of OC in a hospital; and, on the other hand, to outline relationships between OC and patient satisfaction. The study was conducted in Tartu University Hospital, one of the most influential health care organisations in Estonia. This paper has original value by presenting an insight into organisational culture in the Estonian health care sector, and the findings of the study will expand knowledge of OC in the health care sector in general. The OC instrument applied in a quantitative cross-sectional study was earlier developed according to the Competing Values Framework (CVF). Data from 456 medical and non-medical professionals were analysed using non-parametric tests of descriptive statistics. A factor analysis was performed to assess the instrument's compatibility for analysing the OC pattern in the health care sector. The dominant culture type in all the groups investigated was the Internal Processes type, mainly followed by the Rational Goal type, while different cultural patterns were observed in professional groups. The factor analysis yielded a three-subscale solution. Clinics with high patient satisfaction did not score more than clinics with low patient satisfaction in terms of the Human Relations type. In future studies a random sample design and a multidisciplinary approach to OC research should be followed in order to further explore OC patterns in hospitals and their consequences for different aspects of hospital performance.

  18. HCAHPS - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospital ratings for the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital...

  19. The effects of ownership and system affiliation on the economic performance of hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renn, S C; Schramm, C J; Watt, J M; Derzon, R A

    1985-01-01

    We investigated differences among five types of hospitals, defined by ownership (investor-owned or not-for-profit), system affiliation (system-affiliated or freestanding), and government sponsorship on 24 measures of economic performance. Using multivariate analysis of 1980 Medicare cost report and other data from a national sample of 561 hospitals, we found that investor-owned chain hospitals charged significantly more, and were more profitable, than all other types of hospitals except freestanding for-profits; there were no differences in productive efficiency that could be attributed to ownership or affiliation; the investor-owned hospitals had higher debt-to-asset ratios, less-capital-intensive plants, and greater capital costs as a percentage of operating costs than the not-for-profits; and there were no consistent case-mix differences among the hospitals.

  20. Using DRG to analyze hospital production: a re-classification model based on a linear tree-network topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achille Lanzarini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospital discharge records are widely classified through the Diagnosis Related Group (DRG system; the version currently used in Italy counts 538 different codes, including thousands of diagnosis and procedures. These numbers reflect the considerable effort of simplification, yet the current classification system is of little use to evaluate hospital production and performance.Methods: As the case-mix of a given Hospital Unit (HU is driven by its physicians’ specializations, a grouping of DRGs into a specialization-driven classification system has been conceived through the analysis of HUs discharging and the ICD-9-CM codes. We propose a three-folded classification, based on the analysis of 1,670,755 Hospital Discharge Cards (HDCs produced by Lombardy Hospitals in 2010; it consists of 32 specializations (e.g. Neurosurgery, 124 sub-specialization (e.g. skull surgery and 337 sub-sub-specialization (e.g. craniotomy.Results: We give a practical application of the three-layered approach, based on the production of a Neurosurgical HU; we observe synthetically the profile of production (1,305 hospital discharges for 79 different DRG codes of 16 different MDC are grouped in few groups of homogeneous DRG codes, a more informative production comparison (through process-specific comparisons, rather than crude or case-mix standardized comparisons and a potentially more adequate production planning (considering the Neurosurgical HUs of the same city, those produce a limited quote of the whole neurosurgical production, because the same activity can be realized by non-Neurosugical HUs.Conclusion: Our work may help to evaluate the hospital production for a rational planning of available resources, blunting information asymmetries between physicians and managers. 

  1. A systematic review of instruments that assess the implementation of hospital quality management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groene, Oliver; Botje, Daan; Suñol, Rosa; Lopez, Maria Andrée; Wagner, Cordula

    2013-10-01

    Health-care providers invest substantial resources to establish and implement hospital quality management systems. Nevertheless, few tools are available to assess implementation efforts and their effect on quality and safety outcomes. This review aims to (i) identify instruments to assess the implementation of hospital quality management systems, (ii) describe their measurement properties and (iii) assess the effects of quality management on quality improvement and quality of care outcomes. We performed a systematic literature search from 1990 to 2011 in PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and Web of Science. In addition, we used snowball strategies, screened the reference lists of eligible papers, reviewed grey literature and contacted experts in the field. and data extraction Two reviewers screened eligible papers based on pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria and all authors extracted data. Eligible papers are described in terms of general characteristics (settings, type and level of respondents, mode of data collection), methodological properties (sampling strategy, item derivation, conceptualization of quality management, assessment of reliability and validity, scoring) and application/implementation (accounting for context, organizational adaptations, sensitivity to change, deployment and effect size). Eighteen papers were deemed eligible for inclusion. While some common domains emerged in measurement conceptualization, substantial differences in scope persist. The instruments' measurement properties were insufficiently described and only few instruments assessed links between the implementation of quality management systems (QMS) and improvement strategies or outcomes. There is currently no well-established measure to assess the implementation and effectiveness of quality management systems. Future research should address this gap.

  2. A HOSPITAL-BASED STUDY ON THE PREVALENCE OF DRY EYES IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant V. Solanke

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Dry eye syndrome is a common eye disease. Dry Eye Syndrome (DES, also known as Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca (KCS, is the condition of having dry eyes. Other associated symptoms include irritation, redness, discharge and easily fatigued eyes. Blurred vision may also occur. The symptoms can range from mild and occasional to severe and continuous. Scarring of the cornea may occur in some cases without treatment. Dry eye occurs when either the eye does not produce enough tears or when the tears evaporate too quickly. Tobacco smoke exposure or infection may also lead to the condition. Diagnosis is mostly based on the symptoms, though a number of other tests may be used. Prevalence of dry eyes are commoner in females than males. There is a positive relationship between glaucoma and ocular dryness as well as diabetic retinopathy and ocular dryness. Dry eye is a multifactorial disease of the tears and ocular surface. Ocular symptoms such as pain, irritation and poor vision can result from dry eye. The aim of the study is to study the prevalence, symptomatology and distribution of dry eyes. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted during July 2016 to March 2017. Study place was Outpatient Department of Ophthalmology at Sree Mookambika Institute of Medical Sciences, Kulasekharam. Sample size was calculated by 4PQ/d², which was 132. Systemic random sampling was used for the study. RESULTS Prevalence of dry eyes - 17.8%. Dry eyes in males - 16.8% and in females - 24.6%. Dry eyes in age 40 yrs. - 21.8%. Prevalence of dry eyes in contact lens wearers - 36.5%. Prevalence of dry eyes in glaucoma cases - 38.2%. Prevalence of dry eyes in farmers - 27.3%, in smokers - 36.7%. Dry eyes in emmetropes - 12.8% in myopes - 17.2% in hypermetropes - 28.6%. CONCLUSION Dry eyes prevalence obtained was 17.8%. Dry eyes were seen more in females. As age increases, prevalence of dry eyes increases. Ocular surface dryness was observed more in contact

