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Sample records for hospital medical examination

  1. Seriously clowning: Medical clowning interaction with children undergoing invasive examinations in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tener, Dafna; Ofir, Shoshi; Lev-Wiesel, Rachel; Franco, Nessia L; On, Avi

    2016-04-01

    This qualitative study examined the subjective experience of children undergoing an invasive examination in the hospital when accompanied by a medical clown. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine such children and nine of their accompanying parents. The children were patients in two outpatient departments (Pediatric Gastroenterology and a Center for the Sexually Abused) in a hospital in Israel. Interviews were coded thematically using an Atlas.ti software program. Analysis of the interviews indicated that the intervention of the clown positively changed the children's perceptions of the hospital, of experiencing the examination, and of their life narrative. Medical clowns thus appear to be a central, meaningful, and therapeutic source for children undergoing invasive examinations in hospital, as well as for their parents. Therefore, it may be advisable to incorporate medical clowns as an integral part of medical teams performing invasive procedures and to include the clowns in all stages of the hospital visit.

  2. [The keys to success in French Medical National Ranking Examination: Integrated training activities in teaching hospital and medical school].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillois, Pierre; Fourcot, Marie; Genty, Céline; Morand, Patrice; Bosson, Jean-Luc

    2015-12-01

    The National Ranking Examination (NRE) is the key to the choice of career and specialty for future physicians; it lets them choose their place of employment in a specialty and an hospital for their internship. It seems interesting to model the success factors to this exam for the medical students from Grenoble University. For each of the medical students at Grenoble University who did apply to the NRE in 2012, data have been collected about their academic background and personal details from the administration of the University. A simple logistic regression with success set as being ranked in the first 2000 students, then a polytomous logistic regression, have been performed. The 191 students in the models are 59% female, 25 years old in average (SD 1.8). The factors associated to a ranking in the first 2000 are: not repeating the PCEM1 class (odds ratio [OR] 2.63, CI95: [1.26; 5.56]), performing nurse practice during internships (OR=1.27 [1.00; 1.62]), being ranked in the first half of the class for S3 pole (OR=6.04 [1.21; 30.20] for the first quarter, OR=5.65 [1.15; 27.74] for the second quarter) and being in the first quarter at T5 pole (OR=3.42 [1.08; 10.82]). Our study finds four factors independently contributing to the success at NRE: not repeating PCEM1, performing nurse practice and being ranked in the top of the class at certain academic fields. The AUC is 0.76 and student accuracy is more than 80%. However, some items, for example repeating DCEM4 or participating in NRE mock exams, have no influence on success. A different motivation should be a part of the explanation… As these analysed data are mainly institutional, they are accurate and reliable. The polytomic logistic model, sharing 3 factors with the simple logistic model, replace a performing nurse practice factor's by a grant recipient factor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. On-Line Booking Policies and Competitive Analysis of Medical Examination in Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Luo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available From the on-line point, we consider the hospital’s medical examination appointment problem with hierarchical machines. This approach eliminates the need for both demand forecasts and a risk-neutrality assumption. Due to different unit revenue, uncertain demand, and arrival of patients, we design on-line booking policies for two kinds of different situations from the perspective of on-line policy and competitive analysis. After that, we prove the optimal competitive ratios. Through numerical examples, we compare advantages and disadvantages between on-line policies and traditional policies, finding that there is different superiority for these two policies under different arrival sequences.

  4. Frequency of paediatric medical imaging examinations performed at a European teaching hospital over a 7-year period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portelli, Jonathan L.; Bezzina, Paul [University of Malta, Department of Radiography, Faculty of Health Sciences, Msida (Malta); McNulty, Jonathan P.; Rainford, Louise [University College Dublin, Diagnostic Imaging, School of Medicine and Medical Science, Dublin (Ireland)

    2016-12-15

    The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to gain an insight into frequencies by which a range of medical imaging (MI) examinations were performed on paediatric patients at the main acute general teaching hospital in Malta between 2008 and 2014. Frequency data of MI examinations performed on paediatric patients were retrospectively collected from relevant information systems. All data was coded accordingly to facilitate data analysis. A total of 95,805 MI examinations were performed on 39,707 unique paediatric patients (<18 years) between 2008 and 2014. Overall, the total number of paediatric MI examinations performed decreased over time, with use varying depending on modality type and paediatric age. Coincidentally the use of ultrasound and MRI increased year after year. Some paediatric patients underwent at least three MI examinations involving the same anatomical region being scanned, and which may collectively contribute to effective doses exceeding 10 mSv. Knowledge of how MI examinations are used within the paediatric population can help practices evaluate and address any trends highlighted for particular examinations or age category of paediatric patients. Furthermore, awareness of current trends of MI in children can be helpful for the planning of future paediatric radiology departments. (orig.)

  5. Examination of cross contamination risks between hospitals by external medical staff via cross-sectional intercept survey of hand hygiene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiffers, Hank

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] Introduction: Work in hospitals is supported by contributions of life sciences industry representatives (IR in various ways of fields. Close contact between them, caretakers and patients is unavoidable, even in situations where hygiene is critical.The present study investigates whether IR display comparable levels of and methicillin-resistant (MRSA contamination after being exposed to a shared environment for a minimum of 4 hours.Material and methods: An anonymous survey to sample a group of healthcare professionals for traces of fingertip contamination was performed. We used dip slides ( and MRSA to evaluate professionals at the medical exhibition MEDICA. After applying exclusion criteria 298 participants remained valid, they consisted of 208 industry representatives, 49 nurses and 41 physicians.Results: IR where engaged in hospitals, operating rooms and outpatient clinics (82%, 41.8%, 51.9% respectively. 65.9% of IR (vs. 48.8% physicians and 40.8% nurses carried a microbiological burden ≥10 CFU (colony forming units. Neither (≥10 CFU in IR (40.9% did show statistical differences in contamination patterns in comparison to physicians (43.9%, p=0.346 and nurses (36.7%, p=0.878 nor did MRSA (physicians p=0.579, nurses p=0.908. We were unable to differentiate transient from pre-existing permanent colonization.Conclusion: Exposure to the same environment may result in similar hand contamination patterns of IR when compared caregivers. This supports the concern that industry representatives can cause cross infection between hospitals and hygiene sensitive areas like operation room, intensive care unit and central sterilization units particularly. Further study is required to clarify whether pre-existing bacterial colonization is an influencing factor and how industry is taking care of this to create a safe working environment for their employees, the customers and ultimately the patients.

  6. Examination of cross contamination risks between hospitals by external medical staff via cross-sectional intercept survey of hand hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffers, Hank; Zaatreh, Sarah; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Work in hospitals is supported by contributions of life sciences industry representatives (IR) in various ways of fields. Close contact between them, caretakers and patients is unavoidable, even in situations where hygiene is critical. The present study investigates whether IR display comparable levels of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination after being exposed to a shared environment for a minimum of 4 hours. An anonymous survey to sample a group of healthcare professionals for traces of fingertip contamination was performed. We used dip slides (S. aureus and MRSA) to evaluate 311 healthcare professionals at the medical exhibition MEDICA. After applying exclusion criteria 298 participants remained valid, they consisted of 208 industry representatives, 49 nurses and 41 physicians. IR where engaged in hospitals, operating rooms and outpatient clinics (82%, 41.8%, 51.9% respectively). 65.9% of IR (vs. 48.8% physicians and 40.8% nurses) carried a microbiological burden ≥10(4) CFU (colony forming units). Neither S. aureus (≥10(4) CFU) in IR (40.9%) did show statistical differences in contamination patterns in comparison to physicians (43.9%, p=0.346) and nurses (36.7%, p=0.878) nor did MRSA (physicians p=0.579, nurses p=0.908). We were unable to differentiate transient from pre-existing permanent colonization. Exposure to the same environment may result in similar hand contamination patterns of IR when compared caregivers. This supports the concern that industry representatives can cause cross infection between hospitals and hygiene sensitive areas like operation room, intensive care unit and central sterilization units particularly. Further study is required to clarify whether pre-existing bacterial colonization is an influencing factor and how industry is taking care of this to create a safe working environment for their employees, the customers and ultimately the patients.

  7. Medical tourism private hospitals: focus India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotman, Billie Ann

    2010-01-01

    This article examines demand factors for sophisticated medical treatments offered by private hospitals operating in India. Three types of medical tourism exist: Outbound, Inbound, and Intrabound. Increased profitability and positive growth trends by private hospital chains can be attributed to rising domestic income levels within India. Not all of the chains examined were financially solvent. Some of the hospital groups in this sample that advertised directly to potential Inbound medical tourists appear to be experiencing negative cash flows.

  8. Eliminating US hospital medical errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sameer; Steinebach, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Healthcare costs in the USA have continued to rise steadily since the 1980s. Medical errors are one of the major causes of deaths and injuries of thousands of patients every year, contributing to soaring healthcare costs. The purpose of this study is to examine what has been done to deal with the medical-error problem in the last two decades and present a closed-loop mistake-proof operation system for surgery processes that would likely eliminate preventable medical errors. The design method used is a combination of creating a service blueprint, implementing the six sigma DMAIC cycle, developing cause-and-effect diagrams as well as devising poka-yokes in order to develop a robust surgery operation process for a typical US hospital. In the improve phase of the six sigma DMAIC cycle, a number of poka-yoke techniques are introduced to prevent typical medical errors (identified through cause-and-effect diagrams) that may occur in surgery operation processes in US hospitals. It is the authors' assertion that implementing the new service blueprint along with the poka-yokes, will likely result in the current medical error rate to significantly improve to the six-sigma level. Additionally, designing as many redundancies as possible in the delivery of care will help reduce medical errors. Primary healthcare providers should strongly consider investing in adequate doctor and nurse staffing, and improving their education related to the quality of service delivery to minimize clinical errors. This will lead to an increase in higher fixed costs, especially in the shorter time frame. This paper focuses additional attention needed to make a sound technical and business case for implementing six sigma tools to eliminate medical errors that will enable hospital managers to increase their hospital's profitability in the long run and also ensure patient safety.

  9. Assessment of Clinical Competence of Medical Students Using the Objective Structured Clinical Examination: First 2 Years' Experience in Taipei Veterans General Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Chou Huang

    2010-11-01

    Conclusion: The OSCE is an effective method for assessing the clinical competence of medical students. The OSCE could be improved further by modifying the examination questions and promoting effective training for standardized patients and examiners.

  10. 38 CFR 3.358 - Compensation for disability or death from hospitalization, medical or surgical treatment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... disability or death from hospitalization, medical or surgical treatment, examinations or vocational... Special Purposes § 3.358 Compensation for disability or death from hospitalization, medical or surgical... result of hospitalization, medical or surgical treatment, examination, or vocational rehabilitation...

  11. Frequency and risk factors associated with emergency medical readmissions in Galway University Hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, J

    2010-06-01

    Unplanned readmissions of medical hospital patients have been increasing in recent years. We examined the frequency and associates of emergency medical readmissions to Galway University Hospitals (GUH).

  12. Medication safety during your hospital stay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Five-rights - medication; Medication administration - hospital; Medical errors - medication; Patient safety - medication safety ... means there is less chance of a medicine error with electronic prescriptions. Your doctor can tell your nurse to write ...

  13. Examining General Hospitals' Smoke-Free Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Marilyn V.; Harbison, Phillip Adam

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the level of smoke-free policies in general hospitals and the barriers faced in implementing restrictive policies banning smoking inside buildings and on surrounding grounds. Design/methodology/approach; A survey was developed to gather data on hospitals' current smoke-free policies, including the challenges…

  14. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) is designed to collect data on the utilization and provision of ambulatory care services in hospital...

  15. Strategic management of Public Hospitals' medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Aimin; Yi, Tao; Li, Xia; Wei, Lei; Huang, Pei; Xu, Xinzhou; Yi, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The quality of medical services provided by competing public hospitals is the primary consideration of the public in determining the selection of a specific hospital for treatment. The main objective of strategic planning is to improve the quality of public hospital medical services. This paper provides an introduction to the history, significance, principles and practices of public hospital medical service strategy, as well as advancing the opinion that public hospital service strategy must not merely aim to produce but actually result in the highest possible level of quality, convenience, efficiency and patient satisfaction.

  16. Re-examining medical modernization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tupasela, Aaro Mikael

    2007-01-01

    Despite recent evidence that suggests that knowledge production within the medical community is increasingly based on knowledge-making coalitions or what some have called the co-production of knowledge, there remains a strong expert led policy agenda in many countries in relation to human genome...... research. This article reports on the role of experts in defining the scope of discussion in relation to the biomedical use of human tissue sample collections or biobanks in Finland using the case of the Genome Information Center. It is argued that the rhetorical strategies should not be understood simply...

  17. Do primary health centres and hospitals contribute equally towards achievement of the transversal clinical competencies of medical students? Performance on the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) in competency acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler-González, Jorge; Buti, Miquel; Boada, Jordi; Ayala, Victoria; Peñascal, Eduard; Rodriguez, Toni

    2016-01-01

    The adaptation of the educational programmes of European faculties of medicine to the European Higher Education Area guidelines has focused curricula design on competence acquisition. Competencies are defined as the achievements of a predetermined level of efficacy in real-world scenarios. Our objective was to assess whether performance on a common competence evaluation test, the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), resulted in different scores for second-year students after a practical medical training course took place in a primary health centre (PHC) or in a hospital. A descriptive study was conducted during the 2010-2014 academic year of the OSCE test scores obtained by all second-year students. Faculty of Medicine at the University of Lleida (Catalonia, Spain). We performed a correlation analysis between students who completed their practical medical training at the PHC and hospitals utilising Student's t-test for comparison of means. 423 students who completed internships at the PHC and at hospitals obtained OSCE mean scores of 7.32 (SD; IC) (0.82; 7.18-7.47) points and 7.17 (0.83; 6.07-7.26) points, respectively (p=0.07). Second-year medical students acquired similar competency levels in the two analysed training scenarios. The two areas both serve their teaching purpose. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. 21 CFR 880.6350 - Battery-powered medical examination light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6350 Battery-powered medical examination light. (a) Identification. A battery-powered medical examination light is a battery-powered device intended for medical...

  19. Mental Health Conditions and Medical and Surgical Hospital Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doupnik, Stephanie K; Lawlor, John; Zima, Bonnie T; Coker, Tumaini R; Bardach, Naomi S; Hall, Matt; Berry, Jay G

    2016-12-01

    Mental health conditions are prevalent among children hospitalized for medical conditions and surgical procedures, but little is known about their influence on hospital resource use. The objectives of this study were to examine how hospitalization characteristics vary by presence of a comorbid mental health condition and estimate the association of a comorbid mental health condition with hospital length of stay (LOS) and costs. Using the 2012 Kids' Inpatient Database, we conducted a retrospective, nationally representative, cross-sectional study of 670 161 hospitalizations for 10 common medical and 10 common surgical conditions among 3- to 20-year-old patients. Associations between mental health conditions and hospital LOS were examined using adjusted generalized linear models. Costs of additional hospital days associated with mental health conditions were estimated using hospital cost-to-charge ratios. A comorbid mental health condition was present in 13.2% of hospitalizations. A comorbid mental health condition was associated with a LOS increase of 8.8% (from 2.5 to 2.7 days, P < .001) for medical hospitalizations and a 16.9% increase (from 3.6 to 4.2 days, P < .001) for surgical hospitalizations. For hospitalizations in this sample, comorbid mental health conditions were associated with an additional 31 729 (95% confidence interval: 29 085 to 33 492) hospital days and $90 million (95% confidence interval: $81 to $101 million) in hospital costs. Medical and surgical hospitalizations with comorbid mental health conditions were associated with longer hospital stay and higher hospital costs. Knowledge about the influence of mental health conditions on pediatric hospital utilization can inform clinical innovation and case-mix adjustment. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Do general medical practitioners examine injured runners?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Solvej Videbæk; Jensen, A V; Rasmussen, Sten

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General Medical Practitioners (GMP) in Denmark perform clinical examinations of patients with musculoskeletal pain. However, the prevalence proportion of examinations caused by running-related injuries remains unknown. PURPOSE: The primary purpose of the present study was to estimate ...

  1. DO GENERAL MEDICAL PRACTITIONERS EXAMINE INJURED RUNNERS?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbæk, Solvej; Jensen, A V; Rasmussen, S

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General Medical Practitioners (GMP) in Denmark perform clinical examinations of patients with musculoskeletal pain. However, the prevalence proportion of examinations caused by running-related injuries remains unknown. PURPOSE: The primary purpose of the present study was to estimate ...

  2. Medical Professionals Designing Hospital Management Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byg, Vibeke

    especially have been reformed due to the high proportion of resources they absorb and the apparent difficulty of prioritizing and coordinating health care within hospitals. There is abundant research literature on the topic of reforming hospital management models. Lacking from the literature, however......, is insight into how we can understand and explain how medical professionals adapt hospital management over time in relation to changing hospital management models that are global in their influence in hospital organizations. The aim of this dissertation is to understand and explain how medical professionals...... adapt, interpret and negotiate hospital management over time in relation to changing hospital management models in hospital organizations in the Nordic health system context, illustrated by the Danish health system....

  3. Mother-Child Interactions during Medical Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Joseph P.; Melamed, Barbara G.

    To determine how parent behaviors affect children's anxiety and coping responses, and to assess how children's behaviors affect parental functioning in stressful medical settings, 50 children between 4 and 10 years of age, who were seen as outpatients in the Pediatric Clinics at Shands Teaching Hospital at the Unviersity of Florida, were…

  4. Contribution of renal impairment to potentially preventable medication-related hospital admissions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leendertse, A.J.; Dijk, E.A. van; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Egberts, T.C.; Bemt, P.M. van den

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medication errors and renal impairment contribute to severe adverse drug events, which may lead to hospital admission. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether medication errors and renal impairment contribute to hospital admission and examine these errors for strategies to prevent admissions.

  5. Medication Discrepancies at Pediatric Hospital Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattari, Theresa B; Krieger, Lauren N; Hu, Hsou Mei; Mychaliska, Kerry P

    2015-08-01

    The pediatric hospital discharge process presents significant challenges, and medication discrepancies remain an unsolved problem. The purpose of this study was to determine the discrepancy rates at the time of discharge when multiple sources of medication documentation exist, and to characterize the medication discrepancies into error type, medication category, and discharge summary authorship. A prospective study was performed on pediatric patients admitted to a general inpatient floor for >24 hours. After discharge, medication lists were obtained from the patients' parent/guardian, discharge summary, and Patient Summary List, a medication list that is part of the electronic medical record. These 3 medication lists were then compared with the pharmacy record to identify discrepancies, defined as any difference in medication name, dose, route, or frequency. Medication discrepancies were analyzed in terms of error type (dosage or addition/omission), category of medication, and final signers of the discharge summary. Sixty-nine patient charts were analyzed, and 8% of medications contained a documentation discrepancy between sources. Overall, 26% (18 of 69) of the charts contained ≥1 discrepant medication; the Patient Summary List had the highest rate of discrepancy at 29%. Allergy (27%) and seizure medications (25%) were the categories with the highest rates of discrepancy. Addition/omission errors were much more common than dosage errors. Medication discrepancies exist in inpatient documentation at the time of pediatric hospital discharge when multiple sources of documentation exist. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Rotavirus Vaccine Cut Kids' Hospitalization, Medical Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167720.html Rotavirus Vaccine Cut Kids' Hospitalization, Medical Costs Virus a common ... the sustained impact and effectiveness of the rotavirus vaccine program," study author Dr. Eyal Leshem said in ...

  7. Implementing Medical Teaching Policy in University Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engbers, Rik; Fluit, Cornelia Cornelia R. M. G.; Bolhuis, Sanneke; de Visser, Marieke; Laan, Roland F. J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Within the unique and complex settings of university hospitals, it is difficult to implement policy initiatives aimed at developing careers in and improving the quality of academic medical teaching because of the competing domains of medical research and patient care. Factors that influence faculty in making use of teaching policy incentives have…

  8. [Outplacement of medical students in local hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsetmo, R O; Fosse, L; Evensen, S A; Wyller, V B; Nylehn, P; Ogreid, D

    1998-02-28

    The organisation and content of the training of medical students in practical and clinical skills at Norwegian universities is presented and discussed. Based on experience from Tromsø University, an increased use of local hospitals for training medical students in practical and clinical skills is planned for all universities in Norway.

  9. Examining sustainability in a hospital setting: case of smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sharon; Pieters, Karen; Mullen, Kerri-Anne; Reece, Robin; Reid, Robert D

    2011-09-14

    The Ottawa Model of Smoking Cessation (OMSC) is a hospital-based smoking cessation program that is expanding across Canada. While the short-term effectiveness of hospital cessation programs has been documented, less is known about long-term sustainability. The purpose of this exploratory study was to understand how hospitals using the OMSC were addressing sustainability and determine if there were critical factors or issues that should be addressed as the program expanded. Six hospitals that differed on OMSC program activities (identify and document smokers, advise quitting, provide medication, and offer follow-up) were intentionally selected, and two key informants per hospital were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. Key informants were asked to reflect on the initial decision to implement the OMSC, the current implementation process, and perceived sustainability of the program. Qualitative analysis of the interview transcripts was conducted and themes related to problem definition, stakeholder influence, and program features emerged. Sustainability was operationalized as higher performance of OMSC activities than at baseline. Factors identified in the literature as important for sustainability, such as program design, differences in implementation, organizational characteristics, and the community environment did not explain differences in program sustainability. Instead, key informants identified factors that reflected the interaction between how the health problem was defined by stakeholders, how priorities and concerns were addressed, features of the program itself, and fit within the hospital context and resources as being influential to the sustainability of the program. Applying a sustainability model to a hospital smoking cessation program allowed for an examination of how decisions made during implementation may impact sustainability. Examining these factors during implementation may provide insight into issues affecting program

  10. Medical slang in British hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Adam T; Fertleman, Michael; Cahill, Pauline; Palmer, Roger D

    2003-01-01

    The usage, derivation, and psychological, ethical, and legal aspects of slang terminology in medicine are discussed. The colloquial vocabulary is further described and a comprehensive glossary of common UK terms provided in appendix. This forms the first list of slang terms currently in use throughout the British medical establishment.

  11. The independent medical examination: cardiology assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, G R

    1996-12-01

    Insurance companies frequently seek medical opinions from various specialists concerning the severity of a medical problem, the appropriateness of a treatment plan and a assessment of the degree of medical impairment in persons who claim they are entitled to disability benefits. The insurer is requesting a medical opinion from a physician not involved in the care of the claimant and with no regular business ties to the insurance company; the insurance industry refers to this as an independent medical examination (IME). The purpose of the cardiology IME is to have an objective assessment concerning symptomatology and disease severity, and to reach a conclusion as to whether the cardiology problem is expected to prevent a return to work. The cardiologist needs to narrow the focus on the heart solely in terms of its primary function, that is, its ability to pump blood.

  12. Implementing medical teaching policy in university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engbers, Rik; Fluit, Cornelia R M G; Bolhuis, Sanneke; de Visser, Marieke; Laan, Roland F J M

    2017-10-01

    Within the unique and complex settings of university hospitals, it is difficult to implement policy initiatives aimed at developing careers in and improving the quality of academic medical teaching because of the competing domains of medical research and patient care. Factors that influence faculty in making use of teaching policy incentives have remained underexplored. Knowledge of these factors is needed to develop theory on the successful implementation of medical teaching policy in university hospitals. To explore factors that influence faculty in making use of teaching policy incentives and to develop a conceptual model for implementation of medical teaching policy in university hospitals. We used the grounded theory methodology. We applied constant comparative analysis to qualitative data obtained from 12 semi-structured interviews conducted at the Radboud University Medical Center. We used a constructivist approach, in which data and theories are co-created through interaction between the researcher and the field and its participants. We constructed a model for the implementation of medical teaching policy in university hospitals, including five factors that were perceived to promote or inhibit faculty in a university hospital to make use of teaching policy incentives: Executive Board Strategy, Departmental Strategy, Departmental Structure, Departmental Culture, and Individual Strategy. Most factors we found to affect individual teachers' strategies and their use of medical teaching policy lie at the departmental level. If an individual teacher's strategy is focused on medical teaching and a medical teaching career, and the departmental context offers support and opportunity for his/her development, this promotes faculty's use of teaching policy incentives.

  13. Hospitals as factories of medical garbage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Sarah

    2017-12-01

    Over the course of the twentieth century, as hospitals cleaned up, they came to produce more and more rubbish. Beginning in the 1970s and gaining pace in the 1980s and 1990s, single-use plastic items (syringes, blood bags, tubing) saturated everyday medical practice across the globe. This essay brings the question of plastic to bear upon the longer history of twentieth century sanitary science. The widespread adoption of single-use disposable medical plastics consolidated a century's worth of changes in medical hygiene. As strange as it may seem today, the initial uptake of medical plastics was not driven primarily by concerns about hygiene. Plastic began as a mid-century technology of convenience and durability. It was not until the end of the twentieth century that it morphed into a powerful symbol and instrument of medical hygiene. Today, both patients and practitioners have embraced plastic as an indispensable technology of clean medicine. The procession of single-use medical plastics through everyday medicine now comprises a constant, if disposable, infrastructure of medical hygiene. This new processional infrastructure of disposable hygiene has produced another, albeit unintended, consequence. This new regime has exponentially increased hospitals' material outputs. In so doing, plastic has refigured the ecologies of everyday medicine. Plastic hygiene has rendered hospitals factories of medical garbage.

  14. 78 FR 27343 - Medical Examiner's Certification Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 383, 384 and 391 RIN 2126-AB40 Medical Examiner's Certification Integration AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of...

  15. Medical Matters in a Civil Procedure: Role of Forensic Medical Examination

    OpenAIRE

    E. Kh. Barinov; D. V. Sundukov

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the theory of a medical service and medical delict in the supplement to forensic medical examination on medical controversies. Key words: medical delict, forensic medical examination, medical controversies.

  16. Assessment of obesity management in medical examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treyzon Leo

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity is a growing international health problem that has already reached epidemic proportions, particularly within the United States where a majority of the population is overweight or obese. Effective methods of treatment are needed, and should be taught to physicians by efficient means. There exists a disconnect between the rising obesity prevalence with its high toll on medical resources, and the lack of obesity education provided to practitioners in the course of their training. One particular shortfall is the lack of representation of obesity on standardized medical examinations. Physician attitudes toward obesity are influenced by their lack of familiarity with the management of the disease. This may include dietary restriction, increasing physical activity, behavior modification, pharmacotherapy, and surgical interventions. Thus, curricular changes in the medical education of obesity could help reduce morbidity and mortality associated with this disease.

  17. Self-reported study habits for enhancing medical students? performance in the National Medical Unified Examination

    OpenAIRE

    Idris, Amr; Al Saadi, Tareq; Edris, Basel; Sawaf, Bisher; Zakaria, Mhd. Ismael; Alkhatib, Mahmoud; Turk, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    Background: The National Medical Unified Examination (NMUE) is currently required for graduation, joining postgraduate medical training, and practicing medicine in Syria. Objective: To investigate self-reported study habits that correlate with high performance on the NMUE. Methods: First through 3rd year residents at the three main hospitals in Damascus, Syria, were asked to complete a retrospective cross-sectional survey investigating their study habits and previous scores. Results: Signific...

  18. Medicons: toward clinical examination diagrams standardization in medical documentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pafitanis G

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Georgios Pafitanis,1 Michalis Hadjiandreou,2 Leo Withers,1 Helen Dent3 1The Royal London Hospital, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK; 2Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK; 3St Richard’s Hospital, Chichester, UK Background: Electronic patient records (EPRs allow efficient and accurate medical documentation. Diagrams have traditionally been used to document clinical signs in patient notes. The interpretation of these diagrams may vary among doctors across a range of specialties, but this has never been tested previously. This study investigated how common diagrams were interpreted and explored the use of digitalized diagrams – Medicons in creating a common language to be used in digital clinical examination proformas. Materials and methods: A cross-sectional survey utilizing a multiple-choice questionnaire was carried out across London hospitals. Seventeen digitalized examination diagrams were included in a multiple-choice questionnaire to test doctors’ perception and explore their opinions of diagram usage. The questionnaire was sent to junior doctors in training.Results: A total of 206 responses were received from 31 foundation year 1 trainees, 45 foundation year 2 trainees, 94 core surgical trainees and 36 core medical trainees. Diagrams were interpreted correctly, on average, 75% of the time. The majority of doctors (94% felt that diagrams facilitated the understanding of clinical examination, documentation of pathologic site (98% and improved the efficiency of documentation (89.8%. All doctors felt that diagrams may benefit overall medical care provision.Conclusion: Digitalizing signs and symptoms in EPR will enhance clinical documentation and may contribute to better patient care. New initiatives need to be employed to increase the use of diagrams – Medicons, as young doctors perceived these to improve clinical documentation. Standardized electronic proformas should be included into EPR to improve the

  19. Metadata - National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) is designed to collect information on the services provided in hospital emergency and outpatient departments and in ambulatory surgery centers.

  20. The impact of medical tourism on Thai private hospital management: informing hospital policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Paul T J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help consolidate and understand management perceptions and experiences of a targeted group (n=7) of Vice-Presidents of international Private Thai hospitals in Bangkok regarding medical tourism impacts. The method adopted uses a small-scale qualitative inquiry. Examines the on-going development and service management factors which contribute to the establishment and strengthening of relationships between international patients and hospital medical services provision. Develops a qualitative model that attempts to conceptualize the findings from a diverse range of management views into a framework of main (8) - Hospital Management; Hospital Processes; Hospital Technology; Quality Related; Communications; Personnel; Financial; and Patients; and consequent sub-themes (22). Outcomes from small-scale qualitative inquiries cannot by design be taken outside of its topical arena. This inevitably indicates that more research of this kind needs to be carried out to understand this field more effectively. The evidence suggests that Private Thai hospital management have established views about what constitutes the impact of medical tourism on hospital policies and practices when hospital staff interact with international patients. As the private health service sector in Thailand continues to grow, future research is needed to help hospitals provide appropriate service patterns and appropriate medical products/services that meet international patient needs and aspirations. Highlights the increasing importance of the international consumer in Thailand's health industry. This study provides insights of private health service providers in Bangkok by helping to understand more effectively health service quality environments, subsequent service provision, and the integrated development and impacts of new medical technology.

  1. Virginity Testing Beyond a Medical Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robatjazi, Mehri; Simbar, Masoumeh; Nahidi, Fatemeh; Gharehdaghi, Jaber; Emamhadi, Mohammadali; Vedadhir, Abou-Ali; Alavimajd, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Apart from religious values, virginity is important in different communities because of its prominent role in reducing sexually transmitted diseases and teen pregnancies. Even though virginity testing has been proclaimed an example of violence against women by the World Health Organization, it is still conducted in many countries, including Iran. 16 in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants aged 32 to 60 years to elucidate the perceptions and experiences of Iranian examiners of virginity testing. The perception and experience of examiners were reflected in five main themes. The result of this study indicated that virginity testing is more than a medical examination, considering the cultural factors involved and its overt and covert consequences. In Iran, testing is performed for both formal and informal reasons, and examiners view such testing with ambiguity about the accuracy and certainty of the diagnosis and uncertainty about ethics and reproductive rights. Examiners are affected by the overt and covert consequences of virginity testing, beliefs and cultural values underlying virginity testing, and informal and formal reasons for virginity testing. PMID:26925894

  2. Virginity Testing Beyond a Medical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robatjazi, Mehri; Simbar, Masoumeh; Nahidi, Fatemeh; Gharehdaghi, Jaber; Emamhadi, Mohammadali; Vedadhir, Abou-Ali; Alavimajd, Hamid

    2015-11-18

    Apart from religious values, virginity is important in different communities because of its prominent role in reducing sexually transmitted diseases and teen pregnancies. Even though virginity testing has been proclaimed an example of violence against women by the World Health Organization, it is still conducted in many countries, including Iran. 16 in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants aged 32 to 60 years to elucidate the perceptions and experiences of Iranian examiners of virginity testing.The perception and experience of examiners were reflected in five main themes. The result of this study indicated that virginity testing is more than a medical examination, considering the cultural factors involved and its overt and covert consequences. In Iran, testing is performed for both formal and informal reasons, and examiners view such testing with ambiguity about the accuracy and certainty of the diagnosis and uncertainty about ethics and reproductive rights. Examiners are affected by the overt and covert consequences of virginity testing, beliefs and cultural values underlying virginity testing, and informal and formal reasons for virginity testing.

  3. Evaluation of hospital medication inventory policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebicki, Marek; Mooney, Ed; Chen, Shi-Jie Gary; Mazur, Lukasz M

    2014-09-01

    As supply chain costs constitute a large portion of hospitals' operating expenses and with $27.7 billion spent by the US hospitals on drugs alone in 2009, improving medication inventory management provides a great opportunity to decrease the cost of healthcare. This study investigates different management approaches for a system consisting of one central storage location, the main pharmacy, and multiple dispensing machines located in each department. Each medication has a specific unit cost, availability from suppliers, criticality level, and expiration date. Event-driven simulation is used to evaluate the performance of several inventory policies based on the total cost and patient safety (service level) under various arrangements of the system defined by the number of drugs and departments, and drugs' criticality, availability, and expiration levels. Our results show that policies that incorporate drug characteristics in ordering decisions can address the tradeoff between patient safety and cost. Indeed, this study shows that such policies can result in higher patient safety and lower overall cost when compared to traditional approaches. Additional insights from this study allow for better understanding of the medication inventory system's dynamics and suggest several directions for future research in this topic. Findings of this study can be applied to help hospital pharmacies with managing their inventory.

  4. Post-Hospital Medical Respite Care and Hospital Readmission of Homeless Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertesz, Stefan G.; Posner, Michael A.; O’Connell, James J.; Swain, Stacy; Mullins, Ashley N.; Michael, Shwartz; Ash, Arlene S.

    2009-01-01

    Medical respite programs offer medical, nursing, and other care as well as accommodation for homeless persons discharged from acute hospital stays. They represent a community-based adaptation of urban health systems to the specific needs of homeless persons. This paper examines whether post-hospital discharge to a homeless medical respite program was associated with a reduced chance of 90-day readmission compared to other disposition options. Adjusting for imbalances in patient characteristics using propensity scores, Respite patients were the only group that was significantly less likely to be readmitted within 90 days compared to those released to Own Care. Respite programs merit attention as a potentially efficacious service for homeless persons leaving the hospital. PMID:19363773

  5. Hospital electronic medical record enterprise application strategies: do they matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fareed, Naleef; Ozcan, Yasar A; DeShazo, Jonathan P

    2012-01-01

    Successful implementations and the ability to reap the benefits of electronic medical record (EMR) systems may be correlated with the type of enterprise application strategy that an administrator chooses when acquiring an EMR system. Moreover, identifying the most optimal enterprise application strategy is a task that may have important linkages with hospital performance. This study explored whether hospitals that have adopted differential EMR enterprise application strategies concomitantly differ in their overall efficiency. Specifically, the study examined whether hospitals with a single-vendor strategy had a higher likelihood of being efficient than those with a best-of-breed strategy and whether hospitals with a best-of-suite strategy had a higher probability of being efficient than those with best-of-breed or single-vendor strategies. A conceptual framework was used to formulate testable hypotheses. A retrospective cross-sectional approach using data envelopment analysis was used to obtain efficiency scores of hospitals by EMR enterprise application strategy. A Tobit regression analysis was then used to determine the probability of a hospital being inefficient as related to its EMR enterprise application strategy, while moderating for the hospital's EMR "implementation status" and controlling for hospital and market characteristics. The data envelopment analysis of hospitals suggested that only 32 hospitals were efficient in the study's sample of 2,171 hospitals. The results from the post hoc analysis showed partial support for the hypothesis that hospitals with a best-of-suite strategy were more likely to be efficient than those with a single-vendor strategy. This study underscores the importance of understanding the differences between the three strategies discussed in this article. On the basis of the findings, hospital administrators should consider the efficiency associations that a specific strategy may have compared with another prior to moving toward

  6. 42 CFR 34.5 - Postponement of medical examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Postponement of medical examination. 34.5 Section 34.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL EXAMINATION OF ALIENS § 34.5 Postponement of medical examination. Whenever, upon an...

  7. Relationship of in-hospital medication modifications of elderly patients to postdischarge medications, adherence, and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, Nariman; Weiss, Avraham; Beloosesky, Yichayaou

    2008-06-01

    Medication regimens are constantly modified and updated during a patient's hospitalization. These modifications and those made after discharge might increase the risk for nonadherence, polypharmacy, and poor outcomes among elderly patients. To investigate the extent of in-hospital modification of medication regimens of elderly patients and its relationship to medication adherence as well as one-month postdischarge drug regimen modifications and to examine the relationship of the modifications, adherence, and polypharmacy to mortality and readmissions 3 months postdischarge. Clinical and demographic data, postdischarge medication modifications, and adherence were prospectively obtained in 212 elderly patients. Inhospital drug regimen modifications were retrospectively recorded. The average +/- SD in-hospital medication regimen modification rate was 49.8% +/- 28.4. No modifications were found in 9.7% of the patients. Using demographic and clinical parameters, we performed regression analysis and found that patients who were admitted with polypharmacy, discharged home, and cognitively normal experienced fewer medication modifications (p medication regimen modification rate was 37.5% +/- 25.4. In- and posthospital modifications were directly correlated (p = 0.047). Three months postdischarge, 17 patients had died and 50 had been readmitted. The independent risk factors for mortality were in-hospital modification rate of 50% or greater (OR 6.4; 95% CI 1.3 to 29.7), impaired cognition (OR 4.2; 95% CI 1.4 to 12.3), and each chronic disease (OR 1.2; 95% CI 1 to 1.5). No relationships were found between in-hospital medication regimen modifications and readmissions or with postdischarge modifications, adherence, and polypharmacy to mortality and readmissions. Hospitalization of elderly patients is characterized by extensive medication regimen modifications, which are directly correlated with postdischarge modifications and may indicate an increased risk of mortality.

  8. Examining non-structural retrofitting status of teaching hospitals in Kerman against disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Mahmood Nekooi; Moradi, Seyed Mobin; Amiresmaili, Mohammadreza

    2017-05-01

    Continuous services provision of a hospital before and after a disaster is one of the most prominent issues that all people, especially the authorities must take into huge consideration. Concerning the experiences of previous earthquakes, the role and importance of nonstructural components becomes increasingly clear in the uninterrupted services of hospitals. In this study, non-structural retrofitting status of Kerman teaching hospitals was evaluated against natural disasters. This cross-sectional study was carried out in the second half of 2014 on the teaching hospitals in Kerman (Iran). The study population consisted of all Kerman teaching hospitals. The research instrument was World Health Organization/Pan American Health Organization (WHO/PAHO) standard checklist. Data analysis was carried out using descriptive statistics through SPSS 19. One hospital had a low retrofitting level, two hospitals had an average level and one had a high level. In the examined hospitals in this study, the medical gas section had the lowest preparedness against natural disasters, while the office, warehouse and furniture section had the highest resistance. Generally, the non-structural retrofitting status was 50% in one hospital and was between 65% and 85% in other hospitals. Generally, the retrofitting status of hospitals was not at the ideal condition, most hospitals were in average condition. Concerning the high risk of hospitals in disasters, it is necessary that senior executives and managers of Kerman Province and Kerman University of Medical Sciences take some measures to retrofit these buildings and to reduce the risk of vulnerability.

  9. An examination of hospital satisfaction with blood suppliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carden, Robert; DelliFraine, Jami L

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that predict overall hospital satisfaction with blood suppliers. The data for this study came from a 2001 satisfaction survey of hospital blood bank managers conducted by the National Blood Data Resource Center. A total of 1325 blood-utilizing hospitals were included in the final study database. The measurement of hospital satisfaction with its blood supplier encompasses the five composites of the SERVQUAL model. The five composites are 1) tangibles, 2) reliability, 3) responsiveness, 4) assurance, and 5) empathy. Linear regression was performed with overall hospital satisfaction as the dependent variable and the five composites of the SERVQUAL model and control variables as predictors of overall hospital satisfaction with blood suppliers. Significant predictors of hospital satisfaction with blood suppliers are satisfaction with medical and clinical support provided by the blood center, satisfaction with the routine delivery schedule, and price (service fee) of red cells. Prior studies have demonstrated the importance of customer satisfaction to organizations. As organizations, blood centers can benefit from improved satisfaction from their hospital customers. Blood center strategies that focus on improving these three predictors of overall hospital satisfaction with primary blood suppliers will be the most likely to improve and/or maintain hospital customer satisfaction with primary blood suppliers.

  10. Examination of the Accuracy of Coding Hospital-Acquired...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A new study, Examination of the Accuracy of Coding Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcer Stages, published in Volume 4, Issue 1 of the Medicare and Medicaid Research...

  11. [Medical students' knowledge about hospital infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković-Denić, Ljiljana; Maksimović, Jadranka; Sbutega-Milosević, Gorica; Sbutega, Isidora; Maksimović, Milos

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to show the differences in the knowledge level about hospital infections between medical students having studied according to the old and new education programs. Two cross-sectional studies were conducted at the Faculty of Medicine in Belgrade, Serbia. The anonymous self-administrated questionnaires were distributed to all third year students. In 2000, the students followed the "old" system of education, and in 2007 they followed the new curriculum according to the Bologna Process. The questionnaires were answered and returned by 79.8% of students who had the "old" education program and by 71.9% of students having a "new" curriculum. The latter students knew more about the definition of hospital infections (p importance of endogenous reservoirs (p students studying according to the new program recognized that the contact was the most frequent mode of transmission (p students with the new program of studies knew more about hospital infections. This difference may be attributed to the previous course in epidemiology and earlier clinical practice that covered these topics. Although all of the students stated they knew which mode of transmission was the most frequent, when asked in specific terms about the hand hygiene, the "new" curriculum students stated to have intermediate knowledge, and the "old" curriculum students showed a substantial lack of knowledge. It is important to increase their knowledge level and compliance with the hand hygiene. The knowledge about hospital infections seems to have been improved by theoretical and practical sessions during early clinical training by the Bologna curriculum.

  12. Contribution of renal impairment to potentially preventable medication-related hospital admissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Leendertse (Anne); E.A. van Dijk (Elisabeth); P.A. de Smet (Peter); T.C.G. Egberts (Toine); P.M.L.A. van den Bemt (Patricia)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Medication errors and renal impairment contribute to severe adverse drug events, which may lead to hospital admission. Objective: To determine whether medication errors and renal impairment contribute to hospital admission and examine these errors for strategies to prevent

  13. Quality theory paper writing for medical examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Samarth; Acharya, Sourya; Acharya, Neema; Shrivastava, Tripti; Kale, Anita

    2014-04-01

    Aim & Objectives: Developing a tactful paper writing skill, through delivery and depiction of the necessary expressions required for in standard or superior essay writing. Understanding relevance and tact of theoretical expression in exam paper writing Learning Indices of standard or quality theory/essay answer (SAQ/LAQ). Applying knowledge and skill gained through these theory writing exercises and assignments to achieve high or better scores in examinations. The study subjects were divided into two groups- Group A (17 students) and Group B students (10students). The students were selected from II M.B.B.S 4(th) term. Students of Group A were sensitized on how to write a theory paper and went through 4 phases namely pre-sensitization test, sensitization (imparting them with skills of good theory paper writing through home assignments and deliberations/ guidance), post-sensitization test and Evaluation. Students of Group A (17 students) undertook theory tests (twice, i.e. before and after sensitization) and Students of Group B (10 students) who were not sensitized and took the theory test with post sensitized Group A students (random 10 students). Both groups were given general pathology as the test syllabus, taught to both groups in didactic lectures during the last 6 months. The results of pre and Post-sensitization tests from both groups were analyzed. Intra group comparisons (pre sensitized Group A with Post sensitized Group A) and inter group comparisons (Non-sensitized group B with Sensitized Group A) were made. Significant results were found between results of pre and Post-sensitization tests in Group A (intra group analysis) and inter group (Group A and B) Post-sensitization tests, as there was remarkable improvement in student theory paper writing skills post sensitizing the students of Group A. Medical students should be mandatorily guided and exposed to the nuances and tact of writing the theory paper for their examinations, as it definitely gives them

  14. Health Care Practices for Medical Textiles in Government Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akubue, B. N.; Anikweze, G. U.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the health care practices for medical textiles in government hospitals Enugu State, Nigeria. Specifically, the study determined the availability and maintenance of medical textiles in government hospitals in Enugu State, Nigeria. A sample of 1200 hospital personnel were studied. One thousand two hundred…

  15. Documentation of Rectal Examination Performance in the Clinical Teaching Unit of a University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital rectal examination is used to evaluate the distal rectum and other organs, including the prostate gland. It may be combined with fecal screening for occult blood loss, and annual performance has been recommended for asymptomatic individuals over age 40 years for cancer screening. In this study, documentation of digital rectal examinations was assessed through a review of hospital medical records of a randomly selected group of 100 patient discharges (55 females and 45 males from a total of 896 patients admitted through a hospital emergency room to a medical clinical teaching inpatient unit of a university hospital during a six-month period. In this group, 26% were admitted for a gastrointestinal disorder, but only 17% of all hospitalized patients had rectal examinations done by the medical resident house staff and/or attending medical staff directly responsible for the care of these patients. Occult blood testing was done in 15 patients. Pelvic and breast examinations were rarely documented. The majority of rectal examinations (ie, 13 of 17 were ’same sex’ examinations, appeared to be used largely for testing or confirmation of grossly visible blood loss and were never confirmed by attending staff. The presence or absence of nursing staff during examinations was not documented. The prostate examination was normal in one patient but not documented in the other 44 males (ie, 26 patients over age 60 years. In conclusion, rectal examinations (as well as breast and pelvic examinations were rarely documented in the medical teaching unit by medical resident house staff or their attending staff.

  16. Impact of teaching intensity and academic status on medical resource utilization by teaching hospitals in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Daisuke; Fushimi, Kiyohide

    2012-11-01

    Teaching hospitals require excess medical resources to maintain high-quality care and medical education. To evaluate the appropriateness of such surplus costs, we examined the impact of teaching intensity defined as activities for postgraduate training, and academic status as functions of medical research and undergraduate teaching on medical resource utilization. Administrative data for 47,397 discharges from 40 academic and 12 non-academic teaching hospitals in Japan were collected. Hospitals were classified into three groups according to intern/resident-to-bed (IRB) ratio. Resource utilization of medical services was estimated using fee-for-service charge schedules and normalized with case mix grouping. 15-24% more resource utilization for laboratory examinations, radiological imaging, and medications were observed in hospitals with higher IRB ratios. With multivariate adjustment for case mix and academic status, higher IRB ratios were associated with 10-15% more use of radiological imaging, injections, and medications; up to 5% shorter hospital stays; and not with total resource utilization. Conversely, academic status was associated with 21-33% more laboratory examinations, radiological imaging, and medications; 13% longer hospital stays; and 10% more total resource utilization. While differences in medical resource utilization by teaching intensity may not be associated with indirect educational costs, those by academic status may be. Therefore, academic hospitals may need efficiency improvement and financial compensation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Knowledge of healthcare professionals about medication errors in hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Medication errors are the most common types of medical errors in hospitals and leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients. Aims: The aim of the present study was to assess the knowledge of healthcare professionals about medication errors in hospitals. Settings and Design: A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to randomly selected healthcare professionals in eight hospitals in Madinah, Saudi Arabia. Subjects and Methods: An 18-item survey was designed and comp...

  18. Reporting of medication administration errors by nurses in South Korean hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunjoo

    2017-10-01

    To identify differences in what nurses consider as medication administration errors, to examine their willingness to report these errors and to identify barriers to reporting medication errors by hospital type. Cross-sectional, descriptive design. The questionnaire comprised six medication administration error scenarios and items related to the reasons for not reporting medication errors. Two tertiary and three general hospitals in a metropolitan area, and five general hospitals in K province, in South Korea. Registered nurses working at tertiary and general hospitals in South Korea (n = 467). Consideration of medication administration errors, intention to report medication errors and reasoning for not file an incident report. There were no significant differences in what nurses considered as medication administration errors between nurses working different in hospital types. The rate of incident reporting was very low; it ranged from 6.3% to 29.9%, regardless of hospital type. Korean nurses were more likely to report an error to a physician than file an incident report. The primary reason for not reporting medication errors was fear of the negative consequences of reporting the error and subsequent legal action. The rate of filing an incident report among nurses was very low, regardless of hospital type or whether nurses perceived the incident as a medication administration error. These results may have significant implications for improving medication safety in hospitals, and more efforts are needed at the organizational level to improve incident reporting by nurses.

  19. eMedication - a smartphone-based e-medication system for hospitalized patients

    OpenAIRE

    Thapa, Sanjit Jung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to develop a smartphone based e-medication app for hospitalized patients at the University Hospital of North Norway (UNN). The app was expected to provide an overview of medication that the patient is given during hospitalization. Motivation: E-medication has become widely popular in many countries, and has replaced the paper-based prescription. This replacement has enhanced the quality of the medication process and reduced medication err...

  20. Hospital ownership and medical services: market mix, spillover effects, and nonprofit objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Jill R; Nichols, Austin

    2009-09-01

    Hospitals operate in markets with varied demographic, competitive, and ownership characteristics, yet research on ownership tends to examine hospitals in isolation. Here we examine three hospital ownership types -- nonprofit, for-profit, and government -- and their spillover effects. We estimate the effects of for-profit market share in two ways, on the provision of medical services and on operating margins at the three types of hospitals. We find that nonprofit hospitals' medical service provision systematically varies by market mix. We find no significant effect of market mix on the operating margins of nonprofit hospitals, but find that for-profit hospitals have higher margins in markets with more for-profits. These results fit best with theories in which hospitals maximize their own output.

  1. Analysis of the Children's Hospital Graduate Medical Education Program Fund Allocations for Indirect Medical Education Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Barbara O.; Kawata, Jennifer

    This study analyzed issues related to estimating indirect medical education costs specific to pediatric discharges. The Children's Hospital Graduate Medical Education (CHGNE) program was established to support graduate medical education in children's hospitals. This provision authorizes payments for both direct and indirect medical education…

  2. Examining the Medical Blogosphere: An Online Survey of Medical Bloggers

    OpenAIRE

    Kovic, Ivor; Lulic, Ileana; Brumini, Gordana

    2008-01-01

    Background Blogs are the major contributors to the large increase of new websites created each year. Most blogs allow readers to leave comments and, in this way, generate both conversation and encourage collaboration. Despite their popularity, however, little is known about blogs or their creators. Objectives To contribute to a better understanding of the medical blogosphere by investigating the characteristics of medical bloggers and their blogs, including bloggers’ Internet and blogging hab...

  3. [Application of HIS Hospital Management System in Medical Equipment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yucheng

    2015-07-01

    To analyze the effect of HIS hospital management system in medical equipment. From April 2012 to 2013 in our hospital 5 100 sets of medical equipment as the control group, another 2013 in our hospital from April 2014 may 100 sets of medical equipment as the study group, comparative analysis of two groups of medical equipment scrap rate, usage, maintenance score and the score of benefit etc. Control group and taken to hospital information system, his research group equipment scrap rate, there was a significant difference, the research group of equipment maintenance score and efficiency scores were higher than those of the control group (P equipment maintenance score and efficiency scores were higher than those of the control group. HIS hospital management system for medical equipment management has positive clinical application value, can effectively improve the use of medical equipment, it is worth to draw and promote.

  4. Pediatric Hospital School Programming: An Examination of Educational Services for Students Who Are Hospitalized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Sarah M.; Elam, Megan; Irwin, Mary Kay; Sexton, Karen; McGraw, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to define the current functions and operations of hospital school programs nationwide. A 56-item survey was disseminated to hospital teachers across the country to examine perceptions about their work, programs, and professional practice. Quantitative findings were analyzed using descriptive statistics at the individual…

  5. Does electronic medication reconciliation at hospital discharge decrease prescription medication errors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Geneve M; Weigel, Bernard; Holcroft, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Medication errors are an important patient safety issue. Electronic medication reconciliation is a system designed to correct medication discrepancies at transitions in healthcare. The purpose of this paper is to measure types and prevalence of intravenous antibiotic errors at hospital discharge before and after the addition of an electronic discharge medication reconciliation tool (EDMRT). A retrospective study was conducted at a tertiary hospital where house officers order discharge medications. In total, 100 pre-EDMRT and 100 post-EDMRT subjects were randomly recruited from the study center's clinical Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy (OPAT) program. Using infectious disease consultant recommendations as gold standard, each antibiotic listed in these consultant notes was compared to the hospital discharge orders to ascertain the primary outcome: presence of an intravenous antibiotic error in the discharge orders. The primary covariate of interest was pre- vs post-EDMRT group. After generating the crude prevalence of antibiotic errors, logistic regression accounted for potential confounding: discharge day (weekend vs weekday), average years of practice by prescribing physician, inpatient service (medicine vs surgery) and number of discharge mediations per patient. Prevalence of medication errors decreased from 30 percent (30/100) among pre-EDMRT subjects to 15 percent (15/100) errors among post-EDMRT subjects. Dosage errors were the most common type of medication error. The adjusted odds ratio of discharge with intravenous antibiotic error in the post-EDMRT era was 0.39 (0.18, 0.87) compared to the pre-EDMRT era. In the adjusted model, the total number of discharge medications was associated with increased OR of discharge error. To the authors' knowledge, no other study has examined the impact of reconciliation on types and prevalence of medication errors at hospital discharge. The focus on intravenous antibiotics as a class of high-stakes medications

  6. [Proper disposal(management) of medical wastes--infection prevention and waste management(Clean Hospital Project) at Hiroshima City, Asa Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Y; Shigemitsu, M

    2000-05-01

    Hospitals are socially obligated to maintain a clean environment and to dispose of medical waste, in order to prevent pollution and infection within and near the hospital. Since its establishment, Hiroshima City, Asa Hospital has been implementing a "Clean Hospital Project", which has two goals: infection prevention and waste management. The nosocomial infection prevention committee and medical waste treatment and disposal examination committee lead these efforts.

  7. [The development of hospital medical supplies information management system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shaoping; Gu, Hongqing; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Qiang

    2010-05-01

    The information management of medical materials by using high-tech computer, in order to improve the efficiency of the consumption of medical supplies, hospital supplies and develop a new technology way to manage the hospital and material support. Using C # NET, JAVA techniques to develop procedures for the establishment of hospital material management information system, set the various management modules, production of various statistical reports, standard operating procedures. The system is convenient, functional and strong, fluent statistical functions. It can always fully grasp and understand the whole hospital supplies run dynamic information, as a modern and effective tool for hospital materials management.

  8. Self-reported study habits for enhancing medical students' performance in the National Medical Unified Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Amr; Al Saadi, Tareq; Edris, Basel; Sawaf, Bisher; Zakaria, Mhd Ismael; Alkhatib, Mahmoud; Turk, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    The National Medical Unified Examination (NMUE) is currently required for graduation, joining postgraduate medical training, and practicing medicine in Syria. To investigate self-reported study habits that correlate with high performance on the NMUE. First through 3(rd) year residents at the three main hospitals in Damascus, Syria, were asked to complete a retrospective cross-sectional survey investigating their study habits and previous scores. Significantly higher score was associated with >15 study h/day and allocating 1-40% of study time for practicing questions. Mean NMUE score was not significantly different in relation to preparation months for examination or for those who reported spending all their time studying alone compared with spending any amount of time in a group setting. Scores of 231-240 on the Syrian scientific high school exam correlated with significantly higher NMUE performance compared with fewer scores, except scores of 221-230. For every 10 point increase in medical school cumulative grades, the NMUE score increased 3.6 (95% confidence interval 2.5-4.8). The NMUE score was significantly affected by hours spent studying per day, number of practice questions completed, percentage of study time allocated for doing questions, Syrian scientific high school exam scores, and the cumulative medical school class grades. It was not significantly affected by preparation months or studying in a group setting. More studies are needed to further describe and investigate the factors that might affect performance in the NMUE.

  9. Self-reported study habits for enhancing medical students’ performance in the National Medical Unified Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Amr; Al Saadi, Tareq; Edris, Basel; Sawaf, Bisher; Zakaria, Mhd. Ismael; Alkhatib, Mahmoud; Turk, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    Background: The National Medical Unified Examination (NMUE) is currently required for graduation, joining postgraduate medical training, and practicing medicine in Syria. Objective: To investigate self-reported study habits that correlate with high performance on the NMUE. Methods: First through 3rd year residents at the three main hospitals in Damascus, Syria, were asked to complete a retrospective cross-sectional survey investigating their study habits and previous scores. Results: Significantly higher score was associated with >15 study h/day and allocating 1–40% of study time for practicing questions. Mean NMUE score was not significantly different in relation to preparation months for examination or for those who reported spending all their time studying alone compared with spending any amount of time in a group setting. Scores of 231–240 on the Syrian scientific high school exam correlated with significantly higher NMUE performance compared with fewer scores, except scores of 221–230. For every 10 point increase in medical school cumulative grades, the NMUE score increased 3.6 (95% confidence interval 2.5–4.8). Conclusion: The NMUE score was significantly affected by hours spent studying per day, number of practice questions completed, percentage of study time allocated for doing questions, Syrian scientific high school exam scores, and the cumulative medical school class grades. It was not significantly affected by preparation months or studying in a group setting. More studies are needed to further describe and investigate the factors that might affect performance in the NMUE. PMID:27144140

  10. [The study of medical supplies automation replenishment algorithm in hospital on medical supplies supplying chain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xi

    2012-07-01

    The thesis aims to study the automation replenishment algorithm in hospital on medical supplies supplying chain. The mathematical model and algorithm of medical supplies automation replenishment are designed through referring to practical data form hospital on the basis of applying inventory theory, greedy algorithm and partition algorithm. The automation replenishment algorithm is proved to realize automatic calculation of the medical supplies distribution amount and optimize medical supplies distribution scheme. A conclusion could be arrived that the model and algorithm of inventory theory, if applied in medical supplies circulation field, could provide theoretical and technological support for realizing medical supplies automation replenishment of hospital on medical supplies supplying chain.

