WorldWideScience

Sample records for hospital laboratory monitoring

  1. Clinical protein science developments for patient monitoring in hospital central laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Johan; Marko-Varga, György

    2016-12-01

    Patient care relies heavily on standardized tests performed in hospital laboratories, typically including clinical chemistry, pathology and microbiology. With the introduction of personalized medicine tremendous efforts have been made to identify new biomarkers of disease with various omics technologies, often including mass spectrometry. In order to validate new biomarkers and perform clinical studies high quality biobank samples are of key importance. In this editorial different aspects of mass spectrometry in future personalized medicine are discussed.

  2. The reliability of point-of-care prothrombin time testing. A comparison of CoaguChek S and XS INR measurements with hospital laboratory monitoring.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, F

    2010-02-01

    The development of point-of-care (POC) testing devices enables patients to test their own international normalized ratio (INR) at home. However, previous studies have shown that when compared with clinical laboratory values, statistically significant differences may occur between the two methods of INR measurement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the CoaguChek S and XS POC meters relative to clinical laboratory measurements. As part of a randomized, crossover patient self-testing (PST) study at Cork University Hospital, patients were randomized to 6 months PST or 6 months routine care by the anticoagulation management service. During the PST arm of the study, patients measured their INR at home using the CoaguChek S or XS POC meter. External quality control was performed at enrollment, 2 months and 4 months by comparing the POC measured INR with the laboratory determined value. One hundred and fifty-one patients provided 673 paired samples. Good correlation was shown between the two methods of determination (r = 0.91), however, statistically significant differences did occur. A Bland-Altman plot illustrated good agreement of INR values between 2.0 and 3.5 INR units but there was increasing disagreement as the INR rose above 3.5. Eighty-seven per cent of all dual measurements were within the recommended 0.5 INR units of each other. This study adds to the growing evidence that POC testing is a reliable and safe alternative to hospital laboratory monitoring but highlights the importance of external quality control when these devices are used for monitoring oral anticoagulation.

  3. Mining of hospital laboratory information systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søeby, Karen; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Werge, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    of hospital laboratory data as a source of information, we analyzed enzymatic plasma creatinine as a model analyte in two large pediatric hospital samples. Methods: Plasma creatinine measurements from 9700 children aged 0-18 years were obtained from hospital laboratory databases and partitioned into high...... in creatinine levels at different time points after birth and around the early teens, which challenges the establishment and usefulness of reference intervals in those age groups. Conclusions: The study documents that hospital laboratory data may inform on the developmental aspects of creatinine, on periods...... with pronounced heterogeneity and valid reference intervals. Furthermore, part of the heterogeneity in creatinine distribution is likely due to differences in biological and chronological age of children and should be considered when using age-specific reference intervals....

  4. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, R.C.

    1992-06-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of DOE Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. 61 refs

  5. Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2008-04-01

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  6. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2012-08-01

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  7. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2010-10-01

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  8. Environmental monitoring report, Sandia Laboratories 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holley, W.L.; Simmons, T.N.

    1976-04-01

    Water and vegetation are monitored to determine Sandia Laboratories impact on the surrounding environment. Nonradioactive pollutants released are reported. Radioactive effluents are also reported and their person-rem contribution to the population is calculated

  9. Quality management system in hospital radiopharmacy laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poch, Carolina; Rabiller, Graciela; Basualdo, Daniel A.; El Tamer, Elias A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: 1) To determine the necessary conditions for increasing the complexity of the Radiopharmacy Laboratory and reach an operational level defined by the IAEA as 3a (Operational Guidance on Hospital Radiopharmacy). Our aim is that, within a framework of quality, last generation radiopharmaceuticals can be used, by sophisticated techniques such as labeling with bifunctional chelating agents, like HYNIC; 2) Consequently, we decided to implement a Quality Management System (QMS) in the field of Hospital Radiopharmacy in order to guarantee the safe and effective preparation and handling of radiopharmaceuticals for the diagnosis of patients, based on recommendations of the IAEA. Procedure For the implementation of the QMS, the sector of Radiopharmacy was capacitated in the application of ISO 9001. In a first stage it had begun with the formulation of the main documents and their enumeration. According to the recommendations of the IAEA Operational Guide, this year we proceeded to the optimization of the documents produced in the first stage and formulation of new documents essential to the improvement of work in the Radiopharmacy Laboratory. Results: Corrections were made to the performed procedures, and new ones were composed such as: Reception of raw materials, Control dose calibrator (Activity meter), General procedure of dosage, Procedure for decontamination, for Using the bio safety cabinet, for Cleaning the hot laboratory, etc. The Quality Controls were added to each of the Work Instructions of radiopharmaceuticals to be undertaken and how and when to carry out, with their respective references. Records were modified and new ones incorporated, in order to ensure traceability of the results before and after injection. Finally, the require documentation has been completed with the addition of the Staff Training Plan, and other records such as Nonconformance and Corrective and Preventive Actions. Conclusion: With the application of a QMS correctly implemented

  10. A laboratory evaluation of color video monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, P.L.

    1993-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has considerable experience with monochrome video monitors used in alarm assessment video systems. Most of these systems, used for perimeter protection, were designed to classify rather than to identify intruders. There is a growing interest in the identification function of security video systems for both access control and insider protection. Because color video technology is rapidly changing and because color information is useful for identification purposes, Sandia National Laboratories established a program to evaluate the newest relevant color video equipment. This report documents the evaluation of an integral component, color monitors. It briefly discusses a critical parameter, dynamic range, details test procedures, and evaluates the results

  11. A laboratory evaluation of color video monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, P.L.

    1993-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has considerable experience with monochrome video monitors used in alarm assessment video systems. Most of these systems, used for perimeter protection, were designed to classify rather than to identify intruders. There is a growing interest in the identification function of security video systems for both access control and insider protection. Because color video technology is rapidly changing and because color information is useful for identification purposes, Sandia National Laboratories established a program to evaluate the newest relevant color video equipment. This report documents the evaluation of an integral component, color monitors. It briefly discusses a critical parameter, dynamic range, details test procedures, and evaluates the results.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories 1979 environmental monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, T.N.

    1980-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque is located south of the city on two broad mesas. The local climate is arid continental. Radionuclides are released from five technical areas from the Laboratories' resarch activities. Sandia's environmental monitoring program searches for cesium-137, tritium, uranium, alpha emitters, and beta emitters in water, soil, air, and vegetation. No activity was found in public areas in excess of local background in 1979. The Albuquerque population receives only 0.076 person-rem (estimated) from airborne radioactive releases. While national security research is the laboratories' major responsibility, energy research is a major area of activity. Both these research areas cause radioactive releases

  13. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordstrom, Jenifer [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-02-01

    This plan provides a high-level summary of environmental monitoring performed by various organizations within and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and DOE Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, Guide DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, and in accordance with 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. The purpose of these orders is to 1) implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations, and 2) to establish standards and requirements for the operations of DOE and DOE contractors with respect to protection of the environment and members of the public against undue risk from radiation. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL Site, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. Detailed monitoring procedures, program plans, or other governing documents used by contractors or agencies to implement requirements are referenced in this plan. This plan covers all planned monitoring and environmental surveillance. Non-routine activities such as special research studies and characterization of individual sites for environmental restoration are outside the scope of this plan.

  14. Environmental monitoring report: Sandia Laboratories, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, T.N.

    1977-04-01

    Water and vegetation are monitored to determine Sandia Laboratories impact on the surrounding environment. Nonradioactive pollutants released are reported. Radioactive effluents are also reported and their person-rem contribution to the Albuquerque population is calculated. The environmental monitoring for calendar year 1976 shows that concentrations of radioactive materials in the Albuquerque area are typical of natural background for the area. An exception is a single onsite location where slightly abnormal uranium concentrations are expected. An estimated 0.044 person-rem Albuquerque area (80 km radius) population dose commitment results from calculated Sandia Laboratories releases. Over the same area 57,000 person-rem is accumulated from natural background. There were no measurable offsite radioactive effluent releases in CY 1976

  15. Computerized plutonium laboratory-stack monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stafford, R.G.; DeVore, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory has recently designed and constructed a Plutonium Research and Development Facility to meet design criteria imposed by the United States Energy Research and Development Administration. A primary objective of the design criteria is to assure environmental protection and to reliably monitor plutonium effluent via the ventilation exhaust systems. A state-of-the-art facility exhaust air monitoring system is described which establishes near ideal conditions for evaluating plutonium activity in the stack effluent. Total and static pressure sensing manifolds are incorporated to measure average velocity and integrated total discharge air volume. These data are logged at a computer which receives instrument data through a multiplex scanning system. A multipoint isokinetic sampling assembly with associated instrumentation is described. Continuous air monitors have been designed to sample from the isokinetic sampling assembly and transmit both instantaneous and integrated stack effluent concentration data to the computer and various cathode ray tube displays. The continuous air monitors also serve as room air monitors in the plutonium facility with the primary objective of timely evacuation of personnel if an above tolerance airborne plutonium concentration is detected. Several continuous air monitors are incorporated in the ventilation system to assist in identification of release problem areas

  16. [How do hospital clinical laboratories and laboratory testing companies cooperate and build reciprocal relations?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Seiji

    2014-12-01

    As the 2nd Joint Symposium of the Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine and the Japanese Association of Laboratory Pathologists, the symposium on clinical test out-sourcing and branch laboratories was held at the 60th General Meeting of the Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine on November 2nd, 2013 in Kobe. For the symposium, we conducted a questionnaire survey on the usage of clinical test out-sourcing and the introduction of branch laboratories to clinical laboratories of Japanese university hospitals, both private and public, between July 25th and August 20th, 2013. Seventy-two hospitals responded to the questionnaire survey, consisting of 41 public medical school hospitals and 31 private ones. According to the survey, the selection of each clinical test for out-sourcing was mainly determined by the capacities of hospital clinical laboratories and their equipment, as well as the profitability of each test. The main concerns of clinical laboratory members of university hospitals involved the continuity of measurement principles, traceability, and standardization of reference values for each test. They strongly requested the interchangeability and computerization of test data between laboratory testing companies. A branch laboratory was introduced to six hospitals, all of which were private medical college hospitals, out of 72 university hospitals, and eight of the other hospitals were open to its introduction. The merits and demerits of introducing a branch laboratory were also discussed. (Review).

  17. Hawaii Munitions Monitoring Station and Natural Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, M.; Trimble, A. Z.; Rognstad, M. R.

    2017-12-01

    Hundreds of thousands of tons of conventional munitions were fired into the ocean at military ranges or deliberately disposed at sea during the twentieth century. Potential contaminants from munitions and explosives of concern (MEC) affect virtually every coast in the United States, including Alaska, the Hawaiian Islands, Guam, American Samoa and other U.S. territories as well as inland waterways. It is necessary to develop methods to assess the concentrations of munitions constituents present at a site to address concerns about the presence of environmentally relevant concentrations and their potential impacts. Having a well-characterized site to test instruments and methods is important for continued development and refinement of technology. Most sites are too big to characterize comprehensively in three dimensions over time periods lasting days or longer. We are working to develop a monitoring station and natural laboratory near Oahu, Hawaii to create a cost-effective demonstration and validation natural laboratory where emerging technologies can be evaluated and compared. Ordnance Reef (OR) is an ideal location to establish a munitions monitoring station for historical, logistical and environmental reasons. OR is an area of shallow fringing reef measuring approximately 4.2 km by 2.2 km along the Waianae coast of Oahu that was used as a disposal area for military munitions following World War II. OR has been the subject of multiple investigations including an inventory of munitions conducted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 2002 and a screening-level risk investigation conducted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the University of Hawaii in 2006. As a result, there are multiple datasets collected over the past fifteen years that can be leveraged to serve as a baseline for the natural laboratory. These extant datasets are being supplemented with data from integrated unmanned systems deployed at OR to characterize and visualize the

  18. Experience of TLD personnel monitoring laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakhete, Prashant

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Renentech Laboratories is the first Private Enterprise in India to have been chosen to provide Personnel radiation monitoring services to radiation workers at different parts of the country. Since 1992 the Company has been manufacturing TLD phosphor powder of requisite quality and from 1995 commenced the production of TLD cards for radiation monitoring. After getting the necessary approval from the competent authorities in the country, the company undertook a rigorous quality assurance programme and received the accreditation in 1999 to carry out the personnel monitoring of radiation. Since then the trained staff of the Company is covering 1200 institutions in 16 states where radiation is being used. This translates to processing of 60,000 Till cards annually, the maximum limit permitted by BARC. Processing of exposure data is done strictly according well-laid guidelines. Any cases of overexposure are immediately referred to Calibration and Dose Record Section of BARC to meet the regulatory requirements. Necessary procedural guidelines are followed to handle such cases. In this lecture, learning, operation and implementation experience of a typical Private Company in a task, which, hitherto had been regarded as exclusive responsibility of state owned institution, is enumerated

  19. Impact of Laboratory Test Use Strategies in a Turkish Hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Meriç Yılmaz

    Full Text Available Eliminating unnecessary laboratory tests is a good way to reduce costs while maintain patient safety. The aim of this study was to define and process strategies to rationalize laboratory use in Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital (ANH and calculate potential savings in costs.A collaborative plan was defined by hospital managers; joint meetings with ANHTA and laboratory professors were set; the joint committee invited relevant staff for input, and a laboratory efficiency committee was created. Literature was reviewed systematically to identify strategies used to improve laboratory efficiency. Strategies that would be applicable in local settings were identified for implementation, processed, and the impact on clinical use and costs assessed for 12 months.Laboratory use in ANH differed enormously among clinics. Major use was identified in internal medicine. The mean number of tests per patient was 15.8. Unnecessary testing for chloride, folic acid, free prostate specific antigen, hepatitis and HIV testing were observed. Test panel use was pinpointed as the main cause of overuse of the laboratory and the Hospital Information System test ordering page was reorganized. A significant decrease (between 12.6-85.0% was observed for the tests that were taken to an alternative page on the computer screen. The one year study saving was equivalent to 371,183 US dollars.Hospital-based committees including laboratory professionals and clinicians can define hospital based problems and led to a standardized approach to test use that can help clinicians reduce laboratory costs through appropriate use of laboratory tests.

  20. [Future roles of clinical laboratories and clinical laboratory technologists in university hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Hiromitsu; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2013-08-01

    Clinical laboratories in university hospitals should be operated with a good balance of medical practice, education, research, and management. The role of a clinical laboratory is to promptly provide highly reliable laboratory data to satisfy the needs of clinicians involved in medical practice and health maintenance of patients. Improvement and maintenance of the quality of the laboratory staff and environment are essential to achieve this goal. In order to implement these requirements efficiently, an appropriate quality management system should be introduced and established, and evaluated objectively by a third party (e.g. by obtaining ISO 15189 certification). ISO 15189 is an international standard regarding the quality and competence of clinical laboratories, and specifies a review of the efficient operational system and technical requirements such as competence in implementing practical tests and calibration. This means the results of laboratory tests reported by accredited laboratories withstand any international evaluation, which is very important to assure the future importance of the existence and management of clinical laboratories as well as internationalization of medical practice. "Education" and "research" have important implications in addition to "medical practice" and "management", as the roles that clinical laboratories should play in university hospitals. University hospital laboratories should be operated by keeping these four factors in good balance. Why are "education" and "research" required in addition to "medical practice" services? If individual clinical laboratory technologists can provide an appropriate response to this question, the importance of the existence of clinical laboratories would be reinforced, without being compromised.

  1. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1981-04-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data on air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring for 1980 are presented, and general trends are discussed

  2. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1987-04-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1986 are presented and general trends are discussed. Topics include radiation monitoring, wastewater discharge monitoring, dose distribution estimates, and ground water monitoring. 9 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs

  3. Patients satisfaction with laboratory services at antiretroviral therapy clinics in public hospitals, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindaye, Tedla; Taye, Bineyam

    2012-07-04

    Despite the fact that Ethiopia has scale up antiretroviral treatment (ART) program, little is known about the patient satisfaction with ART monitoring laboratory services in health facilities. We therefore aimed to assess patient satisfaction with laboratory services at ART clinics in public hospitals. Hospital based, descriptive cross sectional study was conducted from October to November 2010 among clients attending in nine public hospitals ART clinics in Addis Ababa Ethiopia. Patients' satisfaction towards laboratory services was assessed using exit interview structured questionnaire. Data were coded and entered using EPI info 2002 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, GA) and analyzed using SPSS version 15 software (SPSS INC, Chicago, IL, USA). A total of 406 clients were involved in the study. Of these 255(62.8%) were females. The overall satisfaction rate for ART monitoring laboratory services was (85.5%). Patients were satisfied with measures taken by health care providers to keep confidentiality and ability of the person drawing blood to answer question (98.3% and 96.3% respectively). Moreover, the finding of this study revealed, statistical significant associations between the overall patients' satisfaction with waiting time to get blood drawing service, availability of ordered laboratory tests and waiting time to get laboratory result with (p ART monitoring laboratory services compared to those who underwent for more than 30 minutes. Overall, the satisfaction survey showed, most respondents were satisfied with ART monitoring laboratory services. However, factors such as improving accessibility and availability of latrines should be taken into consideration in order to improve the overall satisfaction.

  4. [Critical role of clinical laboratories in hospital infection control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Tetsuya

    2010-11-01

    The hospital infection control and prevention is recognized to be more and more important according to the advances in modern medical treatment and care. Clinical microbiology laboratory play critical roles in the hospital infection control as a member of infection control team (ICT). They are the first in a hospital to identify outbreak of MRSA in NICU and molecular epidemiological analysis of the isolates lead proper intervention of ICT to the concerned ward. From a viewpoint of infectious disease specialist, rapid and precise microbiological information is essential for the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. Each medical technologist need to make efforts to understand the characteristics of the examinations for infectious diseases and send out information useful for clinical practices. In our hospital, with the participation of all members of medical technologists, rapid reporting system was developed for blood culture examinations, which greatly contribute to the appropriate treatment of bloodstream infections. Collaborations of clinical microbiology laboratory with other members of ICT realize high quality hospital infection control. They also need to be aware of themselves as good practitioners of infection control measures to prevent hospital infections.

  5. Cyber Defense Research and Monitoring Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility acts as a fusion point for bridging ARL's research in tactical and operational Information Assurance (IA) areas and the development and assessment of...

  6. Quality and Safety of Home ICP Monitoring Compared with In-Hospital Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Morten; Juhler, Marianne; Munch, Tina Nørgaard

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring is usually conducted in-hospital using stationary devices. Modern mobile ICP monitoring systems present new monitoring possibilities more closely following the patients' daily life. We reviewed patient safety, quality of technical data...

  7. Establishing a national biological laboratory safety and security monitoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaine, James W

    2012-12-01

    The growing concern over the potential use of biological agents as weapons and the continuing work of the Biological Weapons Convention has promoted an interest in establishing national biological laboratory biosafety and biosecurity monitoring programs. The challenges and issues that should be considered by governments, or organizations, embarking on the creation of a biological laboratory biosafety and biosecurity monitoring program are discussed in this article. The discussion focuses on the following questions: Is there critical infrastructure support available? What should be the program focus? Who should be monitored? Who should do the monitoring? How extensive should the monitoring be? What standards and requirements should be used? What are the consequences if a laboratory does not meet the requirements or is not willing to comply? Would the program achieve the results intended? What are the program costs? The success of a monitoring program can depend on how the government, or organization, responds to these questions.

  8. Costs of examinations performed in a hospital laboratory in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Germán Lobos; Palma, Carolina Salas

    2018-01-01

    To determine the total average costs related to laboratory examinations performed in a hospital laboratory in Chile. Retrospective study with data from July 2014 to June 2015. 92 examinations classified in ten groups were selected according to the analysis methodology. The costs were estimated as the sum of direct and indirect laboratory costs and indirect institutional factors. The average values obtained for the costs according to examination group (in USD) were: 1.79 (clinical chemistry), 10.21 (immunoassay techniques), 13.27 (coagulation), 26.06 (high-performance liquid chromatography), 21.2 (immunological), 3.85 (gases and electrolytes), 156.48 (cytogenetic), 1.38 (urine), 4.02 (automated hematological), 4.93 (manual hematological). The value, or service fee, returned to public institutions who perform laboratory services does not adequately reflect the true total average production costs of examinations.

  9. Case study: improving efficiency in a large hospital laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Marilynn

    2004-01-01

    Saint Francis Health System (SFHS) consists of three hospitals and one clinic: Saint Francis Hospital (SFH); Broken Arrow Medical Center; Laureate Psychiatric Hospital; and Warren Clinic. SFHS has 670 physicians on staff and serves medical (oncology, orthopedic, neurology, and renal), surgical, cardiac, women and infant, pediatric, transplant, and trauma patients in Tulsa County, Oklahoma, which has a population of 660,000. SFH incorporates 706 staffed beds, including 126 pediatric beds and 119 critical care beds. Each year, the health system averages 38,000 admissions, 70,000 emergency department visits, 25,000 surgeries, and 3,500 births. Saint Francis Laboratory is located within the main hospital facility (SFH) and functions as a core lab for the health system. The lab also coordinates lab services with Saint Francis Heart Hospital, a physician-system joint venture. The Optimal Equipment Configuration (OEC) Project was designed by the Clinical Laboratory Services division of Premier, a group purchasing organization, with the goal of determining whether laboratories could improve efficiency and decrease unit cost by using a single-source vendor. Participants included seven business partners (Abbott, Bayer, Beckman/Coulter, Dade/Behring, J&J/ Ortho, Olympus, and Roche) and 21 laboratory sites (a small, mid-sized, and large site for each vendor). SFH laboratory staff embraced Premier's concept and viewed the OEC project as an opportunity to "energize" laboratory operations. SFH partnered with Abbott, their primary equipment vendor, for the project. Using resources and tools made available through the project, the laboratory was re-engineered to simplify workflow, increase productivity, and decrease costs by adding automation and changing to centralized specimen processing. Abbott and SFH shared a common vision for the project and enhanced their partnership through increased communication and problem solving. Abbott's area representatives provided for third

  10. Authorization for the functioning of service laboratories for personal monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    The requirements of the Brazilian CNEN (Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear) are established for the construction licensing and operation authorization of laboratories offering personnel monitoring services for external exposures to X-and gamma radiation. (I.C.R.) [pt

  11. When are fume-cupboards necessary in hospital radioisotope laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birks, J L [Singleton Hospital, Swansea (UK)

    1976-06-01

    Suggestions are made for procedures likely to require the provision of efficient fume-cupboards in hospital radioisotope laboratories. All such departments undertaking in vivo radioisotope procedures will require a supply of sterile materials, but only some of these will also require a fume-cupboard, since the use of a relatively inexpensive aseptic cabinet, without air flow and exhaust system, may suffice for such procedures as the labelling of blood cells or plasma. Efficient fume-cupboards may be required in hospital laboratories that are routinely concerned with the elution of generators of isotopes such as /sup 99/Tcsup(m) and /sup 113/Insup(m), the sterilization of radiopharmaceuticals (e.g. technetium-sulphur colloid) requiring the use of a pressure cooker, and the storage and handling of therapeutic quantities of /sup 131/I. Copious general ventilation of isotope rooms may be preferable to the too frequent incorporation of unnecessary fume-cupboards.

  12. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. 1979 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, W.J.; Lindeken, C.L.; White, J.H.; Buddemeir, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Information on monitoring activities is reported in two sections for EDB/ERA/INIS. The first section covers all information reported except Appendix D, which gives details of sampling and analytical procedures for environmental monitoring used at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. A separate abstract was prepared for Appendix D

  13. Radiation monitoring programme in a university hot laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillander, M.; Heinonen, O.J.

    1979-01-01

    The Department of Radiochemistry in the University of Helsinki is the only institute teaching radiochemistry at the university level in Finland. The research programme of the Deparment must therefore include the uses of radiation and radionuclides in many branches of science. The students must receive adequate instruction in radiation protection for safe work in laboratories. This also has the educational benefit that the radiochemists will subsequently be able to observe the necessary safety precautions when employing ionizing radiation professionally. The Department of Radiochemistry consists of the following laboratories: a radiotracer laboratory, a neutron/electron and a gamma irradiation laboratory, an environmental low activity level laboratory, a whole-body counting laboratory, a reactor chemistry laboratory and a waste-treatment facility. The radiation protection organization of the Department is presented. Various methods of monitoring, including advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the reactor chemistry laboratory where transuranic elements are utilized. These elements are highly radiotoxic and their monitoring in most cases requires destructive analysis. Different methods of determining external and internal doses are evaluated with regard to sensitivity and accuracy. Detection limits for radionuclides utilized in the laboratory are presented for different measurement systems, including non-destructive monitoring, spectrometry after chemical analysis, liquid scintillation counting and low-energy gamma spectrometry using a CsI-NaI scintillation detector. The guidelines laid down in the IAEA Safety Series Manuals are discussed in the light of practical experience. (author)

  14. Monitoring system of the Tritium Research Laboratory, Sandia Laboratories, Livermore, CA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, W.R.; Hafner, R.S.; Westfall, D.L.; Ristau, R.D.

    1978-11-01

    Automated tritium monitoring is now in use at the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL). Betatec 100 tritium monitors, along with several Sandia-designed accessories, have been combined with a PDP 11/40 computer to automatically read and record tritium concentrations of room air, containment, and cleanup systems. Each individual monitoring system, in addition to a local display in the area of interest, has a visible/audible display in the control room. Each system is then channeled into the PDP 11/40 computer, providing immediate assessment of the status of the entire laboratory from a central location. Measurement capability ranges from μCi/m 3 levels for room air monitoring to kCi/m 3 levels for glove box and cleanup systems monitoring. In this report the overall monitoring system and its capabilities are discussed, with detailed descriptions given of monitors and their components

  15. Chromatographic monitoring procedures in laboratory practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplina, E G; Belova, O I; Lasunina, N A

    1976-01-01

    The Moscow Coke and Chemical Works consist of three plants in combination, viz., the coking plant, the synthetic ammonia plant using coke-oven-gas hydrogen and the oxygen plant. The plant requirements include daily analyses not only of the coke-oven gas but also of a rich gas and an ethylene fraction. The analyses are carried out in VTI-2 apparatus. The analytical data are used to calculate the calorific values and densities of the gases. The time requirements are very considerable and the laboratory has long been engaged in developing and introducing chromatographic procedures for the major constituents of coke-oven gas, rich gas and ethylene fraction. The procedure developed for the coke-oven and rich gases uses two parallel columns, one packed with molecular sieves and the other with grade KSM silica gel. Hydrogen was determined with argon as the carrier gas, and all other constituents with helium. The procedure was time-consuming and complicated. An attempt was made to separate the gases in an LKhM-7a chromatograph with a programme-controlled 50 to 250/sup 0/C heating cycle, but the procedure still had a number of serious defects and could not be recommended for regular quality control. The final variant involved two parallel columns and a procedure based on that in GOST 14920 (''Dry gas. Proximate analysis''). The chromatograph was a type KhL-69 with a 6-way cock in the gas line so that each of the columns could be brought on stream in succession. The analytical column packings were zeolite (in a 2 m column) and diatomaceous brick with 25% n-hexadecane (in a 6 m column).

  16. The monitoring system of the Tritium Research Laboratory, Sandia Laboratories, Livermore, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafner, R.S.; Westfall, D.L.; Ristau, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Computerized tritium monitoring is now in use at the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL). Betatec 100 tritium monitors, along with several Sandia designed accessories, have been combined with a PDP 11/40 computer to provide maximum personnel and environmental protection. Each individual monitoring system, in addition to a local display in the area of interest, has a visual/audible display in the control room. Each system is then channeled into the PDP 11/40 computer, providing immediate assessment of the status of the entire laboratory from a central location. Measurement capability ranges from uCi/m 3 levels for room air monitoring to KCi/m 3 levels for glove box and process system monitoring. The overall monitoring system and its capabilities will be presented

  17. Performance indicators for quality in surgical and laboratory services at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH) in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbembati, Naboth A; Mwangu, Mugwira; Muhondwa, Eustace P Y; Leshabari, Melkizedek M

    2008-04-01

    Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH), a teaching and national referral hospital, is undergoing major reforms to improve the quality of health care. We performed a retrospective descriptive study using a set of performance indicators for the surgical and laboratory services of MNH in years 2001 and 2002, to help monitor and evaluate the impact of reforms on the quality of health care during and after the reform process. Hospital records were reviewed and information recorded for planned and postponed operations, laboratory equipment, reagents, laboratory tests and quality assurance programmes. In the year 2001 a total of 4332 non-emergency operations were planned, 3313 operations were performed and 1019 (23.5%) operations were postponed. In the year 2002, 4301 non-emergency operations were planned, 3046 were performed and 1255 (29%) were postponed. The most common reasons for operation postponement were "time-barred", interference by emergency operations, no show of patients and inoperable anaesthetic machines. Equipment problems and supply and staff shortages together accounted for one quarter of postponements. In the laboratory, a lack of equipment prevented some tests, but quality assurance was performed for most tests. Current surgical services at MNH are inadequate; operating theatres require modern, functioning equipment and adequate supplies of consumables to provide satisfactory care.

  18. A test for monitoring under- and overtreatment in Dutch hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Lenz, Oliver Urs; Oberski, Daniel L

    2017-01-01

    Over- and undertreatment harm patients and society and confound other healthcare quality measures. Despite a growing body of research covering specific conditions, we lack tools to systematically detect and measure over- and undertreatment in hospitals. We demonstrate a test used to monitor over- and undertreatment in Dutch hospitals, and illustrate its results applied to the aggregated administrative treatment data of 1,836,349 patients at 89 hospitals in 2013. We employ a random effects mod...

  19. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1989-06-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is described. Data for 1988 are presented and general trends are discussed. In order to establish whether LBL research activities produced any impact on the population surrounding the laboratory, a program of environmental air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring was carried on throughout the year. For 1988, as in the previous several years, dose equivalents attributable to LBL radiological operations were a small fraction of both the relevant radiation protection guidelines (RPG) and of the natural radiation background. 16 refs., 7 figs., 21 tabs

  20. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E. (ed.)

    1989-06-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is described. Data for 1988 are presented and general trends are discussed. In order to establish whether LBL research activities produced any impact on the population surrounding the laboratory, a program of environmental air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring was carried on throughout the year. For 1988, as in the previous several years, dose equivalents attributable to LBL radiological operations were a small fraction of both the relevant radiation protection guidelines (RPG) and of the natural radiation background. 16 refs., 7 figs., 21 tabs.

  1. Implementation of ISO 17025 in the Eletronuclear Environmental Monitoring Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baliza, Ana Rosa; Caetano, Carla de Brito

    2017-01-01

    In order to grant Angra 3 power plant operation license, the Brazilian Institute for the Environment and Renewable Natural Resources (IBAMA), in the IBAMA Installation License 591/2009 condition 2.24, required that Eletronuclear has to obtain the Environmental Monitoring Laboratory accreditation, in accordance with the requirements of NBR ISO / IEC 17025 standard. The accreditation is the formal recognition that a laboratory has a quality assurance system and technical competence to perform specific tests, evaluated according to the criteria based on NBR ISO/IEC 17025 (General requirements for testing and calibration laboratories competence) standard. In Brazil, the General Accreditation Coordination (CGCRE), according to the guidelines already explained by the Brazilian System of Conformity Assessment (INMETRO), does accreditation. The INMETRO is the only official accrediting body in Brazil and internationally recognized by the International Accreditation Forum (IAF). The Environmental Monitoring Laboratory at Eletronuclear is an analytical laboratory of chemical, radiochemical and biological tests, which analyzes several matrices, such as seawater, river water, marine sediment, beach sand, soil, pasture, banana, milk, besides marine sea life, around the Central Almirante Álvaro Alberto power plant station. It is licensed by CNEN, INEA, IBAMA and it follows national and international standards in the performance of the tests as well as in the collection and preparation of samples. This article describes the main steps that the Eletronuclear Environmental Monitoring Laboratory followed to implement ISO 17025. (author)

  2. Implementation of ISO 17025 in the Eletronuclear Environmental Monitoring Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baliza, Ana Rosa; Caetano, Carla de Brito, E-mail: baliza@eletronuclear.gov.br [Eletrobrás Termonuclear S.A. (ELETRONUCLEAR), Angra dos Reis, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    In order to grant Angra 3 power plant operation license, the Brazilian Institute for the Environment and Renewable Natural Resources (IBAMA), in the IBAMA Installation License 591/2009 condition 2.24, required that Eletronuclear has to obtain the Environmental Monitoring Laboratory accreditation, in accordance with the requirements of NBR ISO / IEC 17025 standard. The accreditation is the formal recognition that a laboratory has a quality assurance system and technical competence to perform specific tests, evaluated according to the criteria based on NBR ISO/IEC 17025 (General requirements for testing and calibration laboratories competence) standard. In Brazil, the General Accreditation Coordination (CGCRE), according to the guidelines already explained by the Brazilian System of Conformity Assessment (INMETRO), does accreditation. The INMETRO is the only official accrediting body in Brazil and internationally recognized by the International Accreditation Forum (IAF). The Environmental Monitoring Laboratory at Eletronuclear is an analytical laboratory of chemical, radiochemical and biological tests, which analyzes several matrices, such as seawater, river water, marine sediment, beach sand, soil, pasture, banana, milk, besides marine sea life, around the Central Almirante Álvaro Alberto power plant station. It is licensed by CNEN, INEA, IBAMA and it follows national and international standards in the performance of the tests as well as in the collection and preparation of samples. This article describes the main steps that the Eletronuclear Environmental Monitoring Laboratory followed to implement ISO 17025. (author)

  3. Environmental Monitoring Of Microbiological Laboratory: Expose Plate Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahaya Talib; Othman Mahmud; Noraisyah Mohd Yusof; Asmah Mohibat; Muhamad Syazwan Zulkifli

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring of microorganism is important and conducted regularly on environment of microbiological laboratory at Medical Technology Division. Its objective is to ensure the quality of working environment is maintained according to microbial contamination, consequently to assure the quality of microbiological tests. This paper presents report of environmental monitoring since year 2007. The test involved was bacterial colony counts after the growth media was exposed to air at identified location. (author)

  4. Environmental monitoring systems: a new type of mobile laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruecher, L.; Langmueller, G.; Tuerschmann, G.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear facilities are obligated to monitor the environmental radiation in their vicinity, which is often fulfilled by monitoring cars, combined with fixed monitoring stations. The MOLAR Mobile Laboratory for Environmental Radiation Monitoring as described here is being used under normal and accident conditions as a spot check monitoring system or to perform continuous measurements along a driving track. The mobile laboratories are continuously connected with the control centre's CRCS Central Radiological Computer System, where the RIS Radiological Information System provides corresponding evaluation functions. The mobile labs contain measuring and controlling units like γ-dose rate monitors, γ-spectrometer with a HpGe High Purity Germanium detector, a lead shielded measuring cell and MCA Multi-Channel Analyser, portable β-contamination monitor, α/β/γ multipurpose quick measuring unit, aerosol and iodine sampling units. The collected samples are safely stored for the transport to the environmental laboratory for being analysed later. The geographical location of the moving car is continuously determined by the satellite based GPS Global Positioning System and transferred in the on-board rack mounted computer system for being stored and locally displayed. Real-time data transmission via radio and mobile phone is continuously performed to supply the RIS Radiological Information System in the control centre via radio and mobile phone. The latter also serves for voice communication. Currently three MOLAR systems can be operated parallel and independent from the control centre. The system is ready to be extended to more mobile labs. This combination of mobile monitoring, sample analysis and radiological assessment of environmental data in combination with process occurrences has turned out to be a powerful instrument for emergency preparedness and environmental supervising. (orig.) [de

  5. Tritium monitoring at the Sandia Tritium Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devlin, T.K.

    1978-10-01

    Sandia Laboratories at Livermore, California, is presently beginning operation of a Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL). The laboratory incorporates containment and cleanup facilities such that any unscheduled tritium release is captured rather than vented to the atmosphere. A sophisticated tritium monitoring system is in use at the TRL to protect operating personnel and the environment, as well as ensure the safe and effective operation of the TRL decontamination systems. Each monitoring system has, in addition to a local display, a display in a centralized control room which, when coupled room which, when coupled with the TRL control computer, automatically provides an immediate assessment of the status of the entire facility. The computer controls a complex alarm array status of the entire facility. The computer controls a complex alarm array and integrates and records all operational and unscheduled tritium releases

  6. Test plan for demonstration of Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    This plan describes tests to demonstrate the capability of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) to monitor airborne alpha-emitting radionuclides and analyze soil, smear, and filter samples for alpha- and gamma-emitting radionuclides under field conditions. The RTML will be tested during June 1993 at a site adjacent to the Cold Test Pit at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Measurement systems installed in the RTML that will be demonstrated include two large-area ionization chamber alpha spectrometers, an x-ray/gamma-ray spectrometer, and four alpha continuous air monitors. Test objectives, requirements for data quality, experimental apparatus and procedures, and safety and logistics issues are described

  7. Assessing hospitals' clinical risk management: Development of a monitoring instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeiffer Yvonne

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical risk management (CRM plays a crucial role in enabling hospitals to identify, contain, and manage risks related to patient safety. So far, no instruments are available to measure and monitor the level of implementation of CRM. Therefore, our objective was to develop an instrument for assessing CRM in hospitals. Methods The instrument was developed based on a literature review, which identified key elements of CRM. These elements were then discussed with a panel of patient safety experts. A theoretical model was used to describe the level to which CRM elements have been implemented within the organization. Interviews with CRM practitioners and a pilot evaluation were conducted to revise the instrument. The first nationwide application of the instrument (138 participating Swiss hospitals was complemented by in-depth interviews with 25 CRM practitioners in selected hospitals, for validation purposes. Results The monitoring instrument consists of 28 main questions organized in three sections: 1 Implementation and organizational integration of CRM, 2 Strategic objectives and operational implementation of CRM at hospital level, and 3 Overview of CRM in different services. The instrument is available in four languages (English, German, French, and Italian. It allows hospitals to gather comprehensive and systematic data on their CRM practice and to identify areas for further improvement. Conclusions We have developed an instrument for assessing development stages of CRM in hospitals that should be feasible for a continuous monitoring of developments in this important area of patient safety.

  8. Assessing hospitals' clinical risk management: Development of a monitoring instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briner, Matthias; Kessler, Oliver; Pfeiffer, Yvonne; Wehner, Theo; Manser, Tanja

    2010-12-13

    Clinical risk management (CRM) plays a crucial role in enabling hospitals to identify, contain, and manage risks related to patient safety. So far, no instruments are available to measure and monitor the level of implementation of CRM. Therefore, our objective was to develop an instrument for assessing CRM in hospitals. The instrument was developed based on a literature review, which identified key elements of CRM. These elements were then discussed with a panel of patient safety experts. A theoretical model was used to describe the level to which CRM elements have been implemented within the organization. Interviews with CRM practitioners and a pilot evaluation were conducted to revise the instrument. The first nationwide application of the instrument (138 participating Swiss hospitals) was complemented by in-depth interviews with 25 CRM practitioners in selected hospitals, for validation purposes. The monitoring instrument consists of 28 main questions organized in three sections: 1) Implementation and organizational integration of CRM, 2) Strategic objectives and operational implementation of CRM at hospital level, and 3) Overview of CRM in different services. The instrument is available in four languages (English, German, French, and Italian). It allows hospitals to gather comprehensive and systematic data on their CRM practice and to identify areas for further improvement. We have developed an instrument for assessing development stages of CRM in hospitals that should be feasible for a continuous monitoring of developments in this important area of patient safety.

  9. 1992 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culp, T.; Cox, W.; Hwang, H.; Irwin, M.; Jones, A.; Matz, B.; Molley, K.; Rhodes, W.; Stermer, D.; Wolff, T.

    1993-09-01

    This 1992 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, envirorunental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 0.0034 millirem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.019 person-rem during 1992 from the laboratories' operations. As in the previous year, the 1992 operations at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment

  10. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 325 Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1999-03-01

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs.'' This FEMP has been prepared for the RPL primarily because it has a ''major'' (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The RPL at PNNL houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and radioactive mixed waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities within the building include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed radioactive, low-level radioactive, and transuranic wastes generated by PNNL activities

  11. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 325 Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1999-04-02

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs.'' This FEMP has been prepared for the RPL primarily because it has a ''major'' (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The RPL at PNNL houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and radioactive mixed waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities within the building include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed radioactive, low-level radioactive, and transuranic wastes generated by PNNL activities.

  12. Cost effectiveness of adopted quality requirements in hospital laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Alneil; Ahmed-Abakur, Eltayib; Abugroun, Elsir; Bakhit, Siham; Holi, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed in quasi-experiment to assess adoption of the essential clauses of particular clinical laboratory quality management requirements based on international organization for standardization (ISO 15189) in hospital laboratories and to evaluate the cost effectiveness of compliance to ISO 15189. The quality management intervention based on ISO 15189 was conceded through three phases; pre - intervention phase, Intervention phase and Post-intervention phase. In pre-intervention phase the compliance to ISO 15189 was 49% for study group vs. 47% for control group with P value 0.48, while the post intervention results displayed 54% vs. 79% for study group and control group respectively in compliance to ISO 15189 and statistically significant difference (P value 0.00) with effect size (Cohen's d) of (0.00) in pre-intervention phase and (0.99) in post - intervention phase. The annual average cost per-test for the study group and control group was 1.80 ± 0.25 vs. 1.97 ± 0.39, respectively with P value 0.39 whereas the post-intervention results showed that the annual average total costs per-test for study group and control group was 1.57 ± 0.23 vs 2.08 ± 0.38, P value 0.019 respectively, with cost-effectiveness ratio of (0.88) in pre -intervention phase and (0.52) in post-intervention phase. The planned adoption of quality management requirements (QMS) in clinical laboratories had great effect to increase the compliance percent with quality management system requirement, raise the average total cost effectiveness, and improve the analytical process capability of the testing procedure.

  13. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-12-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the three KAPL Sites [Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York; Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York; S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut] during calendar year 1999 resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations.

  14. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the three KAPL Sites [Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York; Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York; S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut] during calendar year 1999 resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations

  15. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 222-S Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.V.

    1991-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems against applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the first annual report. It shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. The current operation of the 222-S facilities includes the provision of analytical and radiological chemistry services in support of Hanford Site processing plants. The emphasis is on waste management, chemical processing, environmental monitoring effluent programs at B Plant, the Uranium Oxide Plant, Tank Farms, the 242-A Evaporator, the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility, the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Facility, the Plutonium Finishing Plant, process development/impact activities, and essential materials. The laboratory also supplies analytical services in support of ongoing waste tank characterization

  16. Radioactive effluent monitoring at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, O.D.

    1975-01-01

    The Effluent and Radiation Measurements Laboratory at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has recently upgraded capabilities in the field of monitoring and analysis of radioactive airborne and liquid effluents using the techniques of gamma-ray spectrometry. The techniques and equipment used include remotely-operated, computer-based Ge(Li) spectrometers which obtain data on a real-time basis. Permanent record files are maintained of both the effluent release values and the gamma-ray data from which the release values are calculated. Should values for release levels ever be challenged, the gamma-ray spectral information for any measurement can be recalled and analyzed as needed. Daily effluent release reports are provided to operating personnel which contributes to prompt correction of any operational problems. Monthly, quarterly, and annual reports are compiled which provide inventories of the radionuclides released. A description of the effluent monitoring, reporting and records system developed at INEL for this application will be presented

  17. Evaluating laboratory key performance using quality indicators in Alexandria University Hospital Clinical Chemistry Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Mostafa M; Zaki, Adel; Hossam, Nermine; Aboul-Ela, Yasmin

    2014-12-01

    The performance of clinical laboratories plays a fundamental role in the quality and effectiveness of healthcare. To evaluate the laboratory performance in Alexandria University Hospital Clinical Laboratories using key quality indicators and to compare the performance before and after an improvement plan based on ISO 15189 standards. The study was carried out on inpatient samples for a period of 7 months that was divided into three phases: phase I included data collection for evaluation of the existing process before improvement (March-May 2012); an intermediate phase, which included corrective, preventive action, quality initiative and steps for improvement (June 2012); and phase II, which included data collection for evaluation of the process after improvement (July 2012-September 2012). In terms of the preanalytical indicators, incomplete request forms in phase I showed that the total number of received requests were 31 944, with a percentage of defected request of 33.66%; whereas in phase II, there was a significant reduction in all defected request items (Plaboratories.

  18. Tritium monitor calibration at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjork, C.J.; Aikin, D.J.; Houlton, T.W.

    1997-08-01

    Tritium in air is monitored at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with air breathing instruments based on ionization chambers. Stack emissions are continuously monitored from sample tubes which each connect to a Tritium bubble which differentially collects HTO and HT. A set of glass vials of glycol capture the HTO. The HT is oxidized with a palladium catalyst and the resultant HTO is captured in a second set of vials of glycol. The glycol is counted with a liquid scintillation counter. All calibrations are performed with tritium containing gas. The Radiation Instrumentation and Calibration (RIC) Team has constructed and maintains two closed loop gas handling systems based on femto TECH model U24 tritium ion chamber monitors: a fixed system housed in a fume hood and a portable system mounted on two two wheeled hand trucks. The U24 monitors are calibrated against tritium in nitrogen gas standards. They are used as standard transfer instruments to calibrate other ion chamber monitors with tritium in nitrogen, diluted with air. The gas handling systems include a circulation pump which permits a closed circulation loop to be established among the U24 monitor and typically two to four other monitors of a given model during calibration. Fixed and portable monitors can be calibrated. The stack bubblers are calibrated in the field by: blending a known concentration of tritium in air within the known volume of the two portable carts, coupled into a common loop; releasing that gas mixture into a ventilation intake to the stack; collecting oxidized tritium in the bubbler; counting the glycol; and using the stack and bubbler flow rates, computing the bubbler's efficiency. Gas calibration has become a convenient and quality tool in maintaining the tritium monitors at LANL

  19. Monitoring and information management system at the Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobel, G.S.; Chernis, P.J.; Bushman, A.T.; Spinney, M.H.; Backer, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed a customer oriented monitoring and information management system at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) near Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba. The system is used to monitor instruments and manage, process, and distribute data. It consists of signal conditioners and remote loggers, central schedule and control systems, computer aided design and drafting work centres, and the communications linking them. The monitoring and communications elements are designed to meet the harsh demands of underground conditions while providing accurate monitoring of sensitive instruments to rigorous quality assured specifications. These instruments are used for testing of the concept for the deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste as part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. Many of the tests are done in situ and at full-scale. The monitoring and information management system services engineering, research, and support staff working to design, develop, and demonstrate and present the concept. Experience gained during development of the monitoring and information management system at the URL, can be directly applied at the final disposal site. (author)

  20. Monitoring and information management system at the Underground Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobel, G.S.; Chernis, P.J.; Bushman, A.T.; Spinney, M.H.; Backer, R.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

    1996-07-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed a customer oriented monitoring and information management system at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) near Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba. The system is used to monitor instruments and manage, process, and distribute data. It consists of signal conditioners and remote loggers, central schedule and control systems, computer aided design and drafting work centres, and the communications linking them. The monitoring and communications elements are designed to meet the harsh demands of underground conditions while providing accurate monitoring of sensitive instruments to rigorous quality assured specifications. These instruments are used for testing of the concept for the deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste as part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. Many of the tests are done in situ and at full-scale. The monitoring and information management system services engineering, research, and support staff working to design, develop, and demonstrate and present the concept. Experience gained during development of the monitoring and information management system at the URL, can be directly applied at the final disposal site. (author)

  1. Urine Creatinine Concentrations in Drug Monitoring Participants and Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Sara A; Seegmiller, Jesse C; Kloss, Julie; Apple, Fred S

    2016-10-01

    Urine drug testing is commonly performed in both clinical and forensic arenas for screening, monitoring and compliance purposes. We sought to determine if urine creatinine concentrations in monitoring program participants were significantly different from hospital in-patients and out-patients undergoing urine drug testing. We retrospectively reviewed urine creatinine submitted in June through December 2015 for all specimens undergoing urine drug testing. The 20,479 creatinine results were categorized as hospitalized patients (H) and monitoring/compliance groups for pain management (P), legal (L) or recovery (R). Median creatinine concentrations (interquartile range, mg/dL) were significantly different (P creatinine concentrations were significantly lower in the R vs. L group (Pcreatinine concentration and may indicate participants' attempts to tamper with their drug test results through dilution means. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and Site closure activities at the S1C Site (also known as the KAPL Windsor Site) continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations. The environmental monitoring program for the S1C Site continues to be reduced in scope from previous years due to the completion of Site dismantlement activities during 1999 and a return to green field conditions during 2000

  3. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York and the Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York and site closure activities at the S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut, continued to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment during calendar year 2000. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations. Monitoring programs at the S1C Site were reduced in scope during calendar year 2000 due to completion of site dismantlement activities during 1999

  4. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2001-12-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York and the Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York and site closure activities at the S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut, continued to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment during calendar year 2000. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations. Monitoring programs at the S1C Site were reduced in scope during calendar year 2000 due to completion of site dismantlement activities during 1999.

  5. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-12-31

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and Site closure activities at the S1C Site (also known as the KAPL Windsor Site) continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations. The environmental monitoring program for the S1C Site continues to be reduced in scope from previous years due to the completion of Site dismantlement activities during 1999 and a return to green field conditions during 2000.

  6. [Immunological monitoring in kidney transplantation: 13 years experience of a Moroccan histocompatibility laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brick, C; Atouf, O; Essakalli, M

    2016-05-01

    The quality of the immunological monitoring is crucial because it determines the success of the kidney transplantation. The scope of this work is to describe the experience of the department of immunological unity of the Ibn Sina university hospital in Rabat regarding the immunological monitoring of patients transplanted between 2001 and 2014. Patient samples were collected from nephrology services of different public and private hospitals of Morocco. The tests conducted in the context of immunological monitoring are ABO typing, HLA-A, B, DR, DQ typing, anti-HLA antibodies detection and identification and cross-match. One hundred and fourteen benefited from a pre- and post-transplant immunological monitoring in our laboratory. The percentage of recipients having between 2 and 5 stored sera is 60.5 before transplantation and 56.1 after transplantation. Immunized patients account for 22.8% before the transplant and 17.6% after transplantation. Ninety-seven patients still have a functional graft, while 4 of them had DSA of low intensity before transplantation. Five immunological rejections were reported while the cross-match were negative and no DSA was identified before transplantation. Patient survival and graft at 1 year was 98.2% and 92.7% respectively. Conducting regular immunological monitoring is sometimes difficult in our context, however, the results are satisfactory in terms of graft and patients survival. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. 1987 environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devlin, T.K.

    1988-04-01

    Sandia National Labortories conduct various research activities related to Department of Energy interests which have the potential for release of hazardous materials or radionuclides to the environment. A strict environmental control program places maximum emphasis on limiting releases. The environmental monitoring program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and augmented by Sandia is designed to measure the performance of the environmental controls. The program includes analysis of air, water, soil, vegetation, sewer effluent, ground water, and foodstuffs for various toxic, hazardous, or radioactive materials. Based on these studies, the releases of materials of concern at Sandia during 1987 were well below applicable Department of Energy standards. 8 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs

  8. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1983-04-01

    In order to establish whether LBL research activities produces any impact on the population surrounding the Laboratory, a program of environmental air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring was carried on throughout the year. For 1982, as in the previous several years, doses attributable to LBL radiological operations were a small fraction of the relevant radiation protection guidelines (RPG). The maximum perimeter dose equivalent was less than or equal to 24.0 mrem (the 1982 dose equivalent measured at the Building 88 monitoring station B-13A, about 5% of the RPG). The total population dose equivalent attributable to LBL operations during 1982 was less than or equal to 16 man-rem, about 0.002% of the RPG of 170 mrem/person to a suitable sample of the population

  9. Effluent and environmental monitoring of Chalk River Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilgrim, T.; De Waele, C.; Gallagher, C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL's) Environmental Protection Program has been gathering environmental monitoring data at its Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) for over 60 years. The comprehensive effluent and environmental monitoring program at CRL consists of more than 600 sampling locations, including the Ottawa River, with approximately 60,000 analyses performed on air and liquid effluent parameters each year. Monitoring for a variety of radiological and non-radiological parameters is regularly conducted on various media, including ambient air, foodstuff (e.g. milk, fish, garden produce, large game, and farm animals), groundwater, Ottawa River water and other surface water on and off-site. The purpose of the monitoring program is to verify that past and current radiological and non-radiological emissions derived from AECL operations and activities, such as process water effluent into the Ottawa River, are below regulatory limits and demonstrate that CRL operations do not negatively affect the quality of water on or leaving the site. In fact, ongoing program reports demonstrate that radiological emissions are well below regulatory limits and have been declining for the past five years, and that non-radiological contaminants do not negatively affect the quality of water on and off the site. Two updated Canadian Standards Association (CSA) standards for Effluent and Environmental monitoring have come into effect and have resulted in some changes to the AECL Program. This presentation will discuss effluent and surface water monitoring results, the observed trends, the changes triggered by the CSA standards, and a path forward for the future. (author)

  10. Liquid Effluent Monitoring Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballinger, M.Y.

    1995-05-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting a program to monitor the waste water from PNL-operated research and development facilities on the Hanford Site. The purpose of the program is to collect data to assess administrative controls and to determine whether discharges to the process sewer meet sewer criteria. Samples have been collected on a regular basis from the major PNL facilities on the Hanford Site since March 1994. A broad range of analyses has been performed to determine the primary constituents in the liquid effluent. The sampling program is briefly summarized in the paper. Continuous monitoring of pH, conductivity, and flow also provides data on the liquid effluent streams. In addition to sampling and monitoring, the program is evaluating the dynamics of the waste stream with dye studies and is evaluating the use of newer technologies for potential deployment in future sampling/monitoring efforts. Information collected to date has been valuable in determining sources of constituents that may be higher than the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for the Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). This facility treats the waste streams before discharge to the Columbia River

  11. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) sites are summarized and assessed in this report. The principal function at KAPL sites (Knolls, Kesselring, and Windsor) is research and development in the design and operation of Naval nuclear propulsion plants. The Kesselring Site is also used for the training of personnel in the operation of these plants. The Naval nuclear propulsion plant at the Windsor Site is currently being dismantled. Operations at the three KAPL sites resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each site and at off-site background locations

  12. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) sites are summarized and assessed in this report. The principal function at KAPL sites (Knolls, Kesselring, and Windsor) is research and development in the design and operation of Naval nuclear propulsion plants. The Kesselring Site is also used for the training of personnel in the operation of these plants. The Naval nuclear propulsion plant at the Windsor Site is currently being dismantled. Operations at the three KAPL sites resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each site and at off-site background locations.

  13. [Monitoring evaluation system for high-specialty hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo Dolci, Germán; Aguirre Gas, Héctor G; Robledo Galván, Héctor

    2011-01-01

    Hospital evaluation is a fundamental process to identify medical units' objective compliance, to analyze efficiency of resource use and allocation, institutional values and mission alignment, patient safety and quality standards, contributions to research and medical education, and the degree of coordination among medical units and the health system as a whole. We propose an evaluation system for highly specialized regional hospitals through the monitoring of performance indicators. The following are established as base thematic elements in the construction of indicators: safe facilities and equipment, financial situation, human resources management, policy management, organizational climate, clinical activity, quality and patient safety, continuity of care, patients' and providers' rights and obligations, teaching, research, social responsibility, coordination mechanisms. Monitoring refers to the planned and systematic evaluation of valid and reliable indicators, aimed at identifying problems and opportunity areas. Moreover, evaluation is a powerful tool to strengthen decision-making and accountability in medical units.

  14. Status of eye lens radiation dose monitoring in European hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carinou, Eleftheria; Ginjaume, Merce; O’Connor, Una; Kopec, Renata; Sans Merce, Marta

    2014-01-01

    A questionnaire was developed by the members of WG12 of EURADOS in order to establish an overview of the current status of eye lens radiation dose monitoring in hospitals. The questionnaire was sent to medical physicists and radiation protection officers in hospitals across Europe. Specific topics were addressed in the questionnaire such as: knowledge of the proposed eye lens dose limit; monitoring and dosimetry issues; training and radiation protection measures. The results of the survey highlighted that the new eye lens dose limit can be exceeded in interventional radiology procedures and that eye lens protection is crucial. Personnel should be properly trained in how to use protective equipment in order to keep eye lens doses as low as reasonably achievable. Finally, the results also highlighted the need to improve the design of eye dosemeters in order to ensure satisfactory use by workers. (paper)

  15. Radiation exposure of non-monitored hospital personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renaud, L.; Blanchette, J.; Galand, C.

    1993-02-01

    This project investigated the radiological impact of nuclear medicine patients on non-monitored personnel in hospital environments. More than 800 workers and 135 specific areas in three Quebec hospitals were surveyed daily during a six-month period with Geiger counters, TLD badges, and TLD chips. Average dose rates of up to 2.2 μSv/h were measured in some waiting areas. The radiation level of a nursing unit is a direct function of the ambulatory radioactivity carried by nuclear medicine patients. Three percent of the workers surveyed had a work-related dose in excess of 0.3 mSv/6 months (maximum 1.4 mSv/6 months). Over 88 percent were in the range between local background and 0.3 mSv/6 months. Less than 4 percent belong to groups of workers who were exposed to a level indistinguishable from background. Thus many workers surveyed in this study receive a work-related dose similar to those of medical workers monitored by Health and Welfare Canada. The average annual dose for these workers was 104 person-millisieverts. The authors recommend: better management of radioactive patients; the provision of information and education for all hospital workers having regular contact with radioactive patients; and the facilitation of the identification of nuclear medicine patients within the hospital environment. (28 tabs., 23 figs.)

  16. The makeover of the Lakeshore General Hospital laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estioko-Taimuri, Teresa

    2006-01-31

    This article describes the expansion and reorganization of a moderate-sized Canadian laboratory from Day One to "Live Day." The key factors to the success of this project were organized planning by the laboratory staff and the introduction of core lab theories, team building, and organized training sessions. The successful makeover resulted in improved turnaround time for STAT tests, especially those coming from the Emergency Unit. The efforts of the laboratory personnel toward the improvement of laboratory services, in spite of budget, human resources constraints, and resistance to change, are addressed.

  17. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, L.D.