  3. Do Robotic Surgical Systems Improve Profit Margins? A Cross-Sectional Analysis of California Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Shen, Chan; Hu, Jim C

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between ownership of robotic surgical systems and hospital profit margins. This study used hospital annual utilization data, annual financial data, and discharge data for year 2011 from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development. We first performed bivariate analysis to compare mean profit margin by hospital and market characteristics and to examine whether these characteristics differed between hospitals that had one or more robotic surgical systems in 2011 and those that did not. We applied the t test and the F test to compare mean profit margin between two groups and among three or more groups, respectively. We then conducted multilevel logistic regression to determine the association between ownership of robotic surgical systems and having a positive profit margin after controlling for other hospital and market characteristics and accounting for possible correlation among hospitals located within the same market. The study sample included 167 California hospitals with valid financial information. Hospitals with robotic surgical systems tended to report more favorable profit margins. However, multilevel logistic regression showed that this relationship (an association, not causality) became only marginally significant (odds ratio [OR] = 6.2; P = 0.053) after controlling for other hospital characteristics, such as ownership type, teaching status, bed size, and surgical volumes, and market characteristics, such as total number of robotic surgical systems owned by other hospitals in the same market area. As robotic surgical systems become widely disseminated, hospital decision makers should carefully evaluate the financial and clinical implications before making a capital investment in this technology. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Review of Diagnosis-Related Group-Based Financing of Hospital Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasa Mihailovic

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1990s, diagnosis-related group (DRG-based payment systems were gradually introduced in many countries. The main design characteristics of a DRG-based payment system are an exhaustive patient case classification system (ie, the system of diagnosis-related groupings and the payment formula, which is based on the base rate multiplied by a relative cost weight specific for each DRG. Cases within the same DRG code group are expected to undergo similar clinical evolution. Consecutively, they should incur the costs of diagnostics and treatment within a predefined scale. Such predictability was proven in a number of cost-of-illness studies conducted on major prosperity diseases alongside clinical trials on efficiency. This was the case with risky pregnancies, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, depression, alcohol addiction, hepatitis, and cancer. This article presents experience of introduced DRG-based payments in countries of western and eastern Europe, Scandinavia, United States, Canada, and Australia. This article presents the results of few selected reviews and systematic reviews of the following evidence: published reports on health system reforms by World Health Organization, World Bank, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, Canadian Institute for Health Information, Canadian Health Services Research Foundation, and Centre for Health Economics University of York. Diverse payment systems have different strengths and weaknesses in relation to the various objectives. The advantages of the DRG payment system are reflected in the increased efficiency and transparency and reduced average length of stay. The disadvantage of DRG is creating financial incentives toward earlier hospital discharges. Occasionally, such polices are not in full accordance with the clinical benefit priorities.

  5. The impact of an integrated hospital-community medical information system on quality and service utilization in hospital departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirel, Nurit; Rosen, Bruce; Sharon, Assaf; Blondheim, Orna; Sherf, Michael; Samuel, Hadar; Cohen, Arnon D

    2010-09-01

    In 2005, an innovative system of hospital-community on-line medical records (OFEK) was implemented at Clalit Health Services (CHS). The goals of the study were to examine the extent of OFEK's use and its impact on quality indicators and medical-service utilization in Internal Medicine and General Surgery wards of CHS hospitals. Examining the frequency of OFEK's use with its own track-log data; comparing, "before" and "after", quality indicators and service utilization data in experimental (CHS patients) versus control groups (other patients). OFEK's use increased by tens of percentages each year, Internal Medicine wards showed a significant decrease in the number of laboratory tests and 3 CT tests performed compared with the control group. Wards using OFEK extensively showed a greater decrease in CT tests, in one imaging test, and in the average number of ambulatory hospitalizations. No similar changes were found in General Surgery wards. The study helps evaluate the extent to which OFEK's targets were achieved and contributes to the development of measures to examine the impact of such systems, which can be used to assess a broad range of Health Information Technology (HIT) systems. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Training in hospitals: what do GP specialist trainees think of workplace-based assessments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabey, Abigail; Harris, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Workplace-based assessment (WBPA) was introduced in 2007 as a new approach to monitoring competence of GP specialist trainees (GPSTs). It includes a raft of assessments carried out in the workplace to assess what a trainee actually does in clinical practice. The assessment tools used are adapted from other contexts of doctors' training but little is known about how they function in day-to-day practice within GP training or how valid and useful they are found to be by trainees. To establish how the new system of WPBA is working in day-to-day practice for GPSTs in hospital posts. A mixed methods design including quantitative and qualitative phases of data collection. Two training locations within Severn Deanery. A questionnaire was completed by 52 GPSTs (67% response rate) currently in hospital posts. Twenty-two took part in focus groups and semi-structured interviews to explore key findings from the questionnaire in greater depth. There is value in the face-to-face contact between trainees and senior doctors. However, quality and depth of feedback are not consistent and there is evidence of poor use of the tools, reducing the value of the assessments. The system is further undermined by a clear perception of bias and lack of honesty in judgements which limit the scope for assessment to lead to learning. Overall, these weaknesses may impair the validity and usefulness of the system and its potential to improve the performance of doctors. General practice trainees in this study have a low opinion of how WPBA assessments function in the hospital setting. Changes are needed to optimise the potential of WPBA to improve the performance of doctors in training and to increase its credibility.

  7. Factors Influencing Laboratory Information System Effectiveness Through Strategic Planning in Shiraz Teaching Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahador, Fateme; Sharifian, Roxana; Farhadi, Payam; Jafari, Abdosaleh; Nematolahi, Mohtram; Shokrpour, Nasrin

    This study aimed to develop and test a research model that examined 7effective factors on the effectiveness of laboratory information system (LIS) through strategic planning. This research was carried out on total laboratory staff, information technology staff, and laboratory managers in Shiraz (a city in the south of Iran) teaching hospitals by structural equation modeling approach in 2015. The results revealed that there was no significant positive relationship between decisions based on cost-benefit analysis and LIS functionality with LIS effectiveness, but there was a significant positive relationship between other factors and LIS effectiveness. As expected, high levels of strategic information system planning result in increasing LIS effectiveness. The results also showed that the relationship between cost-benefit analysis, LIS functionality, end-user involvement, and information technology-business alignment with strategic information system planning was significant and positive.