  11. Examining the medical blogosphere: an online survey of medical bloggers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovic, Ivor; Lulic, Ileana; Brumini, Gordana

    2008-09-23

    Blogs are the major contributors to the large increase of new websites created each year. Most blogs allow readers to leave comments and, in this way, generate both conversation and encourage collaboration. Despite their popularity, however, little is known about blogs or their creators. To contribute to a better understanding of the medical blogosphere by investigating the characteristics of medical bloggers and their blogs, including bloggers' Internet and blogging habits, their motivations for blogging, and whether or not they follow practices associated with journalism. We approached 197 medical bloggers of English-language medical blogs which provided direct contact information, with posts published within the past month. The survey included 37 items designed to evaluate data about Internet and blogging habits, blog characteristics, blogging motivations, and, finally, the demographic data of bloggers. Pearson's Chi-Square test was used to assess the significance of an association between 2 categorical variables. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was utilized to reveal the relationship between participants' ages, as well as the number of maintained blogs, and their motivation for blogging. The Mann-Whitney U test was employed to reveal relationships between practices associated with journalism and participants' characteristics like gender and pseudonym use. A total of 80 (42%) of 197 eligible participants responded. The majority of responding bloggers were white (75%), highly educated (71% with a Masters degree or doctorate), male (59%), residents of the United States (72%), between the ages of 30 and 49 (58%), and working in the healthcare industry (67%). Most of them were experienced bloggers, with 23% (18/80) blogging for 4 or more years, 38% (30/80) for 2 or 3 years, 32% (26/80) for about a year, and only 7% (6/80) for 6 months or less. Those who received attention from the news media numbered 66% (53/80). When it comes to best practices associated

  12. Medication discrepancy and potentially inappropriate medication in older Chinese-American home-care patients after hospital discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sophia H; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Foust, Janice B; Boltz, Marie P; Kim, Hongsoo

    2012-10-01

    Studies of potential medication problems among older adults have focused on English-speaking populations in a single health care setting or a single potential medication problem. No previous studies investigated potential inappropriate medications (PIMs) and medication discrepancies (MDs) among older Chinese Americans during care transitions from hospital discharge to home care. The aims of this study were to examine, in older Chinese Americans, the prevalence of both PIMs and MDs; the relationship between PIMs and MDs; and the patient and hospitalization characteristics associated with them during care transitions from hospital discharge to home care. This cross-sectional study was conducted with a sample of older Chinese Americans from a large certified nonprofit home-care agency in New York City from June 2010 to July 2011. PIMs were identified by using 2002 diagnosis-independent Beers criteria. MDs were identified by comparing the differences between hospital discharge medication order and home-care admission medication order. Prevalence of PIMs and MDs and their relationship was determined. Logistic regression examined the relationship between hospitalization and patient characteristics with PIMs and MDs. The sample consisted of 82 older Chinese-American home-care patients. Twenty (24.3%) study participants were prescribed at least one PIM at hospital discharge. Fifty-one (67.1%) study participants experienced at least one MD. A positive correlation was found between the occurrence of PIMs and MDs (r = 0.22; P = 0.05). Number of medications was the only significant factor associated with both PIMs and MDs. In addition, older age and more hospitalization days were associated with PIMs. The evident prevalence of PIMs and MDs supports the practice of evaluating the appropriateness of medications while reconciling inconsistencies in medication regimens. The number of medications was the only factor associated with both PIMs and MDs, underscoring the need to

  13. Rural hospital ownership: medical service provision, market mix, and spillover effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Jill R; Nichols, Austin

    2011-10-01

    To test whether nonprofit, for-profit, or government hospital ownership affects medical service provision in rural hospital markets, either directly or through the spillover effects of ownership mix. Data are from the American Hospital Association, U.S. Census, CMS Healthcare Cost Report Information System and Prospective Payment System Minimum Data File, and primary data collection for geographic coordinates. The sample includes all nonfederal, general medical, and surgical hospitals located outside of metropolitan statistical areas and within the continental United States from 1988 to 2005. We estimate multivariate regression models to examine the effects of (1) hospital ownership and (2) hospital ownership mix within rural hospital markets on profitable versus unprofitable medical service offerings. Rural nonprofit hospitals are more likely than for-profit hospitals to offer unprofitable services, many of which are underprovided services. Nonprofits respond less than for-profits to changes in service profitability. Nonprofits with more for-profit competitors offer more profitable services and fewer unprofitable services than those with fewer for-profit competitors. Rural hospital ownership affects medical service provision at the hospital and market levels. Nonprofit hospital regulation should reflect both the direct and spillover effects of ownership. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  14. Medical Audit: A Nigerian Teaching Hospital's Preliminary Experience

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The definition, historical background, aims dimensions and the characteristics of medical audit as well as the indices to be measured in a medical audit exercise are highlighted. The preliminary experience of the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital (UITH) in the planning, implementation and monitoring of a viable medical ...

  15. Medical Admissions and Outcomes at Saint Paul's Hospital, Addis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-04-01

    Background: Globally, trends of medical admission have been changing. This study was carried out to assess the current trend of medical admissions and outcomes in Ethiopia. Methods: Retrospective review of 840 records of patients admitted to medical ward of Saint Paul hospital during April 1, 2012-March 31, 2013 was ...

  16. Effects of Grade, Gender, and Hospitalization on Children's Medical Fears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aho, Amy C.; Erickson, Marilyn T.

    1985-01-01

    First, fourth, and seventh graders (N=291) completed a medical fears questionnaire. Girls expressed significantly more frequent and more intense medical fears than boys. Fourth and seventh graders reported more medical fears than first graders. Previous hospitalization experience had no effect on frequency or intensity of fears. (Author/CL)

  17. Unit cost of medical services at different hospitals in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Chatterjee

    Full Text Available Institutional care is a growing component of health care costs in low- and middle-income countries, but local health planners in these countries have inadequate knowledge of the costs of different medical services. In India, greater utilisation of hospital services is driven both by rising incomes and by government insurance programmes that cover the cost of inpatient services; however, there is still a paucity of unit cost information from Indian hospitals. In this study, we estimated operating costs and cost per outpatient visit, cost per inpatient stay, cost per emergency room visit, and cost per surgery for five hospitals of different types across India: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed government district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital, and a 778-bed government tertiary care hospital for the financial year 2010-11. The major cost component varied among human resources, capital costs, and material costs, by hospital type. The outpatient visit cost ranged from Rs. 94 (district hospital to Rs. 2,213 (private hospital (USD 1 = INR 52. The inpatient stay cost was Rs. 345 in the private teaching hospital, Rs. 394 in the district hospital, Rs. 614 in the tertiary care hospital, Rs. 1,959 in the charitable hospital, and Rs. 6,996 in the private hospital. Our study results can help hospital administrators understand their cost structures and run their facilities more efficiently, and we identify areas where improvements in efficiency might significantly lower unit costs. The study also demonstrates that detailed costing of Indian hospital operations is both feasible and essential, given the significant variation in the country's hospital types. Because of the size and diversity of the country and variations across hospitals, a large-scale study should be undertaken to refine hospital costing for different types of hospitals so that the results can be used for policy purposes, such as revising

  18. Unit Cost of Medical Services at Different Hospitals in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Susmita; Levin, Carol; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2013-01-01

    Institutional care is a growing component of health care costs in low- and middle-income countries, but local health planners in these countries have inadequate knowledge of the costs of different medical services. In India, greater utilisation of hospital services is driven both by rising incomes and by government insurance programmes that cover the cost of inpatient services; however, there is still a paucity of unit cost information from Indian hospitals. In this study, we estimated operating costs and cost per outpatient visit, cost per inpatient stay, cost per emergency room visit, and cost per surgery for five hospitals of different types across India: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed government district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital, and a 778-bed government tertiary care hospital for the financial year 2010–11. The major cost component varied among human resources, capital costs, and material costs, by hospital type. The outpatient visit cost ranged from Rs. 94 (district hospital) to Rs. 2,213 (private hospital) (USD 1 = INR 52). The inpatient stay cost was Rs. 345 in the private teaching hospital, Rs. 394 in the district hospital, Rs. 614 in the tertiary care hospital, Rs. 1,959 in the charitable hospital, and Rs. 6,996 in the private hospital. Our study results can help hospital administrators understand their cost structures and run their facilities more efficiently, and we identify areas where improvements in efficiency might significantly lower unit costs. The study also demonstrates that detailed costing of Indian hospital operations is both feasible and essential, given the significant variation in the country’s hospital types. Because of the size and diversity of the country and variations across hospitals, a large-scale study should be undertaken to refine hospital costing for different types of hospitals so that the results can be used for policy purposes, such as revising payment rates

  19. 76 FR 14366 - National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 390 and 391 RIN 2126-AA97 National Registry of... National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners (NRCME) published on December 1, 2008. In the comments on...'s certificate had been issued to a commercial motor vehicle driver by a medical examiner listed on...

  20. An examination of inpatient medical record keeping in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An examination of inpatient medical record keeping in the Orthopaedic Department of Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC), Moshi, Tanzania. ... Secondary outcome: Admission information and Demographics were both completed 88% (n=137) of the time. History and the Examination sections were complete in ...

  1. Medication Discontinuation in Patients After Discharge From a Psychiatric Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah-Koolmees, Heshu; Gardarsdottir, Helga; Yazir, Dilek; Stoker, Lennart J; Vuyk, Judith; Egberts, Toine C G; Heerdink, Eibert R

    2015-10-01

    Patients discharged from psychiatric hospitals may be at risk for intentional or unintentional discontinuation of their medication. To describe and assess the discontinuation of, and changes to, psychiatric and/or somatic medication in patients after discharge from psychiatric hospitals. A retrospective follow-up study was conducted in patients discharged from 4 psychiatric hospitals in The Netherlands between 2006 and 2009. Patients' medication use during the last 2 days of hospitalization was compared with medication dispensed during the 3 months following discharge. Changes in psychiatric and somatic medication were investigated and defined as medication discontinuation, start, or switch. Patients were classified as continuing users, when there were no changes to the medication after discharge. Relative risks with 95% confidence intervals to measure differences in discontinuation were estimated using Cox regression analysis. This study included 1324 patients, 69.8% of whom discontinued medication, and 9.7% switched one or more medications. Nearly half (47.4%) of all patients started a medication other than that dispensed during the last 2 days of hospitalization, and 13.7% of all patients experienced no changes to their medication regimen. Approximately 40% of the patients discontinued one or more medications for chronic conditions. From these, 68% discontinued psychiatric medications and 49.4% discontinued somatic medications. A quarter (25.2%) of the 644 patients discontinued using antipsychotics. More than a quarter (28.4%) of the 292 patients using medications for cardiovascular problems discontinued. Patients using as-needed medication prior to discharge were more likely to discontinue their medication (relative risk = 1.85; 95% confidence interval = 1.55-2.20). Discharge from a psychiatric hospital led to medication discontinuation in approximately 70% of all patients. Approximately 40% of the patients discontinued medications for chronic conditions

  2. The relationship between transformational leadership and social capital in hospitals--a survey of medical directors of all German hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Antje; Ommen, Oliver; Röttger, Julia; Pfaff, Holger

    2012-01-01

    The German hospital market has been undergoing major changes in recent years. Success in this new market is determined by a multitude of factors. One is the quality of the social relationships between staff and the presence of shared values and rules. This factor can be considered an organization's "social capital." This study investigates the relationship between social capital and leadership style in German hospitals using a written survey of medical directors. In 2008, a cross-sectional representative study was conducted with 1224 medical directors from every hospital in Germany with at least 1 internal medicine unit and 1 surgery unit. Among the scales included in the standardized questionnaire were scales used to assess the medical directors' evaluation of social capital and transformational leadership in the hospital. We used a multiple linear regression model to examine the relationship between social capital and internal coordination. We controlled for hospital ownership, teaching status, and number of beds. In total, we received questionnaires from 551 medical directors, resulting in a response rate of 45.2%. The participating hospitals had an average of 345 beds. The sample included public (41.3%), not-for-profit (46.9%), and for-profit (11.7%) hospitals. The data, which exclusively represent the perceptions of the medical directors, indicate a significant correlation between a transformational leadership style of the executive management and the social capital as perceived by medical directors. A transformational leadership style of the executive management accounted for 36% of variance of the perceived social capital. The perceived social capital in German hospitals is closely related to the leadership style of the executive management. A transformational leadership style of the executive management appears to successfully strengthen the hospital's social capital.

  3. Medical marijuana policies and hospitalizations related to marijuana and opioid pain reliever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yuyan

    2017-04-01

    Twenty-eight states in the U.S have legalized medical marijuana, yet its impacts on severe health consequences such as hospitalizations remain unknown. Meanwhile, the prevalence of opioid pain reliever (OPR) use and outcomes has increased dramatically. Recent studies suggested unintended impacts of legalizing medical marijuana on OPR, but the evidence is still limited. This study examined the associations between state medical marijuana policies and hospitalizations related to marijuana and OPR. State-level annual administrative records of hospital discharges during 1997-2014 were obtained from the State Inpatient Databases (SID). The outcome variables were rates of hospitalizations involving marijuana dependence or abuse, opioid dependence or abuse, and OPR overdose in 1000 discharges. Linear time-series regressions were used to assess the associations of implementing medical marijuana policies to hospitalizations, controlling for other marijuana- and OPR-related policies, socioeconomic factors, and state and year fixed effects. Hospitalizations related to marijuana and OPR increased sharply by 300% on average in all states. Medical marijuana legalization was associated with 23% (p=0.008) and 13% (p=0.025) reductions in hospitalizations related to opioid dependence or abuse and OPR overdose, respectively; lagged effects were observed after policy implementation. The operation of medical marijuana dispensaries had no independent impacts on OPR-related hospitalizations. Medical marijuana polices had no associations with marijuana-related hospitalizations. Medical marijuana policies were significantly associated with reduced OPR-related hospitalizations but had no associations with marijuana-related hospitalizations. Given the epidemic of problematic use of OPR, future investigation is needed to explore the causal pathways of these findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of therapeutic interchange on medication reconciliation during hospitalization and upon discharge in a geriatric population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica S Wang

    Full Text Available Therapeutic interchange of a same class medication for an outpatient medication is a widespread practice during hospitalization in response to limited hospital formularies. However, therapeutic interchange may increase risk of medication errors. The objective was to characterize the prevalence and safety of therapeutic interchange.Secondary analysis of a transitions of care study. We included patients over age 64 admitted to a tertiary care hospital between 2009-2010 with heart failure, pneumonia, or acute coronary syndrome who were taking a medication in any of six commonly-interchanged classes on admission: proton pump inhibitors (PPIs, histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2 blockers, hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, and inhaled corticosteroids (ICS. There was limited electronic medication reconciliation support available. Main measures were presence and accuracy of therapeutic interchange during hospitalization, and rate of medication reconciliation errors on discharge. We examined charts of 303 patients taking 555 medications at time of admission in the six medication classes of interest. A total of 244 (44.0% of medications were therapeutically interchanged to an approved formulary drug at admission, affecting 64% of the study patients. Among the therapeutically interchanged drugs, we identified 78 (32.0% suspected medication conversion errors. The discharge medication reconciliation error rate was 11.5% among the 244 therapeutically interchanged medications, compared with 4.2% among the 311 unchanged medications (relative risk [RR] 2.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.45-5.19.Therapeutic interchange was prevalent among hospitalized patients in this study and elevates the risk for potential medication errors during and after hospitalization. Improved electronic systems for managing therapeutic interchange and medication reconciliation

  5. Systematic literature review of hospital medication administration errors in children

    OpenAIRE

    Ameer A; Dhillon S; Peters MJ; Ghaleb M

    2015-01-01

    Ahmed Ameer,1 Soraya Dhillon,1 Mark J Peters,2 Maisoon Ghaleb11Department of Pharmacy, School of Life and Medical Sciences, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK; 2Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, UK Objective: Medication administration is the last step in the medication process. It can act as a safety net to prevent unintended harm to patients if detected. However, medication administration errors (MAEs) during this process have been documented and t...

  6. History of the medical licensing examination (uieop in Korea’s Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Lock Lee

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to describe the training and medical licensing system (uieop for becoming a physician officer (uigwan during Korea’s Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392. In the Goryeo Dynasty, although no license was necessary to provide medical services to the common people, there was a licensing examination to become a physician officer. No other national licensing system for healthcare professionals existed in Korea at that time. The medical licensing examination was administered beginning in 958. Physician officers who passed the medical licensing examination worked in two main healthcare institutions: the Government Hospital (Taeuigam and Pharmacy for the King (Sangyakguk. The promotion and expansion of medical education differed depending on the historical period. Until the reign of King Munjong (1046-1083, medical education as a path to licensure was encouraged in order to increase the number of physician officers qualifying for licensure by examination; thus, the number of applicants sitting for the examination increased. However, in the late Goryeo Dynasty, after the officer class of the local authorities (hyangri showed a tendency to monopolize the examination, the Goryeo government limited the examination applications by this group. The medical licensing examination was divided into two parts: medicine and ‘feeling the pulse and acupuncture’ (jugeumeop. The Goryeo Dynasty followed the Chinese Dang Dynasty’s medical system while also taking a strong interest in the Chinese Song Dynasty’s ideas about medicine.

  7. Medical Admissions and Outcomes at Saint Paul's Hospital, Addis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kim

    %), and renal failure 46 (5.5%). Mean duration of ... acute febrile illnesses, gastrointestinal infections, pulmonary infections as the leading causes of medical admissions (5). The other study conducted at Gondar Teaching hospital from. 1971 to ...

  8. International travel as medical research: architecture and the modern hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Cameron; Willis, Julie

    2010-01-01

    The design and development of the modern hospital in Australia had a profound impact on medical practice and research at a variety of levels. Between the late 1920s and the 1950s hospital architects, administrators, and politicians travelled widely in order to review the latest international developments in the hospital field They were motivated by Australia's geographic isolation and a growing concern with how to govern the population at the level of physical health. While not 'medical research' in the conventional sense of the term, this travel was a powerful generator of medical thinking in Australia and has left a rich archival legacy. This paper draws on that archive to demonstrate the ways in which architectural research and international networks of hospital specialists profoundly shaped the provision of medical infrastructure in Australia.

  9. A "Medical Physics" Course Based Upon Hospital Field Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onn, David G.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a noncalculus, medical physics'' course with a basic element of direct hospital field experience. The course is intended primarily for premedical students but may be taken by nonscience majors. (Author/PR)

  10. [Serious medication order errors at hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Mette Lehmann; Søndergaard, Jens; Hallas, Jesper; Pedersen, Anette; Hellebek, Annemarie

    2009-03-09

    Medication order errors are frequent in Denmark. It is necessary to know the reasons why these errors happen to be able to implement initiatives limiting medication order errors. In this study we analyzed 811 medications order errors, which were reported as unintended events. The medication order errors were associated with at total of 98 medicinal product; hence nine medicinal products caused 18 errors with severe or catastrophic harm to patients. 46.0% of the errors were incorrect medicinal product, 47.7% were incorrect dosage and 6.3% of the orders were double ordering. Penicillin and warfarin were the most frequently involved medicinal products. The products that most frequently caused severe or catastrophic patient harm were insulin and warfarin. The most frequent errors were "no medicinal product prescribed" and "incorrect medicinal product". The errors with the most severe consequences for the patients were due to "medication was not discontinued" (sevoflurane and warfarin) and "poor patient compliance" (warfarin and insulin). A common feature concerning the errors' origin was incorrect handling of information. Specific initiatives should be taken to counter the above-mentioned problems and reduce the occurrence of medication order errors. Such measures may comprise control, medication reconciliation and imposition of clinical decision support.

  11. Medical technology management in U.S. hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baretich, Matthew F

    2002-01-01

    Medical technologies move from research and development through manufacturing and marketing into the healthcare delivery system. Within the healthcare delivery system, hospitals rely heavily on medical technologies (and the medical devices they enable) to provide diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring in patient care. Managing these devices from acquisition through application in patient care is a formidable task. Hospitals must act to maximize the benefits of medical devices while minimizing adverse side effects. They must do so within a highly regulated and cost-constrained environment. This paper describes the challenges hospitals face and the strategies they employ in their efforts to achieve cost-effective medical technology management. The role of clinical engineering is discussed.

  12. Association between workarounds and medication administration errors in bar-code-assisted medication administration in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Willem; van den Bemt, Patricia M L A; Wouters, Hans; Bates, David W; Twisk, Jos W R; de Gier, Johan J; Taxis, Katja

    2017-08-22

    To study the association of workarounds with medication administration errors using barcode-assisted medication administration (BCMA), and to determine the frequency and types of workarounds and medication administration errors. A prospective observational study in Dutch hospitals using BCMA to administer medication. Direct observation was used to collect data. Primary outcome measure was the proportion of medication administrations with one or more medication administration errors. Secondary outcome was the frequency and types of workarounds and medication administration errors. Univariate and multivariate multilevel logistic regression analysis were used to assess the association between workarounds and medication administration errors. Descriptive statistics were used for the secondary outcomes. We included 5793 medication administrations for 1230 inpatients. Workarounds were associated with medication administration errors (adjusted odds ratio 3.06 [95% CI: 2.49-3.78]). Most commonly, procedural workarounds were observed, such as not scanning at all (36%), not scanning patients because they did not wear a wristband (28%), incorrect medication scanning, multiple medication scanning, and ignoring alert signals (11%). Common types of medication administration errors were omissions (78%), administration of non-ordered drugs (8.0%), and wrong doses given (6.0%). Workarounds are associated with medication administration errors in hospitals using BCMA. These data suggest that BCMA needs more post-implementation evaluation if it is to achieve the intended benefits for medication safety. In hospitals using barcode-assisted medication administration, workarounds occurred in 66% of medication administrations and were associated with large numbers of medication administration errors.

  13. [The military-medical commission FSI "1586th Military Hospital", Russian Ministry of Defence--90 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronenkov, I A; Rybakov, O A; Makhson, I P

    2012-02-01

    The military-medical commission FSI "1586th Military Hospital" of the Ministry of Defense undertakes a significant part of the activities of the entire military medical expertise in the Armed Forces. The commission covers the territory of the Central and Volga Federal Districs (19 subordinate entities of the Russian Federation). Currently, the committee consists of three functional departments: recruitment examination and acquisition of military schools, separation of military and military service examination, and examination of the medical department, flight and selection of specialists. A significant component in the military-medical commission is inspection of flight and flight-lift Air Force, for which the commission has a staff department of medical-flight examination, in which medical examination of pilots is carried out (annually--about 500 people).

  14. Examining the Impact of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Comorbidity on the Medical Lethality of Adolescent "Suicide Attempts"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Manama O'Brien, Kimberly H.; Berzin, Stephanie C.

    2012-01-01

    Specific psychiatric diagnoses and comorbidity patterns were examined to determine if they were related to the medical lethality of "suicide attempts" among adolescents presenting to an urban general hospital (N = 375). Bivariate analysis showed that attempters with substance abuse disorders had higher levels of lethality than attempters without…

  15. Frequency of medical errors in hospitalized children in khorramabad Madani hospital during six months in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    azam Mohsenzadeh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Many hospitalized children are suffered from medical errors that may cause serious injuries. The aim of this study was to evaluate medical errors in hospitalized children in khorramabad Madani hospital in the first half of 2008. Materials and Methods: This study was a cross sectional that was performed for all medical errors in hospitalized children in khorramabad Madani hospital from 21/3/2008 to 21/9/2008. The sampling method was census. Studied variables included: age, sex, weight, kinds of errers, education of parents, job of parents. Data was collected by questionnaire and analyzed by SPSS software. Results: In this study out of 2250 records, 151 (6/3% had medical errors. 53%were girls and 47% were boys that there was a significant relation between sex and medical errors. 46/4%were related to age group lower than 2 years old. Most of the errors were occurred in weight group of 6kg. Types of medical errors included drug ordering 46/3% (involved incorrect dosage of drug (37%, frequency 28%, rout 19% and others 16%, transcribing10%, administering32/4%, dispensing11/3%. Most errors related to liquid therapy 76/2% and intravenous rout 85/4%. Most errors were occurred during night 47% and during weekend 56/6%. Conclusion: Medical errors are common in hospitalized patients, and in our study the rate of medical errors was 6/3%. So further efforts are needed to reduce them.

  16. Health Promotion Practices in Hospital: Examination of Nutrition Conditions of the Ill Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysegul Korkmaz

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In this study, it was aimed to compare nutrition condition of children before and after the hospitalization, and to examine changes that hospitalization created on nutrition of children and its causes. METHODS: In this descriptive research, 32 children that hospitalized more than three days in various clinics of Gulhane Military Medical Academy and their families were studied. Data were obtained with questionnaire and also measurements of weight and height of children. RESULTS: In this study, it was determined that daily food intake of 78.1% of the children was decreased after hospitalization, decreases of daily food intake mostly occurred in children who hospitalized for 3-7 days. Daily food intake, especially cereal, vegetable and fruits groups were decreased in comparison to home intake. It was determined that anthropometric values weren’t affected by changes of nutritional routine. 93.8% of mothers stated primarily that inadequate arrangements of the nutritional environment have negative effect on children’s’ nutrition. It was determined that 59.4% of mothers focused on their child to finish his/her meal ruling out demands of the child, forced children to eat and used rewarding mostly to encourage child to eat while in hospital. CONCLUSION: It is concluded that children’s hospitalization effects the nutrition conditions negatively and the parents tend to use force or prizes to encourage child to eat. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(4.000: 323-332

  17. Retention of Medical Records in Ghanaian Teaching Hospitals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Retention of Medical Records in Ghanaian Teaching Hospitals: Some International Perspectives. ... The study revealed that the problems inherent in the retention of management of non-current medical records are due to the absence of formal guidelines and procedures, and to the fact that those that exist are not properly ...

  18. Determinants of effective medical intern training at a training hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determinants of effective medical intern training at a training hospital in North West Province, South Africa. N Sein, J Tumbo. Abstract. Background. Medical internship that entails training as a doctor and working in an accredited facility under supervision within the limits of a well-defined scope prepares the professional for ...

  19. The medication process in a psychiatric hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soerensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Lisby, Marianne; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the frequency, type, and potential severity of errors in several stages of the medication process in an inpatient psychiatric setting. Methods: A cross-sectional study using three methods for detecting errors: (1) direct observation; (2) unannounced control visits....... The observational unit: The individual handling of medication (prescribing, dispensing, and administering). Results: In total, 189 errors were detected in 1,082 opportunities for error (17%) of which 84/998 (8%) were assessed as potentially harmful. The frequency of errors was: prescribing, 10/189 (5%); dispensing......, 18/189 (10%); administration, 142/189 (75%); and discharge summaries, 19/189 (10%). The most common errors were omission of pro re nata dosing regime in computerized physician order entry, omission of dose, lack of identity control, and omission of drug. Conclusion: Errors throughout the medication...

  20. The medication process in a psychatric hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Lisby, Marianne; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the frequency, type, and potential severity of errors in several stages of the medication process in an inpatient psychiatric setting. METHODS: A cross-sectional study using three methods for detecting errors: (1) direct observation; (2) unannounced control visits....... THE OBSERVATIONAL UNIT: The individual handling of medication (prescribing, dispensing, and administering). RESULTS: In total, 189 errors were detected in 1,082 opportunities for error (17%) of which 84/998 (8%) were assessed as potentially harmful. The frequency of errors was: prescribing, 10/189 (5%); dispensing......, 18/189 (10%); administration, 142/189 (75%); and discharge summaries, 19/189 (10%). The most common errors were omission of pro re nata dosing regime in computerized physician order entry, omission of dose, lack of identity control, and omission of drug. CONCLUSION: Errors throughout the medication...

  1. Mining association rules between abnormal health examination results and outpatient medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao Huang, Yi

    Currently, interpretation of health examination reports relies primarily on the physician's own experience. If health screening data could be integrated with outpatient medical records to uncover correlations between disease and abnormal test results, the physician could benefit from having additional reference resources for medical examination report interpretation and clinic diagnosis. This study used the medical database of a regional hospital in Taiwan to illustrate how association rules can be found between abnormal health examination results and outpatient illnesses. The rules can help to build up a disease-prevention knowledge database that assists healthcare providers in follow-up treatment and prevention. Furthermore, this study proposes a new algorithm, the data cutting and sorting method, or DCSM, in place of the traditional Apriori algorithm. DCSM significantly improves the mining performance of Apriori by reducing the time to scan health examination and outpatient medical records, both of which are databases of immense sizes.

  2. Collaboration between Hospital and Community Pharmacists to Improve Medication Management from Hospital to Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Kristeller

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study is to determine if a model for patient-centered care that integrates medication management between hospital and community pharmacists is feasible and can improve medication adherence. Design: This was a randomized, non-blinded, interventional study of 69 patients discharged from a hospital to home. Process measures include the number and type of medication-related discrepancies or problems identified, patient willingness to participate, the quality and quantity of interactions with community pharmacists, hospital readmissions, and medication adherence. Setting: A 214-bed acute care hospital in Northeastern Pennsylvania and seventeen regional community pharmacies. Patients: Enrolled patients were hospitalized with a primary or secondary diagnosis of heart failure or COPD, had a planned discharge to home, and agreed to speak to one of seventeen community pharmacists within the study network (i.e., a network community pharmacist following hospital discharge. Intervention: Information about a comprehensive medication review completed by the hospital pharmacist was communicated with the network community pharmacist to assist with providing medication therapy management following hospital discharge. Results: Of 180 patients eligible for the study, 111 declined to participate. Many patients were reluctant to talk to an additional pharmacist, however if the patient’s pharmacist was already within the network of 17 pharmacies, they usually agreed to participate. The study enrolled 35 patients in the intervention group and 34 in the control group. An average of 6 medication-related problems per patient were communicated to the patient’s network community pharmacist after discharge. In the treatment group, 44% of patients had at least one conversation with the network community pharmacist following hospital discharge. There was no difference in post-discharge adherence between the groups (Proportion of Days

  3. Standards on medical fitness examinations for Navy divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The German Navy employs approximately 480 divers in their primary and secondary role. Before entering diving training, every diver has to pass an intensive physical examination programme at the German Naval Medical Institute (NMI) in Kiel-Kronshagen. Annual follow-ups ensure the currency of the medical findings. Criteria of medical fitness for diving reflect industrial medical standards for hyperbaric workers as well as the general medical guidelines for NATO divers. A diving examination consists of the individual medical history, a physical examination including the neurological status and the assessment of the cardiovascular fitness by ECG and bicycle ergometry. The respiratory system is screened by regular chest x-rays and spirometry or body plethysmography. Blood and urine samples are taken to look for abnormal haematological and metabolic conditions as well as disorders of the genito-urinary system. In order to determine visual fitness, diver's visual acuity, colour vision and stereopsis as well as eye fundi are examined by an eye specialist. Also the ENT examination involves a speciality consultant and consists of audiometry, inspection of the external ear and tympanic membrane and functional tests. To ensure a high standard of dental fitness, screening by a dental officer is part of the annual check-up. Every routine diving medical examination at the NMI includes a pressure test in the hyperbaric chamber. Divers who use nitrox or oxygen-rebreather devices have to pass successfully an oxygen tolerance test under hyperbaric conditions. The annual routine diving medical examination contributes to minimize the risk of accidents in military diving operations.

  4. [Inter-hospital competition--from a medical director's perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffartzik, Walter

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of a model calculation the Federal Statistical Office--despite a decreasing overall population--predicts a rise in the number of patients requiring inpatient healthcare of approximately 12% because of the ageing of our society. The comparative publication of data about the range, the character, the quality and the success of medical treatment allows more transparency of the medical achievements of a hospital, and the patients have learned to expect a high quality of medical treatment and its outcomes. Therefore hospitals have to find ways to present themselves to the patient as a suitable and desirable institution. In the inter-hospital competition for patients an individual hospital can only be successful by recruiting excellent professional (both medical and nursing) staff. Hospitals seeking to secure their existence will have to develop strategies that allow them to succeed in the competition for patients and staff. This includes a verifiably high quality of their medical treatment while striving for an efficient way of managing the costs. At the same time a realistic approach to the recruitment and motivation of the medical staff is essential, which is especially true of physicians.

  5. [Participation in Preventive Medical Examinations for Children in Saxony-Anhalt (Germany) at the Time of School Entry Medical Examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hase, J; Hartmann, T; Oppermann, H; Wahl, G

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to present data concerning children's participation in the German preventive medical examinations for children ("U2" to "U8") in accordance with sections 26 and 92 of the German Social Code (Book V) as retrospectively recorded by the Public Health Service ("Öffentlicher Gesundheitsdienst") of the German Province of Saxony-Anhalt during school entry medical examinations. Also we wanted to analyse the additional variables recorded per child in the areas of social factors, diagnostic findings and levels of therapeutic care in connection with their degree of participation in the preventive medical examinations. The statistical analysis of 73 628 anonymised data sets from the health monitoring system of the German Province of Saxony-Anhalt that were collected by the 14 health authorities in Saxony-Anhalt during school entry medical examinations between 2008 and 2012. An analysis of the data for 20 variables per child was performed with regard to the influence of their degree of participation in the U2 to U8 medical examinations using differences in frequency in the examination groups and checking the significance of these differences by means of the chi-squared test. 99-96% of children in Saxony-Anhalt underwent the 5 preventive medical examinations U2-U6. As the children get older, the participation rates decrease (U2=98.7% down to U8=88.5%). By the time the school entry medical examinations are carried out (at an average age of 63 months), 83% of the children have -undergone all 7 preventive medical examinations for children, while 0.4% have not -undergone one single "U" examination. A child's gender has no influence on its parents' decision as to whether or not it should undergo the examinations. The results also reveal that children who attend day care -facilities are significantly more likely to have undergone all of the U examinations (84.8%) than children who are cared for at home (55.1%). The retrospective comprehensive collection of

  6. Medication supply chain management through implementation of a hospital pharmacy computerized inventory program in Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle R. Holm

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, St. Luke Hospital was built to help manage the mass casualties and subsequent cholera epidemic. A major problem faced by the hospital system was the lack of an available and sustainable supply of medications. Long-term viability of the hospital system depended largely on developing an uninterrupted medication supply chain. Objective: We hypothesized that the implementation of a new Pharmacy Computerized Inventory Program (PCIP would optimize medication availability and decrease medication shortages. Design: We conducted the research by examining how medications were being utilized and distributed before and after the implementation of PCIP. We measured the number of documented medication transactions in both Phase 1 and Phase 2 as well as user logins to determine if a computerized inventory system would be beneficial in providing a sustainable, long-term solution to their medication management needs. Results: The PCIP incorporated drug ordering, filling the drug requests, distribution, and dispensing of the medications in multiple settings; inventory of currently shelved medications; and graphic reporting of ‘real-time’ medication usage. During the PCIP initiation and establishment periods, the number of medication transactions increased from 219.6 to 359.5 (p=0.055, respectively, and the mean logins per day increased from 24.3 to 31.5, p<0.0001, respectively. The PCIP allows the hospital staff to identify and order medications with a critically low supply as well as track usage for future medication needs. The pharmacy and nursing staff found the PCIP to be efficient and a significant improvement in their medication utilization. Conclusions: An efficient, customizable, and cost-sensitive PCIP can improve drug inventory management in a simplified and sustainable manner within a resource-constrained hospital.

  7. ASSESSMENT OF MEDICAL WASTE MANAGEMENT IN EDUCATIONAL HOSPITALS OF TEHRAN UNIVERSITY MEDICAL SCIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Dehghani, K. Azam, F. Changani, E. Dehghani Fard

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The management of medical waste is of great importance due to its potential environmental hazards and public health risks. In the past, medical waste was often mixed with municipal solid waste and disposed in residential waste landfills or improper treatment facilities in Iran. In recent years, many efforts have been made by environmental regulatory agencies and waste generators to better managing the wastes from healthcare facilities. This study was carried in 12 educational hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The goals of this study were to characterize solid wastes generated in healthcare hospitals, to report the current status of medical waste management and to provide a framework for the safe management of these wastes at the considered hospitals. The methodology was descriptive, cross-sectional and consisted of the use of surveys and interviews with the authorities of the healthcare facilities and with personnel involved in the management of the wastes. The results showed that medical wastes generated in hospitals were extremely heterogeneous in composition. 42% of wastes were collected in containers and plastic bags. In 75% of hospitals, the stay-time in storage sites was about 12-24h. 92% of medical wastes of hospitals were collected by covered-trucks. In 46% of hospitals, transferring of medical wastes to temporary stations was done manually. The average of waste generation rates in the hospitals was estimated to be 4.42kg/bed/day.

  8. Hospitalization and catastrophic medical payment: evidence from hospitals located in Tehran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiasvand, Hesam; Sha'baninejad, Hossein; Arab, Mohammad; Rashidian, Arash

    2014-07-01

    Hospitalized patients constitute the main fraction of users in any health system. Financial burden of reimbursement for received services and cares by these users is sometimes unbearable and may lead to catastrophic medical payments. So, designing and implementing effective health prepayments schemes appear to be an effective governmental intervention to reduce catastrophic medical payments and protect households against it. We aimed to calculate the proportion of hospitalized patients exposed to catastrophic medical payments, its determinant factors and its distribution. We conducted a cross sectional study with 400 samples in five hospitals affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS). A self-administered questionnaire was distributed among respondents. Data were analyzed by logistic regression and χ(2) statistics. Also, we drew the Lorenz curve and calculated the Gini coefficient in order to present the distribution of catastrophic medical payments burden on different income levels. About 15.05% of patients were exposed to catastrophic medical payments. Also, we found that the educational level of the patient's family head, the sex of the patient's family head, hospitalization day numbers, having made any out of hospital payments linked with the same admission and households annual income levels; were linked with a higher likelihood of exposure to catastrophic medical payments. Also, the Gini coefficient is about 0.8 for catastrophic medical payments distribution. There is a high level of catastrophic medical payments in hospitalized patients. The weakness of economic status of households and the not well designed prepayments schemes on the other hand may lead to this. This paper illustrated a clear picture for catastrophic medical payments at hospital level and suggests applicable notes to Iranian health policymakers and planners.

  9. Medical student performance on an adolescent medicine examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Paritosh; Barley, Gwyn; Guiton, Gretchen

    2012-09-01

    To examine the performance of third-year medical students on an adolescent medicine clinical practice examination. The participants were third-year medical students (2010 [n = 145] and 2011 [n = 134]) at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Student performance on adolescent contraceptive management was measured in three domains following Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies in professionalism, communication, and history-taking skills. With regard to professionalism and communication skills, students performed very well, scoring >95% correct in both years. Students demonstrated relatively poorer performance in history-taking competency in 2010 and 2011 (66% and 67% correct, respectively). In the adolescent Objective Structured Clinical Examination case, third-year medical students demonstrated extremely high performance in communication and professionalism skills. However, performance was lower for history-taking skill in contraceptive management. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Scoping medical tourism and international hospital accreditation growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhead, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Uwe Reinhardt stated that medical tourism can do to the US healthcare system what the Japanese automotive industry did to American carmakers after Japanese products developed a value for money and reliability reputation. Unlike cars, however, healthcare can seldom be test-driven. Quality is difficult to assess after an intervention (posteriori), therefore, it is frequently evaluated via accreditation before an intervention (a priori). This article aims to scope the growth in international accreditation and its relationship to medical tourism markets. Using self-reported data from Accreditation Canada, Joint Commission International (JCI) and Australian Council on Healthcare Standards (ACHS), this article examines how quickly international accreditation is increasing, where it is occurring and what providers have been accredited. Since January 2000, over 350 international hospitals have been accredited; the JCI's total nearly tripling between 2007-2011. Joint Commission International staff have conducted most international accreditation (over 90 per cent). Analysing which countries and regions where the most international accreditation has occurred indicates where the most active medical tourism markets are. However, providers will not solely be providing care for medical tourists. Accreditation will not mean that mistakes will never happen, but that accredited providers are more willing to learn from them, to varying degrees. If a provider has been accredited by a large international accreditor then patients should gain some reassurance that the care they receive is likely to be a good standard. The author questions whether commercializing international accreditation will improve quality, arguing that research is necessary to assess the accreditation of these growing markets.

  11. Readmission to hospital of medical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gothardt Rasmussen, Mette; Ravn, Pernille; Molsted, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The incidence of acute readmissions is higher among elderly medical patients than in the general population. Risk factor identification is needed in order to prevent readmissions. Objective: To estimate the incidence of acute readmissions among medical patients ≥ 65 years discharged.......00–1.15), receiving home care service (personal care) (HR: 1.33, 95%CI: 1.15–1.55), nursing home residency (HR: 1.30, 95%CI: 1.14–1.48), a previous admission within six months (HR: 1.59, 95%CI: 1.48–1.72), increased length of index admission (HR: 1.14, 95%CI: 1.11–1.17), and moderate or high level of comorbidities...

  12. Medical directors' perspectives on strengthening hospital quality and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canaway, Rachel; Bismark, Marie; Dunt, David; Kelaher, Margaret

    2017-10-09

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to understand the concerns and factors that impact on hospital quality and safety, particularly related to use of performance data, within a setting of devolved governance. Design/methodology/approach This qualitative study used thematic analysis of interviews with public hospital medical directors. For additional context, findings were framed by themes from a review of hospital safety and quality in the same jurisdiction. Findings Varying approaches and levels of complexity were described about what and how performance data are reviewed, prioritised, and quality improvements implemented. Although no consistent narrative emerged, facilitators of improvement were suggested relating to organisational culture, governance, resources, education, and technologies. These hospital-level perspectives articulate with and expand on the system-level themes in a state-wide review of hospital safety and quality. Research limitations/implications The findings are not generalisable, but point to an underlying absence of system-wide agreement on how to perceive, retrieve, analyse, prioritise and action hospital performance data. Practical implications Lack of electronic medical records and an inefficient incident reporting system limits the extent to which performance and incident data can be analysed, linked and shared, thus limiting hospital performance improvement, oversight and learning. Social implications Variable approaches to quality and safety, standards of care, and hospital record keeping and reporting, mean that healthcare consumers might expect inconsistency across Victorian hospitals. Originality/value The views of medical directors have been little researched. This work uses their voice to better understand contextual factors that situate and impact on hospital quality and safety towards understanding the mixed effectiveness of hospital quality improvement strategies.

  13. Survey of medical examiner office computerization. From the National Association of Medical Examiners (N.A.M.E.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanzlick, R

    1994-06-01

    Following a suggestion that the National Association of Medical Examiners (N.A.M.E.) develop a N.A.M.E. Information Center (NIC), N.A.M.E. conducted a survey to evaluate the current status of medical examiner office automation (computerization) in the United States. Responses were received from 80 unique reporting areas, including 75 medical examiner offices, which represent approximately 30% of the 258 medical examiner jurisdictions in the country. A total of 58 responders (65%) indicated that their office was automated. At least 38 states have one or more automated death investigation office, and electronic data exist for approximately 145,000 deaths per year, or approximately 30% of all deaths certified by medical examiners and coroners annually and approximately 6% of all deaths per year in the United States. Although computerized offices vary substantially in size and in their choice of hardware and software, a typical computerized medical examiner office (a) is in a single county with 1,000-6,000 death reports per year, (b) keeps electronic records on all cases reported, (c) uses an IBM or compatible personal computer (PC) or PC network with off-the-shelf software, (d) stores data on cause of death, manner of death, how injuries occur, and toxicology results, and (e) is interested in sharing its data. Considerable electronic death investigation data exist that can provide timely and valuable information for mortality and public health studies.

  14. Hospital managers' attitude and commitment toward electronic medical records system in Isfahan hospitals 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanbakhsh, Maryam; Karimi, Saeed; Hassanzadeh, Akbar; Beigi, Maliheh

    2017-01-01

    Electronic medical record system (EMRS) is a valuable system for safe access to the patient's data and increases health care quality. Manpower is one of the requirements for EMRS, among which manager is the most important person in any hospital. Taking into account manager's positive attitude and good commitments, EMRS will be implemented successfully. As such, we decided to assess manager's attitude and commitment toward EMRS in Isfahan hospitals in the year of 2014. This article aimed to determine the hospital managers' attitude and commitment toward the implementation of EMRS. The present article is an applied analytic study. Research society consisted of the managers of all the hospitals in Isfahan that include hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, private, and social security hospitals. This study was done in 2014. Data collection tools included a questionnaire for which reliability and validity were determined. Data were analyzed by means of SPSS 20. Average score for the managers' attitude toward EMRS in the city of Isfahan was 77.5 out of 100 and their average score for commitment was 74.7. Manager's attitude in social security hospitals was more positive than the private and governmental ones (83.3%). In addition, the amount of commitment by the managers in social security hospitals was higher than the same in private and governmental hospitals (86.6%). At present, managers' attitude and commitment in Isfahan hospitals toward EMRS are very high and social security hospitals show more readiness in this respect.

  15. [Hospital clinical engineer orientation and function in the maintenance system of hospital medical equipment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Zheng, Yunxin; He, Dehua; Jiang, Ruiyao; Chen, Ying; Jing, Wei

    2012-03-01

    The quantity of medical equipment in hospital rise quickly recent year. It provides the comprehensive support to the clinical service. The maintenance of medical equipment becomes more important than before. It is necessary to study on the orientation and function of clinical engineer in medical equipment maintenance system. Refer to three grade health care system, the community doctors which is called General practitioner, play an important role as the gatekeeper of health care system to triage and cost control. The paper suggests that hospital clinical engineer should play similar role as the gatekeeper of medical equipment maintenance system which composed by hospital clinical engineer, manufacture engineer and third party engineer. The hospital clinical engineer should be responsible of guard a pass of medical equipment maintenance quality and cost control. As the gatekeeper, hospital clinical engineer should take the responsibility of "General engineer" and pay more attention to safety and health of medical equipment. The responsibility description and future transition? development of clinical engineer as "General Engineer" is discussed. More attention should be recommended to the team building of hospital clinical engineer as "General Engineer".

  16. Pathologic examination of the placenta: recommended versus observed practice in a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sills A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Amber Sills,1 Carmen Steigman,2 Songthip T Ounpraseuth,3 Imelda Odibo,1 Adam T Sandlin,1 Everett F Magann11Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Arkansas for the Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA; 2Department of Pathology, University of Arkansas for the Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA; 3Department of Biostatistics, University of Arkansas for the Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USAIntroduction: The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of appropriate placental examinations in a university hospital.Methods: A retrospective review of all deliveries and all placentas submitted for pathologic examination from live births. Placentas were reviewed by a perinatal pathologist to determine whether they met the College of American Pathologists (CAP-recommended guidelines for examination.Results: We used 1346 deliveries between July 1, 2010 and December 31, 2010 as the basis of this review. According to CAP guidelines, 703 placentas (52.2% should have been sent for pathologic examination; 575/703 (81.8%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 78.9–84.7 were actually sent for examination. Of the 643 placentas that did not need to be examined per CAP guidelines, 568 (88.3%; 95% CI = 85.9–90.8 were appropriately not sent. In comparing the three categories of indications for examination (maternal, fetal/neonatal, placental, the only significant association was that women with fetal/neonatal indications were more likely to have their placenta sent than women with maternal indications (odds ratio, 2.63; 95% CI = 1.81–3.80.Conclusion: In this university hospital, more than 80% of the time, placentas were appropriately sent to pathology, and more than 85% of the time, placentas that should not have been sent for evaluation were not sent.Keywords: placenta, pathologic examination, clinical guidelines, birth

  17. Responsibly managing the medical school--teaching hospital power relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, Frank A; McCullough, Laurence B

    2005-07-01

    The relationship between medical schools and their teaching hospitals involves a complex and variable mixture of monopoly and monopsony power, which has not been previously been ethically analyzed. As a consequence, there is currently no ethical framework to guide leaders of both institutions in the responsible management of this complex power relationship. The authors define these two forms of power and, using economic concepts, analyze the nature of such power in the medical school-teaching hospital relationship, emphasizing the potential for exploitation. Using concepts from both business ethics and medical ethics, the authors analyze the nature of transparency and co-fiduciary responsibility in this relationship. On the basis of both rational self-interest, drawn from business ethics, and co-fiduciary responsibility, drawn from medical ethics, they argue for the centrality of transparency in the medical school-teaching hospital relationship. Understanding the ethics of monopoly and monopsony power is essential for the responsible management of the complex relationship between medical schools and their teaching hospitals and can assist the leadership of academic health centers in carrying out one of their major responsibilities: to prevent the exploitation of monopoly power and monopsony power in this relationship.

  18. [The revised system of hospitalization for medical care and protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuo, Yasuhisa

    2014-01-01

    The Act to Partially Amend the Act on Mental Health and Welfare for the Mentally Disabled was passed on June 13, 2013. Major amendments regarding hospitalization for medical care and protection include the points listed below. The guardianship system will be abolished. Consent by a guardian will no longer be required in the case of hospitalization for medical care and protection. In the case of hospitalization for medical care and protection, the administrators of the psychiatric hospital are required to obtain the consent of one of the following persons: spouse, person with parental authority, person responsible for support, legal custodian, or curator. If no qualified person is available, consent must be obtained from the mayor, etc. of the municipality. The following three obligations are imposed on psychiatric hospital administrators. (1) Assignment of a person, such as a psychiatric social worker, to provide guidance and counseling to patients hospitalized for medical care and protection regarding their postdischarge living environment. (2) Collaboration with community support entities that consult with and provide information as necessary to the person hospitalized, their spouse, a person with parental authority, a person responsible for support, or their legal custodian or curator. (3) Organizational improvements to promote hospital discharge. With regard to requests for discharge, the revised law stipulates that, in addition to the person hospitalized with a mental disorder, others who may file a request for discharge with the psychiatric review board include: the person's spouse, a person with parental authority, a person responsible for support, or their legal custodian or curator. If none of the above persons are available, or if none of them are able to express their wishes, the mayor, etc. of the municipality having jurisdiction over the place of residence of the person hospitalized may request a discharge. In order to promote transition to life in the

  19. Constipation - prevalence and incidence among medical patients acutely admitted to hospital with a medical condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noiesen, Eline; Trosborg, Ingelise; Bager, Louise

    2014-01-01

    To examine the prevalence and incidence of patient-reported symptoms of constipation in acutely hospitalised medical patients.......To examine the prevalence and incidence of patient-reported symptoms of constipation in acutely hospitalised medical patients....

  20. Knowledge brokers, companions, and navigators: a qualitative examination of informal caregivers' roles in medical tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Victoria; Crooks, Valorie A; Snyder, Jeremy; Turner, Leigh

    2013-12-01

    Many studies examining the phenomena of medical tourism have identified health equity issues associated with this global health services practice. However, there is a notable lack of attention in this existing research to the informal care provided by the friends and family members who typically accompany medical tourists abroad. To date, researchers have not examined the care roles filled by informal caregivers travelling with medical tourists. In this article, we fill this gap by examining these informal caregivers and the roles they take on towards supporting medical tourists' health and wellbeing. We conducted 21 interviews with International Patient Coordinators (IPCs) working at medical tourism hospitals across ten countries. IPCs work closely with informal caregivers as providers of non-medical personal assistance, and can therefore offer broad insight on caregiver roles. The interviews were coded and analyzed thematically. Three roles emerged: knowledge broker, companion, and navigator. As knowledge brokers, caregivers facilitate the transfer of information between the medical tourist and formal health care providers as well as other staff members at medical tourism facilities. The companion role involves providing medical tourists with physical and emotional care. Meanwhile, responsibilities associated with handling documents and coordinating often complex journeys are part of the navigation role. This is the first study to examine informal caregiving roles in medical tourism. Many of the roles identified are similar to those of conventional informal caregivers while others are specific to the transnational context. We conclude that these roles make informal caregivers an integral part of the larger phenomenon of medical tourism. We further contend that examining the roles taken on by a heretofore-unconsidered medical tourism stakeholder group sheds valuable insight into how this industry operates and that such knowledge is necessary in order to respond to

  1. Medication Distribution in Hospital: Errors Observed X Errors Perceived

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Silva

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The aim of the present study was to compare errors committed in the distribution of medicationsat a hospital pharmacy with those perceived by staff members involved in the distributionprocess. Medications distributed to the medical and surgical wards were analyzed. The drugswere dispensed in individualized doses per patient, separated by administration time in boxes orplastic bags for 24 hours of care and using the carbon copy of the prescription. Nineteen staffmembers involved in the drug-dispensing process were also interviewed. In the observationphase, 1963 drugs dispensed in 259 prescriptions were analyzed, with a total of 61 dispensingerrors (3.2% of the medications. The most frequent errors were omission of the prescribedmedication (23% and distribution of non-prescribed medication (14.8%. In the interviews, themain errors perceived by the staff were medications dispensed at a concentration other thanthat prescribed (22% and the distribution of non-prescribed medication or medication differentfrom that prescribed (20%. Differences were found between the most frequent errors observedand those reported by staff members. Nonetheless, the views of the staff proved coherent withthe literature on this issue.Keywords: medication errors, hospital medication system.

  2. Depression in the hospitalized inpatient with various medical illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ammon Cavanough, S

    1986-01-01

    The amount of depressive symptomatology in the medical population is high. Most of the symptomatology is, however, mild and probably represents an adjustment disorder with depression as a result of illness and hospitalization. Routine screening for depression in the hospitalized medically ill patient appears to be useful, given poor physician recognition of not only mild, but severe depressive symptomatology. Affective and cognitive symptoms of depression are the most discriminating for severe depression. Patients with bone and connective tissue disease, gastrointestinal disease, neurological disease, respiratory disease, and cancer appear to be the groups of diseases at greatest risk for serious depression in a tertiary care setting in the United States.

  3. [Evaluation of the quality of hospital medical records in a hospital in Turin (Italy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianino, Maria Michela; Raciti, Ida Marina; Galzerano, Mario; Villata, Eugenia; Fonte, Gianfranco; Rapellino, Marco; Fiandra, Umberto

    2008-01-01

    The San Giovanni Battista Hospital in Turin validated a tool for evaluating the quality of hospital patient records. The tool defines the essential contents of patient records, indicators and weights as well as the standard score that must be reached. A pilot study was performed in 2007 to evaluate whether this tool adequately evaluates the quality of hospital patient records in both medical and surgical wards, and whether it can do so in a standardized and repeatable manner. A random sample of 206 medical charts of patients admitted to the San Giovanni Battista Hospital in 2007 was extracted and analysed. The instrument was found to adequately evaluate hospital patient records in a standardisd and repeatable manner.

  4. Medication supply chain management through implementation of a hospital pharmacy computerized inventory program in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Michelle R; Rudis, Maria I; Wilson, John W

    2015-01-01

    In the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, St. Luke Hospital was built to help manage the mass casualties and subsequent cholera epidemic. A major problem faced by the hospital system was the lack of an available and sustainable supply of medications. Long-term viability of the hospital system depended largely on developing an uninterrupted medication supply chain. We hypothesized that the implementation of a new Pharmacy Computerized Inventory Program (PCIP) would optimize medication availability and decrease medication shortages. We conducted the research by examining how medications were being utilized and distributed before and after the implementation of PCIP. We measured the number of documented medication transactions in both Phase 1 and Phase 2 as well as user logins to determine if a computerized inventory system would be beneficial in providing a sustainable, long-term solution to their medication management needs. The PCIP incorporated drug ordering, filling the drug requests, distribution, and dispensing of the medications in multiple settings; inventory of currently shelved medications; and graphic reporting of 'real-time' medication usage. During the PCIP initiation and establishment periods, the number of medication transactions increased from 219.6 to 359.5 (p=0.055), respectively, and the mean logins per day increased from 24.3 to 31.5, psupply as well as track usage for future medication needs. The pharmacy and nursing staff found the PCIP to be efficient and a significant improvement in their medication utilization. An efficient, customizable, and cost-sensitive PCIP can improve drug inventory management in a simplified and sustainable manner within a resource-constrained hospital.

  5. Interdisciplinary medication decision making by pharmacists in pediatric hospital settings: An ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Ellie; Kinney, Sharon; Weiner, Carlye; Newall, Fiona; Williams, Allison; Cranswick, Noel; Wong, Ian; Borrott, Narelle; Manias, Elizabeth

    2017-03-22

    Children are particularly vulnerable to experiencing medication incidents in hospitals. Making sound medication decisions is therefore of paramount importance. Prior research has principally described pharmacists' role in reducing medication errors. There is a dearth of information about pharmacists' interactions with pediatric hospital staff across disciplines in resolving medication issues. The aim of this study was to examine interdisciplinary medication decision making by pharmacists in pediatric hospital settings. An ethnographic design was undertaken comprising observations, semi-structured interviews and focus groups. Audio-recorded data were analyzed thematically. The study was conducted in three wards of an Australian pediatric tertiary teaching hospital, comprising general surgical, gastroenterology, endocrinology, neurology, adolescent and rehabilitation settings. Pharmacists, registered nurses and doctors were recruited from diverse clinical wards following information sessions. Pharmacists were central to complex pediatric medication decision making, intervening about dosage, administration, drug interactions and authorities. Pharmacists proactively contacted doctors and nurses about prescribing issues; conversely, staff routinely approached pharmacists for medication advice. Pharmacists were perceived as medication experts, their extensive knowledge valued in resolving complex issues: when off-label medications were prescribed, when protocols were absent or ambiguous, where tension existed between protocol adherence and patient safety, and where patients on multiple medications were at risk of medication error. Pharmacists had strong relationships with doctors and nurses, which had a bearing on pharmacists' input in interventions. Furthermore, pharmacists identified prescribing errors through strategies, such as case note review and medication reconciliation, although the lack of emergency department pharmacists and limited after-hours staffing posed

  6. Bone marrow examination at a paediatric hospital in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Githang'a, J N; Dave, P

    2001-07-01

    To investigate the main indications for, and common conditions found in bone marrow examinations (BME) of children. This was a retrospective study from September 1, 1993 to September 3 1998. All bone marrow aspirate and trephine biopsy results were retrieved. The clinical data provided by clinicians were also noted. A total of 97 BME were recorded from patients aged two months to 13 years. The peak ages for BME were six to eight years (24% of patients). The more frequent indications for BME were unexplained anaemia found in 26% request forms, investigation for solid tumours (10%) and lymphoma (10%) and remission assessment after treatment for leukaemia (26%). The main findings were malignancy (27%) with leukaemia being commonest (ALL) 16% of patients and acute myeloblastic leukaemia (5%). Haematinic deficiency was seen in 12.7% of cases with iron deficiency being the commonest. There were some notable differences and similarities in the study as compared to a similar one performed at a local referral hospital. The importance of BME as a crucial investigational tool in the management of patients is underscored. Interpretation is more meaningful when the haematologist has adequate clinical data.

  7. Frequency of medical and dental x-ray examinations in the UK. 1997/98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, R.; Wall, B.; Shrimpton, P. [and others

    2000-12-01

    A survey has been performed to assess the numbers of all types of radiological x-ray examination conducted in the UK during the period from April 1997 to March 1998. The survey covers all diagnostic and interventional procedures using x-rays for medical and dental purposes, both within and outside the National Health Service (NHS), but excludes a detailed analysis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound and nuclear medicine. This is the first such national survey conducted by NRPB since 1983. The results provide a current picture of the pattern of medical x-ray imaging practice in the UK and will allow revised estimates to be made of the collective dose to the population from these procedures. The survey has utilised detailed information available from radiology management systems at a selected sample of 38 English NHS trusts. The different classifications of x-ray procedure have been re-arranged into 62 standardised categories based on anatomical location and whether they were conventional, computed tomography (CT) or interventional procedures. Extrapolation of the sample data to the whole of England was carried out using broad NHS radiology statistics (KH12 returns) for the period of the survey from the Department of Health. Additional data have been obtained covering NHS radiology practice in Wales and Northern Ireland and also for x-ray imaging practice outside NHS hospitals such as that performed in independent hospitals and by dentists and chiropractors. Results are presented giving the annual numbers and relative frequencies of x-ray examinations in the 62 categories and the contributions from radiology practice outside NHS hospitals and from the whole of the UK. Altogether, about 41.5 million medical and dental x-ray examinations were conducted in the UK in 1997/98, corresponding to 704 examinations per 1000 inhabitants. The increase since 1983 for medical examinations conducted in NHS hospitals has just kept pace with the increase in population

  8. Medication safety infrastructure in critical-access hospitals in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterstein, Almut G; Hartzema, Abraham G; Johns, Thomas E; De Leon, Jessica M; McDonald, Kathie; Henshaw, Zak; Pannell, Robert

    2006-03-01

    The medication safety infrastructure of critical-access hospitals (CAHs) in Florida was evaluated. Qualitative assessments, including a self-administered survey and site visits, were conducted in seven of nine CAHs between January and June 2003. The survey consisted of the Institute for Safe Medication Practices Medication Safety Self-assessment, the 2003 Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations patient safety goals, health information technology (HIT) questions, and medication-use-process flow charts. On-site visits included interviews of CAH personnel who had safety responsibility and inspections of pharmacy facilities. The findings were compiled into a matrix reflecting structural and procedural components of the CAH medication safety infrastructure. The nine characteristics that emerged as targets for quality improvement (QI) were medication accessibility and storage, sterile product compounding, access to drug information, access to and utilization of patient information in medication order review, advanced safety technology, drug formularies and standardized medication protocols, safety culture, and medication reconciliation. Based on weighted importance and feasibility, QI efforts in CAHs should focus on enhancing medication order review systems, standardizing procedures for handling high-risk medications, promoting an appropriate safety culture, involvement in seamless care, and investment in HIT.

  9. The management of hospital medical waste. How to increase efficiency through a medical waste audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studnicki, J

    1992-01-01

    Medical waste is a nightmare for hospital administrators, cutting across department boundaries and incorporating legal, financial, and community concerns. In this two-part article the author provides a stepwise approach to effective waste management. The first part gives background information on waste generation, storage, and disposal and delineates the framework of a medical waste audit. This audit is put to the test in the second part, where data from a pilot trial at an actual hospital are presented and discussed.