    1978-03-01

    The data obtained from the Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for the Calendar year 1977 are described and general trends are discussed. The general trend of decreasing radiation levels at our site boundary due to accelerator operation during past years has leveled off during 1977 and in some areas shows a slight but not statistically significant increase as predicted in last year's summary. There were changes in both ion beams as well as current which have resulted in shifts in maxima at the monitoring stations. The gamma levels are once again reported as zero. There is only one period of detectable gamma radiation due to accelerator operation. The annual dose equivalent are reported from the environmental monitoring stations since they have been established. Radiation levels at the Olympus Gate Station have shown a steady decline since 1959 when estimates were first made. The Olympus Gate Station is in direct view of the Bevatron and most directly influenced by that accelerator. Over the past several years the atmospheric sampling program has, with the exception of occasional known releases, yielded data which are within the range of normal background. The surface water program always yields results within the range of normal background. As no substantial changes in the quantities of radionuclides used are anticipated, no changes are expected in these observations

  18. Implementation of an occupational monitoring program in diagnostic radiology at the 'Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Sergio Ricardo de; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Azevedo, Ana Cecilia Pedrosa de

    2003-01-01

    An occupational monitoring program in diagnostic radiology was implemented at the Hospital Clementino Fraga Filho of the Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UFRJ), Brazil, in accordance with the Brazilian legislation. Previously, a survey of all personnel involved with ionizing radiation was performed. Many problems were observed: the great majority of the workers were not properly monitored; only three departments of the hospital kept an independent survey of the occupational doses; there was not a follow-up control of the high doses. With the implementation of the program, a new laboratory was chosen to read the dosemeters and this initiative resulted in reduction of the hospital costs. The inclusion of seven more departments in the program represented an increase of 60% in the number of monitored workers. The program also provided a system to control the high doses, especially in the Hemodynamics department, which presented the highest mean dose value (0.32 mSv/month). An area survey program was performed during different periods in places considered of high risk for the workers and for the public as well. At the same time, a software was used to build a database with the aim of controlling all personnel data. The implementation of the program provided all personnel involved a better knowledge of the risks associated with ionizing radiation and of radioprotection, and also awareness of the need of correct use of the personal dose monitors. (author)

  19. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1984-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1983 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. 19 references, 8 figures, 49 tables

  20. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1983-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne Ntaional Laboratory for 1982 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and masurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated

  1. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1981-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1980 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and foodstuffs; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated

  2. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1979-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1978 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, Argonne effluent water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and foodstuffs; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements wee made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated

  3. 1990 Environmental Monitoring Report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, S.; Yeager, G.; Wolff, T.; Parsons, A.; Dionne, D.; Massey, C.; Schwartz, B.; Fish, J.; Thompson, D.; Goodrich, M.

    1991-05-01

    This 1990 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 2.0 x 10 -3 mrem. The total 50-mile population received a collective dose of 0.82 person-rem during 1990 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, the 1990 SNL operations had no adverse impact on the general public or on the environment. This report is prepared for the US Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1. 97 refs., 30 figs., 137 tabs

  4. 1991 Environmental monitoring report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culp, T.; Cox, W.; Hwang, S.; Jones, A.; Longley, S.; Parsons, A.; Wolff, T.; Fish, J.; Ward, S.

    1992-11-01

    This 1991 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation, environmental permits, envirorunental restoration (ER), and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 1.3 x 10 -3 mrem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of SNL, Albuquerque, received a collective dose of 0.53 person-rem during 1991 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, the 1991 operations at SNL, Albuquerque, had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment

  5. Environmental and effluent monitoring at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Camilleri, A.; Loosz, T.; Farrar, Y.

    1995-12-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in the vicinity of the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories (LHRL) during 1994. All low level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from controlled airborne discharges during this period, were estimated to be less than 0.015 mSv/year for receptor locations on the 1.6 km buffer zone boundary around HIFAR. This value represents 1.5 % of the 1 mSv/year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council, and 5 % of the site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year adopted by ANSTO. 27 refs., 22 tabs., 6 figs

  6. Environmental and effluent monitoring at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, E L; Camilleri, A; Loosz, T; Farrar, Y

    1995-12-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in the vicinity of the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories (LHRL) during 1994. All low level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from controlled airborne discharges during this period, were estimated to be less than 0.015 mSv/year for receptor locations on the 1.6 km buffer zone boundary around HIFAR. This value represents 1.5 % of the 1 mSv/year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council, and 5 % of the site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year adopted by ANSTO. 27 refs., 22 tabs., 6 figs.

  7. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1982-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1981 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated

  8. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1977-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1976 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, Argonne effluent water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and foodstuffs; for a variety of chemical constituents in surface and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with accepted environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated

  9. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1980-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1979 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, Argonne effluent water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and foodstuffs; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environemetal penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measuremenets were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated

  10. Survey of safety practices among hospital laboratories in Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewunet, Tsegaye; Kebede, Wakjira; Wondafrash, Beyene; Workalemau, Bereket; Abebe, Gemeda

    2014-10-01

    Unsafe working practices, working environments, disposable waste products, and chemicals in clinical laboratories contribute to infectious and non-infectious hazards. Staffs, the community, and patients are less safe. Furthermore, such practices compromise the quality of laboratory services. We conducted a study to describe safety practices in public hospital laboratories of Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia. Randomly selected ten public hospital laboratories in Oromia Regional State were studied from Oct 2011- Feb 2012. Self-administered structured questionnaire and observation checklists were used for data collection. The respondents were heads of the laboratories, senior technicians, and safety officers. The questionnaire addressed biosafety label, microbial hazards, chemical hazards, physical/mechanical hazards, personal protective equipment, first aid kits and waste disposal system. The data was analyzed using descriptive analysis with SPSS version16 statistical software. All of the respondents reported none of the hospital laboratories were labeled with the appropriate safety label and safety symbols. These respondents also reported they may contain organisms grouped under risk group IV in the absence of microbiological safety cabinets. Overall, the respondents reported that there were poor safety regulations or standards in their laboratories. There were higher risks of microbial, chemical and physical/mechanical hazards. Laboratory safety in public hospitals of Oromia Regional State is below the standard. The laboratory workers are at high risk of combined physical, chemical and microbial hazards. Prompt recognition of the problem and immediate action is mandatory to ensure safe working environment in health laboratories.

  11. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Hydro Monitoring Program. Report for 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wass, Eva; Nyberg, Goeran (GEOSIGMA, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2009-08-15

    The Aespoe island is situated close to the nuclear power plant of Simpevarp in southeastern Sweden. As part of the pre-investigations preceding excavation of the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, registrations of the groundwater levels and electrical conductivity in packed-off borehole sections and levels in open boreholes started in 1987. The investigations are still ongoing and are planned to continue for a long period of time. As the tunnel excavation went on from the autumn 1990 and onwards, new boreholes were drilled in the tunnel and instrumented to enable groundwater pressure monitoring in packed-off sections. In addition, other hydro-related measurements such as water flow in the tunnel, electrical conductivity of tunnel water and inflow and outflow of water through tunnel pipes have been performed. This report is a summary of the monitoring during 2008. In order to allow for comparison with factors that may influence the groundwater level/pressure and flow, meteorological data are also presented in the report. From the end of 1991, the disturbance from the tunnel is the dominating factor influencing groundwater levels in the area. In one chapter, activities that may have an influence on the ground water situation are listed and briefly discussed.

  12. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Hydro Monitoring Program. Report for 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wass, Eva; Nyberg, Goeran (GEOSIGMA, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2010-05-15

    The Aespoe island is situated close to the nuclear power plant of Simpevarp in southeastern Sweden. As part of the pre-investigations preceding excavation of the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, registrations of the groundwater levels and electrical conductivity in packed-off borehole sections and levels in open boreholes started in 1987. The investigations are still ongoing and are planned to continue for a long period of time. As the tunnel excavation went on from the autumn 1990 and onwards, new boreholes were drilled in the tunnel and instrumented to enable groundwater pressure monitoring in packed-off sections. In addition, other hydro-related measurements such as water flow in the tunnel, electrical conductivity of tunnel water and inflow and outflow of water through tunnel pipes have been performed. This report is a summary of the monitoring during 2009. In order to allow for comparison with factors that may influence the groundwater level/pressure and flow, meteorological data are also presented in the report. From the end of 1991, the disturbance from the tunnel is the dominating factor influencing groundwater levels in the area. In one chapter, activities that may have an influence on the ground water situation are listed and briefly discussed

  13. Novel Monitoring Techniques for Characterizing Frictional Interfaces in the Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Selvadurai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A pressure-sensitive film was used to characterize the asperity contacts along a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA interface in the laboratory. The film has structural health monitoring (SHM applications for flanges and other precision fittings and train rail condition monitoring. To calibrate the film, simple spherical indentation tests were performed and validated against a finite element model (FEM to compare normal stress profiles. Experimental measurements of the normal stress profiles were within −7.7% to 6.6% of the numerical calculations between 12 and 50 MPa asperity normal stress. The film also possessed the capability of quantifying surface roughness, an important parameter when examining wear and attrition in SHM applications. A high definition video camera supplied data for photometric analysis (i.e., the measure of visible light of asperities along the PMMA-PMMA interface in a direct shear configuration, taking advantage of the transparent nature of the sample material. Normal stress over individual asperities, calculated with the pressure-sensitive film, was compared to the light intensity transmitted through the interface. We found that the luminous intensity transmitted through individual asperities linearly increased 0.05643 ± 0.0012 candelas for an increase of 1 MPa in normal stress between normal stresses ranging from 23 to 33 MPa.

  14. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Hydro Monitoring Program. Report for 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wass, Eva; Nyberg, Goeran

    2009-08-01

    The Aespoe island is situated close to the nuclear power plant of Simpevarp in southeastern Sweden. As part of the pre-investigations preceding excavation of the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, registrations of the groundwater levels and electrical conductivity in packed-off borehole sections and levels in open boreholes started in 1987. The investigations are still ongoing and are planned to continue for a long period of time. As the tunnel excavation went on from the autumn 1990 and onwards, new boreholes were drilled in the tunnel and instrumented to enable groundwater pressure monitoring in packed-off sections. In addition, other hydro-related measurements such as water flow in the tunnel, electrical conductivity of tunnel water and inflow and outflow of water through tunnel pipes have been performed. This report is a summary of the monitoring during 2008. In order to allow for comparison with factors that may influence the groundwater level/pressure and flow, meteorological data are also presented in the report. From the end of 1991, the disturbance from the tunnel is the dominating factor influencing groundwater levels in the area. In one chapter, activities that may have an influence on the ground water situation are listed and briefly discussed

  15. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Hydro Monitoring Program. Report for 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wass, Eva; Nyberg, Goeran

    2010-05-01

    The Aespoe island is situated close to the nuclear power plant of Simpevarp in southeastern Sweden. As part of the pre-investigations preceding excavation of the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, registrations of the groundwater levels and electrical conductivity in packed-off borehole sections and levels in open boreholes started in 1987. The investigations are still ongoing and are planned to continue for a long period of time. As the tunnel excavation went on from the autumn 1990 and onwards, new boreholes were drilled in the tunnel and instrumented to enable groundwater pressure monitoring in packed-off sections. In addition, other hydro-related measurements such as water flow in the tunnel, electrical conductivity of tunnel water and inflow and outflow of water through tunnel pipes have been performed. This report is a summary of the monitoring during 2009. In order to allow for comparison with factors that may influence the groundwater level/pressure and flow, meteorological data are also presented in the report. From the end of 1991, the disturbance from the tunnel is the dominating factor influencing groundwater levels in the area. In one chapter, activities that may have an influence on the ground water situation are listed and briefly discussed

  16. Boston City Hospital and the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory: the birth of modern haematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrod, Jeffrey M; Karnad, Anand B

    2003-05-01

    Established in 1923, the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory at Boston City Hospital was the first clinical research laboratory in a municipal hospital in the United States of America. Minot and Castle, who were the second and third directors of the Laboratory, were pioneer haematologists and clinical investigators of the highest calibre who created an atmosphere at the Laboratory that would foster patient-centred research and attract the best physician-scientists to work and train there. The haematology research division of the Laboratory made important original contributions to the understanding of the pathophysiology of anaemia, the mechanisms of red cell and platelet destruction and the phagocytic role of the spleen, the nature of haemoglobin (normal and sickle cell), the nature of haemophilia and its therapy and the early classification of lymphoma. It contributed to the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory's worldwide reputation as a model research laboratory and established its reputation as the birthplace of modern haematology.

  17. Validation of a laboratory and hospital information system in a medical laboratory accredited according to ISO 15189.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biljak, Vanja Radisic; Ozvald, Ivan; Radeljak, Andrea; Majdenic, Kresimir; Lasic, Branka; Siftar, Zoran; Lovrencic, Marijana Vucic; Flegar-Mestric, Zlata

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to present a protocol for laboratory information system (LIS) and hospital information system (HIS) validation at the Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine of the Merkur University Hospital, Zagreb, Croatia. Validity of data traceability was checked by entering all test requests for virtual patient into HIS/LIS and printing corresponding barcoded labels that provided laboratory analyzers with the information on requested tests. The original printouts of the test results from laboratory analyzer(s) were compared with the data obtained from LIS and entered into the provided template. Transfer of data from LIS to HIS was examined by requesting all tests in HIS and creating real data in a finding generated in LIS. Data obtained from LIS and HIS were entered into a corresponding template. The main outcome measure was the accuracy of transfer obtained from laboratory analyzers and results transferred from LIS and HIS expressed as percentage (%). The accuracy of data transfer from laboratory analyzers to LIS was 99.5% and of that from LIS to HIS 100%. We presented our established validation protocol for laboratory information system and demonstrated that a system meets its intended purpose.

  18. [Medical microbiology laboratories in Dutch hospitals: essential for safe patient care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonten, M J M

    2008-12-06

    The Netherlands Health Care Inspectorate investigated the quality of medical microbiology laboratories in Dutch hospitals. By and large the laboratories fulfilled the requirements for appropriate care, although some processes were unsatisfactory and some were insufficiently formalised. In the Netherlands, laboratories for medical microbiology are integrated within hospitals and medical microbiologists are responsible for the diagnostic processes as well as for co-treatment of patients, infection prevention and research. This integrated model contrasts to the more industrialised model in many other countries, where such laboratories are physically distinct from hospitals with a strong focus on diagnostics. The Inspectorate also concludes that the current position of medical microbiology in Dutch hospitals is necessary for patient safety and that outsourcing of these facilities is considered unacceptable.

  19. Marketing skills for hospital-based laboratory managers in a managed care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchwinski, J; Coggins, F

    1997-01-01

    Managers of hospital-based laboratories have begun to realize the importance of a successful outreach program in protecting against declining inpatient activity. Succeeding in the highly competitive field of outpatient testing requires some new skills and techniques that may not have been apparent when addressing normal inpatient requirements. This article provides an overview of some very basic marketing concepts and attempts to show how they can assist the hospital-based laboratory manager in developing a successful outreach program.

  20. Clinical and laboratory signs associated to serious dengue disease in hospitalized children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Moura Pone

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: Lethargy, abdominal distension, pleural effusion, and hypoalbuminemia were the best clinical and laboratorial markers of serious dengue disease in hospitalized children, while bleeding, severe hemorrhage, hemoconcentration and thrombocytopenia did not reach adequate diagnostic accuracy. In pediatric referral hospitals, the absence of hemoconcentration does not imply absence of plasma leakage, particularly in children with previous fluid replacement. These findings may contribute to the clinical management of dengue in children at referral hospitals.

  1. A prospective survey of air and surface fungal contamination in a medical mycology laboratory at a tertiary care university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sautour, Marc; Dalle, Frédéric; Olivieri, Claire; L'ollivier, Coralie; Enderlin, Emilie; Salome, Elsa; Chovelon, Isabelle; Vagner, Odile; Sixt, Nathalie; Fricker-Pap, Véronique; Aho, Serge; Fontaneau, Olivier; Cachia, Claire; Bonnin, Alain

    2009-04-01

    Invasive filamentous fungi infections resulting from inhalation of mold conidia pose a major threat in immunocompromised patients. The diagnosis is based on direct smears, cultural symptoms, and culturing fungi. Airborne conidia present in the laboratory environment may cause contamination of cultures, resulting in false-positive diagnosis. Baseline values of fungal contamination in a clinical mycology laboratory have not been determined to date. A 1-year prospective survey of air and surface contamination was conducted in a clinical mycology laboratory during a period when large construction projects were being conducted in the hospital. Air was sampled with a portable air system impactor, and surfaces were sampled with contact Sabouraud agar plates. The collected data allowed the elaboration of Shewhart graphic charts. Mean fungal loads ranged from 2.27 to 4.36 colony forming units (cfu)/m(3) in air and from 0.61 to 1.69 cfu/plate on surfaces. Strict control procedures may limit the level of fungal contamination in a clinical mycology laboratory even in the context of large construction projects at the hospital site. Our data and the resulting Shewhart graphic charts provide baseline values to use when monitoring for inappropriate variations of the fungal contamination in a mycology laboratory as part of a quality assurance program. This is critical to the appropriate management of the fungal risk in hematology, cancer and transplantation patients.

  2. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, samples from 18 groundwater monitoring wells of the AMB series at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility were analyzed for certain heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Six parameters exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site Flag 2 criteria during the quarter. The results for fourth quarter 1992 are fairly consistent with the rest of the year's data. Tetrachloroethylene exceeded the final PDWS in well AMB 4D only two of the four quarters; in the other three wells in which it was elevated, it was present at similar levels throughout the year. Trichloroethylene consistently exceeded its PDWS in wells AMB 4A, 4B, 4D, 5, and 7A during the year. Trichloroethylene was elevated in well AMB 6 only during third and fourth quarters and in well AMB 7 only during fourth quarter. Total alpha-emitting radium was above the final PDWS for total radium in well AMB 5 at similar levels throughout the year and exceeded the PDWS during one of the three quarters it was analyzed for (third quarter 1992) in well AMB 10B

  3. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: 1980 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toy, A.J.; Lindeken, C.L.; Griggs, K.S.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    The results of environmental monitoring for 1980 at the Livermore National Laboratory are presented. Radioactivity in air, soil, sewage, water, vegetation and food, and milk was measured. Noise pollution, beryllium, heavy metals, and pesticides were monitored

  4. [Study of continuous quality improvement for clinical laboratory processes via the platform of Hospital Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenqi; Shen, Ying; Peng, Xiaoxia; Tian, Jian; Wang, Hui; Xu, Lili; Nie, Xiaolu; Ni, Xin

    2015-05-26

    The program of continuous quality improvement in clinical laboratory processes for complete blood count (CBC) was launched via the platform of Beijing Children's Hospital Group in order to improve the quality of pediatric clinical laboratories. Fifteen children's hospitals of Beijing Children's Hospital group were investigated using the method of Chinese adapted continuous quality improvement with PDCA (Plan-Do-Check-Action). The questionnaire survey and inter-laboratory comparison was conducted to find the existing problems, to analyze reasons, to set forth quality targets and to put them into practice. Then, targeted training was conducted to 15 children's hospitals and the second questionnaire survey, self examinations by the clinical laboratories was performed. At the same time, the Group's online internal quality control platform was established. Overall effects of the program were evaluated so that lay a foundation for the next stage of PDCA. Both quality of control system documents and CBC internal quality control scheme for all of clinical laboratories were improved through this program. In addition, standardization of performance verification was also improved, especially with the comparable verification rate of precision and internal laboratory results up to 100%. In terms of instrument calibration and mandatory diagnostic rates, only three out of the 15 hospitals (20%) failed to pass muster in 2014 from 46.67% (seven out of the 15 hospitals) in 2013. The abnormal data of intraday precision variance coefficients of the five CBC indicator parameters (WBC, RBC, Hb, Plt and Hct) of all the 15 laboratories accounted for 1.2% (2/165) in 2014, a marked decrease from 9.6% (14/145) in 2013. While the number of the hospitals using only one horizontal quality control object for daily quality control has dropped to three from five. The 15 hospitals organized a total of 263 times of training in 2014 from 101 times in 2013, up 160%. The quality improvement program for

  5. Monitoring Sensitive Bat Species at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenberg, Kari M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Bats play a critical role in ecosystems and are vulnerable to disturbance and disruption by human activities. In recent decades, bat populations in the United States and elsewhere have decreased tremendously. There are 47 different species of bat in the United States and 28 of these occur in New Mexico with 15 different species documented at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and surrounding areas. Euderma maculatum(the spotted bat) is listed as “threatened” by the state of New Mexico and is known to occur at LANL. Four other species of bats are listed as “sensitive” and also occur here. In 1995, a four year study was initiated at LANL to assess the status of bat species of concern, elucidate distribution and relative abundance, and obtain information on roosting sites. There have been no definitive studies since then. Biologists in the Environmental Protection Division at LANL initiated a multi-year monitoring program for bats in May 2013 to implement the Biological Resources Management Plan. The objective of this ongoing study is to monitor bat species diversity and seasonal activity over time at LANL. Bat species diversity and seasonal activity were measured using an acoustic bat detector, the Pettersson D500X. This ultrasound recording unit is intended for long-term, unattended recording of bat and other high frequency animal calls. During 2013, the detector was deployed at two locations around LANL. Study sites were selected based on proximity to water where bats may be foraging. Recorded bat calls were analyzed using Sonobat, software that can help determine specific species of bat through their calls. A list of bat species at the two sites was developed and compared to lists from previous studies. Species diversity and seasonal activity, measured as the number of call sequences recorded each month, were compared between sites and among months. A total of 17,923 bat calls were recorded representing 15 species. Results indicate that there is a

  6. Cost evaluation of therapeutic drug monitoring of gentamicin at a teaching hospital in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim MI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM makes use of serum drug concentrations as an adjunct to decision-making. Preliminary data in our hospital showed that approximately one-fifth of all drugs monitored by TDM service were gentamicin. Objective: In this study, we evaluated the costs associated with providing the service in patients with bronchopneumonia and treated with gentamicin. Methods: We retrospectively collected data from medical records of patients admitted to the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia over a 5-year period. These patients were diagnosed with bronchopneumonia and were on gentamicin as part of their treatment. Five hospitalisation costs were calculated; (i cost of laboratory and clinical investigations, (ii cost associated with each gentamicin dose, (iii fixed and operating costs of TDM service, (iv cost of providing medical care, and (v cost of hospital stay during gentamicin treatment. Results: There were 1920 patients admitted with bronchopneumonia of which 67 (3.5% had TDM service for gentamicin. Seventy-three percent (49/67 patients were eligible for final analysis. The duration of gentamicin therapy ranged from 3 to 15 days. The cost of providing one gentamicin assay was MYR25, and the average cost of TDM service for each patient was MYR104. The average total hospitalisation cost during gentamicin treatment for each patient was MYR442 (1EUR approx. MYR4.02. Conclusion: Based on the hospital perspective, in patients with bronchopneumonia and treated with gentamicin, the provision of TDM service contributes to less than 25% of the total cost of hospitalization.

  7. Outbreak of chikungunya in Johor Bahru, Malaysia: clinical and laboratory features of hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, L P; Chua, H H

    2009-09-01

    In 2008, an outbreak of chikungunya infection occurred in Johor. We performed a retrospective review of all laboratory confirmed adult chikungunya cases admitted to Hospital Sultanah Aminah, Johor Bahru from April to August 2008, looking into clinical and laboratory features. A total of 18 laboratory confirmed cases of chikungunya were identified with patients presenting with fever, joint pain, rash and vomiting. Haemorrhagic signs were not seen. Lymphopenia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, raised liver enzymes and deranged coagulation profile were the prominent laboratory findings. We hope this study can help guide physician making a diagnosis of chikungunya against other arborviruses infection.

  8. Perceptions and attitudes toward SLMTA amongst laboratory and hospital professionals in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulie, Adino D; Hiwotu, Tilahun M; Mulugeta, Achamyeleh; Kebede, Adisu; Asrat, Habtamu; Abebe, Abnet; Yenealem, Dereje; Abose, Ebise; Kassa, Wondwossen; Kebede, Amha; Linde, Mary K; Ayana, Gonfa

    2014-01-01

    Strengthening Laboratory Management Toward Accreditation (SLMTA) is a competency-based management training programme. Assessing health professionals' views of SLMTA provides feedback to inform program planning, implementation and evaluation of SLMTA's training, communication and mentorship components. To assess laboratory professionals' and hospital chief executive officers' (CEOs) perceptions and attitudes toward the SLMTA programme in Ethiopia. A cross-sectional descriptive survey was conducted in March 2013 using a structured questionnaire to collect qualitative data from 72 laboratory professionals and hospital CEOs from 17 health facilities, representing all regions and two city administrations in Ethiopia. Focus groups were conducted with laboratory professionals and hospital administration to gain insight into the strengths and challenges of the SLMTA programme so as to guide future planning and implementation. Ethiopian laboratory professionals at all levels had a supportive attitude toward the SLMTA programme. They believed that SLMTA substantially improved laboratory services and acted as a catalyst for total healthcare reform and improvement. They also noted that the SLMTA programme achieved marked progress in laboratory supply chain, sample referral, instrument maintenance and data management systems. In contrast, nearly half of the participating hospital CEOs, especially those associated with low-scoring laboratories, were sceptical about the SLMTA programme, believing that the benefits of SLMTA were outweighed by the level of human resources and time commitment required. They also voiced concerns about the cost and sustainability of SLMTA. This study highlights the need for stronger engagement and advocacy with hospital administration and the importance of addressing concerns about the cost and sustainability of the SLMTA programme.

  9. Perceptions and attitudes toward SLMTA amongst laboratory and hospital professionals in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adino D. Lulie

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Strengthening Laboratory Management Toward Accreditation (SLMTA is a competency-based management training programme. Assessing health professionals’ views of SLMTA provides feedback to inform program planning, implementation and evaluation of SLMTA's training, communication and mentorship components. Objectives: To assess laboratory professionals’ and hospital chief executive officers’ (CEOs perceptions and attitudes toward the SLMTA programme in Ethiopia. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive survey was conducted in March 2013 using a structured questionnaire to collect qualitative data from 72 laboratory professionals and hospital CEOs from 17 health facilities, representing all regions and two city administrations in Ethiopia. Focus groups were conducted with laboratory professionals and hospital administration to gain insight into the strengths and challenges of the SLMTA programme so as to guide future planning and implementation. Results: Ethiopian laboratory professionals at all levels had a supportive attitude toward the SLMTA programme. They believed that SLMTA substantially improved laboratory services and acted as a catalyst for total healthcare reform and improvement. They also noted that the SLMTA programme achieved marked progress in laboratory supply chain, sample referral, instrument maintenance and data management systems. In contrast, nearly half of the participating hospital CEOs, especially those associated with low-scoring laboratories, were sceptical about the SLMTA programme, believing that the benefits of SLMTA were outweighed by the level of human resources and time commitment required. They also voiced concerns about the cost and sustainability of SLMTA. Conclusion: This study highlights the need for stronger engagement and advocacy with hospital administration and the importance of addressing concerns about the cost and sustainability of the SLMTA programme.

  10. Brookhaven National Laboratory environmental monitoring plan for Calendar Year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.; Lee, R. [and others

    1996-10-01

    As required by DOE Order 5400.1, each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant quantities of hazardous materials shall provide a written Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) covering effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, provides specific guidance regarding environmental monitoring activities.

  11. Brookhaven National Laboratory environmental monitoring plan for Calendar Year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.; Lee, R.

    1996-01-01

    As required by DOE Order 5400.1, each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant quantities of hazardous materials shall provide a written Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) covering effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, provides specific guidance regarding environmental monitoring activities

  12. MONITORING OF THE CEPHALOSPORINS CONSUMPTION IN THE TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radmila Veličković-Radovanović

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Irrational antibiotic consumption, especially in the case when there is no appropriate indication for its usage, may be one of the most crucial global issues for public health care, leading to bacterial resistance and the increase of indirect medical expenses. According to the report of the European program for the monitoring of the antibiotic consumption, Serbia is on the fifth place among the countries which are not members of EU. The goal of this work is the evaluation of antibiotic consumption in the Clinical Centre Niš, from 2007 to 2013, with the focus on the monitoring of the cephalosporins utilization, as they are one of the most prescribed groups of antibiotics in the tertiary health care. The utilization of antibiotics in the Clinical Center Niš in the observed period was obtained from the computerized database of the Department of Pharmacotherapy and expressed as defined daily dose (DDD per 100 bed/days (DBD. Our results showed that there was an increase in antibiotic use of the whole group of cephalosporins and penicillin as well as a reduction of quinolones consumption within the observed period. Our analysis showed that ceftriaxone was the most frequently prescribed cephalosporin, followed by cefuroxime. Although antibiotic therapy and prophylaxis in our hospital are in keeping with the recommended guidelines, the obtained results may suggest that cephalosporin consumption, and especially ceftriaxone consumption is higher than in other European countries.

  13. Water Quality & Pollutant Source Monitoring: Field and Laboratory Procedures. Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on techniques and instrumentation used to develop data in field monitoring programs and related laboratory operations concerned with water quality and pollution monitoring. Topics include: collection and handling of samples; bacteriological, biological, and chemical field and laboratory methods; field…

  14. Improving Gram stain proficiency in hospital and satellite laboratories that do not have microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarner, Jeannette; Street, Cassandra; Matlock, Margaret; Cole, Lisa; Brierre, Francoise

    2017-03-01

    Consolidation of laboratories has left many hospitals and satellite laboratories with minimal microbiologic testing. In many hospitals and satellite laboratories, Gram stains on primary specimens are still performed despite difficultly in maintaining proficiency. To maintain Gram stain proficiency at a community 450-bed hospital with an active emergency room we designed bimonthly challenges that require reporting Gram staining and morphology of different organisms. The challenges consist of five specimens prepared by the reference microbiology laboratory from cultures and primary specimens. Twenty to 23 medical laboratory scientists participate reading the challenges. Results from the challenges are discussed with each medical laboratory scientists. In addition, printed images from the challenges are presented at huddle to add microbiology knowledge. On the first three challenges, Gram staining was read correctly in 71%-77% of the time while morphology 53%-66%. In the last six challenges correct answers for Gram stain were 77%-99% while morphology 73%-96%. We observed statistically significant improvement when reading Gram stains by providing frequent challenges to medical laboratory scientists. The clinical importance of Gram stain results is emphasized during huddle presentations increasing knowledge and motivation to perform the test for patients.

  15. The future of hospital laboratories. Position statement from the Royal Belgian Society of Clinical Chemistry (RBSCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Michel R; Wallemacq, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    To face the economic pressures arising from the current socio-economic conjuncture, hospital laboratories are endangered by an increasing trend towards the outsourcing of clinical laboratory tests to external (mega-) laboratories. This should allow hospitals to meet their economic requirements, but with an increased risk of loss of medical quality and, mid- to long-term, loss of cost effectiveness of healthcare at the national level. To anticipate current developments (economical and technological) that inevitably will affect the future of laboratory medicine, hospital laboratories should be proactive and enhance efficiency, reduce costs by consolidation, integrate into regional networks, and form alliances or partnerships. To create additional value, the core competency of laboratory professionals must be refocused to provide medical knowledge services (consultative support to clinicians) related to in vitro diagnostic testing. To integrate cost-efficiency with medical quality, implementation of a matricial organization - operational vs. biomedical level - could be an interesting approach. This integrated structure should create total quality of laboratory testing, managing the entire medical diagnostic cycle from the pre-preanalytical to post-postanalytical phase.

  16. Factors affecting the labor efficiency of hospital-based blood bank laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, H C; Kominski, G F; Petz, L D; Sofaer, S

    1994-09-01

    A variety of financing mechanisms and managerial innovations have been developed in the past decade to control hospital costs. Some evidence suggests that those changes have not produced substantial improvements in labor efficiency among employees in the hospital's technical level, such as in the blood bank laboratories. This study measured labor efficiency in 40 hospital-based blood bank laboratories in Southern California during the year from July 1989 to June 1990 and explored the impact of financial, managerial, and operational factors on labor efficiency. With standardized output measures used in all blood bank laboratories, a wide variation of labor efficiency was found. Multivariate analyses indicate that the labor efficiency of blood bank employees was not influenced by organizational financial incentives, but was affected by the managerial styles of blood bank managers. Interpretation of the findings suggests that labor efficiency is affected by operational designs intended to improve responses to variable workloads and reduce slack time.

  17. Are laboratory tests always needed? Frequency and causes of laboratory overuse in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadamuro, Janne; Gaksch, Martin; Wiedemann, Helmut; Lippi, Giuseppe; von Meyer, Alexander; Pertersmann, Astrid; Auer, Simon; Mrazek, Cornelia; Kipman, Ulrike; Felder, Thomas K; Oberkofler, Hannes; Haschke-Becher, Elisabeth

    2018-04-01

    Inappropriate utilization of laboratory resources is an increasing concern especially in high-throughput facilities. Until now, no reliable information has been published addressing to which extent laboratory results are actually used for clinical decision-making. Therefore, we aimed to close this gap using a novel retrospective approach including a survey of clinicians and nurses. We retrospectively evaluated the number of re-orders for potassium (K), lactate dehydrogenase (LD), aspartate-aminotransferase (AST), activated partial thromboplastin-time (APTT) and prothrombin-time/INR (PT/INR), after the initial order had to be cancelled due to preanalytical non-conformities. We analyzed subgroups regarding time to re-order, ward and sample priority (urgent vs. routine). Subsequently, we surveyed clinicians and nurses, asking for their estimate of the amount of failed re-orders as well as for possible reasons. From initially cancelled tests, only ~20% of K, LD, AST and ~30% of APTT and PT/INR tests were re-ordered within 24 h. 70% of the investigated clinical chemistry and 60% of coagulation tests were re-ordered one week after cancellation or not at all. Survey participants quite accurately estimated these numbers. Routine laboratory panels, short stay of out-patients, obsolete test results and avoiding additional phlebotomies were the main reasons for not re-ordering cancelled tests. Overall, 60-70% of test results in the investigated assays ordered in a high throughput laboratory are potentially inappropriate or of doubtful clinically importance. Although clinicians and nurses are aware of this situation, it is the duty of laboratory specialists to overcome overutilization in close collaboration with all involved healthcare workers. Copyright © 2018 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Calibration and field evaluation of polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) for monitoring pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailly, Emilie; Levi, Yves; Karolak, Sara

    2013-01-01

    The Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler (POCIS) is a new tool for the sampling of organic pollutants in water. We tested this device for the monitoring of pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater. After calibration, a field application was carried out in a French hospital for six pharmaceutical compounds (Atenolol, Prednisolone, Methylprednisolone, Sulfamethoxazole, Ofloxacin, Ketoprofen). POCIS were calibrated in tap water and wastewater in laboratory conditions close to relevant environmental conditions (temperature, flow velocity). Sampling rates (R s ) were determined and we observed a significant increase with flow velocity and temperature. Whatever the compound, the R s value was lower in wastewater and the linear phase of uptake was shorter. POCIS were deployed in a hospital sewage pipe during four days and the estimated water concentrations were close to those obtained with twenty-four hour composite samples. -- Highlights: ► Calibration of POCIS for the monitoring of pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater. ► Uptake profile presents a shorter linear phase in wastewater than in tap water. ► Influence of R s values by temperature, flow velocity and bio-fouling. ► Correlation between concentrations estimated from POCIS or measured in TWA samples. ► Deployment period should be no longer than five days. -- After calibration in tap water and hospital wastewater, POCIS were used to monitor pharmaceuticals in hospital sewage and were compared to TWA sampling

  19. Environmental monitoring for EG and G Idaho facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachyk, J.W.; Wright, K.C.; Wilhelmsen, R.N.

    1990-08-01

    This report describes the 1989 environmental-monitoring activities of the Environmental Monitoring Unit of EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., at EG ampersand G-operated facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The major facilities monitored include the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility, the Mixed Waste Storage Facility, and two surplus facilities. Additional monitoring activities performed by Environmental Monitoring are also discussed, including drinking-water monitoring and nonradiological liquid-effluent monitoring, as well as data management. The primary purposes of monitoring are to evaluate environmental conditions and to provide and interpret data, in compliance with applicable regulations, to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1989 environmental-monitoring data with derived concentration guides and with data from previous years. This report also presents results of sampling performed by the Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory and by the United States Geological Survey. 17 refs., 49 figs., 11 tabs

  20. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1982-06-01

    Results for 1981 of the LBL Environmental Monitoring Program are given. Data include monitoring results for accelerator-produced radiation, airborne and waterborne radionuclides, and nonradioactive pollutants. Population doses resulting from LBL operations are given in terms of accelerator-produced and airborne radioactivities. Trends in the environmental impacts of LBL operations are discussed in terms of accelerator-produced, airborne, and waterborne radionuclides

  1. Laboratory studies and Pompe disease: from suspicion to therapy monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Savost’yanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease (PD is a rare, progressive, commonly fatal inherited autosomal recessive disease that is difficult to diagnose due to its obvious clinical heterogeneity and low awareness among physicians. Access to the laboratory diagnosis of rare diseases increases every year. In the past several years, Russian and foreign laboratories have achieved considerable success in accelerating and improving the diagnostic accuracy of PD. Unfortunately, the Russian-language literature contains scarce relevant information on the laboratory diagnosis of PD. This review is to fill up this gap. 

  2. Quality improvement project in cervical cancer screening: practical measures for monitoring laboratory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkkanen, Jussi; Geagea, Antoine; Nieminen, Pekka; Anttila, Ahti

    2003-01-01

    We conducted a quality improvement project in a cervical cancer screening programme in Helsinki in order to see if detection of precancerous lesions could be influenced by external (participation rate) and internal (laboratory praxis) quality measures. In order to increase the participation rate, a second personal invitation to Pap-test was mailed to nonparticipants of the first call. In order to improve the quality of screening, the cytotechnicians monitored their performance longitudinally by recording the number of slides reviewed per day, the pick-up rate of abnormal smears, the report of the consulting cytopathologist, and the number of histologically verified lesions detected from the cases that they had screened. Regular sessions were held to compare the histological findings with the cytological findings of all cases referred for colposcopy. No pressure was applied on the cytotechnicians to ensure that they felt comfortable with their daily workload. A total of 110 000 smears were screened for cervical cancer at the Helsinki City Hospital during 1996-99. Initially, the overall participation rate increased from 62% to 71%. The number of histologically confirmed precancerous lesions (CIN 1-3) more than doubled and their detection rate increased from 0.32% to 0.72%. Continuous education and feedback from daily work performance were important, yet rather inexpensive means in increasing laboratory performance. Additional measures are needed to further increase the participation rate. Impact of the quality measures on cancer incidence needs to be assessed later on.

  3. Internal quality control indicators of cervical cytopathology exams performed in laboratories monitored by the External Quality Control Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ázara, Cinara Zago Silveira; Manrique, Edna Joana Cláudio; Tavares, Suelene Brito do Nascimento; de Souza, Nadja Lindany Alves; Amaral, Rita Goreti

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of continued education provided by an external quality control laboratory on the indicators of internal quality control of cytopathology exams. The internal quality assurance indicators for cytopathology exams from 12 laboratories monitored by the External Quality Control Laboratory were evaluated. Overall, 185,194 exams were included, 98,133 of which referred to the period preceding implementation of a continued education program, while 87,061 referred to the period following this intervention. Data were obtained from the Cervical Cancer Database of the Brazilian National Health Service. Following implementation of the continued education program, the positivity index (PI) remained within recommended limits in four laboratories. In another four laboratories, the PI progressed from below the limits to within the recommended standards. In one laboratory, the PI remained low, in two laboratories, it remained very low, and in one, it increased from very low to low. The percentage of exams compatible with a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) remained within the recommended limits in five laboratories, while in three laboratories it progressed from below the recommended levels to >0.4% of the total number of satisfactory exams, and in four laboratories it remained below the standard limit. Both the percentage of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) in relation to abnormal exams, and the ratio between ASC-US and intraepithelial lesions remained within recommended levels in all the laboratories investigated. An improvement was found in the indicators represented by the positivity index and the percentage of exams compatible with a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, showing that the role played by the external quality control laboratory in providing continued education contributed towards improving laboratory staff skills in detecting cervical cancer precursor lesions.

  4. Historical return on investment and improved quality resulting from development and mining of a hospital laboratory relational database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimhall, Bradley B; Hall, Timothy E; Walczak, Steven

    2006-01-01

    A hospital laboratory relational database, developed over eight years, has demonstrated significant cost savings and a substantial financial return on investment (ROI). In addition, the database has been used to measurably improve laboratory operations and the quality of patient care.

  5. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Report. Calendar Year 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations

  6. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Report, Calendar Year 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-12-31

    The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations.

  7. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1979-04-01

    Environmental monitoring data are reported for accelerator produced radiation; radionuclide measurements and release data from atmospheric and water sampling; population dose equivalent resulting from LBL operations; and non-radioactive pollutants

  8. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R. Pace; Julie B. Braun

    2009-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2009 (FY 2009). Throughout the year, thirty-eight cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is a cave, two additional caves, twenty-two prehistoric archaeological sites, six historic homesteads, two historic stage stations, two historic trails, and two nuclear resources, including Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2009 to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations and monitor the effects of ongoing project activities. Although impacts were documented at a few locations and trespassing citations were issued in one instance, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resources were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that several INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources.

  9. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Julie B. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during 2013. Throughout the year, thirty-eight cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is also a cave; fourteen additional caves; seven prehistoric archaeological sites ; four historic archaeological sites; one historic trail; one nuclear resource (Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, a designated National Historic Landmark); and nine historic structures located at the Central Facilities Area. Of the monitored resources, thirty-three were routinely monitored, and five were monitored to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations along with the effects of ongoing project activities. On six occasions, ground disturbing activities within the boundaries of the Power Burst Facility/Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (PBF/CITRC) were observed by INL CRM staff prepared to respond to any additional finds of Native American human remains. In addition, two resources were visited more than once as part of the routine monitoring schedule or to monitor for additional damage. Throughout the year, most of the cultural resources monitored had no visual adverse changes resulting in Type 1determinations. However, Type 2 impacts were noted at eight sites, indicating that although impacts were noted or that a project was operating outside of culturally cleared limitations, cultural resources retained integrity and noted impacts did not threaten National Register eligibility. No new Type 3 or any Type 4 impacts that adversely impacted cultural resources and threatened National Register eligibility were observed at cultural resources monitored in 2013.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories California Environmental Monitoring Program Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Robert C.

    2007-03-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Environmental Monitoring Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2006 program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  11. Monitoring of atmospheric contamination by plutonium in laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomarola, J.; Risselin, A.; Feliers, P.

    1965-02-01

    Immediate detection of atmospheric contamination by plutonium is necessary for warning of operators. A precise estimate of the level of this contamination is also necessary in order to give the Medical Section proper information. Experiments have been carried out at CEN-FAR using atmospheric contamination by plutonium monitors. This paper deals successively with: important problems of monitoring, the carrying out of the experiments and the results yielded. (authors) [fr

  12. Ambient environmental radiation monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindeken, C.L.; White, J.H.; Toy, A.J.; Sundbeck, C.W.

    1975-01-01

    Thermoluminescence dosimetry is the principal means of measuring ambient γ radiation at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. These dosimeters are used at 12 perimeter locations and 41 locations in the off-site vicinity of the Laboratory, and are exchanged quarterly. Control dosimeters are stored in a 75-mm-thick lead shield located out-of-doors to duplicate temperature cycling of field dosimeters. Effect of dosimeter response to radiation in the shield is determined each quarter. Calibration irradiations are made midway through the exposure cycle to compensate for signal fading. Terrestrial exposure rates calculated from the activities of naturally occurring uranium, thorium, and potassium in Livermore Valley soils vary from 3 to 7 μR/hr. Local inferred exposure rates from cosmic radiation are approximately 4 μR/hr. TLD measurements are in good agreement with these data. Off-site and site perimeter data are compared, and differences related to Laboratory operations are discussed

  13. Evaluating effectiveness of infection control efforts in hospitals using information in microbiological laboratory databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Norihiro; Itoga, Masamichi; Kimura, Masahiko; Inoue, Fumio; Minakawa, Satoko; Kimura, Toshiyuki; Ozaki, Hiromi; Saito, Yumiko; Takahashi, Mikiko; Fujishima, Tetsuhiro; Mizuno, Sumie; Ogawa, Shin; Kitayama, Yuko; Kudo, Kazumi; Minami, Kazushi; Abo, Fumiko; Takano, Yasuyuki; Ohdaira, Naotake; Hamada, Satoshi; Ueki, Shigeharu; Hirokawa, Makoto; Kayaba, Hiroyuki

    2017-12-01

    To analyze the quality of infection control activities, bacteriological data relevant to infection control was evaluated through the microbiological data warehouse networking hospitals in two medical regions. Data regarding bacterial test results of 19 hospitals were extracted from two microbiological laboratory information data bases. The rate of MRSA among total S. aureus was used as a general indicator of infection control activities. The occupancy rate of nasal or pharyngeal swabs among MRSA-positive bacteriological samples was used as an indicator of attention paid for infection control in intensive care wards. The number of blood culture sets per examined patient was utilized as an indicator for life-long vocational education on updated medical practice relevant to infectious diseases. The rate of MRSA was significantly higher in secondary private hospitals. The occupancy rate of nasal or pharyngeal swabs was significantly higher in tertiary hospitals. The average number of blood culture set per examined patient were 1.55, 1.54 and 1.39 in tertiary, secondary public and secondary private hospitals, respectively; however, there were no statistical differences between groups. Data bases of microbiological test results shared by hospital laboratories are useful for evaluating regional infection control activities.

  14. Effluent-Monitoring Procedures: Basic Laboratory Skills. Student Reference Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, William T.; And Others

    This is one of several short-term courses developed to assist in the training of waste water treatment plant operational personnel in the tests, measurements, and report preparation required for compliance with their NPDES Permits. This Student Reference Manual provides a review of basic mathematics as it applies to the chemical laboratory. The…

  15. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    INL Cultural Resource Management Office

    2010-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2010 (FY 2010). Throughout the year, thirty-three cultural resource localities were revisited, including somethat were visited more than once, including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is a cave, two additional caves, twenty-six prehistoric archaeological sites, two historic stage stations, and Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. The resources that were monitored included seventeen that are routinely visited and sixteen that are located in INL project areas. Although impacts were documented at a few locations and one trespassing incident (albeit sans formal charges) was discovered, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resources were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that several INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources.

  16. Monitoring laboratory data across manufacturers and laboratories--A prerequisite to make "Big Data" work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Kenneth; Van Uytfanghe, Katleen; Twomey, Patrick J; Thienpont, Linda M

    2015-05-20

    "The Percentiler" project provides quasi real-time access to patient medians across laboratories and manufacturers. This data can serve as "clearinghouse" for electronic health record applications, e.g., use of laboratory data for global health-care research. Participants send their daily outpatient medians to the Percentiler application. After 6 to 8weeks, the laboratory receives its login information, which gives access to the user interface. Data is assessed by peer group, i.e., 10 or more laboratories using the same test system. Participation is free of charge. Participation is global with, to date, >120 laboratories and >250 instruments. Up to now, several reports have been produced that address i) the general features of the project, ii) peer group observations; iii) synergisms between "The Percentiler" and dedicated external quality assessment surveys. Reasons for long-term instability and bias (calibration- or lot-effects) have been observed for the individual laboratory and manufacturers. "The Percentiler" project has the potential to build a continuous, global evidence base on in vitro diagnostic test comparability and stability. As such, it may be beneficial for all stakeholders and, in particular, the patient. The medical laboratory is empowered for contributing to the development, implementation, and management of global health-care policies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. From grass to grace: How SLMTA revolutionised the Bamenda Regional Hospital Laboratory in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyem C. Nkwawir

    2014-11-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the results of SLMTA implementation at BRHL and discuss lessons learned. Method: In 2010, the SLMTA programme was rolled out in Cameroon to improve laboratory quality management systems in five laboratories, including BRHL. Three workshops were conducted (the first centralised, the remaining two on-site at each laboratory and improvement projects were implemented after each workshop with the assistance of mentors. Audits were used in order to evaluate performance and to identify areas for further improvement. Results: BRHL had the lowest score (18% amongst the cohort at the baseline audit and the highest (81% at the official Stepwise Laboratory Quality Improvement Process Towards Accreditation (SLIPTA audit conducted in August 2013 by the African Society for Laboratory Medicine. Improvements were observed in each of the 12 Quality System Essentials; improvement was especially noteworthy in the areas of facilities and safety, and purchasing and inventory. Staff investment and pride in the quality of laboratory services increased. Conclusion: BRHL’s remarkable improvement was achieved with a combination of SLMTA training activities, intensive on-site mentorship and the collective focus of all laboratory staff. The experience at Bamenda Hospital illustrates what can be achieved when a laboratory successfully harnesses the energy of its staff and implements changes to improve the quality of services in a transformation taking them from grass to grace.

  18. Improved monitoring procedure for Iodine -131 in radiochemical process laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Pratap; Yadav, R.K.B.; Anilkumar, S.; Gopalakrishnan, R.K.; Chakraborty, S.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation Hazard Control Unit at Isotope wing provides radiological safety support and advises for safe processing and production of radiopharmaceuticals. Tellurium Oxide (TeO 2 ), irradiated in a nuclear reactor, is processed in a process laboratory for separating 131 I using dry distillation technique. The workplace environment is being assessed for airborne radioactivity using installed Static Air Samplers (SASs). SASs contains two filter media (glass fibre and charcoal impregnated paper) to collect airborne 131 I radioactivity and laboratory air sampled at 50 litres per minutes (lpm). Personal Air Sampler (PAS) consists of three types of filters viz. a glass fibre, charcoal impregnated paper and cartridges containing activated charcoal granules. Three combinations were studied at a sampling rate of 5 lpm

  19. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R. Pace

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2008 (FY 2008). Throughout the year, 45 cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations of heightened Shoshone-Bannock tribal sensitivity, four caves, one butte, twenty-eight prehistoric archaeological sites, three historic homesteads, two historic stage stations, one historic canal construction camp, three historic trails, and Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2008 to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations, confirm the locations of previously recorded cultural resources in relation to project activities, to assess the damage caused by fire-fighting efforts, and to watch for cultural materials during ground disturbing activities. Although impacts were documented at a few locations, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resource were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources

  20. Knowledge, attitude and practice of aspects of laboratory safety in Pathology Laboratories at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejilemele, A A; Ojule, A C

    2005-12-01

    To assess current knowledge, attitudes and practice of aspects of laboratory safety in pathology laboratories at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital in view of perceived inadequacies in safety practices in clinical laboratories in developing countries. Sixty (60) self- administered questionnaires were distributed to all cadres of staff in four (4) different laboratories (Chemical Pathology, Haematology, Blood bank and Medical Microbiology) at the Hospital. Gross deficiencies were found in the knowledge, attitudes and practice of laboratory safety by laboratory staff in areas of use of personal protective equipment, specimen collection and processing, centrifuge--related hazards, infective hazards waste disposal and provision and use of First Aid Kits. Issues pertaining to laboratory safety are not yet given adequate attention by both employers and employees in developing countries in this ear of resurgence of diseases such as HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis Band C, is emphasized.

  1. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. 1979 Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    In 1979, the annual average airborne gross beta activity in Livermore Valley air samples was 2.6 x 10 -14 μCi/ml, or less than half the average observed in 1978. There were no atmospheric nuclear shots in 1979; therefore, fission products seen in the January air filters are probably a result of residual activity from the December 14, 1978 nuclear test in China. Airborne 238 U concentrations at Site 300 were higher than those at Livermore because of the depleted uranium used in high-explosive tests at the Site. However, these concentrations were well below the standards set by DOE. The average annual beryllium concentrations were less than 1% of the appropriate standard at both the Laboratory perimeter and Site 300. Water samples collected in the Livermore Valley and at Site 300 exhibit gross beta and tritium activities within the ranges previously observed in these areas. Tritium analyses were made on well-water-samples collected near the Livermore Water Reclamation Plant (LWRP). As was found during the 1977 and 1978 surveys, the highest tritium values were detected in wells west of the plant near Arroyo Las Positas; however all concentrations were well below the standards set by DOE. As a means of evaluating the possible impact of Laboratory effluents on locally grown foodstuff, the tritium content of Livermore Valley wines was compared with values from other California and European wines. The tritium levels in Livermore Valley wines were found to be within the range in both European wines and surface waters throughout the world and somewhat higher than those in California wines. Assessments of the calculated radiation dose to an individual from the environmental concentrations listed demonstrates that the dose contribution from Laboratory operations in 1979 was small compared with the dose received locally from natural sources

  2. Reduction in Unnecessary Clinical Laboratory Testing Through Utilization Management at a US Government Veterans Affairs Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konger, Raymond L; Ndekwe, Paul; Jones, Genea; Schmidt, Ronald P; Trey, Marty; Baty, Eric J; Wilhite, Denise; Munshi, Imtiaz A; Sutter, Bradley M; Rao, Maddamsetti; Bashir, Chowdry M

    2016-03-01

    To implement an electronic laboratory utilization management system (laboratory expert system [LES]) to provide safe and effective reductions in unnecessary clinical laboratory testing. The LES is a set of frequency filter subroutines within the Veterans Affairs hospital and laboratory information system that was formulated by an interdisciplinary medical team. Since implementing the LES, total test volume has decreased by a mean of 11.18% per year compared with our pre-LES test volume. This change was not attributable to fluctuations in outpatient visits or inpatient days of care. Laboratory cost savings were estimated at $151,184 and $163,751 for 2012 and 2013, respectively. A significant portion of these cost savings was attributable to reductions in high-volume, large panel testing. No adverse effects on patient care were reported, and mean length of stay for patients remained unchanged. Electronic laboratory utilization systems can effectively reduce unnecessary laboratory testing without compromising patient care. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  3. Assessment of leadership among clinical laboratories managers of teaching hospitals: Quantum leadership approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Dargahi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quantum leadership approach causes efficient and effective procedures among health care organizations, specially clinical laboratories. Objective: This research was aimed to determine the status of quantum leadership dimensions among all management levels of clinical laboratories of teaching hospitals of medical sciences universities in Tehran. Methods: This descriptive, analytical and cross-sectional study was induced among 180 managers of 35 clinical laboratories of Iran, Shahid Beheshti and Tehran Universities of Medical Sciences 2016. The research tool was researcher - constructed questionnaire of quantum skills, demographic details that its content and face validity and reliability were confirmed. For analysis of data, T-test and ANOVA techniques were used. Findings: Most of the studied clinical laboratories managers were male, married, with 15-20 years work experiences, 1-5 years managerial services, and minimally one training courses in clinical laboratory management. The managers had relatively desired and desired score of quantum skills and leadership respectively. Also, there was significant correlation between quantum leadership with age (P=0.01, and with management training courses (P=0.02. Conclusion: It is expected this paradigm may change the clinical laboratory management in the near future with regards to desirability of quantum leadership dimensions among clinical laboratories.

  4. Monitoring of rotavirus infection in a paediatric hospital by RNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During the spring of 1987 and the autumn of 1988, stool specimens were collected from infants and young children in the paediatric unit at H. F. Verwoerd Hospital, Pretoria, and examined for the presence of rotaviruses to assess the potential for hospital-acquired infection in the paediatric wards. Stool samples were also ...

  5. SAMJ Monitoring of rotavirus infection in a paediatric hospital by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During the spring of 1987 and the autumn of 1988, stool specimens were collected from infants and young children in the paediatric unit at H. F. Verwoerd Hospital, Pretoria, and examined for the presence of rotaviruses to assess the potential for hospital-acquired infection in the paediatric wards. Stool samples were also ...

  6. Development of a laboratory prototype water quality monitoring system suitable for use in zero gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misselhorn, J. E.; Witz, S.; Hartung, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    The development of a laboratory prototype water quality monitoring system for use in the evaluation of candidate water recovery systems and for study of techniques for measuring potability parameters is reported. Sensing techniques for monitoring of the most desirable parameters are reviewed in terms of their sensitivities and complexities, and their recommendations for sensing techniques are presented. Rationale for selection of those parameters to be monitored (pH, specific conductivity, Cr(+6), I2, total carbon, and bacteria) in a next generation water monitor is presented along with an estimate of flight system specifications. A master water monitor development schedule is included.

  7. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory 1976 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, W.J.; Lindeken, C.L.; Wong, K.M.; Willes, E.H.; White, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    The average airborne gross beta activity from air filters collected during the first three quarters of 1976 was 2.2 x 10 -14 μCi/ml, about half of the average level observed during 1975. However, the atmospheric nuclear tests by the Peoples Republic of China on September 26 and November 17 elevated the fourth quarter values sufficiently to raise the annual average gross beta concentration to 7.6 x 10 -14 μCi/ml, higher than the 1975 average. Airborne 238 U concentrations at Site 300 were higher than those at Livermore perimeters because of the use of depleted uranium (a byproduct of 235 U enrichment) at the site. These uranium concentrations were well below the standards set by ERDA. Both Laboratory perimeter and Site 300 annual average airborne beryllium concentrations were less than 0.002% of the appropriate standard. Soil samples collected in the off-site vicinity of the Laboratory and at Site 300 were analyzed for plutonium. There were negligible changes from the levels previously reported. Water samples collected within the Livermore Valley and Site 300 exhibited gross beta and tritium activities within the ranges previously observed in these areas. Samples of vegetation, milk, and tissues from jackrabbits on the site were also assayed for radioactivity. Measurements were made of Be in air samples and heavy metals in liquid wastes

  8. Five-Year Data of Clinical Characteristics and Laboratory Findings of Hospitalized Hemophilic Patients in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Marlina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemophilia A has the highest incidence, more than 80% of 172.323 cases worldwide in 2012. It is stated that clinical characteristics of hemophilia A is worse than others, so it is required to prove and to know further about the clinical characteristics and severity likelihood in all hemophilic patients in order to prevent re-bleeding and re-injury and also for a better medical response. Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was carried out to 43 medical records of hospitalized hemophilic patients from 2009 to 2013 in Dr Hasan Sadikin General Hospital. The inclusion criteria were a complete patient identity (name, age, sex, written chief complaint, complete physical examination (bleeding, edema, hematoma, hemarthrosis, anemic symptoms and laboratory test results (factor level, hemoglobin, hematocrit, platelet and Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time. The data was collected from August‒October 2014, analyzed and presented using frequency distribution. Results: Most of the patients were 5-10 years old, male and had hemophilia A. The most common complaint was external bleeding, followed by edema. From 43 patients, 38 (88% cases were classified as severe factor deficiency, had mild to severe anemia, however the platelet count in most of the cases was in normal value. About 91% cases had prolonged Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time in moderate to severe level. Conclusions: Similar with other studies worldwide, most of the hospitalized hemophilic patients have hemophilia A. Most of the patents has moderate to severe bleeding with laboratory test result between moderate to severe level as well.

  9. Performance evaluation of the food and environmental monitoring radio-analytical laboratory in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agyeman, Lilian Ataa

    2016-06-01

    Since the establishment of the Radiation Protection Institute’s Food and Environmental Laboratory in 1988, there has never been any thorough evaluation of the activities of the facility to provide assurance of the quality of analytical results produced by the laboratory. The objective of this study, therefore, was to assess the performance level of the Food and Environmental monitoring laboratory with respect to the requirements for a standard analytical laboratory (IAEA, 1989) and ISO 17025. The study focused on the performance of the Gamma Spectrometry laboratory of the Radiation Protection Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission which has been involved in monitoring of radionuclides in food and environmental samples. In doing that, data from 1988 to 2015 was reviewed to ascertain whether the Laboratory has being performing as required in providing quality results on food and environmental samples measured. Besides this data (records kept), the evaluation also covered some Technical Quality Control measures, such as Energy and Efficiency Calibration, that need to be put in place for such laboratories. The laboratory meets almost all conditions and equipment requirements of IAEA (1989), however the laboratory falls short of the management requirements of ISO 17025. Based on the results it was recommended, among others, that management of the laboratory should ensure there are procedures for how calibration and testing is performed for different types of equipment and also the competence of all who operate specific equipment, perform tests, evaluate results and sign test reports ensured. (au)

  10. Clinical and laboratory signs associated to serious dengue disease in hospitalized children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Moura Pone

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the validity of clinical and laboratory signs to serious dengue disease in hospitalized children. Methods: Retrospective cohort of children (19 and negative likelihood ratio <0.6. Pleural effusion and abdominal distension had higher sensitivity (82.6%. History of bleeding (epistaxis, gingival or gastrointestinal bleeding and severe hemorrhage (pulmonary or gastrointestinal bleeding in physical examination were more frequent in serious dengue disease (p < 0.01, but with poor accuracy (positive likelihood ratio = 1.89 and 3.89; negative likelihood ratio = 0.53 and 0.60, respectively. Serum albumin was lower in serious dengue forms (p < 0.01. Despite statistical significance (p < 0.05, both groups presented thrombocytopenia. Platelets count, hematocrit, and hemoglobin parameters had area under the curve <0.5. Conclusions: Lethargy, abdominal distension, pleural effusion, and hypoalbuminemia were the best clinical and laboratorial markers of serious dengue disease in hospitalized children, while bleeding, severe hemorrhage, hemoconcentration and thrombocytopenia did not reach adequate diagnostic accuracy. In pediatric referral hospitals, the absence of hemoconcentration does not imply absence of plasma leakage, particularly in children with previous fluid replacement. These findings may contribute to the clinical management of dengue in children at referral hospitals.