  8. Analysis of Information Security Management Systems at 5 Domestic Hospitals with More than 500 Beds

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Woo-Sung; Seo, Sun-Won; Son, Seung-Sik; Lee, Mee-Jeong; Kim, Shin-Hyo; Choi, Eun-Mi; Bang, Ji-Eon; Kim, Yea-Eun; Kim, Ok-Nam

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The information security management systems (ISMS) of 5 hospitals with more than 500 beds were evaluated with regards to the level of information security, management, and physical and technical aspects so that we might make recommendations on information security and security countermeasures which meet both international standards and the needs of individual hospitals. Methods The ISMS check-list derived from international/domestic standards was distributed to each hospital to com...

  9. CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF A PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN PRIVATE HOSPITALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian TAICU

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining performance in private hospitals require a proper management of costs and implementing a situation for performance monitoring. The implementation of a cost calculation method in hospitals is a complex process that must take into account the particularities of the activity in health care system. This paper presents a comparative analysis of four costing methods and a model of performance monitoring situation, adapted to the specific of the hospitals.

  10. Medicare's prospective payment system for hospitals: new evidence on transitions among health care settings

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Xufeng; Russell, Louise B.; Valiyeva, Elmira; Miller, Jane E.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies of Medicare’s prospective payment system for hospitals (PPS), introduced in 1983, evaluated only its first few years, using data collected during the hospital stay to control for patients’ health. We examine transitions among health care settings over a full decade following implementation of PPS, using survival models and a national longitudinal survey with independent information on health. We find that the rate of discharge from hospitals to nursing homes continued to rise...

  11. Adoption of medication alert systems in hospital outpatient departments in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yu-Chun; Cheng, Shou-Hsia

    2017-06-01

    The adoption of medication alert systems in the health care sector varies among regions. In Taiwan, the health authority introduced policies in 2005 to encourage the adoption of medication alert systems in hospitals. This study aimed to understand the adoption of medication alert systems in the outpatient departments of hospitals in Taiwan using a nationwide survey. A questionnaire was developed and mailed to 380 accredited general hospitals in Taiwan in 2013. The information collected from the questionnaire concerning the outpatient department included (1) the time of adoption of a medication alert system; (2) the operation of individual alert functions: availability, management, and stability; and (3) hospital characteristics: accreditation level, teaching status, ownership, and number of beds. A total of 216 hospitals completed and returned the questionnaire, corresponding to a response rate of 56.8%. The adoption rate of medication alert systems in hospital outpatient departments increased from less than 10% in 1997-95.83% in 2012. Approximately two-thirds of the hospitals developed and maintained the alert systems independently or collaboratively with vendors. Teaching and large hospitals tended to develop more advanced alert functions such as drug-drug interaction functions. Improving the safety and quality of pharmaceutical services and meeting the policy requirements are reasons for hospitals to establish medication alert systems. The adoption rate of medication alert systems reached 95% in accredited general hospitals in Taiwan. Government policy and available health information professionals and vendors may somewhat contribute to the high adoption rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The functions of hospital-based home care for people with severe mental illness in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuan-Yi; Lin, Mei-Jue; Yang, Tuz-Ching; Hsu, Yuan-Shan

    2010-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to understand the functions of hospital-based home care for people with severe mental illness in Taiwan, and the factors that affect functions of professionals who provide hospital-based home care. Hospital-based home care is a service which provides those people with serious mental illnesses who are in crisis and who are candidates for admission to hospital. Home care has been shown to have several advantages over inpatient treatment. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the functions of hospital-based home care for people with severe mental illness in Taiwan. This qualitative study was based on the grounded theory method of Strauss and Corbin. The study was conducted in six different hospital areas in central Taiwan in 2007-2008. Data were collected using semi-structured face-to-face interviews. Constant comparative analysis continued during the open, axial and selective coding processes until data saturation occurred. Participants were selected by theoretical sampling. When theoretical saturation was achieved, 21 clients with mental illness, 19 carers and 25 professionals were interviewed. Several functions were found when these professionals provided hospital-based home care services for people with severe mental illness in Taiwan, including stabilising the clients illness, supplying emergency care services, improving life-coping abilities, employment and welfare assistance, emotional support for both clients and carers, assistance with future and long-term arrangements and assistance with communication between carers and clients. Hospital-based home care provides several important services for helping clients and their families to live in the community. The recommendations based on the findings of this study can be used as a guide to improve the delivery of hospital-based home care services to community-dwelling clients with severe mental illness and their carers.

  13. Web Based Projects Enhancing English Language and Generic Skills Development for Asian Hospitality Industry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-jung

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated hospitality students' responses toward their learning experiences from undertaking group projects based upon a College web platform, the "Ubiquitous Hospitality English Learning Platform" (U-HELP). Twenty-six students in the Department of Applied Foreign Languages participated in this study. Their attitudes toward…

  14. Comparative analysis of current payment system for hospital services in Serbia and projected payments under diagnostic related groups system in urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babić Uroš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Global budget per calendar year is a traditional method of funding hospitals in Serbia. Diagnose related groups (DGR is a method of hospital payment based on classification of patients into groups with clinically similar problems and similar utilization of hospital resources. The aim of this study was to compare current methods of hospital services payment with the projected costs by DRG payment method in urology. Methods. The data were obtained from the information system used in the Clinical Hospital Center “Dr. Dragiša Mišović” - Dedinje in Belgrade, Serbia. The implemented hospital information system was the main criterion for selection of healthcare institutions. The study included 994 randomly selected patients treated surgically and conservatively in 2012. Results. Average costs under the current payment method were slightly higher than those projected by DRG, however, the variability was twice as high (54,111 ± 69,789 compared to 53,434 ± 32,509, p < 0,001 respectively. The univariate analysis showed that the highest correlation with the current payment method as well as with the projected one by DRG was observed in relation to the number of days of hospitalization (ρ = 0.842, p < 0.001, and ρ = 0.637, p < 0.001, respectively. Multivariate regression models confirmed the influence of the number of hospitalization days to costs under the current payment system (β = 0.843, p < 0.001 as well as under the projected DRG payment system (β = 0.737, p < 0.001. The same predictor was crucial for the difference in the current payment method and the projected DRG payment methods (β = 0.501, p <0.001. Conclusion. Payment under the DRG system is administratively more complex because it requires detailed and standardized coding of diagnoses and procedures, as well as the information on the average consumption of resources (costs per DRG. Given that aggregate costs of treatment under two hospital payment methods compared

  15. Characterization of hospitalizations due to external causes in the public health system, Brazil, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Márcio Dênis Medeiros; Barros, Marilisa Berti de Azevedo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to describe the characteristics of hospital admissions owing to external causes in the public health system in Brazil in 2011. Data from the Hospital Information System of the Unified Health System (SIH/SUS) were analyzed to obtain the frequency, coefficient of hospitalization, and hospital morbidity indicators. Of the 973,015 admissions, falls (38.4%) predominated, followed by traffic accidents (15.8%). The estimated coefficient of hospitalization owing to external causes increased with the age, and it was higher in male patients and in the midwest region of the country. The average stay was higher in hospitalizations for traffic accidents (6.1 days) and assaults (6.0 days), while the hospital mortality rate reached higher values in hospitalizations for assaults (4.7%) and self-harms (4.0%). It is evident from the knowledge of the characteristics described the usefulness of hospital morbidity data for planning care actions and prevention of the external causes.