  10. Spreading a medication administration intervention organizationwide in six hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliger, Julie; Singer, Sara; Hoffman, Frank; O'Neil, Edward

    2012-02-01

    Six hospitals from the San Francisco Bay Area participated in a 12-month quality improvement project conducted by the Integrated Nurse Leadership Program (INLP). A quality improvement intervention that focused on improving medication administration accuracy was spread from two pilot units to all inpatient units in the hospitals. INLP developed a 12-month curriculum, presented in a combination of off-site training sessions and hospital-based training and consultant-led meetings, to teach clinicians the key skills needed to drive organizationwide change. Each hospital established a nurse-led project team, as well as unit teams to address six safety processes designed to improve medication administration accuracy: compare medication to the medication administration record; keep medication labeled throughout; check two patient identifications; explain drug to patient (if applicable); chart immediately after administration; and protect process from distractions and interruptions. From baseline until one year after project completion, the six hospitals improved their medication accuracy rates, on average, from 83.4% to 98.0% in the spread units. The spread units also improved safety processes overall from 83.1% to 97.2%. During the same time, the initial pilot units also continued to improve accuracy from 94.0% to 96.8% and safety processes overall from 95.3% to 97.2%. With thoughtful planning, engaging those doing the work early and focusing on the "human side of change" along with technical knowledge of improvement methodologies, organizations can spread initiatives enterprisewide. This program required significant training of frontline workers in problem-solving skills, leading change, team management, data tracking, and communication.

  11. Commentary: Tarasoff duties arising from a forensic independent medical examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutheil, Thomas G; Brodsky, Archie

    2010-01-01

    The question of whether a Tarasoff duty may emerge from a credible threat by an examinee during an independent medical examination has not been extensively addressed in the professional literature. This article analyzes that question and provides suggestions for how to respond to a perceived duty.

  12. Technical Conduct of the Child Sexual Abuse Medical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Martin A.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the technical conduct of the child-sexual-abuse medical examination and offers a research agenda. Introduction of the colposcope in the early 1980s is noted, as are other technological advances, such as the videocolposcopy and linkage with computer technology. Achievement highlights in the last 20 years of research are identified, along…

  13. Analysis of medication information exchange at discharge from a Dutch hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berlo-van de laar, Inge R. F.; Driessen, Erwin; Merkx, Maria M.; Jansman, Frank G. A.

    Background At hospitalisation and discharge the risk of errors in medication information transfer is high. Objective To study the routes by which medication information is transferred during discharge from Deventer Hospital, and to improve medication information transfer. Setting Eight hospital

  14. Ethnic disparities, hospital quality, and discharges against medical advice among patients with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onukwugha, Ebere Chukwu; Shaya, Fadia T; Saunders, Elijah; Weir, Matthew R

    2009-01-01

    Nationally, cardiovascular disease is the third-ranked disease category in terms of discharges against medical advice (AMA). Disparities in discharges AMA have not been examined among patients with cardiovascular disease, nor has the moderating role of hospital quality been studied. We examined the dual effect of race/ethnicity and hospital quality on discharges AMA by retrospectively analyzing hospital discharge data of patients who were admitted with a primary diagnosis of cardiovascular disease from 2000 through 2005. A total of 2619 of the 312,183 hospitalizations for cardiovascular disease (.8%) resulted in a discharge AMA. The sample was 50% male, 32% non-White, and an average age of 68 years of age. Non-White race was associated with a higher probability of a discharge AMA in a high-quality hospital (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.2, P White race/ethnicity was associated with a lower probability of a discharge AMA in a low-quality hospital (AOR .8, P = .01). A discharge AMA was less likely at a high-quality hospital (AOR .7, P < .001), regardless of race/ethnicity. The modifying effect of hospital quality is more apparent at the highest levels of hospital quality. Hospital quality is negatively correlated with discharges AMA and moderates the relationship between race/ethnicity and discharges AMA.

  15. Medical Admissions and Outcomes at Saint Paul's Hospital, Addis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kim

    2012-04-01

    Methods: Retrospective review of 840 records of patients admitted to medical ward of Saint Paul hospital during. April 1, 2012-March 31, .... permission, records were reviewed since patient consent was not .... *Others: Bronchial asthma/COPD (2), Other CV disorders (3), other neurologic disorders (4),. Haematology and ...

  16. A comparison of medical admissions Kamuzu Central Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diagnosis recorded in patients admitted to the adult medical wards of Jane Furse Memorial. Hospital, Lebowa, South Africa, from I November. 1982 - 31 October 1983. Disease Category. Number. Ofo of Patients Total No. Respiratory. 489. 49.0. TB alone. 273. 27.4. Cardiovascular. 147. 14.8. Hepatic. 24. 2.4. Diabetes. 43.

  17. Hospital exclusion clauses limiting liability for medical malpractice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 2002 the Supreme Court of Appeal ruling in Afrox Healthcare Beperk v. Strydom held that the common law allows hospitals to exclude liability for medical malpractice resulting in death or physical or psychological injury – except in the case of gross negligence. The effect of this judgment has now been superseded by the ...

  18. Disparities in the Medical Examination of Children in the Home of a Child with Suspected Physical Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kristine A.; Squires, Janet; Cook, Lawrence J.; Berger, Rachel P.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To identify factors predicting the medical examination of children living in a home with a child referred to child protection services (CPS) for suspected physical abuse. Methods: Medical providers at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh referred 189 children for suspected physical abuse to CPS between November 1, 2004 and May 1, 2006…

  19. [New initiatives to improve medication safety in hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero López, María José

    2004-01-01

    Medication errors constitute a significant public health problem and are recognised as such nowadays among healthcare professionals, societies, authorities and international organizations. This has led to seeking and implementing effective practices focused on improving medication use safety. This article briefly describes some of the most recent initiatives promoted to prevent medication errors in the hospital setting. These safety improvement initiatives are based upon progressively developing an institutional culture of safety and on establishing practices designed to reduce errors or detect them in time, thus avoiding adverse effects to patients. Among these recent initiatives are the safety practices approved by the National Quality Forum, and the National Patient Safety Goals that the Joint Commission on Healthcare Accreditation has required since 2003. Also mentioned are several strategies that have been offered to facilitate the application of these practices, among which are the Pathways to Medication Safely, the development of collaborative projects among hospitals and organizations of experts, and the inclusion of a medication safety specialist in hospitals as a support figure overseeing the application of safety measures. Finally, the challenges inherent in putting these preventive measures into real patient's care are discussed. The barriers confronting this step must obviously be faced if improvements in patient safety are truly to be achieved.

  20. Pedagogical and professional compromises by medical teachers in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jenny; Scott, Karen

    2014-08-01

    Following research about workplace constraints reducing the effectiveness of teaching and the motivation to teach, this study sought to understand how medical teachers in hospitals respond to the institutional context for their teaching of medical students. Through purposive sampling, younger and older male and female teachers in a range of medical and surgical paediatrics subspecialties participated in this qualitative study. We drew on ethnographic methods in interviews so that answers to the questions came from the teachers' own emphases. The systematic coding and categorising procedures used in the inductive analysis of the interview transcripts reflect the constant comparison approach of grounded theory, locating features, patterns and conceptual categories. We identified four main concepts: teachers' goals and motivations; their approaches to teaching; teachers' preferences; and, finally, as discussed in this article, the teachers' perceptions of contextual and institutional pressures in hospital-based medical teaching and related compromises. The teachers perceive constraints resulting from the various mismatches that they experience, a loss of autonomy, and the paucity of acknowledgement and resources. They suggest that the compromises they make in response are both pedagogical and institutional. We conclude that professional development is not enough to address these issues: the conditions for medical teaching and teachers in hospitals require workplace responses to enable a more productive connection between the students, curriculum and pedagogy. In particular, teachers' responsibilities in teaching and curriculum development need to be acknowledged, and practising teachers need to be supported and included in the education mission. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Longitudinal analysis of high-technology medical services and hospital financial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengul, Ferhat D; Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Ozaydin, Bunyamin; Patrician, Patricia A; OʼConnor, Stephen J

    U.S. hospitals have been investing in high-technology medical services as a strategy to improve financial performance. Despite the interest in high-tech medical services, there is not much information available about the impact of high-tech services on financial performance. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of high-tech medical services on financial performance of U.S. hospitals by using the resource-based view of the firm as a conceptual framework. Fixed-effects regressions with 2 years lagged independent variables using a longitudinal panel sample of 3,268 hospitals (2005-2010). It was hypothesized that hospitals with rare or large numbers (breadth) of high-tech medical services will experience better financial performance. Fixed effects regression results supported the link between a larger breadth of high-tech services and total margin, but only among not-for-profit hospitals. Both breadth and rareness of high-tech services were associated with high total margin among not-for-profit hospitals. Neither breadth nor rareness of high-tech services was associated with operating margin. Although breadth and rareness of high-tech services resulted in lower expenses per inpatient day among not-for-profit hospitals, these lower costs were offset by lower revenues per inpatient day. Enhancing the breadth of high-tech services may be a legitimate organizational strategy to improve financial performance, especially among not-for-profit hospitals. Hospitals may experience increased productivity and efficiency, and therefore lower inpatient operating costs, as a result of newer technologies. However, the negative impact on operating revenue should caution hospital administrators about revenue reducing features of these technologies, which may be related to the payer mix that these technologies may attract. Therefore, managers should consider both the cost and revenue implications of these technologies.

  2. Evaluation and comparison of medical records department of Iran university of medical sciences teaching hospitals and medical records department of Kermanshah university of medical sciences teaching hospitals according to the international standards ISO 9001-2000 in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    maryam ahmadi

    2010-04-01

    Conclusion: The rate of final conformity of medical records system by the criteria of the ISO 9001-2000 standards in hospitals related to Iran university of medical sciences was greater than in hospitals related to Kermanshah university of medical sciences. And total conformity rate of medical records system in Kermanshah hospitals was low. So the regulation of medical records department with ISO quality management standards can help to elevate its quality.

  3. Medical indigency and inner city hospital care: patient dumping, emergency care and public policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, M F

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the growing lack of private for-profit hospital care for the medically indigent. The issues of patient dumping and emergency care are examined from both judicial and public policy perspectives. The paper concludes by noting that dumping may be viewed as a most serious form of neglect and more comprehensive laws and court decisions are needed to require all hospitals, regardless of ownership, to treat all patients who arrive at their doors if they have the appropriate medical staff and facilities.

  4. Medical Home Features of VHA Primary Care Clinics and Avoidable Hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jean; Rose, Danielle E; Canelo, Ismelda; Upadhyay, Anjali S; Schectman, Gordon; Stark, Richard; Rubenstein, Lisa V; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2013-09-01

    As the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) reorganizes providers into the patient-centered medical home, questions remain whether this model of care can demonstrate improved patient outcomes and cost savings. We measured adoption of medical home features by VHA primary care clinics prior to widespread implementation of the patient-centered medical home and examined if they were associated with lower risk and costs of potentially avoidable hospitalizations. Secondary patient data was linked to clinic administrative and survey data. Patient and clinic factors in the baseline year (FY2009) were used to predict patient outcomes in the follow-up year. 2,853,030 patients from 814 VHA primary care clinics Patient outcomes were measured by hospitalizations for an ambulatory care sensitive condition (ACSC) and their costs and identified through diagnosis and procedure codes from inpatient records. Clinic adoption of medical home features was obtained from the American College of Physicians Medical Home Builder®. The overall mean home builder score in the study clinics was 88 (SD = 13) or 69%. In adjusted analyses an increase of 10 points in the medical home adoption score in a clinic decreased the odds of an ACSC hospitalization for patients by 3% (P = 0.032). By component, higher access and scheduling (P = 0.004) and care coordination and transitions (P = 0.020) component scores were related to lower risk of an ACSC hospitalization, and higher population management was related to higher risk (P = 0.023). Total medical home features was not related to ACSC hospitalization costs among patients with at least one (P = 0.074). Greater adoption of medical home features by VHA primary care clinics was found to be significantly associated with lower risk of avoidable hospitalizations with access and scheduling and care coordination/transitions in care as key factors.

  5. [Education of medical examiners qualified for death certification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alempijević, Djordje; Savić, Slobodan

    2006-10-01

    Death certification is very important from public health perspective, in particular, referring to gathering of data for mortality statistics on local and national level. When examining the deceased, medical examiner is capable of detecting indications of violent death and report the case for further inquest. The Public Health Care Act of the Republic of Serbia defines the responsibilities of medical examiner (ME) to certify death and estimate the time and cause of death. On the territory of Belgrade, this Service is organized by Department of Public Health of the City Council. Education of doctors-medical examiners certifying death in Belgrade area was organized during 2002 and 2003. Demonstrate the structure of the Program of continual medical education (CME) of medical examiners in Belgrade area, to look into some aspects of their professional career, and to analyze the results of their testing. Based on the Program of CME for medical examiners, test consisting of 13 questions was prepared. These questions were related to thanatology and current legislation. The evaluation of test results as well as particular characteristics (age, duration of professional engagement, etc.) of tested doctors was carried out. A total of 138 participants of CME Program were subjected to test. Mean age of tested MEs was 40.27 +/- 8.06 years, while an average duration of professional engagement was 13.43 +/- 8.00 years. Almost 2/3 of tested MEs were employed as general practitioners, while the rest were specialists, mainly in internal medicine and emergency medicine. Slightly more than 1/5 of tested MEs (21.7%) failed on the test (less than 60% of maximum score). Given the fact that slightly more than 1/5 of tested MEs (21.7%), regardless of duration of their professional engagement, did not pass the test, the level of their specific knowledge of death certification was not sufficient. Therefore, it is necessary to organize periodical CME on specific topics, including practice

  6. Analysis of the medication reconciliation process conducted at hospital admission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Beatriz Contreras Rey

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the outcomes of a medication reconciliation process at admission in the hospital setting. To assess the role of the Pharmacist in detecting reconciliation errors and preventing any adverse events entailed. Method: A retrospective study was conducted to analyze the medication reconciliation activity during the previous six months. The study included those patients for whom an apparently not justified discrepancy was detected at admission, after comparing the hospital medication prescribed with the home treatment stated in their clinical hospital records. Those patients for whom the physician ordered the introduction of home medication without any specification were also considered. In order to conduct the reconciliation process, the Pharmacist prepared the best pharmacotherapeutical history possible, reviewing all available information about the medication the patient could be taking before admission, and completing the process with a clinical interview. The discrepancies requiring clarification were reported to the physician. It was considered that the reconciliation proposal had been accepted if the relevant modification was made in the next visit of the physician, or within 24-48 hours maximum; this case was then labeled as a reconciliation error. For the descriptive analysis, the Statistics® SPSS program, version 17.0, was used. Outcomes: 494 medications were reconciled in 220 patients, with a mean of 2.25 medications per patient. More than half of patients (59.5% had some discrepancy that required clarification; the most frequent was the omission of a medication that the patient was taking before admission (86.2%, followed by an unjustified modification in dosing or way of administration (5.9%. In total, 312 discrepancies required clarification; out of these, 93 (29.8% were accepted and considered as reconciliation errors, 126 (40% were not accepted, and in 93 cases (29,8% acceptance was not relevant due to a change in

  7. 49 CFR 391.43 - Medical examination; certificate of physical examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., blood or sugar in the urine may be an indication for further testing to rule out any underlying medical... findings of the physical examination. Diabetes. If insulin is necessary to control a diabetic driver's... diabetes is present and it is controlled by use of an oral hypoglycemic drug and/or diet and exercise, it...

  8. Copying and pasting of examinations within the electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielke, Stephen; Hammond, Kenric; Helbig, Susan

    2007-06-01

    Electronic patient records often include text that has been copied and pasted from other records. A type of copying that involves the highest risk for confusion, medical error, and medico-legal harm is the copying of the clinical examination. We studied this phenomenon using an automated text categorization algorithm to detect copied exams in a set of 167,076 VA records. Exam copying occurred frequently, in about 3% of all exams, or in 25% of patient charts. Thirteen percent of all authors had copied at least one exam, and 3% of authors had copied an exam from another author. There were significant differences between service types and levels of training of the authors. We speculate that copying and pasting of exams degrades the quality of the medical record, and that studying this behavior is integral to our understanding of phenomenology of the electronic medical record.

  9. Examining the link between burnout and medical error: A checklist approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Tsiga

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: The Medical Error Checklists developed in this study advance the study of medical errors by proposing a comprehensive, valid and reliable self-assessment tool. The results highlight the importance of hospital organizational factors in preventing medical errors.

  10. Medical economic impact of tracheotomy patients on a hospital system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Kenneth W; Banoff, Karen Merl; Tong, Charles C L

    2015-04-01

    Tracheotomy patients are a small portion of hospitalizations, but account for disproportionately high risk and costs. There are many complex decisions that go into the care of these patients, and practice variation is expected to be compounded in a health system. This study sought to characterize the medical economic impact of tracheotomy patients on the hospital system. A retrospective review of the health system's hospital billing software was performed for 2013, and pertinent outcomes measures were tabulated. There were 829 tracheotomies performed in the health system of seven hospitals, with total costs of $128,883,865. Average length of stay was 36.74 days for principal procedures, and 43.36 days for tracheotomy as secondary procedures. Mortality was ∼ 18% overall, and re-admissions were 10.93% for primary, and 14.36% for secondary procedures. A fairly wide variation in each category among the different hospitals was observed. There are potentially many factors that impact variations of care and outcomes in patients with tracheotomy. Due to their large economic impact and risks for morbidity and mortality, a formalized care pathway is warranted. Goals of the pathway should include understanding medical decisions surrounding these complex patients, monitoring pertinent outcomes, reducing practice variation, and improving the efficiency of compassionate care.

  11. Risk assessment - hospital view in selecting medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Yadin; Jahnke, Ernest; Blair, Curtis

    2004-01-01

    Appropriate deployment of technological innovation contributes to improvement in the quality of healthcare delivered, the containment of cost, and access to the healthcare system. Hospitals have been allocating a significant portion of their resources to procuring and managing capital assets; they are continuously faced with demands for new medical equipment and are asked to manage existing inventory for which they are not well prepared. To objectively direct their investment, hospitals are developing medical technology management programs that need pertinent information and planning methodology for integrating new equipment into existing operations as well as for mitigating patient safety issues and costs of ownership. Clinical engineers identify technological solutions based on the matching of new medical equipment with hospital's objectives. They review their institution's overall technological position, determine strengths and weaknesses, develop equipment-selection criteria, supervise installations, train users and monitor post procurement performance to assure meeting of goals. This program, together with consistent assessment methodology and evaluation analysis, will objectively guide the capital assets decision-making process. At Texas Children's Hospital we integrated engineering simulation, bench testing and clinical studies with financial information to assure the validity of risk avoidance practice and the promotion of medical equipment and supplies selection based on quantitative measurement process and product comparison practice. The clinical engineer's skills and expertise are needed to facilitate the adoption of an objective methodology for implementing the program, thus improving the match between the hospital's needs and budget projections, equipment performance and cost of ownership. The result of systematic planning and execution is a program that assures the safety and appropriateness of inventory level at the lowest life-cycle costs at the

  12. Moderating role of interior amenities on hospital medical directors' patient-related work stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Lin, Yung-Kai; Juan, Chi Wen; Lee, Suhsing; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2013-01-01

    Considering hospital medical directors' work stress, this study aims to examine how interior amenities might moderate the effect of work stress on their health. Previous studies have revealed that hospital medical directors-senior physicians in the management positions with high-demand jobs in clinical practices and management-had a lower self-rated health. This was a cross-sectional survey study and 737 hospital medical directors in Taiwan were included. A developed and structured questionnaire covered the dimensions of patient-related work stress (i.e., physician-patient relationship stress and patient condition stress), hospital interior amenities (i.e., indoor plants, aquarium, music, art and exhibitions, and private or personalized spaces that are common or surround the workplace of healthcare professionals), and self-rated health status and health complaints. Hierarchical regressions were performed. Hospital medical directors' physician-patient relationship stresses were found to have more negative effects on their self-reported health status and complaints than do their patient condition stresses; however, only indoor plants were found to have moderating effects on their short-term health complaints (p interior amenities can produce buffering effects on work stress to some extent. Future studies could focus on finding alternatives to relieve hospital medical directors' physician-patient relationship work stresses. Evidence-based design, physicians, privacy and security, satisfaction, work environmentPreferred Citation: Lin, B. Y.-J., Lin, Y.-K., Juan, C.W., Lee, S., Lin, C.-C. (2013). Moderating role of interior amenities on hospital medical directors' patient-related work stresses. Health Environments Research & Design Journal 6(2), pp 77-92.

  13. The use of shared medication record as part of medication reconciliation at hospital admission is feasible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Lars K; Hansen, Karina R; Mølbak, Anne Grethe

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Medication reconciliation improves congruence in cross sectional patient courses. Our regional electronic medical record (EMR) integrates the shared medication record (SMR) which provides full access to current medication and medication prescriptions for all citizens in Denmark. We...... studied whether our SMR integration could facilitate medication reconciliation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients admitted to the emergency department for hospitalization were randomised to consultation using EMR with or without the integrated SMR access. Observed time used for medication reconciliation...... medical training each participated with a median of three consultations (range 1-9). Time expenditure for medicine reconciliation was 5:27 min.:sec. (range: 2:00-15:37) with access to SMR integration and 4:15 min.:sec. (1:15-12:00) without SMR access. The number of active medicine prescriptions was eight...

  14. Test anxiety and United States Medical Licensing Examination scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael; Angoff, Nancy; Encandela, John

    2016-04-01

    Many medical students experience test anxiety, which may impair their performance in examinations. We examined the relationship between test anxiety and United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) step-1 scores and determined the effect of a test-taking course on anxiety and USMLE scores. We randomly chose second-year students to take a test-taking strategies course (cases) from among volunteers. The remainder of the class served as controls. We measured test anxiety with the Westside Test Anxiety Scale (with possible scores of 1-5). The cases completed the Westside Test Anxiety scale at baseline, after completing the course (4 weeks) and again after taking the USLME step 1 (10 weeks). The controls completed the instrument at baseline and after taking the USMLE step 1 (10 weeks). Ninety-three of 101 (92%) students participated in the study. The baseline test anxiety score for all students was 2.48 (SD 0.63). Test anxiety was inversely correlated with USMLE step 1 (β = -0.24, p = 0.01), adjusting for Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) scores. The test anxiety score of the participants decreased from 2.79 to 2.61 after the course (p = 0.09), and decreased further to 2.53 after the USMLE (p = 0.02), whereas the scores of the controls increased. The mean USMLE step-1 score was 234 for the cases and 243 for the controls (p = 0.03). Many medical students experience test anxiety, which may impair their performance in examinations Test anxiety is modestly inversely correlated with USMLE step-1 scores. A test-taking strategy course modestly reduced anxiety, but did not improve USMLE scores. More robust interventions that achieve greater reductions in text anxiety may improve test scores. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Hybrid Simulation in Teaching Clinical Breast Examination to Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassif, Joseph; Sleiman, Abdul-Karim; Nassar, Anwar H; Naamani, Sima; Sharara-Chami, Rana

    2017-10-10

    Clinical breast examination (CBE) is traditionally taught to third-year medical students using a lecture and a tabletop breast model. The opportunity to clinically practice CBE depends on patient availability and willingness to be examined by students, especially in culturally sensitive environments. We propose the use of a hybrid simulation model consisting of a standardized patient (SP) wearing a silicone breast simulator jacket and hypothesize that this, compared to traditional teaching methods, would result in improved learning. Consenting third-year medical students (N = 82) at a university-affiliated tertiary care center were cluster-randomized into two groups: hybrid simulation (breast jacket + SP) and control (tabletop breast model). Students received the standard lecture by instructors blinded to the randomization, followed by randomization group-based learning and practice sessions. Two weeks later, participants were assessed in an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), which included three stations with SPs blinded to the intervention. The SPs graded the students on CBE completeness, and students completed a self-assessment of their performance and confidence during the examination. CBE completeness scores did not differ between the two groups (p = 0.889). Hybrid simulation improved lesion identification grades (p simulation relieved the fear of missing a lesion on CBE (p = 0.043) and increased satisfaction with the teaching method among students (p = 0.002). As a novel educational tool, hybrid simulation improves the sensitivity of CBE performed by medical students without affecting its specificity. Hybrid simulation may play a role in increasing the confidence of medical students during CBE.

  16. The Effect of Physician and Hospital Market Structure on Medical Technology Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca-Mandic, Pinar; Town, Robert J; Wilcock, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    To examine the influence of physician and hospital market structures on medical technology diffusion, studying the diffusion of drug-eluting stents (DESs), which became available in April 2003. Medicare claims linked to physician demographic data from the American Medical Association and to hospital characteristics from the American Hospital Association Survey. Retrospective claims data analyses. All fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries who received a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with a cardiac stent in 2003 or 2004. Each PCI record was joined to characteristics on the patient, the procedure, the cardiologist, and the hospital where the PCI was delivered. We accounted for the endogeneity of physician and hospital market structure using exogenous variation in the distances between patient, physician, and hospital locations. We estimated multivariate linear probability models that related the use of a DES in the PCI on market structure while controlling for patient, physician, and hospital characteristics. DESs diffused faster in markets where cardiology practices faced more competition. Conversely, we found no evidence that the structure of the hospital market mattered. Competitive pressure to maintain or expand PCI volume shares compelled cardiologists to adopt DESs more quickly. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  17. 38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.49 Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care. In scheduling appointments for outpatient medical...

  18. A comparison of performances of consultant surgeons, NCHDs and medical students in a modified HPAT examination.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, A

    2010-06-01

    Following the implementation of the Fottrell report, entry to medical school in Ireland has undergone significant change. Medical school studentship is now awarded based on a combination of points obtained from the final examination of Irish secondary schools (the leaving certificate) combined with HPAT scores (Health Professions Admissions Test). The HPAT is designed to test a candidate\\'s knowledge in several different fields including problem solving skills, logical and non verbal reasoning. A sample HPAT was administered to a test group composed of consultant surgeons, non consultant hospital doctors, and medical students. Statistical analysis was performed and no significant difference was found between the performances of the groups. This is surprising as it was expected that groups with greater experience at medical problem solving would have translated to higher scores. This exposes a flaw within the HPAT system and a potential weakness in the process of doctor selection.

  19. Systematic literature review of hospital medication administration errors in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameer A

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed Ameer,1 Soraya Dhillon,1 Mark J Peters,2 Maisoon Ghaleb11Department of Pharmacy, School of Life and Medical Sciences, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK; 2Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, UK Objective: Medication administration is the last step in the medication process. It can act as a safety net to prevent unintended harm to patients if detected. However, medication administration errors (MAEs during this process have been documented and thought to be preventable. In pediatric medicine, doses are usually administered based on the child's weight or body surface area. This in turn increases the risk of drug miscalculations and therefore MAEs. The aim of this review is to report MAEs occurring in pediatric inpatients. Methods: Twelve bibliographic databases were searched for studies published between January 2000 and February 2015 using “medication administration errors”, “hospital”, and “children” related terminologies. Handsearching of relevant publications was also carried out. A second reviewer screened articles for eligibility and quality in accordance with the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Key findings: A total of 44 studies were systematically reviewed. MAEs were generally defined as a deviation of dose given from that prescribed; this included omitted doses and administration at the wrong time. Hospital MAEs in children accounted for a mean of 50% of all reported medication error reports (n=12,588. It was also identified in a mean of 29% of doses observed (n=8,894. The most prevalent type of MAEs related to preparation, infusion rate, dose, and time. This review has identified five types of interventions to reduce hospital MAEs in children: barcode medicine administration, electronic prescribing, education, use of smart pumps, and standard concentration. Conclusion: This review has identified a wide variation in the prevalence of hospital MAEs in children. This is attributed to

  20. Patients' knowledge concerning their medications on discharge from hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullar, T; Roach, P; Mellor, E J; McNeece, J; Judd, A; Feely, M; Cooke, J

    1989-02-01

    Fifty patients were interviewed, on discharge from hospital, about their medications. Nine (18%) patients did not know, and a further four (8%) had inappropriate beliefs about why they were taking at least one of their discharge medications. Very few patients knew of significant side-effects which they might expect, or precautions which they should take, and over half did not know how long they were to continue taking their medicines. A small proportion was unable to read the bottle or open the container. Thus, even patients who, by virtue of an in-patient stay, have had a prolonged opportunity for education regarding their medicines have very little knowledge of their medicines upon discharge from hospital.

  1. Hospital Social Work and Spirituality: Views of Medical Social Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Samta P

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on a study of 1,389 medical social workers in 108 hospitals across 12 countries, on their views on spirituality and spiritually sensitive interventions in hospital settings. Results of the logistic regression analyses and structural equation models showed that medical social workers from European countries, United States of America, Canada, and Australia, those had undergone spiritual training, and those who had higher self-reported spiritual experiences scale scores were more likely to have the view that spirituality in hospital settings is for facilitating integral healing and wellness of patients and were more likely to prefer spiritual packages of New Age movements as the form of spiritual program, understand spiritual assessment as assessing the patients' spiritual starting point, to then build on further interventions and were likely to attest the understanding of spiritual techniques as mindfulness techniques. Finally they were also likely to understand the spiritual goals of intervention in a holistic way, that is, as that of integral healing, growth of consciousness and promoting overall well-being of patients vis-à-vis only coping and coming to terms with health adversities. Results of the structural equation models also showed covariances between religion, spirituality training, and scores on the self-reported spiritual experiences scale, having thus a set of compounding effects on social workers' views on spiritual interventions in hospitals. The implications of the results for health care social work practice and curriculum are discussed.

  2. Laughing through This Pain: Medical Clowning during Examination of Sexually Abused Children--An Innovative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tener, Dafna; Lev-Wiesel, Rachel; Franco, Nessia Lang; Ofir, Shoshi

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the role of medical clowns during medical examinations of children who were sexually abused. Three case studies are described, illustrating diverse interactions among the victimized child, the medical clown, and the medical forensical examiner during medical forensic examinations held at the Tene Center for Sexually Abused…

  3. Characteristics of registration of medical records in a hospital in southern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cender Udai Quispe-Juli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the characteristics of registration of medical records of hospitalization in the Hospital III Yanahuara in Arequipa, Peru. Material and methods: The study was observational, cross-sectional and retrospective. 225 medical records of hospitalization were evaluated in November 2015. A tab consisting of 15 items was used; each item was assessed using a scale: "very bad", "bad", "acceptable", "good" and "very good". Adescriptive analysis was done by calculating frequency. Results: Items with a higher proportion of acceptable registration data were: clear therapeutic indication (84%, clinical evolution (74.7%, diagnosis (70.7%, complete and orderly therapeutic indication (54.2%, medical history taking (50.2% and physical examination (43.1%. The very well recorded items were: indication of tests and procedures (97.3%, medical identification (91.1% and allergies (67.1%. Very bad recorded items were: reason for admission (91.1%, life habits (72.9% and prior treatment (38.2%. Conclusions: Most medical records of hospitalization are characterized by an acceptable record of most evaluated items; however they have notable deficiencies in some items.

  4. Hospitals as a 'risk environment': an ethno-epidemiological study of voluntary and involuntary discharge from hospital against medical advice among people who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Ryan; Small, Will; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    People who inject drugs (PWID) experience high levels of HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C (HCV) infection that, together with injection-related complications such as non-fatal overdose and injection-related infections, lead to frequent hospitalizations. However, injection drug-using populations are among those most likely to be discharged from hospital against medical advice, which significantly increases their likelihood of hospital readmission, longer overall hospital stays, and death. In spite of this, little research has been undertaken examining how social-structural forces operating within hospital settings shape the experiences of PWID in receiving care in hospitals and contribute to discharges against medical advice. This ethno-epidemiological study was undertaken in Vancouver, Canada to explore how the social-structural dynamics within hospitals function to produce discharges against medical advice among PWID. In-depth interviews were conducted with thirty PWID recruited from among participants in ongoing observational cohort studies of people who inject drugs who reported that they had been discharged from hospital against medical advice within the previous two years. Data were analyzed thematically, and by drawing on the 'risk environment' framework and concepts of social violence. Our findings illustrate how intersecting social and structural factors led to inadequate pain and withdrawal management, which led to continued drug use in hospital settings. In turn, diverse forms of social control operating to regulate and prevent drug use in hospital settings amplified drug-related risks and increased the likelihood of discharge against medical advice. Given the significant morbidity and health care costs associated with discharge against medical advice among drug-using populations, there is an urgent need to reshape the social-structural contexts of hospital care for PWID by shifting emphasis toward evidence-based pain and drug treatment augmented by harm

  5. Prevalence of examination related anxiety in a private medical college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Najeeb; Rasool, Sohail Ataur; Sultan, Ambreen; Tahira, Irum

    2013-01-01

    To assess examination related anxiety among first professional medical students and to determine the factors contributing to this kind of anxiety among them. A cross-sectional study using structured self-administered questionnaire was carried out over 10 days in Frontier Medical and Dental College, Abbottabad, in December 2012, using sample size of 200 students,. Survey questionnaire consisted of twenty questions regarding life style, study style, psychological and social problems, and results were analyzed by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). A total of 200 students out of 220 (90.90%) filled in the questionnaire. There were 61.50% male and 38.50% female students. The average maximum Examination related Anxiety marked on VAS was 47 +/- 21. Among different factors contributing to exam anxiety, inadequate rest (89%), irrational thoughts (67.50) and excessive course load (60%) were the most important factors reported by the students. Most of the students were aware of anxiety-reduction techniques but seldom implement them. On a VAS, examination, in its own right, has been established as a definite cause of anxiety, although the magnitude is not alarming. Students who regularly participate in class tests and perform well there, are least affected by this anxiety.

  6. The effect of electronic medical record adoption on outcomes in US hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jinhyung

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The electronic medical record (EMR is one of the most promising components of health information technology. However, the overall impact of EMR adoption on outcomes at US hospitals remains unknown. This study examined the relationship between basic EMR adoption and 30-day rehospitalization, 30-day mortality, inpatient mortality and length of stay. Methods Our overall approach was to compare outcomes for the two years before and two years after the year of EMR adoption, at 708 acute-care hospitals in the US from 2000 to 2007. We looked at the effect of EMR on outcomes using two methods. First, we compared the outcomes by quarter for the period before and after EMR adoption among hospitals that adopted EMR. Second, we compared hospitals that adopted EMR to those that did not, before and after EMR adoption, using a generalized linear model. Results Hospitals adopting EMR experienced 0.11 (95% CI: -0.218 to −0.002 days’ shorter length of stay and 0.182 percent lower 30-day mortality, but a 0.19 (95% CI: 0.0006 to 0.0033 percent increase in 30-day rehospitalization in the two years after EMR adoption. The association of EMR adoption with outcomes also varied by type of admission (medical vs. surgical. Conclusions Previous studies using observational data from large samples of hospitals have produced conflicting results. However, using different methods, we found a small but statistically significant association of EMR adoption with outcomes of hospitalization.

  7. Medical record-keeping and patient perception of hospital care quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Van Mô; François, Patrice; Batailler, Pierre; Seigneurin, Arnaud; Vittoz, Jean-Philippe; Sellier, Elodie; Labarère, José

    2014-01-01

    Medical record represents the main information support used by healthcare providers. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether patient perception of hospital care quality related to compliance with medical-record keeping. The authors merged the original data collected as part of a nationwide audit of medical records with overall and subscale perception scores (range 0-100, with higher scores denoting better rating) computed for 191 respondents to a cross-sectional survey of patients discharged from a university hospital. The median overall patient perception score was 77 (25th-75th percentiles, 68-87) and differed according to the presence of discharge summary completed within eight days of discharge (81 v. 75, p = 0.03 after adjusting for baseline patient and hospital stay characteristics). No independent associations were found between patient perception scores and the documentation of pain assessment and nutritional disorder screening. Yet, medical record-keeping quality was independently associated with higher patient perception scores for the nurses' interpersonal and technical skills component. First, this was a single-center study conducted in a large full-teaching hospital and the findings may not apply to other facilities. Second, the analysis might be underpowered to detect small but clinically significant differences in patient perception scores according to compliance with recording standards. Third, the authors could not investigate whether electronic medical record contributed to better compliance with recording standards and eventually higher patient perception scores. Because of the potential consequences of poor recording for patient safety, further efforts are warranted to improve the accuracy and completeness of documentation in medical records. A modest relationship exists between the quality of medical-record keeping and patient perception of hospital care.

  8. Integrating patient digital photographs with medical imaging examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, Senthil; Bhatti, Pamela; Arepalli, Chesnal D; Salama, Mohamed; Provenzale, James M; Tridandapani, Srini

    2013-10-01

    We introduce the concept, benefits, and general architecture for acquiring, storing, and displaying digital photographs along with medical imaging examinations. We also discuss a specific implementation built around an Android-based system for simultaneously acquiring digital photographs along with portable radiographs. By an innovative application of radiofrequency identification technology to radiographic cassettes, the system is able to maintain a tight relationship between these photographs and the radiographs within the picture archiving and communications system (PACS) environment. We provide a cost analysis demonstrating the economic feasibility of this technology. Since our architecture naturally integrates with patient identification methods, we also address patient privacy issues.

  9. Potential clinical impact of medication discrepancies at hospital admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quélennec, Baptiste; Beretz, Laurence; Paya, Dominique; Blicklé, Jean Frédéric; Gourieux, Bénédicte; Andrès, Emmanuel; Michel, Bruno

    2013-09-01

    Medication errors at the interfaces of care are highly prevalent. This study aims to identify unintentional medication discrepancies at hospital admission and to explore their potential clinical impact in elderly patients. The study was conducted in an Internal Medicine Department. Patients ≥ 65 years admitted through the emergency department were eligible. Best possible medication histories, obtained from different sources by pharmacists, were compared to admission medication prescriptions to identify and correct unintentional discrepancies. A three-category scale was used to rate errors for their potential to cause harm: Level (L) 1 "no potential harm", L2 "monitoring or intervention potentially required to preclude harm", and L3 "potential harm". This scale was also designed to take into account patient's clinical characteristics and high-risk drugs. 256 patients were included. Mean age was 82.2 ± 7.2 years old. 85 patients (33.2%) had ≥ 1 unintentional discrepancies. Overall, there were 173 unintentional discrepancies. The 3 most common drug classes involved in errors were nervous system (22.0%), gastrointestinal (20.0%) and cardiovascular (18.0%) medications. The most common types of errors were "omission" (87.9%) and "incorrect dose" (8.1%). Among the unintentional discrepancies, 20.8% had the potential to require increased monitoring or intervention to preclude harm (L2) and 6.4% had the potential to cause clinical deterioration (L3). More than 25% of the identified errors presented a potential clinical impact. These results show that a combined intervention of pharmacists and physicians in a collaborative medication reconciliation process has a high potential to reduce clinical relevant errors at hospital admission. Copyright © 2013 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Three controversies over item disclosure in medical licensure examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Soo Park

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In response to views on public's right to know, there is growing attention to item disclosure – release of items, answer keys, and performance data to the public – in medical licensure examinations and their potential impact on the test's ability to measure competence and select qualified candidates. Recent debates on this issue have sparked legislative action internationally, including South Korea, with prior discussions among North American countries dating over three decades. The purpose of this study is to identify and analyze three issues associated with item disclosure in medical licensure examinations – 1 fairness and validity, 2 impact on passing levels, and 3 utility of item disclosure – by synthesizing existing literature in relation to standards in testing. Historically, the controversy over item disclosure has centered on fairness and validity. Proponents of item disclosure stress test takers’ right to know, while opponents argue from a validity perspective. Item disclosure may bias item characteristics, such as difficulty and discrimination, and has consequences on setting passing levels. To date, there has been limited research on the utility of item disclosure for large scale testing. These issues requires ongoing and careful consideration.

  11. Pharmacist Staffing, Technology Use, and Implementation of Medication Safety Practices in Rural Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Michelle M.; Moscovice, Ira S.; Davidson, Gestur

    2006-01-01

    Context: Medication safety is clearly an important quality issue for rural hospitals. However, rural hospitals face special challenges implementing medication safety practices in terms of their staffing and financial and technical resources. Purpose: This study assessed the capacity of small rural hospitals to implement medication safety…

  12. Sleep, mental health status, and medical errors among hospital nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimura, Mayumi; Imai, Makoto; Okawa, Masako; Fujimura, Toshimasa; Yamada, Naoto

    2010-01-01

    Medical error involving nurses is a critical issue since nurses' actions will have a direct and often significant effect on the prognosis of their patients. To investigate the significance of nurse health in Japan and its potential impact on patient services, a questionnaire-based survey amongst nurses working in hospitals was conducted, with the specific purpose of examining the relationship between shift work, mental health and self-reported medical errors. Multivariate analysis revealed significant associations between the shift work system, General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) scores and nurse errors: the odds ratios for shift system and GHQ were 2.1 and 1.1, respectively. It was confirmed that both sleep and mental health status among hospital nurses were relatively poor, and that shift work and poor mental health were significant factors contributing to medical errors.

  13. Medication details documented on hospital discharge: cross-sectional observational study of factors associated with medication non-reconciliation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grimes, Tamasine C

    2011-03-01

    Movement into or out of hospital is a vulnerable period for medication safety. Reconciling the medication a patient is using before admission with the medication prescribed on discharge, and documenting any changes (medication reconciliation) is recommended to improve safety. The aims of the study were to investigate the factors contributing to medication reconciliation on discharge, and identify the prevalence of non-reconciliation.

  14. Medication Discrepancies Associated With a Medication Reconciliation Program and Clinical Outcomes After Hospital Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiu, Jennifer R; Fradette, Miriam; Padwal, Raj S; Majumdar, Sumit R; Youngson, Erik; Bakal, Jeffrey A; McAlister, Finlay A

    2016-04-01

    To identify the frequency of unintended medication discrepancies 30 days postdischarge from medicine wards with interprofessional medication reconciliation processes and clinical import. Prospective cohort study of adults discharged between October 2013 and November 2014 from two teaching hospitals in Edmonton, Canada. The Best Possible Medication Discharge Plan (BPMDP) was prepared for all patients. Patients were called 30 days postdischarge to determine the medication discrepancy rate from the BPMDP and whether this was intentional or unintentional; three clinicians used standardized criteria to determine if the discrepancy was inconsequential. Electronic health records and patient contact were used to ascertain death, hospital readmissions, and emergency department (ED) visits at 90 days. Of 433 patients (mean age 64 yrs, 52% female, median discharge prescriptions 6 [interquartile range 4-9]), 168 (38.8%) had at least one unintentional medication discrepancy at 30 days (325 total discrepancies; median one [interquartile range 1-2 discrepancies per patient]). Patients with unintentional medication discrepancies were older (65.9 vs 61.9 yrs, p=0.03) with more discharge medications (7 vs 6, p=0.03). Most unintentional discrepancies (91.1%) were judged inconsequential. The presence of an unintentional medication discrepancy was not associated with 90-day readmission or death (42/167 [25.1%] vs 64/263 [24.3%], adjusted odds ratio 0.96 [95% confidence interval 0.60-1.54]) or ED visits (69 [41.3%] vs 101 [38.4%], adjusted odds ratio 1.11 [95% confidence interval 0.74-1.67]. Despite the presence of an interprofessional medication reconciliation process, over one-third of patients had a medication discrepancy within 30 days of discharge, although most were inconsequential and there was no association between unintended medication discrepancies and risk of readmission, ED visit, or death 3 months after discharge. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  15. Documentation of clinical care in hospital patients' medical records: A qualitative study of medical students' perspectives on clinical documentation education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Stella; Coverdale, Steven; Callen, Joanne

    2016-12-01

    Clinical documentation is essential for communication between health professionals and the provision of quality care to patients. To examine medical students' perspectives of their education in documentation of clinical care in hospital patients' medical records. A qualitative design using semi-structured interviews with fourth-year medical students was undertaken at a hospital-based clinical school in an Australian university. Several themes reflecting medical students' clinical documentation education emerged from the data: formal clinical documentation education using lectures and tutorials was minimal; most education occurred on the job by junior doctors and student's expressed concerns regarding variation in education between teams and receiving limited feedback on performance. Respondents reported on the importance of feedback for their learning of disease processes and treatments. They suggested that improvements could be made in the timing of clinical documentation education and they stressed the importance of training on the job. On-the-job education with feedback in clinical documentation provides a learning opportunity for medical students and is essential in order to ensure accurate, safe, succinct and timely clinical notes. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Medical review and the newly revised emergency care obligations of Medicare hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, K C

    1990-08-01

    The "anti-dumping" provisions under Section 1867 of the Social Security Act have been clarified and strengthened by recent amendments. Medicare-participating hospitals must post signs informing the public of their obligation to examine, treat, and appropriately transfer individuals who request emergency services in the emergency department. Inquiries about an individual's method of payment or insurance source may not delay examination or treatment. Qualified personnel must perform medical screening of all emergency patients, and those to be transferred with emergency medical conditions which have not been stabilized must receive treatment to minimize the risk of transfer. There are stepped-up requirements for informed patient consent and documentation that the medical benefits of a transfer outweigh the risks. In physician-initiated transfers, the receiving hospital must be sent certification by a physician that the benefits of transfer outweigh the risks. Since there is evidence that medically appropriate transfers of persons with emergency medical conditions may actually be underutilized, particularly in rural settings, medical reviewers should avoid an anti-transfer bias.

  17. Do peer-tutors perform better in examinations? An analysis of medical school final examination results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Kazuya; Furmedge, Daniel S; Sturrock, Alison; Gill, Deborah

    2014-07-01

    Peer-assisted learning (PAL) is recognised as an effective learning tool and its benefits are well documented in a range of educational settings. Learners find it enjoyable and their performances in assessments are comparable with those of students taught by faculty tutors. In addition, PAL tutors themselves report the development of improved clinical skills and confidence through tutoring. However, whether tutoring leads to actual improvement in performance has not been fully investigated. As high-achieving students are already en route to succeeding in final examinations, we wanted to examine whether participation in a peer-tutoring programme in itself leads to better final-year examination performance. We conducted a retrospective analysis of results on final-year written and clinical examinations at University College London Medical School during 2010-2012. Z-scores were calculated and the performances of PAL tutors and students who were not PAL tutors were compared using analysis of covariance (ancova). Year 4 examination results were used as indicators of previous academic attainment. Of the 1050 students who attempted the final examination, 172 were PAL tutors in the final year. Students who acted as PAL tutors outperformed students who did not in all examination components by 1-3%. Z-scores differed by approximately 0.2 and this was statistically significant, although the significance of this difference diminished when controlling for Year 4 results. Students who acted as PAL tutors who had scored in the top quartile in Year 4 examinations scored significantly better in a long-station objective structured clinical examination (LSO). Although students who acted as PAL tutors performed better than students who did not in final-year examinations, this difference was small and attributable to the students' background academic abilities. High-achieving students appear to be self-selecting as peer-tutors and their enhanced performance in LSOs may reflect their

  18. Bone marrow examination findings at Aga Khan University Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute myeloid leukaemia was the most common malignant haematological disorder. The most common indication for bone marrow examination was anaemia followed by diagnostic work up of fever of unknown origin. Conclusion: Nutritional anaemia predominated as the commonest benign haematological finding on bone ...

  19. [The early medical textbooks in Korea: medical textbooks published at Je Joong Won-Severance Hospital Medical School].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H W

    1998-01-01

    Kwang Hye Won(Je Joong Won), the first western hospital in Korea, was founded in 1885. The first western Medical School in Korea was open in 1886 under the hospital management. Dr. O. R. Avison, who came to Korea in 1893, resumed the medical education there, which was interrupted for some time before his arrival in Korea. He inaugurated translating and publishing medical textbooks with the help of Kim Pil Soon who later became one of the first seven graduates in Severance Hospital Medical School. The first western medical textbook translated into Korean was Henry Gray's Anatomy. However, these twice-translated manuscripts were never to be published on account of being lost and burnt down. The existing early anatomy textbooks, the editions of 1906 and 1909, are not the translation of Gray's Anatomy, but that of Japanese anatomy textbook of Gonda. The remaining oldest medical textbook in Korean is Inorganic Materia Medica published in 1905. This book is unique among its kind that O. R. Avison is the only translator of the book and it contains the prefaces of O. R. Avison and Kim Pil Soon. The publication of medical textbook was animated by the participation of other medical students, such as Hong Suk Hoo and Hong Jong Eun. The list of medical textbooks published includes almost all the field of medicine. The medical textbooks in actual existence are as follows: Inorganic Materia Medica (1905), Inorganic Chemistry (1906), Anatomy I (1906), Physiology (1906), Diagnostics I (1906), Diagnostics II (1907), Obstetrics (1908), Organic Chemistry (1909), Anatomy (1909), and Surgery (1910).

  20. How Do Medical Specialty Training Educators and Trainees Perceive Medical Specialty Selection Examination (TUS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozen Kutanis, Rana; Tunc, Tulin; Tunc, Murat

    2011-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to explore whether a single-step examination is adequate for ranking the medical graduates for specialty training in medicine which is practically similar to doctoral training (PhD) in other disciplines. For this purpose, a semi- structured interview-based qualitative research was carried out at a university medical…

  1. [The possibility of medico-legal opinionating on medical error in cases of waived postmortem examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Jerzy

    2008-01-01

    For several years now, with the introduction of the health care sector reform we have been observing a considerable drop in the number of postmortem examinations performed in patients who died in hospitals. The decrease amounts to as much as 50 to 70%. This is undoubtedly a consequence of financial restrictions imposed on the management of these inpatient facilities. On the other hand, Departments of Forensic Medicine established to evaluate the so-called medical errors are swamped with an increasing avalanche of complaints concerning the appropriateness of therapeutic management. This leads to a growing number of orders from penal prosecution and jurisdiction agencies with requests for assessment whether a medical error has been committed in a particular case. The result of a postmortem examination is practically the only basis for a factual evaluation of a given case. When no autopsy has been performed, the experts are virtually helpless, and in the majority of such instances, they are forced to refuse passing an expert opinion. The report presents basic principles of medico-legal opinionating in criminal cases (including proceedings pertaining to medical errors), the rules governing the medical error assessment, as well as problems encountered in evaluating the appropriate course of treatment when a post mortem examination has been waived.

  2. Examining Sense of Community among Medical Professionals in an Online Graduate Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadriye O. Lewis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As the number of online degree programs continues to grow, one of the greatest challenges is developing a sense of community among learners who do not convene at the same time and place. This study examined the sense of community among medical professionals in an online graduate program for healthcare professionals. We took the sample from a fully online program delivered jointly by a state university and a local children's hospital in the Midwest. We administered Rovai's Classroom Community Survey with 11 additional demographic questions. We also utilized online interviews to further explore students’ understanding of sense of community. A bi-factor model was fitted to the online sense of community survey data. Using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA and univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA we identified potential group differences. The qualitative data were analyzed thematically in a recursive and iterative process. Study results suggested that a dominant factor existed: sense of community with two sub-domain factors including sense of learning and sense of connectedness. No significant differences in sense of community with regard to gender, native language, or area of medical practice were detected. However, results showed a difference in sense of community between the three courses examined. This study is the first to examine the sense of community among online medical professionals. Since our findings are in contrast to those of previous studies, this opens the door to additional studies around the possible differences between the community characteristics and needs of medical professionals as online students.

  3. A randomised controlled trial of blended learning to improve the newborn examination skills of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Alice; Inglis, Garry; Jardine, Luke; Koorts, Pieter; Davies, Mark William

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the hypotheses that a blended learning approach would improve the newborn examination skills of medical students and yield a higher level of satisfaction with learning newborn examination. Undergraduate medical students at a tertiary teaching hospital were individually randomised to receive either a standard neonatology teaching programme (control group), or additional online access to the PENSKE Baby Check Learning Module (blended learning group). The primary outcome was performance of newborn examination on standardised assessment by blinded investigators. The secondary outcomes were performance of all 'essential' items of the examination, and participant satisfaction. The recruitment rate was 88% (71/81). The blended learning group achieved a significantly higher mean score than the control group (p=0.02) for newborn examination. There was no difference for performance of essential items, or satisfaction with learning newborn examination. The blended learning group rated the module highly for effective use of learning time and ability to meet specific learning needs. A blended learning approach resulted in a higher level of performance of newborn examination on standardised assessment. This is consistent with published literature on blended learning and has implications for all neonatal clinicians including junior doctors, midwifes and nurse practitioners.

  4. HOW MEDICAL UNDERGRADUATES PREPARE FOR UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION: LESSON FROM A TEACHING MEDICAL INSTITUTION IN SOUTH INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shib Sekhar Datta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical colleges in India conventionally follow a curriculum overfed with large volume of information expecting students will imbibe such curriculum unquestionably overlooking what and how they progress. There have been many attempts to improve the learning process of medical students, neglecting the process which students adopt towards such learning and prepare for their exams aiming better performance. Objective: To explore qualitatively the way medical undergraduates prepare for their university examination. Methods: Present qualitative research was undertaken among medical interns during Nov-2011 to March-2012. FGDs were conducted by trained moderator using semi-structured guidelines and note taker recorded each FGD. Content analysis of FGDs was primarily oriented towards behaviour of medical undergraduates during preparatory phase before their university examinations like study pattern, study material, eating behaviour, level of stress, addiction etc. Qualitative content analysis of textual level of data was undertaken using Atlas.ti.5.0 software package. Results: Students are serious about studies just before examinations and refer to notes prepared by seniors, small books with important topics, and self-made notes. Girls depend predominantly on self-made notes. Students primarily focus on important topics in each subject. Time-in-hand decides what they study and try to remember before exams. They become casual about their diet, clothing and self-care. Stress, fear and high academic expectation often drive them towards addictive substances. They often suffer from loneliness and seek empathy from opposite sex batch mates, seniors, teachers and family members and start believing in their fortune and examiners' will rather than actual preparation. Conclusion: Students' psychology and culture should be addressed in harmony with curriculum reform for better learning by medical undergraduates.

  5. [Ethical behavioral standards of medical students on examinations and studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolkin, Lior; Glick, Shimon

    2007-06-01

    In recent years the medical literature has reflected an increasing interest in the medical ethics of physicians and medical students. Studies have shown that cheating in medical school is frequent enough to cause concern, that there is a positive correlation between students' ethical attitude and their ethical behavior and between cheating in school and cheating in patient care. This study aims to examine student attitudes towards cheating, their self-reported behavior, analyze cultural and sub-cultural differences, and to reach practical conclusions that might be incorporated into the teaching of ethics in medical schools. Anonymous questionnaires were distributed to 193 first and second year students of the Israeli and American programs at Ben-Gurion University. The questionnaire consisted of fifty three multiple choice questions. The students were asked to state their opinion on various cheating practices at medical school and dishonesty in patient care, to estimate how they would resolve various ethical dilemmas and to provide some demographic information. The results were analyzed using SPSS. T-tests, Chi-Square tests, one-way analysis of variance, and Pearson and Spearman's coefficients, all used as appropriate. Completed questionnaires were returned by 141 students (73%). The majority of the students regard cheating in an exam (93%) or on a final paper (85%) to be morally unacceptable behavior. Copying during an exam is regarded as more morally unacceptable than copying a homework exercise. The majority of the students consider faking a patient's laboratory results to be morally unacceptable behavior (98%). American students regard copying a homework exercise, reconstructing exam questions for the benefit of next year students and giving answers to a fellow student during an exam to be more morally unacceptable in comparison to the Israeli students. Married students consider cheating to be more morally unacceptable than unmarried students. A positive

  6. Training of assistant forensic medical examiners in London, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Margaret M; Norfolk, Guy A

    2010-05-01

    The overall aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the quality of current practical training in London with a view to improving future training as part of faculty development. New trainees in clinical forensic medicine (CFM), Assistant Forensic Medical Examiners (AFMEs), were interviewed to gather their views of their recent training experience and to attempt to identify problems with implementing the training as it stands. An overwhelming theme emerged that there should be a more formal structure to the training of newly appointed FMEs. Each trainee should have a named clinical and educational supervisor during the training period. Furthermore it should be mandatory for educational supervisors to undergo training and review of performance. Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Prescribing error at hospital discharge: a retrospective review of medication information in an Irish hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelson, M; Walsh, E; Bradley, C P; McCague, P; Owens, R; Sahm, L J

    2017-08-01

    Prescribing error may result in adverse clinical outcomes leading to increased patient morbidity, mortality and increased economic burden. Many errors occur during transitional care as patients move between different stages and settings of care. To conduct a review of medication information and identify prescribing error among an adult population in an urban hospital. Retrospective review of medication information was conducted. Part 1: an audit of discharge prescriptions which assessed: legibility, compliance with legal requirements, therapeutic errors (strength, dose and frequency) and drug interactions. Part 2: A review of all sources of medication information (namely pre-admission medication list, drug Kardex, discharge prescription, discharge letter) for 15 inpatients to identify unintentional prescription discrepancies, defined as: "undocumented and/or unjustified medication alteration" throughout the hospital stay. Part 1: of the 5910 prescribed items; 53 (0.9%) were deemed illegible. Of the controlled drug prescriptions 11.1% (n = 167) met all the legal requirements. Therapeutic errors occurred in 41% of prescriptions (n = 479) More than 1 in 5 patients (21.9%) received a prescription containing a drug interaction. Part 2: 175 discrepancies were identified across all sources of medication information; of which 78 were deemed unintentional. Of these: 10.2% (n = 8) occurred at the point of admission, whereby 76.9% (n = 60) occurred at the point of discharge. The study identified the time of discharge as a point at which prescribing errors are likely to occur. This has implications for patient safety and provider work load in both primary and secondary care.

  8. Prevalence of Sleep Deprivation and Relation with Depressive Symptoms among Medical Residents in King Fahd University Hospital, Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Maddah, Esraa M.; Badria K. Al-Dabal; Mohammad S. Khalil

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Sleep deprivation is common among medical residents of all specialties. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of sleep deprivation and depressive symptoms among medical residents in King Fahd University Hospital (KFUH) in Al Khobar, Saudi Arabia. Furthermore, the association between sleep deprivation, sleepiness and depressive symptoms was examined. Methods: This cross-sectional study took place between February and April 2012 and involved 171 KFUH medical residents of diff...

  9. A study on the satisfaction of medical licensing examination and the present condition of skill test in medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Hee Park

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available lt has been an issue whether the current medical examination system can evaluate medical students' competencies efficiently. This study was performed to survey on the satisfaction for the current medical examination system and present situation for clinical skill test in medical schools. We conducted a survey for this research and the subjects of this study were deans, medical professors, resident and medical students. We met with interesting results. First, most respondents answered the current medical examination system couldn't evaluate the medical students' competencies efficiently. Second, many residents thought preparing for paper-pencil test was not helpful for training, while experiencing clinical skill test was helpful for it. Third, the current contents and methods to evaluate clinical skill in the medical schools were variable and desirable. We concluded it was high time to change our medical examination system for evaluating the clinical skill performance of medical students.

  10. Hospital Staff and Patient Recognition Toward Opening of Medical Services Market, and Factors in Selecting a Foreign Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Ryu, Hyang Jin; Park, Eun Cheol; Sohn, Tae Yong; Yu, Seung Hum

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The objectives of this study are to compare the hospital employees' and patients' recognition and attitudes toward the opening of the medical services market, to analyze the differences between hospital employees and patients on the factors in selecting a foreign hospital. Materials and Methods This study collected and analyzed data using systematic questionnaires that were self-administered by employees and outpatients to compare their recognition of the opening of the medical servic...

  11. Hospital-based health technology assessment for innovative medical devices in university hospitals and the role of hospital pharmacists: learning from international experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Nicolas; Lelong, Anne-Sophie; Prognon, Patrice; Pineau, Judith

    2013-04-01

    Several models of hospital-based health technology assessment (HTA) have been developed worldwide, for the introduction of innovative medical devices and support evidence-based decision making in hospitals. Two such models, the HTA unit and mini-HTA models, are widespread in university hospitals and involve various stakeholders. The purpose of this work was to highlight the potential role of hospital pharmacists in hospital-based HTA activities. We searched for articles, reviews, and letters relating to hospital-based HTA, as defined by the Hospital-Based Health Technology Assessment Worldwide Survey published by the Health Technology Assessment International (HTAi) Society, in the Health Technology Assessment database, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and hospital pharmacy journals. The number of university hospitals performing hospital-based HTA has increased since the 2008 Hospital-Based Health Technology Assessment Worldwide Survey. Our own experience and international findings show that hospital pharmacists already contribute to hospital-based HTA activities and have developed study interpretation skills and a knowledge of medical devices. Promoting multidisciplinary approaches is one of the key success factors in hospital-based HTA. Hospital pharmacists occupy a position between hospital managers, clinicians, health economists, biomedical engineers, and patients and can provide a new perspective. In the future, hospital pharmacists are likely to become increasingly involved in hospital-based HTA activities.

  12. Determinants of Market Share of For-Profit Hospitals: An Empirical Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungchul Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study estimates the effects of a prospective payment system on the growth of for-profit hospitals. The empirical results show that the proportion of patient care paid for by Medicare managed care has a positive, statistically significant relationship with the market share of for-profit hospitals. Medicare managed care reimburses health care providers prospectively, and a larger portion of prospective reimbursements is received by for-profit hospitals, whose market share consequently increases. In addition, the proportion of patients with Medi-Cal and third party managed care has a positive, statistically significant relationship with the market share of for-profit hospitals.

  13. Resource-oriented coaching for reduction of examination-related stress in medical students: an exploratory randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kötter, Thomas; Niebuhr, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The years spent in acquiring medical education is considered a stressful period in the life of many students. Students whose mental health deteriorates during this long period of study are less likely to become empathic and productive physicians. In addition to other specific stressors, academic examinations seem to further induce medical school-related stress and anxiety. Combined group and individual resource-oriented coaching early in medical education might reduce examination-related stress and anxiety and, consequently, enhance academic performance. Good quality evidence, however, remains scarce. In this study, therefore, we explored the question of whether coaching affects examination-related stress and health in medical students. We conducted a randomized controlled trial. Students who registered for the first medical academic examination in August 2014 at the University of Lübeck were recruited and randomized into three groups. The intervention groups 1 and 2 received a 1-hour psychoeducative seminar. Group 1 additionally received two 1-hour sessions of individual coaching during examination preparation. Group 3 served as a control group. We compared changes in self-rated general health (measured by a single item), anxiety and depression (measured by the hospital anxiety and depression scale), as well as medical school stress (measured by the perceived medical school stress instrument). In order to further investigate the influence of group allocation on perceived medical school stress, we conducted a linear regression analysis. We saw a significant deterioration of general health and an increase in anxiety and depression scores in medical students while preparing for an examination. We found a small, but statistically significant, effect of group allocation on the development of perceived medical school stress. However, we could not differentiate between the effects of group coaching only and group coaching in combination with two sessions of individual

  14. Feasibility Study for Electronic Fitness for Duty Medical Examination Reporting and Oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This report examines the institutional and high-level technology aspects associated with potential mandated : electronic reporting of every commercial driver license (CDL) driver fitness-for-duty medical examination : performed by a medical examiner ...

  15. Blunt cardiac trauma: lessons learned from the medical examiner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Pedro G R; Georgiou, Chrysanthos; Inaba, Kenji; Dubose, Joseph; Plurad, David; Chan, Linda S; Toms, Carla; Noguchi, Thomas T; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze autopsy findings after blunt traumatic deaths to identify the incidence of cardiac injuries and describe the patterns of associated injuries. All autopsies performed by the Los Angeles County Forensic Medicine Division for blunt traumatic deaths in 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Only cases that underwent a full autopsy including internal examination were included in the analysis. The study population was divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of a cardiac injury and compared for differences in baseline characteristics and types of associated injuries. Of the 881 fatal victims of blunt trauma received by the Los Angeles County Forensic Medicine Division, 304 (35%) underwent a full autopsy with internal examination and were included in the analysis. The mean age was 43 years +/- 21 years, patients were more often men (71%) and were intoxicated in 39% of the cases. The most common mechanism was motor vehicle collision (50%), followed by pedestrian struck by auto (37%), and 32% had a cardiac injury. Death at the scene was significantly more common in patients with a cardiac injury (78% vs. 65%, p = 0.02). The right chambers were the most frequently injured (30%, right atrium; 27%, right ventricle). Among the 96 patients with cardiac injuries, 64% had transmural rupture. Multiple chambers were ruptured in 26%, the right atrium in 25%, and the right ventricle in 20% of these patients. Patients with cardiac injuries were significantly more likely to have other associated injuries: thoracic aorta (47% vs. 27%, p = 0.001), hemothorax (81% vs. 59%, p injury (77% vs. 48%, p cardiac injury. Of the 96 patients with a cardiac injury, 78% died at the scene of the crash and 22% died en route or at the hospital. Cardiac injury is a common autopsy finding after blunt traumatic fatalities, with the majority of deaths occurring at the scene. Patients with cardiac injuries are at significantly increased risk for

  16. Potential savings of harmonising hospital and community formularies for chronic disease medications initiated in hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Lapointe-Shaw

    Full Text Available Hospitals in Canada manage their formularies independently, yet many inpatients are discharged on medications which will be purchased through publicly-funded programs. We sought to determine how much public money could be saved on chronic medications if hospitals promoted the initiation of agents with the lowest outpatient formulary prices.We used administrative databases for the province of Ontario to identify patients initiated on a proton pump inhibitor (PPI, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB following hospital admission from April 1(st 2008-March 31(st 2009. We assessed the cost to the Ontario Drug Benefit Program (ODB over the year following initiation and determined the cost savings if prescriptions were substituted with the least expensive agent in each class.The cost for filling all PPI, ACE inhibitor and ARB prescriptions was $ 2.48 million, $968 thousand and $325 thousand respectively. Substituting the least expensive agent could have saved $1.16 million (47% for PPIs, $162 thousand (17% for ACE inhibitors and $14 thousand (4% for ARBs over the year following discharge.In a setting where outpatient prescriptions are publicly funded, harmonising outpatient formularies with inpatient therapeutic substitution resulted in modest cost savings and may be one way to control rising pharmaceutical costs.

  17. High-alert medications in a French paediatric university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Julie; Prot-Labarthe, Sonia; Bourdon, Olivier; Joret, Perrine; Brion, Françoise; Hartmann, Jean-François

    2015-04-01

    High-alert medications (HAMs) are medications that are associated with a high risk of serious harm if used improperly. The objective of this study was to identify paediatric HAM used in our institution and to identify safety measures for their use. The list of HAM and the list of safety measures that were introduced in our department were based on (1) a literature search; (2) a survey of health care professionals in our department including doctors, head nurses, nurses and pharmacists; and (3) the drug steering committee. We found four lists of HAM based on a literature search, including 27 classes of pharmaceutical agents, and 63 common drug names. The response rate of the survey was 20.7% (230 of 1113). Some of the HAMs included in our list were not identified by the literature search. These included neuroleptic drugs, anti-malarial agents, antiviral agents, anti-retroviral agents and intravenous acetaminophen. The drug steering committee selected 17 HAM and highlighted 53 safety measures involving seven broad aspects of pharmacological management. This project was part of the new safety strategies developed in a paediatric hospital. We set out to make a list of HAM relevant to paediatrics with additional safety measures to prevent medication errors associated and a 'joker' system. The various safety measures, such as double-checking of HAM prescriptions, should be reviewed during the year following their implementation. This list, which was developed in our hospital specifically for use in paediatrics, can be adapted for use in other paediatric departments. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Causes of medical coma in adult patients at the University College Hospital, Ibadan Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiako, O R; Oparah, S; Ogunniyi, A

    2011-03-01

    Diseases of medical origin leading to coma account for 3-15% of emergency hospital admissions in developed countries. There is dearth of data on causes of medical coma in adults in Nigeria in particular and Africa in general. This study is to determine the causes of coma in adult patients admitted at the medical emergency unit and wards of the University College Hospital (UCH) Ibadan. A prospective study of two hundred consecutive adult unconscious patients seen at the medical emergency unit of UCH, Ibadan, from August 2004 to March 2005, was undertaken using a structured clinical history and physical examination protocol, and results of relevant diagnostic investigations, including post-mortem. Medical causes of coma constituted 10% of all emergencies and 3% of total hospital admissions respectively during the 8-month period. Sixty six percent were males. The age group 20-59 years were affected most (76.5%). Four commonest causes were: Acute stroke 33%), diabetic emergencies (12.5%), uraemic encephalopathy and meningitides (11% each). Four least causes were cerebral malaria (1.0%), hypertensive encephalopathy, alcohol and gamalline poisoning (0.5% each). Four common predisposing factors which also had significant male predominance were systemic hypertension (38.5%), diabetes mellitus (14%), alcohol and substance abuse (12.5%), and HIV/AIDS (11.5%). Hypertensive stroke and diabetic coma constituted the commonest medical causes of coma. Thus preventive measures such as public health enlightenment campaigns for lifestyle modifications, routine blood pressure and glucose examinations are necessary to avert their disastrous consequences.

  19. Examining the impact of psychiatric diagnosis and comorbidity on the medical lethality of adolescent suicide attempts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManama O'Brien, Kimberly H; Berzin, Stephanie C

    2012-08-01

    Specific psychiatric diagnoses and comorbidity patterns were examined to determine if they were related to the medical lethality of suicide attempts among adolescents presenting to an urban general hospital (N=375). Bivariate analysis showed that attempters with substance abuse disorders had higher levels of lethality than attempters without substance abuse. Regression results indicated having depression comorbid with any other diagnosis was not associated with medical lethality. However, having a substance abuse disorder was associated with higher suicide attempt lethality, highlighting the importance of substance abuse as a risk factor for lethal suicide attempts in adolescents. This finding stimulates critical thinking around the understanding of suicidal behavior in youth and the development and implementation of treatment strategies for suicidal adolescents with substance abuse disorders. © 2012 The American Association of Suicidology.

  20. Hospitals of the Future - Ubiquitous Computing support for Medical Work in Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the visions and on-going research within creating ubiquitous computing support for medical work in the hospitals of the future. Today, clinical computer systems seldom play any role in the execution of clinical work as such. Electronic Patient Records (EPR) are more often...... located in offices at a hospital rather than at patients' bedside, or in operating theaters. There are a number of challenges to the hardware and software design of contemporary computer systems that make them unsuitable for clinical work. It is, for example, difficult to operate a keyboard and a mouse...... while operating a patient. Research within UbiComp provides a range of new conceptual and technological possibilities, which enable us to move clinical computer support closer to the clinical work setting. An important barnce of the research at the Danish Center for Pervasive Healthcare is to design...

  1. Examining the Association between Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Dementia in High-Risk Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siswanto, O; Smeall, K; Watson, T; Donnelly-Vanderloo, M; O'Connor, C; Foley, N; Madill, J

    2015-12-01

    To explore the association between vitamin B12 deficiency and dementia in patients at high risk for vitamin B12 deficiency. Chart review. Emergency, critical care/ trauma, neurology, medicine, and rehabilitation units of two hospitals in Southwestern Ontario, Canada. Adult patients (n = 666) admitted from 2010 to 2012. Data collection included: reason for admission, gender, age, clinical signs and symptoms of B12 deficiency, serum B12 concentration, and B12 supplementation. Patients with dementia were identified based on their medication profile and medical history. Vitamin B12 deficiency (pmol/L) was defined as serum B12 concentration 220. Comparisons between B12-deficient patients with and without dementia were examined using parametric and non-parametric tests. Serum B12 values were available for 60% (399/666) of the patients, of whom 4% (16/399) were B12-deficient and 14% (57/399) were marginally deficient. Patients with dementia were not more likely to be B12-deficient or marginally deficient [21% (26/121)] compared to those with no dementia [17% (47/278), p=0.27)]. Based on documentation, 34% (25/73) of the B12-deficient and marginally-deficient patients did not receive B12 supplementation, of whom 40% (10/25) had dementia. In this sample of patients, there was no association between B12 deficiency and dementia. However, appropriate B12 screening protocols are necessary for high risk patient to identify deficiency and then receive B12 supplementation as needed.

  2. Medical leaders or masters?—A systematic review of medical leadership in hospital settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbricotti, Isabelle N.; Buljac-Samardžić, Martina; Hilders, Carina G. J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Medical leadership is increasingly considered as crucial for improving the quality of care and the sustainability of healthcare. However, conceptual clarity is lacking in the literature and in practice. Therefore, a systematic review of the scientific literature was conducted to reveal the different conceptualizations of medical leadership in terms of definitions, roles and activities, and personal–and context-specific features. Eight databases were systematically searched for eligible studies, including empirical studies published in peer-reviewed journals that included physicians carrying out a manager or leadership role in a hospital setting. Finally, 34 articles were included and their findings were synthesized and analyzed narratively. Medical leadership is conceptualized in literature either as physicians with formal managerial roles or physicians who act as informal ‘leaders’ in daily practices. In both forms, medical leaders must carry out general management and leadership activities and acts to balance between management and medicine, because these physicians must accomplish both organizational and medical staff objectives. To perform effectively, credibility among medical peers appeared to be the most important factor, followed by a scattered list of fields of knowledge, skills and attitudes. Competing logics, role ambiguity and a lack of time and support were perceived as barriers. However, the extent to which physicians must master all elicited features, remains ambiguous. Furthermore, the extent to which medical leadership entails a shift or a reallocation of tasks that are at the core of medical professional work remains unclear. Future studies should implement stronger research designs in which more theory is used to study the effect of medical leadership on professional work, medical staff governance, and subsequently, the quality and efficiency of care. PMID:28910335

  3. Medical leaders or masters?-A systematic review of medical leadership in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghout, Mathilde A; Fabbricotti, Isabelle N; Buljac-Samardžić, Martina; Hilders, Carina G J M

    2017-01-01

    Medical leadership is increasingly considered as crucial for improving the quality of care and the sustainability of healthcare. However, conceptual clarity is lacking in the literature and in practice. Therefore, a systematic review of the scientific literature was conducted to reveal the different conceptualizations of medical leadership in terms of definitions, roles and activities, and personal-and context-specific features. Eight databases were systematically searched for eligible studies, including empirical studies published in peer-reviewed journals that included physicians carrying out a manager or leadership role in a hospital setting. Finally, 34 articles were included and their findings were synthesized and analyzed narratively. Medical leadership is conceptualized in literature either as physicians with formal managerial roles or physicians who act as informal 'leaders' in daily practices. In both forms, medical leaders must carry out general management and leadership activities and acts to balance between management and medicine, because these physicians must accomplish both organizational and medical staff objectives. To perform effectively, credibility among medical peers appeared to be the most important factor, followed by a scattered list of fields of knowledge, skills and attitudes. Competing logics, role ambiguity and a lack of time and support were perceived as barriers. However, the extent to which physicians must master all elicited features, remains ambiguous. Furthermore, the extent to which medical leadership entails a shift or a reallocation of tasks that are at the core of medical professional work remains unclear. Future studies should implement stronger research designs in which more theory is used to study the effect of medical leadership on professional work, medical staff governance, and subsequently, the quality and efficiency of care.

  4. Medical leaders or masters?-A systematic review of medical leadership in hospital settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde A Berghout

    Full Text Available Medical leadership is increasingly considered as crucial for improving the quality of care and the sustainability of healthcare. However, conceptual clarity is lacking in the literature and in practice. Therefore, a systematic review of the scientific literature was conducted to reveal the different conceptualizations of medical leadership in terms of definitions, roles and activities, and personal-and context-specific features. Eight databases were systematically searched for eligible studies, including empirical studies published in peer-reviewed journals that included physicians carrying out a manager or leadership role in a hospital setting. Finally, 34 articles were included and their findings were synthesized and analyzed narratively. Medical leadership is conceptualized in literature either as physicians with formal managerial roles or physicians who act as informal 'leaders' in daily practices. In both forms, medical leaders must carry out general management and leadership activities and acts to balance between management and medicine, because these physicians must accomplish both organizational and medical staff objectives. To perform effectively, credibility among medical peers appeared to be the most important factor, followed by a scattered list of fields of knowledge, skills and attitudes. Competing logics, role ambiguity and a lack of time and support were perceived as barriers. However, the extent to which physicians must master all elicited features, remains ambiguous. Furthermore, the extent to which medical leadership entails a shift or a reallocation of tasks that are at the core of medical professional work remains unclear. Future studies should implement stronger research designs in which more theory is used to study the effect of medical leadership on professional work, medical staff governance, and subsequently, the quality and efficiency of care.

  5. Early rehospitalization after initial chronic kidney disease educational hospitalization relates with a multidisciplinary medical team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Eiji; An, Taesong; Kikkawa, Akihiko; Hayashi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    It is well-documented that chronic kidney disease (CKD) often results in end-stage renal failure and puts patients at extremely high risk for developing cardiovascular disease. Educational hospitalization at medical institutions in Japan is important for patients with CKD because it facilitates treatment in earlier stages of CKD when subjective symptoms are not apparent. However, some patients who have achieved their educational targets tend to have poor compliance at home after discharge from the hospital, resulting in rehospitalization shortly. In this study, we examined the factors for early rehospitalization of patients after initial CKD educational hospitalization compared with non-rehospitalized patients. One hundred thirty-seven patients after discharge from CKD educational hospitalization in Japan between March 2011 and December 2012 were included in the analyses. The subjects were classified into two groups: the early rehospitalization group and control group. We adjusted for confounding variables and performed multiple logistic regression analysis with the presence or absence of early rehospitalization as a dependent variable to investigate the association of early rehospitalization with patient background features, laboratory data, vital signs, instruction-related items, and home environment. Study subjects included 22 patients in the early hospitalization group and 115 patients in control group. Multivariable analysis for early rehospitalization indicated that insufficient instruction by physician, pharmacist, and dietitians was independent explanatory variable. Analyzing by Kaplan-Meier method, the probability of non-rehospitalization in the instruction group was significantly higher than that in the non-instruction group. Therefore, we believe it is necessary to involve a competent, multidisciplinary medical team (consisting of physicians, pharmacists, and dietitians) in addressing the early rehospitalization issue in patients with CKD. These findings

  6. Public opinion and medical cannabis policies: examining the role of underlying beliefs and national medical cannabis policies

    OpenAIRE

    Sznitman, Sharon R.; Bretteville-Jensen, Anne Line

    2015-01-01

    Background Debate about medical cannabis legalization are typically informed by three beliefs: (1) cannabis has medical effects, (2) medical cannabis is addictive and (3) medical cannabis legalization leads to increased used of cannabis for recreational purposes (spillover effects). We examined how strongly these beliefs are associated with public support for medical cannabis legalization and whether this association differs across divergent medical cannabis policy regimes. Methods Robust reg...

  7. Inappropriate medication prescriptions in elderly adults surviving an intensive care unit hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Alessandro; Vasilevskis, Eduard; Pandharipande, Pratik P; Girard, Timothy D; Solberg, Laurence M; Neal, Erin B; Koestner, Tyler; Torres, Renee E; Thompson, Jennifer L; Shintani, Ayumi K; Han, Jin H; Schnelle, John F; Fick, Donna M; Ely, E Wesley; Kripalani, Sunil

    2013-07-01

    To determine types of potentially (PIMs) and actually inappropriate medications (AIMs), which PIMs are most likely to be considered AIMs, and risk factors for PIMs and AIMs at hospital discharge in elderly intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. Prospective cohort study. Tertiary care, academic medical center. One hundred twenty individuals aged 60 and older who survived an ICU hospitalization. Potentially inappropriate medications were defined according to published criteria; a multidisciplinary panel adjudicated AIMs. Medications from before admission, ward admission, ICU admission, ICU discharge, and hospital discharge were abstracted. Poisson regression was used to examine independent risk factors for hospital discharge PIMs and AIMs. Of 250 PIMs prescribed at discharge, the most common were opioids (28%), anticholinergics (24%), antidepressants (12%), and drugs causing orthostasis (8%). The three most common AIMs were anticholinergics (37%), nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics (14%), and opioids (12%). Overall, 36% of discharge PIMs were classified as AIMs, but the percentage varied according to drug type. Whereas only 16% of opioids, 23% of antidepressants, and 10% of drugs causing orthostasis were classified as AIMs, 55% of anticholinergics, 71% of atypical antipyschotics, 67% of nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics and benzodiazepines, and 100% of muscle relaxants were deemed AIMs. The majority of PIMs and AIMs were first prescribed in the ICU. Preadmission PIMs, discharge to somewhere other than home, and discharge from a surgical service predicted number of discharge PIMs, but none of the factors predicted AIMs at discharge. Certain types of PIMs, which are commonly initiated in the ICU, are more frequently considered inappropriate upon clinical review. Efforts to reduce AIMs in elderly ICU survivors should target these specific classes of medications. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, The American Geriatrics Society.

  8. Patients’ satisfaction with diabetes medications in one hospital, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Aujan S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Shiekha Al-Aujan,1 Sinaa Al-Aqeel,1 Abdulhaleem Al-Harbi,2 Emad Al-Abdulatief21Clinical Pharmacy Department, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Family Medicine, Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaObjectives: The main aim of this study was to evaluate diabetic patients’ satisfaction with their treatment. A secondary objective was to assess the relationship between treatment satisfaction scores and patient-related factors, if any.Methods: This cross-sectional study collected data from patients at a primary care clinic of a government hospital located in Riyadh, the capital of Saudi Arabia. Patients were recruited if they were ≥18 years of age, had type 2 diabetes, currently taking oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin or both, and able to read and write in Arabic. Satisfaction was measured using the Diabetes Medication Satisfaction (DiabMedSat questionnaire.Results: One hundred and twenty-three patients completed the questionnaire. The participant mean age was 46 years (standard deviation [SD] = 11.2 years; range 18–75 years, and mean duration of the disease was 7.8 years (SD = 6.9 years. Over half of respondents (63% reported that they were satisfied and only 16% were unsatisfied. Approximately 54% of respondents are interested in changing their diabetes medications. The overall satisfaction score was 59.56 (SD = 15.9. Mean scores for the burden, efficacy, and symptoms domains were 59.81 (SD = 15.7, 58.1 (SD = 22.6, and 60.77 (SD = 22.1, respectively. Treatment factors (eg, type of medication; P < 0.02 and adherence factors (eg, difficulty taking medications; P < 0.032 were independently associated with lower treatment satisfaction.Conclusion: Diabetes patients with difficulties in adherence to recommendations, as well as patients treated with insulin, require more attention in order to improve their treatment satisfaction.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, health status, patient satisfaction

  9. Epidemiology of hospital acquired urinary tract infections in a medical college hospital in Goa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh S Kamat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospital Acquired Urinary Tract Infection (HAUTI is the commonest among the nosocomial infections, and hospital specific data concerning its magnitude and attributes is essential to its effective control. Materials and Methods: Prospective study was undertaken among 498 in-patients at the medical college hospital in Goa, employing the clinico-bacteriologic criteria of CDC, Atlanta, in the representative medicine and surgery wards. Antimicrobial sensitivity was tested using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Statistical Analysis: Statistical significance of association was tested using the chi-square test and the unpaired t-test at 5% level of significance, while the strength of association was expressed as the Odd′s ratio with 95% confidence interval calculated by Wolff′s method. Results: While the overall infection rate was 8.03/100 admissions, 33.6% of the catheterized patients developed HAUTI. Effect of gender was found to remain restricted to the development of HAUTI among females at an earlier age and earlier in time series compared to males, but no overall difference in incidence in the two sexes. The factors significantly associated with HAUTI included: duration of hospitalization, per urethral catheterization and the duration of catheterization. E. coli, Pseudomonas, Kebsiella, and Candida accounted for over 90% of the isolates, and 73.5% of these were resistant to all the antibiotics for which sensitivity was tested. The remaining isolates demonstrated sensitivity to amikacin and/or cefoperazone-sulbactam. Conclusion: High infection rate coupled with widespread isolation polyantimicrobial resistant nosocomial pathogens emphasizes the importance of meticulous surveillance of nosocomial infections in the hospital, with due attention to antibiotic prescription practices.

  10. Debates on Medical Quality and Safety in Wuwei people’s hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-hua QI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available How to improve medical quality and reduce medical disputes has become a major issue in clinical and nonclinical departments at all levels of hospital. The paper puts forward a proposal of “Three lines of defense” concerning medical quality and safety, which plays a positive role in prevention of medical errors, in improvement of medical quality and patient safety.

  11. Medical hospital materials processing: a literature review on sterilization effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Mousinho Guerra

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: Surgical instruments are widely reprocessed, mainly in developing countries, where the cost of using these materials is high. Scientifi c literature indicates the absence of validated cleaning and sterilization processes. The study aimed at evaluating, through a literature review, the evidence to support or not the practice of reprocessing and reuse of originally single-use, medical-hospital materials. Methods: A total of 27 articles in English and Portuguese were selected from journals indexed in the LILACS, Pubmed and Medline databases, as well as studies published in ScienceDirect website using the following key words: sterilization, single-use articles, hospital infection and surgical instruments. Articles that did not fi t the study subject were excluded. Results: There was a great variety of studied instruments and reprocessing methods. Most articles emphasize the sterilization ineffectiveness, identifying microorganisms at the end of the process. Conclusion: Based on the current knowledge, it is important to consider each case validating surgical materials reprocessing and reuse protocols based on scientific knowledge. Based on the analysis of the study articles, we concluded that this practice cannot be performed indiscriminately. KEYWORDS: Sterilization. Cross infection. Surgical Equipment. Public Health.

  12. Etiology and complications of thrombocytopenia in hospitalized medical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Eric M; Arepally, Gowthami M

    2017-05-01

    To determine incidence, risk factors, hematologic complications, and prognostic significance of thrombocytopenia in the general medicine population, we performed a single-institutional, retrospective study of all adult patients admitted to a general medical ward from January 1st, 2014 to December 31st, 2014 with hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia. Those with moderate thrombocytopenia, defined as a platelet count nadir of 50% relative decline, were compared to those with less severe thrombocytopenia. Of the 7420 patients admitted, 465 (6.3%) developed hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia. Infection and moderate thrombocytopenia were present in 56 and 23%, respectively. Severe sepsis and antibiotic use were both associated with moderate thrombocytopenia, and proton pump inhibitor use was statistically significant in both univariate and multivariate analysis. Hematologic complications were more frequent with moderate thrombocytopenia, including frequency of HIT testing and red blood cell transfusions. Outcome metrics including transfer to an intensive care unit (OR 6.78), death during admission (OR 6.85), and length of stay (10.6 vs. 5.1 days) were all associated with moderate thrombocytopenia. Thrombocytopenia is associated with poor prognosis, and the association between moderate thrombocytopenia and proton pump inhibitor use is relatively novel and should be validated in prospective studies.

  13. Effects of interdisciplinary collaboration in hospitals on medication errors: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manias, Elizabeth

    2018-03-01

    Medication errors are commonly affected by breakdowns in communication. Interdisciplinary collaboration is an important means of facilitating communication between health professionals in clinical practice. To date, there has been little systematic examination of past research in this area. Areas covered: The aims of this integrative review are to examine how interdisciplinary collaboration influences medication errors in hospitals, the araes of interdisciplinary collaboration that have been researched in previous work, and recommendations for future research and practice. An integrative review was undertaken of research papers (N = 30) published from inception to August 2017 using MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Embase. Expert opinion: Five different areas of interdisciplinary collaboration were identified in research involving medication errors. These areas were: communication through tools including guidelines, protocols, and communication logs; participation of pharmacists in interdisciplinary teams; collaborative medication review on admission and at discharge; collaborative workshops and conferences; and complexity of role differentiation and environment. Despite encouraging results demonstrated in past research, medication errors continued to occur. Increased focus is needed on developing tailored, individualized strategies that can be applied in particular contexts to create further reductions in medication errors. Greater understandings are also needed about the changing roles of various disciplines.

  14. Forensic Impact of the Child Sexual Abuse Medical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, John E. B.

    1998-01-01

    This commentary on an article (EC 619 279) about research issues at the interface of medicine and law concerning medical evaluation for child sexual abuse focuses on empirically testable questions: (1) the medical history--its accuracy, interviewing issues, and elicitation and preservation of verbal evidence of abuse; and, (2) expert testimony.…

  15. Medical costs, Cesarean delivery rates, and length of stay in specialty hospitals vs. non-specialty hospitals in South Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Ju Kim

    Full Text Available Since 2011, specialty hospitals in South Korea have been known for providing high- quality care in specific clinical areas. Much research related to specialty hospitals and their performance in many such areas has been performed, but investigations about their performance in obstetrics and gynecology are lacking. Thus, we aimed to compare specialty vs. non-specialty hospitals with respect to mode of obstetric delivery, especially the costs and length of stay related to Cesarean section (CS procedures, and to provide evidence to policy-makers for evaluating the success of hospitals that specialize in obstetric and gynecological (OBGYN care.We obtained National Health Insurance claim data from 2012 to 2014, which included information from 418,141 OBGYN cases at 214 hospitals. We used a generalized estimating equation model to identify a potential association between the likelihood of CS at specialty hospitals compared with other hospitals. We also evaluated medical costs and length of stay in specialty hospitals according to type of delivery.We found that 150,256 (35.9% total deliveries were performed by CS. The odds ratio of CS was significantly lower in specialty hospitals (OR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.93-0.96compared to other hospitals Medical costs (0.74% and length of stay (1% in CS cases increased in specialty hospitals, although length of stay following vaginal delivery was lower (0.57% in specialty hospitals compared with other hospitals.We determined that specialty hospitals are significantly associated with a lower likelihood of CS delivery and shorter length of stay after vaginal delivery. Although they are also associated with higher costs for delivery, the increased cost could be due to the high level of intensive care provided, which leads to improve quality of care. Policy-makers should consider incentive programs to maintain performance of specialty hospitals and promote efficiency that could reduce medical costs accrued by patients.

  16. [Historical origins between National Medical Association of China and Boji Hospital in Guangzhou].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pinming

    2015-09-01

    In 2015, National Medical Association of China, now being called the Chinese Medical Association, celebrates its centennial and Boji Hospital in Guangzhou ( also known as Canton Hospital, or the Canton Pok Tsai Hospital, and now Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University ) marks its 180th anniversary. Three major historical events establish the role of Boji Hospital in the founding and development of the National Medical Association of China during the last 100 years, viz.: ①hosting and participating in the establishment of the Medical Missionary Association of China and its official journal: the China Medical Missionary Journal; ②holding the 11th scientific sessions of the National Medical Association of China; ③nominating Dr. Wu Lien-teh as a candidate for the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1935 by William Warder Cadbury, the president of Boji Hospital.

  17. 21 CFR 880.6320 - AC-powered medical examination light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... examination light is an AC-powered device intended for medical purposes that is used to illuminate body surfaces and cavities during a medical examination. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The...

  18. 77 FR 55221 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Report of Medical Examination and Vaccination Record...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    ... Medical Examination and Vaccination Record, Form I-693; Revision of a Currently Approved Collection ACTION...: Report of Medical Examination and Vaccination Record. (3) Agency form number, if any, and the applicable...

  19. 76 FR 44086 - Agency Information Collection (Report of Medical Examination for Disability Evaluation) Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... review and comment. The PRA submission describes the nature of the information collection and its... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Report of Medical Examination for Disability Evaluation) Activity.... 2900-0052.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Report of Medical Examination for Disability Evaluation...

  20. Voluntary Medication Error Reporting by ED Nurses: Examining the Association With Work Environment and Social Capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Amany; Blegen, Mary; Gedney-Lose, Amalia; Lose, Daniel; Perkhounkova, Yelena

    2017-05-01

    Medication errors are one of the most frequently occurring errors in health care settings. The complexity of the ED work environment places patients at risk for medication errors. Most hospitals rely on nurses' voluntary medication error reporting, but these errors are under-reported. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship among work environment (nurse manager leadership style and safety climate), social capital (warmth and belonging relationships and organizational trust), and nurses' willingness to report medication errors. A cross-sectional descriptive design using a questionnaire with a convenience sample of emergency nurses was used. Data were analyzed using descriptive, correlation, Mann-Whitney U, and Kruskal-Wallis statistics. A total of 71 emergency nurses were included in the study. Emergency nurses' willingness to report errors decreased as the nurses' years of experience increased (r = -0.25, P = .03). Their willingness to report errors increased when they received more feedback about errors (r = 0.25, P = .03) and when their managers used a transactional leadership style (r = 0.28, P = .01). ED nurse managers can modify their leadership style to encourage error reporting. Timely feedback after an error report is particularly important. Engaging experienced nurses to understand error root causes could increase voluntary error reporting. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Situation analysis of patients attending TU Teaching Hospital after medical abortion with problems and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Neebha; Bista, Kesang D B

    2013-01-01

    In Nepal medical abortion has been approved for use since 2009. There were many cases coming to Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital coming with problems and complications following medical abortion. Thus the objective of this study was to analyze the cases that came to TUTH following medical abortion with problems and complications. This is a prospective study conducted in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of TUTH. Study was carried from 1st August 2011 to 30th November 2012. Women who came to TUTH with any complaints following medical abortion were interviewed, examined and treatment provided. Relevant clinical finding were noted. There were a total of 57 cases during the study. Most (66.6%) of the women were in age group 20-29 years age. There were 45 (79%) women who had abortion up to 9 weeks. Medical shop was the main place where most of the women (45.6%) directly come to know about medical abortion. More than 34 (77.2%) received the service from medical shops without any supervision. Most 31 (54.4%) presented with incomplete abortion. There were three cases of continuing pregnancy and four presented with ectopic pregnancy. Eighteen (31.6%) cases needed admission. Fifty six percent of the cases were treated with manual vacuum aspiration, six cases underwent laparotomy and there was one maternal mortality. There is a need for proper dissemination and implementation of guideline for management of these women and adequate supervision to reduce the problems and complications.

  2. A tale of two cultures: examining patient-centered care in a forensic mental health hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, James D.; Nijdam-Jones, Alicia; Brink, Johann

    2012-01-01

    Several questions remain unanswered regarding the extent to which the principles and practices of patient-centered care are achievable in the context of a forensic mental health hospital. This study examined patient-centered care from the perspectives of patients and providers in a forensic mental health hospital. Patient-centered care was assessed using several measures of complementary constructs. Interviews were conducted with 30 patients and surveys were completed by 28 service providers in a forensic mental health hospital. Patients and providers shared similar views of the therapeutic milieu and recovery orientation of services; however, providers were more likely to perceive the hospital as being potentially unsafe. Overall, the findings indicated that characteristics of patient-centered care may be found within a forensic mental health hospital. The principles of patient-centered care can be integrated into service delivery in forensic mental health hospitals, though special attention to providers’ perceptions of safety is needed. PMID:22815648

  3. Status of Hepatitis B Immunization in Medical Stuffs at Children Medical Center Hospital-Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Najafi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hepatitis B is a disease caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV, which is transmitted through percutaneous (i.e., puncture through the skin or mucosal (i.e., direct contact with mucous membranes exposure to infectious blood or body fluids. HBV can cause chronic infection, resulting in cirrhosis of the liver, liver cancer, liver failure, and death. Persons with chronic infection also serve as the main reservoir for continued HBV transmission.   Material and Methods: This is a prospective cross sectional study was performed in Children Medical Center Hospital on 396 medical personals (including 172 students, 92 interns, 56 residents and 56 fellowships during September 2012 to October 2013.   Results: All of medical staff had done HB vaccination. In 93% of them the vaccination was complete. The others, 16% had only one, and 84% had two dose injections. 73% didn’t check HBsAb after vaccination.  Results showed in 21.4% of fellowships, 42.8% of residents, non of interns and 35% of students, had checked HBsAb.   Conclusion: Hepatitis B is a vaccine-preventable disease. HB is a serious world wide infection and medical staff are one of the most high risk groups. So Vaccinate their and HBS Antibody titer determination after complete vaccination is mandatory.    Keywords:Immunization, Hepatitis B, Medical Staff, Vaccination.  

  4. Inappropriate Medication Prescriptions among Elders Surviving an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Hospitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, A; Vasilevskis, EE; Pandharipande, PP; Girard, TD; Solberg, LM; Neal, EB; Koestner, T; Torres, RE; Thompson, JL; Shintani, AK; Han, JH; Schnelle, JF; Fick, DM; Ely, EW; Kripalani, S

    2013-01-01

    Background Elderly patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU) are at risk of receiving potentially (PIMs) and actually inappropriate medications (AIMs). Objectives To determine types of PIMs and AIMs, which PIMs are most likely to be considered AIMs, and risk factors for PIMs and AIMs at hospital discharge in elderly ICU survivors. Design Prospective cohort study Setting Tertiary care, academic medical center Participants 120 patients ≥ 60 years old who survived an ICU hospitalization Measurements PIMs were defined according to published criteria; AIMs were adjudicated by a multidisciplinary panel. Medication lists were abstracted at the time of pre-admission, ward admission, Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission, ICU discharge, and hospital discharge. Poisson regression was used to examine independent risk factors for hospital discharge PIMs and AIMs. Results Of 250 PIMs prescribed at discharge, the most common were opioids (28%), anticholinergics (24%), antidepressants (12%), and drugs causing orthostasis (8%). The three most common AIMs were anticholinergics (37%), non-benzodiazepine hypnotics (14%), and opioids (12%). Overall, 36% of discharge PIMs were classified as AIMs, but the percentage varied by drug type. Whereas only 16% of opioids, 23% of antidepressants, and 10% of drugs causing orthostasis were classified as AIMs; 55% of anticholinergics, 71% of atypical antipyschotics, 67% of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics and benzodiazepines, and 100% of muscle relaxants were deemed AIMs. The majority of PIMs and AIMs were first prescribed in the ICU. Pre-admission PIMs, discharge to somewhere other than home, and discharge from a surgical service predicted number of discharge PIMs, but none of the factors predicted AIMs at discharge. Conclusions Certain types of PIMs, which are commonly initiated in the ICU, are more frequently considered inappropriate upon clinical review. Efforts to reduce AIMs in elderly ICU survivors should target these specific classes of

  5. Burnout in medical students: examining the prevalence and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santen, Sally A; Holt, Danielle B; Kemp, Jean D; Hemphill, Robin R

    2010-08-01

    Burnout has been described as a syndrome of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and decreased personal accomplishment, and may originate during medical school. The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence of burnout and contributing factors in medical students. A survey was administered to 249 medical students using a modified Maslach Burnout Inventory Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) and scales of stressors, assessment of workload, relaxation, control, accomplishment, support systems, and demographics. Moderate or high degree of burnout was seen in 21% of the first year class, 41% of the second year class, 43% of the third year class, and 31% of the fourth year class (P burnout using multivariate analysis. Burnout progressively develops over the course of medical education, while a high level of support and low stress decreased burnout.

  6. Situation analysis of patients attending TU Teaching Hospital after medical abortion with problems and complications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ojha, Neebha; Bista, Kesang D B

    2013-01-01

    In Nepal medical abortion has been approved for use since 2009. There were many cases coming to Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital coming with problems and complications following medical abortion...

  7. Medical Examination of Aliens--Revisions to Medical Screening Process. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-26

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), is issuing this final rule (FR) to amend its regulations governing medical examinations that aliens must undergo before they may be admitted to the United States. Based on public comment received, HHS/CDC did not make changes from the NPRM published on June 23, 2015. Accordingly, this FR will: Revise the definition of communicable disease of public health significance by removing chancroid, granuloma inguinale, and lymphogranuloma venereum as inadmissible health-related conditions for aliens seeking admission to the United States; update the notification of the health-related grounds of inadmissibility to include proof of vaccinations to align with existing requirements established by the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA); revise the definitions and evaluation criteria for mental disorders, drug abuse and drug addiction; clarify and revise the evaluation requirements for tuberculosis; clarify and revise the process for the HHS/CDC-appointed medical review board that convenes to reexamine the determination of a Class A medical condition based on an appeal; and update the titles and designations of federal agencies within the text of the regulation.

  8. Twenty-Four-Hour Mobility During Acute Hospitalization in Older Medical Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mette Merete; Bodilsen, Ann Christine; Petersen, Janne

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inactivity during hospitalization in older medical patients may lead to functional decline. This study quantified 24-hour mobility, validated the accelerometers used, and assessed the daily level of basic mobility in acutely admitted older medical patients during their hospitalization....... METHODS: This is a prospective cohort study in older medical patients able to walk independently (ambulatory patients) and those not able to walk independently (nonambulatory patients) on admission. The 24-hour mobility level during hospitalization was assessed by measuring the time in lying, sitting......%-100% with positions performed by older medical patients. CONCLUSIONS: Older acutely hospitalized medical patients with walking ability spent 17h/d of their in-hospital time in bed, and the level of in-hospital mobility seemed to depend on the patients' level of basic mobility. The accelerometers were valid...

  9. Approach to medical missions: Dr. Neil Macvicar and the Victoria Hospital, Lovedale, South Africa, circa 1900-1950

    OpenAIRE

    Lunde, Martin Jacob

    2009-01-01

    This thesis examines the thought, work, and impact of the Scottish medical missionary, Dr Neil Macvicar, as well other personnel connected to the Victoria Hospital at the Lovedale mission in the Eastern Cape. Of special concern for study in medical history, missiology, and relief development studies, this work centres on Macvicar’s modern Western conceptions of Christianity, biomedicine, civilisation, African cosmological understandings, and traditional methods of healing, within the last ye...

  10. Medical, social, and law characteristics of intoxicant's users medically examined in police custody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Renaud; Gerardin, Marie; Vigneau Victorri, Caroline; Guigand, Gabriel; Wainstein, Laura; Jolliet, Pascale

    2013-11-01

    There are no studies on medically examined persons in custody which specifically focus on identifying dependence profiles among users of intoxicants. Nonetheless, the characterisation of dependence profiles for intoxicants such as alcohol, cannabis, cocaine, heroin, amphetamines and their by-products is a medical necessity in this setting. A prospective, monocentric, open-ended study conducted by structured questionnaire was carried out on detainees who admitted to having taken an intoxicant/s (tobacco, alcohol, drugs or illegal substances). Social, legal and medical data were collected. The aim of the study was to explore characteristics of these persons in police custody. 817 questionnaires were examined. More than one-third have a dependence on at least one substance. 37.7% were dependant of tobacco, 86.5% of drinkers, 24.7% of cannabis users. Of these, 90.1% were from men with a mean age of 29.4 years, 40% from individuals living alone, 25.7% from persons with no financial means and 19.6% from homeless persons. 10% were believed to be suffering from mental illness, 7.2% were thought to be asthmatic, 3% to have a chronic infection, and 2.9% to have epilepsy. 36.2% reportedly received treatment, 37.5% of which included benzodiazepine and 20.3% opiate substitution therapy. Incidence of psychological and psychiatric disorders is close to 10% of intoxicant detainees. In this study, some of the stated pathologies occur in ratios similar to those in other published results. But, there is a high, and probably underestimated, prevalence of psychological and psychiatric disorders in this population of detainees reporting exposure to intoxicant or illegal substances. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  11. Examining patients' perceptions of care to identify opportunities for quality improvement in psychiatric inpatient hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Glorimar

    2014-01-01

    Our objectives were to examine patients' perceptions with psychiatric care to prioritize action for quality improvement (QI), and to explore differences in care experiences across domains of care by sample subgroups in psychiatric inpatient hospitals. Analysis of frequency, central tendency, and variation examined the distribution of 11,778 Inpatient Consumer Surveys (ICS), from 67 psychiatric inpatient hospitals, by domain of care and Likert scale. The percentage of patients responding positively to each domain of care was evaluated. A performance-importance matrix was constructed to identify key drivers and prioritize action for QI. Chi-squared, t test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) analyses evaluated the experiences of care by sample subgroups. Overall, patients tended to be satisfied with the care received. However, patients perceived their care differently across hospitals. Hospitals scored lower in the rights domain, mainly attributed to problems with communication between patients and hospital staff. Patients' care experiences varied among sample subgroups; however, four sample characteristics were common to all domains of care. Patients who were Latinos, aged 65 years and older, who completed the survey at discharge, before leaving the hospital, had a higher perception of care across all domains of care. Either an examination of the individual items on the ICS or the aggregation of them by domain of care, the ICS could be a significant tool for hospitals that continuously strive to improve the quality of care provided to psychiatric patients in a time driven by the needs and expectations of consumers.

  12. Oral antioxidants for radioprotection during medical imaging examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velauthapillai, Nivethan

    The oncogenic effect of ionizing radiation (IR) is clearly established and occurs in response to DNA damage. Many diagnostic imaging exams make use of IR and the oncogenic risk of IR-based imaging has been calculated. We hypothesized that the DNA damage sustained from IR exposure during medical imaging exams could be reduced by pre-medicating patients with antioxidants. First, we tested and validated a method for measuring DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. Afterwards, we conducted a pilot clinical study in which we administered oral antioxidants to patients undergoing bone scans, prior to radiotracer injection. We showed that oral antioxidant pre-medication reduced the number of DSBs in PBMCs induced by radiotracer injection. Our study shows proof-of-principle for this simple and inexpensive approach to radioprotection in the clinical setting.

  13. Patients' Adherence to Anti-Diabetic Medications in a Hospital at Ajman, UAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifulla, Mohammed; John, Lisha Jenny; Sreedharan, Jayadevan; Muttappallymyalil, Jayakumary; Basha, Sheikh Altaf

    2014-01-01

    Anti-diabetic medications are integral for glycemic control in diabetes. Non-adherence to drugs can alter blood glucose levels, resulting in complications. Adherence to anti-diabetic medications reported by patients and the factors associated with medication adherence among adult patients with diabetes mellitus were explored. This cross-sectional study was carried out among patients with type II diabetes mellitus attending the Internal Medicine Department of a hospital in the United Arab Emirates. Consecutive patients were selected, and data regarding their medication adherence were collected using a questionnaire. Data analysis was carried out using SPSS-20. The chi-square test was performed to examine the associations between categorical variables; a two-sided P Value anti-diabetic drugs was 84%. The most common reason for non-adherence was forgetfulness, and the adherence rate was similar in both genders. Patients with Bachelor's and Master's degree reported greater adherence rate to anti-diabetic medication in comparison to the secondary school educated. The self-reported adherence rate to anti-diabetic medications was 84%, and forgetfulness was the most common reason for non-adherence. Future studies on strategies to improve adherence rate should be considered.

  14. Status of Hepatitis B Immunization in Medical Stuffs at Children Medical Center Hospital-Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri Najafi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hepatitis B is a disease caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV, which is transmitted through percutaneous (i.e., puncture through the skin or mucosal (i.e., direct contact with mucous membranes exposure to infectious blood or body fluids. HBV can cause chronic infection, resulting in cirrhosis of the liver, liver cancer, liver failure, and death. Persons with chronic infection also serve as the main reservoir for continued HBV transmission.   Material and Methods: This is a prospective cross sectional study was performed in ChildrenMedicalCenterHospital on 396 medical personals (including 172 students,92 interns,56 residents and 56 fellowships during Sep 2012 to  Oct 2013. Results: All of medical staff had done HB vaccination. In 93% of them the vaccination was complete. The others,16% had only one, and 84% had two dose injections. 73% didn’t check HBsAb after vaccination.  Results showed in 21.4% of fellowships, 42.8% of residents, non of interns and 35% of students, had checked HBsAb.   Conclusion: Hepatitis B is a vaccine-preventable disease. HB is a serious world wide infection and medical staff are one of the most high risk groups. So Vaccinate their and HBS Antibody titer determination after complete vaccination is mandatory. 

  15. Experience of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy at Lumbini Medical College Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabin Pokharel

    2013-06-01

    surgeons all over the world and the potential one that places the patient at significant risk. The present study aimed to study all the cases of laparoscopic cholecystectomy conducted in current setup at Lumbini Medical College and Teaching Hospital, to compare the results with the published literature and also analyze the complications and ways to decrease the incidence of conversion to open procedure.   Methods: Five hundred twenty five patients age 10-90 years, male:female ratio of 1:3.86 with body weight 45-65 kilogram, who had undergone laparoscopic cholecystectomy for symptomatic cholelithiasis without choledocholithiasis from April 2011 to April 2013 were studied.   Results: All the laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC were without major complications. Only nineteen out of five hundred twentyfive (3.6% required conversion to open cholecystectomy (OC. Reasons for conversion included: dense omental or visceral adhesions; two (0.38%, unclear anatomy; 16 (3.04%, common bile duct injury; one (0.19%. There were 20 cases of shrunken gallbladder suspicious of malignancy but didn’t required conversion.   Conclusion: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the preferred method in our setup even in difficult cases.

  16. The 2012 derecho: emergency medical services and hospital response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Randy D; Wigal, Mark S; Fernandez, Antonio; Tucker, March A; Zuidgeest, Ginger R; Mills, Michael R; Cairns, Bruce A; Cairns, Charles B

    2014-10-01

    During the early afternoon of June 29, 2012, a line of destructive thunderstorms producing straight line winds known as a derecho developed near Chicago (Illinois, USA). The storm moved southeast with wind speeds recorded from 100 to 160 kilometers per hour (kph, 60 to 100 miles per hour [mph]). The storm swept across much of West Virginia (USA) later that evening. Power outage was substantial as an estimated 1,300,000 West Virginians (more than half) were without power in the aftermath of the storm and approximately 600,000 citizens were still without power a week later. This was one of the worst storms to strike this area and occurred as residents were enduring a prolonged heat wave. The wind damage left much of the community without electricity and the crippling effect compromised or destroyed critical infrastructure including communications, air conditioning, refrigeration, and water and sewer pumps. This report describes utilization of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and hospital resources in West Virginia in response to the storm. Also reported is a review of the weather phenomena and the findings and discussion of the disaster and implications.

  17. Factor structure of the SOCRATES questionnaire in hospitalized medical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertholet, Nicolas; Dukes, Kim; Horton, Nicholas J; Palfai, Tibor P; Pedley, Alison; Saitz, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES), a 19-item instrument developed to assess readiness to change alcohol use among individuals presenting for specialized alcohol treatment, has been used in various populations and settings. Its factor structure and concurrent validity has been described for specialized alcohol treatment settings and primary care. The purpose of this study was to determine the factor structure and concurrent validity of the SOCRATES among medical inpatients with unhealthy alcohol use not seeking help for specialized alcohol treatment. The subjects were 337 medical inpatients with unhealthy alcohol use, identified during their hospital stay. Most of them had alcohol dependence (76%). We performed an Alpha Factor Analysis (AFA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the 19 SOCRATES items, and forced 3 factors and 2 components, in order to replicate findings from Miller and Tonigan (Miller, W. R., & Tonigan, J. S., (1996). Assessing drinkers' motivations for change: The Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES). Psychology of Addictive Behavior, 10, 81-89.) and Maisto et al. (Maisto, S. A., Conigliaro, J., McNeil, M., Kraemer, K., O'Connor, M., & Kelley, M. E., (1999). Factor structure of the SOCRATES in a sample of primary care patients. Addictive Behavior, 24(6), 879-892.). Our analysis supported the view that the 2 component solution proposed by Maisto et al. (Maisto, S.A., Conigliaro, J., McNeil, M., Kraemer, K., O'Connor, M., & Kelley, M.E., (1999). Factor structure of the SOCRATES in a sample of primary care patients. Addictive Behavior, 24(6), 879-892.) is more appropriate for our data than the 3 factor solution proposed by Miller and Tonigan (Miller, W. R., & Tonigan, J. S., (1996). Assessing drinkers' motivations for change: The Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES). Psychology of Addictive Behavior, 10, 81-89.). The first component measured

  18. Medical Knowledge Assessment by Hematology and Medical Oncology In-Training Examinations Are Better Than Program Director Assessments at Predicting Subspecialty Certification Examination Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collichio, Frances A; Hess, Brian J; Muchmore, Elaine A; Duhigg, Lauren; Lipner, Rebecca S; Haist, Steven; Hawley, Janine L; Morrison, Carol A; Clayton, Charles P; Raymond, Marilyn J; Kayoumi, Karen M; Gitlin, Scott D

    2017-09-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System requires training programs to demonstrate that fellows are achieving competence in medical knowledge (MK), as part of a global assessment of clinical competency. Passing American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) certification examinations is recognized as a metric of MK competency. This study examines several in-training MK assessment approaches and their ability to predict performance on the ABIM Hematology or Medical Oncology Certification Examinations. Results of a Hematology In-Service Examination (ISE) and an Oncology In-Training Examination (ITE), program director (PD) ratings, demographic variables, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE), and ABIM Internal Medicine (IM) Certification Examination were compared. Stepwise multiple regression and logistic regression analyses evaluated these assessment approaches as predictors of performance on the Hematology or Medical Oncology Certification Examinations. Hematology ISE scores were the strongest predictor of Hematology Certification Examination scores (β = 0.41) (passing odds ratio [OR], 1.012; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.008-1.015), and the Oncology ITE scores were the strongest predictor of Medical Oncology Certification Examination scores (β = 0.45) (passing OR, 1.013; 95 % CI, 1.011-1.016). PD rating of MK was the weakest predictor of Medical Oncology Certification Examination scores (β = 0.07) and was not significantly predictive of Hematology Certification Examination scores. Hematology and Oncology ITEs are better predictors of certification examination performance than PD ratings of MK, reinforcing the effectiveness of ITEs for competency-based assessment of MK.

  19. Resource-oriented coaching for reduction of examination-related stress in medical students: an exploratory randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kötter T

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Kötter,1 Frank Niebuhr2 1Institute of Social Medicine and Epidemiology, 2Institute of Family Medicine, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany Introduction: The years spent in acquiring medical education is considered a stressful period in the life of many students. Students whose mental health deteriorates during this long period of study are less likely to become empathic and productive physicians. In addition to other specific stressors, academic examinations seem to further induce medical school-related stress and anxiety. Combined group and individual resource-oriented coaching early in medical education might reduce examination-related stress and anxiety and, consequently, enhance academic performance. Good quality evidence, however, remains scarce. In this study, therefore, we explored the question of whether coaching affects examination-related stress and health in medical students.Methods: We conducted a randomized controlled trial. Students who registered for the first medical academic examination in August 2014 at the University of Lübeck were recruited and randomized into three groups. The intervention groups 1 and 2 received a 1-hour psychoeducative seminar. Group 1 additionally received two 1-hour sessions of individual coaching during examination preparation. Group 3 served as a control group. We compared changes in self-rated general health (measured by a single item, anxiety and depression (measured by the hospital anxiety and depression scale, as well as medical school stress (measured by the perceived medical school stress instrument. In order to further investigate the influence of group allocation on perceived medical school stress, we conducted a linear regression analysis.Results: We saw a significant deterioration of general health and an increase in anxiety and depression scores in medical students while preparing for an examination. We found a small, but statistically significant, effect of group allocation on

  20. Determinants of effective medical intern training at a training hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results. Determinants of effective training in internship were identified as good quality supervisors, effective supervision, adequate opportunity to experiential learning, conducive environment, good support system (hospital management, hospital staff, academic opportunities), personal attributes and reasonable work load.

  1. Effects of asymmetric medical insurance subsidy on hospitals competition under non-price regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chan; Nie, Pu-Yan

    2016-11-15

    Poor medical care and high fees are two major problems in the world health care system. As a result, health care insurance system reform is a major issue in developing countries, such as China. Governments should take the effect of health care insurance system reform on the competition of hospitals into account when they practice a reform. This article aims to capture the influences of asymmetric medical insurance subsidy and the importance of medical quality to patients on hospitals competition under non-price regulation. We establish a three-stage duopoly model with quantity and quality competition. In the model, qualitative difference and asymmetric medical insurance subsidy among hospitals are considered. The government decides subsidy (or reimbursement) ratios in the first stage. Hospitals choose the quality in the second stage and then support the quantity in the third stage. We obtain our conclusions by mathematical model analyses and all the results are achieved by backward induction. The importance of medical quality to patients has stronger influence on the small hospital, while subsidy has greater effect on the large hospital. Meanwhile, the importance of medical quality to patients strengthens competition, but subsidy effect weakens it. Besides, subsidy ratios difference affects the relationship between subsidy and hospital competition. Furthermore, we capture the optimal reimbursement ratio based on social welfare maximization. More importantly, this paper finds that the higher management efficiency of the medical insurance investment funds is, the higher the best subsidy ratio is. This paper states that subsidy is a two-edged sword. On one hand, subsidy stimulates medical demand. On the other hand, subsidy raises price and inhibits hospital competition. Therefore, government must set an appropriate subsidy ratio difference between large and small hospitals to maximize the total social welfare. For a developing country with limited medical resources

  2. [Issues related to national university medical schools: focusing on the low wages of university hospital physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamuku, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    University hospitals, bringing together the three divisions of education, research, and clinical medicine, could be said to represent the pinnacle of medicine. However, when compared with physicians working at public and private hospitals, physicians working at university hospitals and medical schools face extremely poor conditions. This is because physicians at national university hospitals are considered to be "educators." Meanwhile, even after the privatization of national hospitals, physicians working for these institutions continue to be perceived as "medical practitioners." A situation may arise in which physicians working at university hospitals-performing top-level medical work while also being involved with university and postgraduate education, as well as research-might leave their posts because they are unable to live on their current salaries, especially in comparison with physicians working at national hospitals, who focus solely on medical care. This situation would be a great loss for Japan. This potential loss can be prevented by amending the classification of physicians at national university hospitals from "educators" to "medical practitioners." In order to accomplish this, the Japan Medical Association, upon increasing its membership and achieving growth, should act as a mediator in negotiations between national university hospitals, medical schools, and the government.

  3. Identifying High-alert Medications in a University Hospital by Applying Data From the Medication Error Reporting System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyynismaa, Lotta; Honkala, Anni; Airaksinen, Marja; Shermock, Kenneth; Lehtonen, Lasse

    2017-06-01

    To facilitate safe use of high-alert medications, lists of medications posing higher risks for medication errors (MEs) and harmful effects have been compiled. These lists can be general or reflect clinical practices in specific settings. Less common has been to compile a hospital-specific list applying data from the organization's ME reporting system. Our objective was to demonstrate a method for compiling such a high-alert medication list in a university hospital. Of the eighteen 136 MEs reported during 2007 to 2013, ME reports with medications coded as a contributing factor to the incident were included (n = 249). The involved medications were identified and compared with the hospital's drug consumption and Institute for Safe Medication Practice's List of High-Alert Medications. The report narratives of MEs with most reported and high-alert medications (120 reports) were qualitatively content analyzed. The included 249 reports concerned 280 medications, of which 33% were classified as high-alert medications by the Institute for Safe Medication Practice. The most common therapeutic groups were antibacterials for systemic use (13%), psycholeptics (10%), analgesics (9%), and antithrombotic agents (9%). The most common high-alert medications were oxycodone (5%), enoxaparin (3%), and noradrenaline (3%). Serious patient harm (3%) was related to cefuroxime, enoxaparin, ibuprofen, midazolam, propofol, and warfarin. A half of the MEs were related to parenteral preparations. The qualitative content analysis revealed the key process safety risks of the most reported and high-alert medications. The method is applicable for compiling a hospital-specific high-alert medication list and related analysis of key process safety risks contributing to MEs.

  4. Western University (No. 10 Canadian Stationary Hospital and No. 14 Canadian General Hospital): a study of medical volunteerism in the First World War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istl, Alexandra C; McAlister, Vivian C

    2016-12-01

    The Canadian government depended on chaotic civilian volunteerism to staff a huge medical commitment during the First World War. Offers from Canadian universities to raise, staff and equip hospitals for deployment, initially rejected, were incrementally accepted as casualties mounted. When its offer was accepted in 1916, Western University Hospital quickly adopted military decorum and equipped itself using Canadian Red Cross Commission guidelines. Staff of the No. 10 Canadian Stationary Hospital and the No. 14 Canadian General Hospital retained excellent morale throughout the war despite heavy medical demand, poor conditions, aerial bombardment and external medical politics. The overwhelming majority of volunteers were Canadian-born and educated. The story of the hospital's commanding officer, Edwin Seaborn, is examined to understand the background upon which the urge to volunteer in the First World War was based. Although many Western volunteers came from British stock, they promoted Canadian independence. A classical education and a broad range of interests outside of medicine, including biology, history and native Canadian culture, were features that Seaborn shared with other leaders in Canadian medicine, such as William Osler, who also volunteered quickly in the First World War.

  5. Risk factors and hospitalization costs of Dementia patients: Examining race and gender variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baqar Husaini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To examine the variation in risk factors and hospitalization costs among four elderly dementia cohorts by race and gender. Materials and Methods: The 2008 Tennessee Hospital Discharged database was examined. The prevalence, risk factors and cost of inpatient care of dementia were examined for individuals aged 65 years and above, across the four race gender cohorts - white males (WM, black males (BM, white females (WF, and black females (BF. Results: 3.6% of patients hospitalized in 2008 had dementia. Dementia was higher among females than males, and higher among blacks than whites. Further, BF had higher prevalence of dementia than WF; similarly, BM had a higher prevalence of dementia than WM. Overall, six risk factors were associated with dementia for the entire sample including HTN, DM, CKD, CHF, COPD, and stroke. These risk factors varied slightly in predicting dementia by race and gender. Hospital costs were 14% higher among dementia patients compared to non-dementia patients. Conclusions: There exist significant race and gender disparities in prevalence of dementia. A greater degree of co-morbidity, increased duration of hospital stay, and more frequent hospitalizations, may result in a higher cost of inpatient dementia care. Aggressive management of risk factors may subsequently reduce stroke and cost of dementia care, especially in the black population. Race and gender dependent milestones for management of these risk factors should be considered.

  6. Assessment of Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiative in Three Hospitals Affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoozeh Bairami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess the status of patient safety in three hospitals, affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, based on the critical standards of Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiative (PSFHI. Materials and Methods:In this cross-sectional study, conducted in 2014, we used PSFHI assessment tool to evaluate the status of patient safety in three hospitals, affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences; these general referral hospitals were selected purposefully. PSFHI assessment tool is comprised of 140 patient safety standards in five domains, categorized in 24 sub-domains. The five major domains include leadership and management, patient and public involvement, safe evidence-based clinical practices, safe environment, and lifelong learning. Results: All three hospitals met more than 70% of the critical standards. The highest score in critical standards (> 80% was related to the domain of leadership and management in all hospitals. The average score in the domain of safe evidence-based clinical practices was 70% in the studied hospitals. Finally, all the hospitals met 50% of the critical standards in the domains of patient and public involvement and safe environment. Conclusion: Based on the findings, PSFHI is a suitable program for meeting patient safety goals. The selected hospitals in this survey all had a high managerial commitment to patient safety; therefore, they could obtain high scores on critical standards.

  7. Use of the National Board of Medical Examiners® Comprehensive Basic Science Exam: survey results of US medical schools

    OpenAIRE

    Wright,William; Baston,Kirk

    2017-01-01

    William S Wright,1 Kirk Baston2 1Department of Biomedical Sciences, 2Department of Pathology, University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville, Greenville, SC, USA Purpose: The National Board of Medical Examiners® (NBME) Comprehensive Basic Science Exam (CBSE) is a subject exam offered to US medical schools, where it has been used for external validation of student preparedness for the United States Medical Licensing Examination® (USMLE) Step 1 in new schools and sch...

  8. Discharge from hospital against medical advice among paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The reasons underlying discharge against medical advice by Paediatric patients varies from place to place. Discharge against medical advice is frustrating to the medical personnel and deprives the patient of adequate medical care. This study aims to determine the prevalence and factors associated with ...

  9. Improving the utilization of medical crisis teams (Condition C) at an urban tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foraida, Mohamed I; DeVita, Michael A; Braithwaite, R Scott; Stuart, Susan A; Brooks, Maria Mori; Simmons, Richard L

    2003-06-01

    Serious clinical deterioration precedes most cardiopulmonary arrests, and there is evidence that organized responses to this deterioration may prevent a substantial proportion of in-hospital deaths. We aimed to increase the utilization of our medical crisis response team (Condition C) to impact this source of mortality. We have examined the change in numbers of Condition Cs and the main alternative response strategy (sequential stat pages) after the implementation of 4 strategies to increase Condition C utilization: (1) immediate reviews of all sequential STAT pages, (2) feedback to caregivers responsible for delays in Condition C activation, (3) creation of objective criteria for invoking a crisis response, and (4) dissemination of objective criteria through posting in units, e-mail, and in-service oral presentations. Over a 3-year period, interventions were followed by increased use of organized responses to medical crises (Condition Cs) and decreased numbers of disorganized responses (sequential STAT pages). The interventions that involved objective definition and dissemination of criteria for initiating the Condition C response were followed by 19.2 more Condition Cs monthly (95% confidence interval [CI], 12.1-26.3; Pinterventions that involved giving feedback to medical personnel based on review of their care were not associated with changes in the measures. Utilization of an important patient safety measure may be increased by focused interventions at an urban tertiary care hospital. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The prevalence of personality disorder in a general medical hospital population in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J; Walcott, G; Clarke, T R; Barton, E N; Hickling, F W

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of personality disorders in patients admitted to the general medical wards of the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI). Patients (n = 100) sequentially admitted to the general medical wards of the UHWI were assessed for the diagnosis of personality disorder using the gold standard of a consultant assessment based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, text revision (DSM IV-TR) diagnostic criteria for personality disorder, the International Personality Disorder Examination Screening questionnaire (IPDE-S) and the Jamaica Personality Disorder Inventory (JPDI). The three assessment instruments identified a prevalence of personality disorder in the cohort of patients of 21% consultant DSM IV-TR assessment, 28% JPDI and 70% IPDE-S. The prevalence rate identified by the IPDE-S was significantly higher than the local instruments used (p Jamaica is significantly higher than the prevalence rate of studies in other countries.

  11. Effect of medication reconciliation on medication costs after hospital discharge in relation to hospital pharmacy labor costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karapinar-Carkit, F.; Borgsteede, S.D.; Zoer, J.; Egberts, T.C.G.; van den Bemt, P.M.L.A.; van Tulder, M.W.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medication reconciliation aims to correct discrepancies in medication use between health care settings and to check the quality of pharmacotherapy to improve effectiveness and safety. In addition, medication reconciliation might also reduce costs. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of

  12. Effect of medication reconciliation on medication costs after hospital discharge in relation to hospital pharmacy labor costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Karapinar-Çarkit (Fatma); S.D. Borgsteede (Sander); J. Zoer (Jan); T.C.G. Egberts (Toine); P.M.L.A. van den Bemt (Patricia); M.W. van Tulder (Maurits)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Medication reconciliation aims to correct discrepancies in medication use between health care settings and to check the quality of pharmacotherapy to improve effectiveness and safety. In addition, medication reconciliation might also reduce costs. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the

  13. A Qualitative Examination of the Administrative Process of Fleet Enlisted Personnel in Various Medical Categories

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weatherford, Lenora

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the medical management process of placing and monitoring active duty fleet enlisted personnel in a temporary medical duty status and its impact on fleet readiness...

  14. The effect of pharmaceutical innovation on longevity, hospitalization and medical expenditure in Turkey, 1999-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Frank R; Tatar, Mehtap; Çalışkan, Zafer

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the impact of pharmaceutical innovation on longevity, hospitalization and medical expenditure in Turkey during the period 1999-2010 using longitudinal, disease-level data. From 1999 to 2008, mean age at death increased by 3.6 years, from 63.0 to 66.6 years. We estimate that in the absence of any pharmaceutical innovation, mean age at death would have increased by only 0.6 years. Hence, pharmaceutical innovation is estimated to have increased mean age at death in Turkey by 3.0 years during the period 1999-2008. We also examine the effect of pharmaceutical innovation on hospital utilization. We estimate that pharmaceutical innovation has reduced the number of hospital days by approximately 1% per year. We use our estimates of the effect of pharmaceutical innovation on age at death, hospital utilization and pharmaceutical expenditure to assess the incremental cost-effectiveness of pharmaceutical innovation, i.e., the cost per life-year gained from the introduction of new drugs. The baseline estimate of the cost per life-year gained from pharmaceutical innovation is $2776. Even the latter figure is a very small fraction of leading economists' estimates of the value of (or consumers' willingness to pay for) a one-year increase in life expectancy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of a medication review service for patients with enteral tubes in a community teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tracey; Eisenhart, Alison; Costello, Jennifer

    2017-06-01

    The results of a study to develop a hospital-wide medication review service for patients with enteral tubes to improve patient safety are presented. Inappropriate enteral administration of medications can result in occluded tubes, altered clinical response, and an increase in adverse effects. At Saint Barnabas Medical Center, a 600-bed community teaching hospital located in Livingston, New Jersey, a medication review service for patients with an enteral tube was developed. A phased approach was used. In phase 1, a retrospective chart review revealed that 43% of our patients with enteral tubes received at least one medication that should not be crushed. In phase 2, we identified formulary medications that should not be crushed based on guidance from the Institute for Safe Medication Practices. We added a "do not crush" warning to the identified medications in our electronic medication administration record and automated medication dispensing system. In phase 3, we created an automatic substitution list of medications. Phase 4 involved the development of the program in our health information technology platform. An electronic task list alerted pharmacists about patients with enteral tubes who required medication review and potential medication substitutions, as well as patients with newly removed enteral tubes who can be placed back on their original medications. In phase 5, we provided education to prescribers, nurses, and pharmacists. A hospital-wide medication review service for patients with enteral tubes at our community teaching medical center was developed. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of hospital accreditation on medical students: a national qualitative study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Jung; Chang, Heng-Hao; Chiu, Yu-Ting; Norris, Jessie L

    2014-11-01

    Hospital accreditation has become a global trend for improving the quality of health care services. In Taiwan, nearly all hospitals are accredited. However, there is a paucity of literature on the effects of hospital accreditation on medical students and the universal applicability of hospital accreditation as developed in the West. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hospital accreditation on medical students in Taiwan. From 2010 to 2012, the authors conducted semistructured interviews with 34 senior, clinical year students at 11 different medical schools in Taiwan. Following a grounded theory approach, the authors transcribed and analyzed the transcripts concurrently with data collection in order to identify emergent themes. Aside from the intended positive effects of hospital accreditation, this study revealed several unintended impacts on medical students, including decreased clinical learning opportunities, increased trivial workload, and violation of professional integrity. Taiwanese students expressed doubt and frustration concerning the value of hospital accreditation and reflected on the cultural and systemic context in which accreditation takes place. Their commentary addressed the challenges associated with the globalization of hospital accreditation processes. This study suggests that, beyond the improvement of patient safety and quality assurance, medical educators must recognize the unintended negative effects of hospital accreditation on medical education and take into account differences in culture and health care systems amid the globalization of medicine.

  17. [The multi-factorial model of satisfaction of medical care by hospital patients suffering from borderline psychic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigankov, B D; Maligin, Ya V

    2015-01-01

    The satisfaction of patients with medical care determines their consumer behavior. The factors of satisfaction with medical care vary depending on level of its provision and profile of medical specialty. At that, there are only sporadic studies dedicated to factors of satisfaction with psychiatric care. The study was carried out to examine factors of satisfaction with hospital psychiatric care by patients suffering from depressive and neurotic disorders. The sampling consisted of 356 hospital patients suffering from depressive and neurotic disorders. The survey in written form was carried out using originally developed questionnaire. The statistical analysis was implemented by compiling equation of multiple regression. It is established that key factors of satisfaction include functioning of medical nurses of department, functioning of attending physician, comfort of wards, proportions and quality of psychiatric care capability of physician to empathic listening. The developed mathematical model explains 81% of variation of satisfaction with treatment.

  18. Characteristics of simulation activities at North American medical schools and teaching hospitals: an AAMC-SSH-ASPE-AACN collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Grace C; Sacks, Heather; Devita, Michael; Reynolds, Robby; Gammon, Wendy; Saleh, Michael; Gliva-McConvey, Gayle; Owens, Tamara; Anderson, Julie; Stillsmoking, Kristina; Cantrell, Mary; Passiment, Morgan

    2012-12-01

    In September 2011, the Association of American Medical Colleges released the results of a survey conducted in 2010 on simulation activities at its member medical schools and teaching hospitals. In this commentary, we offer a synthesis of data and conclude that (1) simulation is used broadly at Association of American Medical Colleges member institutions, for many types of learners, including other health care professionals; (2) it addresses core training competencies and has many educational purposes; (3) its use in learner assessment is more prevalent at medical schools but is still significant at teaching hospitals; and (4) it requires a considerable investment of money, space, personnel, and time. These data confirm general perceptions about the state of simulation in North America for physician training. Future endeavors should include a more granular examination of how simulation is integrated into curricula, a similar survey of other health care-related institutions and professions, and a periodic assessment to characterize trends over time.

  19. Basic cardiac life support education for non-medical hospital employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, M S; Jo, I J; Song, H G

    2009-05-01

    The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) recommends that strategies should be implemented that promote cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training in the workplace. Non-medical employees at a hospital were therefore trained to conduct basic life support (BLS). Subject background information, test results and survey findings were examined and factors affecting BLS skill acquisition were studied. Of 1432 non-medical employees at a hospital trained to conduct BLS, 880 agreed to participate in the survey. The training course consisted of a single session of 3 h of lectures, practice and testing. Skill acquisition was assessed using a 13-item skill checklist and a 5-point overall competency scale. The effects of age, gender, type of job, educational status, a previous history of CPR training and level of subject-perceived training difficulty were examined. According to total checklist scores, subjects achieved a mean (SD) score of 8.66 (3.57). 22.3% performed all 13 skills. Based on 5-point overall competency ratings, 43.7% of subjects were rated as "competent", "very good" or "outstanding". Age (or=40 years) was the only factor that significantly affected skill acquisition (skill acquisition by those >or=40 years of age was poorer than by those aged or=40 years.

  20. Comparison of academic achievement between medical students recruited by state's medical school entrance selection and by Rangsit University's own examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saereeporncharenkul, Kasem

    2011-03-01

    College of Medicine, Rangsit University (RSU), is the only private medical school in Thailand. RSU College of Medicine recruiting method includes the examination together with state's medical schools and its own examination. The study aims to compare number of students in each group who passed, as required in the curriculum, pre-clinical subjects in 3 academic years, graduated Doctor of Medicine degree in 6 academic years, and finally passed the National Board examination for the Medical License following graduation. All medical students enrolled in the College of Medicine from 2000 to 2004 academic year were included in the study. The numbers of students from each group who passed pre-clinical level in 3 academic years, graduated in 6 academic years and finally passed the National Board examination for the Medical License following graduation were analyzed. During the year 2000 to 2004 College of Medicine recruited and enrolled 506 students, of these, 51 resigned. The number of students recruited by examination with other state's medical schools (first group) was 178 and by RSU examination (second group) was 277. Number of medical students who finished pre-clinical study and passed to clinical level in three years as required in the curriculum were 144 from 178 (80.9%) in the first group and 205 from 277 (74.0%) in the second group. Number of medical students who graduated in six years as required in the curriculum were 140 from 178 (78.7%) in the first group and 202 from 277 (72.9%) in the second group. One-hundred and thirteen from 178 students (63.5%) in the first group graduated within 6 years and passed the National Board Examination for Medical License following graduation. However, 149 from 277 students (53.8%) in the second group passed the same described process. Numbers of medical students admitted by examination together with other state's medical schools and examination by RSU itself are not significantly different in finishing pre-clinical subjects in

  1. Implementation of a pharmacy automation system (robotics) to ensure medication safety at Norwalk hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bepko, Robert J; Moore, John R; Coleman, John R

    2009-01-01

    This article reports an intervention to improve the quality and safety of hospital patient care by introducing the use of pharmacy robotics into the medication distribution process. Medication safety is vitally important. The integration of pharmacy robotics with computerized practitioner order entry and bedside medication bar coding produces a significant reduction in medication errors. The creation of a safe medication-from initial ordering to bedside administration-provides enormous benefits to patients, to health care providers, and to the organization as well.

  2. Medication Safety: Experiential Learning for Pharmacy Students and Staff in a Hospital Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Graudins, Linda V.; Dooley, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Medication Safety has been an established pharmacy specialty in Australian hospitals since the early 2000s and is now one of the ten Australian hospital accreditation standards. Although advances have occurred, medication-related patient harm has not been eradicated. Victorian undergraduate pharmacy programs include some aspects of medication safety, however clinical pharmacy experience, along with interpersonal and project management skills, are required to prepare pharmacists to be confiden...

  3. Job stress and burnout in hospital employees: comparisons of different medical professions in a regional hospital in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Li-Ping; Li, Chung-Yi; Hu, Susan C

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To explore the prevalence and associated factors of burnout among five different medical professions in a regional teaching hospital. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Hospital-based survey. Participants A total of 1329 medical professionals were recruited in a regional hospital with a response rate of 89%. These voluntary participants included 101 physicians, 68 physician assistants, 570 nurses, 216 medical technicians and 374 administrative staff. Primary and secondary outcome measures Demographic data included gender, age, level of education and marital status, and work situations, such as position, work hours and work shifts, were obtained from an electronic questionnaire. Job strain and burnout were measured by two validated questionnaires, the Chinese version of the Job Content Questionnaire and the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory. Results Among the five medical professions, the prevalence of high work-related burnout from highest to lowest was nurses (66%), physician assistants (61.8%), physicians (38.6%), administrative staff (36.1%) and medical technicians (31.9%), respectively. Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that job strain, overcommitment and low social support explained the most variance (32.6%) of burnout. Conclusions Physician assistant is an emerging high burnout group; its severity is similar to that of nurses and far more than that of physicians, administrative staff and medical technicians. These findings may contribute to the development of feasible strategies to reduce the stress which results in the burnout currently plaguing most hospitals in Taiwan. PMID:24568961

  4. 22 CFR 11.4 - Medical examination for appointment to class 7 or 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical examination for appointment to class 7 or 8. 11.4 Section 11.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN SERVICE OFFICERS § 11.4 Medical examination for appointment to class 7 or 8. The Board of Examiners for...

  5. Ascertainment of Outpatient Visits by Patients with Diabetes: The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asao, Keiko; McEwen, Laura N.; Lee, Joyce M.; Herman, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To estimate and evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of providers’ diagnosis codes and medication lists to identify outpatient visits by patients with diabetes. Methods We used data from the 2006 to 2010 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of providers’ diagnoses and medication lists to identify patients with diabetes, using the checkbox for diabetes as the gold standard. We then examined differences in sensitivity by patients’ characteristics using multivariate logistic regression models. Results The checkbox identified 12,647 outpatient visits by adults with diabetes among the 70,352 visits used for this analysis. The sensitivity and specificity of providers’ diagnoses or listed diabetes medications were 72.3% (95% CI: 70.8% to 73.8%) and 99.2% (99.1% to 99.4%), respectively. Diabetic patients ≥75 years pf age, women, non-Hispanics, and those with private insurance or Medicare were more likely to be missed by providers’ diagnoses and medication lists. Diabetic patients who had more diagnosis codes and medications recorded, had glucose or hemoglobin A1c measured, or made office- rather than hospital-outpatient visits were less likely to be missed. Conclusions Providers’ diagnosis codes and medication lists fail to identify approximately one quarter of outpatient visits by patients with diabetes. PMID:25891975

  6. Ascertainment of outpatient visits by patients with diabetes: The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asao, Keiko; McEwen, Laura N; Lee, Joyce M; Herman, William H

    2015-07-01

    To estimate and evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of providers' diagnosis codes and medication lists to identify outpatient visits by patients with diabetes. We used data from the 2006 to 2010 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of providers' diagnoses and medication lists to identify patients with diabetes, using the checkbox for diabetes as the gold standard. We then examined differences in sensitivity by patients' characteristics using multivariate logistic regression models. The checkbox identified 12,647 outpatient visits by adults with diabetes among the 70,352 visits used for this analysis. The sensitivity and specificity of providers' diagnoses or listed diabetes medications were 72.3% (95% CI: 70.8% to 73.8%) and 99.2% (99.1% to 99.4%), respectively. Diabetic patients ≥75 years of age, women, non-Hispanics, and those with private insurance or Medicare were more likely to be missed by providers' diagnoses and medication lists. Diabetic patients who had more diagnosis codes and medications recorded, had glucose or hemoglobin A1c measured, or made office- rather than hospital-outpatient visits were less likely to be missed. Providers' diagnosis codes and medication lists fail to identify approximately one quarter of outpatient visits by patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [The diagnosis and treatment of common diseases detected during medical examination of male oil-extracting industry workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdichevskiĭ, V B; Bykova, I N

    2013-01-01

    To study the health status of male shift workers engaged in oil-extracting industry in the Tyumen Region through prophylactic medical examination, to elaborate measures for the diagnosis and treatment of the most common diseases of the viscera and urogenital system (UGS). In 2009, the exit team of the Unit of Preventive Examinations, Tyumen Regional Clinical Hospital, examined 1120 male shift workers of the oil-field facilities of the Tyumen Region. The health of the examined shift workers was generally better than the national and regional indices. At the same time a number of observations demonstrated that shift work had a negative impact on the function of the viscera and UGS in the men, as evidenced by this clinical examination revealing arterial hypertension in 20 men and chronic bacterial prostatitis in 91. All patients with the newly identified diseases were registered to be followed up. In the extrashift period, they were successfully treated at the Diagnostic Center of the Tyumen Regional Hospital according to the national standards. The prophylactic medical examination of shift oil-field workers is substantiated by not only the compuIsory specialized examination for the early diagnosis of evolving diseases, but also by the fact that during their visits to specialists the men can really increase their awareness of their current health and the methods of its promotion.

  8. Hospitalization and medical cost of patients with elevated serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiro Kitagawa

    Full Text Available Patients with heart failure (HF are reportedly at high risk for 'all-cause' re-hospitalization. A biomarker for HF, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP, enables to simply detect patients with possible HF (pHF. We examined the hospitalization and medical cost of Japanese patients detected by an elevated serum NT-proBNP, and also evaluated the effects of institutional team approaches for HF on their all-cause hospitalizations.We retrospectively extracted all adult patients with serum NT-proBNP ≥400 pg/ml measured between January and March 2012 in Hiroshima University Hospital as pHF-positive patients. We studied their all-cause hospitalization records during the past 3-year period. We also extracted all pHF-negative patients with NT-proBNP <400 pg/ml and studied as well. In the pHF-positive patients followed for 3 years after starting interprofessional team approaches to prevent the onset and exacerbation of HF in the hospital, we compared the hospitalization and medical cost between the 3-year periods before and after the start of the team approaches.We enrolled 432 pHF-positive and 485 pHF-negative patients with one or more hospitalization records. Compared to the pHF-negative patients, the pHF-positive patients had longer total hospitalization days (median [interquartile range], 30 [13-58] versus. 18 [8-39], p <0.0001 and higher total medical cost for hospitalizations (2.42 [1.07-5.08] versus. 1.80 [0.79-3.65] million yen, p <0.0001. A subset of 303 pHF-positive patients was followed for 3 years after starting the team approaches, and we found that both total hospitalization days (30 [13-57] to 8 [0-31] and medical cost for hospitalizations (2.59 [1.37-5.05] to 0.76 [0-2.38] million yen showed marked reduction in them.Patients with an elevated serum NT-proBNP have longer hospitalizations and higher costs for all-cause hospitalizations than those without. Institutional team approaches for HF may reduce them.

  9. Correlation of United States Medical Licensing Examination and Internal Medicine In-Training Examination Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jose A., Jr.; Greer, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    The Internal Medicine In-Training Examination (ITE) is administered during residency training in the United States as a self-assessment and program assessment tool. Performance on this exam correlates with outcome on the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying examination. Internal Medicine Program Directors use the United States Medical…

  10. The 'market' for medical and health information in transition: the case of the Hong Kong Hospital Authority libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, G

    1996-06-01

    The last few years have been a period of transition not only for hospitals and their governance but also for post-graduate medical education in Hong Kong. Both trends have a direct impact on the information market place. This article starts by studying the provision of medical and health-related information in Hong Kong. The two university medical and dental libraries, together with the hospital and health sciences libraries in government hospitals and the Department of Health, house the major collections on medicine and health care. The demand for medical and health care information is increasingly felt with the takeover of 39 hospitals by the statutory Hong Kong Hospital Authority in 1991. The major problems and issues in planning for library information services are the historically uneven development of libraries, discrepancies in funding, the changes in organizational and management structure, and the competition with higher development priorities within the organization. In view of current technology and the availability of rich external resources, the adopted strategies tend towards the formation of 10 library service networks, development of integrated library information systems on the Health Authority-wide area network, and the devolution of management responsibilities. The future challenges in store for the information professional are examined.

  11. FACTORS AFFECTING THE DEVELOPMENT OF MEDICAL TOURISM IN PUBLIC HOSPITALS

    OpenAIRE

    YİĞİT, Vahit

    2016-01-01

    Medical tourism is a burgeoning industry in the world. Nowadays, over 50countries have been identified medical tourism as a national industry. AlthoughAsian countries where India, Thailand, Singapore and Malaysia popular medicaltourism destination, medical tourism in Turkey has not reached the desiredlevel and and could not get enough share of the medical tourism market. The aimof this study is to determine the factors influencing the development ofmedical tourism in Turkey. This research was...

  12. An appraisal of medical waste management in four tertiary hospitals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The study revealed that waste segregation is carried out in only one hospital. Hospital wastes are collected with wheel barrows and trolleys. Refuse is transported to treatment or disposal site by open trucks in two centres, the other two by Enugu State Waste Management Agency (ESWAMA) refuse trucks. Only one ...

  13. The maintenance of competence of rural district hospital medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out as a follow-up to an analysis of knowledge and skills of doctors in Western Cape district hospitals. Method A study was therefore designed to investigate the content and methods used for the maintenance of competence of rural district hospital practitioners in the Western Cape province of South ...

  14. Leprosy in Nkhotakota District Hospital | Chisi | East African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study the profile of leprosy cases at Nkhotakota District Hospital in Central Region of Malawi. Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study of all registered cases of leprosy from records over a nine year period (January 1992 to April 2001) Setting: Nkhotakota District Hospital-Central Region of Malawi. Results: ...

  15. The Invention of a Medical Institution? A Discussion of Hospitals Around 1800

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dross, Fritz

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the position of the hospital in the discussion on health care between self-help and formal poor relief. This is done for the late 18th and early 19th centuries when besides the famous hospital foundations e.g. in Vienna and Würzburg, a lot of hospital foundations failed. Although hospitals had been considered to be quite useful for the state by influential publicists, in the German territories neither public opinion nor doctors favoured central hospital care for the poor around 1800. A policinical model with an essential portion of curing the sick in their homes had been the modernist model of medical help in terms of late 18th / early 19th century discourse. The process of inventing the hospital as a new medical institution was based on the acceptance of family and kinship networks as requisite parts of medical help.

  16. [Training of medical students for pelvic examination: Benefits of teaching on anatomic models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouet, P-E; Jeanneteau, P; Legendre, G; El Hachem, H; Richard, I; Granry, J-C; Descamps, P; Sentilhes, L

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the benefits of training sessions for pelvic examination using anatomic models. The medical students (MS) registered in their 5th year of medical studies at Angers University Hospital had to complete two anonymous questionnaires; one at the beginning of the workshop and one at the end. Every procedure which included pelvic exam (PE), vaginal sample (VS), smear test (ST), insertion of a speculum and insertion of intra-uterine device (IUD) was evaluated. Seventy-one MS answered both questionnaires. They were very satisfied or satisfied with the outcomes of the workshop in 91 % of the cases. At the beginning of the workshop, 28 %, 52 %, 30 %, 25 % and 3 % reported a low level of difficulty to carry out, respectively, a PE, VS, ST, insertion of a speculum, insertion of an IUD. At the end of the session, there were respectively 55 %, 83 %, 76 %, 66 % and 16 % of MS to report a low level of difficulty of these same procedures. For all of these procedures, there were a significant (P<0.05) number of MS who estimated the procedure's level of difficulty as being low at the end of the session. The level of technical difficulty of all procedures was significantly decreased at the end of the workshop. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Usability Tests in Medicine: A Cost-Benefit Analysis for Hospitals Before Acquiring Medical Devices for Theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonser, Phillipp; Fuchsberger, Thomas; Matern, Ulrich

    2017-08-01

    The use of active medical devices in clinical routine should be as safe and efficient as possible. Usability tests (UTs) help improve these aspects of medical devices during their development, but UTs can be of use for hospitals even after a product has been launched. The present pilot study examines the costs and possible benefits of UT for hospitals before buying new medical devices for theatre. Two active medical devices with different complexity were tested in a standardized UT and a cost-benefit analysis was carried out assuming a different device bought at the same price with a higher usability could increase the efficiency of task solving and due to that save valuable theatre time. The cost of the UT amounted up to €19.400. Hospitals could benefit from UTs before buying new devices for theatre by reducing time-consuming operator errors and thereby increase productivity and patient safety. The possible benefits amounted from €23.300 to €1.570.000 (median = €797.000). Not only hospitals could benefit economically from investing in a UT before deciding to buy a medical device, but especially patients would profit from a higher usability by reducing possible operator errors and increase safety and performance of use.

  18. Medications Associated with Geriatric Syndromes (MAGS) and their Prevalence in Older Hospitalized Adults Discharged to Skilled Nursing Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraf, Avantika A.; Peterson, Alec W.; Simmons, Sandra F.; Schnelle, John F.; Bell, Susan P.; Kripalani, Sunil; Myers, Amy P.; Mixon, Amanda S.; Long, Emily A.; Jacobsen, J. Mary Lou; Vasilevskis, Eduard E.

    2016-01-01

    Background More than half of the hospitalized older adults discharged to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) have more than three geriatric syndromes. Pharmacotherapy may be contributing to geriatric syndromes in this population. Objectives Develop a list of medications associated with geriatric syndromes and describe their prevalence in patients discharged from acute care to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) Design Literature review and multidisciplinary expert panel discussion, followed by cross-sectional analysis. Setting Academic Medical Center in the United States Participants 154 hospitalized Medicare beneficiaries discharged to SNFs Measurements Development of a list of medications that are associated with six geriatric syndromes. Prevalence of the medications associated with geriatric syndromes was examined in the hospital discharge sample. Results A list of 513 medications was developed as potentially contributing to 6 geriatric syndromes: cognitive impairment, delirium, falls, reduced appetite or weight loss, urinary incontinence, and depression. Medications included 18 categories. Antiepileptics were associated with all syndromes while antipsychotics, antidepressants, antiparkinsonism and opioid agonists were associated with 5 geriatric syndromes. In the prevalence sample, patients were discharged to SNFs with an overall average of 14.0 (±4.7) medications, including an average of 5.9 (±2.2) medications that could contribute to geriatric syndromes, with falls having the most associated medications at discharge, 5.5 (±2.2). Conclusions Many commonly prescribed medications are associated with geriatric syndromes. Over 40% of all medications ordered upon discharge to SNFs were associated with geriatric syndromes and could be contributing to the high prevalence of geriatric syndromes experienced by this population. PMID:27255830

  19. Improving Hospital Quality and Patient Safety an Examination of Organizational Culture and Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, John Wallace

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the effects of safety culture, including operational climate and practices, as well as the adoption and use of information systems for delivering high quality healthcare and improved patient experience. Chapter 2 studies the influence of both general and outcome-specific hospital climate and quality practices on process…

  20. Graduating osteopathic medical students' perceptions and recommendations on the decision to take the United States Medical Licensing Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasty, Robert T; Snyder, Samuel; Suciu, Gabriel P; Moskow, Jaclynn M

    2012-02-01

    Osteopathic medical students have a choice to take the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) in addition to the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination-USA (COMLEX-USA). However, taking the USMLE requires additional commitments of time, effort, and expense, often for uncertain return. No data are available about the attitudes of graduating osteopathic medical students toward their options regarding the USMLE and how they decide whether to take this examination. To uncover attitudes among graduating osteopathic medical students on taking the USMLE. Using an Internet-based questionnaire, the authors surveyed graduating osteopathic medical students about their experiences with deciding whether to take the USMLE and whether they would advise other students to take the examination. Nineteen osteopathic medical colleges agreed to participate in the survey. Of the 2744 graduating students at those schools, 978 (35.7%) completed the survey. Students in higher quintiles (ie, top 40%) of class rank were more likely to take the USMLE than those in lower quintiles (ie, bottom 40%) (Posteopathic medical students polled in the present study believed that osteopathic medical students should take the USMLE.

  1. Communication relating to family members' involvement and understandings about patients' medication management in hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manias, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    Many patients with complex health-care needs are prescribed several medications on a daily basis. With admission to hospital, patients are often placed in a vulnerable position. Family members can therefore play an important role in supporting patients in decision making about managing medications and negotiating communication exchange with health professionals. From the perspective of family members, to explore family members' involvement with health professionals and patients about how patients' medications are managed in hospital. Using an ethnographic design, interviews were conducted with family members of patients admitted to hospital who had at least five medications prescribed in hospital. A purposive sampling approach was used for recruitment. A thematic framework process was used for analysis. Interviews took place in four surgical and four medical wards in each of two Australian hospitals. Forty interviews were conducted with family members in relation to their respective relative's medications. Family members tended to participate in passive, rather than active or shared decision-making activities. Those who demonstrated active or shared decision making were extensively involved in managing medications and in addressing problems relating to continuity of care. Communication with health professionals was generally insufficient, despite family members' keenness to speak with them. Improved communication is needed between family members, health professionals and patients in hospitals. Greater attention should be played by health professionals in initiating communication proactively. Family members possessed valuable, unique information about patients' medications that can be utilized to facilitate patient safety. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. The use of interpreters in medical settings and forensic medical examinations in Australia: the relationship between medicine and linguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Jason R; Odell, Morris S

    2014-07-01

    Medical examinations are dependent on combining communication with professional competence. In the development of a global multicultural community with the use of multiple languages, doctors have become increasingly dependent on language facilitation such as interpreting and translation. Despite professional studies, the use of language facilitation with its associated problems has not been fully explored in graduate and post-graduate medical and forensic medical training. There may still be some lack of reciprocal understanding between the medical and linguistic fields, their ethics, obligations and limits although both fields and their ethical frameworks are closer related than might be expected. This article is a discussion that aims at providing a basic understanding of guidelines as to the origin and appropriate use of language interpretation in medical and forensic medical examinations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  3. [Patient satisfaction with the work of the hospital medical personnel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miseviciene, Irena; Milasauskiene, Zemyna

    2002-01-01

    The article presents the data of patient's satisfaction with the work of nurses and physicians in the hospitals, which belong to Lithuanian Health promotion hospitals network. All nine hospitals of the Lithuanian health promotion hospitals network took part in this study. Altogether 1300 questionnaires were handed out. They have been completed and returned by 1271 patients, i.e. 97.8%. Patients were asked to complete uniform anonymous questionnaire and evaluate the work, behavior and educational activity of nurses and physicians. The majority of respondents assessed the work of nurses and physicians positively, respectively 96.1% and 95.5%. The evaluation of nurses' work depended on patients' sex and the size of the hospital in which they were treated. Male patients and the ones who were treated in big hospitals assessed the work of nurses better than females and patients in smaller hospitals. The evaluation of physicians' work was related to the patients' education and extra payment for health services. Patients, who had higher education and indicated that they had paid additionally, assessed the work of physicians more critically. The majority of patients assessed the behavior of nurses and physicians as very good or excellent, respectively 86.0% and 90.5%. The work of nurses was better evaluated by elderly people and patients treated in big hospitals and as well as in the departments of internal medicine. Patients' satisfaction with the behavior of physicians was associated with patients' education. Better-educated people were more critical in assessing the behavior of physicians. The results of this study have shown that patients' satisfaction depends on many factors. To improve the quality of health care services in hospitals it is necessary to study patients' needs, expectations and factors associated with patients' satisfaction.

  4. Medical Students ? Self-Assessed Confidence Level Before a Major Physiology Examination: Affective Factors in a Nigerian Medical School

    OpenAIRE

    Augustine Egwu, Ogugua; Dimkpa, Uche; Ogbonnaya Orji, Jude; Ogbannaya Njoku, Clinton; Ogbonnia Eni, Egwu; Besong, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Self-reported confidence before any examination in all levels of medical training is a product of previous experience, attitudinal inclinations overtime, degree of self subjection to tenets of professionalism and possibly, the inadvertent role of the medical school environment including colleagues, teachers and faculty members, comfort, satisfaction and psychosocial stability; which may be addressed as sub-factors that determine the level of preparedness. Let medical schools in Nigeria; adopt...

  5. INTRODUCTION OF INNOVATIVE MEDICAL DEVICES AT FRENCH UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS: AN OVERVIEW OF HOSPITAL-BASED HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT INITIATIVES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Nicolas; Billaux, Mathilde; Borget, Isabelle; Pineau, Judith; Prognon, Patrice; van den Brink, Helene

    2015-01-01

    Local health technology assessment (HTA) to determine whether new health technologies should be adopted is now a common practice in many healthcare organizations worldwide. However, little is known about hospital-based HTA activities in France. The objective of this study was to explore hospital-based HTA activities in French university hospitals and to provide a picture of organizational approaches to the assessment of new and innovative medical devices. Eighteen semi-structured interviews with hospital pharmacists were conducted from October 2012 to April 2013. Six topics were discussed in depth: (i) the nature of the institution concerned; (ii) activities relating to innovative medical devices; (iii) the technology assessment and decision-making process; (iv) the methodology for technology assessment; (v) factors likely to influence decisions and (vi) suggestions for improving the current process. The interview data were coded, collated and analyzed statistically. Three major types of hospital-based HTA processes were identified: medical device committees, innovation committees, and "pharmacy & management" processes. HTA units had been set up to support medical device and innovation committees for technology assessment. Slow decision making was the main limitation to both these committee-based approaches. As an alternative, "pharmacy & management" processes emerged as a means of rapidly obtaining a formal assessment. This study provides an overview of hospital-based HTA initiatives in France. We hope that it will help to promote hospital-based HTA activities in France and discussions about ways to improve and harmonize practices, through the development of national guidelines and/or a French mini-HTA tool, for example.

  6. Predictive value of grade point average (GPA), Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), internal examinations (Block) and National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) scores on Medical Council of Canada qualifying examination part I (MCCQE-1) scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Banibrata; Ripstein, Ira; Perry, Kyle; Cohen, Barry

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether the pre-medical Grade Point Average (GPA), Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), Internal examinations (Block) and National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) scores are correlated with and predict the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part I (MCCQE-1) scores. Data from 392 admitted students in the graduating classes of 2010-2013 at University of Manitoba (UofM), College of Medicine was considered. Pearson's correlation to assess the strength of the relationship, multiple linear regression to estimate MCCQE-1 score and stepwise linear regression to investigate the amount of variance were employed. Complete data from 367 (94%) students were studied. The MCCQE-1 had a moderate-to-large positive correlation with NBME scores and Block scores but a low correlation with GPA and MCAT scores. The multiple linear regression model gives a good estimate of the MCCQE-1 (R2 =0.604). Stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that 59.2% of the variation in the MCCQE-1 was accounted for by the NBME, but only 1.9% by the Block exams, and negligible variation came from the GPA and the MCAT. Amongst all the examinations used at UofM, the NBME is most closely correlated with MCCQE-1.

  7. Uninsured Workers Have More Severe Hospitalizations: Examining the Texas Workers' Compensation System, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggess, Bethany; Scott, Brittany; Pompeii, Lisa

    2017-08-01

    Texas' unique elective system of workers' compensation (WC) coverage is being discussed widely in the United States as a possible model to be adopted by other states. Texas is the only state that does not mandate that employers provide state-certified WC insurance. Oklahoma passed legislation for a similar system in 2013, but it was declared unconstitutional by the Oklahoma Supreme Court in 2016. This study examined 9523 work-related hospitalizations that occurred in Texas in 2012 using Texas Department of State Health Services data. We sought to examine work-related injury characteristics by insurance source. An unexpected finding was that among those with WC, 44.6% of the hospitalizations were not recorded as work related by hospital staff. These unrecorded cases had 1.9 (1.6-2.2) times higher prevalence of a severe risk of mortality compared to WC cases that were recorded as work related. Uninsured and publicly insured workers also had a higher prevalence of severe mortality risk. The hospital charges for one year were $615.2 million, including at least $102.8 million paid by sources other than WC, and with $29.6 million that was paid for by injured workers or by taxpayers. There is an urgent need for more research to examine how the Texas WC system affects injured workers.

  8. What If a Resident or Medical Student Is Raped? Hospitals' and Academic Medical Centers' Title IX Obligations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Melinda

    2018-01-01

    Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 protects medical students and residents from all forms of sexual discrimination, including sexual harassment and assault. Hospitals that train residents as well as medical students must follow Title IX mandates, including investigating and addressing all reports of sexual discrimination, harassment, or violence. While these processes can help eliminate potential barriers to women in medical training, the pressure to participate in an internal investigation can discourage some medical students and residents from seeking help. Hospitals should work closely with university Title IX officials to design and implement effective policies and procedures to both prevent and address all types of sexual discrimination as well as to support trainees who have been victimized. © 2018 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Medical leadership, a systematic narrative review: do hospitals and healthcare organisations perform better when led by doctors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay-Williams, Robyn; Ludlow, Kristiana; Testa, Luke; Li, Zhicheng; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Despite common assumptions that doctors are well placed to lead hospitals and healthcare organisations, the peer-reviewed literature contains little evidence on the performance of doctors in leadership roles in comparison with that of non-medical managers. Objectives To determine whether there is an association between the leader’s medical background and management performance in terms of organisational performance or patient outcomes. Methods We searched for peer-reviewed, English language studies using Medline, Embase and Emerald Management between 2005 and 2017. We included quantitative, qualitative and mixed method empirical studies on the performance of senior healthcare managers where participants were described as doctors or leaders and where comparative performance data were provided on non-medical leaders. Studies without full text available, or no organisational, leadership behaviour or patient measures, were excluded. Results The search, conducted in Medline (n=3395), Embase (n=1913) and Emerald Management (n=454) databases, yielded 3926 entries. After the application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, 16 studies remained. Twelve studies found that there were positive differences between medical and non-medical leaders, and eight studies correlated those findings with hospital performance or patient outcomes. Six studies examined the composition of boards of directors; otherwise, there were few common areas of investigation. Five inter-related themes emerged from a narrative analysis: the impact of medical leadership on outcomes; doctors on boards; contribution of qualifications and experience; the medical leader as an individual or part of a team and doctors transitioning into the medical leadership role. Discussion and conclusion A modest body of evidence supports the importance of including doctors on organisational governing boards. Despite many published articles on the topic of whether hospitals and healthcare organisations perform

  10. A psychometric evaluation of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale for the medically hospitalized elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helvik, Anne-Sofie; Engedal, Knut; Skancke, Randi H; Selbæk, Geir

    2011-10-01

    Few psychometric studies of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) scale have been performed with clinical samples of elderly individuals. The participants were 484 elderly (65-101 years, 241 men) patients in an acute medical unit. The HADS, the Montgomery-Aasberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and questionnaires assessing quality of life, functional impairment, and cognitive function were used. The psychometric evaluation of the HADS included the following analyses: 1) the internal construct validity by means of principal component analysis followed by an oblique rotation and corrected item-total correlation; 2) the internal consistency reliability by means of the alpha coefficient (Cronbach's) and 3) concurrent validity by means of Spearman's rho. We found a two-factor solution explaining 45% of the variance. Six of seven items loaded adequately (≥0.40) on the HADS-A subscale (item 7 did not) and five of seven items loaded adequately on the HADS-D subscale (items 8 and 10 did not). Cronbach's alpha for the HADS-A and HADS-D subscale was 0.78 and 0.71, respectively. The correlation between HADS-D and the MADRS, a measure of the concurrent validity, was 0.51. The HADS appears to differentiate well between depression and anxiety. The internal consistency of the HADS in a sample of elderly persons was as satisfactory as it is in samples with younger persons. In contrast to younger samples, item 8 ("I feel as if I have slowed down") did not load adequately on the HADS-D subscale. This may be attributed to the way elderly people experience and describe their symptoms.

  11. [The management of implantable medical device and the application of the internet of things in hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Xu, Liang

    2011-11-01

    Implantable medical device is a special product which belongs to medical devices. It not only possesses product characteristics in common, but also has specificity for safety and effectiveness. Implantable medical device must be managed by the relevant laws and regulations of the State Food and Drug Administration. In this paper, we have used cardiac pacemakers as an example to describe the significance of the management of implantable medical device products and the application of the internet of things in hospitals.

  12. 20 CFR 416.919k - Purchase of medical examinations, laboratory tests, and other services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... for the Type of Referral and for Report Content § 416.919k Purchase of medical examinations... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purchase of medical examinations, laboratory tests, and other services. 416.919k Section 416.919k Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION...

  13. 20 CFR 404.1519k - Purchase of medical examinations, laboratory tests, and other services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Standards for the Type of Referral and for Report Content § 404.1519k Purchase of medical examinations... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purchase of medical examinations, laboratory tests, and other services. 404.1519k Section 404.1519k Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY...

  14. 75 FR 32845 - Consultative Examination-Annual Onsite Review of Medical Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ... 416 RIN 0960-AH17 Consultative Examination--Annual Onsite Review of Medical Providers AGENCY: Social... triggers annual on-site reviews of medical providers who conduct consultative examinations (CEs) for our... in 1991. We expect the revised threshold amount will reestablish the level of oversight activity we...

  15. 78 FR 50136 - Notice of Information Collection Under Emergency Review: Medical History and Examination for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... of Information Collection Under Emergency Review: Medical History and Examination for Foreign Service... submit comments by any of the following methods: Web: Persons with access to the Internet may use the... of Information Collection: Medical History and Examination for Foreign Service. OMB Control Number...

  16. Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treatment modality. Design: It is a retrospective study of all confirmed. Burkitt's lymphoma of the head and neck region seen at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Ile. Ife (OAUTHC) between 1986 and 2002. Patients and methods: The medical records of all the patients with the histopathologically confirmed ...

  17. Medication prescribing patterns among chronic kidney disease patients in a hospital in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowa Al-Ramahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the medication prescribing patterns in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD in a Malaysian hospital, we prospectively studied a cohort of 600 patients in two phases with 300 patients in each phase. The first phase was carried out from the beginning of February to the end of May 2007, and the second phase was from the beginning of March to the end of June 2008. Patients with CKD who had an estimated creatinine clearance ≤ 50 mL/min and were older than 18 years were included. A data collection form was used to collect data from the patients′ medical records and chart review. All systemic medications prescribed during hospitalization were included. The patients were prescribed 5795 medications. During the first phase, the patients were prescribed 2814 medication orders of 176 different medications. The prescriptions were 2981 of 158 medications during the second phase. The mean number of medications in the first and second phases was 9.38 ± 3.63 and 9.94 ± 3.78 res-pectively (P-value = 0.066. The top five used medications were calcium carbonate, folic acid/vitamin B complex, metoprolol, lovastatin, and ferrous sulfate. The most commonly used medication classes were mineral supplements, vitamins, antianemic preparations, antibacterials, and beta-blocking agents. This study provides an overview of prescription practice in a cohort of hospitalized CKD patients and indicates possible areas of improvement in prescription practice.

  18. Hospital waste management status in Iran: a case study in the teaching hospitals of Iran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzadkia, Mahdi; Moradi, Arash; Mohammadi, Mojtaba Shah; Jorfi, Sahand

    2009-06-01

    Hospital waste materials pose a wide variety of health and safety hazards for patients and healthcare workers. Many of hospitals in Iran have neither a satisfactory waste disposal system nor a waste management and disposal policy. The main objective of this research was to investigate the solid waste management in the eight teaching hospitals of Iran University of Medical Sciences. In this cross-sectional study, the main stages of hospital waste management including generation, separation, collection, storage, and disposal of waste materials were assessed in these hospitals, located in Tehran city. The measurement was conducted through a questionnaire and direct observation by researchers. The data obtained was converted to a quantitative measure to evaluate the different management components. The results showed that the waste generation rate was 2.5 to 3.01 kg bed(-1) day(-1), which included 85 to 90% of domestic waste and 10 to 15% of infectious waste. The lack of separation between hazardous and non-hazardous waste, an absence of the necessary rules and regulations applying to the collection of waste from hospital wards and on-site transport to a temporary storage location, a lack of proper waste treatment, and disposal of hospital waste along with municipal garbage, were the main findings. In order to improve the existing conditions, some extensive research to assess the present situation in the hospitals of Iran, the compilation of rules and establishment of standards and effective training for the personnel are actions that are recommended.

  19. Discharge from hospital against medical advice among paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty eight (87.5%) of the 32 children whose social class were available came from low social class. Conclusions: Discharge against medical advice is not infrequent in the study population. We recommend health education and free medical care for under-five children and comprehensive implementation of National ...

  20. [Design and research of hospital medical supplies management information system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hai-lin

    2009-03-01

    This paper introduces an advanced means to confirm management objective, analyze management need, reduce purchase and operating cost, optimize the flow management and establish a medical supplies management information system in purchasing, using, maintaining and disposing step. The system has advantage in realizing efficiency analyze, improving service and quality, guaranteeing safely use of medical supplies.

  1. Medical waste disposal at a hospital in Mpumalanga Province ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in the correct disposal of medical waste is the separation of waste at the point of generation, followed by its disposal into colour-coded containers. Medical waste in these containers can then be disposed of through incineration, sterilisation, chemical disinfection or burial in a secured landfill.[3] Sharps, which include ...

  2. Automated Medical Record Tracking System for the Ridge Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The astronomical increase in patients\\' attendance at health institutions has led to the creation of large volumes of records, thereby confronting medical records managers with the challenges of managing these records. The problem is compounded when patients\\' medical records are maintained with manual records ...

  3. The field hospital at Zagreb: tri-service medical care in a peacekeeping operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, R J; Martino, J; Eyestone, S M; Pugh, W M

    1998-06-01

    The objective of this investigation was to provide military medical planners with insights into the specific materiel, skills, and information requirements demanded by humanitarian missions through review of approximately 16,000 records from a tri-service medical patient database used at the field hospital in Zagreb, Croatia, during Operation Provide Promise. This review describes (1) the origin, rationale, structure, and implementation of the database; (2) the patients who used medical services provided by the hospital; (3) the diagnoses encountered in outpatient visits, admissions, and surgical operations; and (4) the distribution of medical services used by various subgroups of interest.

  4. Hospital Collaboration with Emergency Medical Services in the Care of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: Perspectives from Key Hospital Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, Adam B.; Spatz, Erica S.; Cherlin, Emily J.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Curry, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evidence suggests that active collaboration between hospitals and emergency medical services (EMS) is significantly associated with lower acute myocardial infarction (AMI) mortality rates; however, the nature of such collaborations is not well understood. We sought to characterize views of key hospital staff regarding collaboration with EMS in the care of patients hospitalized with AMI. Methods We performed an exploratory analysis of qualitative data previously collected from site visits and in-depth interviews with 11 US hospitals that ranked in the top or bottom 5% of performance on 30-day risk-standardized AMI mortality rates (RSMRs) using Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services data from 2005–2007. We selected all codes from the first analysis in which EMS was most likely to have been discussed. A multidisciplinary team analyzed the data using the constant comparative method to generate recurrent themes. Results Both higher and lower performing hospitals reported that EMS is critical to the provision of timely care for patients with AMI. However, close, collaborative relationships with EMS were more apparent in the higher performing hospitals. Higher performing hospitals demonstrated specific investment in and attention to EMS through: 1) respect for EMS as valued professionals and colleagues; 2) strong communication and coordination with EMS; and 3) active engagement of EMS in hospital AMI quality improvement efforts. Conclusion Hospital staff from higher performing hospitals described broad, multifaceted strategies to support collaboration with EMS in providing AMI care. The association of these strategies with hospital performance should be tested quantitatively in a larger, representative study. PMID:23146627

  5. [A decade of no effective inpatient medical discharges, experience from a hospital in Lima, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Félix; Cieza, Javier; Flores, Jorge; Huapaya, Julio; Obregón, Ana

    2012-06-01

    Our aim is to describe the financial implications of no effective in patient discharges from 2001-2010 from a general hospital in lima city. For this purpose we analyzed the total amounts, cancellations and exonarations from the patient accounts with a non effective medical discharge because of hospital "debts". We found that the number of patients with a non effective medical discharge decreased 70% from 2001 to 2010, the number of days between the medical discharge until the day the patient left the hospital decreased 80%. The total amounts, cancellations and exonarations decreased 63%, 53% and 68%, respectively. The average amount of exoneration was 61,7%. In conclusion, the non effective medical discharges increase patient debts, which are partially exonerated and assumed by the hospital. Even though it has decreased in the last decade, this could be explained by the implementation of the new health insurance policies.

  6. Health Care Professionals’ Pain Narratives in Hospitalized Children’s Medical Records. Part 1: Pain Descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Rashotte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although documentation of children’s pain by health care professionals is frequently undertaken, few studies have explored the nature of the language used to describe pain in the medical records of hospitalized children.

  7. Workplace violence against medical staff of Chinese children's hospitals: A cross-sectional study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhe Li; Chun-mei Yan; Lei Shi; Hui-tong Mu; Xin Li; An-qi Li; Cheng-song Zhao; Tao Sun; Lei Gao; Li-hua Fan; Yi Mu

    2017-01-01

    .... However, few studies on medical violence are conducted in the settings of children’s hospitals. The aim of this study is to assess the incidence, magnitude, consequences, and potential risk factors of workplace violence...

  8. Motivation and job satisfaction among medical and nursing staff in a Cyprus public general hospital

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lambrou, Persefoni; Kontodimopoulos, Nick; Niakas, Dimitris

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how medical and nursing staff of the Nicosia General Hospital is affected by specific motivation factors, and the association between job satisfaction and motivation...

  9. Epidemic of medical errors and hospital-acquired infections: systemic and social causes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Charney, William

    2012-01-01

    ...) and pharmaceutical errors combined are the second or third leading killer of Americans annually: approximately 300,000 die from a combination of medical errors, hospital acquired infections (HAIs...

  10. Commercialization as a recommended approach to hospital restructuring. Case study of Łańcut Medical Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiktor Patena

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Our society is on the brink of health care system reorganization and implementation of new medical technology. Hospitals have to be a core component of the medical revolution so they have to be prepared for the upcoming leap in their development. If Poland wants to be a pioneer in providing new medical solutions, the current ineffective system has to be changed. The necessary action should be taken to deal with the financial problems Polish hospitals have faced for over 20 years. The current structure of hospitals - SPZOZ, is old-fashioned and cannot adapt to a turbulent social and economic environment. The hospitals should be commercialized and restructured. Being capitalized companies will give incentives and new tools to deal with financial problems. The article presents an example of the commercialized hospital in Łańcut. We make the observations that commercialization increases: a hospital’s profitability, its employment productivity, its capital investment spending and leverage. The case proves that the transformation of hospitals to capital companies proposed by the Ministry of Health may be an appropriate approach and it does work once a reasonable management board is in charge. However, the legal structure alteration should be treated as the first step in the overall restructuring process. The article highlights the problem of managers of Polish hospitals who do not only struggle with financial shortages, but barely know which business model they should follow after commercialization to successfully run the restructuring process. Having examined the LMC the authors are crafting a prelude to the overall research on already commercialized hospitals to find an appropriate business model.

  11. The clinical skills experience of rural immersion medical students and traditional hospital placement students: a student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudland, Joy; Tordoff, Rebecca; Reid, Jim; Farry, Pat

    2011-01-01

    Recent decades have seen an international trend for the development of undergraduate medical programmes in rural locations. These have been considered educationally equivalent alternatives to traditional hospital-based programmes. A pilot Rural Medical Immersion Programme (RMIP) was launched at the University of Otago. To examine the clinical skills experience of RMIP students and to compare it to that of fifth-year students based in the traditional, often urban and hospital-based, rotations. An online questionnaire was completed by 23 medical students: six RMIP students and 17 hospital-based students. Students rated their level of experience in a variety of skills and their self-perceived competence for performing these skills after their fifth year. Total experience and confidence was compared using Mann-Whitney U test, as were subsets of skills. There was no difference found in the total clinical skills experience and confidence between RMIP and traditional students. RMIP students reported greater experience of patient examination and patient education skills; traditional students reported greater experience and confidence in investigation and interpretative skills. Clinical skills experience of the RMIP students is at least equivalent to that of their peers in the tertiary hospital setting. However, attention may be needed in the development of 'investigative and interpretative skills' for rural immersion students.

  12. Medical audit: threat or opportunity for the medical profession. A comparative study of medical audit among medical specialists in general hospitals in The Netherlands and England, 1970-1999

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herk, R.; Klazinga, N. S.; Schepers, R. M.; Casparie, A. F.

    2001-01-01

    Medical audit has been introduced among hospital specialists in both the Netherlands and England. In the Netherlands following some local experiments, medical audit was promoted nationally as early as 1976 by the medical profession itself and became a mandatory activity under the Hospital Licensing

  13. Insufficient communication about medication use at the interface between hospital and primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Bente; Andersen, Stig Ejdrup; Dalhoff, Kim

    2007-01-01

    errors were introduced and the possible implications of incongruent medication lists. METHODS: Patients were visited within one week after discharge from surgical or medical department and interviewed about their use of prescription-only medication (POM). Stored drugs were inspected. Medication lists...... medication according to prescription. In order to prevent medication errors a systematic follow-up after discharge focusing on making an updated medication list might be needed.......BACKGROUND: Lack of updated and uniform medication lists poses a problem for the continuity in patient care. The aim of this study was to estimate whether hospitals succeed in making accurate medication lists congruent with patients' actual medication use. Subsequently, the authors evaluated where...

  14. Medication details documented on hospital discharge: cross-sectional observational study of factors associated with medication non-reconciliation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grimes, Tamasine C

    2012-02-01

    AIMS: Movement into or out of hospital is a vulnerable period for medication safety. Reconciling the medication a patient is using before admission with the medication prescribed on discharge, and documenting any changes (medication reconciliation) is recommended to improve safety. The aims of the study were to investigate the factors contributing to medication reconciliation on discharge, and identify the prevalence of non-reconciliation. METHODS: The study was a cross-sectional, observational survey using consecutive discharges from purposively selected services in two acute public hospitals in Ireland. Medication reconciliation, potential for harm and unplanned re-admission were investigated. RESULTS: Medication non-reconciliation was identified in 50% of 1245 inpatient episodes, involving 16% of 9569 medications. The majority of non-reconciled episodes had potential to result in moderate (63%) or severe (2%) harm. Handwritten rather than computerized discharges (adjusted odds ratio (adjusted OR) 1.60, 95% CI 1.11, 2.99), increasing number of medications (adjusted OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.21, 1.31) or chronic illness (adjusted OR 2.08, 95% CI 1.33, 3.24) were associated with non-reconciliation. Omission of endocrine, central nervous system and nutrition and blood drugs was more likely on discharge, whilst omission on admission and throughout inpatient care, without documentation, was more likely for obstetric, gynaecology and urinary tract (OGU) or respiratory drugs. Documentation in the discharge communication that medication was intentionally stopped during inpatient care was less likely for cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and OGU drugs. Errors involving the dose were most likely for respiratory drugs. CONCLUSIONS: The findings inform strategies to facilitate medication reconciliation on discharge from acute hospital care.

  15. Diagnostic error in children presenting with acute medical illness to a community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, Catherine; Patel, Poonam; Hyer, Warren; Neale, Graham; Sevdalis, Nick; Inwald, David

    2014-10-01

    To determine incidence and aetiology of diagnostic errors in children presenting with acute medical illness to a community hospital. A three-stage study was conducted. Stage 1: retrospective case note review, comparing admission to discharge diagnoses of children admitted to hospital, to determine incidence of diagnostic error. Stage 2: cases of suspected misdiagnosis were examined in detail by two reviewers. Stage 3: structured interviews were conducted with clinicians involved in these cases to identify contributory factors. UK community (District General) hospital. All medical patients admitted to the paediatric ward and patients transferred from the Emergency Department to a different facility over a 90-day period were included. Incidence of diagnostic error, type of diagnostic error and content analysis of the structured interviews to determine frequency of emerging themes. Incidence of misdiagnosis in children presenting with acute illness was 5.0% (19/378, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.8-7.2%). Diagnostic errors were multi-factorial in origin, commonly involving cognitive factors. Reviewers 1 and 2 identified a median of three and four errors per case, respectively. In 14 cases, structured interviews were possible; clinicians believed system-related errors (organizational flaws, e.g. inadequate policies, staffing or equipment) contributed more commonly to misdiagnoses, whereas reviewers found cognitive factors contributed more commonly to diagnostic error. Misdiagnoses occurred in 5% of children presenting with acute illness and were multi-factorial in aetiology. Multi-site longitudinal studies further exploring aetiology of errors and effect of educational interventions are required to generalize these findings and determine strategies for mitigation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  16. Effects of outsourcing magnetic resonance examinations from a public university hospital to a private agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakol, Parvin; Labruto, Fausto; Bergstrand, Lott; Blomqvist, Lennart

    2011-02-01

    Sometimes the measures taken to make a radiology department more effective, such as prioritizing the workload and keeping equipment running for as many hours as staffing permits, are not enough. In such cases, outsourcing radiological examinations is a potential solution for reducing waiting times. To investigate differences in waiting time, quality and costs between magnetic resonance (MR) examinations performed in a university hospital and examinations outsourced to private service. We retrospectively selected a group of consecutive, outsourced MR examinations (n=97) and a control group of in-house MR examinations, matched for type of examination. In each group there were referrals that had a specified preferred timeframe for completion. We measured the percentage of cases in which this timeframe was met and if it was not met, how many days exceeded the preferred time. In referrals without a specified preferred timeframe, we also calculated the waiting time. Quality standards were measured by the percentage of examinations that had to be re-done and re-assessed. Finally, we calculated the cumulative costs, taking into account the costs for re-doing and re-assessing examinations. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups, in either the number of examinations that were not performed within the preferred time or the number of days that exceeded the preferred timeframe. For referrals without a preferred timeframe, the waiting time was shorter for outsourced examinations than those not outsourced. There were no differences in the number of examinations that had to be re-done, but more examinations needed to be re-assessed in the outsourced group than in the in-house group. The calculated costs for outsourced examinations were lower than the costs for internally performed examinations. Outsourcing magnetic resonance examinations may be an effective way of reducing a radiology department's workload. Ways in which to reduce the additional costs

  17. In-hospital mortality of acutely ill medical patients admitted to a resource poor hospital in sub-Saharan Africa and to a Canadian regional hospital compared using the abbreviated VitalPAC Early Warning Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opio, Martin Otyek; Nansubuga, Gertrude; Kellett, John

    2014-02-01

    the development of validated early warning scores that only require the measurement of vital signs at the bedside has provided for the first time a practical and affordable method of comparing the outcomes of similar patients admitted to hospital in the developed and developing world. we compared the outcomes of patients with the same abbreviated version of the VitalPAC early warning score at the time of hospital admission in a Canadian and Ugandan hospital. 844 acutely ill medical patients admitted to Kitovu Hospital, Masaka, Uganda and 48,696 patients admitted to the Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre (TBRHSC), Ontario, Canada were examined. apart from those patients with an abbreviated ViEWS value of 10 there was no statistically significant difference in the in-hospital mortality of Kitvou and TBRHSC patients with the same score on admission. Using arbitrary ranges of the abbreviated ViEWS the 30day Kaplan-Meier survival curves of Kitovu patients were either the same or better than those of TBRHSC patients. the in-hospital mortality of patients with the same abbreviated ViEWS on hospital admission is similar in TBRHSC and Kitovu Hospital. © 2013.

  18. Framing medical tourism: an examination of appeal, risk, convalescence, accreditation, and interactivity in medical tourism web sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Alicia; Wright, Kevin B

    2011-02-01

    This exploratory study analyzed the content of medical tourism Web sites in an attempt to examine how they convey information about benefits and risks of medical procedures, how they frame credibility, and the degree to which these Web sites include interactive features for consumers. Drawing upon framing theory, the researchers content analyzed a sample of 66 medical tourism Web sites throughout the world. The results indicated that medical tourism Web sites largely promote the benefits of medical procedures while downplaying the risks, and relatively little information regarding the credibility of these services appears. In addition, the presentation of benefits/risks, credibility, and Web site interactivity were found to differ by region and type of facility. The authors discuss the implications of these findings concerning the framing of medical tourism Web site content, future directions for research, and limitations.

  19. Mobile Devices, Learning and Clinical Workplaces: Medical Student Use of Smartphones in Parisian Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Megan; Scott, Karen M.; Chauffeté-Manillier, Martine; Lenne, Frédéric; Le Jeunne, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Mobile devices are ubiquitous worldwide, including in hospitals. "Just in time" learning provided by these devices is important for students. We investigated current use of, and learning with, smartphones and other mobile devices by medical students in Parisian hospitals. A survey with quantitative and qualitative items previously used…

  20. Prolonged hospital stay in measles patients | Ashir | Sahel Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Measles is still a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality in Nigeria despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines. The burden of measles using length of hospital stay as a result of complications in hospitalised children with measles is reported. Methods: We carried out a two year retrospective ...

  1. The Medical Duty Officer: An Attempt to Mitigate the Ambulance At-Hospital Interval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan H. Halliday

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A lack of coordination between emergency medical services (EMS, emergency departments (ED and systemwide management has contributed to extended ambulance at-hospital times at local EDs. In an effort to improve communication within the local EMS system, the Baltimore City Fire Department (BCFD placed a medical duty officer (MDO in the fire communications bureau. It was hypothesized that any real-time intervention suggested by the MDO would be manifested in a decrease in the EMS at-hospital time. Methods: The MDO was implemented on November 11, 2013. A senior EMS paramedic was assigned to the position and was placed in the fire communication bureau from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., seven days a week. We defined the pre-intervention period as August 2013 - October 2013 and the post-intervention period as December 2013 - February 2014. We also compared the post-intervention period to the “seasonal match control” one year earlier to adjust for seasonal variation in EMS volume. The MDO was tasked with the prospective management of city EMS resources through intensive monitoring of unit availability and hospital ED traffic. The MDO could suggest alternative transport destinations in the event of ED crowding. We collected and analyzed data from BCFD computer-aided dispatch (CAD system for the following: ambulance response times, ambulance at-hospital interval, hospital diversion and alert status, and “suppression wait time” (defined as the total time suppression units remained on scene until ambulance arrival. The data analysis used a pre/post intervention design to examine the MDO impact on the BCFD EMS system. Results: There were a total of 15,567 EMS calls during the pre-intervention period, 13,921 in the post-intervention period and 14,699 in the seasonal match control period one year earlier. The average at-hospital time decreased by 1.35 minutes from pre- to post-intervention periods and 4.53 minutes from the pre- to seasonal match

  2. Investigating the medical forensic examination from the perspectives of sexually assaulted women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Mont, Janice; White, Deborah; McGregor, Margaret J

    2009-02-01

    Across many jurisdictions, a key institutional response to sexual assault is centred on the collection of medico-legal evidence through a medical forensic examination (MFE). Despite the increased routinization of this practice, such evidence often is not related to positive criminal justice outcomes. As there has been little systematic investigation of the perspectives of victims regarding the MFE, we conducted semi-structured, face-to-face interviews with 19 women aged 17-46 years who had been sexually assaulted and had undergone an MFE in the previous six months at one of four specialized hospital-based sexual assault centres in Ontario, Canada. Extracts from the transcribed interviews were coded into two broad themes, 'Expectations' and 'Experiences', from which a series of lower order constructs were derived. We found that most women went to a centre to have their physical and emotional needs addressed rather than medico-legal evidence collected and were overwhelmingly satisfied with their interactions with specially trained nurse examiners. However, some women were confused about the purpose of the MFE, believing that their access to treatment hinged upon undergoing this process. Moreover, though optional, several indicated that they had been instructed to have an MFE by the police and/or nurse examiner. Most women who chose to have evidence collected did so with the hope that it would hold the assailant accountable and generate social recognition of the harm done to them. While many stated that they were distressed during the MFE, some reported feeling simultaneously empowered by the fact that the experience fostered a "sense of doing something". These findings point to the value of collecting medico-legal evidence in settings staffed with supportive practitioners who also attend to women's health related concerns. Implications with respect to issues of informed consent, revictimization, and empowerment, as well as the relative weight given to the MFE in the

  3. Evaluation of Randomly Selected Completed Medical Records Sheets in Teaching Hospitals of Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Parsa Mahjob

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Medical record documentation, often use to protect the patients legal rights, also providing information for medical researchers, general studies, education of health care staff and qualitative surveys is used. There is a need to control the amount of data entered in the medical record sheets of patients, considering the completion of these sheets is often carried out after completion of service delivery to the patients. Therefore, in this study the prevalence of completeness of medical history, operation reports, and physician order sheets by different documentaries in Jahrom teaching hospitals during year 2009 was analyzed. Methods and Materials: In this descriptive / retrospective study, the 400 medical record sheets of the patients from two teaching hospitals affiliated to Jahrom medical university was randomly selected. The tool of data collection was a checklist based on the content of medical history sheet, operation report and physician order sheets. The data were analyzed by SPSS (Version10 software and Microsoft Office Excel 2003. Results: Average of personal (Demography data entered in medical history, physician order and operation report sheets which is done by department's secretaries were 32.9, 35.8 and 40.18 percent. Average of clinical data entered by physician in medical history sheet is 38 percent. Surgical data entered by the surgeon in operation report sheet was 94.77 percent. Average of data entered by operation room's nurse in operation report sheet was 36.78 percent; Average of physician order data in physician order sheet entered by physician was 99.3 percent. Conclusion: According to this study, the rate of completed record papers reviewed by documentary in Jahrom teaching hospitals were not desirable and in some cases were very weak and incomplete. This deficiency was due to different reason such as medical record documentaries negligence, lack of adequate education for documentaries, High work

  4. Examiner and simulated patient ratings of empathy in medical student final year clinical examination: are they useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Barry; McKendree, Jean; Morgan, Lewys; Allgar, Victoria L; Brown, Andrew

    2014-09-22

    Many medical schools state that empathy is important and have curricular learning outcomes covering its teaching. It is thought to be useful in team-working, good bedside manner, patient perspective taking, and improved patient care. Given this, one might expect it to be measured in assessment processes. Despite this, there is relatively little literature exploring how measures of empathy in final clinical examinations in medical school map onto other examination scores. Little is known about simulated patient (actors) rating of empathy in examinations in terms of inter-rater reliability compared with clinical assessors or correlation with overall examination results. Examiners in final year clinical assessments in one UK medical school rated 133 students on five constructs in Objective Structured Long Examination Record (OSLER) with real patients: gathering information, physical examination, problem solving, managing the diagnosis, and relationship with the patient. Scores were based on a standardized well-established penalty point system. In separate Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) stations, different examiners used the same penalty point system to score performance in both interactional and procedural stations. In the four interaction-based OSCE stations, examiners and simulated patient actors also independently rated empathy of the students. The OSLER score, based on penalty points, had a correlation of -0.38 with independent ratings of empathy from the interactional OSCE stations. The intra-class correlation (a measure of inter-rater reliability) between the observing clinical tutor and ratings from simulated patients was 0.645 with very similar means. There was a significant difference between the empathy scores of the 94 students passing the first part of the sequential examination, based on combined OSCE and OSLER scores (which did not include the empathy scores), and 39 students with sufficient penalty points to trigger attendance for the

  5. [Compulsory hospital admission - coercive measures in medical care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier-Allmendinger, Diana

    2009-08-01

    Any coercive medical intervention is a massive curtailment of the affected person's freedom that is in direct contradiction to their right to self-determination. This is why any such intervention must be laid on a solid legal and ethical foundation. Any decision to commit a person against their will for medical care will have to be made with due regard for both the institution's medical duty and society's interest in public safety. Any such decision must also involve careful consideration of whether the individual concerned is at acute risk of harming or injuring themselves or others as a result of their mental condition. Involuntary committal may be perceived as extremely insulting by the person concerned, who may feel that their right of self-determination has been violated; and at least for a limited period it will inevitably make them feel that they are not being treated like or regarded as an adult. Hence, the following ethical questions arise: Is it justified to suspend an individual's right of self-determination - if only in terms of their place of residence - by committing them for medical treatment and care? And how can such coercive committal be reconciled with the ethical medical principles of autonomy, beneficence, justice and non-maleficence? There are no stock answers or checklist answers to these questions. Whether a committal is warranted must ultimately be decided on a case-by-case basis by thoroughly assessing, weighting and comparing the various principles and considerations involved.

  6. Are language barriers associated with serious medical events in hospitalized pediatric patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Adam L; Rivara, Frederick; Marcuse, Edgar K; McPhillips, Heather; Davis, Robert

    2005-09-01

    Language barriers may lead to medical errors by impeding patient-provider communication. The objective of this study was to determine whether hospitalized pediatric patients whose families have language barriers are more likely to incur serious medical errors than patients whose families do not have language barriers. A case-control study was conducted in a large, academic, regional children's hospital in the Pacific Northwest. Case patients (n = 97) included all hospitalizations of patients who were younger than 21 years and had a reported serious medical event from January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2003. Control patients (n = 475) were chosen from hospitalizations without a reported serious medical event and were matched with case patients on age, admitting service, admission to intensive care, and date of admission. The main exposure was a language barrier defined by self- or provider-reported need for an interpreter. Serious medical events were defined as events that led to unintended or potentially adverse outcomes identified by the hospital's quality improvement staff. Fourteen (14.4%) of the case patients and 53 (11.2%) of the control patients were assigned an interpreter during their hospitalization. Overall, we found no increased risk for serious medical events in patients and families who requested an interpreter compared with patients and families who did not request an interpreter (odds ratio: 1.36; 95% confidence interval: 0.73-2.55). Spanish-speaking patients who requested an interpreter comprised 11 (11.3%) of the case patients and 26 (5.5%) of the control patients. This subgroup had a twofold increased risk for serious medical events compared with patients who did not request an interpreter (odds ratio: 2.26; 95% confidence interval: 1.06-4.81). Spanish-speaking patients whose families have a language barrier seem to have a significantly increased risk for serious medical events during pediatric hospitalization compared with patients whose families

  7. The European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics Policy Statement no. 15: recommended guidelines on the role of the Medical Physicist within the hospital governance board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofides, Stelios; Sharp, Peter

    2015-05-01

    This EFOMP Policy Statement presents an outline on hospital governance and encourages the participation of the Medical Physicist in the hospital governance. It also emphasises how essential it is for Medical Physicists to engage in their hospital's governing board's committees for the overall good of the patient. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Study of breath-holding spell and its triggering factors in Children’s Hospital Medical Center

    OpenAIRE

    Ashrafi MR

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate breath-holding spell (BHS) and its triggering factors, 47 children with BHS admitted to the out patients clinic of Children's hospital medical center, between Sept 1998-June 1999, were included in this prospective study. Diagnosis of BHS was made for cases by medical history, pediatric physical examination, EEG, ECG and lab findings. 4 cases were excluded from study because of paroxysmal epileptic discharges at their EEGs. Of 43 cases having BHS (M:F: 1.15:1), 74.4% were less...

  9. Hospital cost and quality performance in relation to market forces: an examination of U.S. community hospitals in the "post-managed care era".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H Joanna; Friedman, Bernard; Jiang, Shenyi

    2013-03-01

    Managed care substantially transformed the U.S. healthcare sector in the last two decades of the twentieth century, injecting price competition among hospitals for the first time in history. However, total HMO enrollment has declined since 2000. This study addresses whether managed care and hospital competition continued to show positive effects on hospital cost and quality performance in the "post-managed care era." Using data for 1,521 urban hospitals drawn from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, we examined hospital cost per stay and mortality rate in relation to HMO penetration and hospital competition between 2001 and 2005, controlling for patient, hospital, and other market characteristics. Regression analyses were employed to examine both cross-sectional and longitudinal variation in hospital performance. We found that in markets with high HMO penetration, increase in hospital competition over time was associated with decrease in mortality but no change in cost. In markets without high HMO penetration, increase in hospital competition was associated with increase in cost but no change in mortality. Overall, hospitals in high HMO penetration markets consistently showed lower average costs, and hospitals in markets with high hospital competition consistently showed lower mortality rates. Hospitals in markets with high HMO penetration also showed lower mortality rates in 2005 with no such difference found in 2001. Our findings suggest that while managed care may have lost its strength in slowing hospital cost growth, differences in average hospital cost associated with different levels of HMO penetration across markets still persist. Furthermore, these health plans appear to put quality of care on a higher priority than before.

  10. THE AMOUNTS OF MEDICAL SOLID WASTES FROM A DISPENSARY AND A PRIVATE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Talha GÖNÜLLÜ

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available In the disposal of medical wastes, it is important to know about the amount and source of wastes occured for the selection of convenient technologies of disposal. In this research, the kinds and amounts of medical wastes occured in a dispensary and a private hospital in istanbul have been searched.

  11. A Comparison Between Job Stress and Insulin Resistance Among the Hospital Medical Staff

    OpenAIRE

    Zareian; Ghasemi; Abtahi,; Behzadi

    2016-01-01

    Background One of the important risk factors for insulin resistance is stress and a major source of stress is job stress. Objectives The current study aimed to determine the relationship between job stress score and insulin resistance among medical staff of the Imam Reza hospital, Tehran, Iran Methods The current descriptive cross-sectional study was performed on 97 medical staff o...

  12. Medication reconciliation to solve discrepancies in discharge documents after discharge from the hospital.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, M.M.; Flier, M. van der; Vries-Bots, A.M. de; Brink van der Wal, T.I.; Gier, J.J. de

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When patients are admitted to, and discharged from hospital there is a high chance of discrepancies and errors occurring during the transfer of patients' medication information. This often causes drug related problems. Correct and fast communication of patients' medication information

  13. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices regarding Whole Body Donation among Medical Professionals in a Hospital in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballala, Kirthinath; Shetty, Avinash; Malpe, Surekha Bhat

    2011-01-01

    Voluntary body donation has become an important source of cadavers for anatomical study and education. The objective of this study was to assess knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) regarding whole body donation among medical professionals in a medical institute in India. A cross sectional study was conducted at Kasturba Hospital, Manipal,…

  14. Medication reconciliation to solve discrepancies in discharge documents after discharge from the hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Marlies M. E.; van der Flier, Merel; de Vries-Bots, Anne M. B.; Brink-van der Wal, Thaliet I. C.; de Gier, Johan J.

    Background When patients are admitted to, and discharged from hospital there is a high chance of discrepancies and errors occurring during the transfer of patients' medication information. This often causes drug related problems. Correct and fast communication of patients' medication information

  15. Activity-based computing for medical work in hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind

    2009-01-01

    tasks such as word processing while sitting at a desk. This article presents the concept of Activity-Based Computing (ABC), which seeks to create computational support for human activities. The ABC approach has been designed to address activity-based computing support for clinical work in hospitals......Studies have revealed that people organize and think of their work in terms of activities that are carried out in pursuit of some overall objective, often in collaboration with others. Nevertheless, modern computer systems are typically single-user oriented, that is, designed to support individual....... In a hospital, the challenges arising from the management of parallel activities and interruptions are amplified because multitasking is now combined with a high degree of mobility, collaboration, and urgency. The article presents the empirical and theoretical background for activity-based computing, its...

  16. Antibiotic use among medical specialties in a community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jogerst, G J; Dippe, S E

    1981-02-27

    Antibiotic use in a community hospital was evaluated to demonstrate specialty variations. A chart review was performed using the Veterans Administration's "Guidelines for Peer Review" to determine appropriate antibiotic use. Of the 1,054 patients discharged in August 1977, three hundred ten (29.4%) received 479 courses of antibiotics of which two hundred eighty-seven (60%) were considered appropriate. Seventy-two percent of the therapeutic courses and 36% of the prophylactic courses were appropriate. Prophylactic antibiotics were used in 12% of the hospitalized patients and accounted for 33% of the total antibiotics. No notable difference in appropriate antibiotic use was found among general surgeons (73%), internists (72%), orthopedists (71%), and family practitioners (67%). Substantially lower levels were found among urologists (54%), otolaryngologists (44%), and obstetricians (36%). Continued education in proper antibiotic use is needed especially for prophylaxis. Educational programs directed at specific specialties may be the most fruitful way to effect improved overall antibiotic use.

  17. Discharge of hospitalized under-fives against medical advice in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty seven (63.8%) of parents of children DAMA belonged to social classes IV and V. The fathers were the signatories to the discharge documents in 65.5% and the mothers in only 5.2% of cases. Within 24-48 hours after DAMA, 20.7% of cases were re-admitted. Parental fear of accumulation of hospital bills was the ...

  18. Medication errors at hospital admission and discharge in Type 1 and 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuker, C; Macioce, V; Mura, T; Audurier, Y; Boegner, C; Jalabert, A; Villiet, M; Castet-Nicolas, A; Avignon, A; Sultan, A

    2017-12-01

    To assess the prevalence and characteristics of medication errors at hospital admission and discharge in people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, and identify potential risk factors for these errors. This prospective observational study included all people with Type 1 (n = 163) and Type 2 diabetes (n = 508) admitted to the Diabetology-Department of the University Hospital of Montpellier, France, between 2013 and 2015. Pharmacists conducted medication reconciliation within 24 h of admission and at hospital discharge. Medication history collected from different sources (patient/family interviews, prescriptions/medical records, contact with community pharmacies/general practitioners/nurses) was compared with admission and discharge prescriptions to detect unintentional discrepancies in medication indicating involuntary medication changes. Medication errors were defined as unintentional medication discrepancies corrected by physicians. Risk factors for medication errors and serious errors (i.e. errors that may cause harm) were assessed using logistic regression. A total of 322 medication errors were identified and were mainly omissions. Prevalence of medication errors in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes was 21.5% and 22.2% respectively at admission, and 9.0% and 12.2% at discharge. After adjusting for age and number of treatments, people with Type 1 diabetes had nearly a twofold higher odds of having medication errors (odds ratio (OR) 1.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-2.94) and serious errors (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.02-4.76) at admission compared with those with Type 2 diabetes. Medication reconciliation identified medication errors in one third of individuals. Clinical pharmacists should focus on poly-medicated individuals, but also on other high-risk people, for example, those with Type 1 diabetes. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  19. Medication error detection in two major teaching hospitals: What are the types of errors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Saghafi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increasing number of reports on medication errors and relevant subsequent damages, especially in medical centers has become a growing concern for patient safety in recent decades. Patient safety and in particular, medication safety is a major concern and challenge for health care professionals around the world. Our prospective study was designed to detect prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, and administering medication errors in two major university hospitals. Materials and Methods: After choosing 20 similar hospital wards in two large teaching hospitals in the city of Isfahan, Iran, the sequence was randomly selected. Diagrams for drug distribution were drawn by the help of pharmacy directors. Direct observation technique was chosen as the method for detecting the errors. A total of 50 doses were studied in each ward to detect prescribing, transcribing and administering errors in each ward. The dispensing error was studied on 1000 doses dispensed in each hospital pharmacy. Results: A total of 8162 number of doses of medications were studied during the four stages, of which 8000 were complete data to be analyzed. 73% of prescribing orders were incomplete and did not have all six parameters (name, dosage form, dose and measuring unit, administration route, and intervals of administration. We found 15% transcribing errors. One-third of administration of medications on average was erroneous in both hospitals. Dispensing errors ranged between 1.4% and 2.2%. Conclusion: Although prescribing and administrating compromise most of the medication errors, improvements are needed in all four stages with regard to medication errors. Clear guidelines must be written and executed in both hospitals to reduce the incidence of medication errors.

  20. Inappropriate Prescribing in Older Hospitalized Adults: A Comparison of Medical Specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, Ana Carmen Dos Santos Ribeiro Simoes; Lucchetti, Alessandra Lamas Granero; Silva, Jéssica Teixeira Santos da; Santos, Letícia Gomes; Nunes, Jéssica Borges Taranto; Fernandes, Guilherme Cortes; Lucchetti, Giancarlo

    2017-10-04

    To evaluate the prevalence and number of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) in hospitalized older adults, comparing prescription patterns of medical specialties. Retrospective cohort study. Tertiary general hospital. All older adults hospitalized from January through May 2015 (N = 1,900). Information on medications prescribed during the first and last days of hospitalization was collected and evaluated regarding PIMs using Beers and Screening Tool of Older People's Prescriptions (STOPP) criteria. Medical specialties (internal medicine, cardiology, gastroenterology, infectious disease, nephrology, neurology, pneumology) were compared regarding the prevalence of PIMs and the increase in the number of PIMs during hospitalization. The number of individuals with PIMs increased significantly according to both criteria (62.3% to 66.6% according to Beers criteria, 43.4% to 50.0% according to STOPP criteria). The most common PIMs were sliding-scale insulin (26.9%), clonazepam (9.5%), and periciazine (6.4%) using Beers criteria and spironolactone (10.3%), acetylsalicylic acid (9.8%), and periciazine (8.7%) using STOPP criteria. Neurology, infectious disease, and pneumology had the highest numbers of PIMs, and neurology, pneumology, and cardiology had a greater increase in PIMs during hospitalization than the other specialties. This study demonstrates the high and growing prevalence of PIMs in the hospital environment, according to Beers and STOPP criteria. Educational measures and specific pharmaceutical interventions for each specialty are needed to change this situation. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  1. An investigation Into Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospitals in China: Development Trend and Medical Service Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Suo, Sizhuo; Li, Jian; Hu, Yuanjia; Li, Peng; Wang, Yitao; Hu, Hao

    2016-06-07

    This paper aims to investigate the development trend of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) hospitals in China and explore their medical service innovations, with special reference to the changing co-existence with western medicine (WM) at TCM hospitals. Quantitative data at macro level was collected from official databases of China Health Statistical Yearbook and Extracts of Traditional Chinese Medicine Statistics. Qualitative data at micro level was gathered through interviews and second-hand material collection at two of the top-level TCM hospitals. In both outpatient and inpatient sectors of TCM hospitals, drug fees accounted for the biggest part of hospital revenue. Application of WM medical exanimation increased in both outpatient and inpatient services. Even though the demand for WM drugs was much higher in inpatient care, TCM drugs was the winner in the outpatient. Also qualitative evidence showed that TCM dominated the outpatient hospital service with WM incorporated in the assisting role. However, it was in the inpatient medical care that WM prevailed over TCM which was mostly applied to the rehabilitation of patients. By drawing on WM while keeping it active in supporting and strengthening the TCM operation in the TCM hospital, the current system accommodates the overriding objective which is for TCM to evolve into a fully informed and more viable medical field.

  2. [Investigation on dental impression disinfection knowledge grasped by medical staff in stomatological hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Li-mei; Zhao, Fu-rong

    2008-10-01

    To investigate the situation about the dental impression disinfection knowledge of the medical staff in stomatological hospitals. A questionnaire investigation was conducted on 582 medical staff in five Grade A Class Three stomatological hospitals. The investigation items included demographic characteristics and knowledge on dental impression disinfection. Of 582 subjects, 424 subjects (72.85%) thought that the dental impressions should be disinfected. 76 persons chose 75% alcohol to disinfect the dental impressions, 26 persons chose povidone iodine or glutaral, 103 persons chose sterilization machine, 180 persons chose to wash with water, and 197 persons were unknown about the sterilization methods. The status of the staff grasping knowledge on dental impression disinfection was related with the working department. Our results suggest that it is necessary to strengthen the importance of impression disinfection to medical staff in stomatological hospitals. The consciousness of protection should be enhanced to reduce the cross infection in hospitals.

  3. HIV testing during the Canadian immigration medical examination: a national survey of designated medical practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Jennifer M; Li, Alan; Owino, Maureen; English, Ken; Mascarenhas, Lyndon; Tan, Darrell H S

    2014-01-01

    HIV testing is mandatory for individuals wishing to immigrate to Canada. Since the Designated Medical Practitioners (DMPs) who perform these tests may have varying experience in HIV and time constraints in their clinical practices, there may be variability in the quality of pre- and posttest counseling provided. We surveyed DMPs regarding HIV testing, counseling, and immigration inadmissibility. A 16-item survey was mailed to all DMPs across Canada (N = 203). The survey inquired about DMP characteristics, knowledge of HIV, attitudes and practices regarding inadmissibility and counseling, and interest in continuing medical education. There were a total of 83 respondents (41%). Participants frequently rated their knowledge of HIV diagnostics, cultural competency, and HIV/AIDS service organizations as "fair" (40%, 43%, and 44%, respectively). About 25%, 46%, and 11% of the respondents agreed/strongly agreed with the statements "HIV infected individuals pose a danger to public health and safety," "HIV-positive immigrants cause excessive demand on the healthcare system," and "HIV seropositivity is a reasonable ground for denial into Canada," respectively. Language was cited as a barrier to counseling, which focused on transmission risks (46% discussed this as "always" or "often") more than coping and social support (37%). There was a high level of interest (47%) in continuing medical education in this area. There are areas for improvement regarding DMPs' knowledge, attitudes, and practices about HIV infection, counseling, and immigration criteria. Continuing medical education and support for DMPs to facilitate practice changes could benefit newcomers who test positive through the immigration process.

  4. Missing the mark: Current practices in teaching the male urogenital examination to Canadian undergraduate medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Kristen; Steele, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    The urogenital physical examination is an important aspect of patient encounters in various clinical settings. Introductory clinical skills sessions are intended to provide support and alleviate students' anxiety when learning this sensitive exam. The techniques each Canadian medical school uses to guide their students through the initial urogenital examination has not been previously reported. This study surveyed pre-clerkship clinical skills program directors at the main campus of English-speaking Canadian medical schools regarding the curriculum they use to teach the urogenital examination. A response rate of 100% was achieved, providing information on resources and faculty available to students, as well as the manner in which students were evaluated. Surprisingly, over one-third of the Canadian medical schools surveyed failed to provide a setting in which students perform a urogenital examination on a patient in their pre-clinical years. Additionally, there was no formal evaluation of this skill set reported by almost 50% of Canadian medical schools prior to clinical training years. To ensure medical students are confident and accurate in performing a urogenital examination, it is vital they be provided the proper resources, teaching, and training. As we progress towards a competency-based curriculum, it is essential that increased focus be placed on patient encounters in undergraduate training. Further research to quantify students' exposure to the urogenital examination during clinical years would be of interest. Without this commitment by Canadian medical schools, we are doing a disservice not only to the medical students, but also to our patient population.

  5. Medical Waste Management Practices in a Southern African Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    disposal of waste, failure to quantify the waste generated in reliable records, lack of use of coloured bags by limiting the bags to only one colour for all waste, the absence of a dedicated waste manager, and no committee responsible for monitoring the management of medical waste. Recommendations are given with the ...

  6. Leprosy in Nkhotakota District Hospital | Chisi | East African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 80, No 12 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your ...

  7. Interventions for reducing medication errors in children in hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maaskant, Jolanda M; Vermeulen, Hester; Apampa, Bugewa; Fernando, Bernard; Ghaleb, Maisoon A; Neubert, Antje; Thayyil, Sudhin; Soe, Aung

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many hospitalised patients are affected by medication errors (MEs) that may cause discomfort, harm and even death. Children are at especially high risk of harm as the result of MEs because such errors are potentially more hazardous to them than to adults. Until now, interventions to

  8. Performance of on-site Medical waste disinfection equipment in hospitals of Tabriz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Taghipour

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The number of studies available on the performance of on-site medical waste treatment facilities is rare, to date. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of onsite medical waste treatment equipment in hospitals of Tabriz, Iran. Methods: A various range of the on-site medical waste disinfection equipment (autoclave, chemical disinfection, hydroclave, and dry thermal treatment was considered to select 10 out of 22 hospitals in Tabriz to be included in the survey. The apparatus were monitored mechanically, chemically, and biologically for a six months period in all of the selected hospitals. Results: The results of the chemical monitoring (Bowie-Dick tests indicated that 38.9% of the inspected autoclaves had operational problems in pre-vacuum, air leaks, inadequate steam penetration into the waste, and/or vacuum pump. The biological indicators revealed that about 55.55% of the samples were positive. The most of applied devices were not suitable for treating anatomical, pharmaceutical, cytotoxic, and chemical waste. Conclusion: Although on-site medical waste treating facilities have been installed in all the hospitals, the most of infectious-hazardous medical waste generated in the hospitals were deposited into a municipal solid waste landfill, without enough disinfection. The responsible authorities should stringently inspect and evaluate the operation of on-site medical waste treating equipment. An advanced off-site central facility with multi-treatment and disinfection equipment and enough capacity is recommended as an alternative.

  9. Assessment of medical waste management in the main hospitals in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Emad, A A

    2011-10-01

    No previous studies about the management of medical waste have been published in Yemen. This research in 5 government and 12 private hospitals in Sana'a aimed to evaluate waste-workers' and hospital administrators' knowledge and practices regarding medical waste handling. Interviews and observations showedadministrators' knowledge and practices regarding medical waste handling. Interviews and observations showed that the waste-workers were collecting medical and nonmedical wastes together manually in all hospitals without receiving adequate training and without using proper protection equipment. There was poor awareness about medical waste risks and safe handling procedures among hospital administrators, and most hospitals did not differentiate between domestic and medical waste disposal. Budgets were not allocated for waste management purposes, which led to shortages in waste handling equipment and an absence of training programmes for staff. Poor knowledge and practices and a high rate of injuries among waste-workers were noted, together with a risk of exposure of staff and visitors to hazardous waste.

  10. Application and preventive maintenance of neurology medical equipment in Isfahan alzahra hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parivash Alikhani

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Survey of application and preventive maintenance of neurology medical equipment in Isfahan Alzahra hospital show there is no P.M system. Implementing a complete P.M system for this medical center is crucial to preventing cause problems for these medical equipment and decreasing maintenance costs and gaining uptime. Researchers of this article have tried to provide PM, use of texts, web and experts.

  11. Facilitators and obstacles in pre-hospital medical response to earthquakes: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Earthquakes are renowned as being amongst the most dangerous and destructive types of natural disasters. Iran, a developing country in Asia, is prone to earthquakes and is ranked as one of the most vulnerable countries in the world in this respect. The medical response in disasters is accompanied by managerial, logistic, technical, and medical challenges being also the case in the Bam earthquake in Iran. Our objective was to explore the medical response to the Bam earthquake with specific emphasis on pre-hospital medical management during the first days. Methods The study was performed in 2008; an interview based qualitative study using content analysis. We conducted nineteen interviews with experts and managers responsible for responding to the Bam earthquake, including pre-hospital emergency medical services, the Red Crescent, and Universities of Medical Sciences. The selection of participants was determined by using a purposeful sampling method. Sample size was given by data saturation. Results The pre-hospital medical service was divided into three categories; triage, emergency medical care and transportation, each category in turn was identified into facilitators and obstacles. The obstacles identified were absence of a structured disaster plan, absence of standardized medical teams, and shortage of resources. The army and skilled medical volunteers were identified as facilitators. Conclusions The most compelling, and at the same time amenable obstacle, was the lack of a disaster management plan. It was evident that implementing a comprehensive plan would not only save lives but decrease suffering and enable an effective praxis of the available resources at pre-hospital and hospital levels. PMID:21575233

  12. Facilitators and obstacles in pre-hospital medical response to earthquakes: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castrén Maaret

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Earthquakes are renowned as being amongst the most dangerous and destructive types of natural disasters. Iran, a developing country in Asia, is prone to earthquakes and is ranked as one of the most vulnerable countries in the world in this respect. The medical response in disasters is accompanied by managerial, logistic, technical, and medical challenges being also the case in the Bam earthquake in Iran. Our objective was to explore the medical response to the Bam earthquake with specific emphasis on pre-hospital medical management during the first days. Methods The study was performed in 2008; an interview based qualitative study using content analysis. We conducted nineteen interviews with experts and managers responsible for responding to the Bam earthquake, including pre-hospital emergency medical services, the Red Crescent, and Universities of Medical Sciences. The selection of participants was determined by using a purposeful sampling method. Sample size was given by data saturation. Results The pre-hospital medical service was divided into three categories; triage, emergency medical care and transportation, each category in turn was identified into facilitators and obstacles. The obstacles identified were absence of a structured disaster plan, absence of standardized medical teams, and shortage of resources. The army and skilled medical volunteers were identified as facilitators. Conclusions The most compelling, and at the same time amenable obstacle, was the lack of a disaster management plan. It was evident that implementing a comprehensive plan would not only save lives but decrease suffering and enable an effective praxis of the available resources at pre-hospital and hospital levels.

  13. Medication reconciliation to solve discrepancies in discharge documents after discharge from the hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, Marlies M E; van der Flier, Merel; de Vries-Bots, Anne M B; Brink-van der Wal, Thaliet I C; de Gier, Johan J

    2013-08-01

    When patients are admitted to, and discharged from hospital there is a high chance of discrepancies and errors occurring during the transfer of patients' medication information. This often causes drug related problems. Correct and fast communication of patients' medication information between community pharmacy and hospital is necessary. To investigate the number, type, and origin of discrepancies within discharge documents and between discharge documents and information in the pharmacy computer system, concerning the medication of patients living independently when they are discharged from hospital. Second, to test which variables have an impact on the number of discrepancies found and to study the time spent on the medication reconciliation process. One quality-certified community pharmacy in the Netherlands. Pharmacists reviewed discharge documents of patients discharged over one year. This information was compared to information available in the pharmacy computer system. Discrepancies were discussed with medical specialists and/or general practitioners. Type and origin of discrepancies were classified. Differences in variables between hospitals were tested using Independent-Samples Mann-Whitney U Test and Pearson Chi Square test. Poisson regression analysis was performed to test the impact of variables on the number of discrepancies found. Number, type and origin of discrepancies for all independently living patients discharged from the hospital. During the study period, 100 discharges took place and were analyzed. No differences were found between the two main hospitals, a university hospital and a teaching hospital. In total, 223 discrepancies were documented. Sixty-nine discharges (69.0 %) required consultation with a patients' medical specialist. A majority of the discrepancies (73.1 %) have their origin in hospital information. The number of discrepancies found increased with the number of medicines prescribed at discharge. The community pharmacist spent

  14. Medication Adherence and the Risk of Cardiovascular Mortality and Hospitalization Among Patients With Newly Prescribed Antihypertensive Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soyeun; Shin, Dong Wook; Yun, Jae Moon; Hwang, Yunji; Park, Sue K; Ko, Young-Jin; Cho, BeLong

    2016-03-01

    The importance of adherence to antihypertensive treatments for the prevention of cardiovascular disease has not been well elucidated. This study evaluated the effect of antihypertensive medication adherence on specific cardiovascular disease mortality (ischemic heart disease [IHD], cerebral hemorrhage, and cerebral infarction). Our study used data from a 3% sample cohort that was randomly extracted from enrollees of Korean National Health Insurance. Study subjects were aged ≥20 years, were diagnosed with hypertension, and started newly prescribed antihypertensive medication in 2003 to 2004. Adherence to antihypertensive medication was estimated as the cumulative medication adherence. Subjects were divided into good (cumulative medication adherence, ≥80%), intermediate (cumulative medication adherence, 50%-80%), and poor (cumulative medication adherence, adherence groups. We used time-dependent Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the association between medication adherence and health outcomes. Among 33 728 eligible subjects, 670 (1.99%) died of coronary heart disease or stroke during follow-up. Patients with poor medication adherence had worse mortality from IHD (hazard ratio, 1.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-2.31; P for trend=0.005), cerebral hemorrhage (hazard ratio, 2.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-3.77; P for trend=0.004), and cerebral infarction (hazard ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-2.96; P for trend=0.003) than those with good adherence. The estimated hazard ratios of hospitalization for cardiovascular disease were consistent with the mortality end point. Poor medication adherence was associated with higher mortality and a greater risk of hospitalization for specific cardiovascular diseases, emphasizing the importance of a monitoring system and strategies to improve medication adherence in clinical practice. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Evaluation of emergency medical dispatch in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Taipei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Lu, Tsung-Chien; Ng, Josh Chian-Shuin; Lin, Chih-Hao; Chiang, Wen-Chu; Ko, Patrick Chow-In; Shih, Fuh-Yuan; Huang, Chien-Hua; Hsiung, Kuang-Hua; Chen, Shyr-Chyr; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2007-05-01

    Emergency medical dispatchers are the entry points to the emergency medical services (EMS). The overall performances of the dispatchers are imperative determinants of the emergency medical services dispatching system. There is little data on the cultural and language impacts on emergency medical dispatch. This study examined the emotional content and cooperation score (ECCS) among Mandarin Chinese speaking callers for cardiac arrests, and evaluated the performances of emergency medical services dispatching system in Taipei. This retrospective, observational study examined dispatching audio recordings obtained from the Taipei City Fire Department Dispatching Center between January 2004 to April 2004. The tapes of call relating to adult (age >or=18 years), non-traumatic cases with a presumed or field diagnosis of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) underwent systemic review. The caller's ECCS and the dispatcher's performances, including interview skills, provision of telephone-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (T-CPR), and dispatcher's ability to identify OHCA were examined. Interrater reliability for determining ECCS and interview skills were assessed using kappa statistic. A total of 199 audio recordings were reviewed. A mean ECCS of 1.42+/-0.64 (95% CI: 1.33-1.51) demonstrated that most callers were emotionally stable and cooperative when calling for help, even when facing cardiac arrest patients. There was a good association between ECCS and the sex of the callers (male 1.32 versus female 1.49; pskills of the dispatchers was high (4 or 5 points); while in one fifth the interview skills were suboptimal. About one third of the cases were provided with T-CPR by the dispatchers. The sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) for predicting OHCA by dispatchers were 96.9% and 97.9%, respectively. A kappa value of 0.65 and 0.68 were obtained for the interrater reliability of ECCS and interview skills. Most callers were found to be emotional stable and

  16. Impact of Online Learning Modules on Medical Student Microbiology Examination Scores

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Mary T.

    2008-01-01

    Medical students have a limited amount of time in which to acquire working knowledge of an enormous amount of information, and this is especially relevant for microbiology. One large midwestern medical school is unique in having medical microbiology taught at nine regional campuses using a single core curriculum. A committee of statewide course directors writes a licensure board-style final examination that is referenced to the core and used at all campuses. To prepare for the final examinati...

  17. Medication Safety: Experiential Learning for Pharmacy Students and Staff in a Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graudins, Linda V; Dooley, Michael J

    2016-11-17

    Medication Safety has been an established pharmacy specialty in Australian hospitals since the early 2000s and is now one of the ten Australian hospital accreditation standards. Although advances have occurred, medication-related patient harm has not been eradicated. Victorian undergraduate pharmacy programs include some aspects of medication safety, however clinical pharmacy experience, along with interpersonal and project management skills, are required to prepare pharmacists to be confident medication safety practitioners. This article outlines the range of medication safety-related training offered at an Australian tertiary teaching hospital, including; on-site tutorial for undergraduate students, experiential placement for pharmacy interns, orientation for pharmacy staff and resources for credentialing pharmacists for extended roles. Improvements continue to be made, such as electronic medication management systems, which increase the safe use of medications and facilitate patient care. Implementation and evaluation of these systems require medication safety expertise. Patients' engaging in their own care is an acknowledged safety improvement strategy and is enhanced by pharmacist facilitation. Building educator skills and integrating experiential teaching with university curricula should ensure pharmacists have both the knowledge and experience early in their careers, in order to have a leading role in future medication management.

  18. Medication Safety: Experiential Learning for Pharmacy Students and Staff in a Hospital Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda V. Graudins

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Medication Safety has been an established pharmacy specialty in Australian hospitals since the early 2000s and is now one of the ten Australian hospital accreditation standards. Although advances have occurred, medication-related patient harm has not been eradicated. Victorian undergraduate pharmacy programs include some aspects of medication safety, however clinical pharmacy experience, along with interpersonal and project management skills, are required to prepare pharmacists to be confident medication safety practitioners. This article outlines the range of medication safety-related training offered at an Australian tertiary teaching hospital, including; on-site tutorial for undergraduate students, experiential placement for pharmacy interns, orientation for pharmacy staff and resources for credentialing pharmacists for extended roles. Improvements continue to be made, such as electronic medication management systems, which increase the safe use of medications and facilitate patient care. Implementation and evaluation of these systems require medication safety expertise. Patients’ engaging in their own care is an acknowledged safety improvement strategy and is enhanced by pharmacist facilitation. Building educator skills and integrating experiential teaching with university curricula should ensure pharmacists have both the knowledge and experience early in their careers, in order to have a leading role in future medication management.

  19. [Mortality and medical care of patients hospitalized during weekends].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrana-García, J L; Granados, C J; Zambrana-Luque, J L

    It has been shown that patients admitted to hospital during the weekends tend to have less favourable outcomes, including higher mortality rates, compared with those admitted during weekdays. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of on the health outcomes of patients admitted during the weekend. A retrospective observational study was conducted on all patients admitted to Montilla Hospital (Córdoba).. All hospitalised patients were attended to daily, including weekends and holidays. An analysis was performed on the epidemiological variables and health outcomes (total mortality). The study included a total of 2,565 hospital admissions, of whom 653 (25.6%) were discharged during the weekend. Patients discharged during the weekend were significantly younger [53 (27) versus 56 (27) years, P<.002], had fewer diagnoses on discharge [6.2 (3.7) versus 6.7 (3.9), P<.003], and had fewer procedures performed [(3 (1.9) versus 3.2 (1.8), P<.005]. The mean length of stay was shorter for weekend discharges than the weekday discharges [3 (2.6) days versus 3.7 (3.9) days, P<.001). The total mortality was 4%, and there were no differences between weekday and weekend admissions (4.3% versus 3.7%). Home discharges on the weekend were related to a reduction in the mean length of stay by 0.3 days (from 3.6 to 3.9 days, P<.001). Hospitalised patient care has led to the disappearance of increased mortality during weekends. Copyright © 2017 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Medication errors: classification of seriousness, type, and of medications involved in the reports from a university teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Rejane dos Santos Dalmolin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Medication errors can be frequent in hospitals; these errors are multidisciplinary and occur at various stages of the drug therapy. The present study evaluated the seriousness, the type and the drugs involved in medication errors reported at the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre. We analyzed written error reports for 2010-2011. The sample consisted of 165 reports. The errors identified were classified according to seriousness, type and pharmacological class. 114 reports were categorized as actual errors (medication errors and 51 reports were categorized as potential errors. There were more medication error reports in 2011 compared to 2010, but there was no significant change in the seriousness of the reports. The most common type of error was prescribing error (48.25%. Errors that occurred during the process of drug therapy sometimes generated additional medication errors. In 114 reports of medication errors identified, 122 drugs were cited. The reflection on medication errors, the possibility of harm resulting from these errors, and the methods for error identification and evaluation should include a broad perspective of the aspects involved in the occurrence of errors. Patient safety depends on the process of communication involving errors, on the proper recording of information, and on the monitoring itself.

  1. Oral Assessment and Postgraduate Medical Examinations: Establishing Conditions for Validity, Reliability and Fairness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Muhammed Ashraf; Joughin, Gordon Rowland; Memon, Breda

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine the practice of oral assessment in postgraduate medical education in the context of the core assessment constructs of validity, reliability and fairness. Although oral assessment has a long history in the certification process of medical specialists and is a well-established part of such proceedings for a…

  2. Counseling Medical Students Preparing for Their Licensure Examination: Students Evaluation of the Program's Usefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Gerald J.; And Others

    Senior medical students at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences were surveyed regarding the value of a program providing regression based predictions of their individual Day 1, 2, 3, and Total Federation Licensure Examination (FLEX) scores and the probability of passing the FLEX for subsequent Arkansas licensure. The prediction formulas…

  3. 77 FR 33264 - National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners Testing Providers Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ... motor vehicle drivers to undergo training, pass a certification exam, and be listed on the National... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners Testing... Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting. SUMMARY: The National Registry of Certified Medical...

  4. Relationship between in-hospital location and outcomes of care in patients of a large general medical service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perimal-Lewis, L; Li, J Y; Hakendorf, P H; Ben-Tovim, D I; Qin, S; Thompson, C H

    2013-06-01

    The discrepancy between the number of admissions and the allocation of hospital beds means that many patients admitted under the care of a general medical service can be placed in other departments' wards. These patients are called 'outliers', and their outcomes are unknown. To examine the relation between the proportion of time each patient spent in their 'home ward' during an index admission and the outcomes of that hospital stay. Data from Flinders Medical Centre's patient journey database were extracted and analysed. The analysis was carried out on the patient journeys of patients admitted under the general medicine units. Outlier patients' length of stay was significantly shorter than that of the inlier patients (110.7 h cf 141.9 h; P discharge from hospital. Outlier patients' discharge summaries were less likely to be completed within a week (64.3% cf 78.0%; P hospital mortality by over 40%. Fifty per cent of deaths in the outlier group occurred within 48 h of admission. Outlier patients had spent longer in the emergency department waiting for a bed (6.3 h cf 5.3 h; P hospital but significantly greater in-patient death rates. Surviving outlier patients had lower rates of readmission but lower rates of discharge summary completion. © 2012 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  5. [Research of regional medical consumables reagent logistics system in the modern hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingjiong; Zhang, Yanwen; Luo, Xiaochen; Zhang, Qing; Zhu, Jianxin

    2013-09-01

    To explore the modern hospital and regional medical consumable reagents logistics system management. The characteristics of regional logistics, through cooperation between medical institutions within the region, and organize a wide range of special logistics activities, to make reasonable of the regional medical consumable reagents logistics. To set the regional management system, dynamic management systems, supply chain information management system, after-sales service system and assessment system. By the research of existing medical market and medical resources, to establish the regional medical supplies reagents directory and the initial data. The emphasis is centralized dispatch of medical supplies reagents, to introduce qualified logistics company for dispatching, to improve the modern hospital management efficiency, to costs down. Regional medical center and regional community health service centers constitute a regional logistics network, the introduction of medical consumable reagents logistics services, fully embodies integrity level, relevance, purpose, environmental adaptability of characteristics by the medical consumable reagents regional logistics distribution. Modern logistics distribution systems can increase the area of medical consumables reagent management efficiency and reduce costs.

  6. Comparison of Medical Students' Satisfaction with Family Medicine Clerkships between University Hospitals and Community Hospitals or Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eal Whan

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare students' awareness of and satisfaction with clerkships in family medicine between a university hospital and a community hospital or clinic. Thirty-eight 4th year medical students who were undergoing a clerkship in family medicine in the 1st semester of 2012 were surveyed via questionnaire. The questionnaire was administered both before and after the clerkship. External clerkships were completed in eight family medicine clinics and two regional hospitals. At preclerkship, participants showed strong expectation for understanding primary care and recognition of the need for community clerkship, mean scores of 4.3±0.5 and 4.1±0.7, respectively. At post-clerkship, participants showed a significant increase in recognition of the need for community clerkship (4.7±0.5, P<0.001). The pre-clerkship recognition of differences in patient characteristics between university hospitals and community hospitals or clinics was 4.1±0.7; at post-clerkship, it was 3.9±0.7. Students' confidence in their ability to see a first-visit patient and their expectation of improved interviewing skills both significantly increased at post-clerkship (P<0.01). Satisfaction with feedback from preceptors and overall satisfaction with the clerkship also significantly increased, but only for the university hospital clerkship (P<0.01). Students' post-clerkship satisfaction was uniformly high for both clerkships. At pre-clerkship, students were aware of the differences in patient characteristics between university hospitals and community hospitals or clinics, and this awareness did not change by the end of the clerkship.

  7. [Military medical examination and social security of servicemen and members of their families].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, V V; Krasnikov, V N; Koval'skiĭ, O N; Tuaeva, L V; Iadchuk, V N; Kabalin, A P

    2001-03-01

    In the article the main social privileges and guarantees stipulated by the laws of Russian Federation as well as the role and significance of military medical examination organs in the problems of social security of servicemen and persons underwent military service (military training) and members of their families are discussed. The authors emphasize legal significance of conclusions drawn by military medical commissions in examined persons for registration of invalidity, insurance payments, single-payment grants, compensation and privilege rights.

  8. Effect on clinical work practice of establishing a neonatal intensive care unit at a medical school-affiliated teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Yoshio; Migita, Makoto; Asakura, Hirobumi; Takahashi, Tsubasa; Yashiro, Kentaro; Matsumura, Yoshikatsu; Kurokawa, Akira

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a newly established neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) on clinical work practice and educational activity at Nippon Medical School Musashikosugi Hospital. This retrospective study analyzed the clinical records of all neonates admitted to the NICU from December 2010 through November 2013. Anthropometric data, clinical status, problems, and outcomes of patients and the related obstetrical history were extracted and analyzed. Of the 568 neonatal admissions, about half were related to preterm birth (49%) and low birth weight (55%). Forty-eight percent of patients were born via caesarean delivery. Maternal hypertension, diabetes, and thyroid disease were found in 8%, 5%, and 2% of cases, respectively. Mechanical ventilatory support was provided for 20% of patients. Neonates from multiple pregnancy and with significant congenital anomalies accounted for 17% and 10% of all patients, respectively. Five patients died during hospitalization. In addition training was provided in the NICU for an average of 10 residents and 20 medical students per year. Since the NICU was established, closer cooperation beyond the framework of a single department has come to be needed. In addition, NICUs in teaching hospitals are expected to provide opportunities for medical students and residents to observe and participate in multidisciplinary medical care.

  9. Use of oral antihypertensive medication preceding blood pressure elevation in hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macedo Cristiano Ricardo Bastos de

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of oral antihypertensive medication preceding the increase in blood pressure in patients in a university hospital, the drug of choice, and the maintained use of antihypertensive medication. METHODS: Data from January to June 1997 from the University Hospital Professor Edgard Santos Pharmacy concerning the prescriptions of all inpatients were used. Variables included in the analysis were: antihypertensive medication prescription preceding increase in blood pressure, type of antihypertensive medication, gender, clinical or surgical wards, and the presence of maintained antihypertensive medication. RESULTS: The hospital admitted 2,532 patients, 1,468 in surgical wards and 818 in medical wards. Antihypertensive medication prescription preceding pressure increase was observed in 578 patients (22.8%. Nifedipine was used in 553 (95.7% and captopril in 25 (4.3%. In 50.7% of patients, prescription of antihypertensive medication was not associated with maintained antihypertensive medication. Prescription of antihypertensive drugs preceding elevation of blood pressure was significantly (p<0.001 more frequent on the surgical floor (27.5%; 405/1468 than on the medical floor (14.3%; 117/818. The frequency of prescription of antihypertensive drugs preceding elevation of blood pressure without maintained antihypertensive drugs and the ratio between the number of prescriptions of nifedipine and captopril were greater in surgical wards. CONCLUSION: The use of antihypertensive medication, preceding elevation of blood pressure (22.8% observed in admitted patients is not supported by scientific evidence. The high frequency of this practice may be even greater in nonuniversity hospitals.

  10. [Audit as a tool to assess and promote the quality of medical records and hospital appropriateness: metodology and preliminary results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poscia, Andrea; Cambieri, Andrea; Tucceri, Chiara; Ricciardi, Walter; Volpe, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    In the actual economic context, with increasing health needs, efficiency and efficacy represents fundamental keyword to ensure a successful use of the resources and the best health outcomes. Together, the medical record, completely and correctly compiled, is an essential tool in the patient diagnostic and therapeutic path, but it's becoming more and more essential for the administrative reporting and legal claims. Nevertheless, even if the improvement of medical records quality and of hospital stay appropriateness represent priorities for every health organization, they could be difficult to realize. This study aims to present the methodology and the preliminary results of a training and improvement process: it was carried out from the Hospital Management of a third level Italian teaching hospital through audit cycles to actively involve their health professionals. A self assessment process of medical records quality and hospital stay appropriateness (inpatients admission and Day Hospital) was conducted through a retrospective evaluation of medical records. It started in 2012 and a random sample of 2295 medical records was examined: the quality assessment was performed using a 48-item evaluation grid modified from the Lombardy Region manual of the medical record, while the appropriateness of each days was assessed using the Italian version of Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP) - 2002ed. The overall assessment was presented through departmental audit: the audit were designed according to the indication given by the Italian and English Ministry of Health to share the methodology and the results with all the involved professionals (doctors and nurses) and to implement improvement strategies that are synthesized in this paper. Results from quality and appropriateness assessment show several deficiencies, due to 40% of minimum level of acceptability not completely satisfied and to 30% of inappropriateness between days of hospitalization. Furthermore, there are

  11. Burnout and its related Demographic Factors among the Medical Staff working in Hospitals associated with Bushehr University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gashmard, Roqayeh; Bagherzadeh, Razieh; Pouladi, Shahnaz; Akaberian, Sherafat

    2015-12-01

    Burnout exerts a significant negative influence on job performance, especially in such difficult jobs as those to be found in the health care industry. This research aimed to evaluate the association between 3 dimensions of burnout and demographic factors among the medical staff working in all of the hospitals associated with Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The research detailed herein was a descriptive, analytical cross-sectional study which was conducted on 461 medical staff working in all of the hospitals associated with Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Iran, from April 2011 to February 2012. The data were collected using a self-response method and include demographic information as well as the Maslach Burnout Inventory. In this study, samples were selected using a stratified random sampling method. The scoring of the burnout questionnaire ranged from 0 (never) to 6 (every day), with the levels of each of the 3 dimensions of burnout (as well as burnout itself) then being categorized as being low, moderate, or high. The data were analyzed using an independent t-test, a chi-square test, ANOVA, and Pearson's correlation coefficient, all in SPSS 18. Most people had experienced moderate levels of burnout (53.6%). With regard to the 3 domains of burnout, 46.4% of the participants had experienced moderate levels of emotional exhaustion, more than half (56.4%) had experienced low levels of depersonalization, and more than half (52.5%), high levels of a diminished sense of accomplishment. Burnout was shown to be statistically significantly associated with gender, place of residence, the condition of that residence, educational level, and being or not being local (p>0.05). The research findings showed that the rate of burnout was moderate among the medical staff working in hospitals associated with Bushehr University of Medical Sciences. Probably, burnout can be reduced in the hospitals' different staff members through better and suitable planning and

  12. Assessment of quality of care in postpartum wards of Shaheed Beheshti Medical Science University hospitals, 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simbar, M; Dibazari, Z Alizadeh; Saeidi, J Abed; Majd, H Alavi

    2005-01-01

    Despite 77 per cent antenatal care coverage and 90 per cent skilled attendant at delivery, adjusted maternal mortality in Iran is 76 per 100,000 births. Low quality of maternal health services is one cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. However, few and limited studies have been devoted to the quality of postpartum care in Iran. This study aims to assess quality of care in postpartum wards of Shaheed Beheshti Medical Science University hospitals to show weakness and gaps areas in the care procedure for future improvement intervention programs. It is a descriptive study to assess quality of care in postpartum wards of Shaheed Beheshti Medical Science University hospitals, in 2003. Using quota sampling, 60 healthy women were recruited for the study. Data were collected using three forms including a questionnaire with demographic and obstetrics questions, a check-list for the postpartum care and education quality assessment. Control of vital signs, uterus assessment, perineum assessment, leaving bed, urinary system assessment, digestive system assessment, breast examination, extremities assessment, psychological assessment, as well as education about perineum self-care, breast-feeding, infant care, education before discharge and educational method. Validity and reliability of the questionnaire and checklist were assessed prior to use. Data were analyzed using SPSS. Results showed compatibility of provided postpartum care with the standards as follows: method of patient's education (52.68 per cent); control of vital signs (43.21 per cent); education about breast-feeding (26.06 per cent); care in getting out of bed (25.83 per cent); psychological care (19.36 per cent); urinary system assessment (16.66 per cent); education about perineum care (13.12 per cent); uterus assessment (10.6 per cent); digestive system assessment (9.69 per cent); patient's education before discharge (7.99 per cent); education about infant's care (7.81 per cent); perineum assessment (6

  13. Medical students' experience of performing female pelvic examinations: Opportunities and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhoopatkar, Harsh; Wearn, Andy; Vnuk, Anna

    2017-10-01

    Teaching and learning female pelvic examination within the undergraduate medical curriculum offers some potential challenges. One such is the extent to which students are provided practice opportunities with patients in the clinical setting. To quantify how many pelvic examinations, on real patients, have been performed by medical students at the point of graduation, and to explore opportunities and barriers to performing these examinations. A retrospective study using a self-completed, anonymous, electronic survey was developed as part of a multi-centre study. Data were collected in the immediate period after graduation from the medical programs at the University of Auckland and Flinders University in 2013. An ordinal set of range categories was used for recording numbers of examinations. The combined response rate for the survey was 42.9% (134/312). The median range category for the number of pelvic examinations performed in patients who were not in labour was 6-9 and in labour was 2-3. Thirty-three percent of medical students had never performed a pelvic examination in labour. Male medical students performed significantly fewer pelvic examinations compared with female students. Self-reported barriers to performing the pelvic exam include: gender of the student, 'gate-keeping' by other health professionals, lack of confidence and patient factors. The majority of medical students have performed several pelvic examinations on real patients at graduation. Male gender and access being limited by midwives were the main barriers to performing female pelvic examinations. Medical curricula need to address these issues in the learning environment. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  14. Hospitalization Rates and Reasons Among HIV Elite Controllers and Persons With Medically Controlled HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Trevor A; Gebo, Kelly A; Blankson, Joel N; Korthuis, P Todd; Yehia, Baligh R; Rutstein, Richard M; Moore, Richard D; Sharp, Victoria; Nijhawan, Ank E; Mathews, W Christopher; Hanau, Lawrence H; Corales, Roberto B; Beil, Robert; Somboonwit, Charurut; Edelstein, Howard; Allen, Sara L; Berry, Stephen A

    2015-06-01

    Elite controllers spontaneously suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viremia but also demonstrate chronic inflammation that may increase risk of comorbid conditions. We compared hospitalization rates and causes among elite controllers to those of immunologically intact persons with medically controlled HIV. For adults in care at 11 sites from 2005 to 2011, person-years with CD4 T-cell counts ≥350 cells/mm(2) were categorized as medical control, elite control, low viremia, or high viremia. All-cause and diagnostic category-specific hospitalization rates were compared between groups using negative binomial regression. We identified 149 elite controllers (0.4%) among 34 354 persons in care. Unadjusted hospitalization rates among the medical control, elite control, low-viremia, and high-viremia groups were 10.5, 23.3, 12.6, and 16.9 per 100 person-years, respectively. After adjustment for demographic and clinical factors, elite control was associated with higher rates of all-cause (adjusted incidence rate ratio, 1.77 [95% confidence interval, 1.21-2.60]), cardiovascular (3.19 [1.50-6.79]) and psychiatric (3.98 [1.54-10.28]) hospitalization than was medical control. Non-AIDS-defining infections were the most common reason for admission overall (24.1% of hospitalizations) but were rare among elite controllers (2.7%), in whom cardiovascular hospitalizations were most common (31.1%). Elite controllers are hospitalized more frequently than persons with medically controlled HIV and cardiovascular hospitalizations are an important contributor. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. The Relationship Between the Use of a Worksite Medical Home and ED Visits or Hospitalizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marissa Stroo BS

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Worksite medical homes may be a good model for improving employee health. The aim of this study was to compare the likelihood of being seen in the emergency department (ED or being hospitalized by level of use (no use, occasional use, or primary care of a worksite medical home, overall and by type of user (employee, adult dependent, or pediatric dependent. This was a retrospective analysis of claims data, using covariate-adjusted logistic regression models for ED visits and inpatient hospitalizations. Secondary data for the years 2006 to 2008 from a company that offers an on-site health care center (HCC were used. Analyses were based on a data set that combines health plan claims and human resources demographic data. Overall, people who did not use the HCC were more likely to be seen in the ED (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.20, 95% confidence interval or CI [1.06, 1.37], P = .005 or to be hospitalized (adjusted OR = 1.58; 95% CI [1.34, 1.86]; P < .0001 compared with those who used the HCC for primary care. Both ED visits and hospitalizations for employees and dependents in this study were lower among those who used the worksite medical home for primary care. Worksite medical homes can improve chronic disease management and thus reduce ED visits and hospitalizations. These findings contribute to growing evidence that worksite medical homes are potentially cost-effective.

  16. The medical waste audit. A framework for hospitals to appraise options and financial implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studnicki, J

    1992-03-01

    The generation, handling, and disposal of medical wastes involve virtually every department in the hospital. To enhance coordination, managers must comprehensively describe the total system and specify the roles of key functions and individuals. Hospitals produce about 77 percent of the approximately 500,000 tons of regulated medical waste produced annually in the United States. The amount produced by different hospitals varies, primarily because of differences in "waste-management practices." The Environmental Protection Agency is trying to develop a greater understanding of the types of medical wastes that are infectious, methods of transmission, and the likelihood of transmission in the handling and disposal of waste within the hospital environment. To ensure that medical waste is being handled and treated in the most cost-effective manner and with the least health risk to employees and the community, hospital administrators must undertake a comprehensive appraisal of the activities associated with the generation, handling, and disposal processes. A "medical waste audit" requires the following steps: Generation profile to identify origination points, categories or types of waste, and associated generation rates. Inventory of handling practices, including existing regulations, procedures and protocols, training programs, definitions regarding waste segregation, and documentation. Review of current disposal practices and existing and developing alternatives. Cost analysis

  17. Standardization of spedalized medical care to patients with shin fractures in multifield city hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Tikhilov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was development of science-based recommendations for increasing efficiency of operative treatment of adult patients with shin fractures in multiprofile city hospital. Investigation was made in Saint-Petersburg Alexandrovskiy City Hospital. Clinical material was presented by official hospital reports, individual medical documentation and results of direct survey of patients treated in this hospital in period 1999-2010 years. All patients had follow up treatment in outpatient department of this hospital. Information was completed following federal and local laws. Recommendations for standardization of modern specialized medical care of patients with shin fractures, based on methods of internal fixation, were performed. We took into consideration possibilities of conventional and minimally invasive fixation of closed and open fractures including politrauma injuries. Models of patients with shin fractures depending on method of internal fixation and list of basic diagnostic procedures and treatment were formed. Operations classifier of internal shin fractures fixation was developed. This classifier includes calculation of hospital costs in process of specialized medical care considering actual correction coefficients. Calculation of each surgical procedure component was performed. List and composition of instrument sets and expense materials for such operations were formed. Analisis of organizational, medico-technological, economica aspect and expert evaluation of clinical results of different methods of long bones fractures fixation have provided conceptual approach to treatment standardization. On this base we have developed medico-economical standards of long bones fractures treatment in city multiprofile hospital.

  18. Parents' Acute Illnesses, Hospitalizations, and Medication Changes During the Difficult First Year After Infant or Child NICU/PICU Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooten, Dorothy; Youngblut, JoAnne M; Caicedo, Carmen; Del Moral, Teresa; Cantwell, G Patricia; Totapally, Balagangadhar

    2016-01-01

    Infant/child death is described as a most stressful life event; however, there are few reports of effects on parent physical health during the first year after the death. The study's purpose is to examine the patterns of parent acute illnesses, hospitalizations, and medication changes over 1 to 13 months after neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) or pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) infant/child death in 3 racial/ethnic groups. Secondary analyses were conducted with longitudinal data on parent health and functioning 1 to 13 months after infant/child NICU/PICU death. Parents (176 mothers, 73 fathers; 44% Hispanic, 35% black non-Hispanic, and 21% white non-Hispanic) of deceased infants/children were recruited from 4 children's hospitals and state death records. Inclusion criteria-parents understood English or Spanish and had a deceased neonate/child ≤ 18. Exclusion criteria -deceased newborn from multiple gestation pregnancy, child in foster care, child's injury due to suspected abuse, or parent death in illness/injury event. Parents reported numbers and types of acute illnesses, hospitalizations, and medication changes 1 to 13 months postdeath. Parents' acute illnesses, hospitalizations, and medication changes were greatest between months 1 and 6, with relative quiescence in months 7 to 10, and an increase in months 11 to 13. Mothers (aged 32 ± 7.8 years) reported 300 acute illnesses (primarily colds/flu, headaches, anxiety/depression, and infections) and 89 hospitalizations (primarily infections, chest pain, and gastrointestinal problems). Fathers (aged 37 ± 8.8 years) reported 104 acute illnesses (colds/flu and headaches) and 9 hospitalizations. After infant/child NICU/PICU death, mothers had greater morbidity than fathers, with no significant differences by race/ethnicity. Parents' health needs to be monitored in months 1 to 6 and months 11 to 13, and interventions targeted to parents in these months.

  19. Evaluation of a hospital medical library class for NICU nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Misa

    2006-01-01

    A library class was designed and offered to new nurses from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the Children's Hospital of Michigan between 2003 and 2005. The class was intended to increase their knowledge of quality health information resources and to assist them with their smooth transition to a new health care organization. The goal of the library training class was to develop the nurses' awareness and knowledge of the library services and online resources on the organization Intranet and to improve their skills in finding reliable information related to patient care, patient parent education, and research. An evaluation study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of the library class. Although the findings demonstrated strengths of the library class, they also revealed some areas for improvement. The data gathered resulted in a number of recommendations regarding library instruction design and evaluation.

  20. Introduction to an Open Source Internet-Based Testing Program for Medical Student Examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Hwan Lee

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The author developed a freely available open source internet-based testing program for medical examination. PHP and Java script were used as the programming language and postgreSQL as the database management system on an Apache web server and Linux operating system. The system approach was that a super user inputs the items, each school administrator inputs the examinees’ information, and examinees access the system. The examinee’s score is displayed immediately after examination with item analysis. The set-up of the system beginning with installation is described. This may help medical professors to easily adopt an internet-based testing system for medical education.

  1. Introduction to an open source internet-based testing program for medical student examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon-Hwan

    2009-12-20

    The author developed a freely available open source internet-based testing program for medical examination. PHP and Java script were used as the programming language and postgreSQL as the database management system on an Apache web server and Linux operating system. The system approach was that a super user inputs the items, each school administrator inputs the examinees' information, and examinees access the system. The examinee's score is displayed immediately after examination with item analysis. The set-up of the system beginning with installation is described. This may help medical professors to easily adopt an internet-based testing system for medical education.

  2. Medication safety at the interface: evaluating risks associated with discharge prescriptions from mental health hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keers, R N; Williams, S D; Vattakatuchery, J J; Brown, P; Miller, J; Prescott, L; Ashcroft, D M

    2015-12-01

    When compared to general hospitals, relatively little is known about the quality and safety of discharge prescriptions from specialist mental health settings. We aimed to investigate the quality and safety of discharge prescriptions written at mental health hospitals. This study was undertaken on acute adult and later life inpatient units at three National Health Service (NHS) mental health trusts. Trained pharmacy teams prospectively reviewed all newly written discharge prescriptions over a 6-week period, recording the number of prescribing errors, clerical errors and errors involving lack of communication about medicines stopped during hospital admission. All prescribing errors were reviewed and validated by a multidisciplinary panel. Main outcome measures were the prevalence (95% CI) of prescribing errors, clerical errors and errors involving a lack of details about medicines stopped. Risk factors for prescribing and clerical errors were examined via logistic regression and results presented as odds ratios (OR) with corresponding 95% CI. Of 274 discharge prescriptions, 259 contained a total of 1456 individually prescribed items. One in five [20·8% (95%CI 15·9-25·8%)] eligible discharge prescriptions and one in twenty [5·1% (95%CI 4·0-6·2%)] prescribed or omitted items were affected by at least one prescribing error. One or more clerical errors were found in 71·9% (95%CI 66·5-77·3%) of discharge prescriptions, and more than two-thirds [68·8% (95%CI 56·6-78·8%)] of eligible discharge prescriptions erroneously lacked information on medicines discontinued during hospital admission. Logistic regression analyses revealed that middle-grade [whole discharge prescription level OR 3·28 (3·03-3·56)] and senior [whole discharge OR 1·43 (1·04-1·96)] prescribers as well as electronic discharge prescription pro formas [whole discharge OR 2·43 (2·08-2·83)] were all associated with significantly higher risks of prescribing errors than junior prescribers and

  3. Gross Anatomy Examination Performances in relation to Medical Students' Knowledge of Classical Latin and Greek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Shiby; Moxham, Bernard John

    2018-02-03

    The ability of medical students to acquire anatomical and medical terminologies could be influenced by their knowledge of classical Greek and Latin. In a previous study (Stephens and Moxham, 2016), it was reported that, while newly recruited medical students have a very favourable attitude towards the need to understand these classical languages, final year students see no benefit. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that, regardless of attitude, students in the initial stages of their medical education perform better at both summative and formative anatomy examinations if they have prior knowledge of Greek and Latin. First year medical students at Cardiff University who had been involved in the previous study concerning attitudes towards the relevance of the classical languages to medical education were evaluated in terms of their examination results in anatomy. Two hundred and twenty-seven students responded to a questionnaire (83% of the class) that categorised students into their linguistic knowledge and skills and their performances in formative and summative examinations were analysed. For medical students with prior knowledge of classical Greek and Latin performed better in both summative and formative anatomy examinations. The results are therefore consistent with our hypothesis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Medication administration quality and health information technology: a national study of US hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appari, Ajit; Carian, Emily K; Johnson, M Eric; Anthony, Denise L

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether the use of computerized physician order entry (CPOE) and electronic medication administration records (eMAR) is associated with better quality of medication administration at medium-to-large acute-care hospitals. DATA/STUDY SETTING: A retrospective cross-sectional analysis of data from three sources: CPOE/eMAR usage from HIMSS Analytics (2010), medication quality scores from CMS Hospital Compare (2010), and hospital characteristics from CMS Acute Inpatient Prospective Payment System (2009). The analysis focused on 11 quality indicators (January-December 2009) at 2603 medium-to-large (≥ 100 beds), non-federal acute-care hospitals measuring proportion of eligible patients given (or prescribed) recommended medications for conditions, including acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia, and surgical care improvement. Using technology adoption by 2008 as reference, hospitals were coded: (1) eMAR-only adopters (n=986); (2) CPOE-only adopters (n=115); and (3) adopters of both technologies (n=804); with non-adopters of both technologies as reference group (n=698). Hospitals were also coded for duration of use in 2-year increments since technology adoption. Hospital characteristics, historical measure-specific patient volume, and propensity scores for technology adoption were used to control for confounding factors. The analysis was performed using a generalized linear model (logit link and binomial family). Relative to non-adopters of both eMAR and CPOE, the odds of adherence to all measures (except one) were higher by 14-29% for eMAR-only hospitals and by 13-38% for hospitals with both technologies, translating to a marginal increase of 0.4-2.0 percentage points. Further, each additional 2 years of technology use was associated with 6-15% higher odds of compliance on all medication measures for eMAR-only hospitals and users of both technologies. Implementation and duration of use of health information technologies are associated with

  5. Examining Validity and Reliability of the Emotional Reactions Checklist with Hospitalized Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Hwan; Foster, Roxie L

    2015-08-01

    Fear, anxiety, and emotional upset are common experiences for hospitalized children. To identify and treat children's emotional reactions, health care professionals must be able to differentiate emotional reactions from pain and other symptoms. Clinical assessment of emotions requires the use of valid and reliable instruments in acute care settings. This study examined internal consistency, construct, and concurrent validity of the Emotional Reactions Checklist (ERC). A descriptive correlational design guided the psychometric approach. Children answered a sociodemographic questionnaire and responded to self-generated scenarios of pleasant and unpleasant events using two self-report scales of emotions. The convenience sample comprised 59 children admitted to an inpatient unit in a large children's hospital or to a community hospital emergency department. Construct validity was supported by significantly different ERC mean responses to recalled pleasant prehospitalization experiences and unpleasant hospitalization experiences (p Children's explanations for seemingly inconsistent item responses further supported their ability to use the ERC to convey their emotions. Concurrent validity was supported by moderate (r = 0.32) to strong (r = 0.70) correlations between the Facial Affective Scale and ERC items and scale scores. Internal consistency was better supported for the recalled unpleasant experience (α = 0.77) than for the pleasant experience (α = 0.60). Results supported construct and concurrent validity and beginning internal consistency reliability for the ERC in an acute care setting. Further research is required to establish feasibility of repeated use with ill children. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. How common are errors in the medication process in a psychiatric hospital?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Mainz, Jan; Lisby, Marianne

    How common are errors in the medication process in a psychiatric hospital? Background and purpose: Medication errors in psychiatric care is a problem in need of attention in Denmark. Studies are sparse and does not investigate all stages of the medication process. There is an urgent need...... for clarifying studies concerning prevalence and nature of medication errors in psychiatric care, as well as studies concerning associations related to medication errors. This is the basis for quality improving interventions in relation to medication safety in psychiatric care. The aim of this study was to asses...... frequency, type and potential clinical consequences of errors in all stages of the medication process in an inpatient psychiatric setting. Methods and materials: A cross-sectional study in two general psychiatric wards and one acute psychiatric ward. Participants were eligible psychiatric in...

  7. Use of Addenbrooke’s cognitive examination-revised to evaluate the patients’ state in general medical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai Nikolayevich Ivanets

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The differential diagnosis of cognitive impairments is of great importance in mental disorders detectable in general medical practice. Objective: to study whether Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination — Revised (ACE-R may be used in these patients. Patients and methods. The study was conducted in two steps at somatic hospitals and city polyclinics. It enrolled 130patients (36 men and 94 women with anxiety-depression spectrum disorders (ADSD, mild cognitive disorders (MCD and a concurrence of these conditions. The authors used the following psychometric scales: the hospital anxiety and depression scale; the mini-mental state examination; the frontal assessment battery; ACE-R; ten words learning test. The psychometric characteristics of ACE-R and the possibilities of its use were estimated to detect MCD. The differences in the spectrum of cognitive impairments were analyzed in patients with different types of ADSD. Results. ACE-R is shown to be an effective neuropsychological tool for the primary diagnosis, detection, and evaluation of MCD in the general medical network. The results of ACE-R use indicate that the spectrum of cognitive impairments has substantial differences in patients with different types of non-psychotic disorders.

  8. 42 CFR 409.12 - Nursing and related services, medical social services; use of hospital or CAH facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nursing and related services, medical social... services, medical social services; use of hospital or CAH facilities. (a) Except as provided in paragraph... facilities, and medical social services as inpatient hospital or inpatient CAH services only if those...

  9. 75 FR 9102 - Recovery of Cost of Hospital and Medical Care and Treatment Furnished by the United States...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... Part 43 Recovery of Cost of Hospital and Medical Care and Treatment Furnished by the United States..., or dental care. This change responds to the increase in medical costs since 1992, when the current... United States responsible for the furnishing of hospital, medical, surgical, or dental care. During the...

  10. Microblogging violent attacks on medical staff in China: a case study of the Longmen County People's Hospital incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jia; Du, Li

    2017-05-19

    A violent attack on medical staff in Guangdong Province, in which a female doctor at Longmen County People's Hospital (LCPH) was severely injured by a knife-wielding patient, has drawn significant public attention to the phenomenon of hospital violence and initiated discussions on how to resolve violence in hospitals. Social networking sites, such as Sina Weibo, a Chinese version of Twitter, have played a role in this public debate. The incident at LCPH provides an opportunity to examine how Weibo has been used in the debate about violence against medical staff in China. Using the Sina Weibo's built-in search tool, we established a dataset of 661 Chinese-language micro-blogs containing the search terms: Longmen ("), doctor ("), and slash (") that were posted between July 15, 2015, the date of the violent incident at LCPH, and August 15, 2015. We performed a content analysis of the micro-blogs to examine: users' demographics, attitudes toward the injured doctor and the attacker, possible reasons for the hospital violence, and proposed measures for preventing doctors from violent incidents. 73.2% of the micro-blogs were sent by individual Weibo users, and 26.8% were posted by organizations. For individual users, around 10.0% described themselves as either doctors or healthcare providers, but users from the legal profession were rarely identified. Moreover, only 3 micro-blogs proposed concrete strategies for preventing hospital violence, and nearly 10.0% of micro-blogs expressed regrets about entering a medical career and attempts to quit medical positions. In general 56.3% of micro-blogs showed sympathy for the injured doctor, while less than 25.0% of micro-blogs explicitly condemned the attacker's behavior. Weibo users played a role in distributing news information about the violent incident at LCPH; however, the legal perspective is inadequately discussed in the debate, and discussion of constructive measures for protecting doctors and preventing hospital violence

  11. Impact of Online Learning Modules on Medical Student Microbiology Examination Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary T. Johnson

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical students have a limited amount of time in which to acquire working knowledge of an enormous amount of information, and this is especially relevant for microbiology. One large midwestern medical school is unique in having medical microbiology taught at nine regional campuses using a single core curriculum. A committee of statewide course directors writes a licensure board-style final examination that is referenced to the core and used at all campuses. To prepare for the final examination, students traditionally utilize print-based board examination review books. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether students who train using web-based quizzes score differently as a group on this statewide examination than students who do not utilize the materials online for exam preparation. The study included 71 learners from two different campuses who were taught by the same instructor and were admitted to medical school with similar exemplary credentials. Results were aggregated for three consecutive years. A standard medical microbiology textbook was used to assign the same suggested readings for all students and similar laboratory sessions were provided for all learners. The independent variable was use of the web-based quizzes to prepare before examinations, as indicated by student web usage logs. The dependent variable was score on the statewide final examination. Results support the hypothesis that students who use preparation modules online score higher on the final examination than students who do not. Moreover, students who prepared online scored higher on questions designed to test synthesis of knowledge and analysis of data. The significant difference in final examination outcome (P < 0.002 using a two-tailed unpaired t test indicates that online preparation for high-stakes examinations could improve student performance in medical microbiology.

  12. Which Sexual Abuse Victims Receive a Forensic Medical Examination?: The Impact of Children's Advocacy Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Wendy A.; Cross, Theodore P.; Jones, Lisa M.; Simone, Monique; Kolko, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the impact of Children's Advocacy Centers (CAC) and other factors, such as the child's age, alleged penetration, and injury on the use of forensic medical examinations as part of the response to reported child sexual abuse. Methods: This analysis is part of a quasi-experimental study, the Multi-Site Evaluation of…

  13. Cost of hospital care for older adults with heart failure: medical, pharmaceutical, and nursing costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titler, Marita G; Jensen, Gwenneth A; Dochterman, Joanne McCloskey; Xie, Xian-Jin; Kanak, Mary; Reed, David; Shever, Leah L

    2008-04-01

    To determine the impact of patient characteristics, clinical conditions, hospital unit characteristics, and health care interventions on hospital cost of patients with heart failure. Data for this study were part of a larger study that used electronic clinical data repositories from an 843-bed, academic medical center in the Midwest. This retrospective, exploratory study used existing administrative and clinical data from 1,435 hospitalizations of 1,075 patients 60 years of age or older. A cost model was tested using generalized estimating equations (GEE) analysis. Electronic databases used in this study were the medical record abstract, the financial data repository, the pharmacy repository; and the Nursing Information System repository. Data repositories were merged at the patient level into a relational database and housed on an SQL server. The model accounted for 88 percent of the variability in hospital costs for heart failure patients 60 years of age and older. The majority of variables that were associated with hospital cost were provider interventions. Each medical procedure increased cost by $623, each unique medication increased cost by $179, and the addition of each nursing intervention increased cost by $289. One medication and several nursing interventions were associated with lower cost. Nurse staffing below the average and residing on 2-4 units increased hospital cost. The model and data analysis techniques used here provide an innovative and useful methodology to describe and quantify significant health care processes and their impact on cost per hospitalization. The findings indicate the importance of conducting research using existing clinical data in health care.

  14. Comparative Assessment of Patients’ Rights Observance in the Hospitalization Wards of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences’ Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sharifi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients are one of the most vulnerable social groups. Respecting patients’ rights will lead in advantages like “decrease in hospitalization time” and “increase in patients’ satisfaction”. This study is performed to assess the patients' rights observance in the hospitalization wards of educational hospitals of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this descriptive-cross sectional study 137 medical student (intern were selected by convenience sampling method. We used a questionnaire with 12 questions. Reliability of questionnaire was confirmed by experts of the field and validity was confirmed by Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient (81%. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS (v21 using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance and Tukey test. Findings: In this study the observance rate of patients’ rights was at a good level in 41.6% of cases, at an average level in 55.5% of cases and at a low level in 2.9% of cases. There was a significant difference between several hospitalization wards in the observance rate of patients’ rights. (p = 0.001. The observance rate of patients’ rights in infectious disease ward and gynecology ward was at a lower level in comparison with other wards. Conclusion: The observance rate of patients’ rights was at an average to good level in most of hospitalization ward. However this observance rate is at a low level in some wards. More studies about the causes of these differences can help us in planning about improvement of patients’ rights observance.

  15. The hospital educational environment and performance of residents in the General Medicine In-Training Examination: a multicenter study in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimizu T

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Taro Shimizu,1 Yusuke Tsugawa,2,3 Yusuke Tanoue,4 Ryota Konishi,5 Yuji Nishizaki,6 Mitsumasa Kishimoto,7 Toshiaki Shiojiri,8 Yasuharu Tokuda9 1Hospitalist Division, Department of Medicine, Nerima Hikarigaoka Hospital, Tokyo, Japan; 2Division of General Medicine and Primary Care, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 3Center for Clinical Epidemiology, St Luke's Life Science Institute, 4Department of Vascular and Oncological Surgery, Hospital of Tokyo University, 5Department of General Internal Medicine, Kanto Rousai Hospital, 6Department of Cardiology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 7Division of Rheumatology, St Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo, Japan; 8Asahi Chuo Hospital, Chiba, Japan; 9Department of Medicine, Tsukuba University Mito Kyodo General Hospital, Mito City, Ibaraki, Japan Background: It is believed that the type of educational environment in teaching hospitals may affect the performance of medical knowledge base among residents, but this has not yet been proven. Objective: We aimed to investigate the association between the hospital educational environment and the performance of the medical knowledge base among resident physicians in Japanese teaching hospitals. Methods: To assess the knowledge base of medicine, we conducted the General Medicine In-Training Examination (GM-ITE for second-year residents in the last month of their residency. The items of the exam were developed based on the outcomes designated by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare. The educational environment was evaluated using the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM score, which was assessed by a mailed survey 2 years prior to the exam. A mixed-effects linear regression model was employed for the analysis of variables associated with a higher score. Results: Twenty-one teaching hospitals participated in the study and a total of 206 residents (67 women participated and

  16. Evaluating hospital information systems from the point of view of the medical records section users in Medical-Educational Hospitals of Kermanshah 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, S; Sarmad, A; Mohammadi, M; Cheleie, M; Amiri, S; Zardoei Golanbary, S H

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating hospital information systems leads to the improvement and devotion based on the users' needs, especially the medical records section users in hospitals, which are in contact with this system from the moment the patient enters the hospital until his/ her release and after that. The present research aimed to evaluate the hospital information systems from the point of view of the medical record section employees. Materials and method: The current research was applicative-descriptive analytical and the research society included 70 users of the medical history section in the educational-medical centers of Kermanshah city. The data-gathering tool was the 10th part of 9241/ 10 Isometric standard questionnaire of evaluating hospital information systems, with 75 specific questions in 7 bases, with the five spectra Likertt scale, its conceptual admissibility being confirmed in previous researches. 22 SPSS statistical software analyzed its permanency in the present study, which was also confirmed by Cronbach's's alpha test, which equaled to 0.89, and the data. Findings: The highest level of the employees' satisfaction, based on gained scores median, was respectively the incompatibility with the users' expectations, measuring 3.55, self-description measuring 3.54 and controllability - 3.51, which in total presented the average scores of 3.39, the lowest level of satisfaction being related to useful learning , whose value was 3.19. Discussion and conclusion: Hospital information systems' users believe that it is more desirable that the existing systems are based on the measures and consider them proper for making them non-governmental and useful for undesired learning. Considering the long distance of the existing information systems with the desired performance, it is essential that "these systems pay more attention to a more complete and deeper recognition and awareness of users' opinions and requirements in their road. The movement and development is to increase

  17. Recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by medical dispatchers in emergency medical dispatch centres in two countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Andréll, Cecilia; Viereck, Søren

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains low. Early recognition by emergency medical dispatchers is essential for an effective chain of actions, leading to early cardiopulmonary resuscitation, use of an automated external defibrillator and rapid dispatching...... of the emergency medical services. AIM: To analyse and compare the accuracy of OHCA recognition by medical dispatchers in two countries. METHOD: An observational register-based study collecting data from national cardiac arrest registers in Denmark and Sweden during a six-month period in 2013. Data were analysed...... in two steps; registry data were merged with electronically registered emergency call data from the emergency medical dispatch centres in the two regions. Cases with missing or non-OHCA dispatch codes were analysed further by auditing emergency call recordings using a uniform data collection template...

  18. Stainable hepatic iron in 341 African American adults at coroner/medical examiner autopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acton Ronald T

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Results of previous autopsy studies indicate that increased hepatic iron stores or hepatic iron overload is common in African Americans dying in hospitals, but there are no reports of hepatic iron content in other cohorts of African Americans. Methods We investigated the prevalence of heavy liver iron deposition in African American adults. Using established histochemical criteria, we graded Perls' acid ferrocyanide-reactive iron in the hepatocytes and Kupffer cells of 341 consecutive African American adults who were autopsied in the coroner/medical examiner office. Heavy staining was defined as grade 3 or 4 hepatocyte iron or grade 3 Kupffer cell iron. Results There were 254 men and 85 women (mean age ± 1 SD: 44 ± 13 y vs. 48 ± 14 y, respectively; p = 0.0255; gender was unstated or unknown in two subjects. Approximately one-third of subjects died of natural causes. Heavy staining was observed in 10.2% of men and 4.7% of women. 23 subjects had heavy hepatocyte staining only, six had heavy Kupffer cell staining only, and one had a mixed pattern of heavy staining. 15 subjects had histories of chronic alcoholism; three had heavy staining confined to hepatocytes. We analyzed the relationships of three continuous variables (age at death in years, hepatocyte iron grade, Kupffer cell iron grade and two categorical variables (sex, cause of death (natural and non-natural causes in all 341 subjects using a correlation matrix with Bonferroni correction. This revealed two positive correlations: hepatocyte with Kupffer cell iron grades (p Conclusions The present results confirm and extend previous observations that heavy liver iron staining is relatively common in African Americans. The pertinence of these observations to genetic and acquired causes of iron overload in African Americans is discussed.

  19. SPD-based Logistics Management Model of Medical Consumables in Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tongzhu; Shen, Aizong; Hu, Xiaojian; Tong, Guixian; Gu, Wei; Yang, Shanlin

    2016-10-01

    With the rapid development of health services, the progress of medical science and technology, and the improvement of materials research, the consumption of medical consumables (MCs) in medical activities has increased in recent years. However, owing to the lack of effective management methods and the complexity of MCs, there are several management problems including MC waste, low management efficiency, high management difficulty, and frequent medical accidents. Therefore, there is urgent need for an effective logistics management model to handle these problems and challenges in hospitals. We reviewed books and scientific literature (by searching the articles published from 2010 to 2015 in Engineering Village database) to understand supply chain related theories and methods and performed field investigations in hospitals across many cities to determine the actual state of MC logistics management of hospitals in China. We describe the definition, physical model, construction, and logistics operation processes of the supply, processing, and distribution (SPD) of MC logistics because of the traditional SPD model. With the establishment of a supply-procurement platform and a logistics lean management system, we applied the model to the MC logistics management of Anhui Provincial Hospital with good effects. The SPD model plays a critical role in optimizing the logistics procedures of MCs, improving the management efficiency of logistics, and reducing the costs of logistics of hospitals in China.

  20. SPD-based Logistics Management Model of Medical Consumables in Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, Tongzhu; SHEN, Aizong; HU, Xiaojian; TONG, Guixian; GU, Wei; YANG, Shanlin

    2016-01-01

    Background: With the rapid development of health services, the progress of medical science and technology, and the improvement of materials research, the consumption of medical consumables (MCs) in medical activities has increased in recent years. However, owing to the lack of effective management methods and the complexity of MCs, there are several management problems including MC waste, low management efficiency, high management difficulty, and frequent medical accidents. Therefore, there is urgent need for an effective logistics management model to handle these problems and challenges in hospitals. Methods: We reviewed books and scientific literature (by searching the articles published from 2010 to 2015 in Engineering Village database) to understand supply chain related theories and methods and performed field investigations in hospitals across many cities to determine the actual state of MC logistics management of hospitals in China. Results: We describe the definition, physical model, construction, and logistics operation processes of the supply, processing, and distribution (SPD) of MC logistics because of the traditional SPD model. With the establishment of a supply-procurement platform and a logistics lean management system, we applied the model to the MC logistics management of Anhui Provincial Hospital with good effects. Conclusion: The SPD model plays a critical role in optimizing the logistics procedures of MCs, improving the management efficiency of logistics, and reducing the costs of logistics of hospitals in China. PMID:27957435

  1. Blood pressure control at a hospital day clinic - a medical audit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims. To examine prescribing habits and blood pressure control in a hospital day clinic population receiving calcium channel blockers. Setting. King Edward VIII Hospital day clinic, Durban, KwaZulu-Natal. Patients. 200 consecutive patients receiving a regimen containing calcium channel blockers. 190 patients with ...

  2. In-Hospital Formula Supplementation of Healthy Newborns: Practices, Reasons, and Their Medical Justification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boban, Marija; Zakarija-Grković, Irena

    2016-11-01

    In-hospital formula supplementation is a common practice and has been shown to be a strong determinant of shorter exclusive and any breastfeeding. To investigate the reasons for and circumstances in which in-hospital formula supplementation occurs and whether the stated reasons are medically acceptable. This prospective cohort study was conducted among 342 mother-infant pairs from April to July 2011 at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital of Split, Croatia. Data were collected based on "every feed" charts and WHO/UNICEF "Questionnaire for Monitoring Baby-Friendly Hospitals". We used WHO/UNICEF Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative and Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine documents on indications for supplemental feeding. During the first 48 hours and entire hospital stay, 49.5% and 62.8% of infants, respectively, received supplements, given on average 16.68 ± 18.6 hours after delivery. In 94.1% of supplemented infants, healthy newborns were given artificial milk, of which 5.9% of mothers had not been notified. The most common maternal reasons for supplementing were "lack of milk" (49.8%), a "crying baby" (35.5%), "cesarean section" (11.5%), newborn weight loss (10.6%), and sore nipples (10.1%). Of all the given reasons, 24.6% were categorized as being medically acceptable. Primiparas were 1.3 times more likely to supplement in hospital, whereas multiparas were 1.3 times more likely to exclusively breastfeed. In our study, most reasons for formula supplementation of healthy term newborns were not standard acceptable medical reasons, indicating a need for improved maternal support, revision of hospital policies, and training of hospital staff.

  3. Investigating the obstacles and difficulties of using the potentials of medical tourism in Shiraz hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Mooghali

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The tourism industry is one of the greatest professions in the world and the governments have considered it as an important activity to achieve their macroeconomics objectives. One of the branches of this industry is medical tourism. Considering the importance of this issue, this study investigated the obstacles and problems of medical tourism with an adaptive approach between public and private hospitals. Method: This study was cross-sectional, descriptive and analytical. In this study, two tools of checklists and questionnaires in three areas of financial infrastructure, skilled manpower and facilities were used to collect the data. The study population included all senior hospital executives (chairman, manager, matron, the receptionist, clinical supervisor of 14 private hospitals and six governmental hospitals in Shiraz that admit tourists. Results: A total number of 94 subjects participated in the study, of whom 54 (57% were female and 38 (43% were male with a mean age of 47 years and 22.5 years of work experience. The results of the checklist showed that seven private hospitals (50% and four public hospitals (67% had lack of infrastructure. There are significant differences in the number of medical tourists’ admission between private and public hospitals (P=0.001. The results did not show a significant difference between the views of senior executives in private and public hospitals on the effects of these three infrastructures, human resources, financial facilities and equipment on more tourists’ attraction (P=0.077 and P=0.416 and P=0.355. Conclusion: According to the results, admitting foreign patients more frequently occurs in private hospitals due to the presence of famous physicians. It seems that with proper collaboration of some organizations and establishment of health tourism office in these hospitals, including Cultural Heritage and Handicrafts and Tourism, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences and the Governor

  4. Skin Lesions in Kidney Transplant Patients at San Ignacio Medical Hospital in Bogota, Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Cuéllar, Isabel; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Rodríguez, Edna; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; García, Paola; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Hernández, Carolina; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Pinto Ramírez, Jessica Liliana; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Skin diseases are common in postranplant renal patients. It is important to check patients looking for any skin problem to improveearly diagnoses in this group. Aim: To measure the prevalence of cutaneous manifestations in patients with renal transplant at San Ignacio Medical Hospital in Bogota, Colombia.Methods: 86 patients with kidney transplant were evaluated during 2010 and 2011 at the Transplant Unit in San Ignacio Medical Hospital. Diagnosis of cutaneous diseases were made...

  5. Medical Student Performance on the National Board of Medical Examiners Emergency Medicine Advanced Clinical Examination and the National Emergency Medicine M4 Exams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Katherine; House, Joseph; Lawson, Luan; Poznanski, Stacey; Morrissey, Thomas K

    2015-11-01

    In April 2013, the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) released an Advanced Clinical Examination (ACE) in emergency medicine (EM). In addition to this new resource, CDEM (Clerkship Directors in EM) provides two online, high-quality, internally validated examinations. National usage statistics are available for all three examinations, however, it is currently unknown how students entering an EM residency perform as compared to the entire national cohort. This information may help educators interpret examination scores of both EM-bound and non-EM-bound students. The objective of this study was to compare EM clerkship examination performance between students who matched into an EM residency in 2014 to students who did not. We made comparisons were made using the EM-ACE and both versions of the National fourth year medical student (M4) EM examinations. In this retrospective multi-institutional cohort study, the EM-ACE and either Version 1 (V1) or 2 (V2) of the National EM M4 examination was given to students taking a fourth-year EM rotation at five institutions between April 2013 to February 2014. We collected examination performance, including the scaled EM-ACE score, and percent correct on the EM M4 exams, and 2014 NRMP Match status. Student t-tests were performed on the examination averages of students who matched in EM as compared with those who did not. A total of 606 students from five different institutions took both the EM-ACE and one of the EM M4 exams; 94 (15.5%) students matched in EM in the 2014 Match. The mean score for EM-bound students on the EM-ACE, V1 and V2 of the EM M4 exams were 70.9 (n=47, SD=9.0), 84.4 (n=36, SD=5.2), and 83.3 (n=11, SD=6.9), respectively. Mean scores for non-EM-bound students were 68.0 (n=256, SD=9.7), 82.9 (n=243, SD=6.5), and 74.5 (n=13, SD=5.9). There was a significant difference in mean scores in EM-bound and non-EM-bound student for the EM-ACE (p=0.05) and V2 (p<0.01) but not V1 (p=0.18) of the National EM M4

  6. Hospital-acquired acute kidney injury in medical, surgical, and intensive care unit: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T B Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common complication in hospitalized patients. There are few comparative studies on hospital-acquired AKI (HAAKI in medical, surgical, and ICU patients. This study was conducted to compare the epidemiological characteristics, clinical profiles, and outcomes of HAAKI among these three units. All adult patients (>18 years of either gender who developed AKI based on RIFLE criteria (using serum creatinine, 48 h after hospitalization were included in the study. Patients of acute on chronic renal failure and AKI in pregnancy were excluded. Incidence of HAAKI in medical, surgical, and ICU wards were 0.54%, 0.72%, and 2.2% respectively ( P < 0.0001. There was no difference in age distribution among the groups, but onset of HAAKI was earliest in the medical ward ( P = 0.001. RIFLE-R was the most common AKI in medical (39.2% and ICU (50% wards but in the surgical ward, it was RIFLE-F that was most common (52.6%. Acute tubular necrosis was more common in ICU ( P = 0.043. Most common etiology of HAAKI in medical unit was drug induced (39.2%, whereas in surgical and ICU, it was sepsis (34% and 35.2% respectively. Mortality in ICU, surgical and medical units were 73.5%, 43.42%, and 37.2%, respectively ( P = 0.003. Length of hospital stay in surgical, ICU and medical units were different ( P = 0.007. This study highlights that the characters of HAAKI are different in some aspects among different hospital settings.

  7. Ranking Spain's medical schools by their performance in the national residency examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Valcarcel, B G; Ortún, V; Barber, P; Harris, J E; García, B

    2013-12-01

    Medical school graduates in Spain must take a uniform national exam (called "examen MIR") in order to enter postgraduate training in a specialty. Its results offer a unique opportunity to rank medical schools according to this exam. We measured differences in the MIR exam results among Spanish medical schools and assessed the stability of the MIR-based rankings for the period 2003-2011. In the year 2011 a total of 6873 residency positions nationwide were offered by the Spanish Ministry of Health, Social Services and Equality. These positions covered 47 specialties distributed over 231 training centers. A total of 11,550 medical graduates (including 1997 foreign graduates) took the MIR examination. Marked differences among medical schools were evident. The median graduate from medical school #1 and #29 occupied the positions 1477 and 5383, respectively. These figures correspond to a standardized ranking of 21 out of 100 for medical school #1 (that is, 1477/6873; half of medical school #1 obtained better [below position 21%] and half worse [over position 21%] results) and a standardized ranking of 70 out of 100 for medical school #29. While 81% of the medical school #1 graduates were amongst the best 3000 MIR exams and only 5% above the 5000 position the corresponding figures for medical school #29 graduates were 21% and 44%, respectively. The ranking position of the 29 medical schools was very stable between the years 2003 and 2011. There are marked differences in medical schools in Spain and these differences are very consistent over the years 2003-2011. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Use of the National Board of Medical Examiners® Comprehensive Basic Science Exam: survey results of US medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, William S; Baston, Kirk

    2017-01-01

    The National Board of Medical Examiners® (NBME) Comprehensive Basic Science Exam (CBSE) is a subject exam offered to US medical schools, where it has been used for external validation of student preparedness for the United States Medical Licensing Examination® (USMLE) Step 1 in new schools and schools undergoing curricular reform. Information regarding the actual use of the NBME CBSE is limited. Therefore, the aim of the survey was to determine the scope and utilization of the NBME CBSE by US medical schools. A survey was sent in May 2016 to curriculum leadership of the 139 US medical schools listed on the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME®) website with provisional or full accreditation as of February 29, 2016. Responses were received from 53 schools (38% response rate). A series of different follow-up questions were asked if respondents stated "yes" or "no" to the initial question "Does your institution administer the NBME CBSE prior to the USMLE Step 1?". A total of 37 schools (70%) administered the NBME CBSE. In all, 36 of the 37 schools responded to follow-up questions. Of 36 schools, 13 schools (36%) used the NBME CBSE for curriculum modification. Six schools (17%) used the NBME CBSE for formative assessment for a course, and five schools (14%) used the NBME CBSE for summative assessment for a course. A total of 28 schools (78%) used the NBME CBSE for identifying students performing below expectations and providing targeted intervention strategies. In all, 24 schools (67%) of the 36 responding schools administering the NBME CBSE administered the test once prior to the administration of the USMLE Step 1, whereas 10 (28%) schools administered the NBME CBSE two or more times prior to the administration of the USMLE Step 1. Our data suggest that the NBME CBSE is administered by many US medical schools. However, the objective, timing, and number of exams administered vary greatly among schools.

  9. Medical Students' Perception of Educational Environment of Teaching Hospitals of Guilan University of Medical Sciences in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Mehrdad

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: The medical educational environment is increasingly becoming the focus of research globally. It is commonly understood that educational environments are an important factor for efficient learning. The present study was done with the aim to evaluation of clinical phase students' perception of learning environment of our teaching hospital and comparing it with the previous study and other similar studies of other medical teaching centers in Iran and other countries.Methods: The Persian version of DREEM questionnaire was submitted to clinical phase medical students consisted of stagers and interns educating in internal medicine and infectious diseases, dermatology and urology wards rotations of Razi teaching hospital.Results: Among 5 domains,the best scored domain by stagers and interns was “students' perception of teachers” (57.75% and the least scored domain was “student perception of learning“ (52.43%. The total mean score of our study (110.42±19.44 and the mean scores of all 5 domains in our study were higher than previous study. The increase of score in 1 domain: student perception of learning was statistically significant.Conclusions: The present study shows that our clinical educational environment has improved as perceived by medical students in comparison to previous study, but we need more effort to improve our clinical educational environment to approach to other excellent education centers around the world. Keywords: Educational environment, DREEM, medical students

  10. A new method for teaching physical examination to junior medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayma M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Meelad Sayma, Hywel Rhys Williams Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry, Plymouth, UK Introduction: Teaching effective physical examination is a key component in the education of medical students. Preclinical medical students often have insufficient clinical knowledge to apply to physical examination recall, which may hinder their learning when taught through certain understanding-based models. This pilot project aimed to develop a method to teach physical examination to preclinical medical students using “core clinical cases”, overcoming the need for “rote” learning. Methods: This project was developed utilizing three cycles of planning, action, and reflection. Thematic analysis of feedback was used to improve this model, and ensure it met student expectations. Results and discussion: A model core clinical case developed in this project is described, with gout as the basis for a “foot and ankle” examination. Key limitations and difficulties encountered on implementation of this pilot are discussed for future users, including the difficulty encountered in “content overload”. Conclusion: This approach aims to teach junior medical students physical examination through understanding, using a simulated patient environment. Robust research is now required to demonstrate efficacy and repeatability in the physical examination of other systems. Keywords: physical examination, undergraduate, case-based approach 

  11. Time-Course of Cause-Specific Hospital Admissions During Snowstorms: An Analysis of Electronic Medical Records From Major Hospitals in Boston, Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobb, Jennifer F; Ho, Kalon K L; Yeh, Robert W; Harrington, Lori; Zai, Adrian; Liao, Katherine P; Dominici, Francesca

    2017-02-15

    With global climate change, more frequent severe snowstorms are expected; however, evidence regarding their health effects is very limited. We gathered detailed medical records on hospital admissions (n = 433,037 admissions) from the 4 largest hospitals in Boston, Massachusetts, during the winters of 2010-2015. We estimated the percentage increase in hospitalizations for cardiovascular and cold-related diseases, falls, and injuries on the day of and for 6 days after a day with low (0.05-5.0 inches), moderate (5.1-10.0 inches), or high (>10.0 inches) snowfall using distributed lag regression models. We found that cardiovascular disease admissions decreased by 32% on high snowfall days (relative risk (RR) = 0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.54, 0.85) but increased by 23% 2 days after (RR = 1.23, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.49); cold-related admissions increased by 3.7% on high snowfall days (RR = 3.7, 95% CI: 1.6, 8.6) and remained high for 5 days after; and admissions for falls increased by 18% on average in the 6 days after a moderate snowfall day (RR = 1.18, 95% CI: 1.09, 1.27). We did not find a higher risk of hospitalizations for injuries. To our knowledge, this is the first study in which the time course of hospitalizations during and immediately after snowfall days has been examined. These findings can be translated into interventions that prevent hospitalizations and protect public health during harsh winter conditions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Assessment of medical waste management in seven hospitals in Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufunsho Awodele

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical waste (MW can be generated in hospitals, clinics and places where diagnosis and treatment are conducted. The management of these wastes is an issue of great concern and importance in view of potential public health risks associated with such wastes. The study assessed the medical waste management practices in selected hospitals and also determined the impact of Lagos Waste Management Authority (LAWMA intervention programs. A descriptive cross-sectional survey method was used. Methods Data were collected using three instrument (questionnaire, site visitation and in –depth interview. Two public (hospital A, B and five private (hospital C, D, E, F and G which provide services for low, middle and high income earners were used. Data analysis was done with SPSS version 20. Chi-squared test was used to determine level of significance at p < 0.05. Results The majority 56 (53.3 % of the respondents were females with mean age of 35.46 (±1.66 years. The hospital surveyed, except hospital D, disposes both general and medical waste separately. All the facilities have the same process of managing their waste which is segregation, collection/on-site transportation, on-site storage and off–site transportation. Staff responsible for collecting medical waste uses mainly hand gloves as personal protective equipment. The intervention programs helped to ensure compliance and safety of the processes; all the hospitals employ the services of LAWMA for final waste disposal and treatment. Only hospital B offered on-site treatment of its waste (sharps only with an incinerator while LAWMA uses hydroclave to treat its wastes. There are no policies or guidelines in all investigated hospitals for managing waste. Conclusions An awareness of proper waste management amongst health workers has been created in most hospitals through the initiative of LAWMA. However, hospital D still mixes municipal and hazardous wastes. The treatment of waste

  13. Adoption of health information technology for medication safety in U.S. Hospitals, 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Michael F; Raghu, T S; Spaulding, Trent J; Vinze, Ajay

    2008-01-01

    Health information technology (IT) is regarded as an essential tool to improve patient safety, and a range of initiatives to address patient safety are under way. Using data from a comprehensive, national survey from HIMSS Analytics, we analyzed the extent of health IT adoption for medication safety in U.S. hospitals in 2006. Our findings indicate wide variation in health IT adoption by type of technology and geographic location. Hospital size, ownership, teaching status, system membership, payer mix, and accreditation status are associated with health IT adoption, although these relationships differ by type of technology. Hospitals in states with patient safety initiatives have greater adoption rates.

  14. Impact of early in-hospital medication review by clinical pharmacists on health services utilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne M Hohl

    Full Text Available Adverse drug events are a leading cause of emergency department visits and unplanned admissions, and prolong hospital stays. Medication review interventions aim to identify adverse drug events and optimize medication use. Previous evaluations of in-hospital medication reviews have focused on interventions at discharge, with an unclear effect on health outcomes. We assessed the effect of early in-hospital pharmacist-led medication review on the health outcomes of high-risk patients.We used a quasi-randomized design to evaluate a quality improvement project in three hospitals in British Columbia, Canada. We incorporated a clinical decision rule into emergency department triage pathways, allowing nurses to identify patients at high-risk for adverse drug events. After randomly selecting the first eligible patient for participation, clinical pharmacists systematically allocated subsequent high-risk patients to medication review or usual care. Medication review included obtaining a best possible medication history and reviewing the patient's medications for appropriateness and adverse drug events. The primary outcome was the number of days spent in-hospital over 30 days, and was ascertained using administrative data. We used median and inverse propensity score weighted logistic regression modeling to determine the effect of pharmacist-led medication review on downstream health services use.Of 10,807 high-risk patients, 6,416 received early pharmacist-led medication review and 4,391 usual care. Their baseline characteristics were balanced. The median number of hospital days was reduced by 0.48 days (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 0.00 to 0.96; p = 0.058 in the medication review group compared to usual care, representing an 8% reduction in the median length of stay. Among patients under 80 years of age, the median number of hospital days was reduced by 0.60 days (95% CI = 0.06 to 1.17; p = 0.03, representing 11% reduction in the median length of stay

  15. [Quality management of medical laboratory--a survey for National University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Ken; Itoshima, Kouichi

    2012-07-01

    Since ISO (International Organization for Standardization) 15189 for medical laboratories was established in Japan in 2003, 60 medical laboratories had been certified until April 2011. Among them, 10 medical laboratories belong to national university hospitals. To investigate the current status for the development of a quality management system, we carried out a questionnaire survey targeting all national university hospitals. ISO and ISO 15189 have already been introduced in about 70% of all laboratories and 53% are ready to accept them. In medical laboratories that have already accepted ISO 15189, it was suggested that their quality management systems have been functioning effectively and a gradual decrease of the number of the incidents has been confirmed.

  16. Implementing hospital library automation: the GaIN project. Georgia Interactive Network for Medical Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, J A; McInnis, K A; Rosner, A L

    1995-01-01

    The GaIN (Georgia Interactive Network for Medical Information) Hospital Libraries' Local Automation Project was a one-year, grant-funded initiative to implement an integrated library system in three Georgia hospitals. The purpose of the project was to install the library systems, describe the steps in hospital library automation, and identify issues and barriers related to automation in small libraries. The participating hospitals included a small, a medium, and a large institution. The steps and time required for project implementation were documented in order to develop a decision checklist. Although library automation proved a desirable approach for improving collection accessibility, simplifying daily routines, and improving the library's image in the hospital, planners must be sure to consider equipment as well as software support, staffing for the conversion, and training of the library staff and end users. PMID:7581184

  17. Quantifying opportunities for hospital cost control: medical device purchasing and patient discharge planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James C; Brown, Timothy T

    2014-09-01

    To quantify the potential reduction in hospital costs from adoption of best local practices in supply chain management and discharge planning. We performed multivariate statistical analyses of the association between total variable cost per procedure and medical device price and length of stay, controlling for patient and hospital characteristics. Ten hospitals in 1 major metropolitan area supplied patient-level administrative data on 9778 patients undergoing joint replacement, spine fusion, or cardiac rhythm management (CRM) procedures in 2008 and 2010. The impact on each hospital of matching lowest local market device prices and lowest patient length of stay (LOS) was calculated using multivariate regression analysis controlling for patient demographics, diagnoses, comorbidities, and implications. Average variable costs ranged from $11,315 for joint replacement to $16,087 for CRM and $18,413 for spine fusion. Implantable medical devices accounted for a large share of each procedure's variable costs: 44% for joint replacement, 39% for spine fusion, and 59% for CRM. Device prices and patient length-of-stay exhibited wide variation across hospitals. Total potential hospital cost savings from achieving best local practices in device prices and patient length of stay are 14.5% for joint replacement, 18.8% for spine fusion;,and 29.1% for CRM. Hospitals have opportunities for cost reduction from adoption of best local practices in supply chain management and discharge planning.

  18. Touching the private parts: how gender and sexuality norms affect medical students' first pelvic examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörensdotter, Renita; Siwe, Karin

    2016-11-01

    Gynaecologists are in a position to challenge norms about gender and sexuality in relation to female genitals. Through their work they have the opportunity to educate patients, which is why teaching medical students to perform examinations in a gender sensitive way is significant. Medical students performing their first pelvic examination often experience the examination as uncomfortable because it is a body part that is connected to sex and to something private. This paper uses medical students' interpretations of performing their first pelvic examination as a means to discuss how cultural norms for gender, sexuality and female genitals affect these examinations. Issues raised include how cultural connotations of female genitals affect the pelvic examination, how female and male students relate differently to examining female genitals and the interpretations they make in relation to themselves. Findings show that the female genitals are perceived as a special body part connected to sexuality and intimacy. Students' gender also affects the interpretations they make during pelvic examinations. Norms of gender, sexuality and female genitals need to be challenged in the teaching and performance of pelvic examination in order to demystify this experience.

  19. Happy crisis tests hospitals' PR plan. Septuplets' arrival swamps Iowa hospitals with national, international media. Blank Children's Hospital, Iowa Methodist Medical Center, Des Moines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The public relations staff believed the birth of healthy septuplets would become a human interest story for local media. But the staff was stunned at the outpouring of international and national media knocking at their front doors. The staff of both Iowa Methodist Medical Center and Blank Children's Hospital in Des Moines, Iowa, organized a communications plan for 14 official press conferences, constant updates to the media and a website to handle ongoing inquiries from the public. As a result, the story of the McCaughey septuplets was shown in more than 10,000 television stories around the world. The hospitals received more than 36,000 magazine and newspaper articles. The public relations staff not only fielded more than 2,000 phone calls in the days following the Nov. 19 birth, but more than 15 major networks parked their vehicles and satellite dishes in front of the hospital.

  20. Medical identity theft: prevention and reconciliation initiatives at Massachusetts General Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Timothy; Haas, Mark; Lagu, Tara

    2014-07-01

    Medical identity theft refers to the misuse of another individual's identifying medical information to receive medical care. Beyond the financial burden on patients, hospitals, health insurance companies, and government insurance programs, undetected cases pose major patient safety challenges. Inaccuracies in the medical record may persist even after the theft has been identified because of restrictions imposed by patient privacy laws. Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH; Boston) has conducted initiatives to prevent medical identity theft and to better identify and respond to cases when they occur. Since 2007, MGH has used a notification tree to standardize reporting of red flag incidents (warning signs of identity theft, such as suspicious personal identifiers or account activity). A Data Integrity Dashboard allows for tracking and reviewing of all potential incidents of medical identity theft to detect trends and targets for mitigation. An identity-checking policy, VERI-(Verify Everyone's Identity) Safe Patient Care, requires photo identification at every visit and follow-up if it is not provided. Data from MGH suggest that an estimated 120 duplicate medical records are created each month, 25 patient encounters are likely tied to identity theft or fraud each quarter, and 14 patients are treated under the wrong medical record number each year. As of December 2013, 80%-85% of patients were showing photo identification at appointments. Although an organization's policy changes and educational campaigns can improve detection and reconciliation of medical identity theft cases, national policies should be implemented to streamline the process of correcting errors in medical records, reduce the financial disincentive for hospitals to detect and report cases, and create a single point of entry to reduce the burden on individuals and providers to reconcile cases.

  1. Pharmaceutical interventions in medications prescribed for administration via enteral tubes in a teaching hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Justus Buhrer Ferreira Neto; Caroline Koga Plodek; Franciny Kossemba Soares; Rayza Assis de Andrade; Fernanda Teleginski; Maria Dagmar da Rocha

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze the impact of guidelines regarding errors in medications prescribed for administration through enteral tubes. Method: quantitative study, in three phases, undertaken in internal medicine, neurology and an intensive care unit in a general teaching hospital. In Phase 1, the following was undertaken: a protocol for dilution and unit-dose repackaging and administration for 294 medications via enteral tubes; a decision flowchart; operational-standard procedures f...

  2. Improving Bar Code Medication Administration Compliance in a Community Hospital Through a Nursing Leadership Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ornum, Michael

    2018-01-09

    Achieving optimal compliance for bar code medication administration (BCMA) in mature medication use systems is challenging due to the iterative system refinements over time. A nursing leadership initiative increased BCMA compliance, measured as a composite across all hospital units, from 95% to 98%, discovering unanticipated benefits and unintended consequences in the process. The methodology used provides valuable insight into effective strategies for BCMA optimization with applicability for other, similar quality improvement initiatives.

  3. Antibiogram of Medical Intensive Care Unit at Tertiary Care Hospital Setting of Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Qadeer, Aayesha; Akhtar, Aftab; Ain, Qurat Ul; Saadat, Shoab; Mansoor, Salman; Assad, Salman; Ishtiaq, Wasib; Ilyas, Abid; Khan, Ali Y; Ajam, Yousaf

    2016-01-01

    Objective:?To determine the frequency of micro-organisms causing sepsis as well as to determine the antibiotic susceptibility and resistance of microorganisms isolated in a?medical intensive care unit. Materials and methods:?This is a?cross-sectional analysis of 802 patients from a?medical intensive care unit (ICU) of Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan over a one-year period from August 2015 to August 2016. Specimens collected were from blood, urine, endotracheal secretions, ca...

  4. An effective intervention to improve the cleanliness of medical lead clothes in an orthopedic specialized hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Xu, YingJun; Zhang, Fengxia; Yang, Qingfeng; Yuan, Juxiang

    2016-11-01

    Dirty medical lead clothes, contaminated with blood or other infected material, may carry ongoing bioburden, which increase the risk of hospital-acquired infection. In this study, we investigated medical lead clothes contamination levels and assessed the effectiveness of the intervention that was constructed to improve the cleanliness of lead clothes. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of interventions designed to reduce medication administration errors in hospitals: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keers, Richard N; Williams, Steven D; Cooke, Jonathan; Walsh, Tanya; Ashcroft, Darren M

    2014-05-01

    There is a need to identify effective interventions to minimize the threat posed by medication administration errors (MAEs). Our objective was to review and critically appraise interventions designed to reduce MAEs in the hospital setting. Ten electronic databases were searched between 1985 and November 2013. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled trials (CTs) reporting rates of MAEs or related adverse drug events between an intervention group and a comparator group were included. Data from each study were independently extracted and assessed for potential risk of bias by two authors. Risk ratios (RRs, with 95 % confidence intervals [CIs]) were used to examine the effect of an intervention. Six RCTs and seven CTs were included. Types of interventions clustered around four main themes: medication use technology (n = 4); nurse education and training (n = 3); changing practice in anesthesia (n = 2); and ward system changes (n = 4). Reductions in MAE rates were reported by five studies; these included automated drug dispensing (RR 0.72, 95 % CI 0.53-1.00), computerized physician order entry (RR 0.51, 95 % 0.40-0.66), barcode-assisted medication administration with electronic administration records (RR 0.71, 95 % CI 0.53-0.95), nursing education/training using simulation (RR 0.17, 95 % CI 0.08-0.38), and clinical pharmacist-led training (RR 0.76, 95 % CI 0.67-0.87). Increased or equivocal outcome rates were found for the remaining studies. Weaknesses in the internal or external validity were apparent for most included studies. Theses and conference proceedings were excluded and data produced outside commercial publishing were not searched. There is emerging evidence of the impact of specific interventions to reduce MAEs in hospitals, which warrant further investigation using rigorous and standardized study designs. Theory-driven efforts to understand the underlying causes of MAEs may lead to more effective interventions in the future.

  6. Development and validation of a musculoskeletal physical examination decision-making test for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Julie Y; Awan, Hisham M; Rowley, David M; Nagel, Rollin W

    2013-01-01

    Despite a renewed emphasis among educators, musculoskeletal education is still lacking in medical school and residency training programs. We created a musculoskeletal multiple-choice physical examination decision-making test to assess competency and physical examination knowledge of our trainees. We developed a 20-question test in musculoskeletal physical examination decision-making test with content that most medical students and orthopedic residents should know. All questions were reviewed by ratings of US orthopedic chairmen. It was administered to postgraduate year 2 to 5 orthopedic residents and 2 groups of medical students: 1 group immediately after their 3-week musculoskeletal course and the other 1 year after the musculoskeletal course completion. We hypothesized that residents would score highest, medical students 1 year post-musculoskeletal training lowest, and students immediately post-musculoskeletal training midrange. We administered an established cognitive knowledge test to compare student knowledge base as we expected the scores to correlate. Academic medical center in the Midwestern United States. Orthopedic residents, chairmen, and medical students. Fifty-four orthopedic chairmen (54 of 110 or 49%) responded to our survey, rating a mean overall question importance of 7.12 (0 = Not Important; 5 = Important; 10 = Very Important). Mean physical examination decision-making scores were 89% for residents, 77% for immediate post-musculoskeletal trained medical students, and 59% 1 year post-musculoskeletal trained medical students (F = 42.07, p<0.001). The physical examination decision-making test was found to be internally consistent (Kuder-Richardson Formula 20 = 0.69). The musculoskeletal cognitive knowledge test was 78% for immediate post-musculoskeletal trained students and 71% for the 1 year post-musculoskeletal trained students. The student physical examination and cognitive knowledge scores were correlated (r = 0.54, p<0.001), but were not

  7. Impact of supply problems of preservative-free glaucoma medications on patients and hospital staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shima; Theodossiades, Julia; Chapman, Kristin; Murdoch, Ian

    2015-03-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic ocular disease, which is usually managed with long-term daily medical therapy, in the form of eye drops. Patients who are intolerant to preservatives in topical medicines require preservative-free versions. From early 2011 patients attending Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, UK, started to report recurring problems with the supply of the following preservative-free glaucoma medications: Timolol 0.25% (Timoptol 0.25%, MSD UK); Dorzolamide (Trusopt, MSD UK); Dorzolamide and Timolol 0.5% (Cosopt, MSD UK). This study investigates the impact of the supply problems of these medications at Moorfields Eye Hospital from a patient, administrative and clinical perspective. Information was sought by interviewing both patients and hospital staff, and by a retrospective case note review between April 2010 and May 2013. Many hospital roles, both administrative and clinical, were involved in attempting to resolve the impact of the supply problems. All staff reported a considerable increase in their workload. At the peak of the problem, the glaucoma secretaries received about 150 enquiries per week. A review of 83 sets of patient notes, retrieved from a random sample of 125 patients, showed that 22% encountered a supply problem. Of these, more than one-third attended Moorfields Eye Hospital Accident & Emergency (A&E) for repeat supplies and 89% eventually had their medication changed. In telephone interviews with 39 of a random sample of 50 patients (a subset of the 83 notes retrieved), 59% of the interviewees reported a supply problem. Of these, one-third attended Moorfields Eye Hospital A&E for repeat supplies and half eventually required an alternative medication. Some patients reported going to considerable lengths to obtain ongoing supplies in the community. This study shows that medication supply problems can have a major impact on patients and hospital services. Supply problems occur across many fields of medicine and with increasing frequency. The

  8. The Assessment of Undergraduate Medical Students’ Satisfaction Levels With the Objective Structured Clinical Examination

    OpenAIRE

    Khosravi Khorashad, Ahmad; Salari, Somayyeh; Baharvahdat, Humain; Hejazi, Sepideh; Lari, Shiva M; Salari, Maasoomeh; Mazloomi, Maryam; Shahrzad M.Lari

    2014-01-01

    Background: The objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) has been introduced as an efficient method for the assessment of medical students. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to determine the satisfaction level of undergraduate medical students of internal medicine department with the OSCE. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study, performed on all available undergraduate students at the end of their internal medicine training period in Mashhad Uni...

  9. The mediators of minority ethnic underperformance in final medical school examinations

    OpenAIRE

    Woolf, K.; McManus, I. C.; Potts, H. W. W.; Dacre, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: UK-trained medical students and doctors from minority ethnic groups underperform academically. It is unclear why this problem exists, which makes it difficult to know how to address it. Aim: Investigate whether demographic and psychological factors mediate the relationship between ethnicity and final examination scores. Sample: Two consecutive cohorts of Year 5 (final year) UCL Medical School students (n=703; 51% minority ethnic). 587 (83%) had previously completed a questionnaire...

  10. Medical leadership, a systematic narrative review: do hospitals and healthcare organisations perform better when led by doctors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay-Williams, Robyn; Ludlow, Kristiana; Testa, Luke; Li, Zhicheng; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2017-09-24

    Despite common assumptions that doctors are well placed to lead hospitals and healthcare organisations, the peer-reviewed literature contains little evidence on the performance of doctors in leadership roles in comparison with that of non-medical managers. To determine whether there is an association between the leader's medical background and management performance in terms of organisational performance or patient outcomes. We searched for peer-reviewed, English language studies using Medline, Embase and Emerald Management between 2005 and 2017. We included quantitative, qualitative and mixed method empirical studies on the performance of senior healthcare managers where participants were described as doctors or leaders and where comparative performance data were provided on non-medical leaders. Studies without full text available, or no organisational, leadership behaviour or patient measures, were excluded. The search, conducted in Medline (n=3395), Embase (n=1913) and Emerald Management (n=454) databases, yielded 3926 entries. After the application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, 16 studies remained. Twelve studies found that there were positive differences between medical and non-medical leaders, and eight studies correlated those findings with hospital performance or patient outcomes. Six studies examined the composition of boards of directors; otherwise, there were few common areas of investigation. Five inter-related themes emerged from a narrative analysis: the impact of medical leadership on outcomes; doctors on boards; contribution of qualifications and experience; the medical leader as an individual or part of a team and doctors transitioning into the medical leadership role. A modest body of evidence supports the importance of including doctors on organisational governing boards. Despite many published articles on the topic of whether hospitals and healthcare organisations perform better when led by doctors, there were few empirical studies that

  11. Out-of-hospital medication errors: a 6-year analysis of the national poison data system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kanan; Barker, Kimberly A

    2009-11-01

    Previous research and reporting has focused on the incidence and prevention of medication errors in the hospital setting; however, no previous study has reported the frequencies, characteristics and outcomes of out-of-hospital medication (OHME) errors. Data from the National Poison Data System (NPDS) was collected for 2000-2005 and information regarding out-of-hospital medication errors reported to Poison Control Centers (PCC) was collected by a trained investigator. From 2000-2005 there were 1,166,116 OHME reported to PCC. Of these patients, 88,451 (7.5%) received medical evaluation by a healthcare provided and 229 (0.01%) deaths reported. The most common drug classes involved included cough/cold medications, analgesics, cardiovascular agents, antihistamines, antidepressants and antimicrobial agents. The most common error reported in both children and adults was taking or giving medication twice. OHME occur frequently and the NPDS may be a useful resource for data collection and evaluation in this previously overlooked population. The majority of OHME reported did not result in any significant morbidity or mortality and were managed at home without need for healthcare referrral. Further study of OHME is needed, and in particular whether healthcare professionals can target educational instruction to patients so as to effectively reduce the frequency of the most common or injurious errors. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Quality of medication information in discharge summaries from hospitals: an audit of electronic patient records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Beate Hennie; Djønne, Berit Svendsen; Skjold, Frode; Mellingen, Ellen Marie; Aag, Trine Iversen

    2017-12-01

    Background Low quality of medication information in discharge summaries from hospitals may jeopardize optimal therapy and put the patient at risk for medication errors and adverse drug events. Objective To audit the quality of medication information in discharge summaries and explore factors associated with the quality. Setting Helgelandssykehuset Mo i Rana, a rural hospital in central Norway. Method For each month in 2013, we randomly selected 60 discharge summaries from the Department of Medicine and Surgery (totally 720) and evaluated the medication information using eight Norwegian quality criteria. Main outcome measure Mean score per discharge summary ranging from 0 (lowest quality) to 16 (highest quality). Results Mean score per discharge summary was 7.4 (SD 2.8; range 0-14), significantly higher when evaluating medications used regularly compared to mediations used as needed (7.80 vs. 6.52; p quality criteria concerning generic names, indications for medication use, reasons why changes had been made and information about the source for information. Factors associated with increased quality scores are increasing numbers of medications and male patients. Increasing age seemed to be associated with a reduced score, while type of department was not associated with the quality. Conclusion In discharge summaries from 2013, we identified a low quality of medication information in accordance with the Norwegian quality criteria. Actions for improvement are necessary and follow-up studies to monitor quality are needed.

  13. Evaluating the quality of interaction between medical students and nurses in a large teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cushing Herbert E

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective health care depends on multidisciplinary collaboration and teamwork, yet little is known about how well medical students and nurses interact in the hospital environment, where physicians-in-training acquire their first experiences as members of the health care team. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of interaction between third-year medical students and nurses during clinical rotations. Methods We surveyed 268 Indiana University medical students and 175 nurses who worked at Indiana University Hospital, the School's chief clinical training site. The students had just completed their third year of training. The survey instrument consisted of 7 items that measured "relational coordination" among members of the health care team, and 9 items that measured psychological distress. Results Sixty-eight medical students (25.4% and 99 nurses (56.6% completed the survey. The relational coordination score (ranked 1 to 5, low to high, which provides an overall measure of interaction quality, showed that medical students interacted with residents the best (4.16 and with nurses the worst (2.98; p Conclusion The quality of interaction between medical students and nurses during third-year clinical rotations is poor, which suggests that medical students are not receiving the sorts of educational experiences that promote optimal physician-nurse collaboration. Medical students and nurses experience different levels of psychological distress, which may adversely impact the quality of their interaction.

  14. Technology-related medication errors in a tertiary hospital: a 5-year analysis of reported medication incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaranayake, N R; Cheung, S T D; Chui, W C M; Cheung, B M Y

    2012-12-01

    Healthcare technology is meant to reduce medication errors. The objective of this study was to assess unintended errors related to technologies in the medication use process. Medication incidents reported from 2006 to 2010 in a main tertiary care hospital were analysed by a pharmacist and technology-related errors were identified. Technology-related errors were further classified as socio-technical errors and device errors. This analysis was conducted using data from medication incident reports which may represent only a small proportion of medication errors that actually takes place in a hospital. Hence, interpretation of results must be tentative. 1538 medication incidents were reported. 17.1% of all incidents were technology-related, of which only 1.9% were device errors, whereas most were socio-technical errors (98.1%). Of these, 61.2% were linked to computerised prescription order entry, 23.2% to bar-coded patient identification labels, 7.2% to infusion pumps, 6.8% to computer-aided dispensing label generation and 1.5% to other technologies. The immediate causes for technology-related errors included, poor interface between user and computer (68.1%), improper procedures or rule violations (22.1%), poor interface between user and infusion pump (4.9%), technical defects (1.9%) and others (3.0%). In 11.4% of the technology-related incidents, the error was detected after the drug had been administered. A considerable proportion of all incidents were technology-related. Most errors were due to socio-technical issues. Unintended and unanticipated errors may happen when using technologies. Therefore, when using technologies, system improvement, awareness, training and monitoring are needed to minimise medication errors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The experience of the Forensic Anthropology Service of the Medical Examiner's Office in Porto Alegre, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Márcia; Benfica, Francisco Silveira

    2008-08-06

    The Forensic Anthropology Service of the Medical Examiner's Office of Porto Alegre was created in September 1997 to examine human skeletons, establish identification and identify lesions that may explain death. From September 1997 to December 2006, 344 skeletons were examined (mean: 37 examinations/year), and 322 were human remains. Most skeletal remains belonged to men (61%) whose age was estimated at 21-50 years (61%). The most frequent bone lesions were caused by fractures (71%), firearm projectiles (11%) and the effects of weather (10%). Antemortem bone changes due to consolidated fractures, degenerative bone processes, congenital bone diseases, and medical procedures were found in 38 skeletal remains (14%). Identification was possible in 83 cases (26%); of these, 78% were identified by DNA analysis, 16% by dental examination, and 6% by anatomic changes associated with healed fractures.

  16. Physician complicity in misrepresentation and omission of evidence of torture in postdetention medical examinations in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacopino, V; Heisler, M; Pishevar, S; Kirschner, R H

    1996-08-07

    Between June 1994 and October 1995, representatives of Physicians for Human Rights studied the problem of physician complicity in torture (ie, misrepresentation and omission of medical evidence in postdetention examinations of detainees) in Turkey. The research consisted of a survey of forensic documentation of torture, interviews with individual physicians who examine detainees, analyses of official medical reports of detainees, and interviews with survivors of torture. Results from the survey, interviews, and medical report analyses provide evidence that torture of political and criminal detainees continues to occur in Turkey and that Turkish physicians are coerced to ignore, misrepresent, and omit evidence of torture in their examinations of detainees to certify that there are no physical signs of torture.

  17. [Evolution of worker's health in the social security medical examination in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto Júnior, Afrânio Gomes; Braga, Ana Maria Cheble Bahia; Roselli-Cruz, Amadeu

    2012-10-01

    In order to analyze the practice of the social security medical examination starting from the introduction of the worker's health paradigms, data was gathered on the granting of social security disability benefits to assess worker illness based on notification of work-related accidents in the cement industries of Rio de Janeiro. From 2007 to 2009 there was only one notification, which involved a worker handling toxic waste instead of the energy matrix. However, the analysis revealed sources and mechanisms of illness overlooked in the social security medical examination, which is still focused on the one-cause-only logic of occupational medicine. To achieve the worker's health paradigms, changes are required to alter the way of conducting the social security medical examination, by re-establishing partnerships, training human resources, adopting epidemiological indicators, as well as setting and assessing social security goals that transcend the mere granting of disability benefits.

  18. Medical psychology services in dutch general hospitals: state of the art developments and recommendations for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soons, Paul; Denollet, Johan

    2009-06-01

    In this article an overview is presented of the emergence of medical psychology in the care of somatically ill patients. The situation in the Netherlands can be considered as prototypical. For 60 years, clinical psychologists have been working in general, teaching and academic hospitals. Nowadays, they are an integrated non-medical specialism working in the medical setting of hospitals in the Netherlands, and are a full-member of the medical board. This paper discusses several topics: the position of the general hospital in the health care system in the Netherlands, the emergence of medical psychology in Dutch hospitals, the role of the professional association of medical psychologists, and the characteristics of patients seen by clinical psychologists. Following the discussion about the situation of medical psychology in other countries, recommendations are formulated for the further development of medical psychology in the Netherlands as well as in other countries.

  19. Preventing hospital admissions by reviewing medication (PHARM) in primary care : an open controlled study in an elderly population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leendertse, A. J.; de Koning, G. H. P.; Goudswaard, A. N.; Belitser, S. V.; Verhoef, M.; de Gier, H. J.; Egberts, A. C. G.; van den Bemt, P. M. L. A.

    2013-01-01

    What is known and objective Limited and conflicting evidence exists on the effect of a multicomponent pharmaceutical care intervention (i.e. medication review, involving collaboration between general practitioners (GPs), pharmacists and patients) on medication-related hospitalizations, survival,

  20. Medication reconciliation errors in a tertiary care hospital in Saudi Arabia: admission discrepancies and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhar, Faizan; Akram, Shahzad; Al-Osaimi, Yousif A; Haider, Nafis

    2017-01-01

    Medication reconciliation is a major component of safe patient care. One of the main problems in the implementation of a medication reconciliation process is the lack of human resources. With limited resources, it is better to target medication reconciliation resources to patients who will derive the most benefit from it. The primary objective of this study was to determine the frequency and types of medication reconciliation errors identified by pharmacists performing medication reconciliation at admission. Each medication error was rated for its potential to cause patient harm during hospitalization. A secondary objective was to determine risk factors associated with medication reconciliation errors. This was a prospective, single-center pilot study conducted in the internal medicine and surgical wards of a tertiary care teaching hospital in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia. A clinical pharmacist took the best possible medication history of patients admitted to medical and surgical services and compared with the medication orders at hospital admission; any identified discrepancies were noted and analyzed for reconciliation errors. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine the risk factors related to reconciliation errors. A total of 328 patients (138 in surgical and 198 in medical) were included in the study. For the 1419 medications recorded, 1091 discrepancies were discovered out of which 491 (41.6%) were reconciliation errors. The errors affected 177 patients (54%). The incidence of reconciliation errors in the medical patient group was 25.1% and 32.0% in the surgical group (perror was the omission (43.5% and 51.2%). Lipid-lowering (12.4%) and antihypertensive agents were most commonly involved. If undetected, 43.6% of order errors were rated as potentially requiring increased monitoring or intervention to preclude harm; 17.7% were rated as potentially harmful. A multivariate logistic regression model showed that patients aged ≥65 years

  1. Medication reconciliation errors in a tertiary care hospital in Saudi Arabia: admission discrepancies and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazhar F

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medication reconciliation is a major component of safe patient care. One of the main problems in the implementation of a medication reconciliation process is the lack of human resources. With limited resources, it is better to target medication reconciliation resources to patients who will derive the most benefit from it. Objective: The primary objective of this study was to determine the frequency and types of medication reconciliation errors identified by pharmacists performing medication reconciliation at admission. Each medication error was rated for its potential to cause patient harm during hospitalization. A secondary objective was to determine risk factors associated with medication reconciliation errors. Methods: This was a prospective, single-center pilot study conducted in the internal medicine and surgical wards of a tertiary care teaching hospital in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia. A clinical pharmacist took the best possible medication history of patients admitted to medical and surgical services and compared with the medication orders at hospital admission; any identified discrepancies were noted and analyzed for reconciliation errors. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine the risk factors related to reconciliation errors. Results: A total of 328 patients (138 in surgical and 198 in medical were included in the study. For the 1419 medications recorded, 1091 discrepancies were discovered out of which 491 (41.6% were reconciliation errors. The errors affected 177 patients (54%. The incidence of reconciliation errors in the medical patient group was 25.1% and 32.0% in the surgical group (p<0.001. In both groups, the most frequent reconciliation error was the omission (43.5% and 51.2%. Lipid-lowering (12.4% and antihypertensive agents were most commonly involved. If undetected, 43.6% of order errors were rated as potentially requiring increased monitoring or intervention to preclude harm; 17

  2. Doctors' use of electronic medical records systems in hospitals: cross sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lærum, Hallvard; Ellingsen, Gunnar; Faxvaag, Arild

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To compare the use of three electronic medical records systems by doctors in Norwegian hospitals for general clinical tasks. Design Cross sectional questionnaire survey. Semistructured telephone interviews with key staff in information technology in each hospital for details of local implementation of the systems. Setting 32 hospital units in 19 Norwegian hospitals with electronic medical records systems. Participants 227 (72%) of 314 hospital doctors responded, equally distributed between the three electronic medical records systems. Main outcome measures Proportion of respondents who used the electronic system, calculated for each of 23 tasks; difference in proportions of users of different systems when functionality of systems was similar. Results Most tasks listed in the questionnaire (15/23) were generally covered with implemented functions in the electronic medical records systems. However, the systems were used for only 2-7 of the tasks, mainly associated with reading patient data. Respondents showed significant differences in frequency of use of the different systems for four tasks for which the systems offered equivalent functionality. The respondents scored highly in computer literacy (72.2/100), and computer use showed no correlation with respondents' age, sex, or work position. User satisfaction scores were generally positive (67.2/100), with some difference between the systems. Conclusions Doctors used electronic medical records systems for far fewer tasks than the systems supported. What is already known on this topicElectronic information systems in health care have not undergone systematic evaluation, and few comparisons between electronic medical records systems have been madeGiven the information intensive nature of clinical work, electronic medical records systems should be of help to doctors for most clinical tasksWhat this study addsDoctors in Norwegian hospitals reported a low level of use of all electronic medical records systems

  3. HISTOPATHOLOGICAL PROFILE OF LIVER LESIONS IN AUTOPSY EXAMINATION- A HOSPITAL-BASED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratan Konjengbam

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Liver is the main site of various primary and secondary diseases including variety of external agents. Most of the chronic liver diseases remained asymptomatic even in the late stage. In apparently healthy persons, many liver lesions are detected incidentally following a postmortem examination. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study was done for a period of 5 years in a tertiary hospital to evaluate the histopathological profile of liver specimen in autopsy examination. Haematoxylin and Eosin sections of liver specimen were studied. A total of 352 samples were evaluated with male predominates the female sex in the ratio of 5.2:1. RESULTS The most common lesion was fatty liver (19% followed by cirrhosis (11.8%, venous congestion (11.5%, portal triaditis (10.9%, chronic hepatitis (6.2%, granulomatous hepatitis (2.1%, autolysis (16% and others (0.96%. Liver finding was normal in 14% of the cases. CONCLUSION Silent liver diseases are a quite regular finding in autopsy cases and thereby may implicate a common occurrence in general population. Autopsy examination of liver is a must for detection of silent liver diseases like fatty change, cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis.

  4. [Demand for neuropediatric services at a general referral hospital. IV. Psychomotor development and physical examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pisón, J; Baldellou, A; Rebage, V; Arana, T; Lobera, M P; Peña-Segura, J L

    1997-12-01

    Diagnosis in neuropediatrics requires a detailed personal and family history and thorough physical examination. In this paper we study the psychomotor development and physical examination of children evaluated during a 5 year period, from May 1990 to May 1995 by a neuropediatrician newly appointed to the Hospital Miguel Servet in Zaragoza, which previously did not have such a specialist. Psychomotor retardation was seen in 19% of the children. In 50% of the children evaluated, significant data was obtained from the physical examination. The commonest finding, observed in 14% of the children, was of anomalous behaviour or an impression of mental deficiency. In decreasing order of frequency other data were: Diffuse pyramidal involvement, cranial nerve involvement, anomalous phenotype, microcephaly, microsomy, signs of neuromuscular involvement, hemiparesia, macrocephaly, skin markings, scoliosis, signs of extrapyramidal involvement, signs of cerebellar involvement, macrosomy and sensory disorders. Diagnosis in neuropediatrics is directed or established, sometimes exclusively, by an extensive personal and family history and adequate interpretation of this, which in the end depends on the skill of the clinician.

  5. "PERLE bedside-examination-course for candidates in state examination" - Developing a training program for the third part of medical state examination (oral examination with practical skills).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthaus, Anne; Schmidt, Anita

    2016-01-01

    In preparation for the state examination, many students have open questions and a need for advice. Tutors of the Skills Lab PERLE-"Praxis ERfahren und Lernen" (experiencing and learning practical skills) have developed a new course concept to provide support and practical assistance for the examinees. The course aims to familiarize the students with the exam situation in order to gain more confidence. This enables the students to experience a confrontation with the specific situation of the exam in a protected environment. Furthermore, soft skills are utilized and trained. Concept of the course: The course was inspired by the OSCE-model (Objective Structured Clinical Examination), an example for case-based learning and controlling. Acquired knowledge can be revised and extended through the case studies. Experienced tutors provide assistance in discipline-specific competencies, and help in organizational issues such as dress code and behaviour. Evaluation of the course: An evaluation was conducted by the attending participants after every course. Based on this assessment, the course is constantly being developed. In March, April and October 2015 six courses, with a total of 84 participants, took place. Overall 76 completed questionnaires (91%) were analysed. Strengths of the course are a good tutor-participants-ratio with 1:4 (1 Tutor provides guidance for 4 participants), the interactivity of the course, and the high flexibility in responding to the group's needs. Weaknesses are the tight schedule, and the currently not yet performed evaluation before and after the course. In terms of "best practise", this article shows an example of how to offer low-cost and low-threshold preparation for the state examination.

  6. Routine clinical heart examinations using SQUID magnetocardiography at University of Tsukuba Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, T.; Nakazawa, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Kato, Y.; Hattori, A.; Kimura, T.; Hoshi, T.; Ishizu, T.; Seo, Y.; Sato, A.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Nogami, A.; Watanabe, S.; Horigome, H.; Kawakami, Y.; Aonuma, K.

    2017-11-01

    A 64-channel Nb-based DC-SQUID magnetocardiography (MCG) system was installed at the University of Tsukuba Hospital (UTH) in March 2007 after obtaining Japanese pharmaceutical approval and insurance reimbursement approval. In the period between 2008 and 2016, the total number of patients was 10 085. The heart diseases diagnosed in fetuses as well as adults are mainly atrial arrhythmia, abnormal repolarization, ventricular arrhythmia, and fetal arrhythmia. In most cases of insufficient diagnostic accuracy with electrocardiography, SQUID MCG precisely revealed these heart diseases as an abnormal electrical current distribution. Based on success in routine examinations, SQUID MCG is now an indispensable clinical instrument with diagnostic software tuned up during routine use at UTH.

  7. Medical leaders or masters??A systematic review of medical leadership in hospital settings

    OpenAIRE

    Berghout, Mathilde A.; Fabbricotti, Isabelle N.; Martina Buljac-Samardžić; Hilders, Carina G. J. M.

    2017-01-01

    textabstractMedical leadership is increasingly considered as crucial for improving the quality of care and the sustainability of healthcare. However, conceptual clarity is lacking in the literature and in practice. Therefore, a systematic review of the scientific literature was conducted to reveal the different conceptualizations of medical leadership in terms of definitions, roles and activities, and personal-and context-specific features. Eight databases were systematically searched for eli...

  8. Assessing medication adherence and healthcare utilization and cost patterns among hospital-discharged patients with schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karve, Sudeep; Markowitz, Michael; Fu, Dong-Jing; Lindenmayer, Jean-Pierre; Wang, Chi-Chuan; Candrilli, Sean D; Alphs, Larry

    2014-06-01

    Hospital-discharged patients with schizoaffective disorder have a high risk of re-hospitalization. However, limited data exist evaluating critical post-discharge periods during which the risk of re-hospitalization is significant. Among hospital-discharged patients with schizoaffective disorder, we assessed pharmacotherapy adherence and healthcare utilization and costs during sequential 60-day clinical periods before schizoaffective disorder-related hospitalization and post-hospital discharge. From the MarketScan(®) Medicaid database (2004-2008), we identified patients (≥18 years) with a schizoaffective disorder-related inpatient admission. Study measures including medication adherence and healthcare utilization and costs were assessed during sequential preadmission and post-discharge periods. We conducted univariate and multivariable regression analyses to compare schizoaffective disorder-related and all-cause healthcare utilization and costs (in 2010 US dollars) between each adjacent 60-day post-discharge periods. No adjustment was made for multiplicity. We identified 1,193 hospital-discharged patients with a mean age of 41 years. The mean medication adherence rate was 46% during the 60-day period prior to index inpatient admission, which improved to 80% during the 60-day post-discharge period. Following hospital discharge, schizoaffective disorder-related healthcare costs were significantly greater during the initial 60-day period compared with the 61- to 120-day post-discharge period (mean US$2,370 vs US$1,765; p schizoaffective disorder-related costs declined during the 61- to 120-day post-discharge period and remained stable for the remaining post-discharge periods (days 121-365). We observed considerably lower (46%) adherence during 60 days prior to the inpatient admission; in comparison, adherence for the overall 6-month period was 8% (54%) higher. Our study findings suggest that both short-term (e.g., 60 days) and long-term (e.g., 6-12 months) medication

  9. [Comparison of medical ethical competencies of pregraduate third and sixth year students during their internal medical hospital rotations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrier, J H; Brazeau-Lamontagne, L; Pottier, P; Boutoille, D

    2005-02-01

    The study looks for medical students ethical understanding during their internal medicine hospital rotations. As a secondary purpose, the study screens if internal medicine ward provides an environment appropriate for pregraduate medical students ethical training. Retrospective analysis and comparison of logbook writings from 2 different pregraduate groups of students : Group A = 29, third year medical students and Group B = 28, sixth year medical students, (that is last year pre-graduation). The task instructions were the same for the two groups : to identify and to analyse an ethical problem personally witnessed on the ward and to propose a solution either local or personal. Cognitive semantic units (CSU) were first drawn from the writings then subsequently analysed through two grids 1* according to fundamental principles (P) and 2* according to professional responsibilities (R). Students from group A produced a mean of 13,7 CSU per writing (total of 396 CSU) and those from Group B, 7,3. (total of 205 CSU) ; significant difference with P ethical dilemma itself and outbreaking it in (P) and (R) items and articulating solutions were significantly different between the 2 groups(P ethical issues. There is an erosion of clinical ethical sensitivity during pregraduate training. This study shows that internal medicine hospital rotation provides enough opportunities (both in number and in variety) to promote keen clinical ethical learning.

  10. Supervising nursing students in a technology-driven medication administration process in a hospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaard, Mette; Orbæk, Janne

    2016-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to identify, describe and synthesize the experiences of nurse supervisors and the factors that influence the supervision of pre-graduate nursing students in undertaking technology-driven medication administration in hospital settings...

  11. Cost-effectiveness of an electronic medication ordering system (CPOE/CDSS) in hospitalized patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, K. M.; van Doormaal, J. E.; Zaal, R. J.; Mol, P. G. M.; Lenderink, A. W.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F. M.; Kosterink, J. G. W.; van den Bemt, P. M. L. A.

    Introduction: Prescribing medication is an important aspect of almost all in-hospital treatment regimes. Besides their obviously beneficial effects, medicines can also cause adverse drug events (ADE), which increase morbidity, mortality and health care costs. Partially, these ADEs arise from

  12. Positioning academic medical centers and teaching hospitals to thrive in the next decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D E

    1985-06-01

    Market share for academic medical centers and teaching hospitals will decline over the next five years necessitating new strategies to ensure growth and profitability. These types of institutions are, however, in a strong position to compete and gain market share locally by building a defensible competitive advantage. This article offers three avenues for increasing market share: networking, brand name product differentiation, and business diversification.

  13. Disease patterns in the medical wards of a rural South African hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective record review was done to determine disease patterns of patients admitted in the medical wards of St. Rita's Hospital, in rural Limpopo Province of South Africa. Hypertension dominated the disease pattern followed by pulmonary tuberculosis, gastro-enteritis, pneumonia, diabetes, and asthma. The findings of ...

  14. Disease patterns in the medical wards of a rural South African hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective record review was done to determine disease patterns of patients admitted in the medical wards of. St. Rita's Hospital, in rural Northern Province of South Africa. Hypertension dominated the disease pattern followed by pulmonary tuberculosis, gastro-enteritis, pneumonia, diabetes, and asthma. The findings ...

  15. Analysis of Work Assignments After Medical Ethics Workshop for First-Year Residents at Siriraj Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakda Sathirareuangchai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Upon entering the residency training program, all 1st year residents at Siriraj Hospital must join medical ethics workshop held by the Division of Postgraduate Studies. At the end of the workshop, the residents were given a work assignment to write a clinical ethics situation they have encountered in their past practice. Methods: This study is an analysis of content described in the work assignments in order to gain the information regarding common medical ethics dilemmas, which the physicians faced in the early days of practice. Results: 740 work assignments were reviewed. The 4 most common ethical principle mentioned in these assign- ments were autonomy (144, 19.5%, palliative care (133, 18.0%, beneficence (121, 16.4%, and confidentiality (110, 14.9%. More than half of the situations described were during their internship (474, 64.1% and tended to distributed equally among community hospital (39.1%, university hospital (28.0%, and general hospital (24.3%. Conclusion: This study should raise the awareness of the medical educator towards these medical ethics issues during curriculum planning.

  16. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Pre-hospital Medical Emergencies Early Warning Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimian, Abbasali; Masoumi, Gholamreza; Jamshidi-Orak, Roohangiz; Seyedin, Hesam

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The number of requests for emergency medical services (EMSs) has increased during the past decade. However, most of the transports are not essential. Therefore, it seems crucial to develop an instrument to help EMS staff accurately identify patients who need pre-hospital care and transportation. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Pre-hospital Medical Emergencies Early Warning Scale (Pre-MEWS). Materials and Methods: This mixed-method study was conducted in two phases. In the first phase, a qualitative content analysis study was conducted to identify the predictors of medical patients' need for pre-hospital EMS and transportation. In the second phase, the face and the content validity as well as the internal consistency of the scale were evaluated. Finally, the items of the scale were scored and scoring system was presented. Results: The final version of the scale contained 22 items and its total score ranged from 0 to 54. Conclusions: Pre-MEWS helps EMS staffs properly understand medical patients' conditions in pre-hospital environments and accurately identify their need for EMS and transportation. PMID:28515604

  17. Historical evidence for the origin of teaching hospital, medical school and the rise of academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modanlou, H D

    2011-04-01

    Historical progression and the development of current teaching hospitals, medical schools and biomedical research originated from the people of many civilizations and cultures. Greeks, Indians, Syriacs, Persians and Jews, assembled first in Gondi-Shapur during the Sasanian empire in Persia, and later in Baghdad during the Golden Age of Islam, ushering the birth of current academic medicine.

  18. Medical students' experiences of diseases in internal medicine in university and community hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghoebar-Krieger, HMJ; Bender, W; Kreeftenberg, HG; Stewart, RE; Sleijfer, DT

    Because medical students in The Netherlands should achieve common national objectives, it is important to know whether clinical experiences in different hospitals are comparable. The research questions were: (1) Do students achieve learning experiences of the required diseases during the internship

  19. Manchester Clinical Placement Index (MCPI): Conditions for medical students’ learning in hospital and community placements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dornan, Tim; Muijtjens, Arno; Graham, Jennifer; Scherpbier, Albert; Boshuizen, Els

    2012-01-01

    Dornan, T., Muijtjens, A., Graham, J., Scherpbier, A., & Boshuizen, H. P. A. (2012). Manchester Clinical Placement Index (MCPI): Conditions for medical students’ learning in hospital and community placements. Advances in Health Sciences Education, 17, 703-716. doi:10.1007/s10459-10011-19344-x

  20. Medication errors in the adult emergency unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital in Addis Ababa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gediwon Negash

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Incidence and types of medication errors committed in Tikur Anbesa Specialized Hospital Adult Emergency Unit were substantiated; moreover, necessary information on factors within the healthcare delivery system that predispose healthcare professionals to commit errors have been pointed, which should be addressed by healthcare professionals through multidisciplinary efforts and involvement of decision makers at national level.

  1. Translating Research Into Practice: Voluntary Reporting of Medication Errors in Critical Access Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Katherine J.; Cochran, Gary; Hicks, Rodney W.; Mueller, Keith J.

    2004-01-01

    Context:Low service volume, insufficient information technology, and limited human resources are barriers to learning about and correcting system failures in small rural hospitals. This paper describes the implementation of and initial findings from a voluntary medication error reporting program developed by the Nebraska Center for Rural Health…

  2. Oral nutritional support of older (65 years+) medical and surgical patients after discharge from hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Holst, Mette; Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the effectiveness of oral nutritional support compared to placebo or usual care in improving clinical outcome in older (65 years+) medical and surgical patients after discharge from hospital. Outcome goals were: re-admissions, survival, nutritional and functional status, quality of life...

  3. Examining the application of Web 2.0 in medical-related organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Samuel Kai Wah; Woo, Matsuko; King, Ronnel B; Choi, Stephen; Cheng, Miffy; Koo, Peggy

    2012-03-01

    This study surveyed Web 2.0 application in three types of selected health or medical-related organisations such as university medical libraries, hospitals and non-profit medical-related organisations. Thirty organisations participated in an online survey on the perceived purposes, benefits and difficulties in using Web 2.0. A phone interview was further conducted with eight organisations (26.7%) to collect information on the use of Web 2.0. Data were analysed using both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Results showed that knowledge and information sharing and the provision of a better communication platform were rated as the main purposes of using Web 2.0. Time constraints and low staff engagement were the most highly rated difficulties. In addition, most participants found Web 2.0 to be beneficial to their organisations. Medical-related organisations that adopted Web 2.0 technologies have found them useful, with benefits outweighing the difficulties in the long run. The implications of this study are discussed to help medical-related organisations make decisions regarding the use of Web 2.0 technologies. © 2011 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2011 Health Libraries Group.

  4. [Public health education integrated in hospital. An internship proposal, "Medical information and pharmacology"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulay, F; Chevallier, T; Staccini, P; Chichmanian, R M

    1997-06-01

    According to a recent circular reforming french medical studies, we propose a teaching of medical information and pharmacology in situ within hospital instructions. Students could acquire an investigation methodology on the medicine economy. It will cover in four sessions the succeeding stages of medical information processing and be subject to an assessment: case studies and appreciation on student's, instruction record. By combining public health teaching with clinical practice, our project promotes its development in contact with other learnings and activities such as clinical research.

  5. How common are errors in the medication process in a psychiatric hospital?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Mainz, Jan; Lisby, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    -hospital patients (n=67), physicians prescribing drugs and ward staff (nurses and nurses assistants) dispensing and administering drugs. The study was carried out using 3 methods of investigation – an observational study, an unannounced control visit and an audit of medical records. Medication errors were evaluated...... for error. In total, 434 errors were detected in 1333 opportunities for error (33%). The rate of medication errors (with potential to harm patients) was 8% and 0.3% were considered potentially fatal. The frequency of errors was: Prescription: A) Computerized physician order entry (CPOE): 10/267 (4%), B...

  6. What is the impact of commercial test preparation courses on medical examination performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaghie, William C; Downing, Steven M; Kubilius, Ramune

    2004-01-01

    Commercial test preparation courses are part of the fabric of U.S. medical education. They are also big business with 2,000 sales for 1 firm listed at nearly $250 million. This article systematically reviews and evaluates research published in peer-reviewed journals and in the "grey literature" that addresses the impact of commercial test preparation courses on standardized, undergraduate medical examinations. Thirteen computerized English language databases were searched using 29 search terms and search concepts from their onset to October 1, 2002. Also manually searched was medical education conference proceedings and publications after the end date; and medical education journal editors were contacted about articles accepted for publication, but not yet in print, that were deemed pertinent to this review. Studies that met three criteria were selected: (a) a commercial test preparation course or service was an educational intervention, (b) the outcome variable was one of several standardized medical examinations, and (c) results are published in a peer-reviewed journal or another outlet that insures scholarly scrutiny. The criteria were applied and data extracted by consensus of 2 reviewers. The search identified 11 empirical studies, of which 10 (8 journal articles, 2 unpublished reports) are included in this review. Qualitative data synthesis and tabular presentation of research methods and outcomes are used. The articles and unpublished reports reveal that current research lacks control and rigor; the incremental validity of the commercial courses on medical examination performance, if any, is extremely small; and evidence in support of the courses is weak or nonexistent; almost no details are given about the form and conduct of the commercial test preparation courses; studies are confined to courses in preparation for the Medical College Admission Test, the former National Board of Medical Examiners Part 1, and the United States Medical Licensing Examination

  7. Knowledge on Hospital Waste Management among Senior Staff Nurses Working in a Selected Medical College Hospital of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nasir Uddin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Healthcare wastes include all types of wastes generated by healthcare establishments. Waste disposal problem is growing with an ever-increasing number of hospitals, clinics, and diagnostic laboratories in Bangladesh and also in Faridpur town. Aim and Objective. The outcomes of this study will contribute to increase proper waste management practice among nurses in Bangladesh. Methods. A descriptive type of cross sectional study design was used to assess the level of knowledge regarding hospital waste management among senior staff nurses working in Faridpur Medical College Hospital, Bangladesh. All respondents (n=125 were selected by random sampling. Results. In the answer of knowledge about general waste only 4% (n=5 gave all correct answers. In the answer of knowledge about infectious waste 63.2% (n=79 gave one correct answer, of knowledge about pharmaceutical waste only 8% (n=10 gave all correct answers, and of knowledge about biomedical waste only 7.2% (n=9 gave all correct answers. In the answer of knowledge about color coded bins collecting waste 53.6% (n=67 cannot give any correct answer and only 46.4% (n=58 gave all correct answers and of knowledge about the safe disposal of hospital waste 16% (n=8 could not give any correct answer. However, against all questions were 5 options. Conclusion. Knowledge about hospital waste and its management is very poor among senior staff nurses. As a recommendation to improve this situation continuous training should be made compulsory for healthcare personnel specially staff nurses working in Bangladesh.

  8. The use of an essay examination in evaluating medical students during the surgical clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Blair J; Rinewalt, Daniel; Daly, Shaun C; Janssen, Imke; Luu, Minh B; Myers, Jonathan A

    2016-01-01

    Third-year medical students are graded according to subjective performance evaluations and standardized tests written by the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME). Many "poor" standardized test takers believe the heavily weighted NBME does not evaluate their true fund of knowledge and would prefer a more open-ended forum to display their individualized learning experiences. Our study examined the use of an essay examination as part of the surgical clerkship evaluation. We retrospectively examined the final surgical clerkship grades of 781 consecutive medical students enrolled in a large urban academic medical center from 2005 to 2011. We examined final grades with and without the inclusion of the essay examination for all students using a paired t test and then sought any relationship between the essay and NBME using Pearson correlations. Final average with and without the essay examination was 72.2% vs 71.3% (P essay examination increasing average scores by .4, 1.8, and 2.5 for those receiving high pass, pass, and fail, respectively. The essay decreased the average score for those earning an honors by .4. Essay scores were found to overall positively correlate with the NBME (r = .32, P essay examination as part of the third-year surgical core clerkship final did increase the final grade a modest degree, especially for those with lower scores who may identify themselves as "poor" standardized test takers. A more open-ended forum may allow these students an opportunity to overcome this deficiency and reveal their true fund of surgical knowledge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pain Management for Sickle Cell Disease in the Pediatric Emergency Department: Medications and Hospitalization Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciotti, Chantel; Vaiselbuh, Sarah; Romanos-Sirakis, Eleny

    2017-10-01

    The majority of emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) are pain related. Adequate and timely pain management may improve quality of life and prevent worsening morbidities. We conducted a retrospective chart review of pediatric patients with SCD seen in the ED, selected by sickle cell-related ICD-9 codes. A total of 176 encounters were reviewed from 47 patients to record ED pain management and hospitalization trends. Mean time to pain medication administration was 63 minutes. Patients received combination (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug [NSAID] + narcotic) pain medications for initial treatment at a minority of ED encounters (19%). A higher percentage of patients who received narcotics alone as initial treatment were hospitalized as compared with those who received combination treatment initially ( P= 0.0085). Improved patient education regarding home pain management as well as standardized ED guidelines for assessment and treatment of sickle cell pain may result in superior and more consistent patient care.

  10. Trends of increase in western medical services in traditional medicine hospitals in china

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moseley Charles B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compare changes in types of hospital service revenues between traditional Chinese medicine (TCM hospitals and Western-medicine based general hospitals. Methods 97 TCM hospitals and 103 general hospitals were surveyed in years of 2000 and 2004. Six types of medical service revenue between the two types of hospitals were compared overtime. The national statistics from 1999 to 2008 were also used as complementary evidence. Results For TCM hospitals, the percentage of service revenue from Western medicine increased from 44.3% to 47.4% while the percentage of service revenue from TCM declined from 26.4% to 18.8% from 1999 to 2004. Percentages of revenue from laboratory tests and surgical procedures for both types of hospitals increased and the discrepancy between the two types of hospitals was narrowed from 1999 to 2004. For TCM hospitals, revenues from laboratory tests increased from 3.64% to 5.06% and revenues from surgical procedures increased from 3.44% to 7.02%. General hospitals' TCM drug revenue in outpatient care declined insignificantly from 5.26% to 3.87%, while the decline for the TCM hospitals was significant from 19.73% to 13.77%. The national statistics from 1999 to 2008 showed similar trends that the percentage of revenue from Western medicine for TCM hospitals increased from 59.6% in 1999 to 62.2% in 2003 and 66.1% in 2008 while the percentage of revenue from TCM for TCM hospitals decreased from 18.0% in 1999, 15.4% in 2003, and 13.7% in 2008. Conclusion Western medicine has become a vital revenue source for TCM hospitals in the current Chinese health care environment where government subsidies to health care facilities have significantly declined. Policies need to encourage TCM hospitals to identify their own special and effective services, improve public perception, increase demand, strengthen financial sources, and ultimately make contributions to preserving one of the national treasures.

  11. Medication Reconciliation and Evaluation of Drug Discrepancies by a Pharmacist in Omid Hospital, Lali, Khouzestan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Kouti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medication discrepancies occur at the time of medicine prescription in inpatient and outpatient settings, especially at patient transfer and discharge. Pharmacists can prevent these medication errors by reconciliation of the patients’ medications. In this study, medication discrepancies of the only hospital of a small town are assessed by a pharmacist.Methods:A medication reconciliation form was designed to fully record all patients’ drug history and current therapies. All admitted patients during a six month interval were evaluated by a pharmacist and their medical records were compared to the detailed data form.Results:150 admitted patients were evaluated in this study from September 2015 to February 2016. 51% of the patients were male and 49% female. 56% of the patients had medication discrepancies when discharged. Interestingly none of the patients had documented drug history in their medical records.Conclusion:More than half of the patients developed a medication discrepancy at the time of discharge. We think that a drug review of the patients at the time of admission and discharge and establishing medication reconciliation processes may be helpful in improvement of health care.

  12. The Direct Cost of Parkinson Disease at Juntendo Medical University Hospital, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoritaka, Asako; Fukae, Jiro; Hatano, Taku; Oda, Eisei; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many studies on the cost of Parkinson disease (PD) have been published; however, there are limited studies pertaining to this issue in Asia. This study looks to assess the direct medical costs of patients with PD at a university hospital in Japan by calculating the average monthly direct medical costs of PD patients from July to December 2008. Methods We enrolled 724 consecutive patients (411 women and 313 men) with PD who were registered in Japan's "Specified Disease Treatment Research Program" and obtained data on the total direct medical costs of all patients. Results Values are reported as the mean (standard deviation). The major finding of the direct medical cost analysis was that the outpatient clinic cost per subject (n=715) was USD 485.74 (376.31) per month. A multivariate analysis revealed that a younger age, the presence of wearing-off, hallucination, and longer disease duration increased the direct medical cost significantly. Disease severity had no influence on the direct medical costs. A longer disease duration was significantly correlated with higher hospitalization costs. Conclusion The direct medical cost of PD in Japan was found to be similar to that in Western countries. Costs due to productivity loss exceeded the direct costs, and they may be reduced through the better integration of PD patients in the work environment.

  13. Engaging medical staff in clinical governance: introducing new technologies and clinical practice into public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Alison J; Becker, Gavin; Hawkins, Cindy; McKenzie, Lisa; Wells, Malcolm

    2012-02-01

    To enhance patient care, medical staff at major tertiary teaching hospitals are encouraged to innovate through introducing new technologies and clinical practices. However, such introduction must be safe, efficient, effective and appropriate for patients and the organisation, and actively lead by engage medical staff. This study outlines the development, implementation and evaluation of a framework for introducing new technologies and clinical practice to a major tertiary health service. Evaluation includes survey of medical Heads of Units (HOUs) for framework's effectiveness, and comparison of level of medical staff engagement against a best-practice model. Over 2-year period: 19 applications, 7 approved. Successful external funding of $1.993 million achieved. Survey of HOUs in June 2009: response rate 59% (25 of 42 HOUs), with 11 of 25 respondents utilised the committee. Of those 14 of 25 who had not utilised the committee, low awareness of the committee's existence (2 respondents). Most elements of the best-practice model for engaging medical staff were achieved. Recommendations include improvements to committee process and raising profile with medical staff. This study demonstrates an effective and successful clinical governance process for introducing new technologies and clinical practice into a major tertiary teaching hospital, supported by moderate levels of medical staff engagement.

  14. Refractory primary medication nonadherence: Prevalence and predictors after pharmacist counseling at hospital discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, Kathleene; Schnipper, Jeffrey L; Goggins, Kathryn; Dittus, Robert S; Kripalani, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Successful secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease relies on medication therapy; thus, minimizing nonadherence is a focus for improving patient outcomes. Receipt of discharge medication counseling has been associated with improved drug knowledge and adherence. We evaluated the prevalence and predictors of postdischarge primary nonadherence (not filling new prescriptions) in patients who received discharge medication counseling by a pharmacist (ie, refractory to intervention) as part of a randomized controlled trial. Of 341 patients, 9.4% of patients did not fill all prescriptions after discharge. Patients who were living alone were more likely to not fill their medications compared to those who were married or cohabitating (odds ratio [OR]: 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-4.8, P = 0.047). Patients who were discharged with greater than 10 medications were also more likely to demonstrate primary nonadherence (OR: 2.3, 95% CI: 1.05-4.98, P = 0.036). Patients with lower income were less likely to fill prescriptions in univariate analysis (P = 0.04) but not multivariable analysis. Our study demonstrates that among patients hospitalized for acute cardiovascular events, primary medication nonadherence persisted despite discharge medication counseling. Targeted or multimodal approaches that address patient-specific barriers, such as cost, social isolation, and polypharmacy, in addition to discharge counseling, may further facilitate adherence. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  15. Applying Toyota production system techniques for medication delivery: improving hospital safety and efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Terry L; Steinmetz-Malato, Laura L; Van Dyke, Deborah L

    2011-01-01

    The inpatient medication delivery system used at a large regional acute care hospital in the Midwest had become antiquated and inefficient. The existing 24-hr medication cart-fill exchange process with delivery to the patients' bedside did not always provide ordered medications to the nursing units when they were needed. In 2007 the principles of the Toyota Production System (TPS) were applied to the system. Project objectives were to improve medication safety and reduce the time needed for nurses to retrieve patient medications. A multidisciplinary team was formed that included representatives from nursing, pharmacy, informatics, quality, and various operational support departments. Team members were educated and trained in the tools and techniques of TPS, and then designed and implemented a new pull system benchmarking the TPS Ideal State model. The newly installed process, providing just-in-time medication availability, has measurably improved delivery processes as well as patient safety and satisfaction. Other positive outcomes have included improved nursing satisfaction, reduced nursing wait time for delivered medications, and improved efficiency in the pharmacy. After a successful pilot on two nursing units, the system is being extended to the rest of the hospital. © 2010 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  16. Generic substitution: a potential risk factor for medication errors in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkonsen, Helle; Hopen, Heidi Skjønhaug; Abelsen, Linda; Ek, Bjørg; Toverud, Else-Lydia

    2010-02-01

    Efforts to restrain pharmaceutical costs in the Norwegian hospital sector have focused on putting pharmaceuticals out to tender with resultant frequent changes in medicine inventories. Due to the extent of physicians failing to prescribe from the hospital drug list, the nurses have to perform generic substitution on the wards. The objective of the present study is to investigate the hospital nurses' experiences with generic substitution and to explore their views on this strategy as a risk factor for medication errors. Personal interviews with 100 nurses who were employed in a large Norwegian hospital were conducted using a semistructured questionnaire. In all, 75% of nurses thought it was problematic that the hospital's drug inventory was subject to frequent changes, and 91% believed that the high number of generic products may contribute to erroneous dispensing. Nevertheless, three out of four admitted that they seldom or never verified the feasibility of the substitution with the physician, and that it was seldom documented in the medical charts. In total, 42% of the nurses had experienced mistakes that occurred as a result of substitution. They claimed that the medication errors relating to generic substitution derived from difficult drug names, frequent changes in the drug inventory, and the increasing number of generic drugs, as well as from heavy workload and insufficient training. The present study shows that generic substitution is often carried out by nurses on the wards. The nurses feel insecure about the situation and report that they do not have the necessary training for the task. They clearly believe that a high number of generic drugs and frequent generic substitutions are risk factors for medication errors. Hence, hospital managers should be aware that such strategies to reduce costs may interfere with patient safety.

  17. Reliability and Validity of Conversion Formulas Between Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination of the United States Level 1 and United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Albert S.; Chang, Lynn; Feng, Eric; Helf, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Background The Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination of the United States (COMLEX-USA) Level 1 and United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 scores are important factors in the selection process of medical students into US residency programs. Objectives The goals of this study were to investigate the correlation between the COMLEX-USA Level 1 and the USMLE Step 1 and to assess the accuracy of the existing formulas in predicting USMLE scores from COMLEX-USA scores. Methods A retrospective study of 1016 paired COMLEX-USA Level 1 and USMLE Step 1 scores was conducted. Formulas by Sarko et al and by Slocum and Louder were used to estimate USMLE Step 1 scores from COMLEX-USA Level 1 scores, and a paired t test between calculated USMLE Step 1 scores and actual USMLE Step 1 scores was performed. Results During 2006–2012, 1016 of 1440 students (71%) took both the USMLE Step 1 and the COMLEX-USA Level 1 tests in the College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific. The USMLE Step 1 scores were higher than those predicted by Slocum and Louder and by Sarko et al by an average of 14.16 ± 11.69 (P < .001) and 7.80 ± 12.48 (P < .001), respectively. A Pearson coefficient of 0.83 was observed. Regression analysis yielded the following formula: USMLE Step 1  =  0.2392 × COMLEX-USA Level 1 + 82.563 (R2  =  0.69577). Conclusions The USMLE Step 1 scores, on average, were higher than those predicted by the formulas derived by Slocum and Louder and by Sarko et al. Residency program directors should use caution when using formulas to derive USMLE Step 1 scores from COMLEX-USA Level 1 scores. PMID:24949132

  18. The impact of pharmacist-led medication reconciliation during admission at tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulghani, Khulood H; Aseeri, Mohammed A; Mahmoud, Ahmed; Abulezz, Rayf

    2017-12-16

    Background Medication errors represent the most common type of error that compromises patient safety, with approximately 20% believed to result in harm. Over 40% of these errors are believed to result from inadequate medication reconciliation during admission, transfer, and discharge of patients and many of these errors could be prevented if adequate medication reconciliation processes were in place. In an effort to minimize adverse events caused during these care transitions, the Joint Commission has stated medication reconciliation as one of its National Patient Safety Goals and health care providers and organizations are encouraged to perform the process at various patient care transitions. Objective Identify the types of medication discrepancy that occurred during medication reconciliation performed by a pharmacist gathering the best possible medication history (BPMH). Estimate the potential for harm with each medication discrepancy using the severity rating methods developed by Cornish et al. (Arch Intern Med 165(4):424-429, 2005). Setting Tertiary care hospital in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Method Prospective 3-month study on 286 adult patients, admitted for at least 24 h and regularly taking at least four chronic prescription medications. Medication histories taken by physicians and by a pharmacist gathering the BPMH were compared. Identified discrepancies were reviewed by a panel of clinical pharmacists to assess the potential to cause patient harm with these errors. Main Outcome measure Number and types of medication discrepancies recorded by the pharmacist. Results Total number of medications recorded by physicians was 2548, versus 3085 by the pharmacist. 48.3% of patients had at least one unintended medication discrepancy by physicians. 537 medication discrepancies were reported (17.4% of number of medication discrepancies recorded by pharmacist). Types of medication discrepancies included, omissions (77% of discrepancies), commissions (13%), dosing errors

  19. An examination of competition and efficiency for hospital industry in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgen Narcı, Hacer; Ozcan, Yasar A; Şahin, İsmet; Tarcan, Menderes; Narcı, Mustafa

    2015-12-01

    The two particular reforms that have been undertaken under the Health Transformation Program in Turkey are enhancing efficiency and increasing competition. However, there is a lack of information about the relationship between competition and hospital efficiency. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effect of competition on technical efficiency for the hospital industry in Turkey. The target population included all public and private general hospitals that were open in 2010 in Turkey (n = 1,224). From these, 1,103 hospitals met the selection criteria and were included in the study. Data were obtained from the Turkish Statistical Institute, the Ministry of Health, and through a field survey. Technical efficiency of hospitals was estimated using Data Envelopment Analysis with five outputs and five inputs. The intensity of competition among hospitals was measured by objective and subjective measures. Objective competition was measured using the Hirschman-Herfindahl Index, and subjective competition was measured based on the perceptions of top level hospital managers. Multivariate Tobit regression was used to investigate the relationship between competition and efficiency while controlling the effects of demand and supply characteristics of the market and the hospital traits. Efficiency results showed that 17% of hospitals were technically efficient. Regression analyses portrayed that the degree of competition among general hospitals did not have a statistically significant relationship with hospitals' technical efficiency. To conclude, hospital efficiency in Turkey does not seem to be affected by the intensity of competition among hospitals.

  20. Factors affecting the sleep status of surgical and medical patients at a University Hospital of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilingir, Dilek; Hintistan, Sevilay; Ergene, Ozlem

    2016-12-01

    To determine the factors that affect sleep status of surgical and medical patients during hospitalisation. This hospital-based, cross-sectional study was conducted at Karadeniz Technical University's Farabi Hospital, Trabzon, Turkey, from July to October 2014. Data was gathered using a questionnaire and the Form of Factors Affecting Sleep Pattern. SPSS 15 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 184 participants, there were 92(50%) each from the surgery and medical clinics. The mean score for the Form of Factors Affecting Sleep Pattern was 84.57±8.65 among the surgical patients and 78.01±17.61 among the medical patients. It was found that noise at the hospital affected sleep patterns among 73(79.3%) of the surgical patients and among 64(69.6%) of the medical patients. There were statistically significant differences between mean scores of the surgical patients and gender and marital status (p=0.001 and p=0.012, respectively), whereas among the medical patients statistically significant differences existed between mean scores and having operation (p=0.09). Both groups of patients underwent changes in sleep routines during hospitalisation.

  1. [Hospital-based health technology assessment in France: how to proceed to evaluate innovative medical devices?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, N; van den Brink, H; Denies, F; Dervaux, B; Germe, A F; Prognon, P; Pineau, J

    2014-01-01

    Innovative medical devices offer solutions to medical problems and greatly improve patients' outcomes. Like National Health Technology Assessment (HTA) agencies, hospitals face numerous requests for innovative and costly medical devices. To help local decision-makers, different approaches of hospital-based HTA (HB-HTA) have been adopted worldwide. The objective of the present paper is to explore HB-HTA models for adopting innovative medical devices in France and elsewhere. Four different models have been conceptualized: "ambassador" model, "mini-HTA" model, "HTA unit" model and "internal committee". Apparently, "HTA unit" and "internal committee" (or a mixture of both models) are the prevailing HB-HTA models in France. Nevertheless, some weaknesses of these models have been pointed out in previous works. Only few examples involving hospital pharmacists have been found abroad, except in France and in Italy. Finally, the harmonization of the assessment of innovative medical devices in France needs a better understanding of HB-HTA practices. Copyright © 2013 Elsev