  11. Pending laboratory tests and the hospital discharge summary in patients discharged to sub-acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, Stacy E; Smith, Maureen; Cox, Elizabeth; Sattin, Justin; Kind, Amy J H

    2011-04-01

    Previous studies have noted a high (41%) prevalence and poor discharge summary communication of pending laboratory (lab) tests at the time of hospital discharge for general medical patients. However, the prevalence and communication of pending labs within a high-risk population, specifically those patients discharged to sub-acute care (i.e., skilled nursing, rehabilitation, long-term care), remains unknown. To determine the prevalence and nature of lab tests pending at hospital discharge and their inclusion within hospital discharge summaries, for common sub-acute care populations. Retrospective cohort study. Stroke, hip fracture, and cancer patients discharged from a single large academic medical center to sub-acute care, 2003-2005 (N = 564) Pending lab tests were abstracted from the laboratory information system (LIS) and from each patient's discharge summary, then grouped into 14 categories and compared. Microbiology tests were sub-divided by culture type and number of days pending prior to discharge. Of sub-acute care patients, 32% (181/564) were discharged with pending lab tests per the LIS; however, only 11% (20/181) of discharge summaries documented these. Patients most often left the hospital with pending microbiology tests (83% [150/181]), particularly blood and urine cultures, and reference lab tests (17% [30/181]). However, 82% (61/74) of patients' pending urine cultures did not have 24-hour preliminary results, and 19% (13/70) of patients' pending blood cultures did not have 48-hour preliminary results available at the time of hospital discharge. Approximately one-third of the sub-acute care patients in this study had labs pending at discharge, but few were documented within hospital discharge summaries. Even after considering the availability of preliminary microbiology results, these omissions remain common. Future studies should focus on improving the communication of pending lab tests at discharge and evaluating the impact that this improved

  12. Factors Influencing Laboratory Information System Effectiveness Through Strategic Planning in Shiraz Teaching Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahador, Fateme; Sharifian, Roxana; Farhadi, Payam; Jafari, Abdosaleh; Nematolahi, Mohtram; Shokrpour, Nasrin

    This study aimed to develop and test a research model that examined 7effective factors on the effectiveness of laboratory information system (LIS) through strategic planning. This research was carried out on total laboratory staff, information technology staff, and laboratory managers in Shiraz (a city in the south of Iran) teaching hospitals by structural equation modeling approach in 2015. The results revealed that there was no significant positive relationship between decisions based on cost-benefit analysis and LIS functionality with LIS effectiveness, but there was a significant positive relationship between other factors and LIS effectiveness. As expected, high levels of strategic information system planning result in increasing LIS effectiveness. The results also showed that the relationship between cost-benefit analysis, LIS functionality, end-user involvement, and information technology-business alignment with strategic information system planning was significant and positive.

  13. Monitoring technology and firm boundaries: physician-hospital integration and technology utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Jeffrey S; Snir, Eli M

    2010-05-01

    We study the relationship between physician-hospital integration and its relation to monitoring IT utilization. We develop a theoretical model in which monitoring IT may complement or substitute for integration and test these relationships using a novel data source. Physician labor market heterogeneity identifies the empirical model. We find that monitoring IT utilization is increasing in integration, implying that expanded firm boundaries complement monitoring IT adoption. We argue that the relationship between monitoring IT and firm boundaries depends upon the contractibility of the monitored information.

  14. Monitoring of biogas plants - experiences in laboratory and full scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Habermann

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To control and regulate the biogas process there are online process parameters and offline process parameters, which basically don’t differ between pilot biogas plants and industrial biogas plants. Generally, temperature, pH-value, volume flow rate and sometimes redox potential are measured online. An online-measurement of the dissolved volatile fatty acids and an online-detection of dissolved hydrogen both directly in the liquid phase as well as near-infrared spectroscopy are under development. FOS/TAC-analysis is the most common offline-analysis of the biogas process and normally it is carried out by the plant operator directly at the biogas plant. For example dry matter, organic dry matter, nitrogen and fatty acids are other analyses, which are carried out but by a laboratory. Microbiological analyses of biogas plants are very expensive and time-consuming and are therefore in Germany very rare. Microbiological analyses are mainly for research purposes. For example the Fluorescence in situ Hybridiation (FISH is used for characterization of the populations. Electric-optical measurement should be established as a new method to investigate the vitality of the methane producing microorganisms. In a cooperation project, which is promoted by the German ministry for technology, between IASP and Chair of Bioprocess Engineering at TU Berlin, this method is proper investigated using a device from the firm EloSystems. The microorganisms are brought in an electrical field of different frequencies. In this field the microorganisms direct themselves differently according to their physiological state. At the end of this project an early detection of process disturbance will be possible with the help of this method. In this presentation the result of the first tests are presented.

  15. 1996 LMITCO environmental monitoring program report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the calendar year 1996 environmental surveillance and compliance monitoring activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Results of sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance, Site Environmental Surveillance, Drinking Water, Effluent Monitoring, Storm Water Monitoring, Groundwater Monitoring, and Special Request Monitoring Programs are included in this report. The primary purposes of the surveillance and monitoring activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1996 data with program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends.

  16. 1996 LMITCO environmental monitoring program report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the calendar year 1996 environmental surveillance and compliance monitoring activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Results of sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance, Site Environmental Surveillance, Drinking Water, Effluent Monitoring, Storm Water Monitoring, Groundwater Monitoring, and Special Request Monitoring Programs are included in this report. The primary purposes of the surveillance and monitoring activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1996 data with program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends

  17. Monitoring compliance with transfusion guidelines in hospital departments by electronic data capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, Astrid; De Lichtenberg, Trine Honnens; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    -transfusion haemoglobin levels at the departmental level. In a tertiary care hospital, no such data were produced before this study. Our aim was to establish a Patient Blood Management database based on electronic data capture in order to monitor compliance with transfusion guidelines at departmental and hospital levels...

  18. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory annual environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) sites are summarized and assessed in this report. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each site and at off-site background locations.

  19. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory annual environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) sites are summarized and assessed in this report. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each site and at off-site background locations

  20. Monitoring as an information management task in hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentz, Bernhard

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing complexity of information systems requires a systematic monitoring of the information system’s architecture, components, and operation within the strategic, tactical, and operational information management. While there exists a broad methodical assistance for information system’s planning and directing, the monitoring aspect suffers from lacking awareness of the problem on the part of the information manager and missing knowledge about appropriate methods. The paper emphasizes the need for systematic monitoring and gives an overview of the most important methods and tools to support systematic monitoring of the HIS and its components. The overview is presented according to the levels of information management. Basis were best practice approaches like ITIL and COBIT, economic science’s approaches like the Balanced Scorecard as well as appropriate information management’s literature.

  1. The Role of Hospital Information Systems in Universal Health Coverage Monitoring in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karara, Gustave; Verbeke, Frank; Nyssen, Marc

    2015-01-01

    In this retrospective study, the authors monitored the patient health coverage in 6 Rwandan hospitals in the period between 2011 and 2014. Among the 6 hospitals, 2 are third level hospitals, 2 district hospitals and 2 private hospitals. Patient insurance and financial data were extracted and analyzed from OpenClinic GA, an open source hospital information system (HIS) used in those 6 hospitals. The percentage of patients who had no health insurer globally decreased from 35% in 2011 to 15% in 2014. The rate of health insurance coverage in hospitals varied between 75% in private hospitals and 84% in public hospitals. The amounts paid by the patients for health services decreased in private hospitals to 25% of the total costs in 2014 (-7.4%) and vary between 14% and 19% in public hospitals. Although the number of insured patients has increased and the patient share decreased over the four years of study, the patients' out-of-pocket payments increased especially for in-patients. This study emphasizes the value of integrated hospital information systems for this kind of health economics research in developing countries.

  2. Monitoring Cataract Surgical Outcome in a Public Hospital in Orlu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the proportion and causes of poor visual outcome of cataract operations done in a public hospital in southeast Nigeria and propose actions to improve the cataract surgical outcome. Method: A prospective observational analysis of the initial hundred cases of cataract operations done in Imo State ...

  3. Radiation exposure of non-monitored hospital personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renaud, L.; Blanchette, J.; Galand, C.

    1993-02-01

    This addendum to report INFO--0437-1 reports the raw results of phase 2 of the survey of medical personnel exposed to nuclear medicine patients. It also presents floor plans of the three hospitals surveyed. (L.L.) (42 tabs., 36 figs.)

  4. From customer satisfaction survey to corrective actions in laboratory services in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oja, Paula I; Kouri, Timo T; Pakarinen, Arto J

    2006-12-01

    To find out the satisfaction of clinical units with laboratory services in a university hospital, to point out the most important problems and defects in services, to carry out corrective actions, and thereafter to identify the possible changes in satisfaction. and Senior physicians and nurses-in-charge of the clinical units at Oulu University Hospital, Finland. Customer satisfaction survey using a questionnaire was carried out in 2001, indicating the essential aspects of laboratory services. Customer-specific problems were clarified, corrective actions were performed, and the survey was repeated in 2004. In 2001, the highest dissatisfaction rates were recorded for computerized test requesting and reporting, turnaround times of tests, and the schedule of phlebotomy rounds. The old laboratory information system was not amenable to major improvements, and it was renewed in 2004-05. Several clinical units perceived turnaround times to be long, because the tests were ordered as routine despite emergency needs. Instructions about stat requesting were given to these units. However, no changes were evident in the satisfaction level in the 2004 survey. Following negotiations with the clinics, phlebotomy rounds were re-scheduled. This resulted in a distinct increase in satisfaction in 2004. Satisfaction survey is a screening tool that identifies topics of dissatisfaction. Without further clarifications, it is not possible to find out the specific problems of customers and to undertake targeted corrective actions. Customer-specific corrections are rarely seen as improvements in overall satisfaction rates.

  5. 1986 environmental monitoring program report for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoff, D.L.; Chew, E.W.; Rope, S.K.

    1987-05-01

    This report presents onsite and offsite data collected in 1986 for the routine environmental monitoring program conducted by the Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL) of the Department of Energy (DOE) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Site. The purpose of this routine program is to monitor radioactive and nonradioactive materials resulting from INEL Site operations which may reach the surrounding offsite environment and population. This report is prepared in accordance with the DOE requirements in draft DOE Order 5484.1 and is not intended to cover the numerous special environmental research programs being conducted at the INEL by RESL and others

  6. Real-time alpha monitoring of a radioactive liquid waste stream at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.D.; Whitley, C.R.; Rawool-Sullivan, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This poster display concerns the development, installation, and testing of a real-time radioactive liquid waste monitor at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The detector system was designed for the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility so that influent to the plant could be monitored in real time. By knowing the activity of the influent, plant operators can better monitor treatment, better segregate waste (potentially), and monitor the regulatory compliance of users of the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Collection System. The detector system uses long-range alpha detection technology, which is a nonintrusive method of characterization that determines alpha activity on the liquid surface by measuring the ionization of ambient air. Extensive testing has been performed to ensure long-term use with a minimal amount of maintenance. The final design was a simple cost-effective alpha monitor that could be modified for monitoring influent waste streams at various points in the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Collection System.

  7. Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This document presents the Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Based on the results of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) and on subsequent discussions with regulators, a decision was made to defer implementing source control remedial measures at the WAG. The alternative selected to address the risks associated with WAG 6 involves maintenance of site access controls prevent public exposure to on-site contaminants, continued monitoring of contaminant releases determine if source control measures are required, and development of technologies that could support the final remediation of WAG 6. Although active source control measures are not being implemented at WAG 6, environmental monitoring is necessary to ensure that any potential changes in contaminant release from the WAG are identified early enough to take appropriate action. Two types of environmental monitoring will be conducted: baseline monitoring and annual routine monitoring. The baseline monitoring will be conducted to establish the baseline contaminant release conditions at the WAG, confirm the site-related chemicals of concern (COCs), and gather data to confirm the site hydrologic model. The baseline monitoring is expected to begin in 1994 and last for 12--18 months. The annual routine monitoring will consist of continued sampling and analyses of COCs to determine off-WAG contaminant flux and risk, identify mills in releases, and confirm the primary contributors to risk. The annual routine monitoring will continue for ∼ 4 years after completion of the baseline monitoring

  8. Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This document presents the Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Based on the results of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) and on subsequent discussions with regulators, a decision was made to defer implementing source control remedial measures at the WAG. The alternative selected to address the risks associated with WAG 6 involves maintenance of site access controls prevent public exposure to on-site contaminants, continued monitoring of contaminant releases determine if source control measures are required, and development of technologies that could support the final remediation of WAG 6. Although active source control measures are not being implemented at WAG 6, environmental monitoring is necessary to ensure that any potential changes in contaminant release from the WAG are identified early enough to take appropriate action. Two types of environmental monitoring will be conducted: baseline monitoring and annual routine monitoring. The baseline monitoring will be conducted to establish the baseline contaminant release conditions at the WAG, confirm the site-related chemicals of concern (COCs), and gather data to confirm the site hydrologic model. The baseline monitoring is expected to begin in 1994 and last for 12--18 months. The annual routine monitoring will consist of continued sampling and analyses of COCs to determine off-WAG contaminant flux and risk, identify mills in releases, and confirm the primary contributors to risk. The annual routine monitoring will continue for {approximately} 4 years after completion of the baseline monitoring.

  9. Microbiological Standardization in Small Laboratory Animals and Recommendations for the Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meral Karaman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbiological standardization in laboratory animal breeding is based on the classification according to the microorganisms that the animals host and consequently their upbringing environment, as well as the certification of their microbiological status and the protection of their properties. Although there are many different classifications for microbiological standardization of laboratory animals, they can be basically classified as; gnotobiotic animals, animals bred with a complete barrier system (Germ free, GF, with Colonization-Resistant Flora; CRF, animals bred with a partial barrier system (Specified Pathogen Free, SPF, and animals bred by conventional methods in units without barriers (Conventional; CV. Monitoring of microbiological standardization is carried out in two ways. One is controlling barrier systems (process control and the other is controlling laboratory animals (product control. In controlling barrier systems samples are taken routinely from ambient air, surfaces, base plate materials of animals, foods and waters, and microbiological tests are carried out. FELASA guidelines are frequently used in monitoring laboratory animals. These guidelines where the monitoring frequency, sample size, micro-organisms to be tested, vary according to the microbiological quality of the animals, and test methods and are frequently updated by FELASA and shared in their web pages. In our country, in general, laboratory animals used for experimental studies present no microbiological standardization, and follow-up protocols are not implemented. Therefore, construction of facilities for the production of microbiologically standard animals and establishment of backup laboratories testing microbiological quality should be established.

  10. Evolution of a residue laboratory network and the management tools for monitoring its performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, E S; Conceição, E S; Mauricio, A De Q

    2012-01-01

    Since 2005 the National Residue & Contaminants Control Plan (NRCCP) in Brazil has been considerably enhanced, increasing the number of samples, substances and species monitored, and also the analytical detection capability. The Brazilian laboratory network was forced to improve its quality standards in order to comply with the NRCP's own evolution. Many aspects such as the limits of quantification (LOQs), the quality management systems within the laboratories and appropriate method validation are in continuous improvement, generating new scenarios and demands. Thus, efficient management mechanisms for monitoring network performance and its adherence to the established goals and guidelines are required. Performance indicators associated to computerised information systems arise as a powerful tool to monitor the laboratories' activity, making use of different parameters to describe this activity on a day-to-day basis. One of these parameters is related to turnaround times, and this factor is highly affected by the way each laboratory organises its management system, as well as the regulatory requirements. In this paper a global view is presented of the turnaround times related to the type of analysis, laboratory, number of samples per year, type of matrix, country region and period of the year, all these data being collected from a computerised system called SISRES. This information gives a solid background to management measures aiming at the improvement of the service offered by the laboratory network.

  11. Audit of high energy therapy beams in hospital oncology departments by the National Radiation Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyth, V.G.

    1994-02-01

    In 1993 the output of every high energy radiotherapy beam used clinically in New Zealand was measured by National Radiation Laboratory (NRL) staff using independent dosimetry equipment. The purpose of this was to audit the dosimetry that is used by hospital physicists for the basis of patient treatments, and to uncover any errors that may be clinically significant. This report analyses the uncertainties involved in comparing the NRL and hospital measurements, and presents the results of the 1993 audit. The overall uncertainty turns out to be about 1.5%. The results for linear accelerator photon beams are consistent with a purely random variation within this uncertainty. Electron beams show some small errors beyond the expected uncertainty. Gamma beams have the potential to be the most accurately measured, but in practice are less accurately measured than linear accelerator beams. None of the disagreements indicated an error of clinical significance. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Necessity of Internal Monitoring for Nuclear Medicine Staff in a Large Specialized Chinese Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Qing-Zhao; Zhang, Zhen; Hou, Chang-Song; Li, Wen-Liang; Yang, Hui; Sun, Quan-Fu

    2016-04-12

    This work intends to quantify the risk of internal contaminations in the nuclear medicine staff of one hospital in Henan province, China. For this purpose, the criteria proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to determine whether it is necessary to conduct internal individual monitoring was applied to all of the 18 nuclear medicine staff members who handled radionuclides. The activity of different radionuclides used during a whole calendar year and the protection measures adopted were collected for each staff member, and the decision as to whether nuclear medicine staff in the hospital should be subjected to internal monitoring was made on the basis of the criteria proposed by IAEA. It is concluded that for all 18 members of the nuclear medicine staff in the hospital, internal monitoring is required. Internal exposure received by nuclear medicine staff should not be ignored, and it is necessary to implement internal monitoring for nuclear medicine staff routinely.

  13. Requirements for the authorization of operation os a calibration laboratory of gamma-ray monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Raimundo Dias da; Kibrit, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the process for obtaining the authorization of operation of a laboratory designed to calibrate area and personal monitors with gamma radiation, by using a sealed Cs-137 source. The regulations of Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN) are deeply analysed and discussed. The authorization for construction, the authorization for modification of items important to safety, the authorization for the acquisition and handling of radiation sources, the authorization for operating, and the authorization for withdrawal of operation of the laboratory are also discussed. The paper also describes the technical and managerial requirements necessary to operate a gamma radiation calibration laboratory in Brazil. . (author)

  14. Creating a sustainable culture of quality through the SLMTA programme in a district hospital laboratory in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phidelis M. Maruti

    2014-09-01

    Objectives: To describe how the SLMTA programme and enhanced quality interventions changed the culture and management style at BDHL and instilled a quality system designed to sustain progress for years to come. Methods: SLMTA implementation followed the standard three-workshop series, mentorship site visits and audits. In order to build sustainability of progress, BDHL integrated quality improvement processes into its daily operations. The lab undertook a process of changing its internal culture to align all hospital stakeholders – including upper management, clinicians, laboratory staff and maintenance staff – to the mission of sustainable quality practices at BDHL. Results: After 16 months in the SLMTA programme, BDHL improved from zero stars (38% to four stars (89%. Over a period of two to three years, external quality assessment results improved from 47% to 87%; staff punctuality increased from 49% to 82%; clinician complaints decreased from 83% to 16; rejection rates decreased from 12% to 3%; and annual equipment repairs decreased from 40 to 15. Twelve months later the laboratory scored three stars (81% in an external surveillance audit conducted by Kenya Accreditation Service (KENAS. Conclusion: Management buy-in, staff participation, use of progress-monitoring tools and feedback systems, as well as incorporation of improvement processes into routine daily activities, were vital in developing and sustaining a culture of quality improvement.

  15. Virtual-Instrument-Based Online Monitoring System for Hands-on Laboratory Experiment of Partial Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Subrata

    2017-01-01

    Online monitoring of high-voltage (HV) equipment is a vital tool for early detection of insulation failure. Most insulation failures are caused by partial discharges (PDs) inside the HV equipment. Because of the very high cost of establishing HV equipment facility and the limitations of electromagnetic interference-screened laboratories, only a…

  16. Association between air pollution and hospital admission: Case study at three monitoring stations in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahari, Marina; Zin@Ibrahim, Wan Zawiah Wan; Ismail, Noriszura; Ni, Tan Hui

    2014-06-01

    The relationships between the exposure of pollutants towards hospitalized admission and mortality have been identified in several studies on Asian cities such as Taipei, Bangkok and Tokyo. In Malaysia, evidence on the health risks associated with exposure to pollutants is limited. In this study, daily time-series data were analysed to estimate risks of cardiovascular and respiratory hospitalized admissions associated with particulate matter ≤ 10 μm (PM10), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide, and ozone concentrations in Klang Valley during 2004-2009. Daily counts of hospital admissions for cardiovascular and respiratory outcomes were obtained from eleven hospitals while pollutants data were taken from several air quality monitoring stations located nearest to the hospitals. These data were fitted with Generalised Additive Poisson regression models. Additionally, temperature, humidity, and time data were also included to allow for potential effect of weather and time-varying influences on hospital admissions. CO showed the most significant (P Malaysia.

  17. Health centres' view of the services provided by a university hospital laboratory: Use of satisfaction surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oja, Paula; Kouri, Timo; Pakarinen, Arto

    2010-01-01

    Customer orientation has gained increasing attention in healthcare. A customer satisfaction survey is one way to raise areas and topics for quality improvement. However, it seems that customer satisfaction surveys have not resulted in quality improvement in healthcare. This article reports how the authors' university hospital laboratory has used customer satisfaction surveys targeted at the health centres in their hospital district. Closed-ended statements of the questionnaire were planned to cover the essential aspects of laboratory services. In addition, an open-ended question asked what was considered to be the most important problem in services. The questionnaires were sent to the medical directors of the health centres. The open-ended question proved to be very useful because the responses specified the main problems in service. Based on the responses, selected dissatisfied customers were contacted to specify their responses and possible corrective actions were taken. It is concluded that a satisfaction survey can be used as a screening tool to identify topics of dissatisfaction. In addition, further clarifications with selected customers are needed to specify the causes for their dissatisfaction and to undertake proper corrective actions. PMID:20205616

  18. 1985 Effluent and environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The results of the radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring programs for 1985 at the Bettis Laboratory are presented. The results obtained from the monitoring programs demonstrate that the existing procedures ensure that all environmental releases during 1985 were in accordance with applicable State and Federal regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicates that operation of the Laboratory continued to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Laboratory operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Energy

  19. The Coordinating Laboratories for monitoring of environmental radioactivity. History, activities, perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiechen, A.; Bayer, A.

    2000-10-01

    The article reviews the development of the monitoring of environmental radioactivity in the former Federal Republic of Germany and from 1990 onwards in re-unified Germany. This monitoring originated in the need to investigate the radioactive fallout from the testing of atomic bombs in the atmosphere in the 1950's and 1960's. Monitoring was intensified and became increasingly regulated by law as a response to the large scale use of atomic power and in accordance with the Euratom Treaty of 1957. The necessity of evaluating the radiological effects in old mining regions in some of the new Laender was recognised in 1990. Since then legislation and official monitoring have been extended to include this source of radiation exposure. Also described is the way in which those institutions now termed Coordinating Laboratories were involved in all of the developments mentioned above. They tested and developed sampling, analysis and measurement techniques, carried out research projects on the various contamination pathways, reported regularly on environmental radioactivity and radiation exposure, organised and evaluated interlaboratory comparisons, assisted in the setting up of the Federal Integrated Measurement and Information System (IMIS), and advised the appropriate Federal and Laender Ministries. Some of the Coordinating Laboratories also manage Federal Monitoring Networks. The Precautionary Radiation Protection Act stipulates these tasks and names the institutions appointed as Coordinating Laboratories. (orig.) [de

  20. Development of personnel radiation monitoring program for occupationally exposed workers in Malawian Hospitals : A case study of Kamuzu Central, Bwaila and Mtengo Wa Nthenga Hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinangwa, Getrude

    2016-07-01

    Malawi became an IAEA member state in 2006 and developed the Atomic Energy Act and Regulations in 2011 and 2012 respectively. However, regulatory authority and personnel monitoring services have not yet been established. As such, hospitals operating radiological services in Malawi do not have personnel monitoring programme. This study aimed at developing the personnel radiation monitoring program for three hospitals in Malawi namely; Kamuzu Central Hospital, Bwaila Hospital, and Mtengo wa Nthenga Hospital. A radiation protection questionnaire was administered to the X-ray Departments involved in the study to investigate radiation protection practices in the hospitals. Dose rate measurements in the facilities were taken using survey meters and doses to individuals were recorded using personal dosimeters. The results showed that the hospitals lack radiation protection program which covers the critical issues of quality assurance and control as well as the personnel dose monitoring. Average ambient dose rate values were 0.39 μSv/hr for Mtengo wa Nthenga Hospital, 5.03 μSv/hr for Bwaila Hospital and 4μSv/hr for Kamuzu Central Hospital. Average monthly dose for workers was 0.247 mSv. The study recommends the establishment of a regulatory authority, consistent dose assessment, quality control tests and structural shielding assessment in these and probably all the diagnostic facilities in Malawi. The personnel monitoring programme developed from this study is intended to guide diagnostic facilities and personnel monitoring service providers in Malawi in tracking and reporting exposure record for their occupationally exposed workers. (au)

  1. Evaluation of clinical, laboratory, and electrophoretic profiles for diagnosis of malnutrition in hospitalized dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Kelliton Fabretti

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition is a major factor associated with increased rates of mortality and readmission, longer hospital stays, and greater health care spending. Recognizing malnourished or at-risk animals allows for nutritional intervention and improved prognosis. This study evaluated the association between clinical, laboratory, and electrophoretic variables and the nutritional status (NS of hospitalized dogs in order to generate a profile of the sick dog and to facilitate the diagnosis of malnutrition. We divided 215 dogs into groups according to the severity of the underlying disease and we determined the clinical NS based on the assessment of the body condition score and the muscle mass score. The NS was classified as clinically well nourished, clinical moderate malnutrition, or clinical severe malnutrition. Statistical analyses were conducted by using the chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test; the Kruskal-Wallis test was used for continuous variables. A strong association was found between malnutrition and the severity of the underlying disease. In hospitalized dogs, low body mass index values, anemia, low hemoglobin concentrations, high fibrinogen concentrations, decreased albumin fraction, and increased gamma-globulin fraction (in electrophoresis were associated with malnutrition, reinforcing the classification of poor NS. However, the skin and coat characteristics, the total number of lymphocytes, blood glucose, cholesterol, and total protein concentration were not found to be good predictors of NS.

  2. Study of variables affecting critical value notification in a laboratory catering to tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rachna; Chhillar, Neelam; Tripathi, Chandra B

    2015-01-01

    During post-analytical phase, critical value notification to responsible caregiver in a timely manner has potential to improve patient safety which requires cooperative efforts between laboratory personnel and caregivers. It is widely accepted by hospital accreditors that ineffective notification can lead to diagnostic errors that potentially harm patients and are preventable. The objective of the study was to assess the variables affecting critical value notification, their role in affecting it's quality and approaches to improve it. In the present study 1,187 critical values were analysed in the Clinical Chemistry Laboratory catering to tertiary care hospital for neuropsychiatric diseases. During 25 months of study period, we evaluated critical value notification with respect to clinical care area, caregiver to whom it was notified and timeliness of notification. During the study period (25 months), the laboratory obtained 1,279 critical values in clinical chemistry. The analytes most commonly notified were sodium and potassium (20.97 & 20.8 % of total critical results). Analysis of critical value notification versus area of care showed that critical value notification was high in ICU and emergency area followed by inpatients and 64.61 % critical values were notified between 30 and 120 min after receiving the samples. It was found that failure to notify the responsible caregiver in timely manner represent an important patient safety issue and may lead to diagnostic errors. The major area of concern are notification of critical value for outpatient samples, incompleteness of test requisition forms regarding illegible writing, lack of information of treating physician and location of test ordering and difficulty in contacting the responsible caregiver.

  3. Economic Evaluation of Laboratory Testing Strategies for Hospital-Associated Clostridium difficile Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robilotti, Elizabeth; Peterson, Lance R.; Banaei, Niaz; Dowdy, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common cause of infectious diarrhea in health care settings, and for patients presumed to have CDI, their isolation while awaiting laboratory results is costly. Newer rapid tests for CDI may reduce this burden, but the economic consequences of different testing algorithms remain unexplored. We used decision analysis from the hospital perspective to compare multiple CDI testing algorithms for adult inpatients with suspected CDI, assuming patient management according to laboratory results. CDI testing strategies included combinations of on-demand PCR (odPCR), batch PCR, lateral-flow diagnostics, plate-reader enzyme immunoassay, and direct tissue culture cytotoxicity. In the reference scenario, algorithms incorporating rapid testing were cost-effective relative to nonrapid algorithms. For every 10,000 symptomatic adults, relative to a strategy of treating nobody, lateral-flow glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH)/odPCR generated 831 true-positive results and cost $1,600 per additional true-positive case treated. Stand-alone odPCR was more effective and more expensive, identifying 174 additional true-positive cases at $6,900 per additional case treated. All other testing strategies were dominated by (i.e., more costly and less effective than) stand-alone odPCR or odPCR preceded by lateral-flow screening. A cost-benefit analysis (including estimated costs of missed cases) favored stand-alone odPCR in most settings but favored odPCR preceded by lateral-flow testing if a missed CDI case resulted in less than $5,000 of extended hospital stay costs and 93%, or if the symptomatic carrier proportion among the toxigenic culture-positive cases was >80%. These results can aid guideline developers and laboratory directors who are considering rapid testing algorithms for diagnosing CDI. PMID:24478478

  4. Economic evaluation of laboratory testing strategies for hospital-associated Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Lee F; Robilotti, Elizabeth; Peterson, Lance R; Banaei, Niaz; Dowdy, David W

    2014-02-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common cause of infectious diarrhea in health care settings, and for patients presumed to have CDI, their isolation while awaiting laboratory results is costly. Newer rapid tests for CDI may reduce this burden, but the economic consequences of different testing algorithms remain unexplored. We used decision analysis from the hospital perspective to compare multiple CDI testing algorithms for adult inpatients with suspected CDI, assuming patient management according to laboratory results. CDI testing strategies included combinations of on-demand PCR (odPCR), batch PCR, lateral-flow diagnostics, plate-reader enzyme immunoassay, and direct tissue culture cytotoxicity. In the reference scenario, algorithms incorporating rapid testing were cost-effective relative to nonrapid algorithms. For every 10,000 symptomatic adults, relative to a strategy of treating nobody, lateral-flow glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH)/odPCR generated 831 true-positive results and cost $1,600 per additional true-positive case treated. Stand-alone odPCR was more effective and more expensive, identifying 174 additional true-positive cases at $6,900 per additional case treated. All other testing strategies were dominated by (i.e., more costly and less effective than) stand-alone odPCR or odPCR preceded by lateral-flow screening. A cost-benefit analysis (including estimated costs of missed cases) favored stand-alone odPCR in most settings but favored odPCR preceded by lateral-flow testing if a missed CDI case resulted in less than $5,000 of extended hospital stay costs and 93%, or if the symptomatic carrier proportion among the toxigenic culture-positive cases was >80%. These results can aid guideline developers and laboratory directors who are considering rapid testing algorithms for diagnosing CDI.

  5. Monitoring adverse events in hospitals: how safe are hospitals for patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baines, R.J.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis aims to assess trends in adverse event and preventable adverse event rates in hospitals in the Netherlands through the time period 2004 –2012. Furthermore patient safety for specific care processes and patient groups are assessed. Patient safety has been high on the international agenda

  6. Monitoring and reporting of preanalytical errors in laboratory medicine: the UK situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornes, Michael P; Atherton, Jennifer; Pourmahram, Ghazaleh; Borthwick, Hazel; Kyle, Betty; West, Jamie; Costelloe, Seán J

    2016-03-01

    Most errors in the clinical laboratory occur in the preanalytical phase. This study aimed to comprehensively describe the prevalence and nature of preanalytical quality monitoring practices in UK clinical laboratories. A survey was sent on behalf of the Association for Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine Preanalytical Working Group (ACB-WG-PA) to all heads of department of clinical laboratories in the UK. The survey captured data on the analytical platform and Laboratory Information Management System in use; which preanalytical errors were recorded and how they were classified and gauged interest in an external quality assurance scheme for preanalytical errors. Of the 157 laboratories asked to participate, responses were received from 104 (66.2%). Laboratory error rates were recorded per number of specimens, rather than per number of requests in 51% of respondents. Aside from serum indices for haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia, which were measured in 80% of laboratories, the most common errors recorded were booking-in errors (70.1%) and sample mislabelling (56.9%) in laboratories who record preanalytical errors. Of the laboratories surveyed, 95.9% expressed an interest in guidance on recording preanalytical error and 91.8% expressed interest in an external quality assurance scheme. This survey observes a wide variation in the definition, repertoire and collection methods for preanalytical errors in the UK. Data indicate there is a lot of interest in improving preanalytical data collection. The ACB-WG-PA aims to produce guidance and support for laboratories to standardize preanalytical data collection and to help establish and validate an external quality assurance scheme for interlaboratory comparison. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Using preventive home monitoring to reduce hospital admission rates and reduce costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Birthe Irene; Haesum, Lisa K E; Soerensen, Natascha

    2012-01-01

    We studied whether preventive home monitoring of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) could reduce the frequency of hospital admissions and lower the cost of hospitalization. Patients were recruited from a health centre, general practitioner (GP) or the pulmonary hospital ward....... They were randomized to usual care or tele-rehabilitation with a telehealth monitoring device installed in their home for four months. A total of 111 patients were suitable for inclusion and consented to be randomized: 60 patients were allocated to intervention and three were lost to follow...... of admissions was €3461 per patient in the intervention group and €4576 in the control group; this difference was not significant. The Kaplan-Meier estimates for time to hospital admission were longer for the intervention group than the controls, but the difference was not significant. Future work requires...

  8. Quality of the clinical laboratory department in a specialized hospital in Alexandria, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhoseeny, T A; Mohammad, E K

    2013-01-01

    Assessment and improvement of turnaround times (TAT) as well as customer satisfaction is essential for laboratory quality management. This study in a specialized hospital in Alexandria, Egypt measured the current TAT for outpatient department bilirubin samples and evaluated the satisfaction of physicians with aspects of clinical laboratory services. While the mean TAT for 110 bilirubin tests [58.1 (SD 31.8) min] was within the College of American Pathologists' benchmark, the 90th percentile was long (96.7 min); 62.7% of tests were reported within 60 min. The mean overall satisfaction score of physicians (range 1-5) was 3.46 (SD 0.49). The highest satisfaction rating was for staff courtesy while the lowest ratings were for laboratory management responsiveness, outpatient stat TAT and critical value notification. Quality or reliability of results was judged by physicians as the most important factor (32.3%), followed by routine test TAT (18.5%). Further analysis of the different steps of the TAT would be helpful and follow-up through examining outliers is recommended

  9. [Laboratory medicine in the obligatory postgraduate clinical training system--common clinical training program in the department of laboratory medicine in our prefectural medical university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yasuyuki

    2003-04-01

    I propose a postgraduate common clinical training program to be provided by the department of laboratory medicine in our prefectural medical university hospital. The program has three purposes: first, mastering basic laboratory tests; second, developing the skills necessary to accurately interpret laboratory data; third, learning specific techniques in the field of laboratory medicine. For the first purpose, it is important that medical trainees perform testing of their own patients at bedside or in the central clinical laboratory. When testing at the central clinical laboratory, instruction by expert laboratory technicians is helpful. The teaching doctors in the department of laboratory medicine are asked to advise the trainees on the interpretation of data. Consultation will be received via interview or e-mail. In addition, the trainees can participate in various conferences, seminars, and meetings held at the central clinical laboratory. Finally, in order to learn specific techniques in the field of laboratory medicine, several special courses lasting a few months will be prepared. I think this program should be closely linked to the training program in internal medicine.

  10. Report of the unannounced monitoring assessment at University Hospital Limerick

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maher, M M

    2012-02-03

    We aimed to assess management by interventional radiology techniques of patients with urinary diversion procedures (UD) complicated by urinary obstruction (UO). A 12-year electronic database of interventional cases was searched for urinary access in patients with UD. Patients\\' records were assessed for aetiology of obstruction, indication for procedure, types of interventional radiology, complications and outcome. Management issues included frequency of visits for catheter care, type of catheter placement and technical problems associated with catheter maintenance. Three hundred and seventy eight procedures were carried out in 25 patients (mean age 70 years; Male : Female ratio 13:12). Indications for UD were malignancy (n = 22) and neuropathic bladder (n = 3). UD included ileal conduits (n = 17), cutaneous ureterostomy (n = 3 (2 patients)) and sigmoid colon urinary conduit (n = 6). In most patients, catheters were placed antegradely through nephrostomy tract, but subsequent access was through the UD. Twenty of 25 patients had unilateral stents where as 5 had bilateral stents (8-10- Fr pigtail catheters (20-45 cm in length)). The mean number of procedures including catheter changes was 15 +\\/- 4 per patient and 331 of 378 procedures (87 %) were carried out as outpatients. Since catheter placement, 11 patients required hospital admission on 22 occasions for catheter-related complications. Ureteric strictures in patients with UD can be successfully managed by interventional radiology.

  11. 1997 LMITCO Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, B.; Street, L.; Wilhelmsen, R.

    1998-09-01

    This report describes the calendar year 1997 environmental surveillance and compliance monitoring activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance, Site Environmental Surveillance, Drinking Water, Effluent Monitoring, Storm Water Monitoring, Groundwater Monitoring, and Special Request Monitoring Programs and compares 1997 data with program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the surveillance and monitoring activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standard, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends indicating a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. With the exception of one nitrogen sample in the disposal pond effluent stream and iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal pond, compliance with permits and applicable regulations was achieved. Data collected by the Environmental Monitoring Program demonstrate that public health and the environment were protected.

  12. A locally designed mobile laboratory for radiation analysis and monitoring in qatar. Vol. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Leila, H.; El-Samman, H.; Mahmoud, H.

    1996-01-01

    A description of a mobile laboratory for radiation analysis and monitoring, completely designed in qatar and equipped at qatar university, is given. It consists of a van equipped with three scintillation detectors mounted on the front bumper. The detectors can monitor gamma radiations along the path of the laboratory over an angle range 120 degree. One Eberline radiation monitoring station is mounted on the roof. The laboratory is also equipped with several, and neutron survey meters in addition to some sampling equipment. All equipment used are powered with solar panels. The characteristics and performance of solar power/stabilized A C conversion is given. Data acquisition from the three scintillation detectors is performed by adding the outputs of the three detectors and storing the total as a function of time in a computer based multi-channel analyzer (MCA) operated in the MSC mode. The acquisition can be switched easily to the PHA mode to analyze gamma spectra from any possible contamination source. The laboratory was used in several environmental and possible contamination missions. Some results obtained during some of these missions are given. 4 figs

  13. A locally designed mobile laboratory for radiation analysis and monitoring in qatar. Vol. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Leila, H; El-Samman, H; Mahmoud, H [Physics Department, University of qatar, Doha (Qatar)

    1996-03-01

    A description of a mobile laboratory for radiation analysis and monitoring, completely designed in qatar and equipped at qatar university, is given. It consists of a van equipped with three scintillation detectors mounted on the front bumper. The detectors can monitor gamma radiations along the path of the laboratory over an angle range 120 degree. One Eberline radiation monitoring station is mounted on the roof. The laboratory is also equipped with several, and neutron survey meters in addition to some sampling equipment. All equipment used are powered with solar panels. The characteristics and performance of solar power/stabilized A C conversion is given. Data acquisition from the three scintillation detectors is performed by adding the outputs of the three detectors and storing the total as a function of time in a computer based multi-channel analyzer (MCA) operated in the MSC mode. The acquisition can be switched easily to the PHA mode to analyze gamma spectra from any possible contamination source. The laboratory was used in several environmental and possible contamination missions. Some results obtained during some of these missions are given. 4 figs.

  14. Use of ArcGIS in Environmental Monitoring at Idaho National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oertel, Giles

    2007-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy site located in southeastern Idaho. The INL is required to perform environmental monitoring of anthropogenically introduced contaminants. One primary contaminant of interest is radioactive Cs-137 which is resident in INL soils due to past operational activities and atmospheric weapons testing. Collection of field data is performed using vehicle mounted and portable radiation detector units. All data is combined in ArcGIS and displayed over georeferenced satellite images and digital elevation models. The use of the ArcGIS geostatistical analysis package enhances the ability to look for areas of higher Cs-137 concentration. Combining current monitoring results with meteorological wind pattern maps allows for siting of new and improved monitoring locations. Use of the ArcGIS package provides an integrated analysis and mapping protocol for use in radioactive contaminant monitoring

  15. Experiences in the monitoring of radiation workers in industry and hospitals in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateo, A.J.

    1976-08-01

    The task of monitoring of radiation doses among radiation workers employed either in industry and hospitals in the Philippines is presently being undertaken by the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission. These radiation monitoring devices cover not only radioactive materials or sources but also x-ray machines. The most common dosimetry used is the film badge. This paper presents some of the experiences gained in the use of the film badge and other dosimeters

  16. Risk Factor Analysis for AKI Including Laboratory Indicators: a Nationwide Multicenter Study of Hospitalized Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasa Nie

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Risk factor studies for acute kidney injury (AKI in China are lacking, especially those regarding non-traditional risk factors, such as laboratory indicators. Methods: All adult patients admitted to 38 tertiary and 22 secondary hospitals in China in any one month between July and December 2014 were surveyed. AKI patients were screened according to the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes’ definition of AKI. Logistic regression was used to analyze the risk factors for AKI, and Cox regression was used to analyze the risk of in-hospital mortality for AKI patients; additionally, a propensity score analysis was used to reconfirm the risk factors among laboratory indicators for mortality. Results: The morbidity of AKI was 0.97%. Independent risk factors for AKI were advancing age, male gender, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. All-cause mortality was 16.5%. The predictors of mortality in AKI patients were advancing age, tumor, higher uric acid level and increases in Acute Physiologic Assessment and Chronic Health Evaluation II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores. The hazard ratio (HR for mortality with uric acid levels > 9.1 mg/dl compared with ≤ 5.2 mg/dl was 1.78 (95% CI: 1.23 to 2.58 for the AKI patients as a group, and was 1.73 (95% CI: 1.24 to 2.42 for a propensity score-matched set. Conclusion: In addition to traditional risk factors, uric acid level is an independent predictor of all-cause mortality after AKI.

  17. Revolutionizing clinical microbiology laboratory organization in hospitals with in situ point-of-care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Bacrie, Stéphan; Ninove, Laetitia; Nougairède, Antoine; Charrel, Rémi; Richet, Hervé; Minodier, Philippe; Badiaga, Sékéné; Noël, Guilhem; La Scola, Bernard; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Drancourt, Michel; Raoult, Didier

    2011-01-01

    Clinical microbiology may direct decisions regarding hospitalization, isolation and anti-infective therapy, but it is not effective at the time of early care. Point-of-care (POC) tests have been developed for this purpose. One pilot POC-lab was located close to the core laboratory and emergency ward to test the proof of concept. A second POC-lab was located inside the emergency ward of a distant hospital without a microbiology laboratory. Twenty-three molecular and immuno-detection tests, which were technically undemanding, were progressively implemented, with results obtained in less than four hours. From 2008 to 2010, 51,179 tests yielded 6,244 diagnoses. The second POC-lab detected contagious pathogens in 982 patients who benefited from targeted isolation measures, including those undertaken during the influenza outbreak. POC tests prevented unnecessary treatment of patients with non-streptococcal tonsillitis (n = 1,844) and pregnant women negative for Streptococcus agalactiae carriage (n = 763). The cerebrospinal fluid culture remained sterile in 50% of the 49 patients with bacterial meningitis, therefore antibiotic treatment was guided by the molecular tests performed in the POC-labs. With regard to enterovirus meningitis, the mean length-of-stay of infected patients over 15 years old significantly decreased from 2008 to 2010 compared with 2005 when the POC was not in place (1.43±1.09 versus 2.91±2.31 days; p = 0.0009). Altogether, patients who received POC tests were immediately discharged nearly thrice as often as patients who underwent a conventional diagnostic procedure. The on-site POC-lab met physicians' needs and influenced the management of 8% of the patients that presented to emergency wards. This strategy might represent a major evolution of decision-making regarding the management of infectious diseases and patient care.

  18. Revolutionizing clinical microbiology laboratory organization in hospitals with in situ point-of-care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphan Cohen-Bacrie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical microbiology may direct decisions regarding hospitalization, isolation and anti-infective therapy, but it is not effective at the time of early care. Point-of-care (POC tests have been developed for this purpose. METHODS AND FINDINGS: One pilot POC-lab was located close to the core laboratory and emergency ward to test the proof of concept. A second POC-lab was located inside the emergency ward of a distant hospital without a microbiology laboratory. Twenty-three molecular and immuno-detection tests, which were technically undemanding, were progressively implemented, with results obtained in less than four hours. From 2008 to 2010, 51,179 tests yielded 6,244 diagnoses. The second POC-lab detected contagious pathogens in 982 patients who benefited from targeted isolation measures, including those undertaken during the influenza outbreak. POC tests prevented unnecessary treatment of patients with non-streptococcal tonsillitis (n = 1,844 and pregnant women negative for Streptococcus agalactiae carriage (n = 763. The cerebrospinal fluid culture remained sterile in 50% of the 49 patients with bacterial meningitis, therefore antibiotic treatment was guided by the molecular tests performed in the POC-labs. With regard to enterovirus meningitis, the mean length-of-stay of infected patients over 15 years old significantly decreased from 2008 to 2010 compared with 2005 when the POC was not in place (1.43±1.09 versus 2.91±2.31 days; p = 0.0009. Altogether, patients who received POC tests were immediately discharged nearly thrice as often as patients who underwent a conventional diagnostic procedure. CONCLUSIONS: The on-site POC-lab met physicians' needs and influenced the management of 8% of the patients that presented to emergency wards. This strategy might represent a major evolution of decision-making regarding the management of infectious diseases and patient care.

  19. Ambient air monitoring for organic compounds, acids, and metals at Los Alamos National Laboratory, January 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, C.H.; Eberhart, C.F.

    1992-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) contracted Radian Corporation (Radian) to conduct a short-term, intensive air monitoring program whose goal was to estimate the impact of chemical emissions from LANL on the ambient air environment. A comprehensive emission inventory had identified more than 600 potential air contaminants in LANL's emissions. A subset of specific target chemicals was selected for monitoring: 20 organic vapors, 6 metals and 5 inorganic acid vapors. These were measured at 5 ground level sampling sites around LANL over seven consecutive days in January 1991. The sampling and analytical strategy used a combination of EPA and NIOSH methods modified for ambient air applications

  20. Treatment, monitoring, and economic outcomes of venous thromboembolism among hospitalized patients in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Eric Q; Xie, Jipan; Wu, Chun; Du, Ella Xiaoyan; Li, Nanxin; Tan, Ruoding; Liu, Yuanli

    2014-03-01

    The prevalence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) has been increasing in China. However, the treatment pattern and economic burden of these patients have not been well-understood. The objective of this study was to examine the patient characteristics, treatment pattern, anticoagulant monitoring, and economic burden of VTE among hospitalized patients in China. Hospitalizations with a diagnosis of VTE [including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE)] between 1 January 2010 and 30 June 2013 were included. Descriptive analysis was conducted for patients' characteristics, anticoagulant treatment, international normalized ratio (INR) monitoring, and hospitalization cost [in 2013 Chinese yuan (Y) and US dollars (US$)]. Multivariate regressions were performed to assess factors associated with oral anticoagulant use and total costs of inpatient care. A total of 1,047 VTE-related hospitalizations were selected. The sample had a mean age of 62.4 years, with 45.9 % female. About 46.3 % of hospitalizations used heparin only, 35.0 % used warfarin, 0.8 % used rivaroxaban, and 18.0 % did not use anticoagulants. Among hospitalizations where warfarin was used, 90.8 % received at least one INR test and only 30 % had the last INR within the target therapeutic range (2-3) before discharge. The mean (standard deviation) total cost per hospitalization was Y29,114 (43,772) [US$4,757 (7,152)]. PE, VTE as primary diagnosis, female, insurance coverage, anticoagulant treatment, co-morbidities, admission condition, and surgical procedure were significantly associated with inpatient costs. Conventional anticoagulants were most commonly used in the study sample. Under-monitoring and suboptimal care may be an issue for patients treated with warfarin. The average total inpatient cost of VTE-related hospitalizations is high.

  1. Active waste disposal monitoring at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbell, J.M.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes an active waste disposal monitoring system proposed to be installed beneath the low-level radioactive disposal site at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. The monitoring instruments will be installed while the waste is being disposed. Instruments will be located adjacent to and immediately beneath the disposal area within the unsaturated zone to provide early warning of contaminant movement before contaminants reach the Snake River Plain Aquifer. This study determined the optimum sampling techniques using existing monitoring equipment. Monitoring devices were chosen that provide long-term data for moisture content, movement of gamma-emitting nuclides, and gas concentrations in the waste. The devices will allow leachate collection, pore-water collection, collection of gasses, and access for drilling through and beneath the waste at a later time. The optimum monitoring design includes gas sampling devices above, within, and below the waste. Samples will be collected for methane, tritium, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and volatile organic compounds. Access tubes will be utilized to define the redistribution of radionuclides within, above, and below the waste over time and to define moisture content changes within the waste using spectral and neutron logging, respectively. Tracers will be placed within the cover material and within waste containers to estimate transport times by conservative chemical tracers. Monitoring the vadose zone below, within, and adjacent to waste while it is being buried is a viable monitoring option. 12 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab

  2. 1992 Effluent and environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory Pittsburgh Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The results of the radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring programs for 1992 at the Bettis-Pittsburgh Site are presented. The results obtained from the monitoring programs demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that environmental releases during 1992 were in accordance with applicable Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicates that operation of the Laboratory continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Laboratory operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Energy

  3. 1992 Effluent and environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory Pittsburgh Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    The results of the radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring programs for 1992 at the Bettis-Pittsburgh Site are presented. The results obtained from the monitoring programs demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that environmental releases during 1992 were in accordance with applicable Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicates that operation of the Laboratory continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Laboratory operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Energy.

  4. MONITORING ASPERGILLUS SPECIES BY QUANTITATIVE PCR DURING CONSTRUCTION OF A MULTI-STORY HOSPITAL BUILDING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noscomial fungal infections represent a persistent threat in hospitals. One of the major issues in fungal control has been monitoring these fungi in a timely manner. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) allows for the rapid (2 to 4 h), sensitive (often down to a single...

  5. HA Cells monitoring at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in the CMHM (Andra)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, Olivier; Allagnat, Dominique; Morel, Jacques; Armand, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    The experimental monitoring program of the HA (High Activity) cells was carried out at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in the Meuse Haute Marne department in France (CMHM Andra). Inspections made by video and photographs, section measurements and geo-referenced trajectories, in addition to measurements of convergence, temperature and hygrometry over time, allowed a better analysis of the behaviour of the HA cells after excavation, and subsequently over the long term. (authors)

  6. Los Alamos National Laboratory Meteorology Monitoring Program: 2016 Data Completeness/ Quality Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruggeman, David Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-15

    This report summarizes data completeness by tower and by instrument for 2016 and compares that data with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2015 standards. This report is designed to make data users aware of data completeness and any data quality issues. LANL meteorology monitoring goals include 95% completeness for all measurements. The ANSI 2015 standard requires 90% completeness for all measurements. This report documents instrument/tower issues as they impact data completeness.

  7. Use of risk-adjusted CUSUM charts to monitor 30-day mortality in Danish hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmussen TB

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Bøjer Rasmussen, Sinna Pilgaard Ulrichsen, Mette Nørgaard Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus N, Denmark Background: Monitoring hospital outcomes and clinical processes as a measure of clinical performance is an integral part of modern health care. The risk-adjusted cumulative sum (CUSUM chart is a frequently used sequential analysis technique that can be implemented to monitor a wide range of different types of outcomes.Objective: The aim of this study was to describe how risk-adjusted CUSUM charts based on population-based nationwide medical registers were used to monitor 30-day mortality in Danish hospitals and to give an example on how alarms of increased hospital mortality from the charts can guide further in-depth analyses.Materials and methods: We used routinely collected administrative data from the Danish National Patient Registry and the Danish Civil Registration System to create risk-adjusted CUSUM charts. We monitored 30-day mortality after hospital admission with one of 77 selected diagnoses in 24 hospital units in Denmark in 2015. The charts were set to detect a 50% increase in 30-day mortality, and control limits were determined by simulations.Results: Among 1,085,576 hospital admissions, 441,352 admissions had one of the 77 selected diagnoses as their primary diagnosis and were included in the risk-adjusted CUSUM charts. The charts yielded a total of eight alarms of increased mortality. The median of the hospitals’ estimated average time to detect a 50% increase in 30-day mortality was 50 days (interquartile interval, 43;54. In the selected example of an alarm, descriptive analyses indicated performance problems with 30-day mortality following hip fracture surgery and diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.Conclusion: The presented implementation of risk-adjusted CUSUM charts can detect significant increases in 30-day mortality within 2 months, on average, in most

  8. Test plan for preparing the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory for field deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.

    1994-04-01

    This plan describes experimental work that will be performed during fiscal year 1994 to prepare the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) for routine field use by US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management programs. The RTML is a mobile, field-deployable laboratory developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) that provides a rapid, cost-effective means of characterizing and monitoring radioactive waste remediation sites for low-level radioactive contaminants. Analytical instruments currently installed in the RTML include an extended-range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer; two, large-area, ionization chamber alpha spectrometers; and four alpha continuous air monitors. The RTML was field tested at the INEL during June 1993 in conjunction with the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration's remote retrieval demonstration. The major tasks described in this test plan are to (a) evaluate the beta detectors for use in screening soil samples for 90 Sr, (b) upgrade the alpha spectral analysis software programs, and (c) upgrade the photon spectral analysis software programs

  9. Laboratory versus industrial cutting force sensor in tool condition monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szwajka, K

    2005-01-01

    Research works concerning the utilisation of cutting force measures in tool condition monitoring usually present results and deliberations based on laboratory sensors. These sensors are too fragile to be used in industrial practice. Industrial sensors employed on the factory floor are less accurate, and this must be taken into account when creating a tool condition monitoring strategy. Another drawback of most of these works is that constant cutting parameters are used for the entire tool life. This does not reflect industrial practice where the same tool is used at different feeds and depths of cut in sequential passes. This paper presents a comparison of signals originating from laboratory and industrial cutting force sensors. The usability of the sensor output was studied during a laboratory simulation of industrial cutting conditions. Instead of building mathematical models for the correlation between tool wear and cutting force, an FFBP artificial neural network was used to find which combination of input data would provide an acceptable estimation of tool wear. The results obtained proved that cross talk between channels has an important influence on cutting force measurements, however this input configuration can be used for a tool condition monitoring system

  10. Nonradioactive Ambient Air Monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory 2001--2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Gladney; J.Dewart, C.Eberhart; J.Lochamy

    2004-09-01

    During the spring of 2000, the Cerro Grande forest fire reached Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and ignited both above-ground vegetation and disposed materials in several landfills. During and after the fire, there was concern about the potential human health impacts from chemicals emitted by the combustion of these Laboratory materials. Consequently, short-term, intensive air-monitoring studies were performed during and shortly after the fire. Unlike the radiological data from many years of AIRNET sampling, LANL did not have an adequate database of nonradiological species under baseline conditions with which to compare data collected during the fire. Therefore, during 2001 the Meteorology and Air Quality Group designed and implemented a new air-monitoring program, entitled NonRadNET, to provide nonradiological background data under normal conditions. The objectives of NonRadNET were to: (1) develop the capability for collecting nonradiological air-monitoring data, (2) conduct monitoring to develop a database of typical background levels of selected nonradiological species in the communities nearest the Laboratory, and (3) determine LANL's potential contribution to nonradiological air pollution in the surrounding communities. NonRadNET ended in late December 2002 with five quarters of data. The purpose of this paper is to organize and describe the NonRadNET data collected over 2001-2002 to use as baseline data, either for monitoring during a fire, some other abnormal event, or routine use. To achieve that purpose, in this paper we will: (1) document the NonRadNET program procedures, methods, and quality management, (2) describe the usual origins and uses of the species measured, (3) compare the species measured to LANL and other area emissions, (4) present the five quarters of data, (5) compare the data to known typical environmental values, and (6) evaluate the data against exposure standards.

  11. An easy, rapid and inexpensive method to monitor tributyltin (TBT) toxicity in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Andreia; Moreira, Rafael; Mendo, Sónia

    2014-05-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) contamination remains a major problem worldwide. Many laboratories are committed to the development of remediation methodologies that could help reduce the negative impact of this compound in the environment. Furthermore, it is important to have at hand simple methodologies for evaluating TBT toxicity in the laboratory, besides the use of complex and costly analytical instrumentation. With that purpose, a method was adapted that is based on the inhibition of growth of an indicator strain, Micrococcus luteus ATCC 9341, under TBT. Different types of matrices, of TBT concentrations and sample treatments were tested. The results herein reported show that the bioassay method can be applied for both aqueous and soil samples and also for a high range of TBT concentrations (at least up to 500 μmol/L). Besides being cheap and easy to perform, it can be performed in any laboratory. Additionally, one possible application of the method to monitor TBT degradation is presented as an example.

  12. Measurement comparisons of radioactivity among European monitoring laboratories for the environment and food stuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waetjen, U.; Spasova, Y.; Altzitzoglou, T.