  16. Capability-based computer systems

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, Henry M

    2014-01-01

    Capability-Based Computer Systems focuses on computer programs and their capabilities. The text first elaborates capability- and object-based system concepts, including capability-based systems, object-based approach, and summary. The book then describes early descriptor architectures and explains the Burroughs B5000, Rice University Computer, and Basic Language Machine. The text also focuses on early capability architectures. Dennis and Van Horn's Supervisor; CAL-TSS System; MIT PDP-1 Timesharing System; and Chicago Magic Number Machine are discussed. The book then describes Plessey System 25

  17. Validity of a hospital-based obstetric register using medical records as reference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brixval, Carina Sjöberg; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Johansen, Nanna Roed

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data from hospital-based registers and medical records offer valuable sources of information for clinical and epidemiological research purposes. However, conducting high-quality epidemiological research requires valid and complete data sources. OBJECTIVE: To assess completeness...... and validity of a hospital-based clinical register - the Obstetric Database - using a national register and medical records as references. METHODS: We assessed completeness of a hospital-based clinical register - the Obstetric Database - by linking data from all women registered in the Obstetric Database...... Database therefore offers a valuable source for examining clinical, administrative, and research questions....

  18. Assessment of Pharmacy Information System Performance in Three Hospitals in Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mahalli, Azza; El-Khafif, Sahar H; Yamani, Wid

    2016-01-01

    The pharmacy information system is one of the central pillars of a hospital information system. This research evaluated a pharmacy information system according to six aspects of the medication process in three hospitals in Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia. System administrators were interviewed to determine availability of functionalities. Then, system users within the hospital were targeted to evaluate their level of usage of these functionalities. The study was cross-sectional. Two structured surveys were designed. The overall response rate of hospital users was 31.7 percent. In all three hospitals studied, the electronic health record is hybrid, implementation has been completed and the system is running, and the systems have computerized provider order entry and clinical decision support. Also, the pharmacy information systems are integrated with the electronic health record, and computerized provider order entry and almost all prescribing and transcription functionalities are available; however, drug dispensing is a mostly manual process. However, the study hospitals do not use barcode-assisted medication administration systems to verify patient identity and electronically check dose administration, and none of them have computerized adverse drug event monitoring that uses the electronic health record. The numbers of users who used different functionalities most or all of the time was generally low. The highest frequency of utilization was for patient administration records (56.8 percent), and the lowest was for linkage of the pharmacy information system to pharmacy stock (9.1 percent). Encouraging users to use different functionalities was highly recommended.

  19. 42 CFR 412.404 - Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. 412.404 Section 412.404 Public... PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital... must meet the conditions of this section to receive payment under the prospective payment system...

  20. Prioritizing public- private partnership models for public hospitals of iran based on performance indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholamzadeh Nikjoo, Raana; Jabbari Beyrami, Hossein; Jannati, Ali; Asghari Jaafarabadi, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to scrutinize Public- Private Partnership (PPP) models in public hospitals of different countries based on performance indicators in order to se-lect appropriated models for Iran hospitals. In this mixed (quantitative-qualitative) study, systematic review and expert panel has been done to identify varied models of PPP as well as performance indicators. In the second step we prioritized performance indicator and PPP models based on selected performance indicators by Analytical Hierarchy process (AHP) technique. The data were analyzed by Excel 2007 and Expert Choice11 software's. In quality - effectiveness area, indicators like the rate of hospital infections (100%), hospital accidents prevalence rate (73%), pure rate of hospital mortality (63%), patient satisfaction percentage (53%), in accessibility equity area indicators such as average inpatient waiting time (100%) and average outpatient waiting time (74%), and in financial - efficiency area, indicators including average length of stay (100%), bed occupation ratio (99%), specific income to total cost ratio (97%) have been chosen to be the most key performance indicators. In the pri¬oritization of the PPP models clinical outsourcing, management, privatization, BOO (build, own, operate) and non-clinical outsourcing models, achieved high priority for various performance in¬dicator areas. This study had been provided the most common PPP options in the field of public hospitals and had gathered suitable evidences from experts for choosing appropriate PPP option for public hospitals. Effect of private sector presence in public hospital performance, based on which PPP options undertaken, will be different.

  1. Case Study: Evidence-Based Interventions Enhancing Diabetic Foot Care Behaviors among Hospitalized DM Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titis Kurniawan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improving diabetic patients’ foot care behaviors is one of the most effective strategies in minimizing diabetic foot ulceration and its further negative impacts, either in diabetic hospitalized patients or outpatients.Purpose: To describe foot care knowledge and behaviors among hospitalized diabetic patients, to apply selected foot care knowledge and behaviors improvement evidence, and to evaluate its effectiveness.Method: Four diabetic patients who were under our care for at least three days and could communicate in Thai language were selected from a surgical ward in a university hospital. The authors applied educational program based on patients’ learning needs, provided diabetic foot care leaflet, and assisted patients to set their goal and action plans. In the third day of treatment, we evaluated patients’ foot care knowledge and their goal and action plan statements in improving foot care behaviors.Result: Based on the data collected among four hospitalized diabetic patients, it was shown that all patients needed foot care behaviors improvement and the educational program improved hospitalized patients’ foot care knowledge and their perceived foot care behaviors. The educational program that combined with goal setting and action plans method was easy, safe, and seemed feasibly applicable for diabetic hospitalized patients.Conclusion: The results of this study provide valuable information for improvement of hospitalized diabetic patients’ foot care knowledge and behaviors. The authors recommend nurses to use this evidence-based practice to contribute in improving the quality of diabetic care.Keywords: Intervention, diabetic foot care, hospitalized diabetic patients

  2. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and fiscal year 2015 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; reasonable compensation equivalents for physician services in excluded hospitals and certain teaching hospitals; provider administrative appeals and judicial review; enforcement provisions for organ transplant centers; and electronic health record (EHR) incentive program. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-22

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act), the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, and other legislation. These changes are applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2014, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits are effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2014. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes to the LTCH PPS under the Affordable Care Act and the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013 and the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014. In addition, we discuss our proposals on the interruption of stay policy for LTCHs and on retiring the "5 percent" payment adjustment for collocated LTCHs. While many of the statutory mandates of the Pathway for SGR Reform Act apply to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2014, others will not begin to apply until 2016 and beyond. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or revising requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, and LTCHs) that

  3. An evaluation of systemic reforms of public hospitals: the Sanming model in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hongqiao; Li, Ling; Li, Mingqiang; Yang, Chunyu; Hsiao, William

    2017-10-01

    Low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) have been searching for effective strategies to reform their inefficient and wasteful public hospitals. Recently, China developed a model of systemic reforms called the Sanming model to address the inefficiency and waste at public hospitals. In this article, we explain and evaluate how the Sanming model reformed its 22 public hospitals in 2013 by simultaneously restructuring the hospital governance structure, altering the payment system to hospitals, and realigning physicians' incentives. By employing the difference-in-difference (DID) method and using the hospital-level data from 187 public hospitals in Fujian province, we find that the Sanming model has reduced medical costs significantly without measurably sacrificing clinical quality and productive efficiency. The systemic reform, on average, has reduced the medical care cost per outpatient visit and per inpatient admission by 6.1% (P-value = 0.0445) and 15.4% (P-value transformation of public hospitals, where the governance structure, payment system and physician compensation methods are aligned, are crucial to improving their performance; it holds critical lessons for China and other LMICs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Investigating the health care delivery system in Japan and reviewing the local public hospital reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang X

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Xing Zhang, Tatsuo Oyama National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Japan's health care system is considered one of the best health care systems in the world. Hospitals are one of the most important health care resources in Japan. As such, we investigate Japanese hospitals from various viewpoints, including their roles, ownership, regional distribution, and characteristics with respect to the number of beds, staff, doctors, and financial performance. Applying a multivariate analysis and regression model techniques, we show the functional differences between urban populated prefectures and remote ones; the equality gap among all prefectures with respect to the distribution of the number of beds, staff, and doctors; and managerial differences between private and public hospitals. We also review and evaluate the local public hospital reform executed in 2007 from various financial aspects related to the expenditure and revenue structure by comparing public and private hospitals. We show that the 2007 reform contributed to improving the financial situation of local public hospitals. Strategic differences between public and private hospitals with respect to their management and strategy to improve their financial situation are also quantitatively analyzed in detail. Finally, the remaining problems and the future strategy to further improve the Japanese health care system are described. Keywords: health care system, health care resource, public hospital, multivariate regression model, financial performance

  5. A validation of ground ambulance pre-hospital times modeled using geographic information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Alka B; Waters, Nigel M; Blanchard, Ian E; Doig, Christopher J; Ghali, William A

    2012-10-03

    Evaluating geographic access to health services often requires determining the patient travel time to a specified service. For urgent care, many research studies have modeled patient pre-hospital time by ground emergency medical services (EMS) using geographic information systems (GIS). The purpose of this study was to determine if the modeling assumptions proposed through prior United States (US) studies are valid in a non-US context, and to use the resulting information to provide revised recommendations for modeling travel time using GIS in the absence of actual EMS trip data. The study sample contained all emergency adult patient trips within the Calgary area for 2006. Each record included four components of pre-hospital time (activation, response, on-scene and transport interval). The actual activation and on-scene intervals were compared with those used in published models. The transport interval was calculated within GIS using the Network Analyst extension of Esri ArcGIS 10.0 and the response interval was derived using previously established methods. These GIS derived transport and response intervals were compared with the actual times using descriptive methods. We used the information acquired through the analysis of the EMS trip data to create an updated model that could be used to estimate travel time in the absence of actual EMS trip records. There were 29,765 complete EMS records for scene locations inside the city and 529 outside. The actual median on-scene intervals were longer than the average previously reported by 7-8 minutes. Actual EMS pre-hospital times across our study area were significantly higher than the estimated times modeled using GIS and the original travel time assumptions. Our updated model, although still underestimating the total pre-hospital time, more accurately represents the true pre-hospital time in our study area. The widespread use of generalized EMS pre-hospital time assumptions based on US data may not be appropriate in a

  6. [The Perspectives and Expectations of New Nursing Graduates Regarding the Hospital-Based Nursing Students Scholarship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Ling; Tsai, Yun-Fang; Shao, Jung-Hua; Shyu, Yea-Ing

    2016-10-01

    The hospital-based scholarship is a relatively recent incentive used by hospitals to recruit new nursing graduates. Few studies have explored the impact of these scholarship programs on hospital recruitment. To explore the perspectives and expectations of new nursing graduates on the application of a hospital-based scholarship for nursing students. This study used a qualitative research approach. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 20 new nursing graduates from one university in northern Taiwan in 2013. Content analysis was applied to analyze the data. Two themes were identified by participants who had applied for a hospital-based scholarship: "aspire to be a nursing-scholarship recipient and work towards this aspiration" and "look forward to receiving a nursing-scholarship and imagine possible features of the future life." One theme was identified by participants who had not applied for a hospital-based scholarship: "agree with the policy of hospital-based scholarship but resist the restrictions on their life." Although both groups agreed that the scholarship program helped relieve financial stresses, participants who had applied for the scholarship tended to hold positive and aggressive attitudes towards the nursing scholarship. Conversely, participants who had not applied for the scholarship did so due to the perceived conflicts between the scholarship and their career plans. It is recommended to consider providing career-planning assistance to new graduates and to arrange that students who sign a scholarship contract have their clinical practice in their working unit in order to improve adaptation.

  7. System Based Code: Principal Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuhide Asada; Masanori Tashimo; Masahiro Ueta

    2002-01-01

    This paper introduces a concept of the 'System Based Code' which has initially been proposed by the authors intending to give nuclear industry a leap of progress in the system reliability, performance improvement, and cost reduction. The concept of the System Based Code intends to give a theoretical procedure to optimize the reliability of the system by administrating every related engineering requirement throughout the life of the system from design to decommissioning. (authors)

  8. Home-Based Telehealth Hospitalization for Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Anna Svarre; Laursen, Lars C; Rydahl-Hansen, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Telehealth interventions for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have focused primarily on stable outpatients. Telehealth designed to handle the acute exacerbation that normally requires hospitalization could also be of interest. The aim of this study...... was to compare the effect of home-based telehealth hospitalization with conventional hospitalization for exacerbation in severe COPD. Materials and Methods: A two-center, noninferiority, randomized, controlled effectiveness trial was conducted between June 2010 and December 2011. Patients with severe COPD...... admitted because of exacerbation were randomized 1:1 either to home-based telehealth hospitalization or to continue standard treatment and care at the hospital. The primary outcome was treatment failure defined as re-admission due to exacerbation in COPD within 30 days after initial discharge...