    2008-01-01

    For more than 15 years, European Union (EU) laboratories monitoring environmental radioactivity have been obliged to participate in measurement comparisons organised by the European Commission. After a short review of comparisons conducted during the 1990s, the approach of IRMM organising these comparisons since 2003 is presented. It relies on the provision of comparison samples with reference values traceable to the International Reference System for radionuclides (SIR). The results of the most recent comparison, the determination of 40 K, 90 Sr and 137 Cs in milk powder, are presented. The influence of repetitive participation in measurement comparisons on laboratory performance is studied on the basis of data from more than 20 laboratories having participated in several exercises during the last 15 years

  13. The application of acoustic emission measurements on laboratory testpieces to large scale pressure vessel monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingham, T.; Dawson, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    A test pressure vessel containing 4 artificial defects was monitored for emission whilst pressure cycling to failure. Testpieces cut from both the failed vessel and from as-rolled plate material were tested in the laboratory. A marked difference in emission characteristics was observed between plate and vessel testpieces. Activity from vessel material was virtually constant after general yield and emission amplitudes were low. Plate testpieces showed maximum activity at general yield and more frequent high amplitude emissions. An attempt has been made to compare the system sensitivities between the pressure vessel test and laboratory tests. In the absence of an absolute calibration device, system sensitivities were estimated using dummy signals generated by the excitation of an emission sensor. The measurements have shown an overall difference in sensitivity between vessel and laboratory tests of approximately 25db. The reduced sensitivity in the vessel test is attributed to a combination of differences in sensors, acoustic couplant, attenuation, and dispersion relative to laboratory tests and the relative significance of these factors is discussed. Signal amplitude analysis of the emissions monitored from laboratory testpieces showed that, whith losses of the order of 25 to 30db, few emissions would be detected from the pressure vessel test. It is concluded that no reliable prediction of acoustic behaviour of a structure may be made from laboratory test unless testpieces of the actual structural material are used. A considerable improvement in detection sensitivity, is also required for reliable detection of defects in low strength ductile materials and an absolute method of system calibration is required between tests

  14. Study on the internal quality control of thyroid hormones assays in a hospital laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Haiqiang; Chu Shaolin; Ye Peihong; Lei Qiufang; Chai Luhua; Xia Wei

    2004-01-01

    Objective: With the aim of providing more reliable information for clinical diagnosis, this study investigated the possible causes of the occasional instability of thyroid hormones (T 3 , T 4 , FT 3 , FT 4 TSH) assays in this laboratory and tried to seek plausible explanation for some seemingly contradictory (mismatching) readings of the laboratory reports. Methods: Regular monitoring and checks were enforced on laboratory equipment from sampling pipet to gamma-counters. Results of separation with PR reagent and solid - phase coated tube were compared for superiority (FT 3 ). Collected specimens were tested in monthly sets; this study consisted of 10 sets with total 964 specimens. Serum T 3 , T 4 , FT 3 , FT 4 levels were measured with RIA. For every hormone tested, values of parameters of the standard cure (B 0 , NSB, a, b, r, ED 20 , ED 50 , ED 80 , ABCV) were recorded in detail, from which the QC (quality control) table was derived. For complementary sake , mean level in patients' sera was noted along with the quality control sera. Shewart control chart was drawn for quick reference. Serum TSH levels were measured with IRMA; the parameters involved were: B 0 NSB, ED 80 , ED 50 , ED 20 , standard point deviation. Results: Among the 964 specimens tested, there were 154 specimens with seemingly contradictory (mismatching) results, of which, the majority (n=145) were not erroneous and were compatible with the clinical manifestations of thyroid dysfunction other than plain simple hyper-or hypothyroidism. Only 9 (5.8% of the 154) were due to technical errors (defective technic in removing the supernatant n=7, lipid blood separated with PR reagent n=2). Conclusion: Faulty technic in separation is the main source of random error. From the data of this laboratory, authors believe that solid-phase separation method is better than the conventional homogenous-phase separation method and is the preferred one. With meticulous adherence to standard laboratory procedures and

  15. Environmental monitoring plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document presents an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG 6) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This document updates a draft monitoring plan developed in 1993. The draft plan was never finalized awaiting resolution of the mechanisms for addressing RCRA concerns at a site where the CERCLA process resulted in a decision to defer action, i.e., postpone closure indefinitely. Over the past two years the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), US Department of Energy (DOE), and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, have agreed that RCRA authority at the site will be maintained through a post- closure permit; ''closure'' in this case referring to deferred action. Both a Revised Closure Plan (DOE 1995a) and a Post-Closure Permit Application (DOE 1995b) have been developed to document this agreement; relevant portions of the EMP will be included in the RCRA Post-Closure Permit Application. As the RCRA issues were being negotiated, DOE initiated monitoring at WAG 6. The purpose of the monitoring activities was to (1) continue to comply with RCRA groundwater quality assessment requirements, (2) install new monitoring equipment, and (3) establish the baseline conditions at WAG 6 against which changes in contaminant releases could be measured. Baseline monitoring is scheduled to end September 30, 1995. Activities that have taken place over the past two years are summarized in this document

  16. U.S. Geological Survey geohydrologic studies and monitoring at the Idaho National Laboratory, southeastern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomay, Roy C.

    2017-09-14

    BackgroundThe U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) geohydrologic studies and monitoring at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is an ongoing, long-term program. This program, which began in 1949, includes hydrologic monitoring networks and investigative studies that describe the effects of waste disposal on water contained in the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) aquifer and the availability of water for long-term consumptive and industrial use. Interpretive reports documenting study findings are available to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors; other Federal, State, and local agencies; private firms; and the public at https://id.water.usgs.gov/INL/Pubs/index.html. Information contained within these reports is crucial to the management and use of the aquifer by the INL and the State of Idaho. USGS geohydrologic studies and monitoring are done in cooperation with the DOE Idaho Operations Office.

  17. Improvement in QA protocol for TLD based personnel monitoring laboratory in last five year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakesh, R.B.

    2018-01-01

    The Quality Assurance (QA) in Personnel monitoring (PM) is a tool to assess the performance of PM laboratories and reliability of dose estimation with respect to standards laid down by international agencies such as IAEA (ISO trumpet curve), IEC, ANSI etc. Reliable personal dose estimation is a basic requirement for radiation protection planning as well as decision making continuous improvement in radiation protection is inherent in radiation protection practices which is highly dependent on accuracy and reliability of the monitoring data. Experience based evolution of Quality control (QC) measures as well as Quality assurance (QA) protocol are two important aspects towards continuous improvement in accuracy and reliability of personnel monitoring results. The paper describes improvement in QC measures and QA protocols initiated during the last five years which led to improvement in the quality of PM services

  18. 1985 Environmental Monitoring Program report for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoff, D.L.; Chew, E.W.; Rope, S.K.

    1986-05-01

    The results of the various monitoring programs for 1985 indicated that radioactivity from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Site operations could not be distinguished from worldwide fallout and natural radioactivity in the region surrounding the Site. Although some radioactive materials were discharged during Site operations, concentrations and doses to the surrounding population were of no health consequence and were far less than State of Idaho and Federal health protection guidelines. This report describes the air, water, and foodstuff samples routinely collected at the INEL boundary locations and at locations distant from the INEL Site. It compares and evaluates the sample results, discussing implications, if any. Included for the first time this year are data from air and water samples routinely collected from onsite locations. The report also summarizes significant environmental activities at the INEL Site during 1985, nonradioactive and radioactive effluent monitoring at the Site, and the US Geological Survey (USGS) groundwater monitoring program

  19. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2004-11-15

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of Research & Development (R&D) facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the Hanford Site. Facility effluent monitoring plans (FEMPs) have been developed to document the facility effluent monitoring portion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (DOE 2000) for the Hanford Site. Three of PNNL’s R&D facilities, the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling, and individual FEMPs were developed for these facilities in the past. In addition, a balance-of-plant (BOP) FEMP was developed for all other DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site. Recent changes, including shutdown of buildings and transition of PNNL facilities to the Office of Science, have resulted in retiring the 3720 FEMP and combining the 331 FEMP into the BOP FEMP. This version of the BOP FEMP addresses all DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site, excepting the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, which has its own FEMP because of the unique nature of the building and operations. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R&D. R&D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in Appendix A. Potential radioactive airborne emissions in the BOP facilities are estimated annually using a building inventory-based approach provided in federal regulations. Sampling at individual BOP facilities is based on a potential-to-emit assessment. Some of these facilities are considered minor emission points and thus are sampled routinely, but not continuously, to confirm the low emission potential. One facility, the 331 Life Sciences Laboratory, has a major emission point and is sampled continuously. Sampling systems are

  20. Implementing an electronic hand hygiene monitoring system: Lessons learned from community hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmisten, Catherine; Hall, Charles; Kernizan, Lorna; Korwek, Kimberly; Preston, Aaron; Rhoades, Evan; Shah, Shalin; Spight, Lori; Stradi, Silvia; Wellman, Sonia; Zygadlo, Scott

    2017-08-01

    Measuring and providing feedback about hand hygiene (HH) compliance is a complicated process. Electronic HH monitoring systems have been proposed as a possible solution; however, there is little information available about how to successfully implement and maintain these systems for maximum benefit in community hospitals. An electronic HH monitoring system was implemented in 3 community hospitals by teams at each facility with support from the system vendor. Compliance rates were measured by the electronic monitoring system. The implementation challenges, solutions, and drivers of success were monitored within each facility. The electronic HH monitoring systems tracked on average more than 220,000 compliant HH events per facility per month, with an average monthly compliance rate >85%. The sharing of best practices between facilities was valuable in addressing challenges encountered during implementation and maintaining a high rate of use. Drivers of success included a collaborative environment, leadership commitment, using data to drive improvement, consistent and constant messaging, staff empowerment, and patient involvement. Realizing the full benefit of investments in electronic HH monitoring systems requires careful consideration of implementation strategies, planning for ongoing support and maintenance, and presenting data in a meaningful way to empower and inspire staff. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical impact of laboratory error on therapeutic drug monitoring of once-daily tobramycin in cystic fibrosis: Case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A Prescott

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Once-daily dosing intravenous tobramycin is commonly used to treat cystic fibrosis pulmonary exacerbations. Clinicians often utilize historical therapeutic drug monitoring data to individualize the dose among patients who have been treated with tobramycin previously. This case series involves three patients with cystic fibrosis who had supra-therapeutic tobramycin levels despite use of a once-daily dosing that produced therapeutic drug levels during a previous hospital admission, raising questions about the validity of these levels. Investigation into several potential sources of error led to the discovery of an analyzer error in the laboratory. Once the laboratory’s tobramycin analyzer was recalibrated, the reported levels were comparable to historical levels. This case series emphasizes the clinical importance of critically analyzing reported levels, and specifically, the importance of utilizing past therapeutic drug monitoring data, if available, for all patients treated with intravenous tobramycin. If a patient was therapeutic on a similar dose of tobramycin during a previous admission, a dose adjustment may not be necessary, and clinicians should consider repeating levels while pursuing alternative explanations for the discrepant serum levels.

  2. Blood sample collection and patient identification demand improvement: a questionnaire study of preanalytical practices in hospital wards and laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Olof; Söderberg, Johan; Van Guelpen, Bethany; Stenlund, Hans; Grankvist, Kjell; Brulin, Christine

    2010-09-01

    Scand J Caring Sci; 2010; 24; 581-591 
 Blood sample collection and patient identification demand improvement: a questionnaire study of preanalytical practices in hospital wards and laboratories   Most errors in venous blood testing result from human mistakes occurring before the sample reach the laboratory.   To survey venous blood sampling (VBS) practices in hospital wards and to compare practices with hospital laboratories.   Staff in two hospitals (all wards) and two hospital laboratories (314 respondents, response rate 94%), completed a questionnaire addressing issues relevant to the collection of venous blood samples for clinical chemistry testing.   The findings suggest that instructions for patient identification and the collection of venous blood samples were not always followed. For example, 79% of the respondents reported the undesirable practice (UDP) of not always using wristbands for patient identification. Similarly, 87% of the respondents noted the UDP of removing venous stasis after the sampling is finished. Compared with the ward staff, a significantly higher proportion of the laboratory staff reported desirable practices regarding the collection of venous blood samples. Neither education nor the existence of established sampling routines was clearly associated with VBS practices among the ward staff.   The results of this study, the first of its kind, suggest that a clinically important risk of error is associated with VBS in the surveyed wards. Most important is the risk of misidentification of patients. Quality improvement of blood sample collection is clearly needed, particularly in hospital wards. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  3. Prevalence and associated factors of job-related depression in laboratory technicians in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM) and Ministry of Health Malaysia (MOH) Hospitals in Kelantan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziah, B D; Rusli, B N; Winn, T; Naing, L; Tengku, M A

    2004-06-01

    Karasek's job strain model postulates that workers chronically exposed to adverse psychosocial work environment (high strain job)--high psychological job demands and low job control, including poor social support, increased physical demand and hazardous work condition--will eventually develop both physical illnesses such as cardiovascular diseases and psychological disorders such as depression. In order to determine the prevalence and associated factors of job-related depression, a cross-sectional study was conducted among laboratory technicians in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM) and Kementerian Kesihatan Malaysia (KKM) Hospitals in Kelantan between September 2001 and February 2002. One hundred and two laboratory technicians in HUSM and 79 laboratory technicians in 7 KKM Hospitals were selected; 84/102 (82.4%) in HUSM and 71/79 (89.9%) in KKM Hospitals responded. Data was collected using self-administered questionnaires of the validated Malay version of the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ) originally developed by Robert Karasek. Results indicated that the prevalence of high job strain in laboratory technicians in HUSM and KKM hospitals was 33.3% (28/84) and 26.8% (19/71), respectively (p>0.05). Significantly higher proportion (59.5%) (50/84) of laboratory technicians in HUSM compared to those in KKM Hospitals (39.4%) (28/71) (p = 0.016) experienced job-related depression. Significant associated factors of job-related depression were low social support (HUSM: adjusted OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.2-18.8; KKM: adjusted OR 14.8, 95%CI 2.4-89.3), high psychological demand (HUSM: adjusted OR 3.0, 95%CI 1.0-8.8), and low decision authority (KKM: adjusted OR 9.7, 95%CI 1.0-91.1). We conclude that strengthening the social support network (supervisors' and coworkers' support), reducing psychological job demand, and increasing decision-making authority of laboratory technicians may go a long way towards reducing job-related depression.

  4. 1998 Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. V. Street

    1999-09-01

    This report describes the calendar year 1998 compliance monitoring and environmental surveillance activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Drinking Water, Effluent, Storm Water, Groundwater Monitoring, and Environmental Surveillance Programs. This report compares the 1998 results to program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the monitoring and surveillance activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of public health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends, which would indicate a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. The INEEL complied with permits and applicable regulations, with the exception of nitrogen samples in a disposal pond effluent stream and iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal pond. Data collected by the Environmental Monitoring Program demonstrate that the public health and environment were protected.

  5. TEMPERATURE MONITORING OPTIONS AVAILABLE AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; D.L. Knudson; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; K.L Davis

    2012-03-01

    As part of the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced sensors for irradiation testing. To meet recent customer requests, an array of temperature monitoring options is now available to ATR users. The method selected is determined by test requirements and budget. Melt wires are the simplest and least expensive option for monitoring temperature. INL has recently verified the melting temperature of a collection of materials with melt temperatures ranging from 100 to 1000 C with a differential scanning calorimeter installed at INL’s High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). INL encapsulates these melt wires in quartz or metal tubes. In the case of quartz tubes, multiple wires can be encapsulated in a single 1.6 mm diameter tube. The second option available to ATR users is a silicon carbide temperature monitor. The benefit of this option is that a single small monitor (typically 1 mm x 1 mm x 10 mm or 1 mm diameter x 10 mm length) can be used to detect peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 C. Equipment has been installed at INL’s HTTL to complete post-irradiation resistivity measurements on SiC monitors, a technique that has been found to yield the most accurate temperatures from these monitors. For instrumented tests, thermocouples may be used. In addition to Type-K and Type-N thermocouples, a High Temperature Irradiation Resistant ThermoCouple (HTIR-TC) was developed at the HTTL that contains commercially-available doped molybdenum paired with a niobium alloy thermoelements. Long duration high temperature tests, in furnaces and in the ATR and other MTRs, demonstrate that the HTIR-TC is accurate up to 1800 C and insensitive to thermal neutron interactions. Thus, degradation observed at temperatures above 1100 C with Type K and N thermocouples and decalibration due to transmutation with tungsten

  6. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballinger, M.Y.; Shields, K.D.

    1999-04-02

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R and D) facilities for the Department of Energy on the Hanford Site. According to DOE Order 5400.1, a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan is required for each site, facility, or process that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials. Three of the R and D facilities: the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling and thus individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (FEMPs) have been developed for them. Because no definition of ''significant'' is provided in DOE Order 5400.1 or the accompanying regulatory guide DOE/EH-0173T, this FEMP was developed to describe monitoring requirements in the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities that do not have individual FEMPs. The remainder of the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities are referred to as Balance-of-Plant (BOP) facilities. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R and D. R and D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in the FEMP.

  7. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballinger, M.Y.; Shields, K.D.

    1999-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R and D) facilities for the Department of Energy on the Hanford Site. According to DOE Order 5400.1, a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan is required for each site, facility, or process that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials. Three of the R and D facilities: the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling and thus individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (FEMPs) have been developed for them. Because no definition of ''significant'' is provided in DOE Order 5400.1 or the accompanying regulatory guide DOE/EH-0173T, this FEMP was developed to describe monitoring requirements in the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities that do not have individual FEMPs. The remainder of the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities are referred to as Balance-of-Plant (BOP) facilities. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R and D. R and D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in the FEMP

  8. Elaboration of a program for monitoring the ionizing radiations in a large hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreira, Mauricio Costa

    1996-11-01

    Personnel monitoring data collected in the Radiotherapy, Diagnostic Radiology and Hemodynamics Departments of the Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirao Preto - USP during the interval from 1986 to 1995 were analyzed. The data were classified according to the profession of the workers and compared to those collected in a previous period (1973-1982). Internationally established criteria, published published in the ICRP 35 and 60 were used together with additional Brazilian criteria (CNEN NE 3.01) to optimize personnel monitoring such that the required radioprotection is provided. The results show that 80% of the workers need not be monitored because their doses will not exceed 3/10 the annual limits. An economy of about US$10,200 in monitoring cost per year could be realized as well as reduction in the hospital clerical costs expended to maintain the records. The improvements gaining by reducing the number of monitored persons will not compromise the safety standard required for radiation protection. (author)

  9. Rotavirus Infection in the Auckland Region After the Implementation of Universal Infant Rotavirus Vaccination: Impact on Hospitalizations and Laboratory Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Gary N; Taylor, Susan L; Drinković, Dragana; Roberts, Sally A; Wilson, Elizabeth M; Best, Emma J

    2018-01-01

    In July 2014, New Zealand introduced universal infant vaccination with RotaTeq (Merk & Co.) administered as 3 doses at 6 weeks, 3 and 5 months of age. We sought to assess the impact of rotavirus vaccination on gastroenteritis (GE) hospitalizations in the greater Auckland region and analyze changes in rotavirus testing in the period around vaccine introduction. Hospitalizations, laboratory testing rates and methods were compared between the pre-vaccine period (2009-2013), post-vaccine period (January 2015 to December 2015) and year of vaccine introduction (2014). There was a 68% decline in rotavirus hospitalizations of children Auckland region. However, continued rotavirus testing at pre-vaccine rates risks generating false positive results. Laboratories and clinicians should consider reviewing their testing algorithms before vaccine introduction.

  10. [Surface Cleaning and Disinfection in the Hospital. Improvement by Objective Monitoring and Intervention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woltering, R; Hoffmann, G; Isermann, J; Heudorf, U

    2016-11-01

    Background and Objective: An assessment of cleaning and disinfection in hospitals by the use of objective surveillance and review of mandatory corrective measures was undertaken. Methods: A prospective examination of the cleaning and disinfection of surfaces scheduled for daily cleaning in 5 general care hospitals by use of an ultraviolet fluorescence targeting method (UVM) was performed, followed by structured educational and procedural interventions. The survey was conducted in hospital wards, operating theatres and intensive care units. Cleaning performance was measured by complete removal of UVM. Training courses and reinforced self-monitoring were implemented after the first evaluation. 6 months later, we repeated the assessment for confirmation of success. Results: The average cleaning performance was 34% (31/90) at base-line with significant differences between the 5 hospitals (11-67%). The best results were achieved in intensive care units (61%) and operating theatres (58%), the worst results in hospital wards (22%). The intervention significantly improved cleaning performance up to an average of 69% (65/94; +34.7%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 21.2-48.3; pcleaning and disinfection of surfaces by fluorescence targeting is appropriate for evaluating hygiene regulations. An intervention can lead to a significant improvement of cleaning performance. As part of a strategy to improve infection control in hospitals, fluorescence targeting enables a simple inexpensive and effective surveillance of the cleaning performance and corrective measures. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Establishment of Next-Generation Neurosurgery Research and Training Laboratory with Integrated Human Performance Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    Quality of neurosurgical care and patient outcomes are inextricably linked to surgical and technical proficiency and a thorough working knowledge of microsurgical anatomy. Neurosurgical laboratory-based cadaveric training is essential for the development and refinement of technical skills before their use on a living patient. Recent biotechnological advances including 3-dimensional (3D) microscopy and endoscopy, 3D printing, virtual reality, surgical simulation, surgical robotics, and advanced neuroimaging have proved to reduce the learning curve, improve conceptual understanding of complex anatomy, and enhance visuospatial skills in neurosurgical training. Until recently, few means have allowed surgeons to obtain integrated surgical and technological training in an operating room setting. We report on a new model, currently in use at our institution, for technologically integrated surgical training and innovation using a next-generation microneurosurgery skull base laboratory designed to recreate the setting of a working operating room. Each workstation is equipped with a 3D surgical microscope, 3D endoscope, surgical drills, operating table with a Mayfield head holder, and a complete set of microsurgical tools. The laboratory also houses a neuronavigation system, a surgical robotic, a surgical planning system, 3D visualization, virtual reality, and computerized simulation for training of surgical procedures and visuospatial skills. In addition, the laboratory is equipped with neurophysiological monitoring equipment in order to conduct research into human factors in surgery and the respective roles of workload and fatigue on surgeons' performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mass Spectrometry in Clinical Laboratory: Applications in Therapeutic Drug Monitoring and Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Uttam; Zhang, Yan Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been used in research and specialized clinical laboratories for decades as a very powerful technology to identify and quantify compounds. In recent years, application of MS in routine clinical laboratories has increased significantly. This is mainly due to the ability of MS to provide very specific identification, high sensitivity, and simultaneous analysis of multiple analytes (>100). The coupling of tandem mass spectrometry with gas chromatography (GC) or liquid chromatography (LC) has enabled the rapid expansion of this technology. While applications of MS are used in many clinical areas, therapeutic drug monitoring, drugs of abuse, and clinical toxicology are still the primary focuses of the field. It is not uncommon to see mass spectrometry being used in routine clinical practices for those applications.

  13. Report on a Workshop on mobile laboratories for monitoring environmental radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrasi, A,; Nemeth, I.; Zombori, P.; Urban, J.

    1992-01-01

    The international Workshop organized by the Health Physics Department of the Central Research Institute for Physics and by the Radiation Protection Department of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant was presented in this paper. The aims of the Workshop were the introduction of the mobile laboratories and the demonstration of the applied methods for monitoring environmental radiation in accidental situation. The intercomparison measurements showed that the results given by different participating laboratories (9 institutions from the middle and east European region) agreed well within an acceptable error margin. The demonstration, measurements and discussions were very useful for the participants and this could be a good basis for further developments and cooperations among the participating institutions. (author) 7 figs.; 2 tabs

  14. Intercomparison of in vivo monitoring systems in Europe. Results from Risoe National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauridsen, B.; Soegaard-Hansen, J.

    1996-12-01

    This report contains the contribution from Risoe National Laboratory to the European project: 'Intercomparison of in Vivo Monitoring Systems in Europe'. The whole-body counter at Risoe and the measurement on a phantom used as an intercalibration object in the project is described. In four case studies, prepared by the project coordinator, intakes of radionuclides and resulting doses are calculated. These calculations are based on informations on the radioactive materials taken into the body, routes of intake and on body contents of radionuclides from simulated single or multiple whole-body measurement. The answer from Risoe National Laboratory to two questionnaires - one on the whole-body counting facility and calibration methods and one on the legal requirements is the country - is listed. (au)

  15. Impact of professionalism in nursing on in-hospital bedside monitoring practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Gitte; Samuelson, Karin; Akeson, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    practice) and two sub-themes (Knowledge and skills and Involvement in clinical practice through reflections) were identified. Three categories (Decision-making, Sharing of knowledge, and Intra- and interprofessional interaction) were found to be associated with the theme, the sub-themes, and with each...... other. CONCLUSION: Clinical monitoring practice varies considerably between nurses with different individual levels of professionalism. Future initiatives to improve patient safety by further developing professionalism among nurses need to embrace individual and organizational attributes to strengthen......AIM: This article reports a study exploring nursing practice of monitoring in-hospital patients including intra- and interprofessional communication and collaboration. BACKGROUND: Sub-optimal care in general in-hospital wards may lead to admission for intensive care, cardiac arrest, or sudden death...

  16. RADIOLOGICAL EMISSIONS AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING FOR BROOKHAV EN NATIONAL LABORATORY, 1947 - 1961.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MEINHOLD,C.B.; MEINHOLD,A.F.(EDITED BY BOND,P.D.)

    2001-05-30

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has monitored its releases to the environment since its inception in 1947. From 1962 to 1966 and from 1971 to the present, annual reports,were published that recorded the emissions and releases to the environment from Laboratory operations. In 1998, a report was written to summarize the environmental data for the years 1967 to 1970. One of the purposes of the current report is to complete BNL's environmental history by covering the period from 1948 through 1961. The activities in 1947 were primarily organizational and there is no information on the use of radiation at the Laboratory before 1948. An additional objective of this report is to provide environmental data to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). The report does not provide an estimate of the doses associated with BNL operations. The report is comprised of two parts. The first part is a summary of emissions, releases, and environmental monitoring information including a discussion of the uncertainties in these data. Part two contains the detailed information on the approach taken to estimate the releases from the fuel cartridge failures at the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR). A series of appendices present more detailed information on these events in tabular form. The approach in this report is to be reasonable, conservative, (pessimistic), and transparent in estimating releases from fuel cartridge ruptures. Clearly, reactor stack monitoring records and more extensive records would have greatly improved this effort, but in accordance with Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) Appendix 0230 Annex C-9, many of the detailed records from this time were not retained.

  17. The need for strengthening the influenza virus detection ability of hospital clinical laboratories: an investigation of the 2009 pandemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shigui; Zhou, Yuqing; Cui, Yuanxia; Ding, Cheng; Wu, Jie; Deng, Min; Wang, Chencheng; Lu, Xiaoqing; Chen, Xiaoxiao; Li, Yiping; Shi, Dongyan; Mi, Fenfang; Li, Lanjuan

    2017-03-01

    Most hospital clinical laboratories (HCLs) in China are unable to perform influenza virus detection. It remains unclear whether the influenza detection ability of HCLs influences the early identification and mortality rate of influenza. A total of 739 hospitalized patients with 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus treated at 65 hospitals between May and December, 2009, in Zhejiang, China, were included based on identifications by HCLs and by public health laboratories (PHLs) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Of the patients, 407 (55.1%) were male, 17 died, resulting in an in-hospital mortality rate of 2.3%, and 297 patients were identified by HCLs and 442 by PHLs. The results indicated that a 24-hour delay in identification led to a 13% increase in the odds of death (OR = 1.13, P hospital mortality rate of the HCL group was significantly lower than that of the PHL group (1.0% vs. 3.2%, P hospital mortality rate by 68.8%. HCL-based influenza virus detection facilitated early identification and reduced influenza mortality, and influenza detection ability of HCLs should be strengthened.

  18. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report: Third quarter 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    During third quarter 1993, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility were analyzed for certain heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Eight parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards; and aluminum, iron, lead, manganese, pH, and total organic halogens exceeded the Savannah River Site Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water-table unit were similar to previous quarters

  19. Management and technical requirements for laboratories in charge of water monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottaviani, M.; Bonadonna, L.; Lucentini, L.; Pettine, P.

    2008-01-01

    This report completes the series of volumes focused on microbiological (Rapporti ISTISAN 07/5) and chemical methods (Rapporti ISTISAN 07/31) for the monitoring of water intended for human consumption according to the Italian Legislative Decree 31/2001 (transposition of European Directive 98/83/EC) and its integrations. The guidelines here presented concern management and technical requirements for laboratories in charge of testing parameters required by the Decree also taking into account the criteria stated by the standard UNI CEI EN ISO/IEC 17025 [it

  20. Environmental monitoring of subsurface low-level waste disposal facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashwood, T.L.; Hicks, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) generates low-level waste (LLW) as part of its research and isotope production activities. This waste is managed in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Solid LLW management includes disposal in above-ground, tumulus-type facilities as well as in various types of subsurface facilities. Since 1986, subsurface disposal has been conducted using various designs employing greater-confinement-disposal (GCD) techniques. The purpose of this paper is to present monitoring results that document the short-term performance of these GCD facilities

  1. 1983 Environmental monitoring program report for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoff, D.L.; Chew, E.W.; Dickson, R.L.

    1984-05-01

    The results of the various monitoring programs for 1983 indicated that radioactivity from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Site operations could not be distinguished from worldwide fallout and natural radioactivity in the region surrounding the Site. Although some radioactive materials were discharged during Site operations, concentrations and doses to the surrounding population were of no health consequence and were far less than State of Idaho and Federal health protection guidelines. This report describes the air, water, and foodstuff samples routinely collected at the INEL boundary locations and at locations distant from the INEL Site. 11 figures, 14 tables

  2. Quality management system and accreditation of the in vivo monitoring laboratory at Karslruhe Institute of Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breustedt, B; Mohr, U; Biegard, N; Cordes, G

    2011-03-01

    The in vivo monitoring laboratory (IVM) at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), with one whole body counter and three partial-body counters, is an approved lab for individual monitoring according to German regulation. These approved labs are required to prove their competencies by accreditation to ISO/IEC 17025:2005. In 2007 a quality management system (QMS), which was successfully audited and granted accreditation, was set up at the IVM. The system is based on the ISO 9001 certified QMS of the central safety department of the Research Centre Karlsruhe the IVM belonged to at that time. The system itself was set up to be flexible and could be adapted to the recent organisational changes (e.g. founding of KIT and an institute for radiation research) with only minor effort.

  3. Hydrogeological characterization, modelling and monitoring of the site of Canada's Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davison, C.C.; Guvanasen, V.

    1985-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is constructing an Underground Research Laboratory (URL) to a depth of 250 m in a previously undisturbed granitic pluton located near Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba, as one of the major research projects within the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. This paper discusses the hydrogeological characterization of the URL site, the modelling approach used to represent this information, the hydrogeological monitoring system installed to monitor the actual drawdown conditions that develop in response to the excavation, and the procedures employed to calibrate the numerical model. Comparisons between the drawdown predictions made by the model prior to any excavation and the actual drawdowns that have been measured since shaft excavation began in May 1984 are also discussed

  4. Results and discussion of laboratory experiences with different automated TLD readers for personnel monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulla, D.F.; Drexeler, G.

    Although the film seems to continue serving as the main personnel dosemeter in Germany for the time in sight, the evolution of particularly solid state techniques and their properties are thoroughly considered with respect to a possible generalized application in personnel monitoring. For this reason different automated TLD systems that are commercially available have been investigated in the laboratory in order to find out their usefulness for a largescale or also decentralized service. Along with studying the dosimetrical and apparative parameters, the question has been discussed to which monitoring philosophy these TLD systems seem to fit. It is reported both on experimental experiences achieved as well as on the results of basic discussions that in return influence the discussion about the necessary outfit of personnel TL dosemeters

  5. Dig-face monitoring during excavation of a radioactive plume at Mound Laboratory, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josten, N.E.; Gehrke, R.J.; Carpenter, M.V.

    1995-12-01

    A dig-face monitoring system consists of onsite hardware for collecting information on changing chemical, radiological, and physical conditions in the subsurface soil during the hazardous site excavation. A prototype dig-face system was take to Mount Laboratory for a first trial. Mound Area 7 was the site of historical disposals of 232 Th, 227 Ac, and assorted debris. The system was used to monitor a deep excavation aimed at removing 227 Ac-contaminated soils. Radiological, geophysical, and topographic sensors were used to scan across the excavation dig-face at four successive depths as soil was removed. A 3-D image of the contamination plumes was developed; the radiation sensor data indicated that only a small portion of the excavated soil volume was contaminated. The spatial information produced by the dig-face system was used to direct the excavation activities into the area containing the 227 Ac and to evaluate options for handling the separate 232 Th plume

  6. Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bivins, Steven R; Stoetzel, Gregory A

    2001-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM) in January 1993. This program is to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a) (1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the DOE Standard Radiological Control, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to (1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually, and (2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-2000 confirm that personnel dosimetry is not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program

  7. Design of a instrumentation module for monitoring ingestive behavior in laboratory studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Juan M; Lopez-Meyer, Paulo; Sazonov, Edward S

    2011-01-01

    The development of accurate and objective tools for monitoring of ingestive behavior (MIB) is one of the most important needs facing studies of obesity and eating disorders. This paper presents the design of an instrumentation module for non-invasive monitoring of food ingestion in laboratory studies. The system can capture signals from a variety of sensors that characterize ingestion process (such as acoustical and other swallowing sensors, strain sensor for chewing detection and self-report buttons). In addition to the sensors, the data collection system integrates time-synchronous video footage that can be used for annotation of subject's activity. Both data and video are simultaneously and synchronously acquired and stored by a LabVIEW-based interface specifically developed for this application. This instrumentation module improves a previously developed system by eliminating the post-processing stage of data synchronization and by reducing the risks of operator's error.

  8. Reduction of operative mortality after implementation of Surgical Outcomes Monitoring and Improvement Programme by Hong Kong Hospital Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, W C; Wong, K; Cheung, Y S; Lai, P Bs

    2018-04-01

    Since 2008, the Hong Kong Hospital Authority has implemented a Surgical Outcomes Monitoring and Improvement Programme (SOMIP) at 17 public hospitals with surgical departments. This study aimed to assess the change in operative mortality rate after implementation of SOMIP. The SOMIP included all Hospital Authority patients undergoing major/ultra-major procedures in general surgery, urology, plastic surgery, and paediatric surgery. Patients undergoing liver or renal transplantation or who had multiple trauma or massive bowel ischaemia were excluded. In SOMIP, data retrieval from the Hospital Authority patient database was performed by six full-time nurse reviewers following a set of precise data definitions. A total of 230 variables were collected for each patient, on demographics, preoperative and operative variables, laboratory test results, and postoperative complications up to 30 days after surgery. In this study, we used SOMIP cumulative 5-year data to generate risk-adjusted 30-day mortality models by hierarchical logistic regression for both emergency and elective operations. The models expressed overall performance as an annual observed-to-expected mortality ratio. From 2009/2010 to 2015/2016, the overall crude mortality rate decreased from 10.8% to 5.6% for emergency procedures and from 0.9% to 0.4% for elective procedures. From 2011/2012 to 2015/2016, the risk-adjusted observed-to-expected mortality ratios showed a significant downward trend for both emergency and elective operations: from 1.126 to 0.796 and from 1.150 to 0.859, respectively (Mann- Kendall statistic = -0.8; PAuthority's overall crude mortality rates and risk-adjusted observed-to-expected mortality ratios for emergency and elective operations significantly declined after SOMIP was implemented.

  9. Assessment of laboratory and daily energy expenditure estimates from consumer multi-sensor physical activity monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Enhad A; Western, Max J; Nightingale, Thomas E; Peacock, Oliver J; Thompson, Dylan

    2017-01-01

    Wearable physical activity monitors are growing in popularity and provide the opportunity for large numbers of the public to self-monitor physical activity behaviours. The latest generation of these devices feature multiple sensors, ostensibly similar or even superior to advanced research instruments. However, little is known about the accuracy of their energy expenditure estimates. Here, we assessed their performance against criterion measurements in both controlled laboratory conditions (simulated activities of daily living and structured exercise) and over a 24 hour period in free-living conditions. Thirty men (n = 15) and women (n = 15) wore three multi-sensor consumer monitors (Microsoft Band, Apple Watch and Fitbit Charge HR), an accelerometry-only device as a comparison (Jawbone UP24) and validated research-grade multi-sensor devices (BodyMedia Core and individually calibrated Actiheart™). During discrete laboratory activities when compared against indirect calorimetry, the Apple Watch performed similarly to criterion measures. The Fitbit Charge HR was less consistent at measurement of discrete activities, but produced similar free-living estimates to the Apple Watch. Both these devices underestimated free-living energy expenditure (-394 kcal/d and -405 kcal/d, respectively; P<0.01). The multi-sensor Microsoft Band and accelerometry-only Jawbone UP24 devices underestimated most laboratory activities and substantially underestimated free-living expenditure (-1128 kcal/d and -998 kcal/d, respectively; P<0.01). None of the consumer devices were deemed equivalent to the reference method for daily energy expenditure. For all devices, there was a tendency for negative bias with greater daily energy expenditure. No consumer monitors performed as well as the research-grade devices although in some (but not all) cases, estimates were close to criterion measurements. Thus, whilst industry-led innovation has improved the accuracy of consumer monitors, these devices

  10. Assessment of laboratory and daily energy expenditure estimates from consumer multi-sensor physical activity monitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enhad A Chowdhury

    Full Text Available Wearable physical activity monitors are growing in popularity and provide the opportunity for large numbers of the public to self-monitor physical activity behaviours. The latest generation of these devices feature multiple sensors, ostensibly similar or even superior to advanced research instruments. However, little is known about the accuracy of their energy expenditure estimates. Here, we assessed their performance against criterion measurements in both controlled laboratory conditions (simulated activities of daily living and structured exercise and over a 24 hour period in free-living conditions. Thirty men (n = 15 and women (n = 15 wore three multi-sensor consumer monitors (Microsoft Band, Apple Watch and Fitbit Charge HR, an accelerometry-only device as a comparison (Jawbone UP24 and validated research-grade multi-sensor devices (BodyMedia Core and individually calibrated Actiheart™. During discrete laboratory activities when compared against indirect calorimetry, the Apple Watch performed similarly to criterion measures. The Fitbit Charge HR was less consistent at measurement of discrete activities, but produced similar free-living estimates to the Apple Watch. Both these devices underestimated free-living energy expenditure (-394 kcal/d and -405 kcal/d, respectively; P<0.01. The multi-sensor Microsoft Band and accelerometry-only Jawbone UP24 devices underestimated most laboratory activities and substantially underestimated free-living expenditure (-1128 kcal/d and -998 kcal/d, respectively; P<0.01. None of the consumer devices were deemed equivalent to the reference method for daily energy expenditure. For all devices, there was a tendency for negative bias with greater daily energy expenditure. No consumer monitors performed as well as the research-grade devices although in some (but not all cases, estimates were close to criterion measurements. Thus, whilst industry-led innovation has improved the accuracy of consumer monitors

  11. First annual report on the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loar, J.M.; Amano, H.; Jimenez, B.D.; Kitchings, J.T.; Meyers-Schoene, L.; Mohrbacher, D.A.; Olsen, C.R.

    1992-08-01

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. BMAP consists of seven major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota; (3) biological indicator studies; (4) instream ecological monitoring; (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment; (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL); and (7) contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system. This document, the first of a series of annual reports presenting the results of BMAP, describes studies that were conducted from March through December 1986

  12. Area monitoring dosimeter program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bivins, S.R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1998-07-01

    In January 1993, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The purpose of the program was to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a) (1)--(3) and Article 511.1 of the RCM, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to (1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually, and (2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years (CY) 1993--1996 confirmed that personnel dosimetry was not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program. A total of 93 area thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed in PNNL facilities during CY 1997. The TLDs were exchanged and analyzed quarterly. All routine area monitoring TLD results were less than 50 mrem annually after correcting for worker occupancy. The results support the conclusions that personnel dosimeters are not necessary for staff, declared pregnant workers, minors, or members of the public in these monitored areas

  13. Laboratory tools for diagnosis and monitoring response in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohami, Tali; Nagler, Arnon; Amariglio, Ninette

    2012-08-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal hematological disease that represents 15-20% of all adult leukemia cases. The study and treatment of CML has contributed pivotal advances to translational medicine and cancer therapy. The discovery that a single chromosomal abnormality, the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, is responsible for the etiology of this disease was a milestone for treating and understanding CML. Subsequently, CML became the first disease for which allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is the treatment of choice. Currently, CML is one of the few diseases where treatment targeted against the chromosomal abnormality is the sole frontline therapy for newly diagnosed patients. The use of directed therapy for CML challenged disease monitoring during treatment and led to the development of definitions that document response and predict relapse sooner than the former routine methods. These methods relied on classical cytogenetics through molecular cytogenetics (FISH) and, finally, on molecular monitoring assays. This review discusses the laboratory tools used for diagnosing CML, for monitoring during treatment, and for assessing remission or relapse. The advantages and disadvantages of each test, the common definition of response levels, and the efforts to standardize molecular monitoring for CML patient management are discussed.

  14. Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GA Stoetzel; SR Bivins

    1999-01-01

    In January 1993, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The purpose of the program was to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a)(1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the RCM, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to (1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually and (2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-1997 confirmed that personnel dosimetry was not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program. A total of 97 area thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed in PNNL facilities during calendar year 1998. The TLDs were exchanged and analyzed quarterly. All routine area monitoring TLD results were less than 50 mrem annually after correcting for worker occupancy. The results support the conclusion that personnel dosimeters are not necessary for staff, declared pregnant workers, minors, or members of the public in these monitored areas

  15. Second annual report of the Environmental Restoration Monitoring and Assessment Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapp, R.B.; Watts, J.A.

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes the salient features of the annual efforts of environmental monitoring and field investigations conducted to support the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report focuses on the watershed scale, striving to provide an ORNL site-wide perspective on types, distribution, and transport of contamination. Results are used to enhance the conceptual understanding of the key contaminants and the sources, fluxes, and processes affecting their distribution and movement. This report summarizes the efforts of the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 and Site Investigations (SI) program. WAG 2 is the lower portion of the White Oak Creek (WOC) system which drains the major contaminated sites at ORNL and discharges to the Clinch River where public access is allowed. The remedial investigation for WAG 2 includes a long-term multimedia environmental monitoring effort that takes advantage of WAG 2's role as an integrator and conduit of contaminants from the ORNL site. This report also includes information from other site-specific remedial investigations and feasibility studies (RI/FS) for contaminated sites at ORNL and data from other ongoing monitoring programs conducted by other organizations [e.g., the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) compliance monitoring conducted by the Environmental Surveillance and Protection Section]. This information is included to provide an integrated basis to support ER decision making. This report summarizes information gathered through early 1993. Annual data, such as annual discharges of contaminants, are reported for calendar year 1992

  16. First annual report on the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loar, J. M. [ed.; Adams, S. M.; Blaylock, B. G.; Boston, H. L.; Frank, M. L.; Garten, C. T.; Houston, M. A.; Kimmel, B. L.; Ryon, M. G.; Smith, J. G.; Southworth, G. R.; Stewart, A. J.; Walton, B. T.; Berry, J. B.; Talmage, S. S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Amano, H. [JAERI, Tokai Res., Establishment, Ibari-Ken (Japan); Jimenez, B. D. [School of Pharmacy, Univ. of Puerto Rico (San Juan); Kitchings, J. T. [ERCE, Denver, CO (United States); Meyers-Schoene, L. [Advanced Sciences, Inc., Fernald, OH (United States); Mohrbacher, D. A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Olsen, C. R. [USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Health and Environmental Research

    1992-08-01

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. BMAP consists of seven major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota; (3) biological indicator studies; (4) instream ecological monitoring; (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment; (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL); and (7) contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system. This document, the first of a series of annual reports presenting the results of BMAP, describes studies that were conducted from March through December 1986.

  17. A New Meteo-oceanographic and Environmental Monitoring Laboratory in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Roberto F. C.; Dottori, Marcelo; Silveira, Ilson C. A.; Castro, Belmiro M.

    2013-04-01

    The newer oil provinces in the pre-salt regions off the Brazilian Coast have raised the necessity of the creation of monitoring and observational centers, regarding the best comprehension on the ocean and atmosphere dynamics. The relation between industry and university is a concept based on collaboration, and it is an innovative social experiment in Brazil. The sustainability of that collaboration depends on the balance of mutual interests on private business and public academic institutions. The entrepreneur needs continuous accesses to the new academic researches, and the greatest benefit, for the academy, are funding complementation and personnel qualification. We need to establish a thread of new challenges, some of them based on disruption of paradigms in the Brazilian academic culture, and removal of obstructive clauses from the entrepreneur. Questioning and methods revalidation, in the oceanic environment areas, also requires a collaborative and interdisciplinary effort, congregating the physical aspects along with others compartments of the environmental monitoring. We proposed the creation of a Meteo-oceanographic and Environmental Monitoring Laboratory - LAMMOA (Portuguese acronym), which will be installed in a new facility funded by PETROBRAS (the Brazilian leading oil company) and ruled by USP, UNESP and UNICAMP, the state public universities in Santos (São Paulo State, Brazil). The new facility will be a research center in oil and gas activities, named CENPEG-BS (Portuguese acronym for Research Center of Oil and Gas in the Bay of Santos). Several laboratories and groups will work together, in a highly collaborative environment and so, capable of quickly respond to sudden demands on offshore activities and logistic operations, as well as in contingency situations. LAMMOA will continuous monitor oceanic regions where the pre-salt activities of oil exploitation occur. It will monitor meteo-oceanographic parameters like winds, waves and currents

  18. Personal dose monitoring in hospitals: Global assessment, critical applications and future needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covens, P.; Berus, D.; Buls, N.; Clerinx, P.; Vanhavere, F.

    2007-01-01

    It is known that medical applications using ionising radiation are wide spread and still increasing. Physicians, technicians, nurses and others constitute the largest group of workers occupationally exposed to man-made sources of radiation. Many hospital workers are consequently subjected to routine monitoring of professional radiation exposures. in the university hospital, UZ Brussel, 600 out of 4000 staff members are daily monitored for external radiation exposures. The most obvious applications of ionising radiation are diagnostic radiology, diagnostic or therapeutic use of radionuclides in nuclear medicine and external radiation therapy or brachytherapy in radiotherapy departments. Other important applications also include various procedures in interventional radiology (IR), in vitro biomedical research and radiopharmaceutical production around cyclotrons. Besides the fact that many of the staff members, involved in these applications, are not measurably exposed, detailed studies were carried out at workplaces where routine dose monitoring encounters difficulties and for some applications where relatively high occupational exposures can be found. most of the studies are concentrated around nuclear medicine applications and IR. They contain assessments of both effective dose and doses at different parts of the body. The results contribute to better characterisation of the different workplaces in a way that critical applications can be identified. Moreover, conclusions point out future needs for practical routine dose monitoring and optimisation of radiation protection. (authors)

  19. Automated Radioanalytical Chemistry: Applications For The Laboratory And Industrial Process Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, Matthew J.; Farawila, Anne F.; Grate, Jay W.

    2009-01-01

    The identification and quantification of targeted α- and β-emitting radionuclides via destructive analysis in complex radioactive liquid matrices is highly challenging. Analyses are typically accomplished at on- or off-site laboratories through laborious sample preparation steps and extensive chemical separations followed by analysis using a variety of detection methodologies (e.g., liquid scintillation, alpha energy spectroscopy, mass spectrometry). Analytical results may take days or weeks to report. When an industrial-scale plant requires periodic or continuous monitoring of radionuclides as an indication of the composition of its feed stream, diversion of safeguarded nuclides, or of plant operational conditions (for example), radiochemical measurements should be rapid, but not at the expense of precision and accuracy. Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed and characterized a host of automated radioanalytical systems designed to perform reproducible and rapid radioanalytical processes. Platforms have been assembled for (1) automation and acceleration of sample analysis in the laboratory and (2) automated monitors for monitoring industrial scale nuclear processes on-line with near-real time results. These methods have been applied to the analysis of environmental-level actinides and fission products to high-level nuclear process fluids. Systems have been designed to integrate a number of discrete sample handling steps, including sample pretreatment (e.g., digestion and valence state adjustment) and chemical separations. The systems have either utilized on-line analyte detection or have collected the purified analyte fractions for off-line measurement applications. One PNNL system of particular note is a fully automated prototype on-line radioanalytical system designed for the Waste Treatment Plant at Hanford, WA, USA. This system demonstrated nearly continuous destructive analysis of the soft β-emitting radionuclide 99Tc in nuclear

  20. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, Hollie Kae; Holmer, Marie Pilkington; Olson, Christina Liegh; Pace, Brenda Ringe

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory's (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year (FY) 2016. Overall monitoring included surveillance of the following 23 individual cultural resource localities: two locations with human remains, one of which is also a cave; seven additional caves; six prehistoric archaeological sites; four historic archaeological sites; one historic trail; Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I), a National Historic Landmark; Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion (ANP) objects located at EBR-I; and one Arco Naval Proving Ground (NPG) property, CF-633 and related objects and structures. Several INL work processes and projects were also monitored to confirm compliance with original INL CRM recommendations and assess the effects of ongoing work. On one occasion, ground disturbing activities within the boundaries of the Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (CITRC) were observed by INL CRM staff prepared to respond to any additional finds of Native American human remains. Additionally, the CRM office was notified during two Trespass Investigations conducted by INL Security. Most of the cultural resources monitored in FY 2016 exhibited no adverse impacts, resulting in Type 1 impact assessments. However, Type 2 impacts were noted five times. Three previously reported Type 2 impacts were once again documented at the EBR-I National Historic Landmark, including spalling and deterioration of bricks due to inadequate drainage, minimal maintenance, and rodent infestation. The ANP engines and locomotive on display at the EBR-I Visitors Center also exhibited impacts related to long term exposure. Finally, most of the Arco NPG properties monitored at Central Facilities Area exhibited problems with lack of timely and appropriate maintenance as well as inadequate drainage. No new Type 3 or Type 4 impacts that adversely affected significant cultural resources and threatened National

  1. Portable Sleep Monitoring for Diagnosing Sleep Apnea in Hospitalized Patients With Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurora, R Nisha; Patil, Susheel P; Punjabi, Naresh M

    2018-04-21

    Sleep apnea is an underdiagnosed condition in patients with heart failure. Efficient identification of sleep apnea is needed, as treatment may improve heart failure-related outcomes. Currently, use of portable sleep monitoring in hospitalized patients and those at risk for central sleep apnea is discouraged. This study examined whether portable sleep monitoring with respiratory polygraphy can accurately diagnose sleep apnea in patients hospitalized with decompensated heart failure. Hospitalized patients with decompensated heart failure underwent concurrent respiratory polygraphy and polysomnography. Both recordings were scored for obstructive and central disordered breathing events in a blinded fashion, using standard criteria, and the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was determined. Pearson's correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots were used to examine the concordance among the overall, obstructive, and central AHI values derived by respiratory polygraphy and polysomnography. The sample consisted of 53 patients (47% women) with a mean age of 59.0 years. The correlation coefficient for the overall AHI from the two diagnostic methods was 0.94 (95% CI, 0.89-0.96). The average difference in AHI between the two methods was 3.6 events/h. Analyses of the central and obstructive AHI values showed strong concordance between the two methods, with correlation coefficients of 0.98 (95% CI, 0.96-0.99) and 0.91 (95% CI, 0.84-0.95), respectively. Complete agreement in the classification of sleep apnea severity between the two methods was seen in 89% of the sample. Portable sleep monitoring can accurately diagnose sleep apnea in hospitalized patients with heart failure and may promote early initiation of treatment. Copyright © 2018 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Continuous air monitor correlation to fixed air sample data at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    Continuous air monitoring instruments (CAMS) deployed in laboratories in the TA-55 plutonium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) alarmed less than 33 percent of the time when fixed air sample measurements in the same laboratory showed integrated concentrations exceeding 500 DAC-hrs. The purpose of this study was to explore effects of non-instrument variables on alarm sensitivities for properly working CAMS. Non-instrument variables include air flow patterns, particle size of released material, and the energy of the release. Dilution Factors (DFs) for 21 airborne releases in various rooms and of different magnitudes were calculated and compared. The median DF for releases where the CAM alarmed was 13.1 while the median DF for releases where the CAM did not alarm was 179. Particle sizes ranged considerably with many particles larger than 10 μm. The cause of the release was found to be important in predicting if a CAM would alarm with releases from bagouts resulting in the greatest percentage of CAM alarms. The results of this study suggest that a two-component strategy for CAM placement at LANL be utilized. The first component would require CAMs at exhaust points in the rooms to provide for reliable detection for random release locations. The second component would require placing CAMs at locations where releases have historically been seen. Finally, improvements in CAM instrumentation is needed

  3. Using ATP-driven bioluminescence assay to monitor microbial safety in a contemporary human cadaver laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger, Brion; Maier, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to utilize a cost-effective method for assessing the levels of bacterial, yeast, and mold activity during a human dissection laboratory course. Nowadays, compliance with safety regulations is policed by institutions at higher standards than ever before. Fear of acquiring an unknown infection is one of the top concerns of professional healthcare students, and it provokes anti-laboratory anxiety. Human cadavers are not routinely tested for bacteria and viruses prior to embalming. Human anatomy dissecting rooms that house embalmed cadavers are normally cleaned after the dissected cadavers have been removed. There is no evidence that investigators have ever assessed bacterial and fungal activities using adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-driven bioluminescence assays. A literature search was conducted on texts, journals, and websites regarding bacterial, yeast, and mold activities in an active cadaver laboratory. Midway into a clinical anatomy course, ATP bioluminescence assays were used to swab various sites within the dissection room, including entrance and exiting door handles, water taps, cadaver tables, counter tops, imaging material, X-ray box switches, and the cadaver surfaces. The results demonstrated very low activities on cadaver tables, washing up areas, and exiting door handles. There was low activity on counter tops and X-ray boxes. There was medium activity on the entrance door handles. These findings suggest an inexpensive and accurate method for monitoring safety compliance and microbial activity. Students can feel confident and safe in the environment in which they work. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Validity of a heart rate monitor during work in the laboratory and on the Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, A. D. Jr; Lee, S. M.; Greenisen, M. C.; Bishop, P.

    1997-01-01

    Accurate heart rate measurement during work is required for many industrial hygiene and ergonomics situations. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the validity of heart rate measurements obtained by a simple, lightweight, commercially available wrist-worn heart rate monitor (HRM) during work (cycle exercise) sessions conducted in the laboratory and also during the particularly challenging work environment of space flight. Three different comparisons were made. The first compared HRM data to simultaneous electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings of varying heart rates that were generated by an ECG simulator. The second compared HRM data to ECG recordings collected during work sessions of 14 subjects in the laboratory. Finally, ECG downlink and HRM data were compared in four astronauts who performed cycle exercise during space flight. The data were analyzed using regression techniques. The results were that the HRM recorded virtually identical heart rates compared with ECG recordings for the data set generated by an ECG simulator. The regression equation for the relationship between ECG versus HRM heart rate data during work in the laboratory was: ECG HR = 0.99 x (HRM) + 0.82 (r2 = 0.99). Finally, the agreement between ECG downlink data and HRM data during space flight was also very high, with the regression equation being: Downlink ECG HR = 1.05 x (HRM) -5.71 (r2 = 0.99). The results of this study indicate that the HRM provides accurate data and may be used to reliably obtain valid data regarding heart rate responses during work.

  5. Determination of contamination operational value by routine monitoring in research laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomao, Edeilson; Medeiros, Regina Bitelli; Mattos, Maria Fernanda S.S.; Daros, Kellen Adriana Curci

    2008-01-01

    The radioisotopes have a large spectrum of applicability in many areas of science, as in medicine, agriculture and industry in general. In the biological area, the radioisotopes have brought many benefits to study physiological processes in living organisms and in vitro. The most radioisotopes used in biological research are emitters of radiation of low energy, mainly β, and are used as unsealed sources. The manipulation of these radioisotopes generates radioactive wastes and eventually can cause contamination in the areas of handling or even occasionally in areas to which access is not controlled. According to CNEN-NE-3.02 standard is necessary and mandatory the exposure and contamination levels control in the areas of handling of unsealed sources. The goal of the work is to establish how often the monitoring should be done through the survey of the contamination and exposure levels, in areas designed to manipulate 32 P and how this monitoring can contribute to the improvement the conditions of radiological protection. From the twenty eight research laboratories registered by 'Nucleo de Protecao Radiologica' (NPR) were selected four where the activities are not restrict to 32 P biological assays. The levels of contamination and exposure were evaluated using monitors GM and the layout of laboratories containing the points to be tracker defined based on the researchers' routine. At each point three values were obtained to measure the rate of contamination on the surface and exposure rate. The measures were made twice a week before and after the radioisotope manipulation. Based on these data was possible to establish the range from 0,306 to 0,678 Bq.cm -2 as operational average level to the superficial contamination. The average exposure rate measured was 5.16 n C/Kg.h. The results were important to demonstrating to researchers how they can contribute to the improvement of radiological protection conditions. (author)

  6. Intra-operative parathyroid hormone monitoring through central laboratory is accurate in renal secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulpio, Carlo; Bossola, Maurizio; Di Stasio, Enrico; Pepe, Gilda; Nure, Eda; Magalini, Sabina; Agnes, Salvatore

    2016-05-01

    The usefulness, the methods and the criteria of intra-operative monitoring of the parathyroid hormone (ioPTH) during parathyroidectomy (PTX) for renal secondary hyperparathyroidism (rSHPT) in patients on chronic hemodialysis remain still matter of debate. The present study aimed to evaluate the ability of a low cost central-laboratory second generation PTH assay to predict an incomplete resection of parathyroid glands (PTG). The ioPTH decay was determined In 42 consecutive patients undergoing PTX (15 subtotal and 27 total without auto-transplant of PTG) for rSHPT. The ioPTH monitoring included five samples: pre-intubation, post-manipulation of PTG and at 10, 20 and 30min post-PTG excision. The patients with PTH exceeding the normal value (65pg/ml) at the first postoperative week, 6 and 12months were classified as persistent rSHPT. The concentrations of ioPTH declined significantly over time in patients who received total or subtotal PTX; however, no difference was found between the two types of PTX. Irrespective of the type of PTX and the number of PTG removed, combining the absolute and percentage of ioPTH decay at 30min after PTG excision, we found high sensitivity (100%), specificity (92%), negative predictive value (100%) and accuracy (93%) in predicting the persistence of rSHPT. The monitoring of the ioPTH decline by a low cost central-laboratory second generation assay is extremely accurate in predicting the persistence of disease in patients on maintenance hemodialysis undergoing surgery for rSHPT. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prioritizing factors affecting the hospital employees' productivity from the hospital managers' viewpoint using integrated decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory and analytic network process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardalan Feili

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to identify and prioritize factors affecting the hospital employees' productivity from the viewpoint of hospital managers working in the teaching hospitals affiliated to Iran, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, in 2017. Materials and Methods: This was an applied, cross-sectional, and descriptive-analytical study conducted in 2017 in all teaching hospitals affiliated to Iran, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. After identifying factors affecting hospital employees' productivity using the results of previous studies, all hospital managers (56 managers were selected as the study population using census method to prioritize the factors. The decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL and analytic network process (ANP techniques were used for analyzing the collected data through Excel 2010 and Super Decision 2.8. Results: Fifteen factors affecting employees' productivity were determined using the results of previous studies which were classified into four clusters. The results of DEMATEL technique showed that “employees' attitude toward the organization” was the most affecting factor (r = 11.928 and also the most affected factor (c = 12.120, as well as the most important factor affecting the employees' productivity (r + c = 24.048. In addition, the results of ANP showed that the cluster of “leadership and management styles” (relative weight [RW] = 0.274 and its factors, especially “involving employees in the decision-making processes” (L1 (RW = 0.102 and “delegation of authority to the employees” (L2 (RW = 0.100 were the most important factors affecting the employees' productivity. Conclusion: According to the results, adopting an appropriate leadership style and providing participatory management, involving the employees in the hospital decision-making processes, etc., had significant effects on the increases in the employees' motivation and productivity.

  8. Advancing internal erosion monitoring using seismic methods in field and laboratory studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Minal L.

    This dissertation presents research involving laboratory and field investigation of passive and active methods for monitoring and assessing earthen embankment infrastructure such as dams and levees. Internal erosion occurs as soil particles in an earthen structure migrate to an exit point under seepage forces. This process is a primary failure mode for dams and levees. Current dam and levee monitoring practices are not able to identify early stages of internal erosion, and often the result is loss of structure utility and costly repairs. This research contributes to innovations for detection and monitoring by studying internal erosion and monitoring through field experiments, laboratory experiments, and social and political framing. The field research in this dissertation included two studies (2009 and 2012) of a full-scale earthen embankment at the IJkdijk in the Netherlands. In both of these tests, internal erosion occurred as evidenced by seepage followed by sand traces and boils, and in 2009, eventual failure. With the benefit of arrays of closely spaced piezometers, pore pressure trends indicated internal erosion near the initiation time. Temporally and spatially dense pore water pressure measurements detected two pore water pressure transitions characteristic to the development of internal erosion, even in piezometers located away from the backward erosion activity. At the first transition, the backward erosion caused anomalous pressure decrease in piezometers, even under constant or increasing upstream water level. At the second transition, measurements stabilized as backward erosion extended further upstream of the piezometers, as shown in the 2009 test. The transitions provide an indication of the temporal development and the spatial extent of backward erosion. The 2012 IJkdijk test also included passive acoustic emissions (AE) monitoring. This study analyzed AE activity over the course of the 7-day test using a grid of geophones installed on the

  9. Moisture Monitoring at Area G, Technical Area 54, Los Alamos National Laboratory, 2016 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitt, Daniel Glenn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Birdsell, Kay Hanson [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jennings, Terry L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-17

    Hydrological characterization and moisture monitoring activities provide data required for evaluating the transport of subsurface contaminants in the unsaturated and saturated zones beneath Area G, and for the Area G Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis. These activities have been ongoing at Area G, Technical Area 54 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory since waste disposal operations began in 1957. This report summarizes the hydrological characterization and moisture monitoring activities conducted at Area G. It includes moisture monitoring data collected from 1986 through 2016 from numerous boreholes and access tubes with neutron moisture meters, as well as data collected by automated dataloggers for water content measurement sensors installed in a waste disposal pit cover, and buried beneath the floor of a waste disposal pit. This report is an update of a nearly identical report by Levitt et al., (2015) that summarized data collected through early 2015; this report includes additional moisture monitoring data collected at Pit 31 and the Pit 38 extension through December, 2016. It also includes information from the Jennings and French (2009) moisture monitoring report and includes all data from Jennings and French (2009) and the Draft 2010 Addendum moisture monitoring report (Jennings and French, 2010). For the 2015 version of this report, all neutron logging data, including neutron probe calibrations, were investigated for quality and pedigree. Some data were recalculated using more defensible calibration data. Therefore, some water content profiles are different from those in the Jennings and French (2009) report. All of that information is repeated in this report for completeness. Monitoring and characterization data generally indicate that some areas of the Area G vadose zone are consistent with undisturbed conditions, with water contents of less than five percent by volume in the top two layers of the Bandelier tuff at Area G. These data also

  10. Monitoring compliance with transfusion guidelines in hospital departments by electronic data capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgaard, Astrid; de Lichtenberg, Trine Honnens; Nielsen, Jens; Johansson, Pär I.

    2014-01-01

    Background The practice of transfusing red blood cells is still liberal in some centres suggesting a lack of compliance with guidelines recommending transfusion of red blood cells at haemoglobin levels of 6–8 g/dL in the non-bleeding patient. Few databases provide ongoing feedback of data on pre-transfusion haemoglobin levels at the departmental level. In a tertiary care hospital, no such data were produced before this study. Our aim was to establish a Patient Blood Management database based on electronic data capture in order to monitor compliance with transfusion guidelines at departmental and hospital levels. Materials and methods Hospital data on admissions, diagnoses and surgical procedures were used to define the populations of patients. Data on haemoglobin measurements and red blood cell transfusions were used to calculate pre-transfusion haemoglobin, percentage of transfused patients and transfusion volumes. Results The model dataset include 33,587 admissions, of which 10% had received at least one unit of red blood cells. Haemoglobin measurements preceded 96.7% of the units transfused. The median pre-transfusion haemoglobin was 8.9 g/dL (interquartile range 8.2–9.7) at the hospital level. In only 6.5% of the cases, transfusion was initiated at 7.3 g/dL or lower as recommended by the Danish national transfusion guideline. In 27% of the cases, transfusion was initiated when the haemoglobin level was 9.3 g/dL or higher, which is not recommended. A median of two units was transfused per transfusion episode and per hospital admission. Transfusion practice was more liberal in surgical and intensive care units than in medical departments. Discussion We described pre-transfusion haemoglobin levels, transfusion rates and volumes at hospital and departmental levels, and in surgical subpopulations. Initial data revealed an extensive liberal practice and low compliance with national transfusion guidelines, and identified wards in need of intervention. PMID

  11. Monitoring, Verification, and Treatment of Infectious Wastes and Their Optimal Management in the Hospitals of Qom City, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Fahiminia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Given that no comprehensive studies have yet been conducted on treatment of infectious wastes in hospitals of Qom City, this research was performed with the purpose of investigating the treatment methods used in these hospitals and monitoring the performance of waste elimination devices. Methods: Required information was obtained through in-person visit and observing the current situation, and the variables affecting waste treatment were extracted based on the type of treatment systems, and were collected, and accordingly, biological monitoring tests were designed for the studied hospitals. The data were analyzed using Fisher's exact test. Results: In this study, from 9 active hospitals in Qom Province, only 3 hospitals were equipped with waste treatment system. In hospital A, growth of Bacillus stearothermophilus spore were observed in 6.25% of the samples, while no microbial growth was recorded in hospital B. The initial investment to buy the machine in hospital A was about four times than that of hospital B. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that treatment device of hospital B is more appropriate compared to the devices of hospital A due to complete destruction of spores, lower cost (for purchase, and maintenance. .

  12. Vadose zone monitoring at the radioactive waste management complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, D.L.; Hubbell, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    A network of vadose zone instruments was installed in surficial sediments and sedimentary interbeds beneath the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The network of instruments monitor moisture movement in a heterogeneous geologic system comprised of sediments which overlie and are intercalated with basalt flows. The general range of matric potentials in the surficial sediments (0 to 9.1 m) was from saturation to -3 bars. The basalt layer beneath the surficial sediments impedes downward water movement. The general range of matric potentials in the 9-, 34- and 73-m interbeds was from -0.3 to 1.7 bars. Preliminary results indicated downward moisture movement through the interbeds. 8 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  13. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: 1986 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, R.C.; Buddemeier, R.W.; Brekke, D.D.

    1987-04-01

    This report documents the results of the environmental monitoring program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for 1986. To evaluate the effect of LLNL operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation and a variety of radionuclides and chemical pollutants in ambient air, soil, surface water, groundwater, vegetation, milk, foodstuff, and sewage effluents were made at both the Livermore site and nearby Site 300. This report was prepared to meet the requirements of DOE Order 5484.1. Evaluations are made of LLNL's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological releases to the environment. The data indicate that no releases in excess of the applicable standards were made during 1986, and that LLNL operations had no adverse environmental impact

  14. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Annual report, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, R.C.; Brekke, D.D.

    1988-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) for 1987. To evaluate the effect of LLNL operations on the local environment, measurements were made of direct radiation and a variety of radionuclides and chemical pollutants in ambient air, soil, sewage effluents, surface water, groundwater, vegetation, foodstuff, and milk at both the Livermore site and nearby Site 300. Evaluations were made of LLNL's compliance with the applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological releases to the environment. The data indicates that the only releases in excess of applicable standards were four releases to the sanitary sewer. LLNL operations had no adverse impact on the environment during 1987. 65 refs., 24 figs

  15. Development of laboratory and process sensors to monitor particle size distribution of industrial slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendse, H.P.

    1992-10-01

    In this paper we present a novel measurement technique for monitoring particle size distributions of industrial colloidal slurries based on ultrasonic spectroscopy and mathematical deconvolution. An on-line sensor prototype has been developed and tested extensively in laboratory and production settings using mineral pigment slurries. Evaluation to date shows that the sensor is capable of providing particle size distributions, without any assumptions regarding their functional form, over diameters ranging from 0.1 to 100 micrometers in slurries with particle concentrations of 10 to 50 volume percents. The newly developed on-line sensor allows one to obtain particle size distributions of commonly encountered inorganic pigment slurries under industrial processing conditions without dilution.

  16. Towards Robot-Assisted Echocardiographic Monitoring in Catheterization Laboratories : Usability-Centered Manipulator for Transesophageal Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahl, Christina; Ebelt, Henning; Sayahkarajy, Mostafa; Supriyanto, Eko; Soesanto, Amiliana

    2017-08-15

    This paper proposes a robotic Transesophageal Echocardiography (TOE) system concept for Catheterization Laboratories. Cardiovascular disease causes one third of all global mortality. TOE is utilized to assess cardiovascular structures and monitor cardiac function during diagnostic procedures and catheter-based structural interventions. However, the operation of TOE underlies various conditions that may cause a negative impact on performance, the health of the cardiac sonographer and patient safety. These factors have been conflated and evince the potential of robot-assisted TOE. Hence, a careful integration of clinical experience and Systems Engineering methods was used to develop a concept and physical model for TOE manipulation. The motion of different actuators of the fabricated motorized system has been tested. It is concluded that the developed medical system, counteracting conflated disadvantages, represents a progressive approach for cardiac healthcare.

  17. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    During first quarter 1995, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (Met Lab HWMF) were analyzed for selected heavy metals, field measurements, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Six parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS). Total organic halogens exceeded its Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criterion during first quarter 1995 as in fourth quarter 1994. Aluminum, iron, and manganese, which were not analyzed for during fourth quarter 1994, exceeded the Flag 2 criteria in at least two wells each during first quarter 1995. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the M-Area Aquifer Zone were similar to previous quarters. Conditions affecting the determination of groundwater flow directions and rates in the Upper Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, Lower Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, and the Middle Sand Aquifer Zone of the Crouch Branch Confining Unit were also similar to previous quarters

  18. Contaminant monitoring programmes using marine organisms: Quality assurance and good laboratory practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This publication provides guidelines for obtaining reliable and relevant data during monitoring programmes in which contaminants are measured in marine organisms. It describes the precautions to be taken in each of the procedural steps from planning and sampling to the publication of data reports. The purpose of this document is to provide general guidance on quality assurance and to outline the approach that could be taken by laboratories to achieve the specific aims(s) for each marine pollution monitoring programme. Since most laboratories are currently focussing on programmes involving marine organisms, this document will be confined to this aspect. Four main aims can be identified for programmes involving the collection and analysis of marine organisms for the three main groups of contaminants (metals, organochlorine compounds and petroleum hydrocarbons), these are: (i) The measurement of contaminant levels in edible marine organisms in relation to public health; (ii) The identification of heavily contaminated areas of the sea (''hot spots'') where levels of contaminants are at least an order of magnitude higher than levels in clean or uncontaminated areas; (iii) The establishment of present levels of contaminants in marine organisms (i.e., a ''baseline''); (iv) The assessment of changes in concentrations of contaminants in organisms over a period of time (trends). The selection of organisms will be dictated by the eating patterns of the population. These can be identified by a survey of the species sold at the market, by obtaining information from colleagues in government departments who deal with such matters or in the absence of such information, by distributing a questionnaire to a representative section of the general public. 9 refs, 4 figs

  19. A systematic review of the cost of data collection for performance monitoring in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cheryl; Gannon, Brenda; Wakai, Abel; O'Sullivan, Ronan

    2015-04-01

    Key performance indicators (KPIs) are used to identify where organisational performance is meeting desired standards and where performance requires improvement. Valid and reliable KPIs depend on the availability of high-quality data, specifically the relevant minimum data set ((MDS) the core data identified as the minimum required to measure performance for a KPI) elements. However, the feasibility of collecting the relevant MDS elements is always a limitation of performance monitoring using KPIs. Preferably, data should be integrated into service delivery, and, where additional data are required that are not currently collected as part of routine service delivery, there should be an economic evaluation to determine the cost of data collection. The aim of this systematic review was to synthesise the evidence base concerning the costs of data collection in hospitals for performance monitoring using KPI, and to identify hospital data collection systems that have proven to be cost minimising. We searched MEDLINE (1946 to May week 4 2014), Embase (1974 to May week 2 2014), and CINAHL (1937 to date). The database searches were supplemented by searching for grey literature through the OpenGrey database. Data was extracted, tabulated, and summarised as part of a narrative synthesis. The searches yielded a total of 1,135 publications. After assessing each identified study against specific inclusion exclusion criteria only eight studies were deemed as relevant for this review. The studies attempt to evaluate different types of data collection interventions including the installation of information communication technology (ICT), improvements to current ICT systems, and how different analysis techniques may be used to monitor performance. The evaluation methods used to measure the costs and benefits of data collection interventions are inconsistent across the identified literature. Overall, the results weakly indicate that collection of hospital data and improvements in data

  20. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia: reducing misdiagnosis via collaboration between an inpatient anticoagulation pharmacy service and hospital reference laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Allison E; Bowles, Harmony; Borrego, Matthew E; Montoya, Tiffany N; Garcia, David A; Mahan, Charles

    2016-11-01

    Misdiagnosis of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is common and exposes patients to high-risk therapies and potentially serious adverse events. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of collaboration between an inpatient pharmacy-driven anticoagulation management service (AMS) and hospital reference laboratory to reduce inappropriate HIT antibody testing via pharmacist intervention and use of the 4T pre-test probability score. Secondary objectives included clinical outcomes and cost-savings realized through reduced laboratory testing and decreased unnecessary treatment of HIT. This was a single center, pre-post, observational study. The hospital reference laboratory contacted the AMS when they received a blood sample for an enzyme-linked immunosorbent HIT antibody (HIT Ab). Trained pharmacists prospectively scored each HIT Ab ordered by using the 4T score with subsequent communication to physicians recommending for or against processing and reporting of lab results. Utilizing retrospective chart review and a database for all patients with a HIT Ab ordered during the study period, we compared the incidence of HIT Ab testing before and after implementation of the pharmacy-driven 4T score intervention. Our intervention significantly reduced the number of inappropriate HIT Ab tests processed (176 vs. 63, p reference laboratories can result in reduction of misdiagnosis of HIT and significant cost savings with similar safety.

  1. SHynergie: Development of a virtual project laboratory for monitoring hydraulic stimulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Jörg; Friederich, Wolfgang; Meschke, Günther; Müller, Thomas; Steeb, Holger

    2016-04-01

    Hydraulic stimulations are the primary means of developing subsurface reservoirs regarding the extent of fluid transport in them. The associated creation or conditioning of a system of hydraulic conduits involves a range of hydraulic and mechanical processes but also chemical reactions, such as dissolution and precipitation, may affect the stimulation result on time scales as short as hours. In the light of the extent and complexity of these processes, the steering potential for the operator of a stimulation critically depends on the ability to integrate the maximum amount of site-specific information with profound process understanding and a large spectrum of experience. We report on the development of a virtual project laboratory for monitoring hydraulic stimulations within the project SHynergie (http://www.ruhr-uni-bochum.de/shynergie/). The concept of the laboratory envisioned product that constitutes a preparing and accompanying rather than post-processing instrument ultimately accessible to persons responsible for a project over a web-repository. The virtual laboratory consists of a data base, a toolbox, and a model-building environment. Entries in the data base are of two categories. On the one hand, selected mineral and rock properties are provided from the literature. On the other hand, project-specific entries of any format can be made that are assigned attributes regarding their use in a stimulation problem at hand. The toolbox is interactive and allows the user to perform calculations of effective properties and simulations of different types (e.g., wave propagation in a reservoir, hydraulic test). The model component is also hybrid. The laboratory provides a library of models reflecting a range of scenarios but also allows the user to develop a site-specific model constituting the basis for simulations. The laboratory offers the option to use its components following the typical workflow of a stimulation project. The toolbox incorporates simulation

  2. The Lanzarote Geodynamic Laboratory: new capabilities for monitoring of volcanic activity at Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoso, J.; Vélez, E. J.; Soler, V.; Montesinos, F. G.; Benavent, M.

    2012-04-01

    manifestations at the surface level, and to compare geodynamic processes associated with an active area of the Earth's crust. In turn, the results obtained can provide new inputs for studying precursor of volcanic activity and also contribute to volcanic hazard mitigation. The LGL aims to be a permanent status of renewal, using new technologies for data recording and real time transmission, as well as for testing new sensors, scientific equipment and observational techniques related to monitoring and observation of volcanic activity. All these capabilities are necessary when high-resolution ground based observations must provide us the basis for studying the sources of volcanic deformation. The laboratory is thus open to support and to enhance the collaboration among scientists, as well as national and international institutions involved in research at active volcanic areas.

  3. Monitoring Hospitalized Adult Patients for Opioid-Induced Sedation and Respiratory Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungquist, Carla R; Smith, Kirsten; Nicely, Kelly L Wiltse; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2017-03-01

    : Opioid analgesics are commonly administered to hospitalized patients to treat acute pain, but these drugs put patients at risk for serious adverse events, such as unintended advancing sedation, respiratory depression, and death. Nurses play an important role in keeping patients safe by making clinical decisions about the frequency and intensity with which patients receiving IV and epidural opioids should be monitored. To make sound clinical judgments, nurses must be aware of the factors that place patients at elevated risk for adverse opioid-related effects and know how to screen and assess patients for these risks. The authors review the literature on unintended advancing sedation and respiratory depression associated with opioid administration and present evidence-based recommendations for clinical decision making and patient monitoring, using both nursing assessments and electronic technologies.

  4. The clinical practice of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring in Shanghai Huashan Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Jin-song

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM is the gold standard of the intraoperative functional brain mapping. It employs various electrophysiological methods such as awake craniotomy, intraoperative somatosensory and motor evoked potentials monitoring, intraoperative cortical stimulation and sub-cortical stimulation to accurately map the cortical and sub-cortical nervous pathways so that the continuous assessment and real -time protection of the functional integrity of certain neural structures can be achieved during surgery. Based on decades of clinical practice, the Department of Neurosurgery of Shanghai Huashan Hospital has set up an "IONM clinical practice guideline" used in the institute. The clinical practice guideline covers technical and operation standards of IONM in all kinds of common neurosurgery diseases and does improve the clinical efficacy in neurosurgical procedures.

  5. Monitoring of the general population with an installed whole body counter at West Cumberland Hospital, Whitehaven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boddy, K.; Francis, R.A.; Fenwick, J.D.; McKenzie, A.L.

    1989-03-01

    Body radioactivity in the general public has been measured in 395 volunteers in the Whitehaven area, using a whole-body monitor at West Cumberland Hospital. Between October 1986 and October 1987, estimates of total body radiocaesium in 240 volunteers ranged from below detection level to 1844 Bq with a mean of 415 Bq. From October 1987 until May 1988, a further 155 volunteers were monitored, and radiation levels ranged from 34 Bq to 685 Bq, with a mean of 257 Bq. In all volunteers, the ratio of body radiocaesium to body potassium, was well below unity. The average ratio of caesium-137 to caesium-134 from October 1987 to May 1988 was 3.28, corresponding to a ratio of 1.99 at the date of Chernobyl accident. This is consistent with a Chernobyl origin as the primary source for the radiocaesium. There were discernible, but not marked, trends of increasing body radiocaesium with milk and meat/fish consumption. (author)

  6. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenda R. Pace

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory's (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2007 (FY 2007). In FY 2007, 40 localities were revisited: two locations of heightened Shoshone-Bannock tribal sensitivity, four caves, three butte/craters, twelve prehistoric archaeological sites, two historic stage stations, nine historic homesteads, a portion of Goodale's Cutoff of the Oregon Trail, a portion of historic trail T-16, one World War II dump, four buildings from the World War II period, and Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, a modern scientific facility and National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2007. This included direct observation of ground disturbing activities within the Power Burst Facility (PBF, now designated as the Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex-CITRC), backfilling operations associated with backhoe trenches along the Big Lost River, and geophysical surveys designed to pinpoint subsurface unexploded ordnance in the vicinity of the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area. Surprise checks were also made to three ongoing INL projects to ensure compliance with INL CRM Office recommendations to avoid impacts to cultural resources. Although some impacts were documented, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resource were observed at any location

  7. On-line monitoring of toxic materials in sewage at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auyong, M.; Cate, J.L. Jr.; Rueppel, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly important for industry to prevent releases of potentially toxic material to the environment. The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has developed a system to monitor its sewage effluent on a continuous basis. A representative fraction of the total waste stream leaving the Plant is passed through a detection assembly consisting of an x-ray fluorescence unit which detects high levels of metals, sodium iodide crystal detectors that scan the sewage for the presence of elevated levels of radiation, and an industrial probe for pH monitoring. With the aid of a microprocessor, the data collected is reduced and analyzed to determine whether levels are approaching established environmental limits. Currently, if preset pH or radiation levels are exceeded, a sample of the suspect sewage is automatically collected for further analysis, and an alarm is sent to a station where personnel can be alerted to respond on a 24-hour basis. In the same manner, spectral data from the x-ray fluorescence unit will be routed through the 24-hour alarm system as soon as evaluation of the unit is complete. The design of the system and operational experience is discussed

  8. Suspect/foil identification in actual crimes and in the laboratory: a reality monitoring analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrman, Bruce W; Richards, Regina E

    2005-06-01

    Four reality monitoring variables were used to discriminate suspect from foil identifications in 183 actual criminal cases. Four hundred sixty-one identification attempts based on five and six-person lineups were analyzed. These identification attempts resulted in 238 suspect identifications and 68 foil identifications. Confidence, automatic processing, eliminative processing and feature use comprised the set of reality monitoring variables. Thirty-five verbal confidence phrases taken from police reports were assigned numerical values on a 10-point confidence scale. Automatic processing identifications were those that occurred "immediately" or "without hesitation." Eliminative processing identifications occurred when witnesses compared or eliminated persons in the lineups. Confidence, automatic processing and eliminative processing were significant predictors, but feature use was not. Confidence was the most effective discriminator. In cases that involved substantial evidence extrinsic to the identification 43% of the suspect identifications were made with high confidence, whereas only 10% of the foil identifications were made with high confidence. The results of a laboratory study using the same predictors generally paralleled the archival results. Forensic implications are discussed.

  9. 1996 environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Pittsburgh Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The 1996 results for the Bettis-Pittsburgh radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring programs are presented. The primary mission of the Bettis Laboratory has been directed toward the design, development, testing, and operation of nuclear reactor propulsion plants for naval surface and submarine vessels. The results obtained from the monitoring programs demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that releases to the environment during 1996 were in accordance with applicable federal, state, county, and local regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicated that the current operations at the Site continue to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Site operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the US Department of Energy. A risk assessment of potentially exposed populations to chemical residues in the environment at the Site demonstrated that these residues do not pose any significant health risk

  10. 1996 environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Pittsburgh Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The 1996 results for the Bettis-Pittsburgh radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring programs are presented. The primary mission of the Bettis Laboratory has been directed toward the design, development, testing, and operation of nuclear reactor propulsion plants for naval surface and submarine vessels. The results obtained from the monitoring programs demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that releases to the environment during 1996 were in accordance with applicable federal, state, county, and local regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicated that the current operations at the Site continue to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Site operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the US Department of Energy. A risk assessment of potentially exposed populations to chemical residues in the environment at the Site demonstrated that these residues do not pose any significant health risk.

  11. Using statistical process control for monitoring the prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottner, Jan; Halfens, Ruud

    2010-05-01

    Institutionally acquired pressure ulcers are used as outcome indicators to assess the quality of pressure ulcer prevention programs. Determining whether quality improvement projects that aim to decrease the proportions of institutionally acquired pressure ulcers lead to real changes in clinical practice depends on the measurement method and statistical analysis used. To examine whether nosocomial pressure ulcer prevalence rates in hospitals in the Netherlands changed, a secondary data analysis using different statistical approaches was conducted of annual (1998-2008) nationwide nursing-sensitive health problem prevalence studies in the Netherlands. Institutions that participated regularly in all survey years were identified. Risk-adjusted nosocomial pressure ulcers prevalence rates, grade 2 to 4 (European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel system) were calculated per year and hospital. Descriptive statistics, chi-square trend tests, and P charts based on statistical process control (SPC) were applied and compared. Six of the 905 healthcare institutions participated in every survey year and 11,444 patients in these six hospitals were identified as being at risk for pressure ulcers. Prevalence rates per year ranged from 0.05 to 0.22. Chi-square trend tests revealed statistically significant downward trends in four hospitals but based on SPC methods, prevalence rates of five hospitals varied by chance only. Results of chi-square trend tests and SPC methods were not comparable, making it impossible to decide which approach is more appropriate. P charts provide more valuable information than single P values and are more helpful for monitoring institutional performance. Empirical evidence about the decrease of nosocomial pressure ulcer prevalence rates in the Netherlands is contradictory and limited.

  12. Feasibility of Autonomous Monitoring of CO2 Leakage in Aquifers: Results From Controlled Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteeg, R.; Leger, E.; Dafflon, B.

    2016-12-01

    Geologic sequestration of CO2 is one of the primary proposed approaches for reducing total atmospheric CO2 concentrations. MVAA (Monitoring, Verification, Accounting and Assessment) of CO2 sequestration is an essential part of the geologic CO2 sequestration cycle. MVAA activities need to meet multiple operational, regulatory and environmental objectives, including ensuring the protection of underground sources of drinking water. Anticipated negative consequences of CO2 leakage into groundwater, besides possible brine contamination and release of gaseous CO2, include a significant increase of dissolved CO2 into shallow groundwater systems, which will decrease groundwater pH and can potentially mobilize naturally occurring trace metals and ions that are commonly absorbed to or contained in sediments. Autonomous electrical geophysical monitoring in aquifers has the potential of allowing for rapid and automated detection of CO2 leakage. However, while the feasibility of such monitoring has been demonstrated by a number of different field experiments, automated interpretation of complex electrical resistivity data requires the development of quantitative relationships between complex electrical resistivity signatures and dissolved CO2 in the aquifer resulting from leakage Under a DOE SBIR funded effort we performed multiple tank scale experiments in which we investigated complex electrical resistivity signatures associated with dissolved CO2 plumes in saturated sediments. We also investigated the feasibility of distinguishing CO2 leakage signatures from signatures associated with other processes such as salt water movement, temperature variations and other variations in chemical or physical conditions. In addition to these experiments we also numerically modeled the tank experiments. These experiments showed that (a) we can distinguish CO2 leakage signatures from other signatures, (b) CO2 leakage signatures have a consistent characteristic, (c) laboratory experiments

  13. Implementation of a rapid HIT immunoassay at a university hospital - Retrospective analysis of HIT laboratory orders in patients with thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Anne; Heimerl, Susanne; Oertli, Linnéa; Wilczek, Wolf; Greinacher, Andreas; Spannagl, Michael; Herr, Wolfgang; Hart, Christina

    2017-10-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a rare cause of thrombocytopenia and a potentially life-threatening adverse drug reaction. Clinical overdiagnosis of HIT results in costly laboratory tests and anticoagulation. Criteria and algorithms for diagnosis are established, but their translation into clinical practice is still challenging. In a retrospective approach we studied all HIT related laboratory test requests within four years and evaluated data before (1st period, 24month) and after (2nd period, 24month) replacing particle gel immunoassay (PaGIA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) by a chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA). HIT was confirmed by heparin-induced platelet activation (HIPA) test. Clinical pretest probability for HIT using an implemented simplified 4Ts score and platelet count were evaluated. Costs for laboratory tests and alternative anticoagulation were calculated. In 1850 patients with suspected HIT, 2327 laboratory orders were performed. In 87.2% of these orders an intermediate/high simplified 4Ts score was found. Thrombocytopenia was present in 87.1%. After replacing PaGIA and ELISA by CLIA the number of immunological and functional laboratory tests was reduced by 38.2%. The number of positive HIT immunoassays declined from 22.6% to 6.0%, while the number of positive HIPA tests among positive immunological tests increased by 19%. Altogether, acute HIT was confirmed in 59 patients. A decline in the use of alternative anticoagulants was observed in the 2nd period. Our study shows that in a university hospital setting HIT is well-known, but diagnosis requires a precise laboratory confirmation. Replacing PaGIA and ELISA by CLIA did not influence laboratory order behavior but results in reduced overall costs for laboratory diagnostics and alternative anticoagulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Rule Based Expert System for Monitoring Real Time Drug Supply in Hospital Using Radio Frequency Identification Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driandanu, Galih; Surarso, Bayu; Suryono

    2018-02-01

    A radio frequency identification (RFID) has obtained increasing attention with the emergence of various applications. This study aims to examine the implementation of rule based expert system supported by RFID technology into a monitoring information system of drug supply in a hospital. This research facilitates in monitoring the real time drug supply by using data sample from the hospital pharmacy. This system able to identify and count the number of drug and provide warning and report in real time. the conclusion is the rule based expert system and RFID technology can facilitate the performance in monitoring the drug supply quickly and precisely.

  15. Applicability of a generic monitoring program for radioactive waste burial grounds at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    Six burial grounds were evaluated at Oak Ridge to determine which would be most suitable for testing the generic monitoring approach, and two were selected. Burial Ground 4 was chosen because it is known to be leaking radioactivity and a monitoring program is desirable to determine the source, pattern and extent of the leakage. Burial Ground 6 was chosen because the most complete radiologic and geologic data is available and modern burial practices have been utilized at this site. At the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) only one burial ground exists, the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The data available on the burial grounds are insufficient for an adequate understanding of radionuclide migration patterns and accordingly, inadequate for the design of reliable monitoring programs. It was decided, therefore, that preliminary monitoring programs should be designed in order to obtain additional data for a later implementation of reliable monitoring programs. The monitoring programs designed for ORNL consist primarily of the installation of surface water monitoring stations, the surveillance of trench sump wells, a test boring program to study subsurface geologic conditions, a ground water sampling program and the installation of instrumentation, specifically infiltrometers and evaporation pans, to develop data on site water balances. The program designed for the INEL burial ground includes installation of trench sumps, a ground water monitoring program, test borings to further define subsurface geohydrologic conditions and the installation of instrumentation to develop data on the site water balance. The estimated costs of implementing the recommended programs are about $420,820 for monitoring Burial Grounds 4 and 6 at Oak Ridge and $382,060 for monitoring the RWMC at INEL. 12 figures

  16. Molecular diagnostics for lassa fever at Irrua specialist teaching hospital, Nigeria: lessons learnt from two years of laboratory operation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny A Asogun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lassa fever is a viral hemorrhagic fever endemic in West Africa. However, none of the hospitals in the endemic areas of Nigeria has the capacity to perform Lassa virus diagnostics. Case identification and management solely relies on non-specific clinical criteria. The Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital (ISTH in the central senatorial district of Edo State struggled with this challenge for many years. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A laboratory for molecular diagnosis of Lassa fever, complying with basic standards of diagnostic PCR facilities, was established at ISTH in 2008. During 2009 through 2010, samples of 1,650 suspected cases were processed, of which 198 (12% tested positive by Lassa virus RT-PCR. No remarkable demographic differences were observed between PCR-positive and negative patients. The case fatality rate for Lassa fever was 31%. Nearly two thirds of confirmed cases attended the emergency departments of ISTH. The time window for therapeutic intervention was extremely short, as 50% of the fatal cases died within 2 days of hospitalization--often before ribavirin treatment could be commenced. Fatal Lassa fever cases were older (p = 0.005, had lower body temperature (p<0.0001, and had higher creatinine (p<0.0001 and blood urea levels (p<0.0001 than survivors. Lassa fever incidence in the hospital followed a seasonal pattern with a peak between November and March. Lassa virus sequences obtained from the patients originating from Edo State formed--within lineage II--a separate clade that could be further subdivided into three clusters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Lassa fever case management was improved at a tertiary health institution in Nigeria through establishment of a laboratory for routine diagnostics of Lassa virus. Data collected in two years of operation demonstrate that Lassa fever is a serious public health problem in Edo State and reveal new insights into the disease in hospitalized patients.

  17. Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of Hospitals for 50 states and Washington D.C. , Puerto Rico and US territories. The dataset only includes hospital facilities and...

  18. Three-year customer satisfaction survey in laboratory medicine in a Chinese university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Siqi; Duan, Yifei; Liu, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Yongmei

    2018-04-25

    Customer satisfaction is a key quality indicator of laboratory service. Patients and physicians are the ultimate customers in medical laboratory, and their opinions are essential components in developing a customer-oriented laboratory. A longitudinal investigation of customer satisfaction was conducted through questionnaires. We designed two different questionnaires and selected 1200 customers (600 outpatients and 600 physicians) to assess customer satisfaction every other year from 2012 to 2016. Items with scores satisfaction in 2014 was better, which illustrated our strategy was effective. However, some items remained to be less than 4, so we repeated the survey after modifying questionnaires in 2016. However, the general satisfaction points of the physicians and patients reduced in 2016, which reminded us of some influential factors we had neglected. By using dynamic survey of satisfaction, we can continuously find deficiencies in our laboratory services and take suitable corrective actions, thereby improving our service quality.

  19. Prevalência de dislipidemias em adultos da demanda laboratorial de Salvador, Brasil Prevalence of dyslipidemias in non-hospital laboratory tests of adults from Salvador, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Lessa

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a prevalência das dislipidemias em adultos da demanda laboratorial não-hospitalar da cidade de Salvador (BA. MÉTODOS: Casuística procedente de amostra probabilística de 25% dos laboratórios não-hospitalares da cidade que usavam o método enzimático para dosagem dos lípides séricos e controle de qualidade da Sociedade Brasileira de Patologia Clínica (93% do total; LDL estimado pela fórmula de Friedewald. Sorteados os meses ímpares de 1995 para o estudo. Critérios para dislipidemias, em mg/dl: colesterol ³240; LDL ³160; HDL ³200. Análise: prevalências, seus intervalos de confiança (IC a 95% e qui-quadrado (chi². RESULTADOS: Excluídos uma recusa e um laboratório que arquivava laudos só por 3 meses, foram analisados dados de 24 dos 26 laboratórios amostrados. Dos 7392 adultos, 65,5% eram mulheres. Prevalências estimadas e valores dos IC a 95% para homens, foram: hipercolesterolemia =24,0% (20,5; 27,5; LDL elevado =26,1 (22,4; 29,3; HDL baixo =15,9 (14,2; 17,8 e hipertrigliceridemia =27,6 (25,7; 29,5. Para mulheres: hipercolesterolemia =30,0 (27,8; 32,2, LDL elevado =33,1 (30,8; 35,4; HDL baixo =8,0 (7,1; 8,9 e hipertrigliceridemia =30,4 (29,0; 31,4. Todas as prevalências diferiram significantemente inter-gênero (p, 0,05 a pPURPOSE: To determine the prevalence of dyslipidemia in non-hospital laboratory tests of adults from Salvador, Brazil. METHODS: The study was carried out in subjects from a probabilistic sample of 25% of a total of 104 local laboratories that used the same enzymatic method for lipid analysis with the quality control as recommended by the Brazilian Society of Clinical Analyses. These represented 93% of all non-hospital laboratories of Salvador in 1995. The odd months of 1995 were selected for sampling in the present study. Criteria for dyslipidemias were: total cholesterol ³240; LDL ³160; HDL ³200mg/dl. Prevalence rates and their 95% confidence intervals (CI and chi² test were

  20. Leveraging the "living laboratory": on the emergence of the entrepreneurial hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Martin; Miller, Fiona Alice

    2012-08-01

    For years, scholars have debated the "commercial ethos" in higher education, and the rise of the entrepreneurial university. But what of the "entrepreneurial hospital"? Largely unnoticed by scholars, this unique organisational form differs from the entrepreneurial university in some significant ways, not least in its capacity to use its innovations, and to count patients-and even patient populations-amongst its human capital. Accordingly, this article provides an initial conceptualisation of the entrepreneurial hospital, along with an exploration of its larger implications. Using twenty-six semi-structured interviews with key-informants (2008-2009), who work in two networked organisations within a single academic health science system in a Canadian province, our analysis identifies distinctive characteristics of an entrepreneurial hospital. Informed by grounded theory, especially situational analysis, we derive from our data an illustration of potentially incommensurate understandings of the entrepreneurial hospital's resources. On one hand, our study participants view patients and patient populations as a resource for research, linking its value to the contribution it can make to improved, more cost-effective care. On the other hand, some also see commercial potential in this resource. In both cases, exploitation is accompanied by perceived obligations to make proper use of patient populations, and to "give back" to the public-at-large, including through the entrepreneurial search for new ways of mobilising the resources of publicly-funded health care. Thus, a key task of the entrepreneurial hospital is to invent and mediate new uses for its care infrastructure and the unique resource constituted by patient populations. By drawing together care and research in new ways, the entrepreneurial hospital promises increased capacity for biomedical innovation. Yet, as it invents and mediates new uses for patient populations and health care infrastructure, the

  1. Air monitoring data reveal previously unknown contamination at radioactive waste disposal area, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraig, D.H.; Conrad, R.C.

    2000-01-01

    Air monitoring at Area G, the low-level radioactive waste disposal area at Los Alamos National Laboratory, revealed increased air concentrations of 239 Pu and 241 Am at one location along the north boundary. This air monitoring location is a couple of meters north of a dirt road used to access the easternmost part of Area G. Air concentrations of 238 Pu were essentially unaffected which was puzzling because both 238 Pu and 239 Pu are present in the local, slightly contaminated soils. Air concentrations of these radionuclides increased about a factor of ten in early 1995 and remained at those levels until the first quarter of 1996. During the spring of 1996 air concentrations again increased by a factor of about ten. No other radionuclides were elevated, and no other Area G stations showed elevations of these radionuclides. After several formal meetings did not provide an adequate explanation for the elevations, a gamma-survey was performed and showed a small area of significant contamination just south of the monitor location. We found that in February 1995, a trench for a water line had been dug within a meter or so of the air stations. Then, during early 1996, the dirt road was rerouted such that its new path was directly over the unknown contamination. It appears that the trenching brought contaminated material to the surface and caused the firs rise in air concentrations and then the rerouting of the road over the contamination caused the second rise, during 1996. We also found that during 1976 and 1977 contaminated soils from the clean-up of an old processing facility had been spread over the filled pits in the vicinity of the air monitors. These soils, which were probably the source of the air contamination, were very low in 238 Pu which explains why we saw very little 238 Pu in the increased air concentrations. A layer of gravel and sand was spread over the contaminated area. Although air concentrations of 239 Pu and 241 Am dropped considerably, they have

  2. The assessment of stat laboratory test ordering practice and impact of targeted individual feedback in an urban teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorita, Atsushi; Steinberg, Daniel I; Leitman, Michael; Burger, Alfred; Husk, Gregg; Sivaprasad, Latha

    2014-01-01

    Overuse of inpatient stat laboratory orders ("stat" is an abbreviation of the Latin word "statim," meaning immediately, without delay) is a major problem in the modern healthcare system. To understand patterns of stat laboratory ordering practices at our institution and to assess the effectiveness of individual feedback in reducing these orders. Medicine and General Surgery residents were given a teaching session about appropriate stat ordering practice in January 2010. Individual feedback was given to providers who were the highest utilizers of stat laboratory orders by their direct supervisors from February through June of 2010. The proportion of stat orders out of total laboratory orders per provider was the main outcome measure. All inpatient laboratory orders from September 2009 to June 2010 were analyzed. The median proportion of stat orders out of total laboratory orders was 41.6% for nontrainee providers (N = 500), 38.7% for Medicine residents (N = 125), 80.2% for General Surgery residents (N = 32), and 24.2% for other trainee providers (N = 150). Among 27 providers who received feedback (7 nontrainees, 16 Medicine residents, and 4 General Surgery residents), the proportion of stat laboratory orders per provider decreased by 15.7% (95% confidence interval: 5.6%-25.9%, P = 0.004) after feedback, whereas the decrease among providers who were high utilizers but did not receive feedback (N = 39) was not significant (4.5%; 95% confidence interval: 2.1%-11.0%, P = 0.18). Monthly trends showed reduction in the proportion of stat orders among Medicine and General Surgery residents, but not among other trainee providers. The frequency of stat ordering was highly variable among providers. Individual feedback to the highest utilizers of stat orders was effective in decreasing these orders. © 2013 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  3. Annual report of the Environmental Restoration Monitoring and Assessment Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for FY 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapp, R.B.

    1992-09-01

    This report summarizes the salient features of the annual efforts of the investigations and monitoring, conducted to support the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The results presented can be used to develop a conceptual understanding of the key contaminants and the sources, fluxes, and processes affecting their distribution and movement. This information forms a basis for prioritizing sites and for selecting, implementing, and evaluating remedial actions. Groundwater, soils, sediments, and surface water monitoring results are described

  4. Electric conductivity for laboratory and field monitoring of induced partial saturation (IPS) in sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemiroodsari, Hadi

    Liquefaction is loss of shear strength in fully saturated loose sands caused by build-up of excess pore water pressure, during moderate to large earthquakes, leading to catastrophic failures of structures. Currently used liquefaction mitigation measures are often costly and cannot be applied at sites with existing structures. An innovative, practical, and cost effective liquefaction mitigation technique titled "Induced Partial Saturation" (IPS) was developed by researchers at Northeastern University. The IPS technique is based on injection of sodium percarbonate solution into fully saturated liquefaction susceptible sand. Sodium percarbonate dissolves in water and breaks down into sodium and carbonate ions and hydrogen peroxide which generates oxygen gas bubbles. Oxygen gas bubbles become trapped in sand pores and therefore decrease the degree of saturation of the sand, increase the compressibility of the soil, thus reduce its potential for liquefaction. The implementation of IPS required the development and validation of a monitoring and evaluation technique that would help ensure that the sands are indeed partially saturated. This dissertation focuses on this aspect of the IPS research. The monitoring system developed was based on using electric conductivity fundamentals and probes to detect the transport of chemical solution, calculate degree of saturation of sand, and determine the final zone of partial saturation created by IPS. To understand the fundamentals of electric conductivity, laboratory bench-top tests were conducted using electric conductivity probes and small specimens of Ottawa sand. Bench-top tests were used to study rate of generation of gas bubbles due to reaction of sodium percarbonate solution in sand, and to confirm a theory based on which degree of saturation were calculated. In addition to bench-top tests, electric conductivity probes were used in a relatively large sand specimen prepared in a specially manufactured glass tank. IPS was

  5. [Monitoring of hematogenous occupational exposure in medical staff in infectious disease hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Manxia; Zhou, Jin; Wang, Yimei

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the status and risk factors for hematogenous occupational exposure in medical staff in an infectious disease hospital, and to provide a scientific basis for targeted preventive and control measures. The occupational exposure of 395 medical workers in our hospital was monitored from January 2012 to December 2014, among whom 79 individuals with occupational exposure were subjected to intervention and the risk factors for occupational exposure were analyzed. The high-risk group was mainly the nursing staff (69.6%). The incidence of hematogenous occupational exposure was high in medical personnel with a working age under 3 years, aged under 25 years, and at the infection ward, accounting for 63.3%, 72.1%, and 72.2%, respectively. Hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, Treponema pallidum, and human immunodeficiency virus were the primary exposure sources. Sharp injury was the major way of injury (91.1%), with needle stick injury accounting for the highest proportion (86.1%). Injury occurred on the hand most frequently (91.1%). The high-risk links were improper disposal during or after pulling the needle, re-capturing the needle, and processing waste, accounting for 46.8%, 17.7%, and 12.7%, respectively. Seventy-nine professionals with occupational exposure were not infected. The main risk factor for hematogenous occupational exposure in medical staff in the infectious disease hospital is needle stick injury. Strengthening the occupational protection education in medical staff in infectious disease hospital, implementing protective measures, standardizing operating procedures in high-risk links, and enhancing the supervision mechanism can reduce the incidence of occupational exposure and infection after exposure.

  6. Monitoring exposure of personnel to volatile nitrosamines in the laboratory environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Issenberg, P; Swanson, S E

    1980-01-01

    A convenient sampling method was developed for collection of volatile nitrosamines from large-volume air samples. Stainless steel tubes containing 0.3 g Tenax GC were employed to collect nitrosamines from 5-30 1 air samples. Nitrosamines were eluted from the sample tubes with diethylether to minimize formation of artifacts which were observed when thermal desorption was employed. Eluates were analysed directly by GC-TEA and nitrosamine identities were confirmed using high-resolution GC-MS with selected ion-monitoring. The detection limit was approximately 0.8 micrograms/m3 (0.3 ppb) for NDMA in 2 ml of diethylether extract. The laboratory operations studied included chemical synthesis, trace analysis, animal treatment, microbial mutagenesis tests and in vitro biochemical procedures. In most cases, nitrosamines were not detected in laboratory air, but levels of 200-800 micrograms/m3 (42 to 180 ppb) of N-nitrosomethyl-tert-butylamine were measured during animal treatment, 0.8-8.6 micrograms/m3 (0.3 to 2.8 ppb) of NDMA during mutagenesis assays, 12-22 micrograms/m3 (4-7 ppb) of NDMA during in vitro metabolism studies and 11 micrograms/m3 (3.6 ppb) of NDMA in a walk-in refrigerator. Appropriate corrective measures reduced all nitrosamine levels to below the detection limit. Hamsters and rats treated with NDAA (80 mg/kg, s.c.) excreted 4.4 and 12.9%, respectively, of the nitrosamine in expired air in 24 hr. This route of excretion may be metabolically significant and should be considered in the safe design of animal treatment and holding facilities.

  7. Groundwater monitoring at three Oak Ridge National Laboratory inactive waste impoundments: results after one year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, C. W.; Stansfield, R. G.

    1986-10-01

    To determine if the migration of potential contaminants from three inactive waste impoundments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory poses a threat to groundwater quality, at least one upgradient groundwater monitoring well and threee downgradient monitoring wells were installed at each impoundment in early 1985. These three unlined impoundments, formerly used to collect and, in some instances, treat wastewater are: the 3513 impoundment; the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) impoundment; and the Homogeneous Reactor Experimnt No. 2 impoundment. Groundwater samples were collected quarterly for one year. Analyses were conducted for the groundwater protection parameters promulgated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. The groundwater samples were also analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls, copper, nickel, zinc, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 137/Cs, and tritium. The contaminants found most often to affect groundwater quality at all three waste impoundments were radionuclides. For example, mean concentrations of gross beta and gross alpha activity exceeded drinking water limits at all three sites. The gross beta limit was exceeded at the 3513 and OHF impoundments by either /sup 90/Sr or tritium levels. At the 3513 impoundment, there was substantial evidence that the downgradient groundwater has been contaminated by chromium and lead and possibly by halogenated organic compounds. At the OHF impoundment, the mean level of tritium measured in the upgradient well (about 91,000 Bq/L as compared with 80,000 Bq/L in the downgradient wells) indicated that the groundwater quality has been affected by the radioactive wastes buried in the low-level radioactive waste burial ground solid waste storage area-5 upgradient of the impoundment. Testing for groundwater contamination, disclosed statistically significant contamination at all three sites.

  8. Groundwater monitoring at three Oak Ridge National Laboratory inactive waste impoundments: results after one year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, C.W.; Stansfield, R.G.

    1986-10-01

    To determine if the migration of potential contaminants from three inactive waste impoundments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory poses a threat to groundwater quality, at least one upgradient groundwater monitoring well and threee downgradient monitoring wells were installed at each impoundment in early 1985. These three unlined impoundments, formerly used to collect and, in some instances, treat wastewater are: the 3513 impoundment; the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) impoundment; and the Homogeneous Reactor Experimnt No. 2 impoundment. Groundwater samples were collected quarterly for one year. Analyses were conducted for the groundwater protection parameters promulgated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. The groundwater samples were also analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls, copper, nickel, zinc, 90 Sr, 137 Cs, and tritium. The contaminants found most often to affect groundwater quality at all three waste impoundments were radionuclides. For example, mean concentrations of gross beta and gross alpha activity exceeded drinking water limits at all three sites. The gross beta limit was exceeded at the 3513 and OHF impoundments by either 90 Sr or tritium levels. At the 3513 impoundment, there was substantial evidence that the downgradient groundwater has been contaminated by chromium and lead and possibly by halogenated organic compounds. At the OHF impoundment, the mean level of tritium measured in the upgradient well (about 91,000 Bq/L as compared with 80,000 Bq/L in the downgradient wells) indicated that the groundwater quality has been affected by the radioactive wastes buried in the low-level radioactive waste burial ground solid waste storage area-5 upgradient of the impoundment. Testing for groundwater contamination, disclosed statistically significant contamination at all three sites

  9. Advantages of a Web-Based Real-Time Bed-Management System for Hospital Admission Monitoring in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedian, Somayeh; Bitaraf, Ehsan; Askari, Marjan

    2018-01-01

    Lack of up-to-date information of hospitals beds, specifically in emergencies, is a significant problem in many large countries; The Ministry of Health and Medical Education of Iran (MOHME) designed and implemented a dynamic system that reports the status of beds in 2012. This system created great opportunities for national bed management, including real-time hospital admission monitoring, especially for emergency departments, ICUs and CCUs. Therefore, an additional online system was planned to be implemented for monitoring hospital admissions, including a national alert system. Prior to the design of this system, a study was done using literature study and expert opinion to investigate the advantages and features that this monitoring system was required to have. We used the MoSCoW method to prioritize the requirements of the system. This system was designed to have the following advantages, among other things: the hospitals as well as government should be able to track the patients, manage patient distribution in healthcare centers, and make policy for supplying extra beds. It should also be possible for the hospitals executive board, as well as the government, to monitor the performance of the hospitals regarding patient admissions (i.e., the rate of rejection of patients with severe conditions).

  10. The impact of automation on organizational changes in a community hospital clinical microbiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporese, Alessandro

    2004-06-01

    The diagnosis of infectious diseases and the role of the microbiology laboratory are currently undergoing a process of change. The need for overall efficiency in providing results is now given the same importance as accuracy. This means that laboratories must be able to produce quality results in less time with the capacity to interpret the results clinically. To improve the clinical impact of microbiology results, the new challenge facing the microbiologist has become one of process management instead of pure analysis. A proper project management process designed to improve workflow, reduce analytical time, and provide the same high quality results without losing valuable time treating the patient, has become essential. Our objective was to study the impact of introducing automation and computerization into the microbiology laboratory, and the reorganization of the laboratory workflow, i.e. scheduling personnel to work shifts covering both the entire day and the entire week. In our laboratory, the introduction of automation and computerization, as well as the reorganization of personnel, thus the workflow itself, has resulted in an improvement in response time and greater efficiency in diagnostic procedures.

  11. Surveillance Plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    This Surveillance Plan has been developed as part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental monitoring will be conducted in two phases: the baseline monitoring phase and the routine annual monitoring phase. The baseline monitoring phase will be conducted to establish the baseline contaminant release conditions at the Waste Area Grouping (WAG), to confirm the site-related chemicals of concern (COC), and to gather data to confirm the site hydrologic model The baseline monitoring phase is expected to begin in 1994 and continue for 12--18 months. The routine annual monitoring phase will consist of continued sampling and analyses of COC to determine off-WAG contaminant flux, to identify trends in releases, and to confirm the COC The routine annual monitoring phase will continue for ∼4 years after completion of the baseline monitoring phase. This Surveillance Plan presents the technical and quality assurance surveillance activities for the various WAG 6 environmental monitoring and data evaluation plans and implementing procedures

  12. Monitoring of Recommended Metabolic Laboratory Parameters Among Medicaid Recipients on Second-Generation Antipsychotics in Federally Qualified Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzal, Natalia E; Chavez, Benjamin; Kosirog, Emily R; Billups, Sarah J; Saseen, Joseph J

    2018-02-01

    In 2004, a consensus statement outlining recommended metabolic monitoring for patients prescribed second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) was published. More than a decade later, suboptimal adherence rates to these recommendations continue to be reported, which could lead to long-term and costly complications. To define the prevalence of appropriately monitored Medicaid patients receiving care at federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) prescribed SGAs. This was a retrospective study examining electronic health record and Medicaid claims data to assess the rates of glucose and lipid monitoring for patients prescribed SGAs from January 2014 to August 2016 in a FQHC. Prescription and laboratory claims for patients receiving care at 4 FQHCs were reviewed. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate the primary outcome. A total of 235 patients were included in the analysis. Patients initiated on SGA therapy (n = 92) had baseline glucose and lipid monitoring rates of 50% and 23%, respectively. The 3-month monitoring rates were 37% for glucose and 26% for lipids, whereas annual rates were 71% and 40%, respectively. Patients continuing SGA therapy (n = 143) had annual glucose and lipid monitoring rates of 67% and 44%. Medicaid patients at FQHCs initially prescribed SGAs have low baseline and 3-month metabolic monitoring, whereas annual monitoring was comparable to previously published studies. Adults receiving chronic care at a FQHC were more likely to receive glucose monitoring. Those with type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or hyperlipidemia were more likely to receive glucose and lipid monitoring.

  13. Moving out of the Laboratory: Deploying Pervasive Technologies in a Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Riisgaard; Bardram, Jakob; Søgaard, Mads

    2006-01-01

    The authors deployed a distributed system containing a location-tracking system, a context-awareness system, wall-sized displays, and mobile phones in a Danish hospital's operating ward. This article presents the lessons they learned from deploying these pervasive computing technologies...

  14. Laboratory scale micro-seismic monitoring of rock faulting and injection-induced fault reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarout, J.; Dautriat, J.; Esteban, L.; Lumley, D. E.; King, A.

    2017-12-01

    The South West Hub CCS project in Western Australia aims to evaluate the feasibility and impact of geosequestration of CO2 in the Lesueur sandstone formation. Part of this evaluation focuses on the feasibility and design of a robust passive seismic monitoring array. Micro-seismicity monitoring can be used to image the injected CO2plume, or any geomechanical fracture/fault activity; and thus serve as an early warning system by measuring low-level (unfelt) seismicity that may precede potentially larger (felt) earthquakes. This paper describes laboratory deformation experiments replicating typical field scenarios of fluid injection in faulted reservoirs. Two pairs of cylindrical core specimens were recovered from the Harvey-1 well at depths of 1924 m and 2508 m. In each specimen a fault is first generated at the in situ stress, pore pressure and temperature by increasing the vertical stress beyond the peak in a triaxial stress vessel at CSIRO's Geomechanics & Geophysics Lab. The faulted specimen is then stabilized by decreasing the vertical stress. The freshly formed fault is subsequently reactivated by brine injection and increase of the pore pressure until slip occurs again. This second slip event is then controlled in displacement and allowed to develop for a few millimeters. The micro-seismic (MS) response of the rock during the initial fracturing and subsequent reactivation is monitored using an array of 16 ultrasonic sensors attached to the specimen's surface. The recorded MS events are relocated in space and time, and correlate well with the 3D X-ray CT images of the specimen obtained post-mortem. The time evolution of the structural changes induced within the triaxial stress vessel is therefore reliably inferred. The recorded MS activity shows that, as expected, the increase of the vertical stress beyond the peak led to an inclined shear fault. The injection of fluid and the resulting increase in pore pressure led first to a reactivation of the pre

  15. Self-Potential Monitoring of Landslides on Field and Laboratory Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, T.; Limbrock, J. K.; Weigand, M.; Wagner, F. M.; Kemna, A.

    2017-12-01

    Among several other geophysical methods used to observe water movement in the ground, the electrical self-potential method has been applied to a broad range of monitoring studies, especially focusing on volcanism and dam leakage but also during hydraulic fracturing. Electrical self-potential signals may be caused by various mechanisms. Though, the most relevant source of the self-potential field in the given context of landslides is the streaming potential, caused by a flowing electrolyte through porous media with electrically charged internal surfaces. So far, existing models focus on monitoring water flow in non-deformable porous media. However, as the self-potential is sensitive to hydraulic parameters of the soil, any change in these parameters will cause an alteration of the electric signal. Mass movement will significantly influence the hydraulic parameters of the solid as well as the pressure field, assuming that fluid movement is faster than pressure diffusion. We present self-potential measurements from over a year of continuous monitoring at an old landslide site. Using a three-dimensional electric-resistivity underground model, the self-potential signal is analyzed with respect to precipitation and the resulting flow in the ground. Additional data from electrical measurements and conventional sensors are included to assess saturation. The field observations are supplemented by laboratory experiments in which we study the behavior of the self-potential during failure of a piled land slope. For the undrained scenarios, we observe a clear correlation between the mass movements and signals in the electric potential, which clearly differ from the underlying potential variations due to increased saturation and fluid flow. In the drained experiments, we do not observe any measurable change in the electric potential. We therefore assume that change in fluid properties and release of the load causes disturbances in flow and streaming potential. Our results

  16. Clinical and Laboratory Findings in Patients with Tramadol Intoxication Referred to Razi Hospital During 2005-06

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Rahbar Taromsari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Frequency of Tramadol intoxication is increasing as a result of its useas a drug for suppression of withdrawal symptoms by opioids abusers and its wideaccessibility of this drug. Tramadol intoxication can lead to death and, therefore, earlyidentification of its clinical manifestations is crucial since early detection of theintoxication and its treatment could improve patients' survival This study investigatedthe frequency of clinical and laboratory findings in Tramadol intoxication.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, patients with Tramadol intoxication whoreferred to Razi Hospital in Rasht, Iran, during 2005-06 were examined. Theirmedical records were surveyed for demographic data, past medical history,neurological examination, and routine laboratory tests. All data were statisticallyanalyzed by SPSS software version 14.Result: The majority of the 306 patients (83.3% male were in the age range of 20-40 years and 68.6% of them had been educated up to high school. The mean dose ofingested Tramadol was 746± 453mg (mean± SD. Agitation (25.2% and seizure(20.3% were the most frequent reported symptoms. Among laboratory abnormalities,the most common findings were prolonged PT (18.3% and increased ALT (5.6%.Conclusion: The most common clinical presentation was agitation and the mostcommon laboratory finding was prolonged PT. Of all the patients, 3 cases wereadmitted to ICU. Although Tramadol poisoning might lead to death, there was onlyone death after Tramadol poisoning in the current study.

  17. Evaluating laboratory request forms submitted to haematology and blood transfusion departments at a hospital in Northwest Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feyisayo Jegede

    2016-05-01

    Objective: We assessed routinely-submitted LRFs to determine the degree of correctness, completeness and consistency. Methods: LRFs submitted to the Department of Haematology (DH and Blood Transfusion Services (BTS of Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital in Kano, Nigeria, between October 2014 and December 2014, were evaluated for completion of all items on the forms. Performance in four quality indicator domains, including patient identifiers, test request details, laboratory details and physician details, was derived as a composite percentage. Results: Of the 2084 LRFs evaluated, 999 were from DH and 1085 from BTS. Overall, LRF completeness was 89.5% for DH and 81.2% for BTS. Information on patient name, patient location and laboratory number were 100% complete for DH, whereas only patient name was 100% complete for BTS. Incomplete information was mostly encountered on BTS forms for physician’s signature (60.8% and signature of laboratory receiver (63.5%. None of the DH and only 9.4% of BTS LRFs met all quality indicator indices. Conclusion: The level of completion of LRFs from these two departments was suboptimal. This underscores the need to review and redesign the LRF, improve on training and communication between laboratory and clinical staff and review specimen rejection practices.

  18. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    During third quarter 1994, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (Met Lab HWMF) were analyzed for selected heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Eight parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS). Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate exceeded final PDWS in one well. Aluminum, iron, manganese, tin, and total organic halogens exceeded the Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the M-Area Aquifer Zone were similar to previous quarters. Conditions affecting determination of groundwater flow directions and rates in the Upper Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, Lower Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, and the Middle Sand Aquifer Zone of the Crouch Branch Confining Unit were also similar to previous quarters. During second quarter 1994, SRS received South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control approval for constructing five point-of-compliance wells and two plume definition wells near the Met Lab HWMF. This project began in July 1994 and is complete; however, analytical data from these wells is not available yet

  19. Application of short-range photogrammetry for monitoring seepage erosion of riverbank by laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoodi, A.; Noorzad, A.; Majdzadeh Tabatabai, M. R.; Samadi, A.

    2018-03-01

    Temporal and spatial monitoring play a significant role in evaluating and examining the riverbank morphology and its spatiotemporal changes. Unlike the terrestrial laser scanners, other previously used methods such as satellite images, total station surveying, and erosion pins have limited application to quantify the small-scale bank variations due to the lack of rapid survey and resolution in data acquisition. High cost, lack of availability, specialized equipment and hard movement of laser scanners make it necessary to develop new accurate, economical and easily available methods. The present study aims to test the Kinect photogrametric technology for measuring and assessing riverbank variations in laboratory environment. For this purpose, three models of layered soil blocks for three different levels of groundwater (i.e. 24, 34 and 44 cm) were designed to investigate the seepage erosion behavior experimentally. The results indicate the high accuracy of Kinect in measuring the bank erosion cavity dimensions (i.e., 0.5% error) with high spatial resolution data (i.e. 300,000 points per frame). The high speed of Kinect in riverbank scanning enables the analysis of time variations of mechanisms such as seepage erosion which occurs rather rapidly. The results confirmed that there is a power relationship between the seepage gradient and the time of the bank failure with a determination coefficient of 0.97. Moreover, an increase in the level of groundwater on the riverbank increases the rate of undercutting retreat that caused more rapid failure of the riverbank.

  20. Inspection and monitoring plan, contaminated groundwater seeps 317/319/ENE Area, Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    During the course of completing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) in the 317/319/East-Northeast (ENE) Area of Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E), groundwater was discovered moving to the surface through a series of groundwater seeps. The seeps are located in a ravine approximately 600 ft south of the ANL-E fence line in Waterfall Glen Forest Preserve. Samples of the seep water were collected and analyzed for selected parameters. Two of the five seeps sampled were found to contain detectable levels of organic contaminants. Three chemical species were identified: chloroform (14--25 microg/L), carbon tetrachloride (56--340 microg/L), and tetrachloroethylene (3--6 microg/L). The other seeps did not contain detectable levels of volatile organics. The nature of the contaminants in the seeps will also be monitored on a regular basis. Samples of surface water flowing through the bottom of the ravine and groundwater emanating from the seeps will be collected and analyzed for chemical and radioactive constituents. The results of the routine sampling will be compared with the concentrations used in the risk assessment. If the concentrations exceed those used in the risk assessment, the risk calculations will be revised by using the higher numbers. This revised analysis will determine if additional actions are warranted

  1. Chromatography related performance of the Monitor for Aerosols and Gases in Ambient Air (MARGA): laboratory and field based evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluation of the semi-continuous Monitor for Aerosols and Gases in Ambient Air (MARGA, Metrohm Applikon B.V.) was conducted with an emphasis on examination of accuracy and precision associated with processing of chromatograms. Using laboratory standards and atmospheric measureme...

  2. Groundwater level monitoring sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater level monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Groundwater level monitoring will be conducted at 129 sites within the WAG. All of the sites will be manually monitored on a semiannual basis. Forty-five of the 128 wells, plus one site in White Oak Lake, will also be equipped with automatic water level monitoring equipment. The 46 sites are divided into three groups. One group will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level, conductivity, and temperature. The other two groups will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level only. The equipment will be rotated between the two groups. The data collected from the water level monitoring will be used to support determination of the contaminant flux at WAG 6.

  3. Groundwater level monitoring sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater level monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Groundwater level monitoring will be conducted at 129 sites within the WAG. All of the sites will be manually monitored on a semiannual basis. Forty-five of the 128 wells, plus one site in White Oak Lake, will also be equipped with automatic water level monitoring equipment. The 46 sites are divided into three groups. One group will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level, conductivity, and temperature. The other two groups will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level only. The equipment will be rotated between the two groups. The data collected from the water level monitoring will be used to support determination of the contaminant flux at WAG 6

  4. A laser profilometry technique for monitoring fluvial dike breaching in laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewals, Benjamin; Rifai, Ismail; Erpicum, Sébastien; Archambeau, Pierre; Violeau, Damien; Pirotton, Michel; El kadi Abderrezzak, Kamal

    2017-04-01

    A challenging aspect for experimental modelling of fluvial dike breaching is the continuous monitoring of the transient breach geometry. In dam breaching cases induced by flow overtopping over the whole breach crest (plane erosion), a side view through a glass wall is sufficient to monitor the breach formation. This approach can be extended for 3D dam breach tests (spatial erosion) if the glass wall is located along the breach centreline. In contrast, using a side view does not apply for monitoring fluvial dike breaching, because the breach is not symmetric in this case. We present a non-intrusive, high resolution technique to record the breach development in experimental models of fluvial dikes by means of a laser profilometry (Rifai et al. 2016). Most methods used for monitoring dam and dike breaching involve the projection of a pattern (fringes, grid) on the dam or dike body and the analysis of its deformation on images recorded during the breaching (e.g., Pickert et al. 2011, Frank and Hager 2014). A major limitation of these methods stems from reflection on the water surface, particularly in the vicinity of the breach where the free surface is irregular and rippled. This issue was addressed by Spinewine et al. (2004), who used a single laser sheet so that reflections on the water surface were strongly limited and did not hamper the accurate processing of each image. We have developed a similar laser profilometry technique tailored for laboratory experiments on fluvial dike breaching. The setup is simple and relatively low cost. It consists of a digital video camera (resolution of 1920 × 1080 pixels at 60 frames per second) and a swiping red diode 30 mW laser that enables the projection of a laser sheet over the dike body. The 2D image coordinates of each deformed laser profile incident on the dike are transformed into 3D object coordinates using the Direct Linear Transformation (DLT) algorithm. All 3D object coordinates computed over a swiping cycle of the

  5. Monitoring of doses to patients in interventional cardiology: first results from three Serbian hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera; Arandjic, Danijela; Kosutic, Dushko

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to assess level of radiation dose to patients in interventional cardiology procedures in three large Serbian hospitals and to investigate possibility for setting of trigger levels if dose quantities exceed certain levels. Three dedicated interventional cardiology laboratories were included in the survey. Information on annual workload was estimated based on number of coronary angiography (CA) procedures and percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). Patients doses were assessed in terms of air kerma area product (PKA) and air kerma in international reference point (KIRP). Results were compared with internationally proposed Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRL) and similar surveys results. Average total annual number of procedures was 820, 1100 and 2500 in three hospitals, respectively, while total number of dose measurements was 337. All three centers reported PKA values higher than 100 Gy·cm 2 and even values above 200 Gy·cm 2 , corresponding to 42% and 16% of all measurements. Measured KIRP value higher than 5 Gy was reported in one center, indicating that skin doses associated possibility of skin injuries were observed. PKA mean hospital values for CA ranged from 33 to 78 Gy·cm 2 and for PCI from 73 to 113 Gy·cm 2 , while associated vales for KIRP were: 0.45-1.2 Gy and 1.1-1.8 Gy, respectively. Comparison of obtained results with international DRL indicated that significant number of procedures is not optimally performed as in some centers more than a half of patients receive doses above DRL. The presented results are valuable input for dose optimization strategies and increased awareness related to importance of dose management. With respect to high dose values, risk for stochastic effects and tissue reactions, dose management methods were proposed. (Author)

  6. The impact of regulatory control on monitoring of pregnant hospital staff in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Rawlings, D.J.; Marshall, N.W.

    1997-01-01

    In 1990, the International Commission on Radiological Protection recommended the introduction of a supplementary dose limit for pregnant staff so that the foetus was adequately protected. This dose limit was framed in terms of an abdomen surface dose of 2 mSv for the duration of the pregnancy, once it had been declared. The philosophical basis underlying this supplementary dose limit was the desire to treat the foetus as a member of the public in respect of the occupational exposure of the mother. In the Basic Safety Standards, the International Atomic Energy Agency endorsed the need to limit the foetal dose, but in this document the dose limit refers to the foetus. The introduction of dose limits for foetal exposure to radiation has significant implications for hospitals as many workers are women of child bearing age. The practical implications of this dose limit will be discussed as well as suggested monitoring arrangements. (author)

  7. Capacitive Sensing for Non-Invasive Breathing and Heart Monitoring in Non-Restrained, Non-Sedated Laboratory Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos González-Sánchez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Animal testing plays a vital role in biomedical research. Stress reduction is important for improving research results and increasing the welfare and the quality of life of laboratory animals. To estimate stress we believe it is of great importance to develop non-invasive techniques for monitoring physiological signals during the transport of laboratory animals, thereby allowing the gathering of information on the transport conditions, and, eventually, the improvement of these conditions. Here, we study the suitability of commercially available electric potential integrated circuit (EPIC sensors, using both contact and contactless techniques, for monitoring the heart rate and breathing rate of non-restrained, non-sedated laboratory mice. The design has been tested under different scenarios with the aim of checking the plausibility of performing contactless capture of mouse heart activity (ideally with an electrocardiogram. First experimental results are shown.

  8. Capacitive Sensing for Non-Invasive Breathing and Heart Monitoring in Non-Restrained, Non-Sedated Laboratory Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sánchez, Carlos; Fraile, Juan-Carlos; Pérez-Turiel, Javier; Damm, Ellen; Schneider, Jochen G; Zimmermann, Heiko; Schmitt, Daniel; Ihmig, Frank R

    2016-07-07

    Animal testing plays a vital role in biomedical research. Stress reduction is important for improving research results and increasing the welfare and the quality of life of laboratory animals. To estimate stress we believe it is of great importance to develop non-invasive techniques for monitoring physiological signals during the transport of laboratory animals, thereby allowing the gathering of information on the transport conditions, and, eventually, the improvement of these conditions. Here, we study the suitability of commercially available electric potential integrated circuit (EPIC) sensors, using both contact and contactless techniques, for monitoring the heart rate and breathing rate of non-restrained, non-sedated laboratory mice. The design has been tested under different scenarios with the aim of checking the plausibility of performing contactless capture of mouse heart activity (ideally with an electrocardiogram). First experimental results are shown.

  9. [Classification and monitoring of the appropriateness of emergency admissions in a tertiary hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Picazo Ferrer, J J; Tomás García, N; Cubillana Herrero, J D; Gómez Company, J A; de Dios Cánovas García, J

    2014-01-01

    To measure the appropriateness of hospital admissions, to classify its Clinical Services (CS) according to the level of inappropriateness, and to determine the usefulness of applying rapid assessment techniques (lot quality assurance sampling) in these types of measurements. A descriptive, retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary hospital to assess the clinical records of emergency admissions to the 12 CS with a higher volume of admissions, using the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP). A four-level («A» to «D») increasingly inadequate admissions scale was constructed setting both standard and threshold values in every stratum. Every CS was classified in one of them using lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS). A total of 156 cases (13 cases from every CS) were assessed. The assessment effort (devoted time) was also estimated. There were 22.4±6.3% of inadequate admissions. In the CS classification, 9 (75%) got a good or acceptable appropriateness level, and only 1 (8%) got an inacceptable level. The time devoted was estimated at 17 hours. AEP is useful to assess the admission appropriateness and may be included in the «Emergencies» process management, although its variability prevents the use for external comparisons. If both LQAS and the appropriateness classification level and the global estimation (by unifying lot samples) are combined, the monitoring is affordable without a great effort. To extend these tools to other quality indicators requiring direct observation or clinical records, manual assessment could improve the monitoring efficiency. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiation protection in an interventional laboratory: a comparative study of Australian and Saudi Arabian hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alahmari, Mohammed Ali S.; Sun, Zhonghua; Bartlett, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether the use of protection devices and attitudes of interventional professionals (including radiologists, cardiologists, vascular surgeons, medical imaging technicians and nurses) towards radiation protection will differ between Saudi Arabian and Australian hospitals. Hard copies of an anonymous survey were distributed to 10 and 6 clinical departments in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia and metropolitan hospitals in Western Australia, respectively. The overall response rate was 43 % comprising 110 Australian participants and 63 % comprising 147 Saudi participants. Analysis showed that Australian respondents differed significantly from Saudi respondents with respect to their usages of leaded glasses (p < 0.001), ceiling-suspended lead screen (p < 0.001) and lead drape suspended from the table (p < 0.001). This study indicates that the trained interventional professionals in Australia tend to adhere to benefit from having an array of tools for personal radiation protection than the corresponding group in Saudi Arabia. (authors)

  11. The cardiac catheterization laboratory personnel TLD dosimetry in Dr. Faghihi Hospital in Shiraz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derakhshan, Sh.

    2004-01-01

    In this study all of the personnel of Angiography of Dr.Faghihi hospital used TLD service During 2002-2003. This service was given by center for Radiation Protection and Application of the Shiraz University. These staff were divided in two group, one groups was technicians and the other group was the nurses. The result of this research shows that the maximum dose received to Technicians and nurses were 0.4mSv and 0.55mSV respectively. The average annual dose to technicians and nurses were 0.02 mSv and 0.19 mSv. This result shows that the nurses of this hospital receive more dose than the techniques

  12. The hospital tech laboratory: quality innovation in a new era of value-conscious care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keteyian, Courtland K; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K; Ryan, Andrew M

    2017-08-01

    For decades, the healthcare industry has been incentivized to develop new diagnostic technologies, but this limitless progress fueled rapidly growing expenditures. With an emphasis on value, the future will favor information synthesis and processing over pure data generation, and hospitals will play a critical role in developing these systems. A Michigan Medicine, IBM, and AirStrip partnership created a robust streaming analytics platform tasked with creating predictive algorithms for critical care with the potential to support clinical decisions and deliver significant value.

  13. Usability evaluation of Laboratory and Radiology Information Systems integrated into a hospital information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabovati, Ehsan; Vakili-Arki, Hasan; Eslami, Saeid; Khajouei, Reza

    2014-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the usability of widely used laboratory and radiology information systems. Three usability experts independently evaluated the user interfaces of Laboratory and Radiology Information Systems using heuristic evaluation method. They applied Nielsen's heuristics to identify and classify usability problems and Nielsen's severity rating to judge their severity. Overall, 116 unique heuristic violations were identified as usability problems. In terms of severity, 67 % of problems were rated as major and catastrophic. Among 10 heuristics, "consistency and standards" was violated most frequently. Moreover, mean severity of problems concerning "error prevention" and "help and documentation" heuristics was higher than of the others. Despite widespread use of specific healthcare information systems, they suffer from usability problems. Improving the usability of systems by following existing design standards and principles from the early phased of system development life cycle is recommended. Especially, it is recommended that the designers design systems that inhibit the initiation of erroneous actions and provide sufficient guidance to users.

  14. Order No 485 on the use of unsealed radioactive sources in hospitals, laboratories, etc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    This Order, made in furtherance of an Order of 20 Novembre 1975 concerning safety precautions in the use of radioactive substances, implements in Directive 80/836/Euratom on radiation protection. It lays down a licensing system for the purchase and use of unsealed radioactive sources and also provides for their storage and disposal. The National Board of Health is the licensing authority. The Order also prescribes radiation protection measures for laboratory personnel [fr

  15. [Caesarean section in german hospitals: validity of hospital quality report data for monitoring C-section rates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghänel, K; Renz-Polster, H; Jarczok, M N; Hornemann, A; Böhler, T; De Bock, F

    2015-04-01

    It is not known if "hospital quality reports" (HQR) document Caesarean (C-) section rates at the hospital level accurately enough for use as a reliable data source when it comes to explaining regional variations of C-sections in Germany by factors at the hospital level. We aimed to answer this question using HQR from hospitals in Baden-Württemberg as data source. Diagnostic and procedure codes from HQR for the year 2008 (HQRdata), were used to calculate numbers of births, numbers of C-sections, and rates of births by C-section (CSR) for 94 of 97 hospitals in Baden-Württemberg. These numbers were compared to internal hospital (IH) data delivered upon request by 80 of 97 hospitals and stemming from vital statistics, birth registry forms, or external quality assurance datasets. There was no difference in the number of births between HQR data and IH data, but the number of C-sections and the CSR differed significantly (pCSR calculated using HQR data was 4.9 ± 17.9% higher than CSR from IH data (absolute difference 1.5 ± 5.8%). The correlation between the 2 data sources was moderate (r=0.73). Only 55% of the variance in IH data-based CSR was explained by HQR data. The proportion between highest and lowest CSR in hospitals in Baden-Württemberg was 4.9 for HQR data and 3.6 for IH data. There are significant and relevant differences between C-section rates based on ei-ther HQR or IH data. This questions routine data from HQR for 2008 as a reliable data source for research work. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Elaboration of a program for monitoring the ionizing radiations in a large hospital; Elaboracao de um programa de monitoracao das radiacoes ionizantes num hospital de grande porte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreira, Mauricio Costa

    1996-11-01

    Personnel monitoring data collected in the Radiotherapy, Diagnostic Radiology and Hemodynamics Departments of the Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirao Preto - USP during the interval from 1986 to 1995 were analyzed. The data were classified according to the profession of the workers and compared to those collected in a previous period (1973-1982). Internationally established criteria, published published in the ICRP 35 and 60 were used together with additional Brazilian criteria (CNEN NE 3.01) to optimize personnel monitoring such that the required radioprotection is provided. The results show that 80% of the workers need not be monitored because their doses will not exceed 3/10 the annual limits. An economy of about US$10,200 in monitoring cost per year could be realized as well as reduction in the hospital clerical costs expended to maintain the records. The improvements gaining by reducing the number of monitored persons will not compromise the safety standard required for radiation protection. (author)

  17. Monitoring of airborne bacteria and aerosols in different wards of hospitals - Particle counting usefulness in investigation of airborne bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhoseini, Seyed Hamed; Nikaeen, Mahnaz; Khanahmd, Hossein; Hatamzadeh, Maryam; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    The presence of airborne bacteria in hospital environments is of great concern because of their potential role as a source of hospital-acquired infections (HAI). The aim of this study was the determination and comparison of the concentration of airborne bacteria in different wards of four educational hospitals, and evaluation of whether particle counting could be predictive of airborne bacterial concentration in different wards of a hospital. The study was performed in an operating theatre (OT), intensive care unit (ICU), surgery ward (SW) and internal medicine (IM) ward of four educational hospitals in Isfahan, Iran. A total of 80 samples were analyzed for the presence of airborne bacteria and particle levels. The average level of bacteria ranged from 75-1194 CFU/m (3) . Mean particle levels were higher than class 100,000 cleanrooms in all wards. A significant correlation was observed between the numbers of 1-5 µm particles and levels of airborne bacteria in operating theatres and ICUs. The results showed that factors which may influence the airborne bacterial level in hospital environments should be properly managed to minimize the risk of HAIs especially in operating theaters. Microbial air contamination of hospital settings should be performed by the monitoring of airborne bacteria, but particle counting could be considered as a good operative method for the continuous monitoring of air quality in operating theaters and ICUs where higher risks of infection are suspected.

  18. [Team approaches to critical bleeding (massive bleeding and transfusion) - chairmen's introductory remarks. Questionnaire survey on current status of hospital clinical laboratories evaluating critical hemorrhage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kino, Shuichi; Suwabe, Akira

    2014-12-01

    In 2007, "the Guidelines for Actions against Intraoperative Critical Hemorrhage" were established by the Japanese Society of Anaesthesiologists and the Japanese Society of Blood transfusion and Cell Therapy. The documentation of in-hospital procedures for critical hemorrhage, especially about how to select RBC units, has widely standardized hospital practice. Patients with intraoperative critical hemorrhage sometimes suffer from massive blood loss. In this situation, some patients develop coagulopathy. To treat them, we need to evaluate their coagulation status based on laboratory test results. So, we performed a nationwide questionnaire survey on the current status of hospital clinical laboratories evaluating critical hemorrhage. From the results of this survey, it was recommended that central hospital laboratories should try to reduce the turn-around time required to test for coagulation parameters as much as possible for appropriate substitution therapy. (Review).

  19. Optimization is required when using linked hospital and laboratory data to investigate respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Faye J; Blyth, Christopher C; de Klerk, Nicholas; Valenti, Beverly; Rouhiainen, Oliver J; Wu, Dominic Yu-An; Jansz, Christopher S; Moore, Hannah C

    2016-01-01

    Despite a recommendation for microbiological testing, only 45% of children hospitalized for respiratory infections in our previous data linkage study linked to a microbiological record. We conducted a chart review to validate linked microbiological data. The chart review consisted of children aged data linkage study. Poisson regression was used to identify factors predicting the likelihood of microbiological tests in the chart review cohort. From the chart review, 77% of 746 records had a microbiological test performed compared with 46% of 18,687 records from our previous data linkage study. Of those undergoing testing, 66% of the chart review and 64% of data linkage records had ≥1 respiratory pathogen(s) detected. In the chart review cohort, frequency of testing was highest in children admitted to metropolitan hospitals. Validation studies are essential to ensure the quality of linked data. Our previous data linkage study failed to capture all relevant microbiological records. Findings will be used to optimize extraction protocols for future linkage studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. 1981 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auyong, M.; Griggs, K.S.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    This report gives methods and results of the 1981 radiation monitoring program at LLL for both radioactive and non-radioactive contamination from gaseous and liquid effluents. Off-site monitoring includes various radionuclides but especially tritium in the ecosystems

  1. [Vitamin D Insufficiency in a Hospital Population: A Photograph from the Laboratory Perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria Joana; Fernandes, Vera; Garcia, Fernando Mota

    2015-01-01

    Although vitamin D deficiency is increasingly recognized around the world, there are few studies on the Portuguese reality. This study aims to analyse vitamin D levels in the assays performed in our hospital and their relationship with age, genre, requesting specialty and moment of sample collection. Cross-sectional study of measurements of 25(HO)D performed in our Hospital between June 2012 and November 2014. Included variables: gender, age, requesting specialty, month of sample collection. Vitamin D status classified as: 'Deficiency' (≤ 20 ng/mL), 'Insufficiency' (21 - 29 ng/ml) and 'Sufficiency' (≥ 30 ng/mL). We included 5 439 assays; 55.0% from women; the median age was 64.0 years. Sixty per cent had 'Deficiency', 20.7% 'Insufficiency' and 18.9% 'Sufficiency'. We found a negative correlation between age and vitamin D level (p vitamin D levels between genres. Nine specialties requested 98% of the assays, namely Nephrology (56.2%). We found differences between specialties based on age and vitamin D level (p Vitamin D levels changed throughout the year, with higher levels in the summer, followed by autumn, spring and winter (p vitamin D sufficiency was only present in a minority of assays (27.8% in summer and 9.2% in winter). Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in this population, affects individuals of all ages and is not offset by the seasonal variation of sunlight. Vitamin D deficiency is a real and prevalent problem in our population that needs further attention and action, given its clinical implications.

  2. Meteorological monitoring sampling and analysis plan for the environmental monitoring plan at Waste Area Grouping 6, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses meteorological monitoring activities that wall be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. Meteorological monitoring of various climatological parameters (e.g., temperature, wind speed, humidity) will be collected by instruments installed at WAG 6. Data will be recorded electronically at frequencies varying from 5-min intervals to 1-h intervals, dependent upon parameter. The data will be downloaded every 2 weeks, evaluated, compressed, and uploaded into a WAG 6 data base for subsequent use. The meteorological data will be used in water balance calculations in support of the WAG 6 hydrogeological model

  3. Meteorological Monitoring Sampling and Analysis Plan for Environmental Monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses meteorological monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Meterological monitoring of various climatological parameters (eg., temperature, wind speed, humidity) will be collected by instruments installed at WAG 6. Data will be recorded electronically at frequencies varying from 5-min intervals to 1-h intervals, dependent upon parameter. The data will be downloaded every 2 weeks, evaluated, compressed, and uploaded into a WAG 6 data base for subsequent use. The meteorological data will be used in water balance calculations in support of the WAG 6 hydrogeological model

  4. Wireless transmission of monitoring data out of the Hades underground laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, T.J.; Hart, J.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. For the monitoring of geological waste disposal in the post-closure phase, data acquired by the underground monitoring system inside the repository need to be transmitted wirelessly through the underground to the surface. Low frequency magneto-induction techniques as applied in mine communication and rescue can potentially be used for the wireless transmission of data from the repository to the surface. However, the propagation of magnetic fields through porous argillaceous rocks like the Boom Clay is hindered by the high electrical conductivity of the rock. As part of the European 7. framework project MoDeRn, Monitoring Developments for safe Repository operation and staged closure, NRG is conducting tests on the wireless transmission of monitoring data under conditions representative for a generic Dutch disposal in Boom Clay. This should help to judge the general feasibility of long-term wireless data transmission from an underground repository through the enclosing host rock and the overlying geosphere to the surface. Experimental work As contribution to the MoDeRn Work Package 3, In-situ demonstration of innovative monitoring techniques, NRG conducts tests on the wireless transmission of signals and data. The wireless data transmission experiments of NRG are being performed at the HADES Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in Mol, Belgium, situated at 225 m depth in a 100 m thick layer of Boom Clay. The main objective of the contribution is to quantify and optimise the energy efficiency of the transmission technique used. Because the Boom Clay and the overlying aquifers attenuate the magnetic fields more strongly than other host rocks, it is assumed that transmission experiments performed in the HADES give a more realistic picture on field propagation than experiments performed e.g. in granite, salt rock or Opalinus clay. Although the generic depth for the Dutch disposal design is 500 m, the experiments

  5. Parameters of a simple whole body counter and thyroid monitor established at the Dresden Felsenkeller underground laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahre, P [Rossendorf Nuclear Engineering and Analytics, Inc., Dresden (Germany); Schoenmuth, T [Rossendorf Nuclear Engineering and Analytics, Inc., Dresden (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    At the Rossendorf Nuclear Engineering and Analytics Inc. a simple whole body counter and an iodine-thyroid monitor are used for measuring the internal contamination of workers. There is no shielding chamber in both cases. By using the chamber at the Dresden Felsenkeller underground laboratory the lower limit of detection could be improved by a factor of about 3 for whole body counting and by a factor of 2,5 for thyroid monitoring (I 131, I 125). Concerning the lower limit of detection the applicability of the German standard DIN 25 482 implemented in the Gamma-Vision software packadge is discussed in the paper. (orig.)

  6. Hematologic, hepatic, renal, and lipid laboratory monitoring after initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy in the United States, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanik, Elizabeth L; Napravnik, Sonia; Ryscavage, Patrick; Eron, Joseph J; Koletar, Susan L; Moore, Richard D; Zinski, Anne; Cole, Stephen R; Hunt, Peter; Crane, Heidi M; Kahn, James; Mathews, William C; Mayer, Kenneth H; Taiwo, Babafemi O

    2013-06-01

    We assessed laboratory monitoring after combination antiretroviral therapy initiation among 3678 patients in a large US multisite clinical cohort, censoring participants at last clinic visit, combination antiretroviral therapy change, or 3 years. Median days (interquartile range) to first hematologic, hepatic, renal, and lipid tests were 30 (18-53), 31 (19-56), 33 (20-59), and 350 (96-1106), respectively. At 1 year, approximately 80% received more than 2 hematologic, hepatic, and renal tests consistent with guidelines. However, only 40% received 1 or more lipid tests. Monitoring was more frequent in specific subgroups, likely reflecting better clinic attendance or clinician perception of higher susceptibility to toxicities.

  7. Monitoring of Frequency and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Pathogens on the Hands of Healthcare Workers in a Tertiary Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tselebonis Athanasios

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To monitor microbes, focusing on drug resistance, on the hands of the personnel of four departments of a tertiary hospital (ICU, neonatal unit, internal medicine ward and surgical ward and explore differences between departments, professions and genders.

  8. Meningococcal meningitis: clinical and laboratorial characteristics, fatality rate and variables associated with in-hospital mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa L. Strelow

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Meningococcal meningitis is a public health problem. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with meningococcal meningitis, and to identify associated factors with mortality. This was a retrospective study, between 2006 and 2011, at a referral center in São Paulo, Brazil. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with mortality. We included 316 patients. The median age was 16 years (IQR: 7–27 and 60% were male. The clinical triad: fever, headache and neck stiffness was observed in 89% of the patients. The cerebrospinal triad: pleocytosis, elevated protein levels and low glucose levels was present in 79% of patients. Factors associated with mortality in the multivariate model were age above 50 years, seizures, tachycardia, hypotension and neck stiffness. The classic clinical and laboratory triads of meningococcal meningitis were variable. The fatality rate was low. Age, seizures and shock signs were independently associated with mortality.

  9. [Isolation of anaerobes during a 30-month observation at a hospital microbiology laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistono, P G; Rapetti, I; Stacchini, E; Vironda, N; D'Usi, M P; Guasco, C

    1989-01-01

    The authors evaluate retrospectively the results obtained from the research of anaerobial bacteria on 1313 samples received at the Microbiology Laboratory of the "Ospedale Civile di Ivrea" over a period of 31 months (6/1/86-12/31/88). From this evaluation, high percentages of detection of anaerobic bacteria are emerging in the following infections: appendiculare abscesses (60%), intestinal operations (71%), wounds (57%), tubovarian abscesses (100%), as well as thoracic empyema (50%). Also relevant are the isolations from skin and subcutaneous tissues: breast infections (50%) preputial infections (60%), perineal and perirectal abscesses (60%). The incident of anaerobic bacteria in bacteriemia is 17%. The most representative anaerobic bacteria group are: Bacteroides spp. (56%), Peptostreptococcus spp. (12%), Propionibacterium spp. (9%), Fusobacterium spp. (7%) Clostridium spp. (6%), Veillonella spp. and Eubacterium spp. (3%). In the intraabdominal infections prevails the Bacteroides group, particularly fragilis species, while in the skin and subcutaneous infections prevails the Peptostreptococcus group.

  10. Financial performance monitoring of the technical efficiency of critical access hospitals: a data envelopment analysis and logistic regression modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Asa B; Kerr, Bernard J; Bastian, Nathaniel D; Fulton, Lawrence V

    2012-01-01

    From 1980 to 1999, rural designated hospitals closed at a disproportionally high rate. In response to this emergent threat to healthcare access in rural settings, the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 made provisions for the creation of a new rural hospital--the critical access hospital (CAH). The conversion to CAH and the associated cost-based reimbursement scheme significantly slowed the closure rate of rural hospitals. This work investigates which methods can ensure the long-term viability of small hospitals. This article uses a two-step design to focus on a hypothesized relationship between technical efficiency of CAHs and a recently developed set of financial monitors for these entities. The goal is to identify the financial performance measures associated with efficiency. The first step uses data envelopment analysis (DEA) to differentiate efficient from inefficient facilities within a data set of 183 CAHs. Determining DEA efficiency is an a priori categorization of hospitals in the data set as efficient or inefficient. In the second step, DEA efficiency is the categorical dependent variable (efficient = 0, inefficient = 1) in the subsequent binary logistic regression (LR) model. A set of six financial monitors selected from the array of 20 measures were the LR independent variables. We use a binary LR to test the null hypothesis that recently developed CAH financial indicators had no predictive value for categorizing a CAH as efficient or inefficient, (i.e., there is no relationship between DEA efficiency and fiscal performance).

  11. The Antarctic permafrost as a testbed for REMS (Rover Environmental Monitoring Station-Mars Science Laboratory)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, B.; Ramos, M.; Sebastián, E.; Armiens, C.; Gómez-Elvira, J.; Cabos, W.; de Pablo, M. A.

    2009-04-01

    The present climatic characteristics of Mars favor the presence of extense permafrost areas in this lonely planet. Therefore environmental parameters that are included in Martian Rover missions are also used for monitoring thermal soil surface evolution in order to study the permafrost active layer thickness and the energy balance in the soil-atmosphere boundary limit layer. The REMS (Rover Environmental Monitoring Station) is an environmental station designed by the Centro de Astrobiología (CAB- Spain) with the collaboration of national and international partners (CRISA/EADS, UPC and FMI), which is part of the payload of the MSL (Mars Science Laboratory) NASA mission to Mars (http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/overview/). This mission is expected to be launched in the final months of 2009, and mainly consists of a Rover, with a complete set of scientific instruments; the Rover will carry the biggest, most advanced suite of instruments for scientific studies ever sent to the Martian surface. Five sensors compose the REMS instrument: ground (GT-REMS) and air temperatures, wind speed and direction, pressure, humidity and ultraviolet radiation (UV-REMS). A simplified setup of the REMS was deployed on Antarctica in the surroundings of the Spanish Antarctic Stations on Livingston and Deception Islands (Maritime Antarctica), where the permafrost distribution is well-known. The aim of the experiment was to check REMS's sensors response against hard environmental conditions and calibrates their measures with standard Antarctic devices. The experimental apparatuses included some standard meteorological and thermopiles sensors corresponding to the REMS. All the sensors are mounted in a 1.8 m mast and include a Pt100 air temperature sensor with shield solar protection on the mast top, a Kipp and Zonnen CNR1 net radiometer for measuring infrared (5-50 μm) and short wave solar (305-2800 nm) radiation at 1.5 m high, GT-REMS sensor and its amplification box at 0.7 m high and finally

  12. Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullins, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The challenge could be briefly seen in these terms: hospitals as places for treatment where there’s a technology focus and hospitals for healing where there’s a human focus. In the 60s - 70s wave of new hospital building, an emphasis on technology can be seen. It’s time to move from the technology...... focus. It is not enough to consider only the factors of function within architecture, hygiene, economy and logistics. We also need to look at aspects of aesthetics, bringing nature into the building, art, color, acoustics, volume and space as we perceive them. Contemporary methods and advances...... placed, accessible, provided with plenty of greenery, and maximize sensory impressions, providing sounds, smells, sight and the possibility to be touched. This is a very well documented area I can say. Hygiene, in terms of architecture can give attention to hand wash facilities and their positioning...

  13. Appropriateness of laboratory tests: requests for atypical pneumonia serology in a teaching hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jackson, L M

    2012-02-03

    The cost of providing medical care is ever-increasing but the resources available are at best static. Major savings can be made by reducing inappropriate investigations. Using serological testing for organisms causing atypical pneumonia as an example, we examined the appropriateness of requests and also physicians\\' understanding of the test. Of 119 patients tested, only 3 had titres indicative of acute infection. Most patients were tested within 2 days of hospital admission, before receipt of results excluding more likely diagnoses. Forty-five patients had no current or recent respiratory symptoms, in whom infection was highly unlikely. Titres were most often requested by the least experienced members of the clinical team. Of 70 patients with an acute illness in whom a definitive diagnosis, bacteriological or otherwise, was not made, in only 9 was a convalescent specimen sent for follow-up titres. Most requests for serology for organisms causing atypical pneumonia were inappropriate. Furthermore, in the majority of cases the test was incorrectly used.

  14. Environmental Waste Management in a School Hospital and in a Laboratory of Human Anatomy of a University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira Lusa Manfredini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The scientific and professional activities developed in a Hospital School and a Laboratory of Human Anatomy of a university can generate parallel, chemical residues from various degrees of angerousness, which may require physical treatment and / or suitable chemical, before being sent to final destination. The General Hospital (GH generates monthly 10 L of xylenes and 50 L of glutaraldehyde to provide ass instance to their patients. Already the Laboratory of Human Anatomy of University de Caxias do Sul (AL-UCS uses more than 10,000 liters for preserving corpses in tanks. The present study aims to analyze the chemical waste management of the GH and the AL-UCS and propose techniques for recovery and reuse of chemicals formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde and xylenes, minimizing the impacts generated by the use, often indispensable and sometimes questionable, of such waste. So far two sets of samples were collected (in March and April 2013 of xylene, glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde in the GH and also at the AL-UCS and it is intended to repeat the collections with monthly periodicity, in the next two semesters. Partial results show that, comparing the relationship of area and the medium areas of the chromatographic (in µV.s of patterns with compounds of interest, an increase in the percentage of formaldehyde relative to the samples in standard formalin (121.84% may be due to contamination with organic compounds with a retention time close to the compound of interest, the xylene was little degradation in the samples, indicating that this compound can be reused in the common procedures of healthcare institutions, with respect to glutaraldehyde significant degradation was observed for the compound in samples represents only 61.88% of the chromatographic peak area of the standard, therefore the reuse of these compounds may require the use of purification methods such as simple distillation and fractional distillation

  15. Clinical and laboratory features, hospital course, and outcome of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Steven C; Marshall, Gary S; Schutze, Gordon E; Woods, Charles R; Jackson, Mary Anne; Patterson, Lori E R; Jacobs, Richard F

    2007-02-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics and course of children with laboratory-diagnosed Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) and to identify clinical findings independently associated with adverse outcomes of death or discharge with neurologic deficits. Retrospective chart review of 92 patients at six institutions in the southeastern and southcentral United States from 1990 to 2002. Statistical analyses used descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression. Children with RMSF presented to study institutions after a median of 6 days of symptoms, which most commonly included fever (98%), rash (97%), nausea and/or vomiting (73%), and headache (61%); no other symptom or sign was present in >50% of children. Only 49% reported antecedent tick bites. Platelet counts were <150,000/mm3 in 59% of children, and serum sodium concentrations were <135 mEq/dL in 52%. Although 86% sought medical care before admission, only 4 patients received anti-rickettsial therapy during this time. Three patients died, and 13 survivors had neurologic deficits at discharge. Coma and need for inotropic support and intravenous fluid boluses were independently associated with adverse outcomes. Children with RMSF generally present with fever and rash. Delays in diagnosis and initiation of appropriate therapy are unacceptably common. Prognosis is guarded in those with hemodynamic instability or neurologic compromise at initiation of therapy.

  16. Intestinal and hepatic parasites determined in a university hospital parasitology laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Taş Cengiz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to present the prevalence of intestinal and hepatic parasites determined in Yüzüncü Yıl University Medical Faculty Parasitology Laboratory. Methods: The study was performed in 2008, and a total of 5985 stool samples were examined. Stool samples were examined with native-Lugol, sedimentation, flotation, trichrome staining and modified acid-fast staining methods. The stool samples of patient suspected to have Entamoeba histolytica/E.dispar infection were stained by trichrome staining method and evaluated by ELISA method for the antigen. ELISA method was used to confirm the results of Fasciola hepatica positive patients in stool examination. Results: In this study intestinal parasites were identified in 29.6% out of the 5985 people. In the study Giardia intestinalis (9.4%, plenty Blastocystis hominis (5.5%, Hymenolepis nana (1.7%, Ascaris lumbricoides (1.2%, Enterobius vermicularis (0.2%; in the stool examination, F.hepatica (0.1%, Cyclospora cayetanensis (0.1%, E.histolytica/E.dispar (0.06%, Taenia saginata (0.05%, Dicrocoelium dendriticum (0.05%, Trichuris trichiura (0.03% and Cryptosporidium spp. (0.02%, pathogenic parasites, were detected. Conclusion: In the study it is also understood that pathogenic intestinal parasites have still been reported at high rates and the problem of parasitosis continues in Van Province.

  17. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. 1982 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griggs, K.S.; Gonzalez, M.A.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    Environmental monitoring efforts spanned air, water, vegetation and foodstuffs, and radiation doses. Monitoring data collection, analysis, and evaluation are presented for air, soils, sewage, water, vegetation and foodstuffs, milk, and general environmental radioactivity. Non-radioactive monitoring addresses beryllium, chemical effluents in sewage, noise pollution, and storm runoff and liquid discharge site pollutants. Quality assurance efforts are addressed. Five appendices present tabulated data; environmental activity concentration; dose calculation method; discharge limits to sanitary sewer systems of Livermore; and sampling and analytical procedures for environmental monitoring

  18. Monitoring of patients in the Oncology department of the Clinical Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Quiroz, J.

    2010-01-01

    An important number of patients that visit the Oncology department o the Clinicas Hospital lost sight at some stage of their evolution. Our objective was to quantify the proportion of patients who are lost and describe the time spent in the service and its relationship with variables such as age, sex, origin of the patient and progress of the disease, for which we performed a descriptive observational study with an analytical component of 435 stories clinics patients with confirmed diagnosis of cancer, treated from January 2001 to December 2004, in order to have a minimum of 5 years of follow-up potential. Data were processed with Excel 2003. Patients had between 15-85 years old with a mean and median of 52 ± 14 years DS. Two hundred Seventy women and 165 were men, 232 were from the metropolitan area. The time of length of service was 0-114 months with a median of 8 and an average DS 21 months ± 27 months. As of December 2009 31 117 patients had died 36 remained in control and 282 were lost from sight. We found no relationship between age (p = 0.1) nor the state of progress of the disease at diagnosis (p = 0.21) If there were significant differences with greater probability of loss tracking men (p = 0.009) and from sites outside the metropolitan area (p = 0.04). The number of patients who are lost is very large and we must develop strategies more effective monitoring

  19. Gunite and associated tanks dry well conductivity monitoring report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, February 1998 - December 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    A waste removal program is being implemented for the Gunite and Associated Tanks Operable Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The waste is being removed by means of remotely operated, in-tank, confined sluicing equipment. During sluicing operations the dry wells adjacent to each of the tanks are instrumented so that potential releases can be detected by means external to the tank. The method of detection is by monitoring the electrical conductivity of the water in the dry well associated with each tank. This report documents the dry well conductivity monitoring data for the period from February 1998 through December 1998. The dry wells monitored during this period include DW-5, DW-6, DW-7, DW-8, DW-9 and DW-10. The conductivity of the water passing through Pump Station 1 (PS1) was also monitored. During this period the sluicing activities at Tank W-6 were initiated and successfully completed. In addition, flight mixers were used to remove wastes from Tank W-5, and sluicing operations were initiated on Tank W-7. Presented in this report are the dry well conductivity, rainfall, tank level, and other appropriate information relevant to the analysis and interpretation of the monitoring data for the reporting period. A thorough analysis of the monitoring results from the six dry wells in the STF and PS1 for the period between February 1998 and December 1998 indicates that no releases have occurred from the gunite tanks being monitored. Overall, the dry well conductivity monitoring continues to provide a robust and sensitive method for detecting potential releases from the gunite tanks and for monitoring seasonal and construction-related changes in the dry well and drain system

  20. Clinical and laboratory characteristics and associated risk factors of infants hospitalized in neonatal unit due to indirect hyperbilirubinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Hatipoğlu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate characteristicsof neonates hospitalized to Neonatal Unit dueto indirect hyperbilirubinemia and to determine risk factorsfor indirect hyperbilirubinemia.Materials and methods: Totally 222 newborns, aged≥35 weeks of gestational age and hospitalized in neonatalunit with indirect hyperbilirubinemia, were investigated.Physical examination and laboratory studies of childrenwere performed. Decision of phototherapy and exchangetransfusion was done according to total serum bilirubin(TSB level that notified in the Guidelines of AmericanAcademy of Pediatrics.Results: Study group consisted of 131 (60% male and91 (30% female newborns. No significant difference wasfound in TSB values between male and female neonates.There was 71.2% term and 19.8% late preterm newbornbabies. Babies born with spontaneous vaginal deliveryhad borderline higher TSB values compared with cesareansection deliveries (p=0.051. ABO blood group incompatibilitywas found in 30.1% and Rh incompatibilityin 6.7%. Insufficient nutrition and inadequate caloric intakewere found in 49 (22.7% of neonates, urinary tractinfection in 19 (8.5%, hypernatremic dehydration in 9(4.5% and hypothyroidism in 4 (2.0%. Exchange transfusionwas performed in 10 newborns and kernicterus occurredin two. A significant negative correlation was foundbetween TSB values at hospitalization and baby’s birth(p<0.05 and a positive correlation between initial TSBvalue and percent of patient weight loss (p<0.05.Conclusions: According to our results, the most frequentetiological causes of jaundice in newborns were ABOblood group incompatibility, insufficient nutrition and beinglate preterm. J Clin Exp Invest 2012; 3(1: 38-43

  1. Non-Invasive Optical Sensor Based Approaches for Monitoring Virus Culture to Minimize BSL3 Laboratory Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viswanath Ragupathy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available High titers of infectious viruses for vaccine and diagnostic reference panel development are made by infecting susceptible mammalian cells. Laboratory procedures are strictly performed in a Bio-Safety Level-3 (BSL3 laboratory and each entry and exit involves the use of  disposable Personnel Protective Equipment (PPE to observe cell culture conditions. Routine PPE use involves significant recurring costs. Alternative non-invasive optical sensor based approaches to remotely monitor cell culture may provide a promising and cost effective approach to monitor infectious virus cultures resulting in lower disruption and costs. We report here the monitoring of high titer cultures of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1 and Herpes Simplex Virus-2 (HSV-2 remotely with the use of optical oxygen sensors aseptically placed inside the cell culture vessel. The replacement of culture media for cell and virus propagation and virus load monitoring was effectively performed using this fluorescent sensor and resulted in half the number of visits to the BSL3 lab (five versus ten.

  2. The role of the National Metrology laboratory for the improvement for the improvement of the individual monitoring in brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, R.A.; Baptista, L.A.M.M.; Silva, T.A. da

    1998-01-01

    Since 1980, the National Laboratory for ionising Radiation Metrology- LNMRI/IRD from Brazil has given support and performed quality control tests in the services that provide individual monitoring of external radiation in the country. Although the LNMRI/IRD has promoted intercomparisons and performance tests in all Brazilian individual monitoring systems, results showed that improvements in the their quality were too small, mainly due to a lack of a national policy and legal requirements for quality control them. In 1996, the Committee for Evaluation of External Individual Monitoring Services established a national policy for accreditation of individual monitoring services. In the new policy, the role of the LNMRI/IRD is mainly to verify the compliance of any individual monitoring system to the minimum accuracy requirements for the photon dose equivalent evaluation. Additionally, the LNMRI/IRD may verify any specific type-test to verify the results stated by the service itself. A new quality control program for all accredited services is also to be maintained by the LNMRI/IRD . This work shows and discusses the results of the role of the LNMRI/IRD under the old and the new accreditation policy for the systems used for the individual monitoring of photon beams

  3. Maternal health, antenatal and at 8 weeks after delivery, in home versus in-hospital fetal monitoring in high-risk pregnancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monincx, W. M.; Birnie, E.; Zondervan, H. A.; Bleker, O. P.; Bonsel, G. J.

    2001-01-01

    To assess maternal health outcome, comparing high-risk pregnant women to either domiciliary monitoring or in-hospital monitoring, and a low risk pregnant group. Paper and pencil questionnaire, distributed antenatal and 8 weeks after the delivery. A university hospital. Three groups: 130 high-risk

  4. Field Operations Procedures Manual for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses meteorological monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Meteorological monitoring of various climatological parameters (e.g., temperature, wind speed, humidity) will be collected by instruments installed at WAG 6. Data will be recorded electronically at frequencies varying from 5-min intervals to 1-h intervals, dependent upon parameter. The data will be downloaded every 2 weeks, evaluated, compressed, and uploaded into a WAG 6 data base for subsequent use. The meteorological data will be used in water balance calculations in support of the WAG 6 hydrogeological model

  5. The Design Fabrication Installation & Evaluation of the Balance Probe Monitor for Large Centrifuges at a National Laboratory Facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, Jonathan Michael [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Balance Probe Monitors were designed, fabricated, installed, and evaluated at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the 22,600 g kg (50,000 g lb) direct drive electromotor driven large centrifuges. These centrifuges provide a high onset/decay rate g environment. The Balance Probe Monitor is physically located near a centrifuge’s Capacitance Probe, a crucial sensor for the centrifuge’s sustainability. The Balance Probe Monitor will validate operability of the centrifuge. Most importantly, it is used for triggering a kill switch under the condition that the centrifuge displacement value exceeds allowed tolerances. During operational conditions, the Capacitance Probe continuously detects the structural displacement of the centrifuge and an adjoining AccuMeasure 9000 translates this displacement into an output voltage.

  6. Computer modeling and laboratory experiments of a specific borehole to surface electrical monitoring technique (BSEMT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meekes, J.A.C.; Zhang, X.; Abdul Fattah, R.

    2011-01-01

    Geophysical monitoring of the dynamical behavior of subsurface reservoirs (oil, gas, CO2) remains an important issue in geophysical research. A new idea for reservoir monitoring based on electrical resistivity tomography was developed at TNO. The essential element of the so-called BSEMT (Borehole to

  7. Accuracy of a Wrist-Worn Wearable Device for Monitoring Heart Rates in Hospital Inpatients: A Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Ryan R; Boyd, J Gordon; Maslove, David M

    2016-09-20

    As the sensing capabilities of wearable devices improve, there is increasing interest in their application in medical settings. Capabilities such as heart rate monitoring may be useful in hospitalized patients as a means of enhancing routine monitoring or as part of an early warning system to detect clinical deterioration. To evaluate the accuracy of heart rate monitoring by a personal fitness tracker (PFT) among hospital inpatients. We conducted a prospective observational study of 50 stable patients in the intensive care unit who each completed 24 hours of heart rate monitoring using a wrist-worn PFT. Accuracy of heart rate recordings was compared with gold standard measurements derived from continuous electrocardiographic (cECG) monitoring. The accuracy of heart rates measured by pulse oximetry (Spo2.R) was also measured as a positive control. On a per-patient basis, PFT-derived heart rate values were slightly lower than those derived from cECG monitoring (average bias of -1.14 beats per minute [bpm], with limits of agreement of 24 bpm). By comparison, Spo2.R recordings produced more accurate values (average bias of +0.15 bpm, limits of agreement of 13 bpm, P<.001 as compared with PFT). Personal fitness tracker device performance was significantly better in patients in sinus rhythm than in those who were not (average bias -0.99 bpm vs -5.02 bpm, P=.02). Personal fitness tracker-derived heart rates were slightly lower than those derived from cECG monitoring in real-world testing and not as accurate as Spo2.R-derived heart rates. Performance was worse among patients who were not in sinus rhythm. Further clinical evaluation is indicated to see if PFTs can augment early warning systems in hospitals. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02527408; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02527408 (Archived by WebCite at  http://www.webcitation.org/6kOFez3on).

  8. The LLNL Multiuser Tandem Laboratory computer-controlled radiation monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homann, S.G.

    1992-01-01

    The Physics Department of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recently constructed a Multiuser Tandem Laboratory (MTL) to perform a variety of basic and applied measurement programs. The laboratory and its research equipment were constructed with support from a consortium of LLNL Divisions, Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, and the University of California. Primary design goals for the facility were inexpensive construction and operation, high beam quality at a large number of experimental stations, and versatility in adapting to new experimental needs. To accomplish these goals, our main design decisions were to place the accelerator in an unshielded structure, to make use of reconfigured cyclotrons as effective switching magnets, and to rely on computer control systems for both radiological protection and highly reproducible and well-characterized accelerator operation. This paper addresses the radiological control computer system

  9. Microbiological Standardization in Small Laboratory Animals and Recommendations for the Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Meral Karaman

    2014-01-01

    Microbiological standardization in laboratory animal breeding is based on the classification according to the microorganisms that the animals host and consequently their upbringing environment, as well as the certification of their microbiological status and the protection of their properties. Although there are many different classifications for microbiological standardization of laboratory animals, they can be basically classified as; gnotobiotic animals, animals bred with a complete barrie...

  10. Mining of hospital laboratory information systems: a model study defining age- and gender-specific reference intervals and trajectories for plasma creatinine in a pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søeby, Karen; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Werge, Thomas; Sørensen, Steen

    2015-09-01

    The knowledge of physiological fluctuation and variation of even commonly used biochemical quantities in extreme age groups and during development is sparse. This challenges the clinical interpretation and utility of laboratory tests in these age groups. To explore the utility of hospital laboratory data as a source of information, we analyzed enzymatic plasma creatinine as a model analyte in two large pediatric hospital samples. Plasma creatinine measurements from 9700 children aged 0-18 years were obtained from hospital laboratory databases and partitioned into high-resolution gender- and age-groups. Normal probability plots were used to deduce parameters of the normal distributions from healthy creatinine values in the mixed hospital datasets. Furthermore, temporal trajectories were generated from repeated measurements to examine developmental patterns in periods of changing creatinine levels. Creatinine shows great age dependence from birth throughout childhood. We computed and replicated 95% reference intervals in narrow gender and age bins and showed them to be comparable to those determined in healthy population studies. We identified pronounced transitions in creatinine levels at different time points after birth and around the early teens, which challenges the establishment and usefulness of reference intervals in those age groups. The study documents that hospital laboratory data may inform on the developmental aspects of creatinine, on periods with pronounced heterogeneity and valid reference intervals. Furthermore, part of the heterogeneity in creatinine distribution is likely due to differences in biological and chronological age of children and should be considered when using age-specific reference intervals.

  11. Evaluation of hirst-type spore trap to monitor environmental fungal load in hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Dananché

    Full Text Available The main purpose was to validate the use of outdoor-indoor volumetric impaction sampler with Hirst-type spore traps (HTSTs to continuously monitor fungal load in order to prevent invasive fungal infections during major structural work in hospital settings. For 4 weeks, outdoor fungal loads were quantified continuously by 3 HTSTs. Indoor air was sampled by both HTST and viable impaction sampler. Results were expressed as particles/m3 (HTST or colony-forming units (CFU/m3 (biocollector. Paired comparisons by day were made with Wilcoxon's paired signed-rank test or paired Student's t-test as appropriate. Paired airborne spore levels were correlated 2 by 2, after log-transformation with Pearson's cross-correlation. Concordance was calculated with kappa coefficient (κ. Median total fungal loads (TFLs sampled by the 3 outdoor HTSTs were 3,025.0, 3,287.5 and 3,625.0 particles/m3 (P = 0.6, 0.6 and 0.3.-Concordance between Aspergillaceae fungal loads (AFLs, including Aspergillus spp. + Penicillium spp. was low (κ = 0.2. A low positive correlation was found between TFLs sampled with outdoor HTST and indoor HTST with applying a 4-hour time lag, r = 0.30, 95% CI (0.23-0.43, P<0.001. In indoor air, Aspergillus spp. were detected by the viable impaction sampler on 63.1% of the samples, whereas AFLs were found by HTST-I on only 3.6% of the samples. Concordance between Aspergillus spp. loads and AFLs sampled with the 2 methods was very low (κ = 0.1. This study showed a 4-hour time lag between increase of outdoor and indoor TFLs, possibly due to insulation and aeraulic flow of the building. Outdoor HTSTs may permit to quickly identify (after 48 hours time periods with high outdoor fungal loads. An identified drawback is that a too low sample area read did not seem to enable detection of Aspergillaceae spores efficiently. Indoor HTSTs may not be recommended at this time, and outdoor HTSTs need further study. Air sampling by viable impaction sampler remains the

  12. Evaluation of hirst-type spore trap to monitor environmental fungal load in hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dananché, Cédric; Gustin, Marie-Paule; Cassier, Pierre; Loeffert, Sophie Tiphaine; Thibaudon, Michel; Bénet, Thomas; Vanhems, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose was to validate the use of outdoor-indoor volumetric impaction sampler with Hirst-type spore traps (HTSTs) to continuously monitor fungal load in order to prevent invasive fungal infections during major structural work in hospital settings. For 4 weeks, outdoor fungal loads were quantified continuously by 3 HTSTs. Indoor air was sampled by both HTST and viable impaction sampler. Results were expressed as particles/m3 (HTST) or colony-forming units (CFU)/m3 (biocollector). Paired comparisons by day were made with Wilcoxon's paired signed-rank test or paired Student's t-test as appropriate. Paired airborne spore levels were correlated 2 by 2, after log-transformation with Pearson's cross-correlation. Concordance was calculated with kappa coefficient (κ). Median total fungal loads (TFLs) sampled by the 3 outdoor HTSTs were 3,025.0, 3,287.5 and 3,625.0 particles/m3 (P = 0.6, 0.6 and 0.3).-Concordance between Aspergillaceae fungal loads (AFLs, including Aspergillus spp. + Penicillium spp.) was low (κ = 0.2). A low positive correlation was found between TFLs sampled with outdoor HTST and indoor HTST with applying a 4-hour time lag, r = 0.30, 95% CI (0.23-0.43), PHTST-I on only 3.6% of the samples. Concordance between Aspergillus spp. loads and AFLs sampled with the 2 methods was very low (κ = 0.1). This study showed a 4-hour time lag between increase of outdoor and indoor TFLs, possibly due to insulation and aeraulic flow of the building. Outdoor HTSTs may permit to quickly identify (after 48 hours) time periods with high outdoor fungal loads. An identified drawback is that a too low sample area read did not seem to enable detection of Aspergillaceae spores efficiently. Indoor HTSTs may not be recommended at this time, and outdoor HTSTs need further study. Air sampling by viable impaction sampler remains the reference tool for quantifying fungal contamination of indoor air in hospitals.

  13. Cost effectiveness analysis of clinically driven versus routine laboratory monitoring of antiretroviral therapy in Uganda and Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonieta Medina Lara

    Full Text Available Despite funding constraints for treatment programmes in Africa, the costs and economic consequences of routine laboratory monitoring for efficacy and toxicity of antiretroviral therapy (ART have rarely been evaluated.Cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted in the DART trial (ISRCTN13968779. Adults in Uganda/Zimbabwe starting ART were randomised to clinically-driven monitoring (CDM or laboratory and clinical monitoring (LCM; individual patient data on healthcare resource utilisation and outcomes were valued with primary economic costs and utilities. Total costs of first/second-line ART, routine 12-weekly CD4 and biochemistry/haematology tests, additional diagnostic investigations, clinic visits, concomitant medications and hospitalisations were considered from the public healthcare sector perspective. A Markov model was used to extrapolate costs and benefits 20 years beyond the trial.3316 (1660LCM;1656CDM symptomatic, immunosuppressed ART-naive adults (median (IQR age 37 (32,42; CD4 86 (31,139 cells/mm(3 were followed for median 4.9 years. LCM had a mean 0.112 year (41 days survival benefit at an additional mean cost of $765 [95%CI:685,845], translating into an adjusted incremental cost of $7386 [3277,dominated] per life-year gained and $7793 [4442,39179] per quality-adjusted life year gained. Routine toxicity tests were prominent cost-drivers and had no benefit. With 12-weekly CD4 monitoring from year 2 on ART, low-cost second-line ART, but without toxicity monitoring, CD4 test costs need to fall below $3.78 to become cost-effective (<3xper-capita GDP, following WHO benchmarks. CD4 monitoring at current costs as undertaken in DART was not cost-effective in the long-term.There is no rationale for routine toxicity monitoring, which did not affect outcomes and was costly. Even though beneficial, there is little justification for routine 12-weekly CD4 monitoring of ART at current test costs in low-income African countries. CD4 monitoring

  14. Biological monitoring and abatement program plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kszos, L.A.; Anderson, G.E.; Gregory, S.M.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Schilling, E.M.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Phipps, T.L.

    1997-06-01

    The overall purpose of this plan is to evaluate the receiving streams' biological communities for the duration of the permit and meet the objectives for the ORNL BMAP as outlined in the NPDES permit (Appendix). The ORNL BMAP will focus on those streams in the WOC watershed that (1) receive NPDES discharges and (2) have been identified as ecologically impacted. In response to the newly issued NPDES permit, the tasks that are included in this BMAP plan include monitoring biological communities (fish and benthic invertebrates), monitoring mercury contamination in fish and water, monitoring polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination in fish, and evaluating temperature loading from ORNL outfalls. The ORNL BMAP will evaluate the effects of sediment and oil and grease, as well as the chlorine control strategy through the use of biological community data. Monitoring will be conducted at sites in WOC, First Creek, Fifth Creek, Melton Branch, and WOL

  15. Biological monitoring and abatement program plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kszos, L.A.; Anderson, G.E.; Gregory, S.M.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Schilling, E.M.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Phipps, T.L. [CKY, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1997-06-01

    The overall purpose of this plan is to evaluate the receiving streams` biological communities for the duration of the permit and meet the objectives for the ORNL BMAP as outlined in the NPDES permit (Appendix). The ORNL BMAP will focus on those streams in the WOC watershed that (1) receive NPDES discharges and (2) have been identified as ecologically impacted. In response to the newly issued NPDES permit, the tasks that are included in this BMAP plan include monitoring biological communities (fish and benthic invertebrates), monitoring mercury contamination in fish and water, monitoring polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination in fish, and evaluating temperature loading from ORNL outfalls. The ORNL BMAP will evaluate the effects of sediment and oil and grease, as well as the chlorine control strategy through the use of biological community data. Monitoring will be conducted at sites in WOC, First Creek, Fifth Creek, Melton Branch, and WOL.

  16. Titration of Alanine Monitored by NMR Spectroscopy: A Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Francis J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The experiment described here involves simultaneous monitoring of pH and NMR chemical shifts during an aqueous titration of alpha- and beta-alanine. This experiment is designed for use in an undergraduate biochemistry course. (MR)

  17. Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) calibration and assessment of the ATR SPING-3 stack effluent monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeppen, L.D.; Rogers, J.W.; Simpson, O.D.

    1983-12-01

    An evaluation, calibration and assessment of the Eberline SPING-3 ATR stack effluent monitor was conducted. This unit which monitors particulate, iodine and noble gas effluents was producing abnormal results following the initial installation and operational testing. The purposes of this work were to find the causes of the abnormal results and correct them if possible; check the calibrations and adjust them if necessary; and to provide a better in-depth understanding of what the unit is monitoring and how well it performs under this application. Results have shown that there were some problems associated with the unit as initially installed and tested. These problems have been identified and suggested alternatives shown, the monitor was found to be applicable to some extent under the current conditions. The calibrations have been checked and adjustments made. More operation testing and evaluation is needed to assess how well this works under a variety of ATR operating conditions. 2 references, 10 figures, 3 tables

  18. Groundwater level monitoring sampling and analysis plan for the environmental monitoring plan at waste area grouping 6, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document is the Groundwater Level Monitoring Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Note that this document is referred to as a SAP even though no sampling and analysis will be conducted. The term SAP is used for consistency. The procedures described herein are part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for WAG 6, which also includes monitoring tasks for seeps and springs, groundwater quality, surface water, and meteorological parameters. Separate SAPs are being issued concurrently to describe each of these monitoring programs. This SAP has been written for the use of the field personnel responsible for implementation of the EMP, with the intent that the field personnel will be able to take these documents to the field and quickly find the appropriate steps required to complete a specific task. In many cases, Field Operations Procedures (FOPs) will define the steps required for an activity. The FOPs for the EMP are referenced and briefly described in the relevant sections of the SAPs, and are contained within the FOP Manual. Both these documents (the SAP and the FOP Manual) will be available to personnel in the field.

  19. Groundwater level monitoring sampling and analysis plan for the environmental monitoring plan at waste area grouping 6, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document is the Groundwater Level Monitoring Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Note that this document is referred to as a SAP even though no sampling and analysis will be conducted. The term SAP is used for consistency. The procedures described herein are part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for WAG 6, which also includes monitoring tasks for seeps and springs, groundwater quality, surface water, and meteorological parameters. Separate SAPs are being issued concurrently to describe each of these monitoring programs. This SAP has been written for the use of the field personnel responsible for implementation of the EMP, with the intent that the field personnel will be able to take these documents to the field and quickly find the appropriate steps required to complete a specific task. In many cases, Field Operations Procedures (FOPs) will define the steps required for an activity. The FOPs for the EMP are referenced and briefly described in the relevant sections of the SAPs, and are contained within the FOP Manual. Both these documents (the SAP and the FOP Manual) will be available to personnel in the field

  20. Review of EMR monitoring systems developed by the Mobile Radiocommunications Laboratory, National technical University of Athens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popescu Ileana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present fully automated systems that monitors on a real time basis the non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation emitted by wireless networks. The presented radio monitoring systems aim to perform repetitive and reliable measurements by using a well-defined measurement algorithm as well as high quality calibrated equipment and to inform the public - using the widespread web technologies - about the levels of the electromagnetic radiation emitted by any wireless telecommunication system.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories California Environmental Monitoring Program Annual Report for Calendar Year 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Robert C.

    2006-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Environmental Monitoring Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2005 Update program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  2. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Monitoring Program annual report for 2011.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Robert C.

    2011-03-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/California Environmental Monitoring Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/California Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2010 program report describes the activities undertaken during the previous year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/California.

  3. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Huston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Kitchings, J.T.; Olsen, C.R.

    1991-09-01

    On April 1, 1986, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (EPA 1986). As specified in Part 3: Special Conditions (Item H) of the permit, a plan for biological monitoring of the Clinch River, White Oak Creek (WOC), Northwest Tributary (NWT) of WOC, Melton Branch (MB), Fifth Creek, and First Creek shall be submitted for approval to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) within 90 days of the effective date of the permit. The plan, which is referred to in Part 3 (H) of the permit as the Biological Monitoring Plan and Abatement Program (BMPAP), describes characterization monitoring studies to be conducted for the duration of the permit (5 years). In order to be consistent with the terminology used for the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Programs for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plan and the Oak Ridge K-25 Plant, BMPAP will subsequently be referred to as the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP). The proposed BMAP outlined in this document is based on preliminary discussions held on December 9, 1985, between staff of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (ORNL and Central Management), the US Department of Energy (DOE), EPA, and TDHE. 232 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Huston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Kitchings, J.T.; Olsen, C.R.

    1991-09-01

    On April 1, 1986, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (EPA 1986). As specified in Part 3: Special Conditions (Item H) of the permit, a plan for biological monitoring of the Clinch River, White Oak Creek (WOC), Northwest Tributary (NWT) of WOC, Melton Branch (MB), Fifth Creek, and First Creek shall be submitted for approval to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) within 90 days of the effective date of the permit. The plan, which is referred to in Part 3 (H) of the permit as the Biological Monitoring Plan and Abatement Program (BMPAP), describes characterization monitoring studies to be conducted for the duration of the permit (5 years). In order to be consistent with the terminology used for the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Programs for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plan and the Oak Ridge K-25 Plant, BMPAP will subsequently be referred to as the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP). The proposed BMAP outlined in this document is based on preliminary discussions held on December 9, 1985, between staff of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (ORNL and Central Management), the US Department of Energy (DOE), EPA, and TDHE. 232 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs

  5. Clinical usefulness of therapeutic drug monitoring of voriconazole in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral-Galeano, Evelyn; Ruiz-Camps, Isabel; Len-Abad, Oscar; Pou-Clavé, Leonor; Sordé-Masip, Roger; Meije-Castillo, Yolanda; Blanco-Grau, Albert; Barba-Suñol, Pere; Monforte-Torres, Victor; Román-Broto, Antonio; Pahissa-Berga, Albert; Gavaldà-Santapau, Joan

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical usefulness of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of voriconazole (VOR) in a university hospital. A retrospective review was conducted on the clinical records of 52 patients treated with VOR and on whom TDM was performed. Steady-state trough plasma VOR concentration was measured at least 5 days after starting treatment. The therapeutic range of plasma VOR concentration was defined as 1-5.5μg/mL. The most frequent underlying conditions in the study population were lung transplant (48.1%) and hematological malignancies (26.9%). At the first TDM in each patient, VOR levels were outside the therapeutic range in 16 (30.7%) cases: 5.5μg/mL in 6 (11.5%). Eleven patients (21.2%) experienced severe muscle weakness and had considerable difficulty walking. All these patients were receiving concomitant treatment with corticosteroids. Age younger than 30 years (p=.005) and cystic fibrosis as the underlying disease (p=.04) were factors associated with low VOR levels. Almost all patients who had VOR concentrations >1μg/mL at the first TDM had a successful outcome (96%). Plasma VOR concentrations were outside the therapeutic range at the first TDM in 30% (16/52) of patients. Age younger than 30 years and cystic fibrosis were factors associated with low VOR levels. The potential interactions between corticosteroids and VOR should be highlighted, as they could be responsible for a high rate of muscle weakness observed in our patients. Prospective trials are needed to investigate VOR TDM and corticosteroid pharmacokinetics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  6. The laboratory-type data input and processing subsystem of the country-wide environmental radiation monitoring system in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanyar, B.; Fulop, N.; Glavatszkih, N.; Nemeth, A.

    1996-01-01

    The countrywide radiation monitoring activity in Hungary is shared among the national networks as agriculture, environmental protection and public health ones. They are mostly involved in the environmental sampling and laboratory type determinations of the radioactive pollution, meanwhile the organisations mainly from the Army and Civil Defence are responsible to the early warning system. A moderately effective collaboration is established only around the Nuclear Power Plant Paks. Based on more than 10 years experience in collaboration around the NPP the Hungarian Atomic Energy Commission initiated some centralism in the countrywide monitoring activity as well. As the first step the National Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene has been charged to establish an Information Center for laboratory-type data collection, processing, analysis and informing regularly the proper organizations on the results. The Information Centre is equipped with a computer type of SUN SPARCserver-20 and the laboratories are planned to be linked on line by PC stations. The main user programs for data collection, control and restricted processing are written in INGRES data manager software. The semiprocessed results can be transformed in a readable form for general statistical etc. packages

  7. A review of the probabilistic safety assessment of the Radiation Monitor Calibration Laboratory of the Almirante Alvaro Alberto Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Erica Cupertino

    2005-03-01

    The main purpose of this work is to update the PSA study of the Radiation Monitor Calibration Laboratory of the Almirante Alvaro Alberto Power Station taking into account new information. It is considered in this study an evaluation of the human reliability analysis in the calibration procedure of the radiation monitors, and for such the THERP modeling is used, as well as the use of the Bayesian approach for the calculation of the equipment failure probabilities used by the operators. Some accident scenarios of external origin were incorporated for evaluating their importance for an accident that might expose a worker to gamma radiation. A catastrophic failure is analyzed in the diesel generators 3 and 4, whose building is nearby the laboratory, as well as the route of change and the transportation of the steam generator of the nuclear power plant since the laboratory is located in the plant controlled area. Although more accidents scenarios are considered in this work, a conservative approach was not used and thus a smaller radiological risk was obtained. (author)

  8. A monitor for the laboratory evaluation of control integrity in digital control systems operating in harsh electromagnetic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcastro, Celeste M.; Fischl, Robert; Kam, Moshe

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a strategy for dynamically monitoring digital controllers in the laboratory for susceptibility to electromagnetic disturbances that compromise control integrity. The integrity of digital control systems operating in harsh electromagnetic environments can be compromised by upsets caused by induced transient electrical signals. Digital system upset is a functional error mode that involves no component damage, can occur simultaneously in all channels of a redundant control computer, and is software dependent. The motivation for this work is the need to develop tools and techniques that can be used in the laboratory to validate and/or certify critical aircraft controllers operating in electromagnetically adverse environments that result from lightning, high-intensity radiated fields (HIRF), and nuclear electromagnetic pulses (NEMP). The detection strategy presented in this paper provides dynamic monitoring of a given control computer for degraded functional integrity resulting from redundancy management errors, control calculation errors, and control correctness/effectiveness errors. In particular, this paper discusses the use of Kalman filtering, data fusion, and statistical decision theory in monitoring a given digital controller for control calculation errors.

  9. GAAT dry well conductivity monitoring report, July 1997 through January 1998, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    A waste removal program is being implemented for the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Operable Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The waste is being removed by means of remotely operated, in-tank, confined sluicing equipment. The waste removal operations in Tanks W-3 and W-4 in the North Tank Farm (NTF) have been completed and the equipment is being moved to the South Tank Farm (STF), where it will be used to remove the sludges from the six STF tanks (W-5, W-6, W-7, W-8, W-9, and W-10) beginning later this year. During sluicing operations the dry wells adjacent to each of the tanks are instrumented so that potential releases can be detected by means external to the tank. The method of detection is by monitoring the electrical conductivity of the water in the dry well associated with each tank. This report documents the dry well conductivity monitoring data for the period from July 1997 through January 1998. The dry wells monitored during this period include DW-3, DW-4, DW-8, DW-9, and DW-10. The conductivity of the water passing through Pump Station 1 (PS 1) was also monitored. The principal activities that occurred during this period were the sluicing of Tanks W-3 and W-4 in the NTF, transfer of tank liquids from the NTF to the STF, and the installation of new risers, tank dome leveling, and emplacement of stabilized base backfill in the STF. Presented in this report are the dry well conductivity, rainfall, tank level, and STF construction information that is relevant to the analysis and interpretation of the monitoring data for the reporting period. A thorough analysis of the monitoring results for the period indicates that no releases have occurred from the gunite tanks being monitored

  10. Laboratory surveillance of influenza-like illness in seven teaching hospitals, South Korea: 2011-2012 season.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Yun Noh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A well-constructed and properly operating influenza surveillance scheme is essential for public health. This study was conducted to evaluate the distribution of respiratory viruses in patients with influenza-like illness (ILI through the first teaching hospital-based surveillance scheme for ILI in South Korea. METHODS: Respiratory specimens were obtained from adult patients (≥18 years who visited the emergency department (ED with ILI from week 40, 2011 to week 22, 2012. Multiplex PCR was performed to detect respiratory viruses: influenza virus, adenovirus, coronavirus, respiratory syncytial virus, rhinovirus, human metapneumovirus, parainfluenza virus, bocavirus, and enterovirus. RESULTS: Among 1,983 patients who visited the ED with ILI, 811 (40.9% were male. The median age of patients was 43 years. Influenza vaccination rate was 21.7% (430/1,983 during the 2011-2012 season. At least one comorbidity was found in 18% of patients. The positive rate of respiratory viruses was 52.1% (1,033/1,983 and the total number of detected viruses was 1,100. Influenza A virus was the dominant agent (677, 61.5% in all age groups. The prevalence of human metapneumovirus was higher in patients more than 50 years old, while adenovirus was detected only in younger adults. In 58 (5.6% cases, two or more respiratory viruses were detected. The co-incidence case was identified more frequently in patients with hematologic malignancy or organ transplantation recipients, however it was not related to clinical outcomes. CONCLUSION: This study is valuable as the first extensive laboratory surveillance of the epidemiology of respiratory viruses in ILI patients through a teaching hospital-based influenza surveillance system in South Korea.

  11. Clinical and laboratory profile of dengue fever patients admitted in combined military hospital rawalpindi in year 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, M. M. U.; Zakaria, M.; Mustafvi, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the pattern of clinical presentations, haematological and biochemical abnormalities, and outcome of dengue fever patients admitted in Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Rawalpindi in year 2015. Study Design: A descriptive cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Medicine, CMH Rawalpindi, from January 2015 to December 2015. Material and Methods: Patients meeting the inclusion criteria were admitted at CMH Rawalpindi and blood serology was done to confirm the diagnosis of dengue fever. Cases with positive dengue serology were included in the study. Clinical symptoms, signs, investigations and outcome of these patients were recorded on a proforma. Blood samples were taken for analysis. Chest X-Ray and ultrasound abdomen were done on required basis. Results: Out of forty confirmed cases of dengue fever, there were 25 (62.5 percent) males and 15 (37.5 percent) females. Mean age was 40 years. There were 39 cases (97.5 percent) of dengue fever and one case (2.5 percent) of dengue shock syndrome.There was no case of dengue haemorrhagic syndrome. Maximum cases were seen in the month of October 2015.The clinical features noted were: headache and myalgias 62.5 percent, chills and rigors 57.5 percent, retro-orbital pain 42.5 percent, vomiting 35.0 percent, pruritus 27 percent, skin rash 20 percent, abdominal pain 20 percent, diarrhoea 10 percent, bleeding 2.5 percent, ascites and pleural effusion 2.5 percent, and hepatomegaly 15 percent. The laboratory findings were: leucopenia 85 percent and thrombocytopenia 92.5 percent. Serum alanine transaminase (ALT), urea, and creatinine were raised in 30 percent, 2.5 percent and 7.5 percent cases respectively. Mortality was 2.5 percent. Conclusion: This study showed that patients admitted to CMH hospital had a milder presentation of dengue fever in the year 2015. (author)

  12. Monitoring the impact of the DRG payment system on nursing service context factors in Swiss acute care hospitals: Study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirig, Rebecca; Spichiger, Elisabeth; Martin, Jacqueline S.; Frei, Irena Anna; Müller, Marianne; Kleinknecht, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Aims: With this study protocol, a research program is introduced. Its overall aim is to prepare the instruments and to conduct the first monitoring of nursing service context factors at three university and two cantonal hospitals in Switzerland prior to the introduction of the reimbursement system based on Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG) and to further develop a theoretical model as well as a methodology for future monitoring following the introduction of DRGs. Background: DRG was introduced to all acute care hospitals in Switzerland in 2012. In other countries, DRG introduction led to rationing and subsequently to a reduction in nursing care. As result, nursing-sensitive patient outcomes were seriously jeopardised. Switzerland has the opportunity to learn from the consequences experienced by other countries when they introduced DRGs. Their experiences highlight that DRGs influence nursing service context factors such as complexity of nursing care or leadership, which in turn influence nursing-sensitive patient outcomes. For this reason, the monitoring of nursing service context factors needs to be an integral part of the introduction of DRGs. However, most acute care hospitals in Switzerland do not monitor nursing service context data. Nursing managers and hospital executive boards will be in need of this data in the future, in order to distribute resources effectively. Methods/Design: A mixed methods design in the form of a sequential explanatory strategy was chosen. During the preparation phase, starting in spring 2011, instruments were selected and prepared, and the access to patient and nursing data in the hospitals was organized. Following this, online collection of quantitative data was conducted in fall 2011. In summer 2012, qualitative data was gathered using focus group interviews, which helped to describe the processes in more detail. During 2013 and 2014, an integration process is being conducted involving complementing, comparing and contrasting

  13. Monitoring the impact of the DRG payment system on nursing service context factors in Swiss acute care hospitals: Study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirig, Rebecca; Spichiger, Elisabeth; Martin, Jacqueline S; Frei, Irena Anna; Müller, Marianne; Kleinknecht, Michael

    2014-01-01

    With this study protocol, a research program is introduced. Its overall aim is to prepare the instruments and to conduct the first monitoring of nursing service context factors at three university and two cantonal hospitals in Switzerland prior to the introduction of the reimbursement system based on Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG) and to further develop a theoretical model as well as a methodology for future monitoring following the introduction of DRGs. DRG was introduced to all acute care hospitals in Switzerland in 2012. In other countries, DRG introduction led to rationing and subsequently to a reduction in nursing care. As result, nursing-sensitive patient outcomes were seriously jeopardised. Switzerland has the opportunity to learn from the consequences experienced by other countries when they introduced DRGs. Their experiences highlight that DRGs influence nursing service context factors such as complexity of nursing care or leadership, which in turn influence nursing-sensitive patient outcomes. For this reason, the monitoring of nursing service context factors needs to be an integral part of the introduction of DRGs. However, most acute care hospitals in Switzerland do not monitor nursing service context data. Nursing managers and hospital executive boards will be in need of this data in the future, in order to distribute resources effectively. A mixed methods design in the form of a sequential explanatory strategy was chosen. During the preparation phase, starting in spring 2011, instruments were selected and prepared, and the access to patient and nursing data in the hospitals was organized. Following this, online collection of quantitative data was conducted in fall 2011. In summer 2012, qualitative data was gathered using focus group interviews, which helped to describe the processes in more detail. During 2013 and 2014, an integration process is being conducted involving complementing, comparing and contrasting quantitative and qualitative findings

  14. Measuring hospital-acquired pressure injuries: A surveillance programme for monitoring performance improvement and estimating annual prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jull, Andrew; McCall, Elaine; Chappell, Matt; Tobin, Sam

    2016-06-01

    To describe a surveillance approach for monitoring the effect of improvement initiatives on hospital-acquired pressure injuries and findings arising from that surveillance. Random sampling of patients on the same day of each successive month from a campus of child and adult hospitals using a standard audit tool to identify presence of hospital-acquired pressure injury. Where multiple pressure injuries were present, the most severe grade injury contributed to prevalence. Statistical process control charts were used to monitor monthly performance and Maximum Likelihood Estimation to determine timing of step change. 8274 patients were assessed over 3 years from an eligible population of 32,259 hospitalised patients. 517 patients had hospital-acquired pressure injuries giving an overall prevalence of 6.2% (95% CI 5.7-6.8%). Annual prevalence was 8.4% (95% CI 7.4-9.5%) in the first year, falling to 5.6% (95% CI 4.7-6.4%) in the second year and 4.8% (95% CI 4.0-5.6%) in the third year. A step change was signalled with mean prevalence up to July 2013 being 7.9% (95% CI 7.1-8.8%) and mean prevalence thereafter 4.8% (95% CI 4.2-5.4%). Hospital-acquired pressure injuries were found in all age ranges, but were more frequent in children up to 14 years (17.4%) and those aged 75 years or older (38.7%). Monthly random sampling of patients within clinical units can be used to monitor performance improvement. This approach represents a rational alternative to cross-sectional prevalence surveys especially if the focus is on performance improvement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 1984 Environmental monitoring program report for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoff, D.L.; Chew, E.W.; Dickson, R.L.

    1985-05-01

    The results of the various monitoring programs for 1984 indicated that radioactivity from INEL Site operations could not be distinguished from worldwide fallout and natural radioactivity in the region surrounding the Site. Although some radioactive materials were discharged during Site operations, concentrations and doses to the surrounding population were of no health consequence and were far less than State of Idaho and federal health protection guidelines. This report describes the air, water, and foodstuff samples routinely collected at the INEL boundary locations and at locations distant from the INEL Site; and it compares and evaluates the sample results, discussing implications, if any. The report also summarizes significant environmental activities at the INEL Site during 1984, nonradioactive and radioactive effluent monitoring at the Site, and the US Geological Survey (USGS) groundwater monitoring program. 28 refs., 13 figs., 22 tabs

  16. Operation the laboratory for NBC protection and bio monitoring in the case of terrorist attack with NBC weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tusek, D.; Vucemilovic, A; Klobucar, J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop efficacy of Operation the Laboratory for NBC protection and Bio monitoring in the case of terrorist attack with chemical weapons. When is necessary quickly, adeptly Operation and unambiguous confirmation about use chemical warfare agent, the Laboratory must be ready and qualified for reaction. The Laboratory had to develop capability for the timely sampling and unambiguous identification chemical warfare agents in a battlefield or in case of the terrorist attack. The need for quality sample collection and analyses is critical to verify use of chemical weapon (CW) by an enemy or terrorists. Collection, packaging, transport and analysis of samples must be carried out on proper way and quickly enough for military, medical or political purposes. Precise records must accompany each sample but these records must not contaminate samples anyway. All sampling team personnel have to be equipped with appropriate equipment and qualified in its handling. After arriving samples at our Laboratory, we will handle with them on standard procedures; carry out preparation such as Headspace, Liquid/liquid extraction, Solid phase extraction, Liquid/solid extraction, concentration and derivatization. After that we will analyze samples by gas-chromatography mass-spectrometry (GC/MS) method.(author)

  17. Frost damage of bricks composing a railway tunnel monument in Central Japan: field monitoring and laboratory simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomachot, C.; Matsuoka, N.; Kuchitsu, N.; Morii, M.

    2005-07-01

    Bricks of tunnels and bridges of Usui Pass railway (Japan) exposed to north are subject to frost damage. Average depth of erosion due to detachment of angular blocks is around 1-1.5 cm. In order to assess this weathering and to understand its mechanism, an experimental study was carried out in the field and laboratory. Field monitoring showed the combination of seasonal and diurnal freezing with a maximum of heave when the freezing front reached 5 cm depth. Bricks taken from the site were submitted to unidirectional freezing at capillary and vacuum saturation in the laboratory. Results showed that frost damage of bricks was favoured by high saturation level and repetition of freeze-thaw cycles.

  18. Frost damage of bricks composing a railway tunnel monument in Central Japan: field monitoring and laboratory simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Thomachot

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Bricks of tunnels and bridges of Usui Pass railway (Japan exposed to north are subject to frost damage. Average depth of erosion due to detachment of angular blocks is around 1-1.5 cm. In order to assess this weathering and to understand its mechanism, an experimental study was carried out in the field and laboratory. Field monitoring showed the combination of seasonal and diurnal freezing with a maximum of heave when the freezing front reached 5 cm depth. Bricks taken from the site were submitted to unidirectional freezing at capillary and vacuum saturation in the laboratory. Results showed that frost damage of bricks was favoured by high saturation level and repetition of freeze-thaw cycles.

  19. Evaluation of performance of electronic dosimeters for individual monitoring: tests in laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzon, W.J.; Khoury, H.J.; Barros, V.S.M. de; Medeiros, R.B.

    2015-01-01

    Electronic dosimeters based on direct ion storage technology are being widely used in many countries for individual monitoring in many applications of ionizing radiation. However, their use as routine dosimeter has been established in a few countries due to lack of accreditation or intercomparison programs. The objective of this study is to evaluate the performance of two direct íon storage dosimeters model available in the international market: the Miriom-Instadose-1 and RADOS DIS-1 to be eventually accepted for individual monitoring in Brazil. (author)

  20. System of Monitoring Potential Deceased Organ Donations in Over 200 Hospitals in Poland Using a Web Tool: Implementation and Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danek, T; Protasiuk, R; Mańkowski, M; Brutkiewicz, A; Trześniewski, R; Podlińska, I; Milecka, A; Jonas, M; Danielewicz, R; Czerwiński, J

    2016-06-01

    In 2010 the formation of the Polish Hospitals Network of Organ Donation Coordinators, originated by Poltransplant, began. One of the goals of this project is to report all deaths in hospital ICUs in which a coordinator is posted. The aim of this strategy is to monitor donation potential, following the recruitment process of potential donors and indicating stages of that process that may be improved to increase effective recruitment. Until the end of 2014 all data were forwarded to Poltransplant as Excel files, but since January 1, 2015, reporting and data collection have been are performed using web tool www.koordynator.net. The aim of the paper is to present the essentials in functioning principles, structure, and usage of the www.koordynator.net system, its technical construction, and to display good practices (know-how) tested by 1 country, for countries such as Poland, that contend with organ insufficiency. The application www.koordynator.net allows for remote addition of individual records with information about deceased patients in hospital ICUs, the forwarding of data about potential and actual organ donors, the generation of complete reports about deceased patients in each hospital monthly, and the introduction of historical data. Introduction of a potential donation monitoring system in 209 hospitals with transplant coordinators increases the number of identified potential and effective actual donors due to self-assessment analysis. Eventually, the www.koordynator.net reporting system allowed for external evaluation by coordinators from other hospitals, regional coordinators, and Poltransplant. The system is a modern tool that improves and increases the quality system in the organ donation field (quality assurance program). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 3Q/4Q98 Annual M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility Groundwater Monitoring and Correction-Action Report, Volumes I, II, and III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, J.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 1998

  2. Assessing interactions among multiple physiological systems during walking outside a laboratory: An Android based gait monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejdić, E.; Millecamps, A.; Teoli, J.; Rothfuss, M. A.; Franconi, N. G.; Perera, S.; Jones, A. K.; Brach, J. S.; Mickle, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Gait function is traditionally assessed using well-lit, unobstructed walkways with minimal distractions. In patients with subclinical physiological abnormalities, these conditions may not provide enough stress on their ability to adapt to walking. The introduction of challenging walking conditions in gait can induce responses in physiological systems in addition to the locomotor system. There is a need for a device that is capable of monitoring multiple physiological systems in various walking conditions. To address this need, an Android-based gait-monitoring device was developed that enabled the recording of a patient's physiological systems during walking. The gait-monitoring device was tested during self-regulated overground walking sessions of fifteen healthy subjects that included 6 females and 9 males aged 18 to 35 years. The gait-monitoring device measures the patient's stride interval, acceleration, electrocardiogram, skin conductance and respiratory rate. The data is stored on an Android phone and is analyzed offline through the extraction of features in the time, frequency and time-frequency domains. The analysis of the data depicted multisystem physiological interactions during overground walking in healthy subjects. These interactions included locomotion-electrodermal, locomotion-respiratory and cardiolocomotion couplings. The current results depicting strong interactions between the locomotion system and the other considered systems (i.e., electrodermal, respiratory and cardivascular systems) warrant further investigation into multisystem interactions during walking, particularly in challenging walking conditions with older adults. PMID:26390946

  3. Clinical presentation of terbinafine-induced severe liver injury and the value of laboratory monitoring: a Critically Appraised Topic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, O N; Albrecht, J

    2017-11-01

    Many physicians monitor liver function tests during terbinafine therapy. To evaluate the symptoms of published cases of terbinafine-associated severe drug-induced liver injury (DILI) to assess the utility of laboratory monitoring. We based our search on the LiverTox database of the National Institutes of Health, but we also searched both PubMed and Embase. In addition, we hand searched the references of the papers we found. All reports of patients with DILI on terbinafine and with reported clinical symptoms, or absence thereof, were evaluated. Two independent reviewers (J.A. and O.N.K.) assessed articles for eligibility of inclusion, and collected and evaluated the data. Thirty-eight papers fulfilled the inclusion criteria, with reports of 69 symptomatic patients. The mean duration of terbinafine treatment until onset of symptoms was 30·2 days (range 5-84). Symptoms in order of frequency were jaundice, flu-like symptoms, dark urine and pruritus. Patients experienced symptoms for a mean and median of 14·8 and 16 days, respectively (range 0-42) until seeking medical attention. Patients who had DILI were symptomatic, usually with jaundice, abdominal pain and general malaise, but also with severe pruritus. No asymptomatic patient was identified through laboratory screening. The timeline of DILI onset varies significantly, but most cases occur between 4 and 6 weeks. There was no time point at which monitoring was meaningful, and we do not recommend monitoring of liver function tests on terbinafine; however, patients should be advised to discontinue treatment and look for medical care when symptoms of DILI occur. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  4. Monitoring plan for long-term environmental measurements at the proposed Douglas Point Ecological Laboratory, Nanjemoy, Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, B.L.; Miles, K.J.; Strass, P.K.; McDonald, B.S.; Nugent, A.

    1979-01-01

    The Douglas Point Ecological Laboratory has been set up at the site of a proposed power plant, which is to be powered by either nuclear, coal, or an alternate form of fuel. A plan for long-range monitoring of terrestrial ecosystems and atmospheric chemistry is presented. A site characterization study will be made initially. Chemical and physical soil profiles will be established with continuous measurement of soil moisture and nutrient content, as well as other parameters. Data sets will be established, reflecting changes in rainfall pH and rate of deposition through precipitation and dryfall sedimentation of Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , K + , Na + , SO 4 3- , Cl - , NH 4 + , and NO 3 - . Among other objectives are the development of new monitoring techniques that can be used to trace energy flow, nutrient transport, and radionuclide transport through all trophic levels to selected carnivores. The atmospheric monitoring plan is outlined as to system design and specifications; system installation, operation, and maintenance, data processing and reports; quality assurance program; and project organization. A discussion of administrative and operational monitoring costs is included

  5. A Laboratory Experimental Study: An FBG-PVC Tube Integrated Device for Monitoring the Slip Surface of Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaojie; Chen, Jiang; Teng, Pengxiao; Wei, Fangqiang; Chen, Qiao

    2017-01-01

    A new detection device was designed by integrating fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tube in order to monitor the slip surface of a landslide. Using this new FBG-based device, a corresponding slope model with a pre-set slip surface was designed, and seven tests with different soil properties were carried out in laboratory conditions. The FBG sensing fibers were fixed on the PVC tube to measure strain distributions of PVC tube at different elevation. Test results indicated that the PVC tube could keep deformation compatible with soil mass. The new device was able to monitor slip surface location before sliding occurrence, and the location of monitored slip surface was about 1–2 cm above the pre-set slip surface, which basically agreed with presupposition results. The monitoring results are expected to be used to pre-estimate landslide volume and provide a beneficial option for evaluating the potential impact of landslides on shipping safety in the Three Gorges area. PMID:29084157

  6. Analysis of bias in measurements of potassium, sodium and hemoglobin by an emergency department-based blood gas analyzer relative to hospital laboratory autoanalyzer results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Bo Zhang

    Full Text Available The emergency departments (EDs of Chinese hospitals are gradually being equipped with blood gas machines. These machines, along with the measurement of biochemical markers by the hospital laboratory, facilitate the care of patients with severe conditions who present to the ED. However, discrepancies have been noted between the Arterial Blood Gas (ABG analyzers in the ED and the hospital laboratory autoanalyzer in relation to electrolyte and hemoglobin measurements. The present study was performed to determine whether the ABG and laboratory measurements of potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin levels are equivalent, and whether ABG analyzer results can be used to guide clinical care before the laboratory results become available.Study power analyses revealed that 200 consecutive patients who presented to our ED would allow this prospective single-center cohort study to detect significant differences between ABG- and laboratory-measured potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin levels. Paired arterial and venous blood samples were collected within 30 minutes. Arterial blood samples were measured in the ED by an ABL 90 FLEX blood gas analyzer. The biochemistry and blood cell counts of the venous samples were measured in the hospital laboratory. The potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin concentrations obtained by both methods were compared by using paired Student's t-test, Spearman's correlation, Bland-Altman plots, and Deming regression.The mean ABG and laboratory potassium values were 3.77±0.44 and 4.2±0.55, respectively (P<0.0001. The mean ABG and laboratory sodium values were 137.89±5.44 and 140.93±5.50, respectively (P<0.0001. The mean ABG and laboratory Hemoglobin values were 12.28±2.62 and 12.35±2.60, respectively (P = 0.24.Although there are the statistical difference and acceptable biases between ABG- and laboratory-measured potassium and sodium, the biases do not exceed USCLIA-determined limits. In parallel, there are no statistical differences and

  7. Fifty-five years (1955-2010) of the Coagulation Section at Laboratory of Hematology, Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital, and its founder, hematologist Ljubomir Popović.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancić, Vladimir; Stancić, Nevenka; Vucelić, Vesna; Lang, Nada; Grbac, Ljiljana

    2011-09-01

    The Coagulation Section at Laboratory of Hematology, Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital, Zagreb, was founded in 1955 by Ljubomir Popović, hematologist and assistant at School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, in cooperation with hard-working laboratory technicians. Apart from papers on hematologic neoplasms, plasmacytoma and lymphoma, Ljubomir Popović published a number of papers in the field of anticoagulant therapy with heparin and oral anticoagulants, some of which are also in use today. After Ljubomir Popović left the Hospital in 1964, the Laboratory was run by Professor Nedjeljko Milić, head of the newly founded Division of Hematology. In 1968, the management of the Laboratory of Hematology was taken over by Biserka Raić, MS, medical biochemist, until her retirement in 2007. Great development in morphological and cytometric studies of blood and blood cells has been paralleled by continuous progress and almost dominating activities in the diagnosis of hemostasis disorders. In the 1970s, Marko Koprcina, hematologist, and Biserka Raić introduced the then latest tests in practice at all Hospital departments. In that golden age of the Coagulation Section, M. Koprcina, B. Raić and their associates transferred their knowledge to all colleagues in the Hospital. Through that collaboration, high standards in the diagnosis of hemostasis disorders were achieved, from which the currently high level of clinical knowledge about coagulation disorders and their treatment has derived, making Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital one of the leading hospitals in this field in the country. By describing development of the Coagulation Section and the life of its founder Ljubomir Popović, the authors tried to provide an answer to the following question: can today's clinicians still have a deciding role in laboratory development, considering that assessments of different phenomena are always initiated by an interested clinician who is trying to interpret and understand

  8. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, Hollie Kae [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Holmer, Marie Pilkington [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Olson, Christina Liegh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pace, Brenda Ringe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year (FY) 2016. Overall monitoring included surveillance of the following 23 individual cultural resource localities: two locations with human remains, one of which is also a cave; seven additional caves; six prehistoric archaeological sites; four historic archaeological sites; one historic trail; Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I), a National Historic Landmark; Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion (ANP) objects located at EBR-I; and one Arco Naval Proving Ground (NPG) property, CF-633 and related objects and structures. Several INL work processes and projects were also monitored to confirm compliance with original INL CRM recommendations and assess the effects of ongoing work. On one occasion, ground disturbing activities within the boundaries of the Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (CITRC) were observed by INL CRM staff prepared to respond to any additional finds of Native American human remains. Additionally, the CRM office was notified during two Trespass Investigations conducted by INL Security. Most of the cultural resources monitored in FY 2016 exhibited no adverse impacts, resulting in Type 1 impact assessments. However, Type 2 impacts were noted five times. Three previously reported Type 2 impacts were once again documented at the EBR-I National Historic Landmark, including spalling and deterioration of bricks due to inadequate drainage, minimal maintenance, and rodent infestation. The ANP engines and locomotive on display at the EBR-I Visitors Center also exhibited impacts related to long term exposure. Finally, most of the Arco NPG properties monitored at Central Facilities Area exhibited problems with lack of timely and appropriate maintenance as well as inadequate drainage. No new Type 3 or Type 4 impacts that adversely affected significant cultural resources and threatened National

  9. Microseismicity of an Unstable Rock Mass: From Field Monitoring to Laboratory Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombero, C.; Comina, C.; Vinciguerra, S.; Benson, P. M.

    2018-02-01

    The field-scale microseismic (MS) activity of an unstable rock mass is known to be an important tool to assess damage and cracking processes eventually leading to macroscopic failures. However, MS-event rates alone may not be enough for a complete understanding of the trigger mechanisms of mechanical instabilities. Acoustic Emission (AE) techniques at the laboratory scale can be used to provide complementary information. In this study, we report a MS/AE comparison to assess the stability of a granitic rock mass in the northwestern Italian Alps (Madonna del Sasso). An attempt to bridge the gap between the two different scales of observation, and the different site and laboratory conditions, is undertaken to gain insights on the rock mass behavior as a function of external governing factors. Time- and frequency-domain parameters of the MS/AE waveforms are compared and discussed with this aim. At the field scale, special attention is devoted to the correlation of the MS-event rate with meteorological parameters (air temperature and rainfalls). At the laboratory scale, AE rates, waveforms, and spectral content, recorded under controlled temperature and fluid conditions, are analyzed in order to better constrain the physical mechanisms responsible for the observed field patterns. The factors potentially governing the mechanical instability at the site were retrieved from the integration of the results. Abrupt thermal variations were identified as the main cause of the site microsesimicity, without highlighting irreversible acceleration in the MS-event rate potentially anticipating the rock mass collapse.

  10. A Wideband Magnetoresistive Sensor for Monitoring Dynamic Fault Slip in Laboratory Fault Friction Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, Brian D

    2017-12-02

    A non-contact, wideband method of sensing dynamic fault slip in laboratory geophysical experiments employs an inexpensive magnetoresistive sensor, a small neodymium rare earth magnet, and user built application-specific wideband signal conditioning. The magnetoresistive sensor generates a voltage proportional to the changing angles of magnetic flux lines, generated by differential motion or rotation of the near-by magnet, through the sensor. The performance of an array of these sensors compares favorably to other conventional position sensing methods employed at multiple locations along a 2 m long × 0.4 m deep laboratory strike-slip fault. For these magnetoresistive sensors, the lack of resonance signals commonly encountered with cantilever-type position sensor mounting, the wide band response (DC to ≈ 100 kHz) that exceeds the capabilities of many traditional position sensors, and the small space required on the sample, make them attractive options for capturing high speed fault slip measurements in these laboratory experiments. An unanticipated observation of this study is the apparent sensitivity of this sensor to high frequency electomagnetic signals associated with fault rupture and (or) rupture propagation, which may offer new insights into the physics of earthquake faulting.

  11. Is laboratory medicine ready for the era of personalized medicine? A survey addressed to laboratory directors of hospitals/academic schools of medicine in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malentacchi, F.; Mancini, I.; Brandslund, I.

    2015-01-01

    Society of Pharmacogenomics and Personalised Therapy (ESPT). The answers of the participating laboratory medicine professionals indicate that they are aware that personalized medicine can represent a new and promising health model, and that laboratory medicine should play a key role in supporting...

  12. 1993 Effluent and environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Pittsburgh Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The results of the radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring programs for 1993 at the Bettis-Pittsburgh Site are presented. The results obtained from the monitoring programs demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that environmental releases during 1993 were in accordance with applicable Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicates that the current operations at the Site continue to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Site operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the US Department of Energy

  13. 1993 Effluent and environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Pittsburgh Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    The results of the radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring programs for 1993 at the Bettis-Pittsburgh Site are presented. The results obtained from the monitoring programs demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that environmental releases during 1993 were in accordance with applicable Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicates that the current operations at the Site continue to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Site operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the US Department of Energy.

  14. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. 1984 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griggs, K.S.; Myers, D.S.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1985-02-01

    A strict effluent-control program that emphasizes controlling effluents at the source has been in effect since LLNL began operation. The Environmental Monitoring program evaluates the effectiveness of these measures, documents whether effluents from LLNL and Site 300 operations are within applicable standards, and estimates the impact of these operations on the environment. Sensitive monitoring equipment is used that can detect radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants at environmental background levels. The program includes the collection and analysis of air, soil, water, sewer effluent, vegetation, foodstuffs, and milk samples. Also, environmental background radiation is measured at numerous locations in the vicinity of LLNL using gamma and neutron dosimeters. This report summarizes the results of the 1984 program. 28 refs, 25 figs., 40 tabs

  15. The development of a national surveillance system for monitoring blood use and inventory levels at sentinel hospitals in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Y A; Kim, H H; Joung, U S; Kim, C Y; Shin, Y H; Lee, S W; Kim, H J

    2010-04-01

    We developed a web-based program for a national surveillance system to determine baseline data regarding the supply and demand of blood products at sentinel hospitals in South Korea. Sentinel hospitals were invited to participate in a 1-month pilot-test. The data for receipts and exports of blood from each hospital information system were converted into comma-separated value files according to a specific conversion rule. The daily data from the sites could be transferred to the web-based program server using a semi-automated submission procedure: pressing a key allowed the program to automatically compute the blood inventory level as well as other indices including the minimal inventory ratio (MIR), ideal inventory ratio (IIR), supply index (SI) and utilisation index (UI). The national surveillance system was referred to as the Korean Blood Inventory Monitoring System (KBIMS) and the web-based program for KBIMS was referred to as the Blood Inventory Monitoring System (BMS). A total of 30 256 red blood cell (RBC) units were submitted as receipt data, however, only 83% of the receipt data were submitted to the BMS server as export data (25 093 RBC units). Median values were 2.67 for MIR, 1.08 for IIR, 1.00 for SI, 0.88 for UI and 5.33 for the ideal inventory day. The BMS program was easy to use and is expected to provide a useful tool for monitoring hospital inventory levels. This information will provide baseline data regarding the supply and demand of blood products in South Korea.

  16. On-line liquid-effluent monitoring of sewage at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreicer, M.; Cate, J.L.; Rueppel, D.W.; Huntzinger, C.J.; Gonzalez, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    An automatic on line sewage effluent monitoring system has been developed. A representative fraction of the total waste stream leaving the site is monitored for pH, radiation, and metals as it passes through a detection assembly. This assembly consists of an industrial pH probe, NaI radiation detectors, and an x-ray fluorescence metal detector. A microprocessor collects, reduces and analyzes the data to determine if the levels are acceptable by established environmental limits. Currently, if preset levels are exceeded, a sample of the suspect sewage is automatically collected for further analysis, and an alarm is sent to a station where personnel can be alerted to respond on a 24-hour basis. Since at least four hours pass before LLNL effluent reaches the treatment plant, sufficient time is available to alert emergency personnel, evaluate the situation, and if necessary arrange for diversion of the material to emergency holding basins at the treatment plant. Information on the current system is presented, and progress is reported in developing an on-line tritium monitor as an addition to the assembly

  17. Combined administration of antibiotics and direct oral anticoagulants: a renewed indication for laboratory monitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Mattiuzzi, Camilla

    2014-10-01

    The recent development and marketing of novel direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) represents a paradigm shift in the management of patients requiring long-term anticoagulation. The advantages of these compounds over traditional therapy with vitamin K antagonists include a reportedly lower risk of severe hemorrhages and the limited need for laboratory measurements. However, there are several scenarios in which testing should be applied. The potential for drug-to-drug interaction is one plausible but currently underrecognized indication for laboratory assessment of the anticoagulant effect of DOACs. In particular, substantial concern has been raised during Phase I studies regarding the potential interaction of these drugs with some antibiotics, especially those that interplay with permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) and cytochrome 3A4 (CYP3A4). A specific electronic search on clinical trials published so far confirms that clarithromycin and rifampicin significantly impair the bioavailability of dabigatran, whereas clarithromycin, erythromycin, fluconazole, and ketoconazole alter the metabolism of rivaroxaban in vivo. Because of their more recent development, no published data were found for apixaban and edoxaban, or for potential interactions of DOACs with other and widely used antibiotics. It is noteworthy, however, that an online resource based on Food and Drug Administration and social media information, reports several hemorrhagic and thrombotic events in patients simultaneously taking dabigatran and some commonly used antibiotics such as amoxicillin, cephalosporin, and metronidazole. According to these reports, the administration of antibiotics in patients undergoing therapy with DOACs would seem to require accurate evaluation as to whether dose adjustments (personalized or antibiotic class driven) of the anticoagulant drug may be advisable. This might be facilitated by direct laboratory assessments of their anticoagulant effect ex vivo. Thieme Medical Publishers

  18. Laboratory-based clinical audit as a tool for continual improvement: an example from CSF chemistry turnaround time audit in a South-African teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoh, Lucius C; Mutale, Mubanga; Parker, Christopher T; Erasmus, Rajiv T; Zemlin, Annalise E

    2016-01-01

    Timeliness of laboratory results is crucial to patient care and outcome. Monitoring turnaround times (TAT), especially for emergency tests, is important to measure the effectiveness and efficiency of laboratory services. Laboratory-based clinical audits reveal opportunities for improving quality. Our aim was to identify the most critical steps causing a high TAT for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) chemistry analysis in our laboratory. A 6-month retrospective audit was performed. The duration of each operational phase across the laboratory work flow was examined. A process-mapping audit trail of 60 randomly selected requests with a high TAT was conducted and reasons for high TAT were tested for significance. A total of 1505 CSF chemistry requests were analysed. Transport of samples to the laboratory was primarily responsible for the high average TAT (median TAT = 170 minutes). Labelling accounted for most delays within the laboratory (median TAT = 71 minutes) with most delays occurring after regular work hours (P audit identified sample transportation, work shift periods and use of inappropriate CSF sample tubes as drivers of high TAT for CSF chemistry in our laboratory. The results of this audit will be used to change pre-analytical practices in our laboratory with the aim of improving TAT and customer satisfaction.

  19. Dual vs. single computer monitor in a Canadian hospital Archiving Department: a study of efficiency and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Thomas G; Godbout, Sylvie T; Bellemare, Christian

    This paper describes a comparative study of clinical coding by Archivists (also known as Clinical Coders in some other countries) using single and dual computer monitors. In the present context, processing a record corresponds to checking the available information; searching for the missing physician information; and finally, performing clinical coding. We collected data for each Archivist during her use of the single monitor for 40 hours and during her use of the dual monitor for 20 hours. During the experimental periods, Archivists did not perform other related duties, so we were able to measure the real-time processing of records. To control for the type of records and their impact on the process time required, we categorised the cases as major or minor, based on whether acute care or day surgery was involved. Overall results show that 1,234 records were processed using a single monitor and 647 records using a dual monitor. The time required to process a record was significantly higher (p= .071) with a single monitor compared to a dual monitor (19.83 vs.18.73 minutes). However, the percentage of major cases was significantly higher (p= .000) in the single monitor group compared to the dual monitor group (78% vs. 69%). As a consequence, we adjusted our results, which reduced the difference in time required to process a record between the two systems from 1.1 to 0.61 minutes. Thus, the net real-time difference was only 37 seconds in favour of the dual monitor system. Extrapolated over a 5-year period, this would represent a time savings of 3.1% and generate a net cost savings of $7,729 CAD (Canadian dollars) for each workstation that devoted 35 hours per week to the processing of records. Finally, satisfaction questionnaire responses indicated a high level of satisfaction and support for the dual-monitor system. The implementation of a dual-monitor system in a hospital archiving department is an efficient option in the context of scarce human resources and has the

  20. 1982 environmental monitoring program report for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    The results of the various monitoring programs for 1982 indicated that radioactivity from the Site operations could not be distinguished from worldwide fallout and natural radioactivity in the region. Although some radioactive materials were discharged during Site operations, concentrations and dose to the surrounding population were of no health consequence and were far less than State of Idaho and federal health protection guidelines. This report describes the air, water, and foodstuff samples routinely collected at the INEL boundary locations and at locations distant from the INEL Site. The report also compares and evaluates the sample results and discusses implications

  1. Third annual environmental restoration monitoring and assessment report for FY 1994 of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clapp, R.B.; Watts, J.A.; Guth, M.A.S. [eds.

    1994-09-01

    This report summarizes the salient features of the annual efforts of environmental monitoring, field investigations, and assessments conducted to support the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report focuses on the watershed scale, providing an ORNL site-wide perspective on types, distribution, and transport of contamination. The results presented are used to enhance the conceptual understanding of the key contaminants and the sources, fluxes, and processes affecting their distribution and movement. This information forms a basis for prioritizing sites and for selecting, implementing, and evaluating remedial actions. This report summarizes the efforts of the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 and Site Investigations (SI) Project. WAG 2 is the lower portion of the White Oak Creek system which drains the major contaminated sites at ORNL and discharges to the Clinch River where public access is allowed. The Remedial Investigation Plan (DOE 1992) for WAG 2 includes a long-term multimedia environmental monitoring effort that takes advantage of WAG 2`s role as an integrator and the major conduit of contaminants from the ORNL site. During FY 1992, the remedial investigation activities were integrated with a series of environmental monitoring and SI activities at ORNL that address pathways and processes important for contaminant movement to gain a more integrated perspective of contamination movement at the watershed scale.

  2. Vadose zone monitoring at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, 1985--1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, D.L.

    1990-12-01

    Vadose zone monitoring at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was implemented under the Subsurface Investigation Program Plan. The objective of the Subsurface Investigation Program was to characterize the subsurface at the RWMC in order to measure and predict radionuclide transport. Soil moisture sensors were installed to characterize the uniformity of water entry to the surficial sediments and moisture flux in the surficial sediments and the deeper stratigraphic units. From 1985 to 1987, a network of vadose zone instruments was installed in sediments at the RWMC. The instruments included psychrometers, gypsum blocks, heat-dissipation sensors (HDSs), tensiometers, lysimeters, and neutron access tubes. These instruments were placed at depths up to 230 ft below land surface (BLS) in a heterogeneous geologic system comprised of sediments that overlie and are intercalated with basalt flows. After organic contaminants were detected in the subsurface at the RWMC in 1988, the vadose zone monitoring project was incorporated into a broader characterization effort. This report presents the analyses of the vadose zone monitoring data collected from FY-1985 to FY-1989. The performance of the instruments are compared. Matric potential ranges and trends in the surficial sediments and interbeds are discussed. Hydraulic gradients are calculated to determine the direction of moisture movement. Using the neutron logging data in conjunction with the matric potential and hydraulic gradient data, infiltration is examined with respect to seasonal nature and source. 14 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Third annual environmental restoration monitoring and assessment report for FY 1994 of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapp, R.B.; Watts, J.A.; Guth, M.A.S.

    1994-09-01

    This report summarizes the salient features of the annual efforts of environmental monitoring, field investigations, and assessments conducted to support the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report focuses on the watershed scale, providing an ORNL site-wide perspective on types, distribution, and transport of contamination. The results presented are used to enhance the conceptual understanding of the key contaminants and the sources, fluxes, and processes affecting their distribution and movement. This information forms a basis for prioritizing sites and for selecting, implementing, and evaluating remedial actions. This report summarizes the efforts of the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 and Site Investigations (SI) Project. WAG 2 is the lower portion of the White Oak Creek system which drains the major contaminated sites at ORNL and discharges to the Clinch River where public access is allowed. The Remedial Investigation Plan (DOE 1992) for WAG 2 includes a long-term multimedia environmental monitoring effort that takes advantage of WAG 2's role as an integrator and the major conduit of contaminants from the ORNL site. During FY 1992, the remedial investigation activities were integrated with a series of environmental monitoring and SI activities at ORNL that address pathways and processes important for contaminant movement to gain a more integrated perspective of contamination movement at the watershed scale

  4. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R. Pace

    2007-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2007 (FY 2007). In FY 2007, 40 localities were revisited: two locations of heightened Shoshone-Bannock tribal sensitivity, four caves, three butte/craters, twelve prehistoric archaeological sites, two historic stage stations, nine historic homesteads, a portion of Goodale’s Cutoff of the Oregon Trail, a portion of historic trail T-16, one World War II dump, four buildings from the World War II period, and Experimental Breeder Reactor –I, a modern scientific facility and National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2007. This included direct observation of ground disturbing activities within the Power Burst Facility (PBF, now designated as the Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex – CITRC), backfilling operations associated with backhoe trenches along the Big Lost River, and geophysical surveys designed to pinpoint subsurface unexploded ordnance in the vicinity of the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area. Surprise checks were also made to three ongoing INL projects to ensure compliance with INL CRM Office recommendations to avoid impacts to cultural resources. Although some impacts were documented, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resource were observed at any location.

  5. Increased patient delays in care after the closure of Martin Luther King Hospital: implications for monitoring health system changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kara Odom; Leng, Mei; Liang, Li-Jung; Forge, Nell; Morales, Leo; Jones, Loretta; Brown, Arleen

    2011-01-01

    The safety net system remains an important part of the health care system for uninsured and minority populations, however, the closure of safety net hospitals changes the availability of care. Using community-based participatory research methods, we explored the impact of hospital closure among late middle aged and elderly racial/ethnic minorities in South Los Angeles. Telephone survey of participants in both 2008, after hospital closure, and 2003, before hospital closure, who self-identified as African American or Latino, were over the age of 50 and lived in zip codes of South Los Angeles. We developed multiple logistic regression models on imputed data sets weighted for non-response and adjusted for self-reported measures of demographic and clinical characteristics to examine the odds of reporting delays in care. After adjusting for covariates known to influence access to care and distributed differently in the two survey samples, we found significantly greater delays in care. Following the closure of the Martin Luther King, Jr. safety net hospital, the adjusted odds ratios were 1.70 (95% CI 1.01, 2.87) for delays in care, 1.88 (95% Cl 1.06, 3.13) for problems receiving needed medical care, and 2.62 (95% CI 1.46, 4.67) for seeing a specialist. Our survey of older minority adults in South Los Angeles found increased delays in access to care for needed medical services after the closure of Martin Luther King, Jr. Hospital. As health care reform unfolds, monitoring for changes in access to care that may result from new policies will be important to address future disparities, particularly for vulnerable populations.

  6. Data Report for Monitoring at Six West Virginia Marcellus Shale Development Sites using NETL’s Mobile Air Monitoring Laboratory (July–November 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pekney, Natalie J. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Reeder, Matthew [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United Stat; Veloski, Garret A. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Diehl, J. Rodney [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2016-06-16

    The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection’s Office of Oil and Gas was directed according to the Natural Gas Horizontal Well Control Act of December 14, 2011 (West Virginia Code §22-6A) to conduct studies of horizontal well drilling activities related to air quality. The planned study, “Noise, Light, Dust, Volatile Organic Compounds Related to Well Location Restrictions,” required determination of the effectiveness of a 625 ft minimum set-back from the center of the pad of a horizontal well drilling site to the nearest occupied dwelling. An investigation was conducted at seven drilling sites by West Virginia University (WVU) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to collect data on dust, hydrocarbon compounds and on noise, radiation, and light levels. NETL’s role in this study was to collect measurements of ambient pollutant concentrations at six of the seven selected sites using NETL’s Mobile Air Monitoring Laboratory. The trailer-based laboratory was situated a distance of 492–1,312 ft from each well pad, on which activities included well pad construction, vertical drilling, horizontal drilling, hydraulic fracturing, and flaring, with the objective of evaluating the air quality impact of each activity for 1–4 weeks per site. Measured pollutants included volatile organic compounds (VOCs), coarse and fine particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5, respectively), ozone, methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon isotopes of CH4 and CO2, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), and sulfur dioxide (SO2).

  7. Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, J. Matthew; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.

    2012-12-27

    This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006), as well as several other published DQOs. The intent of this report is to determine the necessary steps required to ensure that radioactive emissions to the air from the Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) headquartered at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Sequim Marine Research Operations (Sequim Site) on Washington State’s Olympic Peninsula are managed in accordance with regulatory requirements and best practices. The Sequim Site was transitioned in October 2012 from private operation under Battelle Memorial Institute to an exclusive use contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office.

  8. Monitoring space shuttle air quality using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory electronic nose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Margaret Amy; Zhou, Hanying; Buehler, Martin G.; Manatt, Kenneth S.; Mowrey, Victoria S.; Jackson, Shannon P.; Kisor, Adam K.; Shevade, Abhijit V.; Homer, Margie L.

    2004-01-01

    A miniature electronic nose (ENose) has been designed and built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA, and was designed to detect, identify, and quantify ten common contaminants and relative humidity changes. The sensing array includes 32 sensing films made from polymer carbon-black composites. Event identification and quantification were done using the Levenberg-Marquart nonlinear least squares method. After successful ground training, this ENose was used in a demonstration experiment aboard STS-95 (October-November, 1998), in which the ENose was operated continuously for six days and recorded the sensors' response to the air in the mid-deck. Air samples were collected daily and analyzed independently after the flight. Changes in shuttle-cabin humidity were detected and quantified by the JPL ENose; neither the ENose nor the air samples detected any of the contaminants on the target list. The device is microgravity insensitive.

  9. Direct Penetrating Radiation Monitoring Systems: Technical Evaluation for Use at Area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Kraig; W. A. Treadaway; R. J. Wechsler

    1999-01-01

    Recent advances and commercialization of electret-ion-chamber (EIC) technology for photon measurements prompted us to consider EKs as a replacement for our TLD system. After laboratory tests indicated that both systems gave adequate results for controlled exposures, throughout 1998 we conducted field tests with paired TLDs and EICS, in LANL technical areas and in public areas. We had approximately 30 paired sampling sites at Area G. At each sampling site, we deployed three TLDs and three EICS. The EICS were contained in air-tight jars, each of which was placed in a Tyvek envelope and hung about 1 m above the ground. The dosimeters were read (and, if necessary, replaced) every three months. At the sites outside Area G, the TLD readings for the first two quarters were statistically significantly higher than those of the EICS: group average exposures were 38 and 36, compared with 33 mR (both quarters) for the EICS; during quarter 3, the EIC average (40 mR) was higher than the TLD average (34 mR); and during quarter 4, the two systems were statistically the same: EIC = 42, TLD = 41 with a p-value of 0.61. We are still evaluating these differences and performing additional laboratory studies to determine causes. At the Area G sites,we noticed that several of the TLDs gave much higher readings than their co-located EICS; we believe that the TLDs were over-responding by ∼50% to the low-energy (60-keV) gamma radiation associated with 241 Am, whereas the EICS were responding accurately. We conclude that EICS are more accurate at a wide range of gamma energies and are preferable to TLDs in environments where a significant fraction of the photons are low energy

  10. State-wide hospital clinical laboratory plan for measuring cholinesterase activity for individuals suspected of exposure to nerve agent chemical weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Alan H B; Smith, Andrew; McComb, Robert; Bowers, George N; Makowski, Gregory S; McKay, Charles A; Vena, Jason; McDonagh, John; Hopfer, Sidney; Sena, Salvatore F; Malkus, Herbert; Forte, Elaine; Kelly, Katherine

    2008-02-01

    Hospital laboratories currently lack the capacity to provide emergency determination of cholinesterase activity. We have developed a hospital-based 3-tiered system to test plasma for butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity and whole blood for red cell acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity using available technology and personnel. Interagency communications, toxidrome definition, and patient triage will be coordinated by the Connecticut Department of Public Health and the Poison Control Center. Initial BChE data documents good precision between institutions (coefficient of variation chemical terrorism or large scale HazMat events.

  11. Transient myocardial ischaemia during ambulatory monitoring out of hospital in patients with chronic stable angina pectoris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egstrup, K

    1988-01-01

    monitoring was significantly lower than heart rate at the onset of ST-segment change during exercise testing (100.2 +/- 14.6 vs. 115.8 +/- 19.6 beats/min, p less than 0.01), which may indicate different pathophysiological mechanisms. Transient impairment in coronary oxygen supply seems to be of importance......Transient myocardial ischaemia during daily life, detected by ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring, was investigated in 42 patients with chronic stable angina and documented coronary artery disease. Ambulatory monitoring was initiated for 36 hours after all prophylactic antianginal medication...

  12. 2001 environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, West Mifflin, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The 2001 results for the Bettis-Pittsburgh radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs are presented. The results demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that releases to the environment during 2001 were in accordance with applicable Federal, State, County, and local regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicates that current operations at the Site continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Site operations demonstrates that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the U.S. Department of Energy. A risk assessment of potentially exposed populations to chemical residues in the environment at the Site demonstrates that any potential risk posed by these residues is much less than the risks encountered in normal everyday life

  13. 1999 environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Pittsburgh Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The 1999 results for the Bettis-Pittsburgh radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs are presented. The results demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that releases to the environment during 1999 were in accordance with applicable Federal, State, County, and local regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicates that current operations at the Site continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Site operations demonstrates that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the US Department of Energy. A risk assessment of potentially exposed populations to chemical residues in the environment at the Site demonstrates that these residues do not pose any significant risk to human health or the environment

  14. 2003 Environmental Monitoring Report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory Pittsburgh Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The 2003 results for the Bettis-Pittsburgh radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs are presented. The results demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that releases to the environment during 2003 were in accordance with applicable Federal, State, County, and local regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicates that current operations at the Site continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Site operations demonstrates that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the U.S. Department of Energy. A risk assessment of potentially exposed populations to chemical residues in the environment at the Site demonstrates that any potential risk posed by these residues in much less than the risks encountered in normal everyday life

  15. 1997 environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Pittsburgh Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The 1997 results for the Bettis-Pittsburgh radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs are presented. The results demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that releases to the environment during 1997 were in accordance with applicable Federal, State, County, and local regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicates tat current operations at the Site continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Site operations demonstrates that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the US Department of Energy. A risk assessment of potentially exposed populations to chemical residues in the environment at the Site demonstrates that these residues do not pose any significant risk to human health or the environment

  16. Manageable and Extensible Video Streaming Systems for On-Line Monitoring of Remote Laboratory Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Wei Lin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available To enable clients to view real-time video of the involved instruments during a remote experiment, two real-time video streaming systems are devised. One is for the remote experiments which instruments locate in one geographic spot and the other is for those which instruments scatter over different places. By means of running concurrent streaming processes at a server, multiple instruments can be monitored simultaneously by different clients. The proposed systems possess excellent extensibility, that is, the systems can easily add new digital cameras for instruments without modifying any software. Also they are well-manageable, meaning that an administrator can conveniently adjust the quality of the real-time video depending on system load and visual requirements. Finally, some evaluation concerning CPU utilization and bandwidth consumption of the systems have been evaluated to verify the effectiveness of the proposed solutions.

  17. Monitoring of small laboratory animal experiments by a designated web-based database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, T; Grohmann, C; Schumacher, U; Krüll, A

    2015-10-01

    Multiple-parametric small animal experiments require, by their very nature, a sufficient number of animals which may need to be large to obtain statistically significant results.(1) For this reason database-related systems are required to collect the experimental data as well as to support the later (re-) analysis of the information gained during the experiments. In particular, the monitoring of animal welfare is simplified by the inclusion of warning signals (for instance, loss in body weight >20%). Digital patient charts have been developed for human patients but are usually not able to fulfill the specific needs of animal experimentation. To address this problem a unique web-based monitoring system using standard MySQL, PHP, and nginx has been created. PHP was used to create the HTML-based user interface and outputs in a variety of proprietary file formats, namely portable document format (PDF) or spreadsheet files. This article demonstrates its fundamental features and the easy and secure access it offers to the data from any place using a web browser. This information will help other researchers create their own individual databases in a similar way. The use of QR-codes plays an important role for stress-free use of the database. We demonstrate a way to easily identify all animals and samples and data collected during the experiments. Specific ways to record animal irradiations and chemotherapy applications are shown. This new analysis tool allows the effective and detailed analysis of huge amounts of data collected through small animal experiments. It supports proper statistical evaluation of the data and provides excellent retrievable data storage. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. In Vitro Comparison of the New In-Line Monitor BMU 40 versus a Conventional Laboratory Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, F. Oliver; Holzhey, David; Falk, Volkmar; Schaarschmidt, Jan; Kraemer, Klaus; Mohr, Friedrich W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Reliable information about different blood parameters is essential in maintaining hemodynamics, perfusion, and gas exchange during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). For this purpose, a precise and continuous monitoring is needed. The objective of this in vitro study was to compare a novel continuous in-line blood parameter monitoring system versus a reference laboratory analyzer. The study was conducted as an in vitro prospective experimental study during a CPB simulation. The reliability of BMU 40 was tested in monitoring the pO2, oxygen saturation (SO2), and hematocrit (Hct) under physiological and extreme conditions with regards to temperature, oxygenation, and blood concentration. Four different tests were performed and conducted with five sensors each. Correlation analyses and Bland-Altman analyses were performed. A total of 350 measurement points were compared. All monitored values of blood parameters correlated highly with laboratory values (all r values >.90). Test 1: Biases of pO2 (act) varied from −3.24 mmHg (±6.86 mmHg) up to 6.0 mmHg (±17.89 mmHg). The biases of pO2 (37°C) ranged from −3.52 mmHg (±6.01 mmHg) up to 68.8 mmHg (±67.82 mmHg). Test 2: The biases standard deviations (SD) for Hct ranged from −0.35% (±.79%) up to 2.35% (±.91%). The biases (SD) for SO2 varied from −.45% (±.86%) up to .85% (±1.01%). Test 3: The biases (SD) of Hct ranged from −1.00% (±1.84%) up to −.67% (±1.49%). Test 4: The biases (SD) for SO2 varied from −.36% (±1.60%) up to.48% (±.90%). The BMU 40 is a reliable device in measuring the partial oxygen pressure (pO2), SO2, and Hct under normal physiological and extreme conditions with regards to temperature, oxygenation, and blood concentration in simulation of CPB. The algorithm to calculate pO2 (37°C) under hypothermic conditions needs to be adjusted. (Before the official market launch a new software version of the BMU 40 has been developed. The algorithm to calculate pO2 (37°C) under

  19. Accreditation of medical laboratories in Croatia--experiences of the Institute of Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital "Merkur", Zagreb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegar-Mestrić, Zlata; Nazor, Aida; Perkov, Sonja; Surina, Branka; Kardum-Paro, Mirjana Mariana; Siftar, Zoran; Sikirica, Mirjana; Sokolić, Ivica; Ozvald, Ivan; Vidas, Zeljko

    2010-03-01

    Since 2003 when the international norm for implementation of quality management in medical laboratories (EN ISO 15189, Medical laboratories--Particular requirements for quality and competence) was established and accepted, accreditation has become practical, generally accepted method of quality management and confirmation of technical competence of medical laboratories in the whole world. This norm has been translated into Croatian and accepted by the Croatian Institute for Norms as Croatian norm. Accreditation is carried out on voluntary basis by the Croatian Accreditation Agency that has up to now accredited two clinical medical biochemical laboratories in the Republic of Croatia. Advantages of accredited laboratory lie in its documented management system, constant improvement and training, reliability of test results, establishing users' trust in laboratory services, test results comparability and interlaboratory (international) test results acceptance by adopting the concept of metrological traceability in laboratory medicine.

  20. The role of the National Physical Laboratory in monitoring and improving dosimetry in UK radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.A.S.; Duane, S.; McEwen, M.R.; Rosser, K.E.

    2002-01-01

    In the UK, the National Physical Laboratory, in collaboration with the Institute for Physics and Engineering in Medicine operates an audit programme to ensure national consistency in radiotherapy dosimetry. The present programme covers dosimetry of megavoltage photons and electrons (3-19 MeV) and low and medium energy (10-300 kV) photons. The aim of each audit is to verify the local measurement of absorbed dose at the radiotherapy centre. The audit measurements - principally beam quality and linac output - are made following the same protocol as the clinic but using different equipment. The audit is not an absolute measurement of the absorbed dose but amounts to a check that the equipment used by the centre is operating as expected and that the Code of Practice is being followed correctly. The protocols used in the UK are IPSM 1990 for high-energy photons, IPEMB 1996 for electrons and IPEMB 1996 for low energy photons. For the purpose of these audits, NPL maintains a set of calibrated ionisation chambers

  1. Automatization of the Calibration Laboratory for Radiation Monitors of the IRD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, Tania S.; Ramos, Manoel M.O.; Quaresma, Daniel S.

    2007-01-01

    This work will present the concluded stages and also the ones that are still in process to reach the full automation of the calibration system. Little by little the laboratory included in its installations the automatization of some of its operations, aiming the safety of the staff and their equipment. The automation makes the installation almost ideal for the radioprotection, that is, makes its exposure as low as possible and the routines more accurate, minimizing attributed the uncertainties and the doses received by the professionals who operated the system manually. Currently, on the operation table there is a control of the position car exists and its speed, the internal TV circuit (of the room, the position of the car and equipment that is going to be calibrated), the control of the registration is done by the Autolab program and the Irradiator Buchler OB85 control with the sources of 137Cs and 60Co.A next stage will be the implantation of the automation project of the positioning of the three used attenuators. (author)

  2. Laboratory monitoring of bacterial gastroenteric pathogens Salmonella and Shigella in Shanghai, China 2006-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Wang, F; Jin, H; Hu, J; Yuan, Z; Shi, W; Yang, X; Meng, J; Xu, X

    2015-02-01

    In 2006 we initiated an enhanced laboratory-based surveillance of Salmonella and Shigella infections in Shanghai, China. A total of 4483 Salmonella and 2226 Shigella isolates were recovered from stool specimens by 2012. In 80 identified Salmonella serovars, Enteritidis (34·5%) and Typhimurium (26·2%) were the most common. Shigella (S.) sonnei accounted for 63·9% of human Shigella infections over the same time period, and replaced S. flexneri to become the primary cause of shigellosis since 2010. Overall, a high level of antimicrobial resistance was observed in Salmonella and Shigella, particularly to nalidixic acid, ampicillin, and tetracycline. Ciprofloxacin resistance was common in Salmonella Typhimurium (21·0%) and S. flexneri (37·6%). The cephalosporin resistance in both pathogens also increased over the years, ranging from 3·4% to 7·0% in Salmonella, and from 10·4% to 28·6% in Shigella. Resistance to multiple antimicrobials was also identified in a large number of the isolates. This study provides insight into the distribution of Salmonella and Shigella in diarrhoeal diseases.

  3. Contaminant monitoring of biota downstream of a radioactive liquid waste treatment facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, K.D.; Biggs, J.R.; Fresquez, P.R.

    1996-01-01

    Small mammals, plants, and sediments were sampled at one upstream location (Site 1) and two downstream locations (Site 2 and Site 3) from the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) outfall number-sign 051-051 in Mortandad Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. The purpose of the sampling was to identify radionuclides potentially present, to quantitatively estimate and compare the amount of radionuclide uptake at specific locations (Site 2 and Site 3) within Mortandad Canyon to an upstream site (Site 1), and to identify the primary mode (inhalation/ingestion or surface contact) of contamination to small mammals. Three composite samples of at least five animals per sample were collected at each site. The pelt was separated from the carcass of each animal and both were analyzed independently. In addition, three composite samples were also collected for plants and sediments at each site. Samples were analyzed for americium ( 241 Am), strontium ( 90 Sr), plutonium ( 238 Pu and 239 Pu), and total uranium (U). With the exception of total U, all mean radionuclide concentrations in small mammal carcasses and sediments were significantly higher at Site 2 than Site 1 or Site 3. No differences were detected in the mean radionuclide concentration of plant samples between sites. However, some radionuclide concentrations found at all three sites were higher than regional background. No differences were found between mean carcass radionuclide concentrations and mean pelt radionuclide concentrations, indicating that the two primary modes of contamination may be equally occurring

  4. Contamination of the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory with Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci and Multidrug- Resistant Enterobacteriaceae: Implications for Hospital and Laboratory Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Susan M.; Hacek, Donna M.; Degen, Lisa A.; Wright, Marc O.; Noskin, Gary A.; Peterson, Lance R.

    2001-01-01

    We surveyed environmental surfaces in our clinical microbiology laboratory to determine the prevalence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (MDRE) during a routine working day. From a total of 193 surfaces, VRE were present on 20 (10%) and MDRE were present on 4 (2%) of the surfaces tested. In a subsequent survey after routine cleaning, all of the 24 prior positive surfaces were found to be negative. Thus, those in the laboratory should recognize that many surfaces may be contaminated by resistant organisms during routine processing of patient specimens. PMID:11574615

  5. Internet of Health Things: Toward intelligent vital signs monitoring in hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Cristiano André; Pasluosta, Cristian F; Eskofier, Björn; da Silva, Denise Bandeira; da Rosa Righi, Rodrigo

    2018-06-02

    Large amounts of patient data are routinely manually collected in hospitals by using standalone medical devices, including vital signs. Such data is sometimes stored in spreadsheets, not forming part of patients' electronic health records, and is therefore difficult for caregivers to combine and analyze. One possible solution to overcome these limitations is the interconnection of medical devices via the Internet using a distributed platform, namely the Internet of Things. This approach allows data from different sources to be combined in order to better diagnose patient health status and identify possible anticipatory actions. This work introduces the concept of the Internet of Health Things (IoHT), focusing on surveying the different approaches that could be applied to gather and combine data on vital signs in hospitals. Common heuristic approaches are considered, such as weighted early warning scoring systems, and the possibility of employing intelligent algorithms is analyzed. As a result, this article proposes possible directions for combining patient data in hospital wards to improve efficiency, allow the optimization of resources, and minimize patient health deterioration. It is concluded that a patient-centered approach is critical, and that the IoHT paradigm will continue to provide more optimal solutions for patient management in hospital wards. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. DOSIS & DOSIS 3D: long-term dose monitoring onboard the Columbus Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The radiation environment encountered in space differs in nature from that on Earth, consisting mostly of highly energetic ions from protons up to iron, resulting in radiation levels far exceeding the ones present on Earth for occupational radiation workers. Since the beginning of the space era, the radiation exposure during space missions has been monitored with various active and passive radiation instruments. Also onboard the International Space Station (ISS, a number of area monitoring devices provide data related to the spatial and temporal variation of the radiation field in and outside the ISS. The aim of the DOSIS (2009–2011 and the DOSIS 3D (2012–ongoing experiments was and is to measure the radiation environment within the European Columbus Laboratory of the ISS. These measurements are, on the one hand, performed with passive radiation detectors mounted at 11 locations within Columbus for the determination of the spatial distribution of the radiation field parameters and, on the other, with two active radiation detectors mounted at a fixed position inside Columbus for the determination of the temporal variation of the radiation field parameters. Data measured with passive radiation detectors showed that the absorbed dose values inside the Columbus Laboratory follow a pattern, based on the local shielding configuration of the radiation detectors, with minimum dose values observed in the year 2010 of 195–270 μGy/day and maximum values observed in the year 2012 with values ranging from 260 to 360 μGy/day. The absorbed dose is modulated by (a the variation in solar activity and (b the changes in ISS altitude.

  7. An enhanced ionising radiation monitoring and detecting technique in radiotherapy units of hospitals using wireless sensor networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a solution of ionising radiation monitoring based on the concept of Wireless Sensor Network (WSN), is presented. Radiation dose rate measured by the sensor node is sent to the monitoring station through ZigBee wireless network operated on 2.4 GHz unlicensed Industrial Scientific Medical (ISM) band. The system is calibrated for use for ionizing radiation dose rate range of between amount of ionising radiation observed in radiotherapy unit of a hospital and 1.02 mSv/h. Power consumption of the sensor node is kept low by operating the node ZigBee radio with low duty cycle: i.e. by keeping the radio awake only during data transmission/reception. Two ATmega8 microcontrollers, one each for sensor node and the monitoring station, are programmed to perform interfacing, data processing, and control functions. The system range of coverage is 124m for outdoor (line of site) deployment and 56.8m for indoor application where 5 brick walls separated the sensor node and the monitoring station. Range of coverage of the system is extendable via the use of ZigBee router (s)

  8. TH-E-209-01: Fluoroscopic Dose Monitoring and Patient Follow-Up Program at Massachusetts General Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation dose monitoring solutions have opened up new opportunities for medical physicists to be more involved in modern clinical radiology practices. In particular, with the help of comprehensive radiation dose data, data-driven protocol management and informed case follow up are now feasible. Significant challenges remain however and the problems faced by medical physicists are highly heterogeneous. Imaging systems from multiple vendors and a wide range of vintages co-exist in the same department and employ data communication protocols that are not fully standardized or implemented making harmonization complex. Many different solutions for radiation dose monitoring have been implemented by imaging facilities over the past few years. Such systems are based on commercial software, home-grown IT solutions, manual PACS data dumping, etc., and diverse pathways can be used to bring the data to impact clinical practice. The speakers will share their experiences with creating or tailoring radiation dose monitoring/management systems and procedures over the past few years, which vary significantly in design and scope. Topics to cover: (1) fluoroscopic dose monitoring and high radiation event handling from a large academic hospital; (2) dose monitoring and protocol optimization in pediatric radiology; and (3) development of a home-grown IT solution and dose data analysis framework. Learning Objectives: Describe the scope and range of radiation dose monitoring and protocol management in a modern radiology practice Review examples of data available from a variety of systems and how it managed and conveyed. Reflect on the role of the physicist in radiation dose awareness.

  9. TH-E-209-01: Fluoroscopic Dose Monitoring and Patient Follow-Up Program at Massachusetts General Hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B. [Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Radiation dose monitoring solutions have opened up new opportunities for medical physicists to be more involved in modern clinical radiology practices. In particular, with the help of comprehensive radiation dose data, data-driven protocol management and informed case follow up are now feasible. Significant challenges remain however and the problems faced by medical physicists are highly heterogeneous. Imaging systems from multiple vendors and a wide range of vintages co-exist in the same department and employ data communication protocols that are not fully standardized or implemented making harmonization complex. Many different solutions for radiation dose monitoring have been implemented by imaging facilities over the past few years. Such systems are based on commercial software, home-grown IT solutions, manual PACS data dumping, etc., and diverse pathways can be used to bring the data to impact clinical practice. The speakers will share their experiences with creating or tailoring radiation dose monitoring/management systems and procedures over the past few years, which vary significantly in design and scope. Topics to cover: (1) fluoroscopic dose monitoring and high radiation event handling from a large academic hospital; (2) dose monitoring and protocol optimization in pediatric radiology; and (3) development of a home-grown IT solution and dose data analysis framework. Learning Objectives: Describe the scope and range of radiation dose monitoring and protocol management in a modern radiology practice Review examples of data available from a variety of systems and how it managed and conveyed. Reflect on the role of the physicist in radiation dose awareness.

  10. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. 1983 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griggs, K.S.; Myers, D.S.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1984-02-01

    The 1983 annual average airborne gross beta activity in Livermore Valley air samples, 1.4 x 10 -14 μCi/ml, was less than 1982. Airborne 238 U concentrations at Site 300 were higher than those at Livermore because of the depleted uranium (a byproduct of 235 U enrichment) used in high-explosive tests at the Site. However, these concentrations were well below the standards set by DOE. The average gross alpha activity shows no significant change from 1982. The annual average beryllium concentrations were less than 1% of the local air pollution standard at both sites and can be accounted for by the natural concentrations in airborne dust. The total tritium released to the atmosphere in 1983 was 3245 Ci. Water samples exhibited gross beta and tritium activities within the ranges previously observed in these areas. Two water samples from Site 300 showed an above-average level of gross alpha activity. This activity is due to naturally occurring uranium. The discharge of tritiated water (HTO) into the sanitary sewer system in 1982 was 1.7 Ci, unchanged from the previous year. Tritium concentrations observed in local wells in 1983 were generally the same as previous years measurements. Tritium levels found in the Livermore Valley and Site 300 vegetation were comparable to 1982. The 1983 average annual gamma-radiation doses at the Laboratory perimeter and off-site locations were 51 mrem and 50 mrem, essentially unchanged from previous year. A 14-MeV neutron generator (Bldg. 212) near the south perimeter continued to be a source of elevated radiation. 19 references, 19 figures, 36 tables

  11. Mixed waste landfill monitoring prototype test design for Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, C.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this contract is to design the prototype tests necessary for the verification of the measurement methods proposed for the Mixed Waste Disposal Facility. The design is limited to the hydrological performance of the measurement methods. It does not include the mechanical testing of the methods proposed. The test site is to be selected and when approved, construction drawings provided. The contract also includes testing of vitrified clay pipe as the liner of choice for the passages under the landfill. The tests are to be done of both he hydrologic and the mechanical capability of the pipe. The test bed construction is to be supervised as it is being done by the construction contractor monitored by LANL. This contract does not include the logical subsequent work of performance of the measurements in the test bed. Since this contract was received by September 15, with the work to be completed by September 30, only that work possible in the short time was performed. That included the design of the test bed, the purchase of the vitrified clay pipe and the mechanical tests of the pipe, and the purchase of the SEAMIST systems for testing in the clay pipe. None of those could be delivered in time for flow tests to be done on the clay pipe. The mechanical tests were done as part of the pipe purchase and are reported here. The contract was not extended beyond September 30 for lack of funds. This report is therefore limited to the preliminary design of the test bed and to the specification of the orders for the materials. The hope is that funding will be restored to the program for the completion of the design and measurement effort

  12. Development of an integrated laboratory system for the monitoring of cyanotoxins in surface and drinking waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantis, Theodoros; Tsimeli, Katerina; Kaloudis, Triantafyllos; Thanassoulias, Nicholas; Lytras, Efthymios; Hiskia, Anastasia

    2010-05-01

    A system of analytical processes has been developed in order to serve as a cost-effective scheme for the monitoring of cyanobacterial toxins on a quantitative basis, in surface and drinking waters. Five cyclic peptide hepatotoxins, microcystin-LR, -RR, -YR, -LA and nodularin were chosen as the target compounds. Two different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were validated in order to serve as primary quantitative screening tools. Validation results showed that the ELISA methods are sufficiently specific and sensitive with limits of detection (LODs) around 0.1 microg/L, however, matrix effects should be considered, especially with surface water samples or bacterial mass methanolic extracts. A colorimetric protein phosphatase inhibition assay (PPIA) utilizing protein phosphatase 2A and p-nitrophenyl phosphate as substrate, was applied in microplate format in order to serve as a quantitative screening method for the detection of the toxic activity associated with cyclic peptide hepatotoxins, at concentration levels >0.2 microg/L of MC-LR equivalents. A fast HPLC/PDA method has been developed for the determination of microcystins, by using a short, 50mm C18 column, with 1.8 microm particle size. Using this method a 10-fold reduction of sample run time was achieved and sufficient separation of microcystins was accomplished in less than 3 min. Finally, the analytical system includes an LC/MS/MS method that was developed for the determination of the 5 target compounds after SPE extraction. The method achieves extremely low limits of detection (<0.02 microg/L), in both surface and drinking waters and it is used for identification and verification purposes as well as for determinations at the ppt level. An analytical protocol that includes the above methods has been designed and validated through the analysis of a number of real samples. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of a Real-Time Radiological Area Monitoring Network for Emergency Response at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertoldo, N; Hunter, S; Fertig, R; Laguna, G; MacQueen, D

    2004-01-01

    A real-time radiological sensor network for emergency response was developed and deployed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Real-Time Radiological Area Monitoring (RTRAM) network is comprised of 16 Geiger-Mueller (GM) sensors positioned on the LLNL Livermore site perimeter to continuously monitor for a radiological condition resulting from a terrorist threat to site security and the health and safety of LLNL personnel. The RTRAM network sensor locations coincide with wind sector directions to provide thorough coverage of the one square mile site. These loW--power sensors are supported by a central command center (CCC) and transmit measurement data back to the CCC computer through the LLNL telecommunications infrastructure. Alarm conditions are identified by comparing current data to predetermined threshold parameters and are validated by comparison with plausible dispersion modeling scenarios and prevailing meteorological conditions. Emergency response personnel are notified of alarm conditions by automatic radio and computer based notifications. A secure intranet provides emergency response personnel with current condition assessment data that enable them to direct field response efforts remotely. The RTRAM network has proven to be a reliable system since initial deployment in August 2001 and maintains stability during inclement weather conditions

  14. Monitoring of surface deformation and microseismicity applied to radioactive waste disposal through hydraulic fracturing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stow, S.H.; Haase, C.S.; Switek, J.; Holzhausen, G.R.; Majer, E.

    1985-01-01

    Low-level liquid nuclear wastes are disposed of at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by the hydrofracture process. Wastes are mixed with cement and other additives to form a slurry that is injected into shale of low permeability at 300 m depth. The slurry spreads radially along bedding plane fractures before setting as a grout. Different methods for monitoring the location and behavior of the fractures have been investigated. Radioactive grout sheets can be located by gamma-ray logging of cased observation wells. Two other methods are based on the fact that the ground surface is deformed by the injection. The first entails surface leveling of a series of benchmarks; uplift up to 2.5 cm occurs. The second method involves use of tiltmeters that are sensitive and measure ground deformation in real time during an injection. Both methods show subsidence during the weeks following an injection. Interpretive models for the tiltmeter data are based on the elastic response of isotropic and anisotropic media to the inflation of a fluid-filled fracture. A fourth monitoring method is based on microseismicity. Geophone arrays were used to characterize the fracture process and to provide initial assessment of the feasibility of using seismic measurements to map the fractures as they form. An evaluation of each method is presented. 8 refs., 6 figs

  15. Monitoring of surface deformation and microseismicity applied to radioactive waste disposal through hydraulic fracturing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stow, S.H.; Haase, C.S.; Switek, J.; Holzhausen, G.R.; Majer, E.; Applied Geomechanics, Inc., Santa Cruz, CA; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA)

    1985-01-01

    Low-level liquid nuclear wastes are disposed of at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by the hydrofracture process. Wastes are mixed with cement and other additives to form a slurry that is injected into shale of low permeability at 300 m depth. The slurry spreads radially along bedding plane fractures before setting as a grout. Different methods for monitoring the location and behavior of the fractures have been investigated. Radioactive grout sheets can be located by gamma-ray logging of cased observation wells. Two other methods are based on the fact that the ground surface is deformed by the injection. The first entails surface leveling of a series of benchmarks; uplift up to 2.5 cm occurs. The second method involves use of tiltmeters that are sensitive and measure ground deformation in real time during an injection. Both methods show subsidence during the weeks following an injection. Interpretive models for the tiltmeter data are based on the elastic response of isotropic and anisotropic media to the inflation of a fluid-filled fracture. A fourth monitoring method is based on microseismicity. Geophone arrays were used to characterize the fracture process and to provide initial assessment of the feasibility of using seismic measurements to map the fractures as they form. An evaluation of each method is presented

  16. The Normal Electrocardiogram: Resting 12-Lead and Electrocardiogram Monitoring in the Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Patricia R E

    2016-09-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) is a well-established diagnostic tool extensively used in clinical settings. Knowledge of cardiac rhythm and mastery of cardiac waveform interpretation are fundamental for intensive care nurses. Recognition of the normal findings for the 12-lead ECG and understanding the significance of changes from baseline in continuous cardiac monitoring are essential steps toward ensuring safe patient care. This article highlights historical developments in electrocardiography, describes the normal resting 12-lead ECG, and discusses the need for continuous cardiac monitoring. In addition, future directions for the ECG are explored briefly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cytogenetic monitoring of hospital workers exposed to low-level ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigatti, P.; Lamberti, L.; Ardito, G.; Armellino, F.

    1988-01-01

    In the present study the cytogenetic effects in hospital workers exposed to low-level radiation were evaluated. Samples of peripheral blood were collected from 63 subjects working in radiodiagnostics and from 30 subjects, working in the same hospitals, who were used as controls. A higher number of cells with chromosome-type aberrations (CA) was observed in the exposed workers vs. the controls and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). No correlation was, on the contrary, found between CA and years of exposure. A significant difference was observed in the incidence of cells with CA between smokers and non-smokers, but in the control group only. In contrast, in the workers exposed to ionizing radiation, the frequency of cells with CA was very similar in smokers and non-smokers. 13 refs.; 4 tabs

  18. Isotope laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This report from the Dutch Ministry of Health is an advisory document concerned with isotope laboratories in hospitals, in connection with the Dutch laws for hospitals. It discusses which hospitals should have isotope laboratories and concludes that as many hospitals as possible should have small laboratories so that emergency cases can be dealt with. It divides the Netherlands into regions and suggests which hospitals should have these facilities. The questions of how big each lab. is to be, what equipment each has, how each lab. is organised, what therapeutic and diagnostic work should be carried out by each, etc. are discussed. The answers are provided by reports from working groups for in vivo diagnostics, in vitro diagnostics, therapy, and safety and their results form the criteria for the licences of isotope labs. The results of a questionnaire for isotope labs. already in the Netherlands are presented, and their activities outlined. (C.F.)

  19. Digital immunohistochemistry platform for the staining variation monitoring based on integration of image and statistical analyses with laboratory information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurinaviciene, Aida; Plancoulaine, Benoit; Baltrusaityte, Indra; Meskauskas, Raimundas; Besusparis, Justinas; Lesciute-Krilaviciene, Daiva; Raudeliunas, Darius; Iqbal, Yasir; Herlin, Paulette; Laurinavicius, Arvydas

    2014-01-01

    Digital immunohistochemistry (IHC) is one of the most promising applications brought by new generation image analysis (IA). While conventional IHC staining quality is monitored by semi-quantitative visual evaluation of tissue controls, IA may require more sensitive measurement. We designed an automated system to digitally monitor IHC multi-tissue controls, based on SQL-level integration of laboratory information system with image and statistical analysis tools. Consecutive sections of TMA containing 10 cores of breast cancer tissue were used as tissue controls in routine Ki67 IHC testing. Ventana slide label barcode ID was sent to the LIS to register the serial section sequence. The slides were stained and scanned (Aperio ScanScope XT), IA was performed by the Aperio/Leica Colocalization and Genie Classifier/Nuclear algorithms. SQL-based integration ensured automated statistical analysis of the IA data by the SAS Enterprise Guide project. Factor analysis and plot visualizations were performed to explore slide-to-slide variation of the Ki67 IHC staining results in the control tissue. Slide-to-slide intra-core IHC staining analysis revealed rather significant variation of the variables reflecting the sample size, while Brown and Blue Intensity were relatively stable. To further investigate this variation, the IA results from the 10 cores were aggregated to minimize tissue-related variance. Factor analysis revealed association between the variables reflecting the sample size detected by IA and Blue Intensity. Since the main feature to be extracted from the tissue controls was staining intensity, we further explored the variation of the intensity variables in the individual cores. MeanBrownBlue Intensity ((Brown+Blue)/2) and DiffBrownBlue Intensity (Brown-Blue) were introduced to better contrast the absolute intensity and the colour balance variation in each core; relevant factor scores were extracted. Finally, tissue-related factors of IHC staining variance were

  20. UK Transfusion Laboratory Collaborative: minimum standards for staff qualifications, training, competency and the use of information technology in hospital transfusion laboratories 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffe, B; Glencross, H; Jones, J; Staves, J; Capps-Jenner, A; Mistry, H; Bolton-Maggs, P; McQuade, M; Asher, D

    2014-12-01

    The SHOT Adverse Incident Reporting Scheme has consistently reported an unacceptably high level of errors originating in the laboratory setting. In 2006 an initiative was launched in conjunction with the IBMS, SHOT, RCPath, BBTS, UK NEQAS, the NHSE NBTC and the equivalents in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland that led to the formation of the UK TLC. The UK TLC in considering the nature and spread of the errors documented by SHOT concluded that a significant proportion of these errors were most likely to be related to either the use of information technology or staff education, staffing levels, skill mix, training and competency issues. In the absence of any formal guidance on these matters, the UK TLC developed a series of recommendations using the results of two laboratory surveys conducted in 2007 and 2008.

  1. RAPID MONITORING BY QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION FOR PATHOGENIC ASPERGILLUS DURING CARPET REMOVAL FROM A HOSPITAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monitoring for pathogenic Aspergillus species using a rapid, highly sensitive, quantitative polumerase chain reaction technique during carpet removal in a burn unit provided data which allowed the patients to be safely returned to the re-floored area sooner than if only conventio...

  2. RAPID MONITORING BY QPCR FOR PATHOGENIC ASPERGILLUS DURING CARPET REMOVAL FROM A HOSPITAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monitoring for pathogenic Aspergillus species using a rapid, highly sensitive, quantitative polymerase chain reaction technique during carpet removal in a burn unit provided data which allowed the patients to be safely returned to the re-floored area sooner than if only conventi...

  3. Monitoring of Adverse Drug Reactions Associated with Antihypertensive Medicines at a University Teaching Hospital in New Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fowad Khurshid

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim To monitor the adverse drug reactions (ADRs caused by antihypertensive medicines prescribed in a university teaching hospital.Methods:he present work was an open, non-comparative, observational study conducted on hypertensive patients attending the Medicine OPD of Majeedia Hospital, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, India by conducting patient interviews and recording the data on ADR monitoring form as recommended by Central Drugs Standard Control Organization (CDSCO, Government of India.Results:A total of 21 adverse drug reactions were observed in 192 hypertensive patients. Incidence of adverse drug reactions was found to be higher in patients more than 40 years in age, and females experienced more ADRs (n = 14, 7.29 % than males, 7 (3.64 %. Combination therapy was associated with more number of adverse drug reactions (66.7 % as against monotherapy (33.3 %. Calcium channel blockers were found to be the most frequently associated drugs with adverse drug reactions (n = 7, followed by diuretics (n = 5, and beta- blockers (n = 4. Among individual drugs, amlodipine was found to be the commonest drug associated with adverse drug reactions (n = 7, followed by torasemide (n = 3. Adverse drug reactions associated with central nervous system were found to be the most frequent (42.8 % followed by musculo-skeletal complaints (23.8 % and gastro-intestinal disorders (14.3 %. Conclusions:The present pharmacovigilance study represents the adverse drug reaction profile of the antihypertensive medicines prescribed in our university teaching hospital. The above findings would be useful for physicians in rational prescribing. Calcium channel blockers were found to be the most frequently associated drugs with adverse drug reactions.

  4. A mobile laboratory for surface and subsurface imaging in geo-hazard monitoring activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornacchia, Carmela; Bavusi, Massimo; Loperte, Antonio; Pergola, Nicola; Pignatti, Stefano; Ponzo, Felice; Lapenna, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    A new research infrastructure for supporting ground-based remote sensing observations in the different phases of georisk management cycle is presented. This instrumental facility has been designed and realised by TeRN, a public-private consortium on Earth Observations and Natural Risks, in the frame of the project "ImpresAmbiente" funded by Italian Ministry of Research and University. The new infrastructure is equipped with ground-based sensors (hyperspectral cameras, thermal cameras, laser scanning and electromagnetic antennae) able to remotely map physical parameters and/or earth-surface properties (temperature, soil moisture, land cover, etc…) and to illuminate near-surface geological structures (fault, groundwater tables, landslide bodies etc...). Furthermore, the system can be used for non-invasive investigations of architectonic buildings and civil infrastructures (bridges, tunnel, road pavements, etc...) interested by natural and man-made hazards. The hyperspectral cameras can acquire high resolution images of earth-surface and cultural objects. They are operating in the Visible Near InfraRed (0.4÷1.0μm) with 1600 spatial pixel and 3.7nm of spectral sampling and in the Short Wave InfraRed (1.3÷2.5µm) spectral region with 320 spatial pixel and 5nm of spectral sampling. The IR cameras are operating in the Medium Wavelength InfraRed (3÷5µm; 640x512; NETDcultural heritage. As a consequence, laser data can be useful integrated with traditional monitoring techniques. The Laser Scanner is characterized by very high data acquisition repetition rate up to 500.000 pxl/sec with a range resolution of 0.1 mm, vertical and horizontal FoV of 310° and 360° respectively with a resolution of 0.0018°. The system is also equipped with a metric camera allows to georeference the high resolution images acquired. The electromagnetic sensors allow to obtain in near real time high-resolution 2D and 3D subsurface tomographic images. The main components are a fully automatic

  5. A Review of Electronic Hand Hygiene Monitoring: Considerations for Hospital Management in Data Collection, Healthcare Worker Supervision, and Patient Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuckin, Maryanne; Govednik, John

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) in U.S. acute care hospitals lead to a burden of $96-$147 billion annually on the U.S. health system and affect 1 in 20 hospital patients (Marchetti & Rossiter, 2013). Hospital managers are charged with reducing and eliminating HAIs to cut costs and improve patient outcomes. Healthcare worker (HCW) hand hygiene (HH) practice is the most effective means of preventing the spread of HAIs, but compliance is at or below 50% (McGuckin, Waterman, & Govednik, 2009). For managers to increase the frequency of HCW HH occurrences and improve the quality of HH performance, companies have introduced electronic technologies to assist managers in training, supervising, and gathering data in the patient care setting. Although these technologies offer valuable feedback regarding compliance, little is known in terms of capabilities in the clinical setting. Less is known about HCW or patient attitudes if the system allows feedback to be shared. Early-adopting managers have begun to examine their experiences with HH technologies and publish their findings. We review peer-reviewed research on infection prevention that focused on the capabilities of these electronic systems, as well as the related research on HCW and patient interactions with electronic HH systems. Research suggests that these systems are capable of collecting data, but the results are mixed regarding their impact on HH compliance, reducing HAIs, or both and their costs. Research also indicates that HCWs and patients may not regard the technology as positively as industry or healthcare managers may have intended. When considering the adoption of electronic HH monitoring systems, hospital administrators should proceed with caution.

  6. Air Monitoring Leads to Discovery of New Contamination at Radioactive Waste Disposal Site (Area G) at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraig, D.H.; Conrad, R.C.

    1999-01-01

    Air monitoring at Area G, the low-level radioactive waste disposal area at Los Alamos National Laboratory, revealed increased air concentrations of 239 Pu and 241 Am at one location along the north boundary. This air monitoring location is a couple of meters north of a dirt road used to access the easternmost part of Area G. Air concentrations of 238 Pu were essentially unaffected, which was puzzling because the 238 Pu and 239 Pu are present in the local, slightly contaminated soils. Air concentrations of these radionuclides increased about a factor of ten in early 1995 and remained at those levels until the first quarter of 1996. During the spring of 1996 air concentrations again increased by a factor of about ten. No other radionuclides were elevated and no other Area G stations showed elevations of these radionuclides. After several formal meetings didn't provide an adequate cause for the elevations, a gamma survey was performed and showed a small area of significant contamination just south of the monitor location. We found in February, 1995, a trench for a water line had been dug within a meter of so of the air stations. Then, during early 1996, the dirt road was rerouted such that its new path was directly over the unknown contamination. It appears that the trenching brought contaminated material to the surface and caused the first rise in air concentrations and then the rerouting of the road over the contamination caused the second rise, during 1996. We also found that during 1976 and 1977 contaminated soils from the clean-up of an old processing facility had been spread over the filled pits in the vicinity of the air monitors. These soils were very low in 238Pu which explains why we saw very little 238 Pu in the increased air concentrations. A layer of gravel and sand was spread over the contaminated area. Although air concentrations of 239 Pu and 241 Am dropped considerably, the y have not returned to pre-1995 levels

  7. Reverse Logistics of Class-D Waste in a Hospital Environment: Monitoring and Evaluation of Recycling in the Cândido Fontoura Children’s Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Antonietta Leitão Zajac

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The proper segregation of Health Services Waste (HSW reduces contamination of ordinary waste and the risks to occupational health, besides allowing for the recovering of recyclable materials. Efficient segregation depends on the training and awareness of staff involved in the generation of HSW. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to develop an evaluation model, training and measurement of segregation of common waste, especially recyclable paper, in the administrative sector of the Hospital Cândido Fontoura, located in the city of São Paulo. Monitoring was held for the management routine of ordinary waste and recyclable paper, from June to October (2014. Training through lectures was held so as to raise employee awareness about the importance of proper disposal of waste. The results were obtained by segregation and weighing of recyclable waste paper and ordinary waste. Three samples were considered: before sensitization (Before; after sensitization (After; with daily monitoring in the sector (Accompanied. The period for evaluation per sample was nine days (n = 9. The statistical test was applied (analysis of variance, as well as the  Kruskal-Wallis test (α < 0.05 for the weights of the samples, that which were considered significantly different (p = 0.0034. The Before sample (6.2 ± 2.9 kg was considered heavier. There was no significant difference between the samples After (3.0 ± 1.7 kg and Accompanied (2.8 ± 1.5 kg being considered similar. The amount of recyclable paper evolved inversely to the common residue, 3.7 ± 0.2 kg (Before to 6.7 ± 3.1 kg (Accompanied demonstrating the effectiveness and proper recycling HSW.

  8. Educational intervention together with an on-line quality control program achieve recommended analytical goals for bedside blood glucose monitoring in a 1200-bed university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor; Rodriguez-Oliva, Manuel; Sánchez-Pozo, Cristina; Fernández-Gallardo, María Francisca; Goberna, Raimundo

    2005-01-01

    Portable meters for blood glucose concentrations are used at the patients bedside, as well as by patients for self-monitoring of blood glucose. Even though most devices have important technological advances that decrease operator error, the analytical goals proposed for the performance of glucose meters have been recently changed by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) to reach nurses in a 1200-bed University Hospital to achieve recommended analytical goals, so that we could improve the quality of diabetes care. We used portable glucose meters connected on-line to the laboratory after an educational program for nurses with responsibilities in point-of-care testing. We evaluated the system by assessing total error of the glucometers using high- and low-level glucose control solutions. In a period of 6 months, we collected data from 5642 control samples obtained by 14 devices (Precision PCx) directly from the control program (QC manager). The average total error for the low-level glucose control (2.77 mmol/l) was 6.3% (range 5.5-7.6%), and even lower for the high-level glucose control (16.66 mmol/l), at 4.8% (range 4.1-6.5%). In conclusion, the performance of glucose meters used in our University Hospital with more than 1000 beds not only improved after the intervention, but the meters achieved the analytical goals of the suggested ADA/National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry criteria for total error (<7.9% in the range 2.77-16.66 mmol/l glucose) and optimal total error for high glucose concentrations of <5%, which will improve the quality of care of our patients.

  9. Large-scale laboratory testing of bedload-monitoring technologies: overview of the StreamLab06 Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Jeffrey D.G.; Gray, John R.; Davis, Broderick E.; Ellis, Chris; Johnson, Sara; Gray, John R.; Laronne, Jonathan B.; Marr, Jeffrey D.G.

    2010-01-01

    A 3-month-long, large-scale flume experiment involving research and testing of selected conventional and surrogate bedload-monitoring technologies was conducted in the Main Channel at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory under the auspices of the National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics. These experiments, dubbed StreamLab06, involved 25 researchers and volunteers from academia, government, and the private sector. The research channel was equipped with a sediment-recirculation system and a sediment-flux monitoring system that allowed continuous measurement of sediment flux in the flume and provided a data set by which samplers were evaluated. Selected bedload-measurement technologies were tested under a range of flow and sediment-transport conditions. The experiment was conducted in two phases. The bed material in phase I was well-sorted siliceous sand (0.6-1.8 mm median diameter). A gravel mixture (1-32 mm median diameter) composed the bed material in phase II. Four conventional bedload samplers – a standard Helley-Smith, Elwha, BLH-84, and Toutle River II (TR-2) sampler – were manually deployed as part of both experiment phases. Bedload traps were deployed in study Phase II. Two surrogate bedload samplers – stationarymounted down-looking 600 kHz and 1200 kHz acoustic Doppler current profilers – were deployed in experiment phase II. This paper presents an overview of the experiment including the specific data-collection technologies used and the ambient hydraulic, sediment-transport and environmental conditions measured as part of the experiment. All data collected as part of the StreamLab06 experiments are, or will be available to the research community.

  10. Global baby-friendly hospital initiative monitoring data: update and discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbok, Miriam H

    2012-08-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO)/UNICEF Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) was developed to support the implementation of the Ten Steps for Successful Breastfeeding. The purpose of this study is to assess trends in the numbers facilities ever-designated "baby-friendly," to consider uptake of the new WHO/UNICEF BFHI materials, and to consider implications for future breastfeeding support. The national contacts from the 2006-2007 UNICEF BFHI update were recontacted, as were WHO and UNICEF officers worldwide, to ascertain the number of hospitals ever-designated "baby-friendly," presence of a government breastfeeding oversight committee, use of the new BFHI materials and, if yes, use of the new maternity or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) materials. Seventy countries reporting in 2010-2011 and the updates from an additional 61 reporting in 2006-2007 (n=131, or 66% of the 198 countries) confirm that there are at least 21,328 ever-designated facilities. This is 27.5% of maternities worldwide: 8.5% of those in industrialized countries and 31% in less developed settings. In 2010, government committees were reported by 18 countries, and 34 reported using the new BFHI materials: 14 reported using the maternity care and 11 reported using the HIV materials. Rates of increase in the number of ever-certified "baby-friendly" hospitals vary by region and show some chronological correlation with trends in breastfeeding rates. Although it is not possible to attribute this increase to the BFHI alone, there is ongoing interest in Ten Steps implementation and in BFHI. The continued growth may reflect the dedication of ministries of health and national BFHI groups, as well as increasing recognition that the Ten Steps are effective quality improvement practices that increase breastfeeding and synergize with community interventions and other program efforts. With renewed interest in maternal/neonatal health, revitalization of support for Ten Steps and their effective

  11. An audit of therapeutic drug monitoring services of anticonvulsants at a tertiary care hospital in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taur, Santosh R; Kulkarni, Namrata B; Gogtay, Nithya J; Thatte, Urmila M

    2013-04-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is an important adjunct to the treatment of epilepsy. However, few studies have actually correlated plasma levels of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) with treatment response. The present audit aimed to study (i) the association between seizure control and number of AEDs, plasma AED concentration, and concomitant use of antitubercular drugs; (ii) the pattern of indications for TDM requisitions; and (iii) the association between referral for toxicity and plasma AED concentration. This observational and retrospective study was carried out to analyze the TDM data of patients referred between January 2008 and December 2011. As per the International League Against Epilepsy Task Force 2009, patients were categorized into responders and nonresponders. Plasma AED levels were interpreted as below, within, and above the reference range. Of 3206 TDM requisitions, 67% were monotherapy and 33% were 2 or more AEDs. Only 8% were responders as against 92% nonresponders. Of 95 patients on concomitant antituberculosis treatment, 72 were nonresponders, with odds ratio (95% confidence interval) 3.71 [2.19 to 6.23]. Breakthrough seizure (37%) was the most common indication followed by suspected toxicity and routine monitoring in 22% each and suspected nonadherence in 11% of the total requests. In 52% of patients, plasma levels were below the reference range, and they were equally distributed amongst responders and nonresponders. Among patients referred for suspected phenytoin toxicity, only 59% (50.6 to 67.8) had plasma concentrations above the reference range. TDM continues to remain an important tool to support dose individualization when the patient is receiving multiple AEDs or other drugs such as antitubercular medicines, to assess compliance, and to monitor and treat toxicity.

  12. Is point of care testing in Irish hospitals ready for the laboratory modernisation process? An audit against the current national Irish guidelines.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Kelly, R A

    2013-04-11

    BACKGROUND: The Laboratory modernisation process in Ireland will include point of care testing (POCT) as one of its central tenets. However, a previous baseline survey showed that POCT was under-resourced particularly with respect to information technology (IT) and staffing. AIMS: An audit was undertaken to see if POCT services had improved since the publication of National Guidelines and if such services were ready for the major changes in laboratory medicine as envisaged by the Health Service Executive. METHODS: The 15 recommendations of the 2007 Guidelines were used as a template for a questionnaire, which was distributed by the Irish External Quality Assessment Scheme. RESULTS: Thirty-nine of a possible 45 acute hospitals replied. Only a quarter of respondent hospitals had POCT committees, however, allocation of staff to POCT had doubled since the first baseline survey. Poor IT infrastructure, the use of unapproved devices, and low levels of adverse incident reporting were still major issues. CONCLUSIONS: Point of care testing remains under-resourced, despite the roll out of such devices throughout the health service including primary care. The present high standards of laboratory medicine may not be maintained if the quality and cost-effectiveness of POCT is not controlled. Adherence to national Guidelines and adequate resourcing is essential to ensure patient safety.

  13. Application Anti Microbial Activity Test and Direct Inoculation of Urinary Specimen Test to Increase the Quality of Results and Decrease the Production Cost in Clinical Microbiology Laboratory, Sanglah General Hospital Hospital, Bali-Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyoman Sri-Budayanti

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Urinary tract infection (UTI is the most common bacterial infection in general practice and in hospitals. Fast and accurate urine culture and sensitivity test are needed for adequate therapy. Anti Microbial Activity test (AMA test that is used to detect the presence of antibiotics in urine specimens is not commonly used in clinical microbiology laboratories. Some laboratories are still using indirect inoculation technique using enriched media before inoculating onto the agar media. The aim of this research is to compare results of urinary examination of direct inoculation technique with AMA test with indirect inoculation technique without AMA test.Methods: A number of 210 urine specimens were collected in Clinical Microbiology Laboratory at Sanglah General Hospital within a time period between 16 June until 16 July 2009.Results: Antibiotics were detected in 40% of the urinary specimens; whereas 48.1% showed no evidence of UTI, that is negative AMA test and sterile urinary culture or colony growth < 105 CFU/ml. Only 11.9% of the specimens indicates urinary tract infections. The examination can be completed within 2-3 days which is shorter than indirect inoculation test which require 5-7 days. Direct inoculation technique can reduce the cost of production three-fold the costs require for an indirect inoculation test.Conclusions: Application of AMA test and direct inoculation technique can give results more rapidly, reliable and useful for clinicians. This also decrease the laboratory’s cost of production.

  14. Use of hospital discharge data to monitor uterine rupture--Massachusetts, 1990-1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-31

    Uterine rupture (UR), a potentially life-threatening condition for both mother and infant, occurs in vaginal birth after cesarean section (VBAC) (1-4). During 1990-1997, the proportion of vaginal deliveries among women who had previous cesarean sections (CS) in Massachusetts increased 50%, from 22.3% to 33.5% (5). Concern about a corresponding increase in UR prompted the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and CDC to initiate a state-wide investigation that included an assessment of the validity and reliability of International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) (6), codes in hospital discharge data to identify UR cases. This report summarizes the results of the investigation, which indicate that ICD-9-CM codes related to UR, designed before increased concern about UR, lack adequate specificity for UR surveillance and have not been applied consistently over time.

  15. Clinical, laboratory, and demographic determinants of hospitalization due to dengue in 7613 patients: A retrospective study based on hierarchical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Natal Santos; Undurraga, Eduardo A; da Silva Ferreira, Elis Regina; Estofolete, Cássia Fernanda; Nogueira, Maurício Lacerda

    2018-01-01

    In Brazil, the incidence of hospitalization due to dengue, as an indicator of severity, has drastically increased since 1998. The objective of our study was to identify risk factors associated with subsequent hospitalization related to dengue. We analyzed 7613 dengue confirmed via serology (ELISA), non-structural protein 1, or polymerase chain reaction amplification. We used a hierarchical framework to generate a multivariate logistic regression based on a variety of risk variables. This was followed by multiple statistical analyses to assess hierarchical model accuracy, variance, goodness of fit, and whether or not this model reliably represented the population. The final model, which included age, sex, ethnicity, previous dengue infection, hemorrhagic manifestations, plasma leakage, and organ failure, showed that all measured parameters, with the exception of previous dengue, were statistically significant. The presence of organ failure was associated with the highest risk of subsequent dengue hospitalization (OR=5·75; CI=3·53-9·37). Therefore, plasma leakage and organ failure were the main indicators of hospitalization due to dengue, although other variables of minor importance should also be considered to refer dengue patients to hospital treatment, which may lead to a reduction in avoidable deaths as well as costs related to dengue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Retrospective analysis of non-laboratory-based adverse drug reactions induced by intravenous radiocontrast agents in a Joint Commission International-accredited academic medical center hospital in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen QL

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Qin-lan Chen,1 Xiao-ying Zhao,2 Xiao-mi Wang,1 Na Lv,2 Ling-ling Zhu,3 Hui-min Xu,4 Quan Zhou4 1Radiology Nursing Unit, Division of Nursing, 2Department of Quality Management, 3Geriatric VIP Care Ward, Division of Nursing, 4Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The authors retrospectively analyzed the pattern and characteristics of non-laboratory-based adverse drug reactions (ADRs induced by intravenous radiocontrast agents in a large-scale hospital in China during 2014–2015. There were 314 ADR cases among 118,208 patients receiving enhanced CT or MRI examinations. The frequency of moderate/severe ADRs defined by Chinese Society of Radiology (ie, severe vomiting, systematic urticaria, facial swelling, dyspnea, vasovagal reaction, laryngeal edema, seizure, trembling, convulsions, unconsciousness, shock, death, and other unexpected adverse reactions was rare (0.0431%, whereas the mild ADRs were uncommon (0.2225% and accounted for 83.76% of ADRs. Frequency of ADRs induced by iodinated contrast agents was related with examination site, sex, and type of patient settings (P<0.01 and was higher compared with gadolinium contrast agents (0.3676% vs 0.0504%, P<0.01. From 2014 to 2015, frequencies of total and moderate/severe ADRs induced by iodinated contrast agents decreased significantly (0.4410% vs 0.2947%, P<0.01; 0.0960% vs 0.0282%, P<0.01, respectively. Frequency of ADRs differed among different iodinated contrast and gadolinium contrast (P<0.05 agents. Iopromide’s ADR frequency in 2014 was significantly higher compared with iopamidol, ioversol, or iohexol (P<0.01. Frequency of moderate/severe ADRs induced by iodixanol was 4.1–5.4 times that of iohexol, iopromide, or iopamidol. Rash was the predominant ADR subtype (84.39% and occurred more frequently with iodixanol compared with iohexol, iopamidol, or ioversol (P<0

  17. Predictable and reliable ECG monitoring over IEEE 802.11 WLANs within a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Juyoung; Kang, Kyungtae

    2014-09-01

    Telecardiology provides mobility for patients who require constant electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring. However, its safety is dependent on the predictability and robustness of data delivery, which must overcome errors in the wireless channel through which the ECG data are transmitted. We report here a framework that can be used to gauge the applicability of IEEE 802.11 wireless local area network (WLAN) technology to ECG monitoring systems in terms of delay constraints and transmission reliability. For this purpose, a medical-grade WLAN architecture achieved predictable delay through the combination of a medium access control mechanism based on the point coordination function provided by IEEE 802.11 and an error control scheme based on Reed-Solomon coding and block interleaving. The size of the jitter buffer needed was determined by this architecture to avoid service dropout caused by buffer underrun, through analysis of variations in transmission delay. Finally, we assessed this architecture in terms of service latency and reliability by modeling the transmission of uncompressed two-lead electrocardiogram data from the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database and highlight the applicability of this wireless technology to telecardiology.

  18. Assessment of readiness for clinical decision support to aid laboratory monitoring of immunosuppressive care at U.S. liver transplant centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, J; Weir, C; Evans, R S; Staes, C

    2014-01-01

    Following liver transplantation, patients require lifelong immunosuppressive care and monitoring. Computerized clinical decision support (CDS) has been shown to improve post-transplant immunosuppressive care processes and outcomes. The readiness of transplant information systems to implement computerized CDS to support post-transplant care is unknown. a) Describe the current clinical information system functionality and manual and automated processes for laboratory monitoring of immunosuppressive care, b) describe the use of guidelines that may be used to produce computable logic and the use of computerized alerts to support guideline adherence, and c) explore barriers to implementation of CDS in U.S. liver transplant centers. We developed a web-based survey using cognitive interviewing techniques. We surveyed 119 U.S. transplant programs that performed at least five liver transplantations per year during 2010-2012. Responses were summarized using descriptive analyses; barriers were identified using qualitative methods. Respondents from 80 programs (67% response rate) completed the survey. While 98% of programs reported having an electronic health record (EHR), all programs used paper-based manual processes to receive or track immunosuppressive laboratory results. Most programs (85%) reported that 30% or more of their patients used external laboratories for routine testing. Few programs (19%) received most external laboratory results as discrete data via electronic interfaces while most (80%) ma