  9. Marketing and reputation aspects of neonatal safeguards and hospital-security systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alan D

    2009-01-01

    Technological advancements have migrated from personal-use electronics into the healthcare setting for security enhancements. Within maternity wards and nurseries, technology was seen as one of best way to protect newborns from abduction. The present study is a focus on what systems and methods are used in neonatal security, the security arrangements, staff training, and impacts outside the control of the hospital, customer satisfaction and customer relations management. Through hypothesis-testing and exploratory analysis, gender biases and extremely high levels of security were found within a web-enabled and professional sample of 200 respondents. The factor-based constructs were found to be, in order of the greatest explained variance: security concerns, personal technology usage, work technology applications, and demographic maturity concerns, resulting in four factor-based scores with significant combined variance of 61.5%. It was found that through a better understanding on the importance and vital need for hospitals to continue to improve on their technology-based security policies significantly enhanced their reputation in the highly competitive local healthcare industry.

  10. Development and implementation of a hospital-based patient safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frush, Karen S.; Alton, Michael; Frush, Donald P.

    2006-01-01

    Evidence from numerous studies indicates that large numbers of patients are harmed by medical errors while receiving health-care services in the United States today. The 1999 Institute of Medicine report on medical errors recommended that hospitals and health-care agencies ''establish safety programs to act as a catalyst for the development of a culture of safety'' [1]. In this article, we describe one approach to successful implementation of a hospital-based patient safety program. Although our experience at Duke University Health System will be used as an example, the needs, principles, and solutions can apply to a variety of other health-care practices. Key components include the development of safety teams, provision of tools that teams can use to support an environment of safety, and ongoing program modification to meet patient and staff needs and respond to changing priorities. By moving patient safety to the forefront of all that we do as health-care providers, we can continue to improve our delivery of health care to children and adults alike. This improvement is fostered when we enhance the culture of safety, develop a constant awareness of the possibility of human and system errors in the delivery of care, and establish additional safeguards to intercept medical errors in order to prevent harm to patients. (orig.)

  11. Do hospital physicians really want to go digital? Acceptance of a picture archiving and communication system in a university hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duyck, P.; Pynoo, B.; Devolder, P.; Voet, T.; Adang, L.; Vercruysse, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: radiology departments are making the transition from analog film to digital images by means of PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System). It is critical for the hospital that its physicians adopt and accept the new digital work method regarding radiological information. The aim of this study is to investigate hospital physicians' acceptance of PACS using questionnaires pre- and post-implementation and to identify main influencing factors. Materials and methods: the study was conducted in an 1169 bed university hospital. The UTAUT (Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology) questionnaire was administered at two times: one month pre-implementation (T1) and 1.5 years post-implementation (T2) of PACS, targeting all hospital physicians with the exemption of radiologists. The UTAUT scales (Behavioral Intention BI; Facilitating Conditions FC; Effort Expectancy EE; Performance Expectancy PE; Anxiety ANX; Social Influence SI; System Use USE; Attitude toward technology ATT; Self-Efficacy SE) were used to assess questions regarding: (a) PACS' usefulness, (b) PACS' ease of learning/using, (c) PACS support availability, (d) the perceived pressure to use PACS, (e) physicians' attitude towards PACS and (f) physicians' intention to use and actual use of PACS. Results: at T1 scale ratings were positive toward the PACS implementation. The ratings on all scales with the exception of self-efficacy improved at T2. Regression analysis revealed that the key factor for intention to use PACS at T1 was the usefulness of PACS, while the availability and awareness of support was its most important predictor at T2. Overall, PE was the best predictor of BI, but all four UTAUT-determinants (PE, FC, EE and SI) were salient for its prediction. Variance explained in BI ranged from 31 to 37% while variance explained in USE was very low (3%). (orig.)

  12. Hospital-Based Cancer Profile at the Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Lahore, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badar, F.; Mahmood, S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine a frequency distribution of the type and clinical profile of cancer cases registered at the Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre (SKMCH and RC). Study Design: A retrospective, observational study. Place and Duration of Study: The SKMCH and RC, Lahore, from December 1994 to December 2012. Methodology: The time period taken into consideration for the three most common diagnoses was December 1994 - December 2012. Summaries were obtained for gender, age-group, and cancer type on: (i) all age-groups, both genders combined; (ii) adults (> 18 years); (iii) adult males (> 18 years); (iv) adult females (> 18 years); and (v) children (18 years). For a subset of cases registered between January 2004 to December 31, 2012 (9 years), summaries on cancers, age, addiction, family history, disease stage, and grade were obtained for the above groups. Statistical Package for Social Sciences, version 19, was used to analyze the data. Results: The most common malignancies, for the 18-year time period, among adults, were those of breast (11,848/ 49,765, 23.81%), lip and oral cavity (3, 291/49, 765, 6.61%), and liver and intrahepatic bile ducts (2, 836/49, 765, 5.70%). Conclusion: Hospital-based results obtained from various oncology hospital and departments, can be considered as an effective way forward in getting a preview of cancer burden in the region. (author)

  13. Population-based characteristics of fatal and hospital admissions for poisoning in Fiji: TRIP Project-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris-John, Roshini; Kafoa, Berlin; Wainiqolo, Iris; Reddy, Ravi Krishnan; McCaig, Eddie; Ameratunga, Shanthi N

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the incidence and characteristics of poisoning fatalities and hospital admissions among indigenous Fijians and Indians in Viti Levu, Fiji. Individuals with a mechanism of injury classified as poisoning were identified using the Fiji injury surveillance in hospitals system, a population-based registry established for 12 months in Viti Levu, and analysed using population-based denominators. The mean annual rates of fatalities and hospitalisations were 2.3 and 26.0 per 100 000, respectively. Over two-thirds of poisonings occurred among people of Indian ethnicity. Most intentional poisoning admissions occurred among women (58.3%) and in 15–29-year-old individuals (73.8%). Unintentional poisoning admission rates were highest among Indian boys aged 0–14 years. While over 75% of events occurred at home, the substances involved were not systematically identified. The findings indicate the need for a strategy that addresses the differing contexts across age group, gender and ethnicity, and a lead agency responsible for implementing and monitoring its effectiveness. PMID:23353079

  14. The impacts of smart cards on hospital information systems--an investigation of the first phase of the national health insurance smart card project in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chien-Tsai; Yang, Pei-Tun; Yeh, Yu-Ting; Wang, Bin-Long

    2006-02-01

    To investigate the impacts of the first phase of Taiwan's Bureau of National Health Insurance (TBNHI) smart card project on existing hospital information systems. TBNHI has launched a nationwide project for replacement of its paper-based health insurance cards by smart cards (or NHI-IC cards) since November 1999. The NHI-IC cards have been used since 1 July 2003, and they have fully replaced the paper-based cards since 1 January 2004. Hospitals must support the cards in order to provide medical services for insured patients. We made a comprehensive study of the current phase of the NHI-IC card system, and conducted a questionnaire survey (from 1 October to 30 November, 2003) to investigate the impacts of NHI-IC cards on the existing hospital information systems. A questionnaire was distributed by mail to 479 hospitals, including 23 medical centers, 71 regional hospitals, and 355 district hospitals. The returned questionnaires were also collected by prepaid mail. The questionnaire return rates of the medical centers, regional hospitals and district hospitals were 39.1, 29.6 and 20.9%, respectively. In phase 1 of the project, the average number of card readers purchased per medical center, regional hospital, and district hospital were 202, 45 and 10, respectively. The average person-days for the enhancement of existing information systems of a medical center, regional hospital and district hospital were 175, 74 and 58, respectively. Three months after using the NHI-IC cards most hospitals (60.6%) experienced prolonged service time for their patients due to more interruptions caused mainly by: (1) impairment of the NHI-IC cards (31.2%), (2) failure in authentication of the SAMs (17.0%), (3) malfunction in card readers (15.3%) and (4) problems with interfaces between the card readers and hospital information systems (15.8%). The overall hospital satisfaction on the 5-point Likert scale was 2.86. Although most hospitals were OK with the project, there was about 22

  15. Direct costs of dengue hospitalization in Brazil: public and private health care systems and use of WHO guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Machado, Alessandra A; Estevan, Anderson Oliveira; Sales, Antonio; Brabes, Kelly Cristina da Silva; Croda, Júlio; Negrão, Fábio Juliano

    2014-09-01

    Dengue, an arboviral disease, is a public health problem in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. In Brazil, epidemics have become increasingly important, with increases in the number of hospitalizations and the costs associated with the disease. This study aimed to describe the direct costs of hospitalized dengue cases, the financial impact of admissions and the use of blood products where current protocols for disease management were not followed. To analyze the direct costs of dengue illness and platelet transfusion in Brazil based on the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, we conducted a retrospective cross-sectional census study on hospitalized dengue patients in the public and private Brazilian health systems in Dourados City, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil. The analysis involved cases that occurred from January through December during the 2010 outbreak. In total, we examined 8,226 mandatorily reported suspected dengue cases involving 507 hospitalized patients. The final sample comprised 288 laboratory-confirmed dengue patients, who accounted for 56.8% of all hospitalized cases. The overall cost of the hospitalized dengue cases was US $210,084.30, in 2010, which corresponded to 2.5% of the gross domestic product per capita in Dourados that year. In 35.2% of cases, blood products were used in patients who did not meet the blood transfusion criteria. The overall median hospitalization cost was higher (p = 0.002) in the group that received blood products (US $1,622.40) compared with the group that did not receive blood products (US $550.20). The comparative costs between the public and the private health systems show that both the hospitalization of and platelet transfusion in patients who do not meet the WHO and Brazilian dengue guidelines increase the direct costs, but not the quality, of health care.

  16. Assessment of the health care waste generation rates and its management system in hospitals of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debere Mesfin Kote

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare waste management options are varying in Ethiopia. One of the first critical steps in the process of developing a reliable waste management plan requires a widespread understanding of the amount and the management system. This study aimed to assess the health care waste generation rate and its management system in some selected hospitals located in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods Six hospitals in Addis Ababa, (three private and three public, were selected using simple random sampling method for this work. Data was recorded by using an appropriately designed questionnaire, which was completed for the period of two months. The calculations were based on the weights of the health care wastes that were regularly generated in the selected hospitals over a one week period during the year 2011. Average generation indexes were determined in relation to certain important factors, like the type of hospitals (public vs private. Results The median waste generation rate was found to be varied from 0.361- 0.669 kg/patient/day, comprised of 58.69% non-hazardous and 41.31% hazardous wastes. The amount of waste generated was increased as the number of patients flow increased (rs=1. Public hospitals generated high proportion of total health care wastes (59.22% in comparison with private hospitals (40.48%. The median waste generation rate was significantly vary between hospitals with Kruskal-Wallis test (X2=30.65, p=0.0001. The amount of waste was positively correlated with the number of patients (p Conclusion These findings revealed that the management of health care waste at hospitals in Addis Ababa city was poor.

  17. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2018 Rates; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers; Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-14

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2018. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, the 21st Century Cures Act, and other legislation. We also are making changes relating to the provider-based status of Indian Health Service (IHS) and Tribal facilities and organizations and to the low-volume hospital payment adjustment for hospitals operated by the IHS or a Tribe. In addition, we are providing the market basket update that will apply to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2018. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2018. In addition, we are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific Medicare providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities). We also are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for eligible professionals (EPs), eligible hospitals, and critical access hospitals (CAHs) participating in the Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Programs. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program, the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and the Hospital-Acquired Condition (HAC) Reduction Program. We also are making changes relating to transparency of accrediting organization survey

  18. 75 FR 50041 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... site to view public comments. Comments received timely will also be available for public inspection... Stimulation System b. IntraOperative Electron RadioTherapy (IOERT) c. Brachytherapy d. Excisional Debridement...

  19. Study of the length of hospital stay for free flap reconstruction of oral and pharyngeal cancer in the context of the new French casemix-based funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girod, Angélique; Brancati, Antonio; Mosseri, Véronique; Kriegel, Irène; Jouffroy, Thomas; Rodriguez, José

    2010-03-01

    The French national health insurance reimbursement system has recently changed from a global hospital funding system to casemix-based funding. The authors studied the factors likely to influence the length of hospital stay for free flap reconstructions after surgery for cancers of the oral cavity or pharynx. Data concerning 207 oral cavity or pharynx free flap reconstructions were extracted from a prospective registration. Lengths of hospital stay were compared by an analysis of variance F test or a nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test, and transfusion rates were compared by Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test, as appropriate. The median length of hospital stay was 24 days (range: 7-145 days). Length of hospital stay was significantly longer according to the type of flap (pcasemix-based funding, this study raises the problem of harvesting of the fibula flap, management of preoperative haemoglobin and nutritional status. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of APACHE II system among intensive care patients at a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Antonio Chiavone

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The high-complexity features of intensive care unit services and the clinical situation of patients themselves render correct prognosis fundamentally important not only for patients, their families and physicians, but also for hospital administrators, fund-providers and controllers. Prognostic indices have been developed for estimating hospital mortality rates for hospitalized patients, based on demographic, physiological and clinical data. OBJECTIVE: The APACHE II system was applied within an intensive care unit to evaluate its ability to predict patient outcome; to compare illness severity with outcomes for clinical and surgical patients; and to compare the recorded result with the predicted death rate. DESIGN: Diagnostic test. SETTING: Clinical and surgical intensive care unit in a tertiary-care teaching hospital. PARTICIPANTS: The study involved 521 consecutive patients admitted to the intensive care unit from July 1998 to June 1999. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: APACHE II score, in-hospital mortality, receiver operating characteristic curve, decision matrices and linear regression analysis. RESULTS: The patients' mean age was 50 ± 19 years and the APACHE II score was 16.7 ± 7.3. There were 166 clinical patients (32%, 173 (33% post-elective surgery patients (33%, and 182 post-emergency surgery patients (35%, thus producing statistically similar proportions. The APACHE II scores for clinical patients (18.5 ± 7.8 were similar to those for non-elective surgery patients (18.6 ± 6.5 and both were greater than for elective surgery patients (13.0 ± 6.3 (p < 0.05. The higher this score was, the higher the mortality rate was (p < 0.05. The predicted death rate was 25.6% and the recorded death rate was 35.5%. Through the use of receiver operating curve analysis, good discrimination was found (area under the curve = 0.80. From the 2 x 2 decision matrix, 72.2% of patients were correctly classified (sensitivity = 35.1%; specificity = 92.6%. Linear

  1. An evaluation of gas engines as prime movers in cogeneration systems for the power safety in hospitals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsanis, J.S.; Tsarabaris, P.T.; Halaris, P.G.; Bourkas, P.D. [National Technical Univ. of Athens, Athens (Greece). School of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Malahias, G.N. [Hellenic Naval Academy, Athens (Greece)

    2008-07-01

    Modern hospitals are completely dependent on energy. According to Environmental Protection Agency, healthcare organizations spend over $6 billion on energy each year in USA alone to meet patient needs. The increase in the use of technology in healthcare has increased energy demand within hospitals. At the same time energy costs have been on the rise due to the increased energy demand, aging energy infrastructure, and deregulation of energy markets. Heating, cooling, domestic hot water use and lighting systems are responsible for about 80 per cent of the energy consumed in hospitals. Support functions, such as food service and equipment, account for the remaining 20 per cent. From the fuel utilization viewpoint, the permanent demand for electricity, steam, hot water, heating and cooling makes hospitals an ideal candidates for cogeneration. In addition to reducing energy costs, cogeneration with internal combustion engines can provide emergency power capability, improve power quality, and reduce the burden on utility transmission and distribution systems during periods of peak demand. On-site natural gas power generators can be used for primary power, base load power, peak shaving or emergency power. The security of electrical supply is highly important in hospitals. Reciprocating engines are a proven technology with a range of size and the lowest first capital costs of all combined cooling, heating and power systems. Modern gas engines are designed to provide high output with fuel flexibility, low emission rates, high efficiency and high reliability. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Getting more for your money: designing community needs assessments to build collaboration and capacity in hospital system community benefit work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Dale; Diaz, Heather; Schmidtlein, Mathew C

    2013-11-01

    Most community health needs assessments (CHNAs) are unilateral in nature and fail to include a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach, limiting them in their scope. Nonprofit hospitals are required to conduct CHNAs every 3 years to determine where community prevention dollars should be spent. In 2010, a CBPR CHNA approach was conducted with four hospital systems in Northern California. Merging concepts from organization development, the approach included (a) goal determination, (b) use of a guiding framework, (c) creation of a container in which to interact, (d) established feedback loops, and (e) intentional trust-building exercises. The approach was to build lasting relationships between hospital systems that would extend beyond the CHNA. Results using this approach revealed that members representing all four hospital systems (a) began to meet regularly after the CHNA was completed, (b) increased collaboration with other community organizations, (c) expanded their level of intraorganization partnerships, (d) enjoyed the process, (e) felt that their professional knowledge expanded, and (f) felt connected professionally and personally with other hospital representatives. As a result, other joint projects are underway. The results of this study indicate that using CBPR to design a CHNA can build sustained collaborative relationships between study participants that continue.

  3. The growth of corporate private hospitals in Malaysia: policy contradictions in health system pluralism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, S

    1997-01-01

    The rapid growth of corporate investment in the Malaysian private hospital sector has had a considerable impact on the health care system. Sustained economic growth, the development of new urban areas, an enlarged middle class, and the inclusion of hospital insurance in salary packages have all contributed to a financially lucrative investment environment for hospital entrepreneurs. Many of Malaysia's most technologically advanced hospitals employing leading specialists are owned and operated as corporate business ventures. Corporate hospital investment has been actively encouraged by the government, which regards an expanded private sector as a vital complement to the public hospital system. Yet this rapid growth of corporately owned private hospitals has posed serious contradictions for health care policy in terms of issues such as equity, cost and quality, the effect on the wider health system, and the very role of the state in health care provision. This article describes the growth of corporate investment in Malaysia's private hospital sector and explores some of the attendant policy contradictions.

  4. Marketing skills for hospital-based laboratory managers in a managed care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchwinski, J; Coggins, F

    1997-01-01

    Managers of hospital-based laboratories have begun to realize the importance of a successful outreach program in protecting against declining inpatient activity. Succeeding in the highly competitive field of outpatient testing requires some new skills and techniques that may not have been apparent when addressing normal inpatient requirements. This article provides an overview of some very basic marketing concepts and attempts to show how they can assist the hospital-based laboratory manager in developing a successful outreach program.

  5. Constructing optimal experience for the hospitalized newborn through neuro-based music therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen eShoemark

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Music-based intervention for hospitalized newborn infants has traditionally been based in a biomedical model, with physiological stability as the prime objective. More recent applications are grounded in other theories, including attachment, trauma and neurological models in which infant, parent and the dyadic interaction may be viewed as a dynamic system bound by the common context of the NICU. The immature state of the preterm infant’s neurological system and particularly auditory system means that no assumptions can be made about auditory processing and stimulation should proceed with caution. The infant’s experience of an unpredictable auditory environment is further compromised by a potential lack of meaningful auditory stimulation. Parents often feel disconnected from their own capacities to nurture their infant. The implications for the infant’s neurobehavioral and psychological well-being are life-long. This perspectives paper will outline the likely neurological considerations for auditory processing in the premature infant as well as establishing a premise for music-based interventions. A hypothetical clinical case will illustrate the application of music by a music therapist with an infant and family in NICU.

  6. 75 FR 45699 - Medicare Program: Changes to the Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System and CY 2010...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... Prospective Payment System and CY 2010 Payment Rates; Changes to the Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment System...-1414-CN2] RIN 0938-AP41 Medicare Program: Changes to the Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System and CY 2010 Payment Rates; Changes to the Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment S