WorldWideScience

Sample records for hospital emergency management

  1. Assessment of hospital emergency management in the Beijing area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantao, Xin

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, the number of public health emergencies has increased. Improving hospital emergency management is an important challenge. This is a pilot study intended to assess hospital emergency management in the Beijing area, make recommendations to government health authorities and hospital managers, and offer references for similar studies. This was an observational, cross-sectional survey. Forty-five hospitals in the Beijing area were selected randomly. A self-administered questionnaire was used as a data collection tool. It comprised of three sections: (1) Section A was the introduction; (2) Section B asked for the respondent's personal information; and (3) Section C comprised the major part of the questionnaire and was intended to gather information regarding the hospital's general emergency management situation. The survey response rate was 44%, accounting for 29% of total hospitals that the study targeted. No hospital had an established emergency management department or full-time staff for emergency management. A total of 15-45% of the hospitals had established a hospital emergency management committee, performed a vulnerability analysis, or evaluated emergency management regularly. Twenty-five percent of respondents thought that the local government health authority had established an integrated hospital incident command system. A total of 40%-55% of hospitals contracted with outside institutions for supplements, backup of key functional systems and professional support. After the occurrence of the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic, Chinese hospital managers took many measures to improve hospital resilience. However, most of these efforts lacked the guidance of theories, concepts, principles, and methods. An integrated, standardized, operational hospital emergency management model has not been established. Although the survey response rate was relatively low, some clues for further study were discovered, and suggestions to the

  2. Evaluating Emergency Department Asthma Management Practices in Florida Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Alexandra C H; Carretta, Henry J; Dudley, Julie K; Forrest, Jamie R; Folsom, Abbey N

    2016-01-01

    To assess gaps in emergency department (ED) asthma management at Florida hospitals. Survey instrument with open- and closed-ended questions. Topics included availability of specific asthma management modalities, compliance with national guidelines, employment of specialized asthma care personnel, and efforts toward performance improvement. Emergency departments at 10 large hospitals in the state of Florida. Clinical care providers and health administrators from participating hospitals. Compliance with national asthma care guideline standards, provision of specific recommended treatment modalities and resources, employment of specialized asthma care personnel, and engagement in performance improvement efforts. Our results suggest inconsistency among sampled Florida hospitals' adherence to national standards for treatment of asthma in EDs. Several hospitals were refining their emergency care protocols to incorporate guideline recommendations. Despite a lack of formal ED protocols in some hospitals, adherence to national guidelines for emergency care nonetheless remained robust for patient education and medication prescribing, but it was weaker for formal care planning and medical follow-up. Identified deficiencies in emergency asthma care present a number of opportunities for strategic mitigation of identified gaps. We conclude with suggestions to help Florida hospitals achieve success with ED asthma care reform. Team-based learning activities may offer an optimal strategy for sharing and implementing best practices.

  3. Managing pediatric dental trauma in a hospital emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jonathan; Sheller, Barbara; Velan, Elizabeth; Caglar, Derya; Scott, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) examine types of dental trauma presenting to a hospital emergency department (ED); (2) describe the medical services provided to these patients; and (3) quantify time spent during ED encounters for dental trauma emergencies. Records of 265 patients who presented to the ED with dental trauma over a three-year period were reviewed. Demographics, injury types, triage acuity, pain scores, and dental/medical treatment and times were analyzed. Patient demographics and injury types were similar to previous studies. Eighty-two percent of patients received mid-level triage scores; 41 percent of patients had moderate to severe pain. The most frequently provided medical services were administration of analgesics and/or prescriptions (78 percent). The mean times were: 51 minutes waiting for a physician; 55 minutes with dentists; and 176 minutes total time. Higher triage acuity and pain levels resulted in significantly longer wait times for physician assessment. Dental evaluation, including treatment, averaged 32 percent of time spent at the hospital. A dental clinic is the most efficient venue for treating routine dental trauma. Patients in this study spent the majority of time waiting for physicians and receiving nondental services. Most patients required no medical intervention beyond prescriptions commonly used in dental practice.

  4. [Evaluations by hospital-ward physicians of patient care management quality for patients hospitalized after an emergency department admission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartiaux, M; Mols, P

    2017-01-01

    patient management in the acute and sub-acute setting of an Emergency Department is challenging. An assessment of the quality of provided care enables an evaluation of failings. It contributes to the identification of areas for improvement. to obtain an analysis, by hospital-ward physicians, of adult patient care management quality, as well as of the correctness of diagnosis made during emergency admissions. To evaluate the consequences of inadequate patient care management on morbidity, mortality and cost and duration of hospitalization. prospective data analysis obtained between the 1/12/2009 and the 21/12/2009 from physicians using a questionnaire on adult-patient emergency admissions and subsequent hospitalization. questionnaires were completed for 332 patients. Inadequate management of patient care were reported for 73/332 (22 %) cases. Incorrect diagnoses were reported for 20/332 (6 %) cases. 35 cases of inadequate care management (10.5 % overall) were associated with morbidity (34 cases) or mortality (1 case), including 4 cases (1.2 % ) that required emergency intensive-care or surgical interventions. this quality study analyzed the percentage of patient management cases and incorrect diagnoses in the emergency department. The data for serious outcome and wrong diagnosis are comparable with current literature. To improve performance, we consider the process for establishing a diagnosis and therapeutic care.

  5. Pain Management for Sickle Cell Disease in the Pediatric Emergency Department: Medications and Hospitalization Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciotti, Chantel; Vaiselbuh, Sarah; Romanos-Sirakis, Eleny

    2017-10-01

    The majority of emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) are pain related. Adequate and timely pain management may improve quality of life and prevent worsening morbidities. We conducted a retrospective chart review of pediatric patients with SCD seen in the ED, selected by sickle cell-related ICD-9 codes. A total of 176 encounters were reviewed from 47 patients to record ED pain management and hospitalization trends. Mean time to pain medication administration was 63 minutes. Patients received combination (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug [NSAID] + narcotic) pain medications for initial treatment at a minority of ED encounters (19%). A higher percentage of patients who received narcotics alone as initial treatment were hospitalized as compared with those who received combination treatment initially ( P= 0.0085). Improved patient education regarding home pain management as well as standardized ED guidelines for assessment and treatment of sickle cell pain may result in superior and more consistent patient care.

  6. [Pre-hospital management of adults with life-threatening emergencies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattel, Francis; Dubois, François

    2012-01-01

    , fewer voluntary firemen, hospital reorganization, tight funding, difficulties of medical dispatching, and the varying skills of "first-on-the-scene "emergency workers. Grievances include late emergency responses, inappropriate medical care, and dispatching to the wrong facility. This raises the question of equal opportunity for all in a country with widely varying geographic features and population density. Improvement in the system's efficiency will require a series of objectives to be met in varied and complementary--Enhanced functional coordination, by speeding up the deployment of the ANTARES digital radio-frequency transmission network (Adaptation Nationale des Transmissions Aux Risques Et aux Secours).--Implementation of a network of emergency services with varying degrees of emergency healthcare management related to the technical nature of the facilities. Three levels of emergency healthcare must be made available: level 1 is provided by local hospitals, level 2 includes support facilities available in general hospitals (not necessarily the nearest hospital), and level 3 provides specialized healthcare in large and/or training hospitals with specialized departments. Life-threatening emergency situations are to be handled by level 2 or 3 facilities. Specific facilities must be selected as reference centers. In France, the ARS (Agences Régionales de Santé) is in charge of this procedure, as it provide funding for healthcare continuity--Reducing inequalities in access to emergency care. This will involve improving the network of SDIS brigades, making local medical facilities more responsive, delegating more medical procedures, on-site telemedicine, providing more helicopters equipped with healthcare facilities, more automated external defibrillators, and more dedicated neuro-vascular units.--First aid training must be made widely available. The French National Academy of Medicine has approved ten recommendations regarding organization and facilities.

  7. Difficult Airway Response Team: A Novel Quality Improvement Program for Managing Hospital-Wide Airway Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Lynette J.; Herzer, Kurt R.; Cover, Renee; Pandian, Vinciya; Bhatti, Nasir I.; Berkow, Lauren C.; Haut, Elliott R.; Hillel, Alexander T.; Miller, Christina R.; Feller-Kopman, David J.; Schiavi, Adam J.; Xie, Yanjun J.; Lim, Christine; Holzmueller, Christine; Ahmad, Mueen; Thomas, Pradeep; Flint, Paul W.; Mirski, Marek A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Difficult airway cases can quickly become emergencies, increasing the risk of life-threatening complications or death. Emergency airway management outside the operating room is particularly challenging. Methods We developed a quality improvement program—the Difficult Airway Response Team (DART)—to improve emergency airway management outside the operating room. DART was implemented by a team of anesthesiologists, otolaryngologists, trauma surgeons, emergency medicine physicians, and risk managers in 2005 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. The DART program had three core components: operations, safety, and education. The operations component focused on developing a multidisciplinary difficult airway response team, standardizing the emergency response process, and deploying difficult airway equipment carts throughout the hospital. The safety component focused on real-time monitoring of DART activations and learning from past DART events to continuously improve system-level performance. This objective entailed monitoring the paging system, reporting difficult airway events and DART activations to a web-based registry, and using in situ simulations to identify and mitigate defects in the emergency airway management process. The educational component included development of a multispecialty difficult airway curriculum encompassing case-based lectures, simulation, and team building/communication to ensure consistency of care. Educational materials were also developed for non-DART staff and patients to inform them about the needs of patients with difficult airways and ensure continuity of care with other providers after discharge. Results Between July 2008 and June 2013, DART managed 360 adult difficult airway events comprising 8% of all code activations. Predisposing patient factors included body mass index > 40, history of head and neck tumor, prior difficult intubation, cervical spine injury, airway edema, airway bleeding, and previous

  8. Difficult airway response team: a novel quality improvement program for managing hospital-wide airway emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Lynette J; Herzer, Kurt R; Cover, Renee; Pandian, Vinciya; Bhatti, Nasir I; Berkow, Lauren C; Haut, Elliott R; Hillel, Alexander T; Miller, Christina R; Feller-Kopman, David J; Schiavi, Adam J; Xie, Yanjun J; Lim, Christine; Holzmueller, Christine; Ahmad, Mueen; Thomas, Pradeep; Flint, Paul W; Mirski, Marek A

    2015-07-01

    Difficult airway cases can quickly become emergencies, increasing the risk of life-threatening complications or death. Emergency airway management outside the operating room is particularly challenging. We developed a quality improvement program-the Difficult Airway Response Team (DART)-to improve emergency airway management outside the operating room. DART was implemented by a team of anesthesiologists, otolaryngologists, trauma surgeons, emergency medicine physicians, and risk managers in 2005 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. The DART program had 3 core components: operations, safety, and education. The operations component focused on developing a multidisciplinary difficult airway response team, standardizing the emergency response process, and deploying difficult airway equipment carts throughout the hospital. The safety component focused on real-time monitoring of DART activations and learning from past DART events to continuously improve system-level performance. This objective entailed monitoring the paging system, reporting difficult airway events and DART activations to a Web-based registry, and using in situ simulations to identify and mitigate defects in the emergency airway management process. The educational component included development of a multispecialty difficult airway curriculum encompassing case-based lectures, simulation, and team building/communication to ensure consistency of care. Educational materials were also developed for non-DART staff and patients to inform them about the needs of patients with difficult airways and ensure continuity of care with other providers after discharge. Between July 2008 and June 2013, DART managed 360 adult difficult airway events comprising 8% of all code activations. Predisposing patient factors included body mass index >40, history of head and neck tumor, prior difficult intubation, cervical spine injury, airway edema, airway bleeding, and previous or current tracheostomy. Twenty

  9. Ischaemic stroke management by emergency care physicians at public sector hospitals of Karachi, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luni, F.K.; Hamid, S.A.; Mamji, S.; Baig, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the clinicians management of patients presenting with acute ischaemic stroke in the emergency departments of two large state run hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan. A questionnaire was filled by 59 registered medical practitioners working at these two government hospitals who would be managing stroke patients presenting in the emergency. It was a descriptive cross sectional study designed to assess the methods used by the doctors for diagnosing and treating stroke patients. The data was collected from October to November 2007 and entered using Epi Data Entry and analyzed by SPSS 13.0. Results: The preferred overall investigation for a suspected stroke patient in an emergency ward was an ECG (98%). 51% of the respondents would prescribe aspirin to most patients (300 mg by 40% respondents). Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator was thought to be beneficial by 43% of doctors, low molecular weight heparin by 91%, subcutaneous heparin by 86.5%, intravenous Vitamin B complex by 20% and steroids by 39% of respondents. Regarding elevated blood pressure, 60% answered that they would manage the blood pressure according to the type of stroke and 73% responded that they would lower blood pressure when it reached greater than 150/80. 88% of the doctors answered that they would use cholesterol lowering drugs in the management of stroke patients in an emergency. 97% of the doctors recommended rehabilitation and 88% of the respondents believed that there should be separate stroke units. Conclusion: The development of a standardized protocol and stroke team is recommended which should speed the clinical assessment, decisions for early management and also increase the performance of diagnostic studies. (author)

  10. Hospitals - HOSPITALS_HAZUS_IN: Hospitals and Clinics in Indiana, Derived from HAZUS (Federal Emergency Management Agency, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — HOSPITALS_HAZUS_IN is a point shapefile that shows locations of hospitals and clinics in Indiana. HOSPITALS_HAZUS_IN was derived from the shapefile named "HOSPITAL."...

  11. Management of patients with severe hypertension in emergency department, Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sruamsiri, Kamphee; Chenthanakij, Boriboon; Wittayachamnankul, Borwon

    2014-09-01

    Management of patients with severe hypertension without progressive target organ damage remains controversial. Some guidelines mentioned oral anti-hypertensive medication as a treatment to reduce blood pressure in the emergency department, while others recommended against such treatment. To review the management ofpatients with severe hypertension without progressive target organ damage in the emergency department, Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai hospital. In a retrospective descriptive analysis study, medical records ofadult patients diagnosed with severe hypertension without progressive target organ damage between January 2011 and December 2012 were reviewed. Patient demographics, data on management including investigation sent and treatment given were collected. Statistical analysis was done by using descriptive statistics and Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance test. One hundred fifty one medical records were reviewed. Four oral anti-hypertensive medication were used to reduce blood pressure, Amlodipine, Captopril, Hydralazine, and Nifedipine. There were no significant diference between each medication in terms of their effect on bloodpressure reduction (p = 0.513). No side effect or other complications from the use of oral anti-hypertensive medication were recorded The choice of medication used for the treatment of hypertensive urgency ranged from Amlodipine, Captopril, Hydralazine, and Nifedipine, which varied in dosage. However their efficacies were the same when compared with each other and none produced any notable side effects.

  12. Pain Management and Its Related Factors in the Emergency Department of Besat Hospital in Sanadaj, 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Movahedi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Background: Pain is a distressing feeling as well as a discomfort which triggers as the result of a special stimulation of nerve endings.This study aimed to investigate the amount of sufficient pain management among patients referring to the emergency department in Besat Hospital in the city of Sanandaj in Iran. Material and Methods: in this descriptive-analytical study, 175 patients with severe pain intensity higher than 3 and definite causes of pain with physical origins admitted to the emergency department were included. Before and after analgesics injection, pain intensity was assessed by a 10-point scoring system. Results: No significant correlation showed between pain intensity in patients, administration of painkillers, and age (P>0.05.There was a statistically significant relationship between pain intensity, gender, and the type of analgesics received (P 0.05. Conclusion: Failure to control pain among patients can lead to physical, mental, psychological, and social health-related problems. Therefore, proper examination of pains can provide suitable interventions in order to control and manage pains among patients and consequently promote their quality of life.

  13. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Community and Hospital Medical Record Integration on Management of Behavioral Health in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Stephanie; Shahsahebi, Mohammad; Schreiber, Sean; Johnson, Fred; Silberberg, Mina

    2017-11-09

    This study evaluated the correlation of an emergency department embedded care coordinator with access to community and medical records in decreasing hospital and emergency department use in patients with behavioral health issues. This retrospective cohort study presents a 6-month pre-post analysis on patients seen by the care coordinator (n=524). Looking at all-cause healthcare utilization, care coordination was associated with a significant median decrease of one emergency department visit per patient (p management of behavioral health patients.

  14. Emergency general surgery in Rwandan district hospitals: a cross-sectional study of spectrum, management, and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpirimbanyi, Christophe; Nyirimodoka, Alexandre; Lin, Yihan; Hedt-Gauthier, Bethany L; Odhiambo, Jackline; Nkurunziza, Theoneste; Havens, Joaquim M; Omondi, Jack; Rwamasirabo, Emile; Ntirenganya, Faustin; Toma, Gabriel; Mubiligi, Joel; Bayitondere, Scheilla; Riviello, Robert

    2017-12-01

    Management of emergency general surgical conditions remains a challenge in rural sub-Saharan Africa due to issues such as insufficient human capacity and infrastructure. This study describes the burden of emergency general surgical conditions and the ability to provide care for these conditions at three rural district hospitals in Rwanda. This retrospective cross-sectional study included all patients presenting to Butaro, Kirehe and Rwinkwavu District Hospitals between January 1st 2015 and December 31st 2015 with emergency general surgical conditions, defined as non-traumatic, non-obstetric acute care surgical conditions. We describe patient demographics, clinical characteristics, management and outcomes. In 2015, 356 patients presented with emergency general surgical conditions. The majority were male (57.2%) and adults aged 15-60 years (54.5%). The most common diagnostic group was soft tissue infections (71.6%), followed by acute abdominal conditions (14.3%). The median length of symptoms prior to diagnosis differed significantly by diagnosis type (p operated on at the district hospital, either by a general surgeon or general practitioner. Patients were more likely to receive surgery if they presented to a hospital with a general surgeon compared to a hospital with only general practitioners (75% vs 43%, p operation in a hospital with a general surgeon as opposed to a general practitioner. This provides evidence to support increasing the surgical workforce in district hospitals in order to increase surgical availability for patients.

  15. Emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    In 1995, major efforts of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR) were focused on tasks associated with completion and incorporation of the Emergency Response Centre (ERC) of NRA SR in emergency planning and crisis management. Construction of the ERC had begun based on NRA SR's knowledge, as well as recommendations of Regulatory Assistance Management Group (RAMG) International Mission in 1993 and follow-up missions in 1994. Early in 1994, re-construction of selected rooms had been done and early in 1995, supported by the UK and U.S.A. Government's funding, technical equipment was purchased. The equipment was necessary for ERC operation as tools to improve NRA SR readiness for the management of emergency situations at nuclear installations. NRA SR commenced operation of the Centre in April 1995. The Centre has been on-line connected to a teledosimetric system of Radiation Monitoring Laboratory in Trnava. The basic software for assessment of radiation consequences of a NPP accident was supplied were also focused on cooperation with state administration authorities and organizations which were involved in an emergency planning structure. In September 1995, staffing of the ERC was completed and parallel, the first document concerning the ERC prime task, i.e. activities and procedures of of NRA SR Crisis crew in case of an accident at a nuclear installation on the territory of the Slovak Republic, was approved by the NRA SR's Management. In the period that is being assessed, NRA SR made significant progress in events classification and emergency planning terminology in order to unify the above between both the Slovak NPPs

  16. Assessment of disaster preparedness among emergency departments in Italian hospitals: a cautious warning for disaster risk reduction and management capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganini, Matteo; Borrelli, Francesco; Cattani, Jonathan; Ragazzoni, Luca; Djalali, Ahmadreza; Carenzo, Luca; Della Corte, Francesco; Burkle, Frederick M Jr; Ingrassia, Pier Luigi

    2016-08-15

    Since the 1990s, Italian hospitals are required to comply with emergency disaster plans known as Emergency Plan for Massive Influx of Casualties. While various studies reveal that hospitals overall suffer from an insufficient preparedness level, the aim of this study was to better determine the preparedness level of Emergency Departments of Italian hospitals by assessing the knowledge-base of emergency physicians regarding basic disaster planning and procedures. A prospective observational study utilized a convenience sample of Italian Emergency Departments identified from the Italian Ministry of Health website. Anonymous telephone interviews were conducted of medical consultants in charge at the time in the respective Emergency Departments, and were structured in 3 parts: (1) general data and demographics, (2) the current disaster plan and (3) protocols and actions of the disaster plan. Eighty-five Emergency Departments met inclusion criteria, and 69 (81 %) agreed to undergo the interview. Only 45 % of participants declared to know what an Emergency Plan for Massive Influx of Casualties is, 41 % believed to know who has the authority to activate the plan, 38 % knew who is in charge of intra-hospital operations. In Part 3 physicians revealed a worrisome inconsistency in critical content knowledge of their answers. Results demonstrate a poor knowledge-base of basic hospital disaster planning concepts by Italian Emergency Department physicians-on-duty. These findings should alert authorities to enhance staff disaster preparedness education, training and follow-up to ensure that these plans are known to all who have responsibility for disaster risk reduction and management capacity.

  17. [Hospital emergency rooms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudela, Pere; Mòdol, Josep Maria

    2003-05-17

    Overuse of hospital emergency rooms (HERs) is parallel to their controversy. To understand this problem, some concepts should be first clarified. In HERs, there are some intrinsic aspects which are directly related to the emergency itself and thus cannot be modified (intermittent patient flow, need to prioritize, difficulty to achieve a rapid diagnosis, influence of time on treatment, value of clinical follow up, patient's expectations, impact of HER on the overall hospital working dynamics). On the other hand, there are some extrinsic aspects which indeed are not related to HER itself but are rather historically associated with it (precarious structure, delay on admission, lack of privacy, inadequate triage of cases, lack of professionalization); these latter aspects may be potentially modified and should be reconsidered.

  18. Service delivery innovation for hospital emergency management using rich organizational modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Yogit; Bhuiyan, Moshiur; Prasad, Pwc; Krishna, Aneesh

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify and assess service delivery issues within a hospital emergency department and propose an improved model to address them. Possible solutions and options to these issues are explored to determine the one that best fits the context. In this article, we have analysed the emergency department's organizational models through i* strategic dependency and rational modelling technique before proposing updated models that could potentially drive business process efficiencies. The results produced by the models, framework and improved patient journey in the emergency department were evaluated against the statistical data revealed from a reputed government organization related to health, to ensure that the key elements of the issues such as wait time, stay time/throughput, workload and human resource are resolved. The result of the evaluation was taken as a basis to determine the success of the project. Based on these results, the article recommends implementing the concept on actual scenario, where a positive result is achievable.

  19. Guidelines on hospital emergency plans for the management of minor radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    This document provides guidance on the organizational structure, personnel, facilities, equipment, supplies and treatment principles required for the initial care of injured persons who have been accidentally exposed to ionizing radiation and who may be contaminated with radioisotopes. The first part of the document, directed at hospital administrators, provides guidance on the principles of planning and preparedness for handling a radiation incident. The second part is directed at hospital emergency personnel responsible for treating patients who may be contaminated with radioactive materials. Three types of victims are considered. The first has been accidentally irradiated with X-rays or gamma rays over the entire body or in localized areas. There is no radioactive residue on or about the body. The second type of victim has known or suspected radioactive contamination within a wound, within the body or on the skin. A third type of victim believes he or she has been exposed and contaminated, but has not been. These guidelines apply in particular to smaller community hospitals. (L.L.) 27 refs., 3 figs

  20. Emotional intelligence and stress management in Nursing professionals in a hospital emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nespereira-Campuzano, Tatiana; Vázquez-Campo, Miriam

    To determine stress levels and to identify if there is a relationship between emotional intelligence and work stress in nurses and healthcare assistants of the Emergency Department. Observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach. The population were nurses and healthcare assistants of the Emergency Department of the University Hospital of Ourense. The data were collected between January and May 2016. The tool used was a validated, anonymous, and self-administered questionnaire that included the Trait Meta-Mood Scale and Moreno's Brief Burnout Questionnaire. The study was approved by the Clinical Research Ethics Committee of Galicia. Descriptive and association analyses were performed using the SPSS 15.0 statistics program. A total of 60 professionals participated, of whom 36 were qualified nurses and 24 were auxiliary nurses. The response rate was 68.1%. The results showed a deficiency in emotional care, with a score of 22.87, while emotional clarity and reparation of emotions were situated within normal levels, with values of 26.42 and 26.60, respectively. The burnout levels of the sample were medium-high. The mean score in the depersonalisation dimension was 8.05, whereas emotional fatigue obtained a mean of 6.90, with a value of 7.50 for professional fulfilment. Significant positive correlations were found between the employment situation and emotional clarity (r=.276; P=.033), and between the latter and personal fulfilment (r=.277; P=.032), and organisation (r=.316; P=.014). Nurses and healthcare assistants of the Emergency Department showed medium-high average levels of burnout, with depersonalisation being the symptom that reflects the highest values. Emotional Intelligence is related to work stress and, specifically, the understanding of one's own emotional states influences personal fulfilment. Professionals with more job stability show a better capacity to feel and express their feelings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Espa

  1. [Management of severe sepsis and septic shock in a tertiary care urban hospital emergency department: opportunities for improvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monclús Cols, Ester; Capdevila Reniu, Aina; Roedberg Ramos, Desirée; Pujol Fontrodona, Gabriel; Ortega Romero, Mar

    2016-01-01

    To describe the characteristics of early management of severe sepsis and septic shock in a hospital emergency department that does not have a specific triage category to identify patients in these states. To determine opportunities for improvement. Prospective cohort study from March 2014 to March 2015. On each day during the study period, we included the first patient with signs compatible with septic shock. We recorded the severity level assigned according to the Andorran Triage Model and the main clinical and epidemiological variables. Patients were followed until hospital discharge. Fifty patients (35 men) with septic shock (mean age 65 years) were included. Thirty-five were at triage level 1 or 2 and 15 were at level 3. Patients initially classified as level 1-2 had significantly higher heart rates than level 3 patients (mean 110 vs 90 bpm, respectively; P=.003) and respiratory rates (mean 27 vs 18 breaths per minute; P=.001). Patients classified as level 1-2 also had significantly shorter care times than level 3 patients: time from arrival to examination room entry, 18 vs 117 minutes, respectively (P=.002); time from arrival to the first antibiotic dose (85 vs 231 minutes (P=.001). Medical care for patients with septic shock in this emergency department needs to improve in terms of earlier diagnosis and better compliance with guidelines for initial therapeutic management.

  2. Survey of Canadian hospitals radiation emergency plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, C [Social Data Research Ltd./The Flett Consulting Group, Inc., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1996-02-01

    This report documents the findings of a survey of Canadian hospitals conducted by Social Data Research Ltd. during the Spring and Summer, 1995. The main objective of the survey was to determine the state of readiness of Canadian hospitals in respect of radiation emergency planning. In addition, the AECB was interested in knowing the extent to which a report by the Group of Medical Advisors, `GMA-3: Guidelines on Hospital Emergency Plans for the Management of Minor Radiation Accidents`, which was sponsored and distributed in 1993, was received and was useful to hospital administrators and emergency personnel. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 598 acute care hospitals, and 274 responses were received. The main conclusion of this study is that, with the exception of a few large institutions, hospitals generally do not have specific action plans to handle minor radiation accidents. (author).

  3. Survey of Canadian hospitals radiation emergency plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, C.

    1996-02-01

    This report documents the findings of a survey of Canadian hospitals conducted by Social Data Research Ltd. during the Spring and Summer, 1995. The main objective of the survey was to determine the state of readiness of Canadian hospitals in respect of radiation emergency planning. In addition, the AECB was interested in knowing the extent to which a report by the Group of Medical Advisors, 'GMA-3: Guidelines on Hospital Emergency Plans for the Management of Minor Radiation Accidents', which was sponsored and distributed in 1993, was received and was useful to hospital administrators and emergency personnel. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 598 acute care hospitals, and 274 responses were received. The main conclusion of this study is that, with the exception of a few large institutions, hospitals generally do not have specific action plans to handle minor radiation accidents. (author)

  4. Emergency Department Management of Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKenzie, Colin; Lippert, Freddy

    1999-01-01

    Initial assessment and management of severely injured patients may occur in a specialized area of an emergency department or in a specialized area of a trauma center. The time from injury until definitive management is of essence for survival of life-threatening trauma. The initial care delivered...... injured patients after these patients reach a hospital emergency department or a trauma center....

  5. Hospital emergency preparedness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tamara Shefer

    to make informed decisions about prioritising hazards in view of limited resources ... contingency plan, for instance, the Oshikoto Regional Council has identified ..... hospital relies on exercises conducted by the Namibia Airports Company (NAC) ... Small scale exercises can also be done in which certain elements of the plan ...

  6. Emergency Department Management of Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKenzie, Colin; Lippert, Freddy

    1999-01-01

    services (EMS) response times and advanced prehospital care increase the number of critically injured patients surviving sufficiently long to reach a hospital “in extremis.” Both scenarios provide challenges in the management of traumatized patients. This article addresses the management of severely......Initial assessment and management of severely injured patients may occur in a specialized area of an emergency department or in a specialized area of a trauma center. The time from injury until definitive management is of essence for survival of life-threatening trauma. The initial care delivered...... injured patients after these patients reach a hospital emergency department or a trauma center....

  7. Research in Hospitality Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in Hospitality Management (RHM) is a peer-reviewed journal ... to the quintessential managerial areas of Finance, Human Resources, Operations, ... competency and career development of hospitality management students · EMAIL ...

  8. Initial Management of Poisoned Patients in Emergency Medical Services and Non-poisoning Hospitals in Tehran: The Comparison between Expected and Performed Managements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Hassanian-Moghadam

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is no clear data on the adherence of emergency medical services (EMS paramedics and hospital staff rather than those working in poisoning centers to the guidelines for managing acutely poisoned patients in developing countries. Methods: During a 6-month period, all EMS-managed poisoned patients along with those initially managed in a non-poisoning center before being referred to a poisoning hospital in Tehran, Iran, were instructed. Then the indications for administrating the activated charcoal (AC as well as performing gastric lavage (GL and tracheal intubation were studied and compared to the recommended guidelines. Results: A total of 3347 cases, including 1859 males (55.6%, were evaluated. There were significant differences between expected and performed endotracheal intubations in both EMS and other medical centers (P-value = 0.002 and 0.001, respectively as well as the administration of GL and AC in other medical centers (P-values= 0.003 and 0.03, respectively. Conclusion: More extensive educational programs should be established to improve the preliminary management of poisoned patients performed by EMS paramedics and staff of hospitals other than poisoning centers.

  9. Current practices in the management of patients with ureteral calculi in the emergency room of a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Rojas Claros

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Urinary lithiasis is a common disease. The aim of the present study is to assess the knowledge regarding the diagnosis, treatment and recommendations given to patients with ureteral colic by professionals of an academic hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty-five physicians were interviewed about previous experience with guidelines regarding ureteral colic and how they manage patients with ureteral colic in regards to diagnosis, treatment and the information provided to the patients. RESULTS: Thirty-six percent of the interviewed physicians were surgeons, and 64% were clinicians. Forty-one percent of the physicians reported experience with ureterolithiasis guidelines. Seventy-two percent indicated that they use noncontrast CT scans for the diagnosis of lithiasis. All of the respondents prescribe hydration, primarily for the improvement of stone elimination (39.3%. The average number of drugs used was 3.5. The combination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids was reported by 54% of the physicians (i.e., 59% of surgeons and 25.6% of clinicians used this combination of drugs (p = 0.014. Only 21.3% prescribe alpha blockers. CONCLUSION: Reported experience with guidelines had little impact on several habitual practices. For example, only 21.3% of the respondents indicated that they prescribed alpha blockers; however, alpha blockers may increase stone elimination by up to 54%. Furthermore, although a meta-analysis demonstrated that hydration had no effect on the transit time of the stone or on the pain, the majority of the physicians reported that they prescribed more than 500 ml of fluid. Dipyrone, hyoscine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and opioids were identified as the most frequently prescribed drug combination. The information regarding the time for the passage of urinary stones was inconsistent. The development of continuing education programs regarding ureteral colic in the emergency room is necessary.

  10. Availability of treatment resources for the management of acute toxic exposures and poisonings in emergency departments among various types of hospitals in Palestine: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyoud, Sa'ed H; Al-Jabi, Samah W; Bali, Yara I; Al-Sayed, Afnan M; Sweileh, Waleed M; Awang, Rahmat

    2014-02-21

    Poisoning exposures continue to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The lack of facilities, treatment resources, and antidotes in hospitals may affect the treatments provided and outcomes. This study aimed to determine the availability of gastrointestinal (GI) decontamination, stabilisation, elimination enhancement resources, and antidotes for the management of acute toxic exposures and poisonings in emergency departments (EDs) among various types of governmental and private hospitals in Palestine. A cross-sectional study using semi-structured questionnaire was performed. Data were collected based on hospital resources; GI decontamination, stabilisation, elimination enhancement resources and antidotes from Palestinian hospitals. Eighteen hospitals (94.7%) have responded. Among them, paracetamol poisoning was the most frequently reported cases by EDs (mean frequency score = 7.6 ± 2.1), followed by bee stings (mean = 6.9 ± 2.7) and organophosphate poisoning (mean = 6.7 ± 2.7). The availabilities of most resources related to GI decontamination items varied substantially with hospital type, but these differences were not statistical significant. The availability of stabilisation resources was not significantly different between hospitals types. For the availability of techniques used to enhance the elimination of toxic substances, there were variations between the hospitals types. However, these differences were not statistical significant, except for haemodialysis (p = 0.003) which was more available in governmental hospitals. For the availability of antidotes, none of the hospitals had sufficient stock of all antidotes listed. In relation to hospital type, there was variability in the availability of antidotes, but this did not reach statistical significance, except for deferoxamine (p management of acute toxic exposure and poisoning. The implementation of a minimum list of antidotes and treatment resources would be useful to increase the

  11. Integrating hospitals into community emergency preparedness planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Barbara I; Wineman, Nicole V; Finn, Nicole L; Barbera, Joseph A; Schmaltz, Stephen P; Loeb, Jerod M

    2006-06-06

    Strong community linkages are essential to a health care organization's overall preparedness for emergencies. To assess community emergency preparedness linkages among hospitals, public health officials, and first responders and to investigate the influence of community hazards, previous preparation for an event requiring national security oversight, and experience responding to actual disasters. With expert advice from an advisory panel, a mailed questionnaire was used to assess linkage issues related to training and drills, equipment, surveillance, laboratory testing, surge capacity, incident management, and communication. A simple random sample of 1750 U.S. medical-surgical hospitals. Of 678 hospital representatives that agreed to participate, 575 (33%) completed the questionnaire in early 2004. Respondents were hospital personnel responsible for environmental safety, emergency management, infection control, administration, emergency services, and security. Prevalence and breadth of participation in community-wide planning; examination of 17 basic elements in a weighted analysis. In a weighted analysis, most hospitals (88.2% [95% CI, 84.1% to 92.3%]) engaged in community-wide drills and exercises, and most (82.2% [CI, 77.8% to 86.5%]) conducted a collaborative threat and vulnerability analysis with community responders. Of all respondents, 57.3% (CI, 52.1% to 62.5%) reported that their community plans addressed the hospital's need for additional supplies and equipment, and 73.0% (CI, 68.1% to 77.9%) reported that decontamination capacity needs were addressed. Fewer reported a direct link to the Health Alert Network (54.4% [CI, 49.3% to 59.5%]) and around-the-clock access to a live voice from a public health department (40.0% [CI, 35.0% to 45.0%]). Performance on many of 17 basic elements was better in large and urban hospitals and was associated with a high number of perceived hazards, previous national security event preparation, and experience in actual

  12. Availability of treatment resources for the management of acute toxic exposures and poisonings in emergency departments among various types of hospitals in Palestine: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Zyoud, Sa’ed H; Al-Jabi, Samah W; Bali, Yara I; Al-Sayed, Afnan M; Sweileh, Waleed M; Awang, Rahmat

    2014-01-01

    Background Poisoning exposures continue to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The lack of facilities, treatment resources, and antidotes in hospitals may affect the treatments provided and outcomes. This study aimed to determine the availability of gastrointestinal (GI) decontamination, stabilisation, elimination enhancement resources, and antidotes for the management of acute toxic exposures and poisonings in emergency departments (EDs) among various types of govern...

  13. Managing a front-line field hospital in Libya: Description of case mix and lessons learned for future humanitarian emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C. Levine

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Between June and August 2011, International Medical Corps deployed a field hospital near the front-line of the fighting between government troops and opposition fighters in Western Libya. The field hospital cared for over 1300 combatants and non-combatants from both sides of the conflict during that time period, the vast majority of them presenting with war-related injuries. Over 60% of battle-related injuries were due to shrapnel wounds and blast injuries from exploding small mortars, with smaller percentages due to battle-related motor vehicle accidents, gun shot wounds, burns, and other causes. The most pertinent lessons learned from our experience were the importance of dedicating significant resources to logistics and supply chain management, the rewards garnered from building strong ties with the local community early in the deployment of the field hospital, and the need to pay careful attention to basic principles of humanitarian ethics.

  14. [Impact of an emergency department short-stay unit on clinical management and quality of hospital care indicators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Espiga, Fernando; Mòdol Deltell, Josep María; Martín-Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Fernández Sierra, Abel; Fernández Pérez, Cristina; Pastor, Antoni Juan

    2017-06-01

    The primary aim was to study the impact that creating a short-stay unit (SSU) had on clinical management and quality of care indicators of a hospital overall and its conventional wards. The secondary aim was to establish values for those indicators and determine the level of satisfaction of patients admitted to the SSU. Quasi-experimental before-after study of the impact of establishing a SSU in a tertiary care teaching hospital. The first period (without the SSU) was in 2012, the second (with the SSU) was from 2013 through 2015. To meet the first objective we selected cases in 2012 in which patients were hospitalized for problems related to the 5 diagnosis-related groups most often admitted to the SSU in the second period. To meet the second objective, we studied all patients admitted to the SSU in the second period Data related to quality of care and clinical management were analyzed retrospectively. and asked them to complete a questionnaire on patient satisfaction. A total of 76 241 admissions were included: 19 090 in the first period and 57 151 in the second (2705 admissions were to the SSU). The mean hospital stay decreased in the second period (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.93; 95% CI, 0.91-0.95); the mean stay also decreased on medical wards (IRR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.92-0.96) with no impact on adverse outcomes. The mean stay in the SSU was under 3 days in spite of an increase in the weighted mean (IRR,1.08; 95% CI, 1.05-1.11). A total of 320 questionnaires were received (11.8% response rate); all aspects were assessed very highly. Our experience suggests that opening a SSU could improve clinical management and quality of care indicators for a hospital overall and for its conventional wards in the context of the GRDs that most frequently lead to admissions.

  15. Assessment of hospital-based adult triage at emergency receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted in 6 of the 7 hospitals in the region. ... gency department, the rest receive emergency patients/perform triage from .... gional Referral Hospital (government facility) with emer- ... sionals who were involved in daily initial management of ..... for receiving emergency cases can be complex especially.

  16. Identifying an evidence-based model of therapy for the pre-hospital emergency management of supraventricular tachycardia

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Gavin

    2017-01-01

    This thesis provides a comprehensive reporting of the work undertaken to identify evidence supporting pre-hospital management of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), delivering an evidence base for paramedic treatment of these patients. The literature search identified absences in evidence supporting therapies used within existing clinical guidelines. The vagal manoeuvres, the simplest and least invasive therapy to employ in the stable patient, were insufficiently evidenced regarding technique...

  17. Hospital Management Software Development

    OpenAIRE

    sobogunGod, olawale

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to implement a hospital management software which is suitable for small private hospitals in Nigeria, especially for the ones that use a file based system for storing information rather than having it stored in a more efficient and safer environment like databases or excel programming software. The software developed within this thesis project was specifically designed for the Rainbow specialist hospital which is based in Lagos, the commercial neurological cente...

  18. Research in Hospitality Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in Hospitality Management. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  19. Training for emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauf, E.

    1993-01-01

    There are specific boundary conditions where preparedness for in-plant emergency management is as necessary and useful as is the training for the management of design-based accidents. The shift personnel has to be trained to cope particularly with the difficult and demanding initial phase of an emergency, and care must be taken to be very close to reality. Only thus can weak points be discovered and removed by pinpointed measures such as organisational changes, optimization of emergency management procedures, or hardware conditions. (orig.) [de

  20. Management and Outcomes of Acute Surgical Patients at a District Hospital in Uganda with Non-physician Emergency Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresser, Caleb; Periyanayagam, Usha; Dreifuss, Brad; Wangoda, Robert; Luyimbaazi, Julius; Bisanzo, Mark

    2017-09-01

    Acute surgical care services in rural Sub-Saharan Africa suffer from human resource and systemic constraints. Developing emergency care systems and task sharing aspects of acute surgical care addresses many of these issues. This paper investigates the degree to which specialized non-physicians practicing in a dedicated Emergency Department contribute to the effective and efficient management of acute surgical patients. This is a retrospective review of an electronic quality assurance database of patients presenting to an Emergency Department in rural Uganda staffed by non-physician clinicians trained in emergency care. Relevant de-identified clinical data on patients admitted directly to the operating theater from 2011 to 2014 were analyzed in Microsoft Excel. Overall, 112 Emergency Department patients were included in the analysis and 96% received some form of laboratory testing, imaging, medication, or procedure in the ED, prior to surgery. 72% of surgical patients referred by ED received preoperative antibiotics, and preoperative fluid resuscitation was initiated in 65%. Disposition to operating theater was accomplished within 3 h of presentation for 73% of patients. 79% were successfully followed up to assess outcomes at 72 h. 92% of those with successful follow-up reported improvement in their clinical condition. The confirmed mortality rate was 5%. Specialized non-physician clinicians practicing in a dedicated Emergency Department can perform resuscitation, bedside imaging and laboratory studies to aid in diagnosis of acute surgical patients and arrange transfer to an operating theater in an efficient fashion. This model has the potential to sustainably address structural and human resources problems inherent to Sub-Saharan Africa's current acute surgical care model and will benefit from further study and expansion.

  1. Identification and evaluation of competencies of health professionals in the hospital emergency management of the radiation accident victim

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    A preliminary list of ten competency and forty-six sub-competency statements derived from literature and consultation with experts and based on the general areas of clinical performance defined by the National Board of Medical Examiners were the concern of Phase I of this study. Forty-eight experts in nuclear medicine, radiology, radiotherapy, health physics, medical physics, radiation biology, public and occupational health, surgery, and emergency medicine and nursing considered this preliminary list of competencies and sub-competencies to determine which were essential for health professionals who may be caring for radiation accident victims in hospital emergency departments. Eight competencies and thirty-three sub-competencies were rated as Essential competencies. Competencies dealing with establishing priorities in patient care and initiating treatment, assessment, contamination control, and decontamination were highly rated. In the second part of this study, the Essential competencies were utilized in the development of an original evaluation instrument designed to identify deficiencies and continuing education needs during radiation accident drills or exercises. The instrument was designed for use in sixteen possible patient care situations in which the radiation accident victims have varying medical and radiological conditions. Development of the evaluation instrument was described

  2. Building Footprints, Primarily residential, at risk buildings such as hospitals, nursing homes, etc for use in Emergency Management Hazard Mitigation planning., Published in 2010, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Carroll County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Building Footprints dataset current as of 2010. Primarily residential, at risk buildings such as hospitals, nursing homes, etc for use in Emergency Management Hazard...

  3. Accident and emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, V.; Moellenbach, K.; Heinonen, R.; Jakobsson, S.; Kukko, T.; Berg, Oe.; Larsen, J.S.; Westgaard, T.; Magnusson, B.; Andersson, H.; Holmstroem, C.; Brehmer, B.; Allard, R.

    1988-06-01

    There is an increasing potential for severe accidents as the industrial development tends towards large, centralised production units. In several industries this has led to the formation of large organisations which are prepared for accidents fighting and for emergency management. The functioning of these organisations critically depends upon efficient decision making and exchange of information. This project is aimed at securing and possibly improving the functionality and efficiency of the accident and emergency management by verifying, demonstrating, and validating the possible use of advanced information technology in the organisations mentioned above. With the nuclear industry in focus the project consists of five main activities: 1) The study and detailed analysis of accident and emergency scenarios based on records from incidents and rills in nuclear installations. 2) Development of a conceptual understanding of accident and emergency management with emphasis on distributed decision making, information flow, and control structure sthat are involved. 3) Development of a general experimental methodology for evaluating the effects of different kinds of decision aids and forms of organisation for emergency management systems with distributed decision making. 4) Development and test of a prototype system for a limited part of an accident and emergency organisation to demonstrate the potential use of computer and communication systems, data-base and knowledge base technology, and applications of expert systems and methods used in artificial intelligence. 5) Production of guidelines for the introduction of advanced information technology in the organisations based on evaluation and validation of the prototype system. (author)

  4. Emergency management at sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockholts, I.P.

    1992-01-01

    In the past years, all kind of activities in the field of emergency management have been taken in order to handle accidents. In the scope of this paper, emergencies are those accidents that may lead to severe releases of oil and gas, whereby also attention is paid to collisions between offshore installations and drifting objects and the situation where people fall overboard. Case histories show that coping with these serious accidents is not always as effective and successful as intended. The stage from being aware of the risks, to being prepared to cope with the consequences, to actually being capable to combat is long and consists of many elements. This paper will deal with the general approach of emergency management, the development of automated tools for decision support on emergencies as well as some fate and effect models

  5. [The Hospital Emergency Plan: Important Tool for Disaster Preparedness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurmb, Thomas; Scholtes, Katja; Kolibay, Felix; Rechenbach, Peer; Vogel, Ulrich; Kowalzik, Barbara

    2017-09-01

    Hospitals need to be prepared for any kind of disaster. The terrorist attacks and mass shootings that took place in Europe in recent years impressively demonstrated the capability of hospitals to manage such challenging and disastrous events. To be adequately prepared, the hospital emergency plan is a very important tool. In this article we describe the entire process of drafting the emergency plan. We discuss the theoretical background as well as different models of disaster planning and we give important practical hints and tips for those in charge of the hospital disaster planning. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Clinical features and therapeutic management of patients admitted to Italian acute hospital psychiatric units: the PERSEO (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russo Federico

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PERSEO study (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology is a naturalistic, observational clinical survey in Italian acute hospital psychiatric units, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura; in English, the psychiatric service for diagnosis and management. The aims of this paper are: (i to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients, including sociodemographic features, risk factors, life habits and psychiatric diagnoses; and (ii to assess the clinical management, subjective wellbeing and attitudes toward medications. Methods A total of 62 SPDCs distributed throughout Italy participated in the study and 2521 patients were enrolled over the 5-month study period. Results Almost half of patients (46% showed an aggressive behaviour at admission to ward, but they engaged more commonly in verbal aggression (38%, than in aggression toward other people (20%. A total of 78% of patients had a psychiatric diagnosis at admission, most frequently schizophrenia (36%, followed by depression (16% and personality disorders (14%, and no relevant changes in the diagnoses pattern were observed during hospital stay. Benzodiazepines were the most commonly prescribed drugs, regardless of diagnosis, at all time points. Overall, up to 83% of patients were treated with neuroleptic drugs and up to 27% received more than one neuroleptic either during hospital stay or at discharge. Atypical and conventional antipsychotics were equally prescribed for schizophrenia (59 vs 65% during stay and 59 vs 60% at discharge, while atypical drugs were preferred in schizoaffective psychoses (72 vs 49% during stay and 70 vs 46% at discharge and depression (41 vs 32% during stay and 44 vs 25% at discharge. Atypical neuroleptics were slightly preferred to conventional ones at hospital discharge (52 vs 44%. Polypharmacy was in general widely used. Patient attitudes toward medications were on average positive and self

  7. The crisis in United States hospital emergency services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jeffrey P; Ferguson, Emily D

    2011-01-01

    Emergency services are critical for high-quality healthcare service provision to support acute illness, trauma and disaster response. The greater availability of emergency services decreases waiting time, improves clinical outcomes and enhances local community well being. This study aims to assess United States (U.S.) acute care hospital staffs ability to provide emergency medical services by evaluating the number of emergency departments and trauma centers. Data were obtained from the 2003 and 2007 American Hospital Association (AHA) annual surveys, which included over 5000 US hospitals and provided extensive information on their infrastructure and healthcare capabilities. U.S. acute care hospital numbers decreased by 59 or 1.1 percent from 2003 to 2007. Similarly, U.S. emergency rooms and trauma centers declined by 125, or 3 percent. The results indicate that US hospital staffs ability to respond to traumatic injury and disasters has declined. Therefore, US hospital managers need to increase their investment in emergency department beds as well as provide state-of-the-art clinical technology to improve emergency service quality. These investments, when linked to other clinical information systems and the electronic medical record, support further healthcare quality improvement. This research uses the AHA annual surveys,which represent self-reported data by individual hospital staff. However, the AHA expendssignificant resources to validate reported information and the annual survey data are widely used for hospital research. The declining US emergency rooms and trauma centers have negative implications for patients needing emergency services. More importantly, this research has significant policy implications because it documents a decline in the US emergency healthcare service infrastructure. This article has important information on US emergency service availability in the hospital industry.

  8. Medical management of radiation emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongirwar, P.R.

    2002-01-01

    This review deals specifically with the medical management of victims, such as, the triage of exposed individuals on the basis of preliminary observations and investigations, planning priority of treatment to different groups, emergency care, and definitive care. The infrastructure for appropriate management involves first aid posts, decontamination centre, Site Hospital and Specialized Central Hospital. Medical management of life threatening radiation doses involve haematological examinations, blood component therapy, treatment with growth factors and if necessary, bone marrow transplantation as the last option. Most of the radiation accidents involving partial body and localized exposures are associated with industrial radiography sources. Such exposures are generally not life threatening but may involve serious skin injury, such as, ulceration, necrosis and gangrene. Methods have been developed to carry out decontamination of skin and decorporation of internally deposited radio nuclides. This article also provides information on the Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network and also outlines the role of media in reducing the human suffering in the event of an accident

  9. Strategic management for university hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Isabel Riaño-Casallas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are several approaches and schools that support strategic management processes. University hospitals require the implementation of a strategic approach to their management, since they are a particular type of organization with the triple mission of providing health care, education and research. Objective: To propose a strategic profile for a university hospital. Materials and methods: The theoretical framework of strategic management was analyzed and some particular components of hospital management were studied; based on these criteria, the strategic management process in three high complexity hospitals of Bogotá, D.C. was examined and a profile of both the objectives and the functional strategies for the hospital was proposed. Results: The main strategic thinking schools are presented; the processes and components of strategic management are described, and a strategic management profile for a university hospital is proposed. Conclusion: The strategic orientation of management for an institution with the characteristics of a university hospital facilitates achieving organizational objectives.

  10. Pre-hospital Emergency Care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    20 Apr 1974 ... lance services, training programmes that are not geared to the needs of these personnel and, not least, a lack of interest on the part of the medical profession, with a few notable exceptions, in the whole question of emergency care. There is a re- luctance on the part of many doctors to assist in the training of ...

  11. Emergency Contraception: a survey of Hospital Emergency Departments Staffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization defines emergency contraception (EC as a means to prevent unwanted pregnancy. In countries where EC is dispensed behind the counter, emergency departments are a preferred point of care for its prescription and dispensing. In light of this situation and as no studies on emergency contraception in emergency departments in Italy have been conducted to date, this study was designed with a view to analyze the responses of emergency room physicians in relation to their prescribing habits and knowledge about the drug and in relation to frequency and profile of women arriving for care at hospital emergency departments in Piedmont and requesting prescription for the morning-after pill. This cross-sectional survey involved 29 hospital emergency departments in Piedmont where no gynecologists are on active duty. The survey instrument was a 24-item questionnaire. Analysis of responses revealed that in the physicians’ opinion the vast majority of requests came from Italian nationals (97% ranging in age from 18 to 30 years (76%, single and not cohabiting with a partner (60%, and nulliparous (64.0%. Women mostly request EC for first-time and the most common reasons were condom breakage or slippage. Just over half the physicians (52% stated that emergency contraception prescription was not an appropriate part of care provided at an emergency department and 72% stated they felt uneasy about prescribing emergency contraception. The survey also revealed gaps in physician knowledge about the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of emergency contraception pills.

  12. Emergency Contraception: a survey of Hospital Emergency Departments Staffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization defines emergency contraception (EC as a means to prevent unwanted pregnancy. In countries where EC is dispensed behind the counter, emergency departments are a preferred point of care for its prescription and dispensing. In light of this situation and as no studies on emergency contraception in emergency departments in Italy have been conducted to date, this study was designed with a view to analyze the responses of emergency room physicians in relation to their prescribing habits and knowledge about the drug and in relation to frequency and profile of women arriving for care at hospital emergency departments in Piedmont and requesting prescription for the morning-after pill. This cross-sectional survey involved 29 hospital emergency departments in Piedmont where no gynecologists are on active duty. The survey instrument was a 24-item questionnaire. Analysis of responses revealed that in the physicians’ opinion the vast majority of requests came from Italian nationals (97% ranging in age from 18 to 30 years (76%, single and not cohabiting with a partner (60%, and nulliparous (64.0%. Women mostly request EC for first-time and the most common reasons were condom breakage or slippage. Just over half the physicians (52% stated that emergency contraception prescription was not an appropriate part of care provided at an emergency department and 72% stated they felt uneasy about prescribing emergency contraception. The survey also revealed gaps in physician knowledge about the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of emergency contraception pills.

  13. How a hospital must face a massive emergency: the case of Martini Hospital, Turin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Morra

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The terms “disaster” or “surge capability”, referred to hospitals, are often used to define a massive casualty admission. This may be a misleading concept, because emergency may as well arise from inside hospitals, and the last years high figures related to fires in the about 2,000 italian hospitals should suggest a different point of view. In this article the authors describe their experience in hospital preparedness at Ospedale Martini in Turin. Hospital operators regularly attend basic (GOM and advanced (HDM© courses about disaster response and organization, and a specific course is dedicated to operators involved in internal safety (fire emergency. In this courses, computer simulations are widely used, associated with conventional didactic. If education is one of the two cornerstones of disaster preparedness at Ospedale Martini, well designed emergency plans and an effective disaster management are the other one. The Internal Emergency Plan (Fire and Evacuation is aimed to give a proper response to fires and other events arising from inside the hospital and potentially requiring its partial or total evacuation. The Massive Casualties Admission Emergency Plan increases the surge capability of the hospital allowing to take care of a great number of injured people, and at the same time avoiding a dramatic fall in the treatment quality. The “Hospital Disaster Management©” system, created by the authors, is an organizational scheme based on team work. Its aim is to “put order in chaos” when hospitals are facing a disaster. Properly trained physicians and nurses, assigned to key positions, act in this system as Hospital Disaster Managers: their tasks are to coordinate the teams, to manage critical resources and to use the emergency plans as powerful instruments.

  14. Hospitality Management Education and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherton, Bob, Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Seven articles on hospitality management training discuss the following: computerized management games for restaurant manager training, work placement, real-life exercises, management information systems in hospitality degree programs, modular programming, service quality concepts in the curriculum, and General National Vocational Qualifications…

  15. Integrated hospital emergency care improves efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, A A; Robinson, S M; Whitwell, D; Myers, S; Bennett, T J H; Hall, N; Haydock, S; Fritz, Z; Atkinson, P

    2008-02-01

    There is uncertainty about the most efficient model of emergency care. An attempt has been made to improve the process of emergency care in one hospital by developing an integrated model. The medical admissions unit was relocated into the existing emergency department and came under the 4-hour target. Medical case records were redesigned to provide a common assessment document for all patients presenting as an emergency. Medical, surgical and paediatric short-stay wards were opened next to the emergency department. A clinical decision unit replaced the more traditional observation unit. The process of patient assessment was streamlined so that a patient requiring admission was fully clerked by the first attending doctor to a level suitable for registrar or consultant review. Patients were allocated directly to specialty on arrival. The effectiveness of this approach was measured with routine data over the same 3-month periods in 2005 and 2006. There was a 16.3% decrease in emergency medical admissions and a 3.9% decrease in emergency surgical admissions. The median length of stay for emergency medical patients was reduced from 7 to 5 days. The efficiency of the elective surgical services was also improved. Performance against the 4-hour target declined but was still acceptable. The number of bed days for admitted surgical and medical cases rose slightly. There was an increase in the number of medical outliers on surgical wards, a reduction in the number of incident forms and formal complaints and a reduction in income for the hospital. Integrated emergency care has the ability to use spare capacity within emergency care. It offers significant advantages beyond the emergency department. However, improved efficiency in processing emergency patients placed the hospital at a financial disadvantage.

  16. Management of gynecologic oncology emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harwood-Nuss, A.L.; Benrubi, G.I.; Nuss, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    Gynecologic malignancies are the third most common cancer among women in the United States. Because of often subtle early findings, the diagnosis may not be made before the widespread dissemination of the disease. The Emergency Department physician will commonly encounter a woman with vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain, or a symptomatic abdominal mass. In this article, we have described the epidemiology, recognized patterns of spread, and associated findings of gynecologic tumors. The proper Emergency Department evaluation and management of these problems is emphasized with guidelines for the timing of referrals and consultation with the gynecologic oncologist. The treatment of gynecologic malignancies is often complicated and responsible for Emergency Department visits. The various modalities are addressed according to the organ systems affected and include sections on postoperative problems, gastrointestinal complaints, urologic complications of therapy, radiation therapy and its complications, with an emphasis on the most serious complications necessitating either careful outpatient management or hospital admission. As cost-containment pressure grows, we have included sections on chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition, both of which are becoming common outpatient events for the cancer patient. 28 references

  17. Managing hypopituitarism in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Jeanette

    2015-10-01

    Healthcare professionals manage patients with a vast range of conditions, but often specialise and acquire expertise in specific disease processes. Emergency and pre-hospital clinicians care for patients with various conditions for short periods of time, so have less opportunity to become familiar with more unusual conditions, yet it is vital that they have some knowledge and understanding of these. Patients with rare conditions can present at emergency departments with common complaints, but the effect of their original diagnosis on the presenting complaint may be overlooked or underestimated. This article uses a case study to describe the experience of one patient who presented with vomiting, but who also had hypopituitarism and therefore required specific management she did not at first receive. The article describes hypopituitarism and the initial management of patients with this condition who become unwell, and discusses how the trust responded to the patient's complaint to improve patient safety and care. It has been written with the full participation and consent of the patient and her husband.

  18. A financial career in a hospital management company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, H T

    1980-01-01

    Concurrent with the recent development of the hospital financial manager's position has been the emergence of investor-owned multifacility hospital management companies. Many of these companies had their beginnings in the late 1960s. One such company is Hospital Affiliates International, formed in 1967 and now providing management to approximately 150 hospitals. About 50 of these facilities are owned by Hospital Affiliates, and 100 are managed for other, primarily community, nonprofit and governmental organizations. Development of investor-owned management companies has progressed to the extent that as of September 30, 1979 they provided management to approximately 330 hospitals in the United States and in foreign countries.

  19. In-Hospital Management and Follow-Up Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism: Focus on New and Emerging Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenchus, Joshua D; Biehl, Michelle; Cabrera, Jorge; Moraes, Alice Gallo de; Dezfulian, Cameron

    2017-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), encompassing pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT), is a major cause of morbidity and mortality of particular relevance for intensivists and hospitalists. Acute VTE is usually managed with parenteral unfractionated heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin, followed by an oral vitamin K antagonist. Data are lacking for optimal treatment of less common occurrences, such as upper extremity DVT, and for approaches such as thrombolysis for PE associated with early signs of hemodynamic compromise or inferior vena cava filters when anticoagulation is contraindicated. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) including apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban are now added to the armamentarium of agents available for acute management of VTE and/or reducing the risk of recurrence. This review outlines an algorithmic approach to acute VTE treatment: from aggressive therapies when anticoagulation may be inadequate, to alternative choices when anticoagulation is contraindicated, to anticoagulant options in the majority of patients in whom anticoagulation is appropriate. Evidence-based guidelines and the most recent DOAC clinical trial data are discussed in the context of the standard of care. Situations and treatment approaches for which data are unavailable or insufficient are identified. VTE therapy in care transitions is discussed, as are choices for secondary prevention.

  20. Strategic management process in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zovko, V

    2001-01-01

    Strategic management is concerned with strategic choices and strategic implementation; it provides the means by which organizations meet their objectives. In the case of hospitals it helps executives and all employees to understand the real purpose and long term goals of the hospital. Also, it helps the hospital find its place in the health care service provision chain, and enables the hospital to coordinate its activities with other organizations in the health care system. Strategic management is a tool, rather than a solution, that helps executives to identify root causes of major problems in the hospital.

  1. Challenge of hospital emergency preparedness: analysis and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbera, Joseph A; Yeatts, Dale J; Macintyre, Anthony G

    2009-06-01

    In the United States, recent large-scale emergencies and disasters display some element of organized medical emergency response, and hospitals have played prominent roles in many of these incidents. These and other well-publicized incidents have captured the attention of government authorities, regulators, and the public. Health care has assumed a more prominent role as an integral component of any community emergency response. This has resulted in increased funding for hospital preparedness, along with a plethora of new preparedness guidance.Methods to objectively measure the results of these initiatives are only now being developed. It is clear that hospital readiness remains uneven across the United States. Without significant disaster experience, many hospitals remain unprepared for natural disasters. They may be even less ready to accept and care for patient surge from chemical or biological attacks, conventional or nuclear explosive detonations, unusual natural disasters, or novel infectious disease outbreaks.This article explores potential reasons for inconsistent emergency preparedness across the hospital industry. It identifies and discusses potential motivational factors that encourage effective emergency management and the obstacles that may impede it. Strategies are proposed to promote consistent, reproducible, and objectively measured preparedness across the US health care industry. The article also identifies issues requiring research.

  2. Management of information within emergencies departments in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: the management of health information is a key pillar in both emergencies reception and handling facilities, given the strategic position and the potential of these facilities within hospitals, and in the monitoring of public health and epidemiology. With the technological revolution, computerization made the ...

  3. Security and Emergency Management Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Volpe's Security and Emergency Management Division identifies vulnerabilities, risks, and opportunities to improve the security of transportation systems, critical...

  4. An organizational metamodel for hospital emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptan, Kubilay

    2014-10-01

    I introduce an organizational model describing the response of the hospital emergency department. The hybrid simulation/analytical model (called a "metamodel") can estimate a hospital's capacity and dynamic response in real time and incorporate the influence of damage to structural and nonstructural components on the organizational ones. The waiting time is the main parameter of response and is used to evaluate the disaster resilience of health care facilities. Waiting time behavior is described by using a double exponential function and its parameters are calibrated based on simulated data. The metamodel covers a large range of hospital configurations and takes into account hospital resources in terms of staff and infrastructures, operational efficiency, and the possible existence of an emergency plan; maximum capacity; and behavior both in saturated and overcapacitated conditions. The sensitivity of the model to different arrival rates, hospital configurations, and capacities and the technical and organizational policies applied during and before a disaster were investigated. This model becomes an important tool in the decision process either for the engineering profession or for policy makers.

  5. Training teams for emergency management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafstal, A.M.; Johnston, J.H.; Oser, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Emergency management (EM), the decision making involved in directing the relief operation after a disaster or otherwise catastrophic accident is an issue of great public and private concern because of the high stakes involved. Due to the nature of emergencies, and especially mass emergencies, EM

  6. Fire Service Emergency Management Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Adapted from Formulating Public Policy in Emergency Management Course Book and ResourceMRanual for Public OTTicials, ILMA Emergency Management Institute...659-2447 (202) 785-2757 Christian Reformed World Relief Presbyterian Church in U.S. Committee General Assemby Mission Board C. Neil Molenaar 341 Ponce...Healer, Mind as Slayer. New York: Delta Books , 1977. 86B:6 B-45 4) Mitchell, J.T., & Resnik, HLP: Emergency Response to Crisis: A Crisis Intervention

  7. Emergency management information system (EMINS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desonier, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    In a time of crisis or in an emergency, a manager is required to make many decisions to facilitate the proper solution and conclusion to the emergency or crisis. In order to make these decisions, it is necessary for the manager to have correct up-to-date information on the situation, which calls for an automated information display and entry process. The information handling needs are identified in terms of data, video, and voice. Studies of existing Emergency Operations Centers and evaluations of hardware and software have been completed. The result of these studies and investigations is the design and implementation of an automated Emergency Management Information System. Not only is the system useful for Emergency Management but for any information management requirement

  8. Ocular emergencies presenting to Menelik II Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negussie, Dereje; Bejiga, Abebe

    2011-01-01

    Ocular conditions such as trauma, painful red eye of any cause, painless sudden visual loss and others are commonly seen as ocular emergencies, and can lead to ocular morbidity and visual loss. To determine types and causes of ocular emergencies seen at Menelik II hospital. A cross-sectional study was conducted from April to October, 2007. Consecutive patients who presented with ocular emergencies at any time of the day were prospectively evaluated and registered on a formatted questionnaire. Evaluation of the patients included history of presenting illness, visual acuity testing intraocular pressure measurement on non-perforated and non-infected eyes, and complete eye examination in order to arrive at the diagnosis. A total of 26,400 patients attended Menelik II hospital during the study period. Of these, 758 (3%) were persons with an ocular emergency. The majority of patients (n=551; 72.7%) were male, with a male to female ratio of 2.7:1. The age group of 16 to 30 years was the most affected (47.9%), followed by those aged 15 years or younger (27.3%). Ocular trauma and ocular infections accounted for 75.6% and 13.1% of cases, respectively. Of the total ocular emergencies, open globe injuries constituted 171 (22.6%), corneal foreign bodies and abrasion 125 (16.5%), and open adnexal injuries 119 (15.7%). Metal and wood were the commonest work-related causes of ocular injuries in adults, with both together accounting for 60% of all ocular injuries. Children, on the other hand, sustained ocular injury while playing with others in 128 (22.3%) of cases. This study was able to provide a more complete picture to improve understanding of the nature and circumstances of ocular emergencies in Ethiopia. Ocular emergencies were dominated by ocular trauma, particularly affecting males and working-age adults. Public education and use of protective safety measures are recommended to alleviate the problem.

  9. Management of Radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentijo, J. C.; Gil, E.; San Nicolas, J.; Lazuen, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Spain has a system of planning and response to emergency situations that is structured and coordinated by the General Directorship of civil Defense of the Ministry of the Interior and in which all levels of the Public Administration. state, autonomous and municipal-and owners of potentially hazardous activities participate. Activities involving a nuclear or radiological risk have specific emergency plans whose general principles are based on the general emergency system and whose technical bases are consistent with international practices and recommendations. The Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear actively participates in the design, implementation and activation of these plans, and for this purpose has an organization superimposed on its ordinary working organization that is activated in the event of an accident, as well as an Emergency Room specifically designed to deal with nuclear and radiological emergencies. (Author)

  10. Retrospective analysis of the role and performance of family medicine versus emergency medical services in the pre-hospital management of patients with AMI in Banja Luka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakić, Biljana; Račić, Maja; Vulić, Duško

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in pre-hospital care of patients with acute myocardial infarction between emergency medical services and family medicine. This retrospective descriptive study included patients treated for acute myocardial infarction at the University Clinical Centre of Banja Luka, in the period from 1st January to 31st December 2011. The patients were divided into two groups: patients who received a hospital referral from the family medicine service and those who received one from the emergency medical service. The majority of patients (54.8%) received pre-hospital care from emergency medical services, while in 24.8% of cases the care was provided by family medicine physicians. The analysis showed that the time that passed from the onset of symptoms to the visit to the health institution of first medical contact was shorter in the emergency medical service (pfamily practice was 24 hours, and to the emergency service 2 hours. The patients who established their first medical contact with the emergency service reported more severe symptoms than the ones who visited a family practice over the same period of time. The severity of symptoms affected the patients' decisions to seek help in a timely manner and to choose the facility of first medical contact. Interventions to decrease delay must focus on improving public awareness of acute myocardial infarction symptoms and increasing their knowledge of the benefits of early medical contact and treatment. Continuing education of family practitioners in this field is required. Copyright © 2016 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  11. Research in Hospitality Management: Contact

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Principal Contact. Dr Sjoerd A Gehrels Editor-in-Chief Stenden Hotel Management School, Academy of International Hospitality Research, Leeuwarden, The Netherlands Email: sjoerd.gehrels@stenden.com ...

  12. Hospital Waste Management - Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Edra

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The importance of waste management in hospitals is indisputable in preserving the environment and protecting public health, but management models are rarely discussed. This study presents the legal and conceptual frameworks of good waste management practices applicable to hospitals and associated indicators. As a case study, the overall performance of Hospital Centre of São João, in Porto, was analysed based on published reports. Data on the production of waste in their different typologies were collected from 2010 to 2016, enabling a correlation of the waste production with the kg/bed/day indicator. The aim of this study was to gather data and discuss trends in a real scenario of evolution over a six-year period in order to contribute to a future research proposal on indicators that can be used as reference for benchmarking the construction of methodological guides for hospital waste management.

  13. Hospital management. The reflective practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, I

    Ian Campbell's paper, originally delivered at a conference on the development of 'The reflective practitioner' while he was Unit General Manager of Sunderland Royal Infirmary, describes the liaison between general and nurse managers in the hospital. Management must give a hospital organisation direction and must set the parameters of corporate and individual performance, but it must also be responsive to the feedback received from practising clinicians. The key concept is quality of service, and in this managers and practitioners can work together towards a common goal.

  14. Emergency Response of Iranian Hospitals Against Disasters: A Practical Framework for Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janati, Ali; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Hasanpoor, Edris; Sokhanvar, Mobin; HaghGoshyie, Elaheh; Salehi, Abdollah

    2018-04-01

    Hospital emergency management is a continuous process that requires monolithic integration of planning and response attempts with local and national schemes. The aim of the current study is to evaluate emergency response by hospitals against potential disasters in Tabriz, north-west Iran. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the city of Tabriz, in Iran, in 2016. The study population included all hospitals in Tabriz. A total of 18 hospitals were assessed. The hospital emergency response checklist was used to collect data. Tool components included command and control, communication, safety and security, triage, surge capacity, continuity of essential services, human resources, logistics and supply management, and post-disaster recovery. Data entry and analysis were carried out using SPSS software (version 20). The results showed that the emergency response rate of hospitals was 54.26% in Tabriz. The lowest response rates were for Shafaa hospital (18.89%) and the highest response rates were for Razi Hospital (91.67%). The components of hospital emergency response were assessed to be between 48.07% (surge capacity) and 58.95% (communication). On the basis of the World Health Organization checklist, the emergency response rate for hospitals in Tabriz was only 54.26%. Therefore, hospital emergency responses against disasters have to be improved and must be made to reach 100%. It is essential to design a comprehensive framework for hospital emergency response. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2018;12:166-171).

  15. Decision support for emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, V.

    1989-05-01

    A short introduction will be given to the Nordic project ''NKA/INF: Information Technology for Accident and Emergency Management'', which is now in its final phase. To perform evaluation of the project, special scenarious have been developed, and experiments based on these will be fulfilled and compared with experiments without use of the decision support system. Furthermore, the succeeding European project, ''IT Support for Emergency Management - ISEM'', with the purpose of developing a decision support system for complex and distributed decision making in emergency management in full scale, will be described and the preliminary conceptual model for the system will be presented. (author)

  16. Medical management and planning for radiation emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongirwar, P.R.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation Emergencies which result as a consequence of nuclear or radiological accidents can produce a spectrum of different types of radiation injuries which could include cases of whole body irradiation causing Acute Radiation Syndrome, partial body irradiation, radiation burns (localized irradiation), radioactive contamination and combined injuries having component of conventional injuries. General principles of managing these cases entail doing triage, offering immediate emergency care and instituting definitive treatment. Infra-structural facilities which are required to facilitate their management include first aid post at plant site, personnel decontamination centre, site clinic and specialized hospital which can offer comprehensive investigational and treatment modalities. Training of medical and paramedical personnel is crucial as part of emergency preparedness programme and if needed, help can be sought from WHO's Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network Centres. (author)

  17. Training Hospital Managers as to Fire Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Khalili

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fire is one of the most dangerous phenomena in the world which yields main damages, healthy and economical, and is thus a major threat to hospitals. Since, most of the residents in hospitals are the individuals who cannot rescue themselves in such situations, fire in hospitals is more hazardous than any other public place; hence, it can endanger several sophisticated medical equipment. Therefore, security against fire plays a very vital role in hospitals and has to be taken into account by authorities. Among the personnel, hospital manager and the security guard supervisor are much more responsible. One of their responsibilities includes planning fire security scheme in hospitals to reduce the death rate caused by fire so that there is less threat to the building of hospital admits content. Due to the significance of this issue in hospitals, it seems necessary for the personnel to be aware of security measures against fire. Therefore, a study was carried out in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences teaching hospitals on all managers, their awareness about this issue was measured through a questionnaire. The results indicated that of a total of 60, the obtained average was (37.63+7.36 in the medium level. Also, most of the managers believed that proper and updated training by skillful trainers regarding hospital security measures and its application can be truly effective on their productivity. Thus, it is concluded that practical training the mentioned target group (hospital personnel especially clerks and the managers about the security plans can be effective in the control of fire and security measures, resulting in reduction of accidents and human and economic loss in the future.

  18. Development of a statewide hospital plan for radiologic emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dainiak, Nicholas; Delli Carpini, Domenico; Bohan, Michael; Werdmann, Michael; Wilds, Edward; Barlow, Agnus; Beck, Charles; Cheng, David; Daly, Nancy; Glazer, Peter; Mas, Peter; Nath, Ravinder; Piontek, Gregory; Price, Kenneth; Albanese, Joseph; Roberts, Kenneth; Salner, Andrew L.; Rockwell, Sara

    2006-01-01

    Although general guidelines have been developed for triage of victims in the field and for hospitals to plan for a radiologic event, specific information for clinicians and administrators is not available for guidance in efficient management of radiation victims during their early encounter in the hospital. A consensus document was developed by staff members of four Connecticut hospitals, two institutions of higher learning, and the State of Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection and Office of Emergency Preparedness, with assistance of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. The objective was to write a practical manual for clinicians (including radiation oncologists, emergency room physicians, and nursing staff), hospital administrators, radiation safety officers, and other individuals knowledgeable in radiation monitoring that would be useful for evaluation and management of radiation injury. The rationale for and process by which the radiation response plan was developed and implemented in the State of Connecticut are reviewed. Hospital admission pathways are described, based on classification of victims as exposed, contaminated, and/or physically injured. This manual will be of value to those involved in planning the health care response to a radiologic event

  19. [Hospitality for elderly patients in the emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Marie-Claude; Dami, Fabrice; Hugli, Olivier; Renard, Delphine; Foucault, Eliane; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2015-12-09

    Demographic evolution results in a growing use of emergency department by elderly patients. They require special care to avoid any further degradation of cognitive and functional abilities already compromised by the disease or injury that led them to hospital in the first place. Through a clinical case, we list the risks related to the care of these particular patients in the emergency department. Early recognition of those risks and careful management of these patients' specific needs can significantly contribute to reduce lengths of stay, an important outcome from both the individual patient's and society's perspective.

  20. Recommendations on pre-hospital & early hospital management of acute heart failure : a consensus paper from the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology, the European Society of Emergency Medicine and the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mebazaa, Alexandre; Yilmaz, M. Birhan; Levy, Phillip; Ponikowski, Piotr; Peacock, W. Frank; Laribi, Said; Ristic, Arsen D.; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Masip, Josep; Riley, Jillian P.; McDonagh, Theresa; Mueller, Christian; deFilippi, Christopher; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Thiele, Holger; Piepoli, Massimo F.; Metra, Marco; Maggioni, Aldo; McMurray, John; Dickstein, Kenneth; Damman, Kevin; Seferovic, Petar M.; Ruschitzka, Frank; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F.; Bellou, Abdelouahab; Anker, Stefan D.; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    Acute heart failure is a fatal syndrome. Emergency physicians, cardiologists, intensivists, nurses and other health care providers have to cooperate to provide optimal benefit. However, many treatment decisions are opinion-based and few are evidenced-based. This consensus paper provides guidance to

  1. Conflicts between managed care organizations and emergency departments in California.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, L A; Derlet, R W

    1996-01-01

    To control costs, managed care organizations have begun to restrict the use of hospital emergency departments by their enrollees. They are doing this by educating enrollees, providing better access to 24-hour urgent care, denying preauthorizations for care for some patients who do present to emergency departments, and retrospectively denying payment for certain patients who use emergency services. Changing traditional use of emergency departments has resulted in conflicts between managed care...

  2. German emergency management concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkart, K.

    1993-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of the margin and start-up value concepts (according to ICRP 40 and EU-ordinances) are explained, and it is demonstrated that the two concepts are combinable. The combined concept has the advantage of immediately providing, if required, intervention levels for the various measures to be taken, and of obliging those persons concerned with emergency protection to study and quantify, already at the planning stage, the influence of a range of accident conditions on the decision on measures. In this context, the use of computerized decision support systems which are currently being developed is indispensable. (orig./DG) [de

  3. Business Intelligence in Hospital Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Achim; Hainc, Nicolin; Boll, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Business intelligence (BI) is a worthwhile investment, and will play a significant role in hospital management in the near future. Implementation of BI is challenging and requires resources, skills, and a strategy, but enables management to have easy access to relevant analysis of data and visualization of important key performance indicators (KPI). Modern BI applications will help to overcome shortages of common "hand-made" analysis, save time and money, and will enable even managers to do "self-service" analysis and reporting.

  4. Emergency management logistics must become emergency supply chain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard R; Peterson, Matthew R

    2014-01-01

    Much has been written about how emergency management (EM) needs to look to the future regarding issues of resource management (monetary, human, and material). Constraints on budgets are ongoing and the staffing of emergency response activities is often difficult because volunteers have little to no training. The management of material resources has also been a challenge because 1) the categories of material vary by the type of emergency, 2) the necessary quantities of material are often not located near the ultimate point of need, and 3) the transportation assets are rarely available in the form and quantity required to allow timely and effective response. The logistics and resource management functions of EM (what we refer to as EM logistics) have been largely reactive, with little to no pre-event planning for potential demand. We applied the Supply Chain Operational Reference (SCOR) model to EM logistics in an effort to transform it to an integrated and scalable system of physical, information, and financial flows into which are woven the functions of sourcing, making, delivering, and returning, with an overarching planning function that transcends the organizational boundaries of participants. The result is emergency supply chain management, which embraces many more participants who share in a larger quantity of more useful information about the resources that need to be deployed when responding to and recovering from emergency events.

  5. Hospital waste management in Lebanon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaker, Alissar

    1999-01-01

    Hospital wastes comprises approximately 80% domestic waste components, also known as non-risk waste and 20% hazardous or risk waste. The 20% of the hospital waste stream or the risk waste (also known as infectious, medical, clinical wastes) comprises components which could be potentially contaminated with infections, chemical or radioactive agents. Therefore, it should be handled and disposed of in such a manner as to minimize potential human exposure and cross-contamination. Hospital risk waste and be subdivided into seven general categories as follows: infections, anatomical/pathological, chemical, pharmaceutical, radioactive waste, sharps and pressurised containers. These waste categories are generated by many types of health care establishments, including hospitals, clinics, infirmaries.... The document presents also tables of number of hospitals and estimated bed number in different regions in Lebanon; estimated hospital risk and non-risk waste generation per tonnes per day for the years 1998 until 2010 and finally sensitivity analysis of estimated generation of hospital risk waste in Lebanon per tonnes per day for the years 1998 until 2010. The management, treatment and disposal of hospital risk waste constitute important environmental and public safety issues. It is recognised that there is alack of infrastructure for the safe and environmentally acceptable disposal of hospital waste in Lebanon

  6. Pain management trend of vaso-occulsive crisis (VOC) at a community hospital emergency department (ED) for patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Susumu; Khan, Isra'a; Mushtaq, Rao; Sanikommu, Srinivasa Reddy; Mbeumo, Carline; LaChance, Jenny; Roebuck, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Pain management at the emergency department (ED) for vaso-occulsive crisis (VOC) for patients with sickle cell disease has not been optimum, with a long delay in giving the initial analgesic. We conducted a retrospective survey over a 7-year period to determine our ED's timing in giving pain medication to patients with VOC as a quality improvement project. We compared different periods, children vs adults, and the influence of gender in the analgesic administration timing. This is a retrospective chart review of three different periods: (1) years 2007-2008, (2) years 2011-2012, and (3) year 2013. We extracted relevant information from ED records. Data were analyzed using Student t test, chi-square analysis, and the Kruskal-Wallis test. There was a progressive improvement in the time interval to the 1st analgesic over these three periods. Children received analgesics more quickly than adults in all periods. Male adult patients received pain medication faster than female adult patients, although initial pain scores were higher in female than in male patients. Progressively fewer pediatric patients utilized ED over these three periods, but no difference for adult patients was observed. The proportion of pediatric patients admitted to the hospital increased with each period. The progressive decrease in both the number of patients and the number of visits to the ED by children suggested that the collective number of VOC in children has decreased, possibly secondary to the dissemination of hydroxyurea use. We failed to observe the same trend in adult patients. The need for IV access, and ordering laboratory tests or imaging studies tends to delay analgesic administration. Delay in administration of the first analgesic was more pronounced for female adult patients than male adult patients in spite of their higher pain score. Health care providers working in ED should make conscious efforts to respect pain in women as well as pain in men. Though not proven from this study

  7. [Moral responsibility of hospital management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Wilcke, Heinrich Alyosius

    2009-03-15

    The self-concept of hospitals today includes the role of service providers, and so they act accordingly. This attitude is chiefly held by hospital administrators. It means that at management level there is a shift of values toward business ethics. However, hospital management is responsible not only for the business aspects of the hospital but also for the provision of adequate medical care to patients. Therefore, hospitals as service providers must be governed by the principles of medical as well as of business ethics. These principles, although from different areas, can be made to largely coincide, but can also lead to divergent positions within a hospital. The result is what within the scope of medical ethics, too, is experienced as a conflict of principles, e.g., the principle of beneficence versus the principle of autonomy. A reconciliation of such divergent moral positions can often be effected by analyzing the actual conflict situation and thus reaching consensus. The conflict between the principles of medical ethics and business ethics takes place chiefly within the sphere of activity of those providing medical and nursing care. As a consequence, a necessary business decision taken by the management to improve the productivity of medical and nursing activities can lead to serious deficits on the staff side. In terms of business ethics, this is a lack of beneficence toward individual staff members that are perhaps overtaxed, and at the same time, in terms of medical ethics, a potential lack of beneficence toward hospital patients is implicitly accepted. In general, management has the responsibility for bringing about, in the day-to-day operation of a hospital, a plausible reconciliation of the ethical principles of two spheres of activity that are only apparently independent of each other.

  8. The effectiveness of emergency nurse practitioner service in the management of patients presenting to rural hospitals with chest pain: a multisite prospective longitudinal nested cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Tina E; Gardner, Glenn; Jack, Leanne

    2017-06-27

    Health reforms in service improvement have included the use of nurse practitioners. In rural emergency departments, nurse practitioners work to the full scope of their expanded role across all patient acuities including those presenting with undifferentiated chest pain. Currently, there is a paucity of evidence regarding the effectiveness of emergency nurse practitioner service in rural emergency departments. Inquiry into the safety and quality of the service, particularly regarding the management of complex conditions is a priority to ensure that this service improvement model meets health care needs of rural communities. This study used a prospective, longitudinal nested cohort study of rural emergency departments in Queensland, Australia. Sixty-one consecutive adult patients with chest pain who presented between November 2014 and February 2016 were recruited into the study cohort. A nested cohort of 41 participants with suspected or confirmed acute coronary syndrome were identified. The primary outcome was adherence to guidelines and diagnostic accuracy of electrocardiograph interpretation for the nested cohort. Secondary outcomes included service indicators of waiting times, diagnostic accuracy as measured by unplanned representation rates, satisfaction with care, quality-of-life, and functional status. Data were examined and compared for differences for participants managed by emergency nurse practitioners and those managed in the standard model of care. The median waiting time was 8.0 min (IQR 20) and length-of-stay was 100.0 min (IQR 64). Participants were 2.4 times more likely to have an unplanned representation if managed by the standard service model. The majority of participants (91.5%) were highly satisfied with the care that they received, which was maintained at 30-day follow-up measurement. In the evaluation of quality of life and functional status, summary scores for the SF-12 were comparable with previous studies. No differences were

  9. Emergency Managers Confront Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Labadie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Emergency managers will have to deal with the impending, uncertain, and possibly extreme effects of climate change. Yet, many emergency managers are not aware of the full range of possible effects, and they are unsure of their place in the effort to plan for, adapt to, and cope with those effects. This may partly reflect emergency mangers’ reluctance to get caught up in the rancorous—and politically-charged—debate about climate change, but it mostly is due to the worldview shared by most emergency managers. We focus on: extreme events; acute vs. chronic hazards (floods vs. droughts; a shorter event horizon (5 years vs. 75–100 years; and a shorter planning and operational cycle. This paper explores the important intersection of emergency management, environmental management, and climate change mitigation and adaptation. It examines the different definitions of terms common to all three fields, the overlapping strategies used in all three fields, and the best means of collaboration and mutual re-enforcement among the three to confront and solve the many possible futures that we may face in the climate change world.

  10. Information technology for emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, V.

    1990-01-01

    Improved performance in emergency management by the use of modern information technology has been investigated. Limited parts of a preparedness system have been chosen based on analysis of drills with respect to emergency situations and real accidents. Specific functions relevant for the situation have been selected and implemented in prototype test systems. Finally, the usefulness of the prototype systems has been evaluated by experiments following specific scenarios. (author) 24 refs

  11. An overview of the construction of emergency and pre-hospital first aid platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To further improve the ability of pre-hospital and in-hospital collaborative treatment, strengthen emergency multidisciplinary cooperation and construct a scientific, rational and efficient emergency system, under the support of former chairman Yu Xue-zhong, Dr. Li Chun-sheng and numerous colleagues in the industry, the Emergency Medicine Society of the Chinese Medical Association appeal to us to draft Construction of Emergency and Pre-hospital Platform. Based on this background, the platform of emergency and pre-hospital first aid helps to build a “one horizontal and one Longitudinal” treatment model, using the horizontal and longitudinal patterns to integrate emergency medical resources to satisfy the automatic information integration and intelligent analysis sharing, realizing the emergency management visualization and medical information digitization, simplifying the medical process and establishing a perfect standard for the emergent diseases, thereby ultimately achieving efficient diagnosis and scientific treatment.

  12. Management of hospital radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantrana, D.

    1986-01-01

    The general structure of a regulatory scheme for the management of hospital radioactive wastes is presented. The responsabilities of an institution in the radioactive waste management, and storage conditions are defined. The radioactive wastes are classified in physical terms, and the criteria for evaluating the activity of solid wastes are described. The container characteristics and, the types of treatments given to the wastes are specified. (M.C.K.) [pt

  13. Hospital all-risk emergency preparedness in Ghana | Norman ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (2) The hospitals' respective abilities to handle large scale RTA's were ... The biggest challenge facing the hospitals in their emergency intervention is the lack of preemergency and emergency preparedness plans as well as the coordination of the hospitals response mechanisms. Conclusion: The paper ended with ...

  14. Research in Hospitality Management: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in Hospitality Management is a peer-reviewed journal publishing papers that ... financial management, marketing, strategic management, economics, ... Articles covering social theory and the history and politics of the hospitality ...

  15. Hospitality Management: Learning, Doing, Knowing

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Muller

    2016-01-01

    Is there something distinct about the traditional Hospitality Management curriculum? First offered in 1893 at the Ecole Hoteliere Lausanne in Switzerland and launched in the United States at The School of Hotel Administration at Cornell University in 1922, has this course of study evolved over time to focus on both of Meyer's skills - originally based on technical skills but now transforming to emotional skills?

  16. Research in Hospitality Management: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Before submitting a manuscript, authors should peruse and consult a recent issue of the Journal for format and style. ... The submission of a manuscript by the authors implies that they automatically agree to assign exclusive copyright to the publishers of the Research in Hospitality Management, NISC (Pty) Ltd. There are no ...

  17. Drug shortage management in Alabama hospital pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver W. Holmes, III

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify effective strategies used by Alabama hospitals to manage drug shortages. Moreover, this study aims to determine if there are any relationships among hospital size, utilization of a standard policy for drug shortage management and perceived usefulness of standard procedures for drug shortages. Methods: A paper survey was mailed to 129 hospital pharmacies in Alabama (per the Alabama Hospital Association directory. The survey consisted of 5 demographic questions, questions involving perception of current medication shortages, sources of information about shorted drugs, and frequency of discussion at P&T committee meetings. Most importantly, the survey contained questions about the use of a standard policy for handling drug shortages, the effectiveness of the policy if one is used, and an open-ended question asking the recipient to describe the policy being used. Results: A response rate of 55% was achieved as 71 surveys were completed and returned. Approximately 70% of the survey respondents described the current drug shortage issue as a top priority in their pharmacy department. The pharmacy distributor served as the primary source of information regarding drug shortages for 45% of the facilities. There is a direct relationship between size of hospital and likelihood of utilization of a standard policy or procedure for drug shortage management among the sample. The smaller facilities of the sample perceived their management strategies as effective more frequently than the larger hospitals. Conclusion: Common components of effective management strategies included extensive communication of shortage details and the ability to locate alternative products. The use of portable technology (e.g., Smart phones and tablets along with mobile applications may emerge as popular means for communicating drug product shortage news and updates within a facility or healthcare system.   Type: Original Research

  18. Drug shortage management in Alabama hospital pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver W. Holmes III, Pharm.D. Candidate 2013

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify effective strategies used by Alabama hospitals to manage drug shortages. Moreover, this study aims to determine if there are any relationships among hospital size, utilization of a standard policy for drug shortage management and perceived usefulness of standard procedures for drug shortages.Methods: A paper survey was mailed to 129 hospital pharmacies in Alabama (per the Alabama Hospital Association directory. The survey consisted of 5 demographic questions, questions involving perception of current medication shortages, sources of information about shorted drugs, and frequency of discussion at P&T committee meetings. Most importantly, the survey contained questions about the use of a standard policy for handling drug shortages, the effectiveness of the policy if one is used, and an open-ended question asking the recipient to describe the policy being used.Results: A response rate of 55% was achieved as 71 surveys were completed and returned. Approximately 70% of the survey respondents described the current drug shortage issue as a top priority in their pharmacy department. The pharmacy distributor served as the primary source of information regarding drug shortages for 45% of the facilities. There is a direct relationship between size of hospital and likelihood of utilization of a standard policy or procedure for drug shortage management among the sample. The smaller facilities of the sample perceived their management strategies as effective more frequently than the larger hospitals.Conclusion: Common components of effective management strategies included extensive communication of shortage details and the ability to locate alternative products. The use of portable technology (e.g., Smart phones and tablets along with mobile applications may emerge as popular means for communicating drug product shortage news and updates within a facility or healthcare system.

  19. Blood pressure management and guideline adherence in hypertensive emergencies and urgencies: A comparison between telemedically supported and conventional out-of-hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brokmann, Jörg C; Rossaint, Rolf; Müller, Michael; Fitzner, Christina; Villa, Luigi; Beckers, Stefan K; Bergrath, Sebastian

    2017-07-01

    Prehospital hypertensive emergencies and urgencies are common, but evidence is lacking. Telemedically supported hypertensive emergencies and urgencies were prospectively collected (April 2014-March 2015) and compared retrospectively with a historical control group of on-scene physician care in the emergency medical service of Aachen, Germany. Blood pressure management and guideline adherence were evaluated. Telemedical (n=159) vs conventional (n=172) cases: blood pressure reductions of 35±24 mm Hg vs 44±23 mm Hg revealed a group effect adjusted for baseline differences (P=.0006). Blood pressure management in categories: no reduction 6 vs 0 (P=.0121); reduction ≤25% (recommended range) 113 vs 110 patients (P=.2356); reduction >25% to 30% 13 vs 29 (0.020); reduction >30% 12 vs 16 patients (P=.5608). The telemedical approach led to less pronounced blood pressure reductions and a tendency to improved guideline adherence. Telemedically guided antihypertensive care may be an alternative to conventional care especially for potentially underserved areas. ©2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Early detection of abnormal patient arrivals at hospital emergency department

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi; Sun, Ying; Kadri, Farid; Chaabane, Sondes; Tahon, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Overcrowding is one of the most crucial issues confronting emergency departments (EDs) throughout the world. Efficient management of patient flows for ED services has become an urgent issue for most hospital administrations. Handling and detection of abnormal situations is a key challenge in EDs. Thus, the early detection of abnormal patient arrivals at EDs plays an important role from the point of view of improving management of the inspected EDs. It allows the EDs mangers to prepare for high levels of care activities, to optimize the internal resources and to predict enough hospitalization capacity in downstream care services. This study reports the development of statistical method for enhancing detection of abnormal daily patient arrivals at the ED, which able to provide early alert mechanisms in the event of abnormal situations. The autoregressive moving average (ARMA)-based exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) anomaly detection scheme proposed was successfully applied to the practical data collected from the database of the pediatric emergency department (PED) at Lille regional hospital center, France.

  1. Early detection of abnormal patient arrivals at hospital emergency department

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2015-10-21

    Overcrowding is one of the most crucial issues confronting emergency departments (EDs) throughout the world. Efficient management of patient flows for ED services has become an urgent issue for most hospital administrations. Handling and detection of abnormal situations is a key challenge in EDs. Thus, the early detection of abnormal patient arrivals at EDs plays an important role from the point of view of improving management of the inspected EDs. It allows the EDs mangers to prepare for high levels of care activities, to optimize the internal resources and to predict enough hospitalization capacity in downstream care services. This study reports the development of statistical method for enhancing detection of abnormal daily patient arrivals at the ED, which able to provide early alert mechanisms in the event of abnormal situations. The autoregressive moving average (ARMA)-based exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) anomaly detection scheme proposed was successfully applied to the practical data collected from the database of the pediatric emergency department (PED) at Lille regional hospital center, France.

  2. Hospital waste management in nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow City, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Kumar Manar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess hospital waste management in nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow city. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted on the staffs of nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow from September 2012 to March 2013. A total of eight hospitals were chosen as the study sample size. Simple random sampling technique was used for the selection of the nonteaching hospitals. A pre-structured and pre-tested interview questionnaire was used to collect necessary information regarding the hospitals and biomedical waste (BMW management of the hospitals. The general information about the selected hospitals/employees of the hospitals was collected. Results: Mean hospital waste generated in the eight nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow was 0.56 kg/bed/day. About 50.5% of the hospitals did not have BMW department and colored dustbins. In 37.5% of the hospitals, there were no BMW records and segregation at source. Incinerator was used only by hospital A for treatment of BMW. Hospital G and hospital H had no facilities for BMW treatment. Conclusion: There is a need for appropriate training of staffs, strict implementation of rules, and continuous surveillance of the hospitals of Lucknow to improve the BMW management and handling practices.

  3. Mobile emergency, an emergency support system for hospitals in mobile devices: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Pierfrancesco; Boncinelli, Sergio; Grossi, Francesco; Mangini, Marco; Nesi, Paolo; Sequi, Leonardo

    2013-05-23

    Hospitals are vulnerable to natural disasters, man-made disasters, and mass causalities events. Within a short time, hospitals must provide care to large numbers of casualties in any damaged infrastructure, despite great personnel risk, inadequate communications, and limited resources. Communications are one of the most common challenges and drawbacks during in-hospital emergencies. Emergency difficulties in communicating with personnel and other agencies are mentioned in literature. At the moment of emergency inception and in the earliest emergency phases, the data regarding the true nature of the incidents are often inaccurate. The real needs and conditions are not yet clear, hospital personnel are neither efficiently coordinated nor informed on the real available resources. Information and communication technology solutions in health care turned out to have a great positive impact both on daily working practice and situations. The objective of this paper was to find a solution that addresses the aspects of communicating among medical personnel, formalizing the modalities and protocols and the information to guide the medical personnel during emergency conditions with a support of a Central Station (command center) to cope with emergency management and best practice network to produce and distribute intelligent content made available in the mobile devices of the medical personnel. The aim was to reduce the time needed to react and to cope with emergency organization, while facilitating communications. The solution has been realized by formalizing the scenarios, extracting, and identifying the requirements by using formal methods based on unified modeling language (UML). The system and was developed using mobile programming under iOS Apple and PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor My Structured Query Language (PHP MySQL). Formal questionnaires and time sheets were used for testing and validation, and a control group was used in order to estimate the reduction of time needed

  4. Integrated emergency management in KKG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluegel, J.U.; Plank, H.

    2007-01-01

    The development and introduction of emergency measures in Switzerland was mainly characterized by the evaluation of international experience and by systematic analysis of beyond-design basis accidents within the framework of plant-specific probabilistic safety analyses. As early as in the mid-eighties, the Swiss regulatory authority demanded that measures be taken against severe accidents, and periodically added more detailed requirements, most recently in 2000 when the introduction of Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SMAG) was demanded for power operation as well as operation in the non-power mode. The SMAG were introduced at the Goesgen nuclear power station within a project in the period between 2003 and 2005. For this purpose, a concept of integrated emergency management was developed which is based on updates of the proven emergency manual. One important aspect of this integrative concept is the distinction between preventive and mitigating procedures by defining appropriate criteria. The findings made in the implementation phase of the project include the realization that the introduction of procedures dealing with severe accidents also requires the ability to develop new ways of thinking and acting in accident management. This implies the awareness that procedures covering severe accidents must be applied much more flexibly and in the light of the situation than regulations covering fault conditions. Also possibilities to simulate severe accidents were created within the project both for the development of procedures and for training plant operators and members of the emergency staff. (orig.)

  5. Hospitality Management: Learning, Doing, Knowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Muller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Is there something distinct about the traditional Hospitality Management curriculum? First offered in 1893 at the Ecole Hoteliere Lausanne in Switzerland and launched in the United States at The School of Hotel Administration at Cornell University in 1922, has this course of study evolved over time to focus on both of Meyer's skills - originally based on technical skills but now transforming to emotional skills?

  6. International Journal of Hospitality Management

    OpenAIRE

    Woo, Gon Kima, 1,; Hyunjung, Limb,; Robert, A. Brymerc, 2,

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates how managing online reviews affects hotel performance. An international hotel chain provided the hotel performance data and the online review data. A leading social media firm for the hospitality industry collected the online review data, which the hotel company purchased. The results indicate that overall ratings are the most salient predictor of hotel performance, followed by response to negative comments. The better the overall ratings and the higher the response ra...

  7. Modelling Hospital Materials Management Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Iannone

    2013-06-01

    integrated and detailed analysis and description model for hospital materials management data and tasks, which is able to tackle information from patient requirements to usage, from replenishment requests to supplying and handling activities. The model takes account of medical risk reduction, traceability and streamlined processes perspectives. Second, the paper translates this information into a business process model and mathematical formalization.The study provides a useful guide to the various relevant technology‐related, management and business issues, laying the foundations of an efficient reengineering of the supply chain to reduce healthcare costs and improve the quality of care.

  8. [Management accounting in hospital setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzović, Z; Richter, D; Simunić, S; Bozić, R; Hadjina, N; Piacun, D; Harcet, B

    1998-12-01

    The periodic income and expenditure accounts produced at the hospital and departmental level enable successful short term management, but, in the long run do not help remove tensions between health care demand and limited resources, nor do they enable optimal medical planning within the limited financial resources. We are trying to estabilish disease category costs based on case mixing according to diagnostic categories (diagnosis related groups, DRG, or health care resource groups, HRG) and calculation of hospital standard product costs, e.g., radiology cost, preoperative nursing cost etc. The average DRG cost is composed of standard product costs plus any costs specific to a diagnostic category. As an example, current costing procedure for hip artheroplasty in the University Hospital Center Zagreb is compared to the management accounting approach based on British Health Care Resource experience. The knowledge of disease category costs based on management accounting requirements facilitates the implementation of medical programs within the given financial resources and devolves managerial responsibility closer to the clinical level where medical decisions take place.

  9. O enfermeiro no gerenciamento à qualidade em serviço hospitalar de emergência: revisão integrativa da literatura La enfermera en la gestión de la calidad en el servicio de urgencia en el hospital: revisión integradora de la literatura Quality management by nurses in hospitals' emergency services: integrative literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Aparecido Bellucci Júnior

    2011-12-01

    las enfermeras en la Acogida Clasificadora de Riesgo es una estrategia clave para la gestión de calidad en los servicios.This study aimed to analyze publications related to the activities of nurses managing the quality in the Emergency Services of Hospitals. An integrative literature review identified 4780 articles of which 8 were selected considering the criteria: full articles, published from 2000 to 2010; available in Portuguese; indexed in the databases of the Virtual Health Library. All the material was analyzed through Content Analysis. Two themes emerged: Working in the structuring of the nursing staff to the quality of care and Nursing actions managing the quality of care. The conclusion is that the promotion of the quality of care provided in Hospitals' Emergency Services is linked to the actions promoting the humanization of both care and caregivers, and that the role of the nurse in the User Reception with Risk Rating is a key strategy for managing quality in services.

  10. 40 ANAESTHETIC MANAGEMENT OF SURGICAL EMERGENCIES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... *Department of Anaesthesiology, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City,. Nigeria ... anaesthesia for emergency surgery. This expose seeks .... and the hospital's capacity for ... planning and clinical prudence in the.

  11. Hospital managers need management information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S; Freeman, J R

    1976-01-01

    A new hospital director seeking to bring his institution to the brink of solvency found himself with ten pounds of data but no "information"--at least, not the kind of information he could use as a basis for management decisions. What he needed was a system that would not only present data, but the meaning of the data. Such a system is the integrated MIS.

  12. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Federal Training Center is a safety and emergency response training center that offers...

  13. Management Development in Hospitality and Tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teare, Richard, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A theme issue devoted to management development in hospitality and tourism includes nine articles on assessing human resource needs and priorities, management development and training, preparing managers, curriculum design, supervised work experience, manager role, and the current business environment. (JOW)

  14. Study on value of Extended-Focused Abdominal Scan For Trauma (e-FAST performed by non-radiologist emergency care doctors in Management of Trauma at Emergency Trauma Centre, Teaching Hospital, Karapitiya,Galle, Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seneviratne RW

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy and usefulness of ultrasound in the hands of emergency physicians and medical officers who are non-radiologistsin assessing Trauma patients at Emergency Trauma Centre(ETC at Teaching Hospital, Karapitiya, Galle, Sri Lanka Methodology We performed an observational study on Trauma patients admitted to Emergency Department at Teaching Hospital, Karapitiya from 1.12.2014 to 31.12.2014 who fulfilled indications for e-FAST using a specially designed performa. Accuracy of eFAST was tested by comparing the original with subsequent imaging, clinical decision by surgeons, findings at surgery or more than one of the above. Results 69 patients fulfilled the entry criteria.Nineteen of the scans were performed by consultants while rest was done by senior medical officers. All of them were trained in eFAST. Of the 20 scans which were positive there were four pneumothoraxes and one haemothorax. 15 scans which were positive for intraperitoneal free fluid were later. Out of 49 Patients who had negative scans 47 did not require surgery or any interventions. Other two required laparotomy later. Sensitivity and specificity ofeFast was 90.4% and 97.9% respectively. Positive predictive value was 95.0% while Negative predictive value was at 95.9% . Conclusions eFAST is a rapidand reliable alternative in detecting free intra-abdominal fluid as well as pneumotorax and haemothorax. It is a safe decision making tool which can be used with confidence and accuracy after brief training and experience by non radiologists which will reduce morbidity and mortality in trauma patients of Sri Lanka.

  15. The Obstetrics Gynecology and Children's Hospital Emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    The efficiency of emergency rooms is becoming increasingly important and has been addressed by legislation. Prompt emergency room service is expected when patients present to an emergency room with urgent health problems. However, depending on various factors, the wait times for access to health services can be ...

  16. Information technology support for emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uuspaeae, P.

    1990-01-01

    Information systems for distributed decision support for emergency management are considered. Specific applications include nuclear power plant emergencies. Emergencies in other industries such as chemical industry may also be considered. Research in the ISEM project is briefly summarized

  17. Psychiatric Case Management in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Stephanie B; Stanton, Marietta P

    2015-01-01

    The care of the mentally ill has reached a real crisis in the United States. There were more than 6.4 million visits to emergency departments (EDs) in 2010, or about 5% of total visits, involved patients whose primary diagnosis was a mental health condition or substance abuse (). That is up 28% from just 4 years earlier, according to the latest figures available from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality in Rockville, MD. Using a method called scoping, the purpose of this article is to examine the range, extent, and evidence available regarding case management as an intervention in the ED to manage mental health patients, to determine whether there is sufficient quantity and quality of evidence on this topic to conduct a meta-analysis, and to identify relevant studies that balance comprehensiveness with reasonable limitations. One solution for ensuring that the costs are contained, efficiency is maintained, and quality outcomes are achieved is the placement of a case manager in the ED. According to , because the majority of hospital admissions come through the ED, it makes sense to have case managers located there to act as gatekeepers and ensure that patients who are admitted meet criteria and are placed in the proper bed with the proper status. From the scoping techniques implemented in this study, the authors came to the conclusion that case management has been and can be used to effectively treat mental health patients in the emergency room. A good number of patients with psych mental health issues are frequent visitors and repeat visitors. Case management has not been used very often as a strategy for managing patients through the ED or for follow-up after the visit. Hospitals that have developed a protocol for managing these patients outside the main patient flow have had successful results. Staff training and development on psych mental health issues have been helpful in the ED. While there are not a large number of studies available on this topic

  18. Effective emergency management: reconsidering the bureaucratic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, D M; Phillips, B D

    1995-12-01

    The command and control approach is compared with the Emergent Human Resources Model (EHRM) approach to emergency management. Four decades of systematic research shows that a rigid, bureaucratic command and control approach to emergency management generally leads to an ineffective emergency response. Previous studies and our own research suggest that flexible, malleable, loosely coupled, organizational configurations can create a more effective disaster response.

  19. Glass injuries seen in the emergency department of a South African district hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Nzaumvila, Doudou; Govender, Indiran; Kramer, Efraim B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The emergency department of Embhuleni Hospital frequently manages patients with glass-related injuries. This study assessed these injuries and the glass that caused them in more detail. AIM: The objectives of our study included determining the type of glass causing these injuries and describing the circumstances associated with different types of glass injuries. SETTING: The emergency department of Embhuleni Hospital in Elukwatini, Mpumalanga province, South Africa. METHODS: This ...

  20. The Danish database for acute and emergency hospital contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lassen AT

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Annmarie T Lassen,1 Henrik Jørgensen,2 Hanne Blæhr Jørsboe,3,4 Annette Odby,5 Mikkel Brabrand,6 Jacob Steinmetz,7 Julie Mackenhauer,8 Hans Kirkegaard,8 Christian Fynbo Christiansen9 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Odense University Hospital, Odense, 2Department of Surgery, Hospital of Northern Sjaelland, Hilleroed, 3Department of Emergency Medicine, Nykobing F Hospital, 4Department of Hospital Administration, Nykobing F Hospital, Nykøbing Falster, 5The Danish Clinical Registers, Registry Support Centre for Health Quality and Informatics, Aarhus, 6Department of Emergency Medicine, Hospital of South West Jutland, Esbjerg, 7Department of Anaesthesia, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, 8Research Center for Emergency Medicine, Aarhus University, 9Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Aim for database: Aim of the Danish database for acute and emergency hospital contacts (DDAEHC is to monitor the quality of care for all unplanned hospital contacts in Denmark (acute and emergency contacts.Study population: The DDAEHC is a nationwide registry that completely covers all acute and emergency somatic hospital visits at individual level regardless of presentation site, presenting complaint, and department designation since January 1, 2013.Main variables: The DDAEHC includes ten quality indicators – of which two are outcome indicators and eight are process indicators. Variables used to compute these indicators include among others day and time of hospital contact, vital status, ST-elevation myocardial infarction diagnosis, date and time of relevant procedure (percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary angiography, X-ray of wrist, and gastrointestinal surgery as well as time for triage and physician judgment. Data are currently gathered from The Danish National Patient Registry, two existing databases (Danish Stroke Register and Danish Database for Emergency Surgery, and will

  1. Emergency response planning in hospitals, United States: 2003-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niska, Richard W; Burt, Catharine W

    2007-08-20

    This study presents baseline data to determine which hospital characteristics are associated with preparedness for terrorism and natural disaster in the areas of emergency response planning and availability of equipment and specialized care units. Information from the Bioterrorism and Mass Casualty Preparedness Supplements to the 2003 and 2004 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys was used to provide national estimates of variations in hospital emergency response plans and resources by residency and medical school affiliation, hospital size, ownership, metropolitan statistical area status, and Joint Commission accreditation. Of 874 sampled hospitals with emergency or outpatient departments, 739 responded for an 84.6 percent response rate. Estimates are presented with 95 percent confidence intervals. About 92 percent of hospitals had revised their emergency response plans since September 11, 2001, but only about 63 percent had addressed natural disasters and biological, chemical, radiological, and explosive terrorism in those plans. Only about 9 percent of hospitals had provided for all 10 of the response plan components studied. Hospitals had a mean of about 14 personal protective suits, 21 critical care beds, 12 mechanical ventilators, 7 negative pressure isolation rooms, and 2 decontamination showers each. Hospital bed capacity was the factor most consistently associated with emergency response planning and availability of resources.

  2. Computer managed emergency operating procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamun, I.; Mavko, B.; Stritar, A.

    1994-01-01

    New computer technology is a very effective tool for developing a new design of nuclear power plant control room. It allows designer possibility to create a tool for managing with large database of power plant parameters and displaying them in different graphic forms and possibility of automated execution of well known task. The structure of Emergency Operating Procedures (EOP) is very suitable for programming and for creating expert system. The Computerized Emergency Operating Procedures (CEOP) described in this paper can be considered as an upgrading of standard EOP approach. EmDiSY (Emergency Display System - computer code name for CEOP) main purpose is to supply the operator with necessary information, to document all operator actions and to execute well known tasks. It is a function oriented CEOP that gives operator guidance on how to verify the critical safety functions and how to restore and maintain these functions where they are degraded. All knowledge is coded and stored in database files. The knowledge base consists from stepping order for verifying plant parameters, desired values of parameters, conditions for comparison and links between procedures and actions. Graphical shell allows users to read database, to follow instruction and to find out correct task. The desired information is concentrated in one screen and allows users to focus on a task. User is supported in two ways: desired parameter values are displayed on the process picture and automated monitoring critical safety function status trees are all time in progress and available to the user. (author). 4 refs, 4 figs

  3. Information Systems Coordinate Emergency Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The rescue crews have been searching for the woman for nearly a week. Hurricane Katrina devastated Hancock County, the southernmost point in Mississippi, and the woman had stayed through the storm in her beach house. There is little hope of finding her alive; the search teams know she is gone because the house is gone. Late at night in the art classroom of the school that is serving as the county s emergency operations center, Craig Harvey is discussing the search with the center s commander. Harvey is the Chief Operating Officer of a unique company called NVision Solutions Inc., based at NASA s Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, only a couple of miles away. He and his entire staff have set up a volunteer operation in the art room, supporting the emergency management efforts using technology and capabilities the company developed through its NASA partnerships. As he talks to the commander, Harvey feels an idea taking shape that might lead them to the woman s location. Working with surface elevation data and hydrological principles, Harvey creates a map showing how the floodwaters from the storm would have flowed along the topography of the region around the woman s former home. Using the map, search crews find the woman s body in 15 minutes. Recovering individuals who have been lost is a sad reality of emergency management in the wake of a disaster like Hurricane Katrina in 2005. But the sooner answers can be provided, the sooner a community s overall recovery can take place. When damage is extensive, resources are scattered, and people are in dire need of food, shelter, and medical assistance, the speed and efficiency of emergency operations can be the key to limiting the impact of a disaster and speeding the process of recovery. And a key to quick and effective emergency planning and response is geographic information. With a host of Earth-observing satellites orbiting the globe at all times, NASA generates an unmatched wealth of data about our ever

  4. Are hospitals ready to response to disasters? Challenges, opportunities and strategies of Hospital Emergency Incident Command System (HEICS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Atighechian, Golrokh; Shams, Lida; Haghshenas, Abbas

    2011-08-01

    Applying an effective management system in emergency incidents provides maximum efficiency with using minimum facilities and human resources. Hospital Emergency Incident Command System (HEICS) is one of the most reliable emergency incident command systems to make hospitals more efficient and to increase patient safety. This research was to study requirements, barriers, and strategies of HEICS in hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS). This was a qualitative research carried out in Isfahan Province, Iran during 2008-09. The study population included senior hospital managers of IUMS and key informants in emergency incident management across Isfahan Province. Sampling method was in non-random purposeful form and snowball technique was used. The research instrument for data collection was semi-structured interview; collected data was analyzed by Colaizzi Technique. Findings of study were categorized into three general categories including requirements (organizational and sub-organizational), barriers (internal and external) of HEICS establishment, and providing short, mid and long term strategies. These categories are explained in details in the main text. Regarding the existing barriers in establishment of HEICS, it is recommended that responsible authorities in different levels of health care system prepare necessary conditions for implementing such system as soon as possible via encouraging and supporting systems. This paper may help health policy makers to get reasonable framework and have comprehensive view for establishing HEICS in hospitals. It is necessary to consider requirements and viewpoints of stakeholders before any health policy making or planning.

  5. Hospital epidemiology of emergent cervical necrotizing fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Nissar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Necrotizing fasciitis (NF is a surgical emergency. It is a rapidly progressing infection of the fascia and subcutaneous tissue and could be fatal if not diagnosed early and treated properly. NF is common in the groin, abdomen, and extremities but rare in the neck and the head. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF is an aggressive infection of the neck and the head, with devastating complications such as airway obstruction, pneumonia, pulmonary abscess, jugular venous thrombophlebitis, mediastinitis, and septic shock associated with high mortality. Aim : To assess the presentation, comorbidities, type of infection, severity of disease, and intensive care outcome of CNF. Methods : Medical records of the patients treated for NF in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU from January 1995 to February 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Results : Out of 94 patients with NF, 5 (5.3% had CNF. Four patients were male. The mean age of our patients was 41.2 ± 14.8 years. Sixty percent of patients had an operative procedure as the predisposing factor and 80% of patients received nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. The only comorbidity associated was diabetes mellitus (DM in 3 patients (60%. Sixty percent of the cases had type1 NF. Mean sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score on admission to the ICU was 8.8 ± 3.6. All patients had undergone debridement at least two times. During the initial 24 h our patients received 5.8 ± 3.0 l of fluid, 2.0 ± 1.4 units of packed red blood cells (PRBC, 4.8 ± 3.6 units of fresh frozen plasma (FFP, and 3.0 ± 4.5 units of platelet concentrate. The mean number of days patients were intubated was 5.2 ± 5.1 days and the mean ICU stay was 6.4 ± 5.2 days. Sixty percent of cases had multiorgan dysfunction (MODS and one patient died, resulting in a mortality rate of 20%. Conclusion : According to our study, CNF represents around 5% of NF patients. CNF was higher among male patients and in

  6. Environmental management in public hospitals: Environmental management in Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Pablo Rodríguez-Miranda; César Augusto García-Ubaque; María Camila García-Vaca

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Activities in hospitals have environmental impacts which may pose risks to human and environmental health if they are not managed correctly. For this reason, it is necessary to implement an environmental management plan in hospitals that not only focuses on solid waste management but includes all aspects associated with health within institutions. Objective: To review environmental management aspects related to public hospitals in order to identify environmental management a...

  7. The Danish database for acute and emergency hospital contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Annmarie T; Jørgensen, Henrik; Jørsboe, Hanne Blæhr

    2016-01-01

    AIM FOR DATABASE: Aim of the Danish database for acute and emergency hospital contacts (DDAEHC) is to monitor the quality of care for all unplanned hospital contacts in Denmark (acute and emergency contacts). STUDY POPULATION: The DDAEHC is a nationwide registry that completely covers all acute a...... and emergency hospital contacts in Denmark. The database includes specific outcome and process health care quality indicators as well as demographic and other basic information with the purpose to be used for enhancement of quality of acute care.......AIM FOR DATABASE: Aim of the Danish database for acute and emergency hospital contacts (DDAEHC) is to monitor the quality of care for all unplanned hospital contacts in Denmark (acute and emergency contacts). STUDY POPULATION: The DDAEHC is a nationwide registry that completely covers all acute...... and emergency somatic hospital visits at individual level regardless of presentation site, presenting complaint, and department designation since January 1, 2013. MAIN VARIABLES: The DDAEHC includes ten quality indicators - of which two are outcome indicators and eight are process indicators. Variables used...

  8. Hospital disaster emergency preparedness: A study of Onandjokwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study explored disaster emergency preparedness at Onandjokwe Lutheran Hospital in Northern Namibia. It utilized quantitative and qualitative research methods, using a self-administered questionnaire, semi-structured key informant interviews, and a hospital disaster plan checklist. A stratified sample of 120 ...

  9. Estimating Uncompensated Care Charges at Rural Hospital Emergency Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kevin J.; Moore, Charity G.; Probst, Janice C.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Rural hospitals face multiple financial burdens. Due to federal law, emergency departments (ED) provide a gateway for uninsured and self-pay patients to gain access to treatment. It is unknown how much uncompensated care in rural hospitals is due to ED visits. Purpose: To develop a national estimate of uncompensated care from patients…

  10. ISEM: Europe's ESPRIT support for emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, V.

    1991-01-01

    The CEC-supported ISEM project to develop Information technology Support for Emergency Management was started in 1989. Two specific applications to demonstrate the ISEM system were selected; a NPP accident and a chemical plant emergency. An Emergency Management System provides user-friendly facilities for communication between the numerous local, regional and national organizations

  11. Emergency Department (ED, ED Observation, Day Hospital, and Hospital Admissions for Adults with Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Silva

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Use of alternative venues to manage uncomplicated vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC, such as a day hospital (DH or ED observation unit, for patients with sickle cell anemia, may significantly reduce admission rates, which may subsequently reduce 30-day readmission rates. Methods: In the context of a two-institution quality improvement project to implement best practices for management of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD VOC, we prospectively compared acute care encounters for utilization of 1 emergency department (ED; 2 ED observation unit; 3 DH, and 4 hospital admission, of two different patient cohorts with SCD presenting to our two study sites. Using a representative sample of patients from each institution, we also tabulated SCD patient visits or admissions to outside hospitals within 20 miles of the patients’ home institutions. Results: Over 30 months 427 patients (297 at Site 1 and 130 at Site 2 initiated 4,740 institutional visits, totaling 6,627 different acute care encounters, including combinations of encounters. The range of encounters varied from a low of 0 (203 of 500 patients [40.6%] at Site 1; 65 of 195 patients [33.3%] at Site 2, and a high of 152 (5/month acute care encounters for one patient at Site 2. Patients at Site 2 were more likely to be admitted to the hospital during the study period (88.4% vs. 74.4%, p=0.0011 and have an ED visit (96.9% vs. 85.5%, p=0.0002. DH was used more frequently at Site 1 (1.207 encounters for 297 patients at Site 1, vs. 199 encounters for 130 patients at Site 2, and ED observation was used at Site 1 only. Thirty-five percent of patients visited hospitals outside their home academic center. Conclusion: In this 30-month assessment of two sickle cell cohorts, healthcare utilization varied dramatically between individual patients. One cohort had more hospital admissions and ED encounters, while the other cohort had more day hospital encounters and used a sickle cell disease

  12. Hospital-based ocular emergencies: epidemiology, treatment, and visual outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Cindy A; Rogers-Martel, Melanie; Golas, Liliya; Chepurny, Anna; Martel, James B; Martel, Joseph R

    2014-03-01

    Ocular trauma is recognized as the leading cause of unilateral blindness. However, few studies to date have focused on the clinical features of hospital-based ocular emergencies. Effectiveness of trauma centers in treating ocular emergencies was compared with treatment in traditional community hospital emergency departments. Demographics, causes, and nature of ocular emergencies, as well as visual outcome in community hospitals emergency departments and trauma centers, were also examined. Records of 1027 patients with ocular emergencies seen between July 2007 and November 2010 at 3 community hospitals emergency departments and 2 hospitals with level II trauma centers were retrospectively examined. Unpaired t test and Pearson χ(2) test were used to determine statistical significance. The incidence of patients requiring ophthalmic intervention was 77.2 per 100 000 in the community hospitals and 208.9 per 100 000 in the trauma centers. Rates of ocular emergencies were higher in middle-aged, white men. Orbital fractures were found in 86% of all orbital contusion cases in trauma centers, whereas 66.7% of patients with fall injuries and open globe diagnoses resulted in legal blindness. The middle-aged, white men are more vulnerable to ocular injuries caused mainly by motor vehicle accidents. The ability of trauma centers to provide comparable increases in vision outcomes, despite treating more severe ocular emergencies, demonstrates the effectiveness of trauma centers. Patients diagnosed as having orbital contusions or who have fall injuries deserve careful evaluation because they are more likely to have more severe sight-threatening injuries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A Tactical Emergency Response Management System (Terms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... information is a result of collaboration between accident response personnel. ... Tactical Emergency Response Management System (TERMS) which unifies all these different ... purpose of handling crisis and emergency.

  14. Hospital waste management and other small producers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, H.; Roy, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes waste management in hospitals and other waste producers. Low-level radioactive wastes are collected by ANDRA (French Agency for radioactive waste management) and informations on waste processing or regulations on radiation sources are given

  15. A case study of hospital operations management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, T C

    1987-12-01

    This paper discusses a study to investigate various operations management problems in a newly opened, modern regional hospital in Hong Kong. The findings of the study reveal that there exist in the hospital a number of current and potential problem areas. Recommendations for solving these problems are suggested with a view to improving the overall operational efficiency and effectiveness of the hospital.

  16. EARNINGS MANAGEMENT IN U.S. HOSPITALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Gang Nathan

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the hospital management practices of manipulating financial earnings within the bounds of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). We conduct regression analyses that relate earnings management to hospital characteristics to assess the economic determinants of hospital earnings management behavior. From the CMS Cost Reports we collected hospital financial data of all U.S. hospitals that request reimbursement from the federal government for treating Medicare patients, and regress discretionary accruals on hospital size, profitability, asset liquidity, operating efficiency, labor cost, and ownership. Hospitals with higher profit margin, current ratio, working capital, days of patient receivables outstanding and total wage are associated with more earnings management, whereas those with larger size and higher debt level, asset turnover, days cash on hand, fixed asset age are associated with lower level of earnings manipulation. Additionally, managers of non-profit hospitals are more likely to undertake some form of window-dressing by manipulating accounting accruals without changing business models or pricing strategies than their public hospital counterparts. We provide direct evidence of the use of discretionary accruals to manage financial earnings among U.S. hospitals and the finding has profound policy implications in terms of assessing the pervasiveness of accounting manipulation and the overall integrity of financial reporting in this very special public and quasi-public service sector.

  17. PRE-HOSPITAL EMERGENCY CARE IN SWEDEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf BJÖRNSTIG

    2004-01-01

    In Sweden (9 million inhabitants, a sparsely populated country with sometimes long transportation distances to the nearest trauma hospital, 800 ambulances, 7 ambulance helicopters and 3–5 fixed wing ambulance aircraft are the available transport resources. In case of a mass casualty or disaster situation, inside or outside the country, a governmental project (Swedish National Medevac aims to convert a passenger aircraft from Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS to a qualified medical resource for long distance transport, with capacity to nurse six intensive care patients and an additional 6–20 lieing or seated patients during transport.

  18. Knowledge Management Orientation: An Innovative Perspective to Hospital Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Matina; Ghadiri Nejad, Mazyar; Bagzibagli, Kemal

    2017-12-01

    By considering innovation as a new project in hospitals, all the project management's standard steps should be followed in execution. This study investigated the validation of a new set of measures in terms of providing a procedure for knowledge management-oriented innovation that enriches the hospital management system. The relation between innovation and all the knowledge management areas, as the main constructs of project management, was illustrated by referring to project management standard steps and previous studies. Through consultations and meetings with a committee of professional project managers, a questionnaire was developed to measure ten knowledge management areas in hospital's innovation process. Additionally, a group of experts from hospital managers were invited to comment on the applicability of the questionnaires by considering if the items are measurable in hospitals practically. A close-ended, Likert-type scale items, consisted of ten sections, were developed based on project management body of knowledge thorough Delphi technique. It enables the managers to evaluate hospitals' situation to be aware whether the organization follows the knowledge management standards in innovation process or not. By pilot study, confirmatory factor analysis and exploratory factor analysis were conducted to ensure the validity and reliability of the measurement items. The developed items seem to have a potential to help hospital managers and subsequently delivering new products/services successfully based on the standard procedures in their organization. In all innovation processes, the knowledge management areas and their standard steps help hospital managers by a new tool as questionnaire format.

  19. Minor emergency clinic: key to the future of successful hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, S; Kathawala, Y; Elmuti, D

    1992-01-01

    This project set out to determine whether there is a relationship between the minor emergency facility an individual uses and their choice of a hospital for in-patient care. In studying this relationship, the factors that are important to persons choosing a clinic or hospital facility, as well as the influence of a physician, were also identified. A structured, undisguised telephone survey was used for interviewing a randomly selected sample population of 189 San Angelo residents. Analysis of the survey data indicated that dependency does exist between minor emergency clinic use and the hospital chosen for in-patient care. The results of this study also suggested that hospitals' marketing strategy should shift the emphasis of their advertising from the hospital itself to their physician association and clinics. In addition, a number of other interesting observations concerning the relative importance of various medical factors to the participants was also explored.

  20. Medical Professionals Designing Hospital Management Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byg, Vibeke

    Health care administration in many OECD countries has undergone substantial changes in recent years as a consequence of NPM reforms, rising costs, the pace of technological innovation, heightened competition for patients and resources, quality of managed care and demographic shifts. Hospitals...... especially have been reformed due to the high proportion of resources they absorb and the apparent difficulty of prioritizing and coordinating health care within hospitals. There is abundant research literature on the topic of reforming hospital management models. Lacking from the literature, however......, is insight into how we can understand and explain how medical professionals adapt hospital management over time in relation to changing hospital management models that are global in their influence in hospital organizations. The aim of this dissertation is to understand and explain how medical professionals...

  1. Experiential Learning in Hospitality Management Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennen, Paul George

    2017-01-01

    The research study recognized that, although the knowledge obtained from academic textbooks and traditional classes are important to post-secondary hospitality management curriculum as they provide numerous insights and perspectives of different methods to manage a particular avenue within the hospitality industry; it is not the only aspect of the…

  2. Corrigendum | Gehrels | Research in Hospitality Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Li, L. (2016). Are social media applications a facilitator or barrier to learning for tourism and hospitality management students? Research in Hospitality Management, 6 (2), 195–202. https://doi.org/10.1080/22243534.2016.1253289. Acknowledgement — I thank University of Surrey, University of Derby, and Bath Spa ...

  3. Regulatory Information by Topic: Emergency Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulatory information about emergencies, including chemical accident prevention, risk management plans (RMPs), chemical reporting, community right to know, and oil spills and hazardous substances releases.

  4. Flexible UAV Mission Management Using Emerging Technologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Desimone, Roberto; Lee, Richard

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses recent results and proposed work in the application of emerging artificial intelligence technologies for flexible mission management, especially for unmanned (combat) airborne vehicles...

  5. A 2-year retrospective study of pediatric dental emergency visits at a hospital emergency center in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chia-Pei; Tsai, Aileen I; Chen, Ching-Ming

    2016-06-01

    There is a paucity of information regarding pediatric dental emergencies in Taiwan. This study investigates the prevalence and characteristics of the pediatric dental emergency services provided at a medical center. This study included a retrospective chart review of patients under 18 years of age with dental complaints who visited the Emergency Department (ED) of Linkou Medical Center of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital from January 2012 to December 2013. Information regarding age, gender, time/day/month of presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up was collected and analyzed. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics and Pearson's Chi-square test with the significance level set as p dental emergencies in the medical center ED were predominantly related to orodental trauma (47.1%) and pulpal pain (29.9%). Most patients were male (p management for dental emergencies was prescribing medication for pulp-related problems and orodental trauma. The follow-up rate of orodental trauma was the highest (p dental emergency visits at a hospital emergency center in Taiwan. While dental emergencies are sometimes unforeseeable or unavoidable, developing community awareness about proper at-home care as well as regular dental preventive measures can potentially reduce the number of emergency visits. Copyright © 2016 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Management of hospital radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houy, J.C.; Rimbert, J.C.; Bouvet, C.; Laugle, S.

    1997-01-01

    The hospital radioactive wastes are of three types: solid, liquid and gaseous. Prior to final evacuation all these wastes are checked by a detector the threshold of which is lower than the standard. This system allows detecting activities very low under the daily recommended threshold of 37 kBq (1μ Ci), for the group II. In metabolic radiotherapy the unsealed sources of iodine 131 will form mainly the wastes arising from the rooms contaminated by the patient himself. In this service anything touching the patient's room most by systematically checked. All the rooms are provided with toilette with two compartments, one connected traditionally to the sewerage system for faeces and the other coupled to tanks for urine storing. The filled reservoirs waits around 10 month span prior to being emptied, after checking, into the sewerage system. The volume activity most be lower than 7 Bq per liter (standard). For the hot labs, injection room and in-vitro lab, the liquid waste retrieved from dedicated stainless sinks are stored in storage tanks and will waits for 2 years before evacuation. The undies coming from the metabolic radiotherapy service are possible contaminated by the patient sheets, pillow cases, etc. These undies freshly contaminated may be contaminating if the contamination is non fixated. All the undies coming from this service are checked like all the wastes by means of the fixed detector. For the solid wastes two evacuation channels are possible: the urban garbage repository for household wastes and the Brest waste repository for hospital wastes. For the liquid waste arising for urines, used washing water, etc, the evacuation will be done towards city sewerage system after storing or dilution. Concerning the liquid wastes presenting chemical risks, they will be evacuated in cans by NETRA. Concerning the gaseous wastes, trapped on active carbon filters, they will be handled like solid wastes and will be directed to the waste repository of Brest. The other

  7. The organizational commitment of emergency physicians in Spanish public hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noval de la Torre, A; Bulchand Gidumal, J; Melián González, S

    2016-12-30

    Background. There are not too many studies that deal with the organizational commitment of emergency physicians. This commitment has been shown to impact organizational performance. The aim of this paper is to analyse the degree of commitment of the emergency physicians in Spanish public hospitals and the factors that may influence it. Method. Online survey using SurveyMonkey to emergency physicians in Spanish public hospitals. Results. Two hundred and five questionnaires were received, 162 from physicians and 43 from heads of the emergency service. Results show an intermediate level of commitment, with affective commitment showing the lowest level and continuance commitment showing the highest level. The capabilities of the physician have an influence on their affective commitment; specific training in emergency procedures and seniority has an influence on their continuance commitment; and the opinion they hold about the organization of their service influences affective commitment. Conclusions. Emergency physicians show an average involvement in the hospital in which they work (average 3.8 on a range of 1 to 5), feel an average affection for it (3.4), and have a high intention to keep working there (4.0). The resources the hospital has due to its level do not have an influence on this commitment, while the training and perceptions of the service do have an influence.

  8. Highly Enhanced Risk Management Emergency Satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalmeir, Michael; Gataullin, Yunir; Indrajit, Agung

    HERMES (Highly Enhanced Risk Management Emergency Satellite) is potential European satellite mission for global flood management, being implemented by Technical University Munich and European Space Agency. With its main instrument - a reliable and precise Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) antenna...

  9. Emergency management and the nuclear terrorism threat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVito, D.A.; Suiter, L.

    1987-01-01

    Counterterrorism is not the province of the emergency manager. Generally law enforcement has that role. Instead, the emergency manager's role is crisis management; the responsibility is to be the focal point for the chief executive officer (mayor, governor, or national executive) regarding the protection of the population. Managers must be able to gather and synthesize sufficient information, rapidly and accurately, on which to base sound decisions. To do so, they must have a highly efficient, coordinated emergency management organization in place at the state and local levels of government, and there must be a workable plan for emergency operations that integrates all public safety forces into an effective response to all types of emergencies. A major goal of emergency management is to ensure that government is in control and that the public perceives that the system is working. All states have an emergency management organization at the state level, as do most counties and large cities. However, some states and local governments, particularly those that have nuclear power plants within their borders, are better staffed, equipped, and trained than others to deal with nuclear incidents. States with nuclear facilities have an emergency management organization, an emergency plan, and adequate communications, equipment, and trained personnel to handle a nuclear accident or incident at a plant. 21 references

  10. Positive Coping: A Unique Characteristic to Pre-Hospital Emergency Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, Abbas; Froutan, Razieh

    2017-01-01

    It is important to gain a thorough understanding of positive coping methods adopted by medical emergency personnel to manage stressful situations associated with accidents and emergencies. Thus, the purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of positive coping strategies used by emergency medical service providers. This study was conducted using a qualitative content analysis method. The study participants included 28 pre-hospital emergency personnel selected from emergency medical service providers in bases located in different regions of the city of Mashhad, Iran, from April to November 2016. The purposive sampling method also was used in this study, which was continued until data saturation was reached. To collect the data, semistructured open interviews, observations, and field notes were used. Four categories and 10 subcategories were extracted from the data on the experiences of pre-hospital emergency personnel related to positive coping strategies. The four categories included work engagement, smart capability, positive feedback, and crisis pioneering. All the obtained categories had their own subcategories, which were determined based on their distinctly integrated properties. The results of this study show that positive coping consists of several concepts used by medical emergency personnel, management of stressful situations, and ultimately quality of pre-hospital clinical services. Given the fact that efficient methods such as positive coping can prevent debilitating stress in an individual, pre-hospital emergency authorities should seek to build and strengthen "positive coping" characteristics in pre-hospital medical emergency personnel to deal with accidents, emergencies, and injuries through adopting regular and dynamic policies.

  11. Spinoffs from radiological emergency preparedness programmes to generic emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    In the USA, the radiological emergency preparedness (REP) programme for nuclear power plants is being used to enhance emergency management programmes for other types of emergencies. The REP programme is particularly useful in developing plans and preparedness measures for chemical accidents. The Integrated Emergency Management System (IEMS) approach provides a means for maximizing relationships between the REP programme and other programmes. IEMS essentially involves applying common elements of planning and preparedness to all types of emergencies, while recognizing that unique characteristics of specific natural and man-made emergencies require special planning and preparedness considerations. Features of the REP programme that make it compatible with the IEMS approach and useful in coping with other types of emergencies are: (1) the close co-operation between the national nuclear regulatory and emergency management organizations; (2) the programme integration among all levels of government, the nuclear power industry, public interest groups and the general public and (3) the comprehensiveness and sophistication of the programme. The REP programme in the USA represents a state-of-the-art emergency management capability. Some of its elements are readily transferrable to most other types of emergency preparedness programmes, while other elements can be adapted more readily to other hazard-specific programmes. The Bhopal accident has been a catalyst for this adaptation to chemical accidents, in such areas as furnishing hazard-specific information to the public, alert and notification systems, definition of the hazards and risks involved, establishing planning zones and developing close working relationships among the industry, the public and government

  12. Hospital management structures in Maltese hospital through the ages

    OpenAIRE

    Savona-Ventura, Charles

    2001-01-01

    The spreading cult of Christ the Healer during the Medieval period led to sick-nursing being viewed as a Christian duty. This encouraged royal dignitaries and philantrophic individuals to donate funds towards the institution and maintenance of a hospital or hospice, the management of these institutions being often shared with religious authorities. The Maltese Islands have been serviced by a series of hospitals, the earliest dating to the fourteenth century. In line with the ch...

  13. Retrospective evaluation of urological admissions to emergency service of a training and research hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topaktaş, Ramazan; Altın, Selçuk; Aydın, Cemil; Akkoç, Ali; Yılmaz, Yakup

    2014-12-01

    Many patients consult emergency services with urological complaints. The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiology, clinical presentation and treatments of urological emergency cases in a training and research hospital. We retrospectively evaluated urological emergency patients referred to the emergency unit between July 2012 and July 2013 according to age, gender, affected organ, radiological imaging techniques and treatment. Among 141.844 emergency cases, 3.113 (2.19%) were urological emergencies and 53.2% of the patients were male (mean age: 49.1), and 46.8% of them were female (median age: 42.8). The most frequent illness was genitourinary infection constituting 41.2% of the cases followed by renal colic (36.9%). Among the urological emergencies 483 (15.5%) patients were hospitalized and 152 surgical operations were performed. The mostly performed procedure was the placement of a suprapubic catheter in 34 patients constituting (22.3%) of the cases. Totally eight patients were referred to another experienced health center due to different reasons. Most of the urological emergency patients do not require emergency surgical interventions however, timely identification and management of urological emergencies with in-depth clinical evaluation are important to prevent late complications. Therefore the doctors working in emergency services must be heedful of urological emergencies.

  14. A Computerized Hospital Patient Information Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, Eldon D.

    1982-01-01

    The information processing needs of a hospital are many, with varying degrees of complexity. The prime concern in providing an integrated hospital information management system lies in the ability to process the data relating to the single entity for which every hospital functions - the patient. This paper examines the PRIMIS computer system developed to accommodate hospital needs with respect to a central patient registry, inpatients (i.e., Admission/Transfer/Discharge), and out-patients. Finally, the potential for expansion to permit the incorporation of more hospital functions within PRIMIS is examined.

  15. Urological Emergency Admissions to a Community Hospital: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Sam O.

    1983-01-01

    A one-year study was conducted on the impact of emergency admissions to the 125-bed Southwest Community Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia. During the study in 1979, 70 urological emergency room admissions were made, of which 44 (62.8 percent) were males and 26 (37.2 percent) were females. In comparison, 93 admissions were made directly from the private office. The study considered the timeliness of diagnosis and treatment, surgical procedures performed, impact on urological emergency room nursing and medical personnel, physician response to notification, cost containment, and implied legal ramifications and organization structure. Thus, an immediate close scrutiny of urological emergency admission at the nonuniversity affiliated Southwest Community Hospital was permitted. PMID:6876189

  16. [Factors related to patient satisfaction with hospital emergency services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Hidalgo, Pedro; Bermejo Alegría, Rosa María; Más Castillo, Adelia; Hidalgo Montesinos, María Dolores; Gomis Cebrián, Rafael; Calle Urra, José Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    To determine the perceived quality variables related to satisfaction and to identify the influence of sociodemographic factors on user satisfaction with hospital emergencies. A telephone survey was conducted with a specifically designed questionnaire for use in a sample of 3,600 users of hospital emergency services in nine public hospitals in 2008 and 2009. The adjusted model including all perceived quality and sociodemographic variables explained 47.1% of the variance (adjusted R(2)). Of all the independent variables included, only eight were significant in predicting the level of patient satisfaction. These variables were related to the patient's opinion of the relationship with medical staff (p = 0.041), nurses' and porters' professionalism (p = 0.010 and 0.022), infrastructure (cleanliness and comfort) (p = 0.033 and 0.008), information received at discharge (p = 0.000), waiting time in the emergency department (p = 0.000) and the perception of treatment-diagnosis without failure (p = 0.028). The variables influencing emergency patients' satisfaction were determined, allowing areas where corrective action could be introduced to be identified. In addition, possible confounding factors that should be controlled for when comparing results among distinct hospitals were identified. The emergency satisfaction questionnaire is a useful instrument to evaluate and improve quality of care. Copyright © 2011 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Management strategies in hospitals: scenario planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanem, Mohamed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Instead of waiting for challenges to confront hospital management, doctors and managers should act in advance to optimize and sustain value-based health. This work highlights the importance of scenario planning in hospitals, proposes an elaborated definition of the stakeholders of a hospital and defines the influence factors to which hospitals are exposed to. Methodology: Based on literature analysis as well as on personal interviews with stakeholders we propose an elaborated definition of stakeholders and designed a questionnaire that integrated the following influence factors, which have relevant impact on hospital management: political/legal, economic, social, technological and environmental forces. These influence factors are examined to develop the so-called critical uncertainties. Thorough identification of uncertainties was based on a “Stakeholder Feedback”. Results: Two key uncertainties were identified and considered in this study: According to the developed scenarios, complementary education of the medical staff as well as of non-medical top executives and managers of hospitals was the recommended core strategy. Complementary scenario-specific strategic options should be considered whenever needed to optimize dealing with a specific future development of the health care environment. Conclusion: Strategic planning in hospitals is essential to ensure sustainable success. It considers multiple situations and integrates internal and external insights and perspectives in addition to identifying weak signals and “blind spots”. This flows into a sound planning for multiple strategic options. It is a state of the art tool that allows dealing with the increasing challenges facing hospital management.

  18. Are hospitals ready to response to disasters? Challenges, opportunities and strategies of Hospital Emergency Incident Command System (HEICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Yarmohammadian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Applying an effective management system in emergency incidents provides maximum efficiency with using minimum facilities and human resources. Hospital Emergency Incident Command System (HEICS is one of the most reliable emergency incident command systems to make hospitals more efficient and to increase patient safety. This research was to study requirements, barriers, and strategies of HEICS in hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS. Methods: This was a qualitative research carried out in Isfahan Province, Iran during 2008-09. The study population included senior hospital managers of IUMS and key informants in emergency incident management across Isfahan Province. Sampling method was in non-random purposeful form and snowball technique was used. The research in-strument for data collection was semi-structured interview; collected data was analyzed by Colaizzi Technique. Results: Findings of study were categorized into three general categories including requirements (organizational and sub-organizational, barriers (internal and external of HEICS establishment, and providing short, mid and long term strategies. These categories are explained in details in the main text. Conclusions: Regarding the existing barriers in establishment of HEICS, it is recommended that responsible authori-ties in different levels of health care system prepare necessary conditions for implementing such system as soon as possible via encouraging and supporting systems. This paper may help health policy makers to get reasonable frame-work and have comprehensive view for establishing HEICS in hospitals. It is necessary to consider requirements and viewpoints of stakeholders before any health policy making or planning.

  19. Examining professional emergency managers in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Kyoo-Man

    2017-01-01

    Although the number of emergency managers has risen in South Korea (hereafter referred to as Korea) over the years, their role is not yet as defined and noteworthy compared to other professions because of its unidisciplinary approach. This article investigates how Korea has to improve emergency managers' disciplinary approach to ultimately contribute to the goal of effective transnational disaster management. This study uses qualitative content analysis of government policies, college curricula, nongovernmental organizations' (NGOs') emergency-manager certification, and mass media coverage to compare emergency managers' unidisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches. The key tenet is that Korea must change its emergency managers' unidisciplinary approach into a multidisciplinary approach because the former is less effective when dealing with complicated disaster management systems. To achieve this change, the stakeholders must carry out their assigned responsibilities under risk-oriented management. As for the study's international implications, developing nations may consider the enhancement of related educational curricula, collaborative learning, continuous evaluation, disaster awareness, and disaster prevention for the emergency managers' multidisciplinary approach.

  20. Examining professional emergency managers in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Kyoo-Man, E-mail: ha1999@hotmail.com

    2017-01-15

    Although the number of emergency managers has risen in South Korea (hereafter referred to as Korea) over the years, their role is not yet as defined and noteworthy compared to other professions because of its unidisciplinary approach. This article investigates how Korea has to improve emergency managers' disciplinary approach to ultimately contribute to the goal of effective transnational disaster management. This study uses qualitative content analysis of government policies, college curricula, nongovernmental organizations' (NGOs') emergency-manager certification, and mass media coverage to compare emergency managers' unidisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches. The key tenet is that Korea must change its emergency managers' unidisciplinary approach into a multidisciplinary approach because the former is less effective when dealing with complicated disaster management systems. To achieve this change, the stakeholders must carry out their assigned responsibilities under risk-oriented management. As for the study's international implications, developing nations may consider the enhancement of related educational curricula, collaborative learning, continuous evaluation, disaster awareness, and disaster prevention for the emergency managers' multidisciplinary approach.

  1. Total quality management in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, D F

    1994-01-01

    With the increasing demands on hospitals for improved quality and lower costs, hospitals have been forced to reevaluate their manner of operation and quality assurance (QA) programs. Hospitals have been faced with customer dissatisfaction with services, escalating costs, intense competition, and reduced reimbursement for services. As a result, many hospitals have incorporated total quality management (TQM), also known as continuous quality improvement (CQI) and quality improvement (QI), to improve quality care and decrease costs. This article examines the concept of TQM, its rationale, and how it can be implemented in a hospital. A comparison of TQM and QA is made. Examples of hospital implementation of TQM and problems and issues associated with TQM in the hospital setting are explored.

  2. development of improved solid hospital waste management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A pre-intervention situation analysis was conducted to assess Hospital Waste Management (HWM) practices, solutions were proffered for the observed inadequacies and advocacy was made to Hospital administration for which a number of interventional measures were instituted. A post interventional survey was conducted ...

  3. Hospitality Management: Perspectives from Industry Advisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Roginsky

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In prior quarterly reports, Pinnacle Advisory Group presented timely updates about the New England lodging industry, which included focused profiles on particular cities. In this issue, the firm offers more general insight about the hospitality industry. Several Pinnacle executives recently participated in a panel discussion about investment, management, and careers in the hospitality industry.

  4. Relationships of hospital-based emergency department culture to work satisfaction and intent to leave of emergency physicians and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Wan, Thomas T H; Hsu, Chung-Ping Cliff; Hung, Feng-Ru; Juan, Chi-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2012-05-01

    Given the limited studies on emergency care management, this study aimed to explore the relationships of emergency department (ED) culture values to certain dimensions of ED physicians' and nurses' work satisfaction and intent to leave. Four hundred and forty-two emergency medical professionals completed the employee satisfaction questionnaire across 119 hospital-based EDs, which had culture value evaluations filed, were used as unit of analysis in this study. Adjusting the personal and employment backgrounds, and the surrounded EDs' unit characteristics and environmental factors, multiple regression analyses revealed that clan and market cultures were related to emergency physicians' work satisfaction and intent to leave. On the other hand, adhocracy, market and hierarchical cultures were related to emergency nurses' work satisfaction. There do exist different patterns among various culture types on various work satisfaction dimensions and intent to leave of emergency physicians and nurses. The findings could offer hospital and ED leaders insights for changes or for building a better atmosphere to enhance the work life of emergency physicians and nurses.

  5. Service quality for facilities management in hospitals

    CERN Document Server

    Sui Pheng, Low

    2016-01-01

    This book examines the Facilities Management (FM) of hospitals and healthcare facilities, which are among the most complex, costly and challenging kind of buildings to manage. It presents and evaluates the FM service quality standards in Singapore’s hospitals from the patient’s perspective, and provides recommendations on how to successfully improve FM service quality and achieve higher patient satisfaction. The book also features valuable supplementary materials, including a checklist of 32 key factors for successful facilities management and another checklist of 24 service attributes for hospitals to achieve desirable service quality in connection with facilities management. The book adopts a unique approach of combining service quality and quality theory to provide a more holistic view of how FM service quality can be achieved in hospitals. It also integrates three instruments, namely the SERVQUAL model, the Kano model and the QFD model to yield empirical results from surveys for implementation in hosp...

  6. Editorial | Cavagnaro | Research in Hospitality Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in Hospitality Management. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 6, No 1 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  7. Editorial | Lashley | Research in Hospitality Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in Hospitality Management. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 7, No 2 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. Editorial | Lashley | Research in Hospitality Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in Hospitality Management. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 7, No 1 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  9. Editorial | Lashley | Research in Hospitality Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in Hospitality Management. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 2 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  10. Contextual factors associated with hospitals' decision to operate freestanding emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patidar, Nitish; Weech-Maldonado, Robert; O'Connor, Stephen J; Sen, Bisakha; Trimm, J M Mickey; Camargo, Carlos A

    Freestanding emergency departments (FSEDs) are fast growing entities in health care, delivering emergency care outside of hospitals. Hospitals may benefit in several ways by opening FSEDs. The study used the resource dependence theory as a means to analyze the relationship between market and organizational factors and the likelihood of hospitals to operate FSEDs. All acute care hospitals in 14 states with FSEDs present during the study period from 2002 to 2011. Data on FSEDs were merged with American Hospital Association Annual Survey, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' Cost Reports, and Area Resource File data. The outcome variable consists of whether or not the hospital operates an FSED. Independent variables include per capita income, percent population over age of 65 years, primary care and specialist physicians per capita, urban location, change in the unemployment rate, change in the population, change in poverty level, market competition, total satellite and autonomous FSEDs in the market, Medicare-managed care penetration rate, hospital beds, total margin, and system membership. We used logistic regression analysis with state and year fixed effects. Standard errors in the regression were clustered by hospital. The number of hospitals operating satellite FSEDs increased from 32 (2.33%) in 2002 to 91 (5.76%) hospitals in 2011 among the 14 states included in the study sample. The results support the hypothesis that hospitals located in munificent environments and more competitive environments (presence of other FSEDs) are more likely to operate an FSED. Organizational level factors such as bed size and system membership are associated with a hospital operating an FSED. The findings may be used by policy makers in developing regulations for hospitals opening FSEDs. Also, study findings of this study may be used by hospitals to make informed decisions when formulating strategies regarding FSEDs.

  11. Sociodemographic profile and hospitalization process of elderly assisted at a emergency hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luciene Nobre Coutinho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to investigate the sociodemographic profile and the process of hospitalization of elderly assisted in an emergency hospital. Methods: descriptive epidemiological study conducted at an emergency hospital with 300 elderly patients using a form with hospitalization process and sociodemographic variables. Results: there was a predominance of females (56.0%, between 80 and 89 years old (45.4%, illiterate or with elementary education (86.7%, married or living in stable union (42.6%, with non-communicable chronic disease (54.7% and regular use of medications. The main reason for hospitalization was fall (54.7% at home and in the morning hours (42.4%, with admission in the afternoon, transported by ambulance. Conclusion: the findings contribute to the development of strategies directed to assist and care of the healthy elderly and in vulnerable situations.

  12. Organization structure and the performance of hospital emergency services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, B S

    1985-07-01

    A comparative study of 30 hospital emergency departments (EDs) and nearly 1,500 individuals associated with them was conducted. Data were obtained from institutional records, physicians, patients, and other sources. The object was to investigate the relationship between the organization and performance of these health service systems. The study assessed the quality of medical care, the quality of nursing care, and the economic efficiency of hospital EDs. The results show substantial interinstitutional differences in these criteria. They also show a significant relationship between medical and nursing care, but not between the quality of care and economic efficiency. Differences in ED performance are related to medical staffing patterns, medical teaching affiliation, personnel training, scope of emergency services, number of patient visits processed, and hospital size and complexity. Not all of these variables, however, correlate positively with all three criteria of performance, nor are they equally important to each.

  13. Management of incomplete abortion in South African public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, H C; Jewkes, R; Levin, J; Dickson-Tetteh, K; Rees, H

    2003-04-01

    To describe the current management of incomplete abortion in South African public hospitals and to discuss the extent to which management is clinically appropriate. A multicentre, prospective descriptive study. South African public hospitals that manage gynaecological emergencies. Hospitals were selected using a stratified random sampling method. All women who presented to the above sampled hospitals with incomplete abortion during the three week data collection period in 2000 were included. A data collection sheet was completed at the time of discharge for each woman admitted with a diagnosis of incomplete, complete, missed or inevitable abortion during the study period. Information gathered included demographic data, clinical signs and symptoms at admission, medical management, surgical management, anaestetic management, use of blood products and antibiotics and complications. Three clinical severity categories were used for the purpose of data analysis and interpretation. Detail of medical management, detail of surgical management, use of blood products and antibiotics, methods of analgesia and anaesthesia used, and use of abortifacients. There is a trend towards low cost technology such as the use of manual vacuum aspiration and sedation anaesthesia; however, this is mainly limited to the better resourced tertiary hospitals linked to academic units. The use of antibiotics and blood products has decreased but much of the use is inappropriate. The use of abortifacients does include some use of misoprostol but merely as an adjunct to surgical evacuation. The management of incomplete abortion remains a problem in South Africa, a low income country that is still managing a common clinical problem with costly interventions. The evidence of a trend towards low cost technology is promising, albeit limited to tertiary centres. This study has given us information as how to best address this problem. More training in low cost methods is needed, targeting in particular the

  14. PREVALENCE OF ALCOHOLISM IN HOSPITALIZATIONS OF PSYCHIATRIC EMERGENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robsmeire Calvo Melo Zurita

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The psychiatric emergency is used to treat people with mental disordersworking 24 hours followed the new model of mental health care recommended by theMinistry of Health, creating care options, with a focus centered on reintegration of the patientto their social and family. The study aimed to characterize the hospitalizations of patients inthe Psychiatric Emergency Municipal Hospital of Maringa in the period January 2009 to June2010. Were selected and included a total of 1548 hospitalizations, behavioral disorder due toalcohol use. Predominance in male admissions with 88.6%, the predominant age group inboth sexes was 41-51 years with 59.75%, with the majority of hospitalizations of patientsliving in Maringá. Referred to the Psychiatric Hospital were46.18% of hospitalizations,diagnosed mostly in mental and behavioral disorders due to alcohol use,CID-10 F10, with720 (46.51% of admissions. The legal framework of the Psychiatric Reform, ratified,guaranteeing the universal right to access and assistance as well as to its completeness;decentralization of the service model, configuring networks care more attentive toinequalities, setting fair and democratic way of their actions to needs of the population

  15. Applying business intelligence innovations to emergency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegelmilch, Jeffrey; Albanese, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The use of business intelligence (BI) is common among corporations in the private sector to improve business decision making and create insights for competitive advantage. Increasingly, emergency management agencies are using tools and processes similar to BI systems. With a more thorough understanding of the principles of BI and its supporting technologies, and a careful comparison to the business model of emergency management, this paper seeks to provide insights into how lessons from the private sector can contribute to the development of effective and efficient emergency management BI utilisation.

  16. Emergency nurses' knowledge of pain management principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, P; Buschmann, M

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine areas of emergency nurses' knowledge deficit regarding pain management, and to identify barriers to pain management as perceived by emergency nurses. Data were collected anonymously in a mail survey using a 52-item knowledge questionnaire addressing pain management principles and asking emergency nurses (Illinois Emergency Nurses Association members) to rate various barriers as to how often they affect their practice. Questionnaires were mailed to all Illinois ENA members (n = 1000). Three hundred five emergency nurses' questionnaires were returned. A significant deficit existed on 2 domains of knowledge: understanding of the terms "addiction," "tolerance," and "dependence"; and knowledge of various pharmacologic analgesic principles. Nurses with a master's degree or higher, or those who attended a 1-day seminar on pain management, achieved statistically significantly higher scores. The 2 barriers identified by emergency nurses as the most common were the inability to administer medication until a diagnosis is made (53%), and inadequate assessment of pain and pain relief (48%) (the percentage indicates how often the emergency nurses believed the barrier was present in their practice). The data indicate that emergency nurses may not have a good understanding of the management of pain with drugs, or of such issues as risk of addiction.

  17. Temporal data mining for hospital management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumoto, Shusaku; Hirano, Shoji

    2009-04-01

    It has passed about twenty years since clinical information are stored electronically as a hospital information system since 1980's. Stored data include from accounting information to laboratory data and even patient records are now started to be accumulated: in other words, a hospital cannot function without the information system, where almost all the pieces of medical information are stored as multimedia databases. In this paper, we applied temporal data mining and exploratory data analysis techniques to hospital management data. The results show several interesting results, which suggests that the reuse of stored data will give a powerful tool for hospial management.

  18. [Hypertensive emergencies at the University Hospital Center in Brazzaville, Congo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenga, Mbolla B F; Gombet, T R; Mahoungou, Guimbi K C; Otiobanda, G F; Ossou, Nguiet P M; Ikama, M S; Kimbally-Kaky, G; Etitiele, F

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study conducted in the emergency department of the University Hospital Center in Brazzaville, Congo was to determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of hypertensive emergencies. With a total of 76 patients admitted during the study period, the prevalence of hypertensive emergency was 4%. The sex ratio was 1 and mean patient age was 57.3 years (range, 30 to 80 years). Risk factors included obesity in 62 cases (81.6%), history of hypertension in 65 (85.5%) and low socioeconomic level in 58 (76.3%). Mean delay for consultation was 50 hours (range, 1 to 240 hours). The disease underlying the hypertensive emergency was stroke with 38 cases (50%), heart failure in 20 (26.3%), hypertensive encephalopathy in 11 (14.4%), malignant hypertension in 9 (11.8%), and renal failure in 10 (13.1%). The mean length of emergency treatment was 14.7 hours (range, 5 to 48 hours). Eight deaths (10.5%) occurred during hospitalization in the emergency department.

  19. The emerging land management paradigm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    for comprehensive information about environmental conditions in combination with other land related data. It is argued that development of such a model is important or even necessary for facilitating a holistic approach to the management of land as the key asset of any nation or jurisdiction. Finally, the paper......Land management is the process by which the resources of land are put into good effect. Land management encompasses all activities associated with the management of land that are required to achieve sustainable development. The concept of land includes properties and natural resources and thereby...... encompasses the total natural and built environment. Land Administration Systems (LAS) are institutional frameworks complicated by the tasks they must perform, by national cultural, political and judicial settings, and by technology. This paper facilitates an overall understanding of the land management...

  20. How do nonprofit hospitals manage earnings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Andrew J; Van Horn, R Lawrence

    2005-07-01

    We hypothesize that, unlike for-profit firms, nonprofit hospitals have incentives to manage earnings to a range just above zero. We consider two ways managers can achieve this. They can adjust discretionary spending [Hoerger, T.J., 1991. 'Profit' variability in for-profit and not-for-profit hospitals. Journal of Health Economics 10, 259-289.] and/or they can adjust accounting accruals using the flexibility inherent in Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). To test our hypothesis we use regressions as well as tests of the distribution of earnings by Burgstahler and Dichev [Burgstahler, D., Dichev, I., 1997. Earnings management to avoid earnings decreases and losses. Journal of Accounting and Economics 24, 99-126.] on a sample of 1,204 hospitals and 8,179 hospital-year observations. Our tests support the use of discretionary spending and accounting accrual management. Like Hoerger (1991), we find evidence that nonprofit hospitals adjust discretionary spending to manage earnings. However, we also find significant use of discretionary accruals (e.g., adjustments to the third-party-allowance, and allowance for doubtful accounts) to meet earnings objectives. These findings have two important implications. First, the previous evidence by Hoerger that nonprofit hospitals show less variation in income may at least partly be explained by an accounting phenomenon. Second, our findings provide guidance to users of these financial statements in predicting the direction of likely bias in reported earnings.

  1. Social media best practices in emergency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siskey, Ashley; Islam, Tanveer

    2016-01-01

    Social media platforms have become popular as means of communications in emergency management. Many people use social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter on a daily basis including during disaster events. Emergency management agencies (EMAs) need to recognize the value of not only having a presence on social media but also actively engaging stakeholders and the public on these sites. However, identifying best practices for the use of social media in emergency management is still in its infancy. The objective of this article is to begin to create or further define best practices for emergency managers to use social media sites particularly Facebook and Twitter in four key areas: 1) implementation, 2) education, 3) collaboration, and 4) communication. A list of recommendations of best practices is formulated for each key area and results from a nationwide survey on the use of social media by county EMAs are discussed in this article.

  2. Development on the radiological emergency management guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khang, Byung Oui; Lee, Jong Tai; Lee, Goan Yup; Lee, Moon

    2000-01-01

    The comprehensive emergency management system in KAERI describes the requirements for emergency plan, preparedness, evaluations and readiness assurance, response and recovery activities to timely and effectively countermeasure according to the type and size of an event. The guidance of facility emergency plan and detailed response procedures for initial action, building/site evacuation, personnel accountability, search and fire fighting in the radioactive, fissionable, toxic and inflammable hazardous substances handling facilities are also developed. (author)

  3. Hospital capacity and management preparedness for pandemic influenza in Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, Ben; Barr, Ian; Robinson, Priscilla

    2014-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate acute hospital pandemic influenza preparedness in Victoria, Australia, particularly focussing on planning and management efforts. A prospective study was conducted by questionnaire and semi-structured interview of health managers across the Victorian hospital system from July to October 2011. Participants with responsibility for emergency management, planning and operations were selected from every hospital in Victoria with an emergency department to complete a questionnaire (response rate 22/43 = 51%). Each respondent was invited to participate in a phone-based semi-structured interview (response rate 11/22 = 50%). Rural/regional hospitals demonstrated higher levels of clinical (86%) and non-clinical (86%) staff contingency planning than metropolitan hospitals (60% and 40% respectively). Pandemic plans were not being sufficiently tested in exercises or drills, which is likely to undermine their effectiveness. All respondents reported hand hygiene and standard precautions programs in place, although only one-third (33%) of metropolitan respondents and no rural/regional respondents reported being able to meet patient needs with high levels of staff absenteeism. Almost half Victoria's healthcare workers were unvaccinated against influenza. Hospitals across Victoria demonstrated different levels of influenza pandemic preparedness and planning. If a more severe influenza pandemic than that of 2009 arose, Victorian hospitals would struggle with workforce and infrastructure problems, particularly in rural/regional areas. Staff absenteeism threatens to undermine hospital pandemic responses. Various strategies, including education and communication, should be included with in-service training to provide staff with confidence in their ability to work safely during a future pandemic. © 2014 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.

  4. Accident knowledge and emergency management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, B; Groenberg, C D

    1997-03-01

    The report contains an overall frame for transformation of knowledge and experience from risk analysis to emergency education. An accident model has been developed to describe the emergency situation. A key concept of this model is uncontrolled flow of energy (UFOE), essential elements are the state, location and movement of the energy (and mass). A UFOE can be considered as the driving force of an accident, e.g., an explosion, a fire, a release of heavy gases. As long as the energy is confined, i.e. the location and movement of the energy are under control, the situation is safe, but loss of confinement will create a hazardous situation that may develop into an accident. A domain model has been developed for representing accident and emergency scenarios occurring in society. The domain model uses three main categories: status, context and objectives. A domain is a group of activities with allied goals and elements and ten specific domains have been investigated: process plant, storage, nuclear power plant, energy distribution, marine transport of goods, marine transport of people, aviation, transport by road, transport by rail and natural disasters. Totally 25 accident cases were consulted and information was extracted for filling into the schematic representations with two to four cases pr. specific domain. (au) 41 tabs., 8 ills.; 79 refs.

  5. Accident knowledge and emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, B.; Groenberg, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    The report contains an overall frame for transformation of knowledge and experience from risk analysis to emergency education. An accident model has been developed to describe the emergency situation. A key concept of this model is uncontrolled flow of energy (UFOE), essential elements are the state, location and movement of the energy (and mass). A UFOE can be considered as the driving force of an accident, e.g., an explosion, a fire, a release of heavy gases. As long as the energy is confined, i.e. the location and movement of the energy are under control, the situation is safe, but loss of confinement will create a hazardous situation that may develop into an accident. A domain model has been developed for representing accident and emergency scenarios occurring in society. The domain model uses three main categories: status, context and objectives. A domain is a group of activities with allied goals and elements and ten specific domains have been investigated: process plant, storage, nuclear power plant, energy distribution, marine transport of goods, marine transport of people, aviation, transport by road, transport by rail and natural disasters. Totally 25 accident cases were consulted and information was extracted for filling into the schematic representations with two to four cases pr. specific domain. (au) 41 tabs., 8 ills.; 79 refs

  6. Hospital waste management status in Lebanon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, R.; Oueida, F.; Tissot-Guerraz, F.; Trepo, D.; Collombel, C.

    2000-01-01

    author.The existing management of hospital waste in Lebanon currently poses both an environmental hazard as well as a public health risk. This is due mainly to lack of legislation, information and modern treatment and disposal facilities designed for this purpose. A nation-wide questionnaire survey was conducted to asses the status of hospital waste management. The study started from October 1997 till August 1998. We found that 75% of the surveyed hospitals completely ignore their total waste quantity: 73% of hospitals surveyed practice segregation at source of infectious, pathological, sharps and pharmaceuticals; more than 40% dispose of their hospital risk wastes through the municipality waste disposal, 24% by burning in open fires, 14% by on-site hospital incinerators, 11% in on-site dumping, 8% handled by a private contractor and 1% in uncontrolled landfill. We conclude that with some exceptions, the hospital waste management situation in Lebanon is very far from being satisfactory and therefore needs to be reconsidered. 1 Fig., 6 tabs., 18 refs

  7. Emergency department operations and management education in emergency medicine training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bret A Nicks; Darrell Nelson

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND:This study was undertaken to examine the current level of operations and management education within US-based Emergency Medicine Residency programs.METHODS:Residency program directors at all US-based Emergency Medicine Residency programs were anonymously surveyed via a web-based instrument.Participants indicated their levels of residency education dedicated to documentation,billing/coding,core measure/quality indicator compliance,and operations management.Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics for the ordinal data/Likert scales.RESULTS:One hundred and six(106)program directors completed the study instrument of one hundred and fifty-six(156)programs(70%).Of these,82.6%indicated emergency department(ED)operations and management education within the training curriculum.Dedicated documentation training was noted in all but 1 program(99%).Program educational offerings also included billing/coding(83%),core measure/quality indicators(78%)and operations management training(71%).In all areas,the most common means of educating came through didactic sessions and direct attending feedback or 69%-94%and 72%-98%respectively.Residency leadership was most confident with resident understanding of quality documentation(80%)and less so with core measures(72%),billing/coding/RVUs(58%),and operations management tools(23%).CONCLUSIONS:While most EM residency programs integrate basic operational education related to documentation and billing/coding,a smaller number provide focused education on the dayto-day management and operations of the ED.Residency leadership perceives graduating resident understanding of operational management tools to be limited.All respondents value further resident curriculum development of ED operations and management.

  8. Controlling Legal Risk for Effective Hospital Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Jun Park

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze the types of medical malpractice, medical errors, and medical disputes in a university hospital for the proposal of countermeasures that maximize the efficiency of hospital management, medical departments, and healthcare providers. Materials and Methods: This study retrospectively reviewed and analyzed 55 closed civil lawsuits among 64 medical lawsuit cases carried out in Pusan National University Hospital from January 2000 to April 2013 using medical records, petitions, briefs, and data from the Medical Dispute Mediation Committee. Results: Of 55 civil lawsuits, men were the main plaintiffs in 31 cases (56.4%. The average period from medical malpractice to malpractice proceeding was 16.5 months (range, 1 month to 6.4 years, and the average period from malpractice proceeding to the disposition of a lawsuit was 21.7 months (range, 1 month to 4 years and 11 months. Conclusions: Hospitals can effectively manage their legal risks by implementing a systematic medical system, eliminating risk factors in administrative service, educating all hospital employees on preventative strategies, and improving customer service. Furthermore, efforts should be made to establish standard coping strategies to manage medical disputes and malpractice lawsuits, operate alternative dispute resolution methods including the Medical Dispute Mediation Committee, create a compliance support center, deploy a specialized workforce including improved legal services for employees, and specialize the management-level tasks of the hospital.

  9. Management strategies in hospitals: scenario planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard; Kuwatsch, Sandra; Bohn, Marco; Josten, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Instead of waiting for challenges to confront hospital management, doctors and managers should act in advance to optimize and sustain value-based health. This work highlights the importance of scenario planning in hospitals, proposes an elaborated definition of the stakeholders of a hospital and defines the influence factors to which hospitals are exposed to. Based on literature analysis as well as on personal interviews with stakeholders we propose an elaborated definition of stakeholders and designed a questionnaire that integrated the following influence factors, which have relevant impact on hospital management: political/legal, economic, social, technological and environmental forces. These influence factors are examined to develop the so-called critical uncertainties. Thorough identification of uncertainties was based on a "Stakeholder Feedback". Two key uncertainties were identified and considered in this study: the development of workload for the medical staff the profit oriented performance of the medical staff. According to the developed scenarios, complementary education of the medical staff as well as of non-medical top executives and managers of hospitals was the recommended core strategy. Complementary scenario-specific strategic options should be considered whenever needed to optimize dealing with a specific future development of the health care environment. Strategic planning in hospitals is essential to ensure sustainable success. It considers multiple situations and integrates internal and external insights and perspectives in addition to identifying weak signals and "blind spots". This flows into a sound planning for multiple strategic options. It is a state of the art tool that allows dealing with the increasing challenges facing hospital management.

  10. [Causes of 72-hour return visits to hospital emergency departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Puente, Alberto; Del Río-Mata, José; Arjona-Huertas, José Luis; Mora-Ordóñez, Begoña; Nieto-de Haro, Lourdes; Lara-Blanquer, Antonio; Martínez-Reina, Alfonso; Martínez Del Campo, Miguel

    2015-10-01

    The return-visit rate has been suggested as a measure of emergency department quality of care. We aimed to identify the reasons for emergency revisits and the percentage of returns related to problems with quality of care in the previous visit. Cross-sectional observational study of clinical records for a random sample of unscheduled returns within 72 hours of discharge from the emergency departments of 3 hospitals attending a population of nearly 3 million in the Spanish province of Malaga. The records were reviewed by 2 data collectors, who assigned a reason for revisits according to a standardized classification. A sample of 1075 emergency revisits were reviewed; 895 met the inclusion criteria. The most common reasons for revisits were the persistence or progression of disease (48.8%), an unrelated new problem (9.3%), and referral from a hospital that did not have the required specialized service (8.6%). Reasons attributable to the patient accounted for 14.5% of the revisits; 15.2% were attributable to health care staff errors, 9.2% to system organization, and 61.1% to the disease process. Most emergency department revisits are related to the progression of the disease that led to the first visit. Only a small percentage can be linked to diagnostic or treatment errors in the previous visit.

  11. Temporary emergency pacing-an orphan in district hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjesdal, Knut; Johansen, Jens Brock; Gadler, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    This editorial discusses a report on the 1 year experience with temporary pacing, especially in the emergency setting, in several Norwegian district hospitals. The vast majority of the patients received transvenous temporary pacing, and the majority of leads were placed by noncardiologists....... The procedure times were long and complications were frequent. The organization of emergency pacing is discussed, and we suggest that unless qualified physicians can establish transvenous pacing, the patients who need that should be transferred with transcutaneous pacing as back-up during transport...

  12. Emergency department management of shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Portal, Daniel A; Horn, Amanda E; Vilke, Gary M; Chan, Theodore C; Ufberg, Jacob W

    2014-03-01

    Precipitous obstetric deliveries can occur outside of the labor and delivery suite, often in the emergency department (ED). Shoulder dystocia is an obstetric emergency with significant risk of adverse outcome. To review multiple techniques for managing a shoulder dystocia in the ED. We review various techniques and approaches for achieving delivery in the setting of shoulder dystocia. These include common maneuvers, controversial interventions, and interventions of last resort. Emergency physicians should be familiar with multiple techniques for managing a shoulder dystocia to reduce the chances of fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 77 FR 9665 - Submission for OMB Emergency Review; Comment Request: A Multi-Center International Hospital-Based...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... Review; Comment Request: A Multi- Center International Hospital-Based Case-Control Study of Lymphoma in... the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request for emergency review and processing this... Hospital- Based Case-Control Study of Lymphoma in Asia (AsiaLymph) (NCI). Type of Information Collection...

  14. The emerging land management paradigm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2006-01-01

    Manchet: This paper was first presented by Professor Enemark at the RICS Christmas Lecture in December last year. It provides a cogent and detailed reference point for the current state of land management in developed countries, charts a course for the future and looks at how education must chang...

  15. Operations management approach to hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, J; Duguay, C R

    1988-06-01

    An operations management systems approach can be a useful tool for coordinating and planning in a complex organization. The authors argue for adapting such an approach to health care from the manufacturing industries in order to facilitate strategy formulation, communication and implementation.

  16. [Management characteristics in charity hospitals in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Sheyla Maria Lemos; Barbosa, Pedro Ribeiro; Portela, Margareth C; Ugá, Maria Alicia Dominguez; Vasconcellos, Miguel Murat; Gerschman, Silvia

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the management characteristics of charity hospitals in Brazil, based on data from a national survey developed in 2001. The sample accounted for the random inclusion of 66 Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) inpatient care providers with less than 599 beds and all 26 hospitals with at least 599 beds. It also included 10 institutions assumed as non-providers of services to the SUS. The analyses are descriptive, focusing on the classification of the hospitals according to their managerial development level, as well as selected issues regarding the utilization of specific managerial technologies, human resources, technical services, and services contracting. Distinct managerial levels were identified, but it is important to note that 83% of the SUS providers with less than 599 beds were classified as having incipient management. The authors discuss implications of the findings for inpatient care policies, considering the importance of charity hospitals for the Brazilian Health System.

  17. Medical emergencies in the imaging department of a university hospital: event and imaging characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tonder, F C; Sutherland, T; Smith, R J; Chock, J M E; Santamaria, J D

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to describe the characteristics of medical emergencies that occurred in the medical imaging department (MID) of a university hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A database of 'Respond Medical Emergency Team (MET)' and 'Respond Blue' calls was retrospectively examined for the period June 2003 to November 2010 in relation to events that occurred in the MID. The hospital medical imaging database was also examined in relation to these events and, where necessary, patients' notes were reviewed. Ethics approval was granted by the hospital ethics review board. There were 124 medical emergency calls in the MID during the study period, 28% Respond Blue and 72% Respond MET. Of these 124 calls, 26% occurred outside of usual work hours and 12% involved cardiac arrest. The most common reasons for the emergency calls were seizures (14%) and altered conscious state (13%). Contrast anaphylaxis precipitated the emergency in 4% of cases. In 83% of cases the emergency calls were for patients attending the MID for diagnostic imaging, the remainder being for a procedure. Of the scheduled imaging techniques, 45% were for computed tomography. The scheduled imaging was abandoned due to the emergency in 12% of cases. When performed, imaging informed patient management in 34% of cases in diagnostic imaging and in all cases in the context of image-guided procedures. Medical emergency calls in the MID often occurred outside usual work hours and were attributed to a range of medical problems. The emergencies occurred in relation to all imaging techniques and imaging informed patient management in many cases. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The management of hospital radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrin, J.O.

    1992-01-01

    Enquiries performed by nuclear medicine services together with ANDRA in order to characterize the radioactive wastes from hospital origin have led to suggest some improvements in the management of these products: improved screening on the production site by rationalized collection, planning of a local storage installation for decay of 125 I-containing products, systematic education of concerned hospital staff, in particular to prevent infectious risks, obtaining legislatively a change of class for tritiated and carbonated hospital radioactive wastes, which will be then considered as common wastes. The practical application of these arrangements in hospital by the 'radiation protection competent person' would liberate hospital departments from systematic appeal to ANDRA and thus result in money saving

  19. Patients with worsening chronic heart failure who present to a hospital emergency department require hospital care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafazand Masoud

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic heart failure (CHF is a major public health problem characterised by progressive deterioration with disabling symptoms and frequent hospital admissions. To influence hospitalisation rates it is crucial to identify precipitating factors. To characterise patients with CHF who seek an emergency department (ED because of worsening symptoms and signs and to explore the reasons why they are admitted to hospital. Method Patients (n = 2,648 seeking care for dyspnoea were identified at the ED, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra. Out of 2,648 patients, 1,127 had a previous diagnosis of CHF, and of these, 786 were included in the present study with at least one sign and one symptom of worsening CHF. Results Although several of the patients wanted to go home after acute treatment in the ED, only 2% could be sent home. These patients were enrolled in an interventional study, which evaluated the acute care at home compared to the conventional, in hospital care. The remaining patients were admitted to hospital because of serious condition, including pneumonia/respiratory disease, myocardial infarction, pulmonary oedema, anaemia, the need to monitor cardiac rhythm, pathological blood chemistry and difficulties to communicate. Conclusion The vast majority of patients with worsening CHF seeking the ED required hospital care, predominantly because of co-morbidities. Patients with CHF with symptomatic deterioration may be admitted to hospital without additional emergency room investigations.

  20. Medical Professionals Designing Hospital Management Models

    OpenAIRE

    Byg, Vibeke

    2016-01-01

    Health care administration in many OECD countries has undergone substantial changes in recent years as a consequence of NPM reforms, rising costs, the pace of technological innovation, heightened competition for patients and resources, quality of managed care and demographic shifts. Hospitals especially have been reformed due to the high proportion of resources they absorb and the apparent difficulty of prioritizing and coordinating health care within hospitals. There is abundant research lit...

  1. [Loyal frequent users of hospital emergency departments: the FIDUR project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Alonso, Cesáreo; Romero Pareja, Rodolfo; Rivas García, Aristides; Jiménez Gallego, Rosa; Majo Carbajo, Yolanda; Aguilar Mulet, Juan Mariano

    2016-02-01

    To describe the characteristics of frequent users of hospital emergency departments and analyze whether characteristics varied in relation to how revisits were distributed over the course of the year studied. Retrospective study of patients over the age of 14 years who were treated in a hospital emergency department at least 10 times in 2013. Patients were identified in 17 public hospitals in the Spanish autonomous community of Madrid. Data related to the first and successive visits were gathered and analyzed by quarter year. We included 2340 patients with a mean (SD) age of 54 (21) years. A total of 1361 (58.%) were women, 1160 (50%) had no concomitant diseases, 1366 (58.2%) were substance abusers, and 25 (1.1%) were homeless. During the first visit, 2038 (87.1%) complained of a recent health problem, and 289 (12.4%) were admitted. Sixty (2.6%) patients concentrated their revisits in a single quarters 335 (14.3%) in 2 quarters, 914 (39.1%) in 3, and 1005 (42.9%) in 4. Patients whose revisits were distributed over more quarters were older (> 65 years), had more concomitant conditions, were on more medications (P women (P = .012) and more likely to have a specific diagnosis (P loyally comes to the same emergency department over the course of a year. Patients whose revisits are dispersed over a longer period have more complex problems and use more resources during their initial visit.

  2. Hospital management principles applicable to the veterinary teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Donna L; Lloyd, James W; Marrinan, Mike

    2004-01-01

    The Skills, Knowledge, Aptitude, and Attitude (SKA) Subcommittee of the National Commission on Veterinary Economic Issues (NCVEI) has identified the need for veterinary teaching hospitals (VTH) to be at the forefront of progressive business management to serve as a model for both students and practitioners to emulate. To provide a foundation for developing a model, this study reviewed pertinent literature applicable to the management of a VTH. Much of the literature relevant to VTH management relates to work completed for the human side of medicine (academic health centers, or AHCs) or to the private sector. This review explores management practices in strategic planning, financial management, human resource management, marketing, pricing, operations, and legal issues. It is concluded that strategic management is important to provide the foundation for success in the VTH. In addition, periodic financial reports are recommended, as are the development and use of benchmarks for financial management. Establishing positive, motivating human resource practices is also suggested, along with development of a marketing plan based on a clear understanding of VTH core competencies and the market's specific needs.

  3. Emergency management in the early phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crick, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: An overview of emergency management is provided from a systems approach with the aim of providing a common understanding for the diverse symposium participants of the elements of the management system required for preparedness and response for the early phase of an emergency at a nuclear installation. The systems approach starts with the recognition of response goals, and using detailed analyses of threats, past experience, international law and principles, a response strategy is developed. This step is illustrated with the case of severe accidents at PWRs and identifies the need for and nature of: emergency classification based an plant conditions; notification; radiological monitoring and assessment strategies; operational criteria for implementing protective action decisions; management of public information. From the strategy, detailed functional requirements can be defined addressing: establishing emergency management and operations; identifying, notifying and activating; taking mitigatory action; taking urgent protective action; providing information and issuing instructions and warnings to the public; protecting emergency workers; assessing the initial phase; managing the medical response; keeping the public informed; taking countermeasures against ingestion; mitigating the non-radiological consequences of the emergency and the response. Meeting these requirements necessitates decisions from competent authorities, the means to implement them, and mechanisms for response co-ordination, which need to be prepared in advance. These are supported by infrastructure, including: clear authorities; organization; coordinated plans and procedures; logistical support, facilities and tools; training and exercises; and a quality assurance programme. Some reflections an the key differences between response to emergencies arising from accidents and these arising from deliberate acts will be provided. An impression will be given of the level of preparedness and

  4. Frequency and risk factors associated with emergency medical readmissions in Galway University Hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, J

    2010-06-01

    Unplanned readmissions of medical hospital patients have been increasing in recent years. We examined the frequency and associates of emergency medical readmissions to Galway University Hospitals (GUH).

  5. [Burnout syndrome in pre-hospital and hospital emergency. Cognitive study in two cohorts of nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchitti, Chiara; Cannizzaro, Giorgia; Rosi, Fabrizio; Maccaroni, Roberto; Menditto, Vincenzo G

    2014-01-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) associated with stress has been documented in health care professionals in many specialties. The emergency department and the pre-hospital healthcare services are highly stressful environments. Little is known about the BOS in critical care nursing staff. The objective of the study is to compare the incidence of BOS and its three domains, namely, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced professional accomplishment, in two cohorts of critical care nurses: a pre-hospital and a hospital emergency service. A survey using a questionnaire (the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, MBI-GS), among nurses of two Italian emergency services has been performed: a hospital emergency service (HES, Emergency Department or "Pronto Soccorso") and a pre-hospital emergency service (PHES, territorial healthcare service or "Centrale Operativa 118"). All 60 nurses surveyed (82% female) filled the questionnaires. BOS-related symptoms have been identified in at least 50% of the nurses in the HES: 50% suffered a medium-high emotional exhaustion, 75% had a medium-high depersonalization and 92.5% had a medium-high reduced professional accomplishment. Among the PEHS nurses, BOS-related symptoms have been identified in at least 60% of the respondents: 60% had a medium-high emotional exhaustion, 70% had a medium-high depersonalization and 95% had a medium-high reduced professional accomplishment. Moreover, the likelihood that a nurse has a severe BOS, that is at least one degree of high burnout or ≥2 degrees of medium burnout, is significantly higher in the group of the PHES than in the HES (90% vs 60%, p nursing staff had a severe BOS. The incidence of BOS appeared to be similar among PHES and HES nurses with a higher trend for the former. Further interventional studies are needed to investigate the determinants of BOS among critical care nurses and the potentially preventive strategies.

  6. The Impact of Hospital Closures and Hospital and Population Characteristics on Increasing Emergency Department Volume: A Geographic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David C; Carr, Brendan G; Smith, Tony E; Tran, Van C; Polsky, Daniel; Branas, Charles C

    2015-12-01

    Emergency visits are rising nationally, whereas the number of emergency departments is shrinking. However, volume has not increased uniformly at all emergency departments. It is unclear what factors account for this variability in emergency volume growth rates. The objective of this study was to test the association of hospital and population characteristics and the effect of hospital closures with increases in emergency department volume. The study team analyzed emergency department volume at New York State hospitals from 2004 to 2010 using data from cost reports and administrative databases. Multivariate regression was used to evaluate characteristics associated with emergency volume growth. Spatial analytics and distances between hospitals were used in calculating the predicted impact of hospital closures on emergency department use. Among the 192 New York hospitals open from 2004 to 2010, the mean annual increase in emergency department visits was 2.7%, but the range was wide (-5.5% to 11.3%). Emergency volume increased nearly twice as fast at tertiary referral centers (4.8%) and nonurban hospitals (3.7% versus urban at 2.1%) after adjusting for other characteristics. The effect of hospital closures also strongly predicted variation in growth. Emergency volume is increasing faster at specific hospitals: tertiary referral centers, nonurban hospitals, and those near hospital closures. This study provides an understanding of how emergency volume varies among hospitals and predicts the effect of hospital closures in a statewide region. Understanding the impact of these factors on emergency department use is essential to ensure that these populations have access to critical emergency services.

  7. Blood inventory management: hospital best practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanger, Sebastian H W; Yates, Nicola; Wilding, Richard; Cotton, Sue

    2012-04-01

    Blood is a perishable product, and hence good management of inventories is crucial. Blood inventory management is a trade-off between shortage and wastage. The challenge is to keep enough stock to ensure a 100% supply of blood while keeping time expiry losses at a minimum. This article focuses on inventory management of red blood cells in hospital transfusion laboratories to derive principles of best practice and makes recommendations that will ensure losses due to time expiry are kept to a minimum. The literature was reviewed to identify available models for perishable inventory management. Historical data from the UK blood supply chain was analyzed to identify hospitals with good inventory management practice and low wastage levels. Transfusion laboratory managers in the selected hospitals were interviewed in 7 case studies with the aim of identifying drivers for low wastage and good inventory management practice. The findings from the case studies were compared with the literature. The extant literature asserts that the drivers for good inventory performance are the use of complex inventory models and algorithms. This study has found this not to be the case. Instead, good performance is driven by the quality of transfusion laboratory staff, who must be skilled, regularly trained, and experienced. Electronic crossmatching, transparency of the inventory, and simple management procedures also facilitate good performance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Environmental management in public hospitals: Environmental management in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Rodríguez-Miranda

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: Hospitals can apply broader environmental management instruments, including life cycle analysis of their products and services and monitoring of the carbon footprint; they may also take into account the different areas of environmental impact of their operation.

  9. Clinical Aspects and Emergent Management of Snake Bites Presented to Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedriye Sonmez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Evaluating the epidemiologic characteristics and management of snake bites presenting to emergency departments. Material and Method: In this retrospective study 74 cases of snakebites admitted to Emergency Department of Diyarbakir Training and Research Hospital between 2008 and 2009 were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Fourty-six (62.2% of patients were male and 28 (37.8% were female. Mean age of the study population was 34.85±19.17 (min 7- max 80 years. Most of the snakebites occurred between 18.00 to 06.00 hours and at home (73%. 79.7% of snake bites occurred to upper extremities. %93 of cases had intravenous administration of antivenin (one dose. Neither none of the patients needed recurrent administration. Discussion: Snake bites are still a major public health problem especially in rural areas. Particularly emergency care physicians should be adequately capable and sophisticated in multidisciplinary management of snake bites.

  10. Post-traumatic stress disorder among paramedic and hospital emergency personnel in south-east Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sedigheh Iranmanesh; Batool Tirgari; Hojat Sheikh Bardsiri

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Paramedic and emergency personnel may encounter directly many events that threat their own wellbeing during their daily work.This study was conducted to examine the prevalence rate of post-traumatic stress disorder(PTSD) among two groups of paramedic and emergency personnel in south-east Iran.METHODS:The study employed a descriptive design and was conducted in four hospital emergency wards and a pre-hospital emergency base supervised by Kerman Medical University.Using Mississippi PTSD,we assessed the prevalence rate in paramedics(n=150) and emergency personnel(n=250).RESULTS:The two groups had different levels of education,marital status,experience of traumatic events,work hours per month,and gender.Most(94%) of paramedic and hospital emergency personnel reported moderate PTSD.The two groups had significant different levels of PTSD in all subscale.CONCLUSION:The study suggests that health care managers should organize systematic and dynamic policies and procedures in dealing with PTSD to assist both groups of personnel.

  11. Clinical characteristics of dental emergencies and prevalence of dental trauma at a university hospital emergency center in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Young-Kyun; Choi, Yong-Hoon

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the clinical characteristics of dental emergency patients who visited a university hospital emergency center and to evaluate the incidence of dental trauma. A retrospective chart review of patients with dental complaints and who visited the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (SNUBH) emergency center in Gyeonggi-do, Korea, from January 2009 to December 2009 was conducted. Information regarding age, gender, the time, day, and month of presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and follow up was collected and analyzed. One thousand four hundred twenty-five patients with dental problems visited the SNUBH emergency center. Dental patients accounted for 1.47% of the total 96,708 patients at the emergency center. The male-to-female ratio was 1.68:1, with a considerably larger number of male patients (62.7%). The age distribution peak was at 0-9 years (27.5%), followed by patients in their forties (14.1%). The number of patients visiting the dental emergency center peaked in May (14.2%), on Sundays (22.4%), and between 2100 and 2400 h (20.8%). The patients' chief complaints were as follows: dental trauma, dental infection, oral bleeding, and temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD). The prevalence of dental trauma was 66%. The reasons for dental emergency visits included the following: dental trauma, dental infection, oral bleeding, and TMD, with 66% of the patients requiring management of dental trauma. It is important that dentists make a prompt, accurate diagnosis and initiate effective treatment in case of dental emergencies, especially dental trauma. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Cultivating stakeholder interaction in emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, W.J.; Brownell, L.F.

    1994-01-01

    The Secretary of Energy has defined the mission for the Department. Her vision for the Department of Energy (DOE) is to promote environmental excellence, economic growth, and leadership in science and technology. The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), which is responsible for implementing an emergency management system for EM facilities and the transport of non-weapons-related radioactive materials, has addressed this mission through the establishment of six goals. This paper specifically discusses efforts to accomplish the last goal: Develop a stronger partnership between the DOE and its stakeholders. EM's Emergency Management Program supports strong partnerships with all interested parties. The EM Emergency Management Program provides the capability for preparedness in the event of an operational emergency at EM facilities, and it gives DOE the capability for preparedness in the event of an operational emergency involving DOE shipments of non-weapons-related radioactive and hazardous materials in transit. The Program is committed to plan, train, and provide material resources for the protection and safety of DOE workers, the public, and the environment. A great deal of stakeholder interaction is associated with the transport of DOE radioactive materials. To assure a communication link to other DOE program areas and interested stakeholders outside the DOE, the Emergency Management Program has committed extensive resources within the transportation program to promote and support EM's commitment to stakeholder involvement. The Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) develops and enhances integrated emergency preparedness in the area of transportation. TEPP coordinates programs across the DOE complex and supplies a DOE-wide unified approach to the public

  13. [Out-of-hospital pediatric emergencies. Perception and assessment by emergency physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eich, C; Roessler, M; Timmermann, A; Heuer, J F; Gentkow, U; Albrecht, B; Russo, S G

    2009-09-01

    Out-of-hospital (OOH) pediatric emergencies have a relatively low prevalence. In Germany the vast majority of cases are attended by non-specialized emergency physicians (EPs) for whom these are not routine procedures. This may lead to insecurity and fear. However, it is unknown how EPs perceive and assess pediatric emergencies and how they could be better prepared for them. All active EPs (n=50) of the Department of Anaesthesiology, Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine at the University Medical Centre of Göttingen were presented with a structured questionnaire in order to evaluate their perception and assessment of OOH pediatric emergencies. The 43 participating EPs made highly detailed statements on the expected characteristics of OOH pediatric emergencies. Their confidence level grew with the children's age (pemergencies. They felt the greatest deficits were in the care of infrequent but life-threatening emergencies. Three educational groups can be differentiated: knowledge and skills to be gained with children in hospital, clinical experience from adult care also applicable in children and rare diagnoses and interventions to be trained with manikins or simulators.

  14. Medical emergency management among Iranian dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khami, Mohammad Reza; Yazdani, Reza; Afzalimoghaddam, Mohammad; Razeghi, Samaneh; Moscowchi, Anahita

    2014-11-01

    More than 18,000 patients need medical emergencies management in dental offices in Iran annually. The present study investigates medical emergencies management among Iranian dentists. From the list of the cell phone numbers of the dentists practicing in the city of Tehran, 210 dentists were selected randomly. A self-administered questionnaire was used as the data collection instrument. The questionnaire requested information on personal and professional characteristics of the dentists, as well as their knowledge and self-reported practice in the field of medical emergency management, and availability of required drugs and equipments to manage medical emergencies in their offices. Totally, 177 dentists (84%) completed the questionnaire. Less than 60% of the participants were knowledgeable about characteristics of hypoglycemic patient, chest pain with cardiac origin, and true cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) practice. Regarding practice, less than one quarter of the respondents acquired acceptable scores. In regression models, higher practice scores were significantly associated with higher knowledge scores (p < 0.001). The results call for a need to further education on the subject for dentists. Continuing education and changing dental curriculum in the various forms seems to be useful in enhancement of the self-reported knowledge and practice of dentists. To successful control of medical emergencies in the dental office, dentists must be prepared to recognize and manage a variety of such conditions. In addition to dentist's knowledge and skill, availability of necessary equipments and trained staff is also of critical importance.

  15. Risks in hospitals. Assessment and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradea Ioana-Alexandra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In a complex world, characterized by a multitude of risks, managers need to manage the risks they encounter, in an efficient way and in the shortest time possible. In the current economic crisis, the concept of hospital risk management, as the process in which is identified, analyzed, reduced, or avoided a risk that may affect the hospital, gained great importance. The Romanian health system, distinguished by: lack of transparency, poor funding, the loss of the valuable medical staff, lack of hospitals in villages and small towns, inability to engage patients due to the old and poor equipment, lack of research and problems in information privacy and cyber-security, requires an appropriate management, enabling risk managers to take decisions in order to avoid the occurrence of risks. Important for the functioning of every hospital is the perception of patients and their degree of satisfaction, regarding the quality of services, which depend largely on the quality of human resources. But what are the human resources weaknesses and risks from the patient point of view? What are the risk indicators which must be monitored to avoid risks? And also, which is the most useful method for measurement and assessment of risk?

  16. Duration of patients’ visits to the hospital emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaca Zeynal

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Length of stay is an important indicator of quality of care in Emergency Departments (ED. This study explores the duration of patients’ visits to the ED for which they are treated and released (T&R. Methods Retrospective data analysis and multivariate regression analysis were conducted to investigate the duration of T&R ED visits. Duration for each visit was computed by taking the difference between admission and discharge times. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD for 2008 were used in the analysis. Results The mean duration of T&R ED visit was 195.7 minutes. The average duration of ED visits increased from 8 a.m. until noon, then decreased until midnight at which we observed an approximately 70-minute spike in average duration. We found a substantial difference in mean duration of ED visits (over 90 minutes between Mondays and other weekdays during the transition time from the evening of the day before to the early morning hours. Black / African American patients had a 21.4-minute longer mean duration of visits compared to white patients. The mean duration of visits at teaching hospitals was substantially longer than at non-teaching hospitals (243.8 versus 175.6 minutes. Hospitals with large bed size were associated with longer duration of visits (222.2 minutes when compared to hospitals with small bed size (172.4 minutes or those with medium bed size (166.5 minutes. The risk-adjusted results show that mean duration of visits on Mondays are longer by about 4 and 9 percents when compared to mean duration of visits on non-Monday workdays and weekends, respectively. Conclusions The duration of T&R ED visits varied significantly by admission hour, day of the week, patient volume, patient characteristics, hospital characteristics and area characteristics.

  17. Designing Customer Relationship Management Model in Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Abbaszadeh; Roohollah Askari; Morad Alizadeh; Mohammad Amin Bahrami

    2017-01-01

    Background: Customer relationship management is a modern marketing concept which is also considered as a successful business strategy. The present study aimed to design a customer relationship management model in the hospital. Methods: The study is an applied research performed in 2 phases of 1) texts investigation and 2) the experts' opinions to achieve consensus. Data were analyzed using SPSS 18 software along with descriptive statistics. Results: The designed model included areas of ...

  18. Health care waste management practice in a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, R; Pradhan, B

    2010-10-01

    Health-care waste is a by-product of health care. Its poor management exposes health-care workers, waste handlers and the community to infections, toxic effects and injuries including damage of the environment. It also creates opportunities for the collection of disposable medical equipment, its re-sale and potential re-use without sterilization, which causes an important burden of disease worldwide. The purpose of this study was to find out health care waste management practice in hospital. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Narayani Sub-Regional Hospital, Birgunj from May to October 2006 using both qualitative and quantitative methods. Study population was four different departments of the hospital (Medical/Paediatric, Surgical/Ortho, Gynae/Obstetric and Emergency), Medical Superintendent, In-charges of four different departments and all sweepers. Data was collected using interview, group discussion, observation and measurement by weight and volume. Total health-care waste generated was 128.4 kg per day while 0.8 kg per patient per day. The composition of health care waste was found to be 96.8 kg (75.4%) general waste, 24.1 kg (8.8%) hazardous waste and 7.5 kg (5.8%) sharps per day by weight. Health staffs and sweepers were not practicing the waste segregation. Occupational health and safety was not given due attention. Majority of the sweepers were unaware of waste management and need of safety measures to protect their own health. Health care waste management practice in the hospital was unsatisfactory because of the lack of waste management plan and carelessness of patients, visitors and staffs. Therefore the hospital should develop the waste management plan and strictly follow the National Health Care Waste Management Guideline.

  19. [Out of hospital emergencies towards a safety culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-del Pozo, M I; Obón-Azuara, B; Valderrama-Rodríguez, M; Revilla-López, C; Brosed-Yuste, C; Fajardo-Trasobares, E; Garcés-Baquero, P; Mateo-Clavería, J; Molina-Estrada, I; Perona-Flores, N; Salcedo-de Dios, S; Tomé-Rey, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to measure the degree of safety culture (CS) among healthcare professional workers of an out-of-hospital Emergency Medical Service. Most patient safety studies have been conducted in relation to the hospital rather than pre-hospital Emergency Medical Services. The objective is to analyze the dimensions with lower scores in order to plan futures strategies. A descriptive study using the AHRQ (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality) questionnaire. The questionnaire was delivered to all healthcare professionals workers of 061 Advanced Life Support Units of Aragón, during the month of August 2013. The response rate was 55%. Main strengths detected: an adequate number of staff (96%), good working conditions (89%), tasks supported from immediate superior (77%), teamwork climate (74%), and non-punitive environment to report adverse events (68%). Areas for improvement: insufficient training in patient safety (53%) and lack of feedback of incidents reported (50%). The opportunities for improvement identified focus on the training of professionals in order to ensure safer care, while extending the safety culture. Also, the implementation of a system of notification and registration of adverse events in the service is deemed necessary. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. [Controlling and operation management in hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagts, Dierk A

    2010-03-01

    The economical pressure on the health system and especially on hospitals is growing rapidly. Hence, economical knowledge for people in medical executive positions becomes imperative. In advanced and forward-looking hospitals controlling is gaining more and more weight, because it takes over a coordinative responsibility. Ideally controlling is navigating the teamwork of managers (CEOs) and medical executives by weighing medical necessities and economical framework. Controlling is contributing to evaluate an optimal efficiency of a hospital in a highly competitive surrounding by providing medical and economical data on a regular basis. A close, open-minded and trusting cooperation between all people, who are involved, is imperative. Hence, controlling in the proper meaning of the word can not flourish in dominant and hierarchic hospital structures. Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart * New York.

  1. Rural emergency medical technician pre-hospital electrocardiogram transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, A M; Halon, J M; Nelson, J

    2014-01-01

    Emergent care of the acute heart attack patient continues to be at the forefront of quality and cost reduction strategies throughout the healthcare industry. Although the average cardiac door-to-balloon (D2B) times have decreased substantially over the past few years, there are still vast disparities found in D2B times in populations that reside in rural areas. Such disparities are mostly related to prolonged travel time and subsequent delays in cardiac catherization lab team activation. Urban ambulance companies that are routinely staffed with paramedic level providers have been successful in the implementation of pre-hospital 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) protocols as a strategy to reduce D2B times. The authors sought to evaluate the evidence related to the risk and benefits associated with the replication of an ECG transmission protocol in a small rural emergency medical service. The latter is staffed with emergency medical technician-basics (EMT-B), emergency medical technician-advanced (EMT-A), and emergency medical technician-intermediate (EMT-I) level. The evidence reviewed was limited to studies with relevant data regarding the challenges and complexities of the ECG transmission process, the difficulties associated with ECG transmission in rural settings, and ECG transmission outcomes by provider level. The evidence supports additional research to further evaluate the feasibility of ECG transmission at the non-paramedic level. Multiple variables must be investigated including equipment cost, utilization, and rural transmission capabilities. Clearly, pre-hospital ECG transmission and early activation of the cardiac catheterization laboratory are critical components to successfully decreasing D2B times.

  2. HBCUs Gear Up to Produce Hospitality Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Chris

    1994-01-01

    Increasingly, historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) are developing professional programs in hotel and restaurant management and travel and tourism. One objective is to train African Americans to become owners and operators of their own enterprises. An obstacle is the perception that hospitality careers involve menial labor. (MSE)

  3. [Evaluation of the activity of a urological emergency unit in university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L; Pillot, P; Bardonnaud, N; Lillaz, J; Chabannes, E; Bernardini, S; Guichard, G; Bittard, H; Kleinclauss, F

    2014-01-01

    To determine the epidemiology of urological emergencies in a university hospital and the interest of a dedicated urological emergency unit. In 2008, a dedicated urological emergency unit was individualized in our department of urology. We conducted a retrospective study including all patients consulting in this unit in 2009 with epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic data. During 2009, 1257 patients consulted in this unit. Main diagnoses were acute urinary retention (303, 24.11%), renal colic (219, 17.42%), urinary infections (278, 22.11%), postoperative complications (141, 11.22%), symptomatic benign prostate hyperplasia (65, 5.17%), genitourinary cancers (61, 4.85%), trauma of urinary apparel (41, 3.26%), and spermatic cords torsion (10, 0.8%). In 99 cases (7.88%) diagnosis did not involved the urinary system. The treatment was surgical in 213 (17.7%) cases, technical procedure under local anesthesia in 368 (29.3%) and a medical treatment in 675 (53.7%) cases. Six hundred and sixty (52.5%) patients were managed ambulatory whereas 596 (47.5%) needed hospitalization. The opening of a dedicated urological emergency unit lead to 1257 emergency consultations. Frequent etiologies were acute urinary retention, renal colic and urinary infection. The creation of this unit allowed to register and to valorize this emergency activity through the ATU emergency amount. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. Corporate and Hospital Profiteering in Emergency Medicine: Problems of the Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derlet, Robert W; McNamara, Robert M; Plantz, Scott H; Organ, Matthew K; Richards, John R

    2016-06-01

    Health care delivery in the United States has evolved in many ways over the past century, including the development of the specialty of Emergency Medicine (EM). With the creation of this specialty, many positive changes have occurred within hospital emergency departments (EDs) to improve access and quality of care of the nation's de facto "safety net." The specialty of EM has been further defined and held to high standards with regard to board certification, sub-specialization, maintenance of skills, and research. Despite these advances, problems remain. This review discusses the history and evolution of for-profit corporate influence on EM, emergency physicians, finance, and demise of democratic group practice. The review also explores federal and state health care financing issues pertinent to EM and discusses potential solutions. The monopolistic growth of large corporate contract management groups and hospital ownership of vertically integrated physician groups has resulted in the elimination of many local democratic emergency physician groups. Potential downsides of this trend include unfair or unlawful termination of emergency physicians, restrictive covenants, quotas for productivity, admissions, testing, patient satisfaction, and the rising cost of health care. Other problems impact the financial outlook for EM and include falling federal, state, and private insurance reimbursement for emergency care, balance-billing, up-coding, unnecessary testing, and admissions. Emergency physicians should be aware of the many changes happening to the specialty and practice of EM resulting from corporate control, influence, and changing federal and state health care financing issues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Improving the safety of remote site emergency airway management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesuriya, Julian; Brand, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Airway management, particularly in non-theatre settings, is an area of anaesthesia and critical care associated with significant risk of morbidity & mortality, as highlighted during the 4th National Audit Project of the Royal College of Anaesthetists (NAP4). A survey of junior anaesthetists at our hospital highlighted a lack of confidence and perceived lack of safety in emergency airway management, especially in non-theatre settings. We developed and implemented a multifaceted airway package designed to improve the safety of remote site airway management. A Rapid Sequence Induction (RSI) checklist was developed; this was combined with new advanced airway equipment and drugs bags. Additionally, new carbon dioxide detector filters were procured in order to comply with NAP4 monitoring recommendations. The RSI checklists were placed in key locations throughout the hospital and the drugs and advanced airway equipment bags were centralised in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). It was agreed with the senior nursing staff that an appropriately trained ICU nurse would attend all emergency situations with new airway resources upon request. Departmental guidelines were updated to include details of the new resources and the on-call anaesthetist's responsibilities regarding checks and maintenance. Following our intervention trainees reported higher confidence levels regarding remote site emergency airway management. Nine trusts within the Northern Region were surveyed and we found large variations in the provision of remote site airway management resources. Complications in remote site airway management due lack of available appropriate drugs, equipment or trained staff are potentially life threatening and completely avoidable. Utilising the intervention package an anaesthetist would be able to safely plan and prepare for airway management in any setting. They would subsequently have the drugs, equipment, and trained assistance required to manage any difficulties or complications

  6. [Paediatric emergencies; example of the management of winter epidemics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Jean-Christophe; Bellettre, Xavier; Lejay, Émilie; Desmarest, Marie; Titomanlio, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Every year, epidemics of viral bronchiolitis and gastroenteritis occur with a significant increase in the number of visits (by a factor 1.8) and hospitalisations that can over-exceed bed capacity leading to transfer sick children to other hospitals. This kind of hospital 'crisis' is not limited to paediatrics, big cities or western nations. It is a worldwide worrying problem. Because our hospital sits in the Northern districts of Paris where a large community of m.ncants lives in poverty, our number of visits is high (mean 250 per day), and winter epidemics further jeopardise the difficult equilibrium achieved between quality management and waiting times. Thus, we have taken various initiatives in terms of organisation of the paediatric emergency department and other wards, including a "fast track" clinic, the opening of beds dedicated to winter epidemics, the institution of a "bed manager" in order to more easily find a bed, and a larger use of home hospitalisations. Furthermore, we created a specific committee which may decide on various indicators of tension whether it is necessary to cancel programmed hospitalisations or surgery.in order to resolve the emergency crisis. This kind of organisation can serve as a model for other hospitals facing winter epidemics crises.

  7. The emergence of scientific management in America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin-George Toma

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A scientific approach to management was initiated for the first time in America in the late 19th century. Scientific management arose mainly from the need to increase efficiency in America, but other key factors were the spread of big businesses and the expanding application of science in industry. The aims of our paper are to present the emergence of scientific management in America and to emphasize the contribution of some of the most representatives American authors to its development. The methodological approach is literature review. Our paper shows that scientific management was essentially an American achievement that provided useful lessons for the whole human society.

  8. Minimizing patient waiting time in emergency department of public hospital using simulation optimization approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ireen Munira; Liong, Choong-Yeun; Bakar, Sakhinah Abu; Ahmad, Norazura; Najmuddin, Ahmad Farid

    2017-04-01

    Emergency department (ED) is the main unit of a hospital that provides emergency treatment. Operating 24 hours a day with limited number of resources invites more problems to the current chaotic situation in some hospitals in Malaysia. Delays in getting treatments that caused patients to wait for a long period of time are among the frequent complaints against government hospitals. Therefore, the ED management needs a model that can be used to examine and understand resource capacity which can assist the hospital managers to reduce patients waiting time. Simulation model was developed based on 24 hours data collection. The model developed using Arena simulation replicates the actual ED's operations of a public hospital in Selangor, Malaysia. The OptQuest optimization in Arena is used to find the possible combinations of a number of resources that can minimize patients waiting time while increasing the number of patients served. The simulation model was modified for improvement based on results from OptQuest. The improvement model significantly improves ED's efficiency with an average of 32% reduction in average patients waiting times and 25% increase in the total number of patients served.

  9. Workplace violence against emergency versus non-emergency nurses in Mansoura university hospitals, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-ElWafa, Hala Samir; El-Gilany, Abdel-Hady; Abd-El-Raouf, Samar E; Abd-Elmouty, Samia Mahmoud; El-Sayed, Rabab El-Sayed Hassan

    2015-03-01

    Workplace violence (WPV) against nurses is a common but neglected problem in Egypt. The objectives are to estimate the prevalence and associated risk factors of different types of violence against nurses working in the emergency hospital compared with those working in non-emergency clinics, circumstances of violence, type of perpetrators, and victims' response. This cross-sectional comparative study was carried out at Mansoura University Hospitals, Egypt, during January 2013. The data were collected through the adapted version of a self-administered questionnaire developed by the International Labor Office/International Council of Nurses/World Health Organization/Public Services International on WPV in the health sector. All types of WPV are common among nurses. Precipitating factors for violent incidents identified by respondents are emergency specialty, having work shift, and younger age. Violent incidents result in work dissatisfaction and consequently impair work productivity. Nurses working in emergency hospital experienced a higher level of different types of WPV. There is an urgent need to formulate and implement a policy for dealing with violent events. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. [The characteristics of medical technologies in emergency medical care hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakhovskiĭ, A G; Babenko, A I; Bravve, Iu I; Tataurova, E A

    2013-01-01

    The article analyzes the implementation of major 12 diagnostic and 17 treatment technologies applied during medical care of patients with 12 key nosology forms of diseases in departments of the emergency medical care hospital No 2 of Omsk. It is established that key groups of technologies in the implementation of diagnostic process are the laboratory clinical diagnostic analyses and common diagnostic activities at reception into hospital and corresponding departments. The percentage of this kind of activities is about 78.3% of all diagnostic technologies. During the realization of treatment process the priority technologies are common curative and rehabilitation activities, intensive therapy activities and clinical diagnostic monitoring activities. All of them consist 80.1% of all curative technologies.

  11. Nuclear emergency management procedures in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Emma

    The Chernobyl accident brought to the fore the need for decision-making in nuclear emergency management to be transparent and consistent across Europe. A range of systems to support decision-making in future emergencies have since been developed, but, by and large, with little consultation with potential decision makers and limited understanding of the emergency management procedures across Europe and how they differ. In nuclear emergency management, coordination, communication and information sharing are of paramount importance. There are many key players with their own technical expertise, and several key activities occur in parallel, across different locations. Business process modelling can facilitate understanding through the representation of processes, aid transparency and structure the analysis, comparison and improvement of processes. This work has been conducted as part of a European Fifth Framework Programme project EVATECH, whose aim was to improve decision support methods, models and processes taking into account stakeholder expectations and concerns. It has involved the application of process modelling to document and compare the emergency management processes in four European countries. It has also involved a multidisciplinary approach taking a socio-technical perspective. The use of process modelling did indeed facilitate understanding and provided a common platform, which was not previously available, to consider emergency management processes. This thesis illustrates the structured analysis approach that process modelling enables. Firstly, through an individual analysis for the United Kingdom (UK) model that illustrated the potential benefits for a country. These are for training purposes, to build reflexive shared mental models, to aid coordination and for process improvement. Secondly, through a comparison of the processes in Belgium, Germany, Slovak Republic and the UK. In this comparison of the four processes we observed that the four process

  12. Hospital emergency preparedness and response during Superstorm Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a report by the HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) on the performance of 172 Medicare-certified hospitals in the New York Metropolitan Area before, during, and after Sandy. It makes recommendations on how to close gaps that were found in emergency planning and execution for a disaster of this magnitude. To download the complete 40-page report and a Podcast based on it, go to http://oig.hhs.gov/oei/ reports/oei-06-13-00260. asp.

  13. ["Lean management" in hospitals: potentials and limitations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glossmann, J P; Schliebusch, O; Diehl, V; Walshe, R

    2000-08-15

    Little attention has yet been payed on establishing modern and competitive organizational structures in German hospitals. In this paper, we attempt to apply elements of lean management to the work of physicians working in an inpatient setting. Traditional ways of communication and their disadvantages are discussed. These include loss of motivation, bureaucratic structures and a lack of interdisciplinary cooperation. Using Maslow's theory of motivation, possible improvements are discussed, such as the reduction of restrictive job characteristics, an increase of physicians' spheres of competence and the use of their innovative potentials. These suggestions are explained using practical examples. The aim of the study is to contribute to quality management in hospitals by increasing personal responsibilities according to lean management.

  14. Audit of surgical emergency at lahore general hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, S.; Bhatti, A.A.; Burhanulhuq, A.

    2015-01-01

    Audit is a quality improvement process that seeks to improve patient care and outcomes through systematic review of care against explicit criteria and the review of change. Objective of this study was to report the patterns of admissions in our surgical emergency and the comparison of results with the available data Methods: All the patients presented in the surgical emergency of Unit III from April to December 2014. Detail of all surgical patients admitted during the period was recorded from the emergency entry register maintained by the staff nurse. Demographic data mode of admission, diagnosis and outcomes were recorded on proforma. Results: Results: Total number of patients were 11140, out of which 5998 (53.8%) were males and 5142 (46%) were females, mostly were between 18-56 years of age. Emergency surgeries were performed in 650 of our cases whereas the rest of the patients were managed conservatively, treated at minor operation theatre (MOT), referred to their concerned emergencies or discharged. The most common presentation was road traffic accidents followed by trauma, urological emergencies and intestinal obstruction. Overall mortality was estimated as 1.5%. Conclusions: Surgical audit should be made a regular practice to serve as an important and effective tool of accountibilty on clinical outcomes and self evaluation and in improving the quality of our health care system. (author)

  15. AUDIT OF SURGICAL EMERGENCY AT LAHORE GENERAL HOSPITAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Sadaf; Bhatti, Afsar Ali; Burhanulhuq

    2015-01-01

    Audit is a quality improvement process that seeks to improve patient care and outcomes through systematic review of care against explicit criteria and the review of change. Objective of this study was to report the patterns of admissions in our surgical emergency and the comparison of results with the available data. All the patients presented in the surgical emergency of Unit III from April to December 2014. Detail of all surgical patients admitted during the period was recorded from the emergency entry register maintained by the staff nurse. Demographic data, mode of admission, diagnosis and outcomes were recorded on a pro forma. Total number of patients were 11140, out of which 5998 (53.8%) were males and 5142 (46%) were females, mostly were between 18-56 years of age. Emergency surgeries were performed in 650 of our cases whereas the rest of the patients were managed conservatively, treated at minor operation theatre (MOT), referred to their concerned emergencies or discharged. The most common presentation was road traffic accidents followed by trauma, urological emergencies and intestinal obstruction. Overall mortality was estimated as 1.5%. Surgical audit should be made a regular practice to serve as an important and effective tool of accountibilty on clinical outcomes and self evaluation and in improving the quality of our health care system.

  16. Current management of surgical oncologic emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosscher, Marianne R F; van Leeuwen, Barbara L; Hoekstra, Harald J

    2015-01-01

    For some oncologic emergencies, surgical interventions are necessary for dissolution or temporary relieve. In the absence of guidelines, the most optimal method for decision making would be in a multidisciplinary cancer conference (MCC). In an acute setting, the opportunity for multidisciplinary discussion is often not available. In this study, the management and short term outcome of patients after surgical oncologic emergency consultation was analyzed. A prospective registration and follow up of adult patients with surgical oncologic emergencies between 01-11-2013 and 30-04-2014. The follow up period was 30 days. In total, 207 patients with surgical oncologic emergencies were included. Postoperative wound infections, malignant obstruction, and clinical deterioration due to progressive disease were the most frequent conditions for surgical oncologic emergency consultation. During the follow up period, 40% of patients underwent surgery. The median number of involved medical specialties was two. Only 30% of all patients were discussed in a MCC within 30 days after emergency consultation, and only 41% of the patients who underwent surgery were discussed in a MCC. For 79% of these patients, the surgical procedure was performed before the MCC. Mortality within 30 days was 13%. In most cases, surgery occurred without discussing the patient in a MCC, regardless of the fact that multiple medical specialties were involved in the treatment process. There is a need for prognostic aids and acute oncology pathways with structural multidisciplinary management. These will provide in faster institution of the most appropriate personalized cancer care, and prevent unnecessary investigations or invasive therapy.

  17. Hanford emergency management plan - release 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CARPENTER, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    The Hanford emergency management plan for the US Department of Energy Richland, WA and Office of River Protection. The program was developed in accordance with DOE Orders as well as Federal and State regulations to protect workers and public health and safety

  18. Hanford emergency management plan - release 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CARPENTER, G.A.

    1999-07-19

    The Hanford emergency management plan for the US Department of Energy Richland, WA and Office of River Protection. The program was developed in accordance with DOE Orders as well as Federal and State regulations to protect workers and public health and safety.

  19. Managing a Nuclear Emergency Originating from Abroad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grlicarev, I.

    1998-01-01

    The basic aspects of managing a nuclear emergency, which occurred in a foreign country, are considered. The most important sources of information are defined by the bilateral or multilateral conventions. The decision aiding techniques and intervention levels can substantially improve the decision making. The experiences from the INEX-2 exercises are presented after the Swiss and Finnish exercise. (author)

  20. Emergency room management of radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, R.; Mettler, F.A. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Emergency room management of radioactively contaminated patients who have an associated medical injury requiring immediate attention must be handled with care. Radioactive contamination of the skin of a worker is not a medical emergency and is usually dealt with at the plant. Effective preplanning and on-the-scene triage will allow the seriously injured and contaminated patients to get the medical care they need with a minimum of confusion and interference. Immediate medical and surgical priorities always take precedence over radiation injuries and radioactive contamination. Probably the most difficult aspect of emergency management is the rarity of such accidents and hence the unfamiliarity of the medical staff with the appropriate procedures. The authors discuss how the answer to these problems is preplanning, having a simple and workable procedure and finally having 24-h access to experts

  1. Nurse Case Managers' Experiences on Case Management for Long-term Hospitalization in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjoo Oh, Ph.D., RN, GNP

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The implementation of case management for long-term hospitalization use has been approved for controlling medical cost increases in other countries. But, introduction of the case management in Korea has created issues that hinder its effective operation. This qualitative study aimed to obtain further understanding of the issues surrounding the management of Medical Aid beneficiaries' use of long-term hospitalization from the case managers' perspectives and to provide suggestions for successful case management. Methods: Thematic analysis was employed to analyze the data. Medical Aid case managers with 3 or more years of case management experience were recruited from urban, suburban, and rural regions. Data were collected through in-depth interviews: 12 nurse case managers participated in focus group interviews and 11 participated in individual one-on-one interviews. Results: Four major themes emerged: on-site obstacles that hinder work progress; going in an opposite direction; ambiguous position of case managers; and work-related emotions. Eleven subthemes were discovered: chasing potential candidates; becoming an enemy; discharging patients who have nowhere to go; welfare-centered national policies increasing medical costs; Medical Aid Program that encourages hospitalization; misuse of hospitalization; feeling limited; working without authority; fulfilling the expected role; fretting about social criticism; and feeling neglected and unprotected. Conclusion: The findings highlight the complexity and ambiguity of the issues faced by case managers. Successful management of Medical Aid resources requires the orchestrated efforts and collaboration of multiple stakeholders. More systematized support and resources for nurse case managers are essential to fully implement this nursing innovation in Korea. Keywords: case management, focus groups, hospitalization, qualitative research, vulnerable populations

  2. A 2-year retrospective study of pediatric dental emergency visits at a hospital emergency center in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Pei Jung

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: For children, trauma and toothache constituted the most common reasons for dental emergency visits at a hospital emergency center in Taiwan. While dental emergencies are sometimes unforeseeable or unavoidable, developing community awareness about proper at-home care as well as regular dental preventive measures can potentially reduce the number of emergency visits.

  3. Diabetes mellitus and infection: an evaluation of hospital utilization and management costs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbel, Lindsey; Spencer, John David

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the number of diabetics that seek medical treatment in emergency departments or require hospitalization for infection management in the United States. This study also assesses the socioeconomic impact of inpatient infection management among diabetics. We accessed the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's Nationwide Emergency Department Sample database and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database to perform a retrospective analysis on diabetics presenting to the emergency department or hospitalized for infection management from 2006 to 2011. Emergency Department: Since 2006, nearly 10 million diabetics were annually evaluated in the emergency department. Infection was the primary reason for presentation in 10% of these visits. Among those visits, urinary tract infection was the most common infection, accounting for over 30% of emergency department encounters for infections. Other common infections included sepsis, skin and soft tissue infections, and pneumonia. Diabetics were more than twice as likely to be hospitalized for infection management than patients without diabetes. Hospitalization: Since 2006, nearly 6 million diabetics were annually hospitalized. 8-12% of these patients were hospitalized for infection management. In 2011, the inpatient care provided to patients with DM, and infection was responsible for over $48 billion dollars in aggregate hospital charges. Diabetics commonly present to the emergency department and require hospitalization for infection management. The care provided to diabetics for infection management has a large economic impact on the United States healthcare system. More efforts are needed to develop cost-effective strategies for the prevention of infection in patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Using social media for disaster emergency management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. D.; Wang, T.; Ye, X. Y.; Zhu, J. Q.; Lee, J.

    2016-06-01

    Social media have become a universal phenomenon in our society (Wang et al., 2012). As a new data source, social media have been widely used in knowledge discovery in fields related to health (Jackson et al., 2014), human behaviour (Lee, 2014), social influence (Hong, 2013), and market analysis (Hanna et al., 2011). In this paper, we report a case study of the 2012 Beijing Rainstorm to investigate how emergency information was timely distributed using social media during emergency events. We present a classification and location model for social media text streams during emergency events. This model classifies social media text streams based on their topical contents. Integrated with a trend analysis, we show how Sina-Weibo fluctuated during emergency events. Using a spatial statistical analysis method, we found that the distribution patterns of Sina-Weibo were related to the emergency events but varied among different topics. This study helps us to better understand emergency events so that decision-makers can act on emergencies in a timely manner. In addition, this paper presents the tools, methods, and models developed in this study that can be used to work with text streams from social media in the context of disaster management.

  5. System for radiation emergency medicine. Activities of tertiary radiation emergency hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Kenji; Tanigawa, Koichi; Hosoi, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    Japanese system for radiation emergency medicine is primarily built up by Cabinet Nuclear Safety Commission in 2001 based on previous Tokai JCO Accident (1999) and is composed from the primary, secondary and tertiary medical organizations. This paper describes mainly about roles and actions of the tertiary facilities at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident and tasks to be improved in future. The primary and secondary organizations in the system above are set up in the prefectures with or neighboring the nuclear facility, and tertiary ones, in two parts of western and eastern Japan. The western organization is in Hiroshima University having its cooperating 7 hospitals, and is responsible for such patients as exposed to high dose external radiation, having serious complication, and difficult to treat in the primary/secondary hospitals. The eastern is in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) with 6 cooperating hospitals and responsible for patients with internal radiation exposure difficult to treat, with contaminated body surface with difficulty in decontamination and/or with causable of secondary contamination, and difficult to treat in the secondary hospitals. The tertiary organizations have made efforts for the education and training of medical staff, for network construction among the primary, secondary and other medicare facilities, for establishment of transferring system of patients, and for participation to the international network by global organizations like Response Assistance Network (RANET) in International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and Radiation Emergency Preparedness and Network (REMPAN) in World Health Organization (WHO). At the Fukushima Accident, staffs of the two tertiary hospitals began to conduct medicare on site (Mar. 12-) and learned following tasks to be improved in future: the early definition of medicare and its network system, and Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ); urgent evacuation of residents weak to disaster like elderly

  6. Goldratt’s Theory Applied to the Problems Associated with an Emergency Department at a Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Nayak

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare costs continue to increase dramatically, while quality remains a significant problem. Reform measures initiated by the government will drive expansion of these costs, further stressing taxpayers and employers, and forcing hospitals to adopt fundamental changes as they try to adjust to increased demands for services and to lessening reimbursements from all payers. This struggle is best seen at the point of entry for many at a hospital: the emergency department (ED. It is at the emergency department that patients’ expectations regarding staff communication with patients, wait times, the triage process, capacity and payment will determine a significant part of a hospital’s revenue. Using Dr. Eliyahu M. Goldratt’s Thinking Process, we will determine what core problem(s are causing a 362-bed regional West Texas hospital emergency department to lose revenue. Evaluation of the current emergency department will determine the Undesirable Effects (UDE. Using that information will lead to the construction of the Current Reality Tree (CRT, which will bring focus to the core problem(s. To break the constraints, which are the core problem(s, an Evaporative Cloud (EC is generated. And, the end result will be to construct a Future Reality Tree (FRT, which will validate the idea(s generated in the EC. It was determined that there are ten major UDE’s that affected this hospital’s emergency department. They were focused around staff communication, wait times, triage process, information management, service provided and bill collections. A conclusion was made that the core problem dealt with triaging patients and utilization of the services provided by the hospital. Since the reimbursement rate is affected by the patient’s satisfaction, the areas to focus on would be: triage, education, communication and retention. Although it may be neither feasible nor desirable to meet all the patient’s expectations, increased focus on those areas may

  7. The financial consequences of lost demand and reducing boarding in hospital emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Jesse M; Batt, Robert J; Hilton, Joshua A; Terwiesch, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Some have suggested that emergency department (ED) boarding is prevalent because it maximizes revenue as hospitals prioritize non-ED admissions, which reimburse higher than ED admissions. We explore the revenue implications to the overall hospital of reducing boarding in the ED. We quantified the revenue effect of reducing boarding-the balance of higher ED demand and the reduction of non-ED admissions-using financial modeling informed by regression analysis and discrete-event simulation with data from 1 inner-city teaching hospital during 2 years (118,000 ED visits, 22% ED admission rate, 7% left without being seen rate, 36,000 non-ED admissions). Various inpatient bed management policies for reducing non-ED admissions were tested. Non-ED admissions generated more revenue than ED admissions ($4,118 versus $2,268 per inpatient day). A 1-hour reduction in ED boarding time would result in $9,693 to $13,298 of additional daily revenue from capturing left without being seen and diverted ambulance patients. To accommodate this demand, we found that simulated management policies in which non-ED admissions are reduced without consideration to hospital capacity (ie, static policies) mostly did not result in higher revenue. Many dynamic policies requiring cancellation of various proportions of non-ED admissions when the hospital reaches specific trigger points increased revenue. The optimal strategies tested resulted in an estimated $2.7 million and $3.6 in net revenue per year, depending on whether left without being seen patients were assumed to be outpatients or mirrored ambulatory admission rates, respectively. Dynamic inpatient bed management in inner-city teaching hospitals in which non-ED admissions are occasionally reduced to ensure that EDs have reduced boarding times is a financially attractive strategy. Copyright © 2010 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. MEMbrain. A software emergency management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drager, K.H.; Brokke, I.

    1998-01-01

    MEMbrain is the name of the EUREKA project EU904. MEM is an abbreviation for Major Emergency Management and brain refers to computer technology. MEMbrain is a strategic European project - the consortium includes partners from six countries, covering the European continent from North to South (Finland, Norway, Denmark, France, Portugal and Greece). The strategy for the project has been to develop a dynamic decision support tool based on: information, prediction, communication, on-line training. The project's results has resulted in a set of knowledge-based software tools supporting MEM activities e.g.; public protection management, man to man communication management, environment information management, resource management, as well as an implementation of an architecture to integrate such tools. (R.P.)

  9. Emergency surgical airway management in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstock, C V; Nørskov, A K; Wetterslev, J

    2016-01-01

    for difficult airway management. RESULTS: In the DAD cohort 27 out of 452 461 patients had an ESA representing an incidence of 0.06 events per thousand (95% CI; 0.04 to 0.08). A total of 12 149/452 461 patients underwent Ear-Nose and Throat (ENT) surgery, giving an ESA incidence among ENT patients of 1.6 events...... of which three failed. Reviewers evaluated airway management as satisfactory in 10/27 patients. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of ESA in the DAD cohort was 0.06 events per thousand. Among ENT patients, the ESA Incidence was 1.6 events per thousand. Airway management was evaluated as satisfactory for 10......BACKGROUND: The emergency surgical airway (ESA) is the final option in difficult airway management. We identified ESA procedures registered in the Danish Anaesthesia Database (DAD) and described the performed airway management. METHODS: We extracted a cohort of 452 461 adult patients undergoing...

  10. Radioactive waste management in a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shoukat; Syed, At; Ahmad, Reyaz; Rather, Tanveer A; Ajaz, M; Jan, Fa

    2010-01-01

    Most of the tertiary care hospitals use radioisotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Safe disposal of the radioactive waste is a vital component of the overall management of the hospital waste. An important objective in radioactive waste management is to ensure that the radiation exposure to an individual (Public, Radiation worker, Patient) and the environment does not exceed the prescribed safe limits. Disposal of Radioactive waste in public domain is undertaken in accordance with the Atomic Energy (Safe disposal of radioactive waste) rules of 1987 promulgated by the Indian Central Government Atomic Energy Act 1962. Any prospective plan of a hospital that intends using radioisotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures needs to have sufficient infrastructural and manpower resources to keep its ambient radiation levels within specified safe limits. Regular monitoring of hospital area and radiation workers is mandatory to assess the quality of radiation safety. Records should be maintained to identify the quality and quantity of radioactive waste generated and the mode of its disposal. Radiation Safety officer plays a key role in the waste disposal operations.

  11. Radioactive Waste Management in A Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shoukat; Syed, AT; Ahmad, Reyaz; Rather, Tanveer A.; Ajaz, M; Jan, FA

    2010-01-01

    Most of the tertiary care hospitals use radioisotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Safe disposal of the radioactive waste is a vital component of the overall management of the hospital waste. An important objective in radioactive waste management is to ensure that the radiation exposure to an individual (Public, Radiation worker, Patient) and the environment does not exceed the prescribed safe limits. Disposal of Radioactive waste in public domain is undertaken in accordance with the Atomic Energy (Safe disposal of radioactive waste) rules of 1987 promulgated by the Indian Central Government Atomic Energy Act 1962. Any prospective plan of a hospital that intends using radioisotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures needs to have sufficient infrastructural and manpower resources to keep its ambient radiation levels within specified safe limits. Regular monitoring of hospital area and radiation workers is mandatory to assess the quality of radiation safety. Records should be maintained to identify the quality and quantity of radioactive waste generated and the mode of its disposal. Radiation Safety officer plays a key role in the waste disposal operations. PMID:21475524

  12. A Cognitive Task Analysis for an Emergency Management Serious Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dass, Susan; Barnieu, Joanne; Cummings, Paul; Cid, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The Bethesda Hospitals' Emergency Preparedness Partnership identified a need to design training systems for hospital emergency management scenarios that included incident command situations. As part of this partnership, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) was challenged to develop an engaging, learner-centered simulation to specifically address hospital procedures for highly infectious diseases (HIDs) for multiple hospital roles. A serious game approach was selected for the simulation because collaborative (multiplayer) immersive, game-based simulations have been proven to generate realistic and engaging learning experiences and, when properly designed, can enhance training while minimizing cost compared to full-scale disaster exercises (Spain et al., 2013). Although substantial research effort has been put into design and evaluation of serious games, less time has been spent on developing sound instructional design methodologies to support serious game development. So how does one collect the appropriate, relevant, contextualized content and then align with serious game design elements? This paper describes how a cognitive task approach supported by a live demonstration with a think-aloud protocol was used to collect the rich psychomotor, procedural, and cognitive data necessary for the design of a serious game for handling HIDs. Furthermore, the paper presents a process to translate the collected data into meaningful content to support rapid prototyping. Recommendations for data collection and translation for a serious game close the paper.

  13. Energy management installation at North Middlesex Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, V A

    1986-05-01

    The author is the Energy Conservation Officer for the Haringey Health Authority. The North Middlesex Hospital is an acute unit with approximately 700 beds. Currently, twenty-one outstations control the maternity/radio therapy tower complex plus the outpatients' department. Plans have been approved to extend the system and Phase 2 will cover pathology, administration, medical and surgical blocks together with x-ray and casualty blocks. Transmitton Ltd, as in Phase 1, will supply the hardware and contract management.

  14. FEMA's Integrated Emergency Management Information System (IEMIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaske, R.T.; Meitzler, W.

    1987-01-01

    FEMA is implementing a computerized system for use in optimizing planning, and for supporting exercises of these plans. Called the Integrated Emergency Management Information System (IEMIS), it consists of a base geographic information system upon which analytical models are superimposed in order to load data and report results analytically. At present, it supports FEMA's work in offsite preparedness around nuclear power stations, but is being developed to deal with a full range of natural and technological accident hazards for which emergency evacuation or population movement is required

  15. IT support for emergency management - ISEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, V.

    1990-11-01

    The project is aimed at the development of an integrated information system capable of supporting the complex, dynamic distributed decision making in the management of emergencies. Emphasis will be put on definition of a system architecture and on development of an application generator and tools to support the full life cycle of the system. The development will be driven by the requirements derived from emergency organisations in two different industries. Care is taken that the results are easily applicable and adaptable to other organisations. (author)

  16. [Current situation of pediatric emergency in tertiary and teaching hospitals in 15 provinces, municipalities and autonomous regions in China Mainland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Pre-hospital care, emergency department and critical care medicine are the key components of emergency medical service system. Two investigations about the pediatric critical care medicine in China mainland showed great progress. In recent years, most hospitals in China mainland have established emergency department, hardware configuration and staff status were gradually standardized. But most of the emergency departments mainly provide service to adult patients and pediatric emergency medicine lags behind. The purpose of this investigation was to understand the current situation and main problems of pediatric emergency in China mainland. A questionnaire developed by the Subspecialty Group of Pediatrics, Chinese Society of Emergency Medicine and the Subspecialty Group of Emergency Medicine, Chinese Society of Pediatrics was e-mailed to the members of the above-mentioned two subspecialty groups. The contents of the questionnaire included 46 items which were divided into 5 categories: the general situation of the hospital, the pediatric emergency setting and composition, key equipments and techniques, staff status, training program and running data from 2011 to 2012. Sixty-three questionnaires were delivered and 27 (42.9%) hospitals responded which located in 15 different provinces, municipalities and autonomous regions. Among the 27 hospitals, 10 (37.0%) had no pediatric resuscitation room; 25 (92.6%) had no equipments for cardiac output monitor and gastric lavage; 13 (48.1%) had no bedside fibrolaryngoscope or fiberbronchoscope; 5 (18.5%) had no blood gas analyzer; 4 (14.8%) without respirator, defibrillator, bedside radiography or ultrasonic equipment; 2 (7.4%) had no neonatal incubator; 9 (33.3%) could not do intraossous infusion. The average ratio of professional emergency pediatricians to all physicians was 43.5%. Twenty hospitals incompletely filled in the pediatric emergency running data. The main problems existing in pediatric emergency include: imperfect

  17. Assessing the effect of increased managed care on hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowll, C A

    1998-01-01

    This study uses a new relative risk methodology developed by the author to assess and compare certain performance indicators to determine a hospital's relative degree of financial vulnerability, based on its location, to the effects of increased managed care market penetration. The study also compares nine financial measures to determine whether hospital in states with a high degree of managed-care market penetration experience lower levels of profitability, liquidity, debt service, and overall viability than hospitals in low managed care states. A Managed Care Relative Financial Risk Assessment methodology composed of nine measures of hospital financial and utilization performance is used to develop a high managed care state Composite Index and to determine the Relative Financial Risk and the Overall Risk Ratio for hospitals in a particular state. Additionally, financial performance of hospitals in the five highest managed care states is compared to hospitals in the five lowest states. While data from Colorado and Massachusetts indicates that hospital profitability diminishes as the level of managed care market penetration increases, the overall study results indicate that hospitals in high managed care states demonstrate a better cash position and higher profitability than hospitals in low managed care states. Hospitals in high managed care states are, however, more heavily indebted in relation to equity and have a weaker debt service coverage capacity. Moreover, the overall financial health and viability of hospitals in high managed care states is superior to that of hospitals in low managed care states.

  18. Primary care referral management: a marketing strategy for hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, A D; Geoghegan, S S; Lundquist, S H; Cantone, J M; Krasnick, C J

    1990-06-01

    With increasing competition among hospitals, primary care referral development and management programs offer an opportunity for hospitals to increase their admissions. Such programs require careful development, the commitment of the hospital staff to the strategy, an integration of hospital activities, and an understanding of medical practice management.

  19. Management of district hospitals--exploring success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couper, Ian D; Hugo, Jannie F M

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore and document what assists a rural district hospital to function well. The lessons learned may be applicable to similar hospitals all over the world. A cross-sectional exploratory study was carried out using in-depth interviews with 21 managers of well-functioning district hospitals in two districts in South Africa. Thirteen themes were identified, integrated into three clusters, namely 'Teams working together for a purpose', 'Foundational framework and values' and 'Health Service and the community'. Teamwork and teams was a dominant theme. Teams working together are held together by the cement of good relationships and are enhanced by purposeful meetings. Unity is grown through solving difficult problems together and commitment to serving the community guides commitment towards each other, and towards patients and staff. Open communication and sharing lots of information between people and teams is the way in which these things happen. The structure and systems that have developed over years form the basis for teamwork. The different management structures and processes are developed with a view to supporting service and teamwork. A long history of committed people who hand over the baton when they leave creates a stable context. The health service and community theme cluster describes how integration in the community and community services is important for these managers. There is also a focus on involving community representatives in the hospital development and governance. Capacity building for staff is seen in the same spirit of serving people and thus serving staff, all aimed at reaching out to people in need in the community. The three clusters and thirteen themes and the relationships between them are described in detail through diagrams and narrative in the article. Much can be learned from the experience of these managers. The key issue is the development of a team in the hospital, a team with a unified vision of giving

  20. Emergency Management for Disasters in Malaysian Hotel Industry

    OpenAIRE

    AlBattat Ahmad Rasmi; Mat Som Ahmad Puad; Abukhalifeh Ala`a

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to identify major emergencies that have the potential to place Malaysian hotels in emergency and disaster situations; investigate how hotels were prepared for emergencies, how they manage and overcome emergencies when occurred; and limitations and factors influencing successful emergency planning and adoption emergency management in Malaysian hotels. Face-to-face interview with managers from three, four and five star hotels from different backgrounds: local; regional; and Inte...

  1. [Primary emergencies: management of acute ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leys, Didier; Goldstein, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The emergency diagnostic strategy for acute ischemic stroke consists of:--identification of stroke, based on clinical examination (sudden onset of a focal neurological deficit);--identification of the ischemic or hemorrhagic nature by MRI or CT;--determination of the early time-course (clinical examination) and the cause. In all strokes (ischemic or hemorrhagic), treatment consists of:--the same general management (treatment of a life-threatening emergency, ensuring normal biological parameters except for blood pressure, and prevention of complications);--decompressive surgery in the rare cases of intracranial hypertension. For proven ischemic stroke, other therapies consist of: rt-PA for patients admitted with 4.5 hours of stroke onset who have no contraindications, and aspirin (160 to 300 mg) for patients who are not eligible for rt-PA. These treatments should be administered within a few hours. A centralized emergency call system (phone number 15 in France) is the most effective way of achieving this objective.

  2. Emergency department management of priapism [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolej, Gregory S; Babcock, Christine; Kim, Jeremy

    2017-01-22

    Priapism is a genitourinary emergency that demands a thorough, time-sensitive evaluation. There are 3 types of priapism: ischemic, nonischemic, and recurrent ischemic priapism; ischemic priapism accounts for 95% of cases. Ischemic priapism must be treated within 4 to 6 hours to minimize morbidity, including impotence. The diagnosis of ischemic priapism relies heavily on the history and physical examination and may be facilitated by penile blood gas analysis and penile ultrasound. This issue reviews current evidence regarding emergency department treatment of ischemic priapism using a stepwise approach that begins with aspiration of cavernosal blood, cold saline irrigation, and penile injection with sympathomimetic agents. Evidence-based management and appropriate urologic follow-up of nonischemic and recurrent ischemic priapism maximizes patient outcomes and resource utilization. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice].

  3. ARAC: A support capability for emergency managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, J.C.; Sullivan, T.J.; Baskett, R.L. [and others

    1995-08-01

    This paper is intended to introduce to the non-radiological emergency management community the 20-year operational history of the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), its concept of operations, and its applicability for use in support of emergency management decision makers. ARAC is a centralized federal facility for assessing atmospheric releases of hazardous materials in real time, using a robust suite of three-dimensional atmospheric transport and diffusion models, extensive geophysical and source-description databases, automated meteorological data acquisition systems, and experienced staff members. Although originally conceived to respond to nuclear accidents, the ARAC system has proven to be extremely adaptable, and has been used successfully during a wide variety of nonradiological hazardous chemical situations. ARAC represents a proven, validated, operational support capability for atmospheric hazardous releases.

  4. Current management of surgical oncologic emergencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne R F Bosscher

    Full Text Available For some oncologic emergencies, surgical interventions are necessary for dissolution or temporary relieve. In the absence of guidelines, the most optimal method for decision making would be in a multidisciplinary cancer conference (MCC. In an acute setting, the opportunity for multidisciplinary discussion is often not available. In this study, the management and short term outcome of patients after surgical oncologic emergency consultation was analyzed.A prospective registration and follow up of adult patients with surgical oncologic emergencies between 01-11-2013 and 30-04-2014. The follow up period was 30 days.In total, 207 patients with surgical oncologic emergencies were included. Postoperative wound infections, malignant obstruction, and clinical deterioration due to progressive disease were the most frequent conditions for surgical oncologic emergency consultation. During the follow up period, 40% of patients underwent surgery. The median number of involved medical specialties was two. Only 30% of all patients were discussed in a MCC within 30 days after emergency consultation, and only 41% of the patients who underwent surgery were discussed in a MCC. For 79% of these patients, the surgical procedure was performed before the MCC. Mortality within 30 days was 13%.In most cases, surgery occurred without discussing the patient in a MCC, regardless of the fact that multiple medical specialties were involved in the treatment process. There is a need for prognostic aids and acute oncology pathways with structural multidisciplinary management. These will provide in faster institution of the most appropriate personalized cancer care, and prevent unnecessary investigations or invasive therapy.

  5. Knowledge, Skills and Experience Managing Tracheostomy Emergencies: A Survey of Critical Care Medicine trainees

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nizam, AA

    2016-10-01

    Since the development of percutaneous tracheostomy, the number of tracheostomy patients on hospital wards has increased. Problems associated with adequate tracheostomy care on the wards are well documented, particularly the management of tracheostomy-related emergencies. A survey was conducted among non-consultant hospital doctors (NCHDs) starting their Critical Care Medicine training rotation in a university affiliated teaching hospital to determine their basic knowledge and skills in dealing with tracheostomy emergencies. Trainees who had received specific tracheostomy training or who had previous experience of dealing with tracheostomy emergencies were more confident in dealing with such emergencies compared to trainees without such training or experience. Only a minority of trainees were aware of local hospital guidelines regarding tracheostomy care. Our results highlight the importance of increased awareness of tracheostomy emergencies and the importance of specific training for Anaesthesia and Critical Care Medicine trainees.

  6. 'Hidden messages' emerging from Afrocentric management perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Van den Heuvel

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper aims to examine how 'African management' discourse has emerged in South Africa. Altogether, it has stimulated debates - sometimes in controversial ways - on 'taboo issues', e.g. relating to 'cultural diversity' and 'ethnicity'. The stimulation of such debates within organisations is probably a more valuable contribution than a static, essentialised 'African identity' that it proclaims. Design/Methodology/Approach: The paper draws on a qualitative research project conducted in South Africa in 2003-2004. Its relevance lies in gaining in-depth insights into ('non-western' local management discourse. It seeks to contribute to the body of knowledge on political and cultural contexts in which South African organizations operate, and how they impact on local management perspectives, and vice versa. Findings: The research findings make clear how and under what circumstances 'African management' discourse has come about in South Africa, and how it could be interpreted. Implications: 'African management' advocates allegedly attempt to revise dominant management thinking and promote 'humane-ness' and participatory decision-making in South African organisations, in search of a contextualised management approach. Amongst others, it has produced new meanings of 'Africanness' and has opened up space for 'hidden messages', resentments and aspirations to become openly articulated. This throws another light on phenomena such as cultural diversity and ethnicity that usually tend to be 'neutralised'. This may turn out to be far healthier for blooming organisational cultures in South Africa than relentlessly hammering on prescribed 'corporate values'. Originality/Value: This paper informs the reader in detail about the emergence and evolvement of 'African management' discourse in South Africa. It is a unique attempt to develop an interpretative viewpoint on this intriguing phenomenon that offers a potentially valuable contribution in reading

  7. COMMUNICATION IN THE EMERGENCY SITUATIONS MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Ovidiu Aurel GHIUȚĂ; Gabriela PRELIPCEAN

    2014-01-01

    This paper is talking about communication use in emergency situations management from a marketing perspective. We have analyzed if this communication is different from the communication of a company with her publics; the legislation which provides the framework for this type of communication in Romania, when is applicable and who is in charge. As methodology we have utilized documentary research. We mention similarities and differences between this type of communication and Integrated Ma...

  8. COMMUNICATION IN THE EMERGENCY SITUATIONS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu Aurel GHIUȚĂ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is talking about communication use in emergency situations management from a marketing perspective. We have analyzed if this communication is different from the communication of a company with her publics; the legislation which provides the framework for this type of communication in Romania, when is applicable and who is in charge. As methodology we have utilized documentary research. We mention similarities and differences between this type of communication and Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC.

  9. [Institutional demands and care demands in the management of nurses in an emergency unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montezelli, Juliana Helena; Peres, Aida Maris; Bernardino, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    To characterize the registered nurse's management activities in an emergency department. Qualitative research, implemented from February to April 2009 by a semi-structured interview with eight nurses from an emergency department at a university hospital in Curitiba, PR. Brazil. The data was submitted to content analyses. Two categories emerged: Management focused on meeting the institutional demands that emphasizes the Registered Nurses' bureaucratic activities required by the hospital; and Management focused on meeting the nursing care demands that prioritizes the care as the main management activity. The study reached its objective and joined the literature findings that the division between care and management does not match with the registered nurse's performance at an emergency department.

  10. Nurse Case Managers' Experiences on Case Management for Long-term Hospitalization in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jinjoo; Oh, Seieun

    2017-12-01

    The implementation of case management for long-term hospitalization use has been approved for controlling medical cost increases in other countries. But, introduction of the case management in Korea has created issues that hinder its effective operation. This qualitative study aimed to obtain further understanding of the issues surrounding the management of Medical Aid beneficiaries' use of long-term hospitalization from the case managers' perspectives and to provide suggestions for successful case management. Thematic analysis was employed to analyze the data. Medical Aid case managers with 3 or more years of case management experience were recruited from urban, suburban, and rural regions. Data were collected through in-depth interviews: 12 nurse case managers participated in focus group interviews and 11 participated in individual one-on-one interviews. Four major themes emerged: on-site obstacles that hinder work progress; going in an opposite direction; ambiguous position of case managers; and work-related emotions. Eleven subthemes were discovered: chasing potential candidates; becoming an enemy; discharging patients who have nowhere to go; welfare-centered national policies increasing medical costs; Medical Aid Program that encourages hospitalization; misuse of hospitalization; feeling limited; working without authority; fulfilling the expected role; fretting about social criticism; and feeling neglected and unprotected. The findings highlight the complexity and ambiguity of the issues faced by case managers. Successful management of Medical Aid resources requires the orchestrated efforts and collaboration of multiple stakeholders. More systematized support and resources for nurse case managers are essential to fully implement this nursing innovation in Korea. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. AN EFFICIENT PATIENT INFLOW PREDICTION MODEL FOR HOSPITAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kottalanka Srikanth

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available There has been increasing demand in improving service provisioning in hospital resources management. Hospital industries work with strict budget constraint at the same time assures quality care. To achieve quality care with budget constraint an efficient prediction model is required. Recently there has been various time series based prediction model has been proposed to manage hospital resources such ambulance monitoring, emergency care and so on. These models are not efficient as they do not consider the nature of scenario such climate condition etc. To address this artificial intelligence is adopted. The issues with existing prediction are that the training suffers from local optima error. This induces overhead and affects the accuracy in prediction. To overcome the local minima error, this work presents a patient inflow prediction model by adopting resilient backpropagation neural network. Experiment are conducted to evaluate the performance of proposed model inter of RMSE and MAPE. The outcome shows the proposed model reduces RMSE and MAPE over existing back propagation based artificial neural network. The overall outcomes show the proposed prediction model improves the accuracy of prediction which aid in improving the quality of health care management.

  12. A multivariate time series approach to forecasting daily attendances at hospital emergency department

    KAUST Repository

    Kadri, Farid

    2018-02-07

    Efficient management of patient demands in emergency departments (EDs) has recently received increasing attention by most healthcare administrations. Forecasting ED demands greatly helps ED\\'s managers to make suitable decisions by optimally allocating the available limited resources to efficiently handle patient attendances. Furthermore, it permits pre-emptive action(s) to mitigate and/or prevent overcrowding situations and to enhance the quality of care. In this work, we present a statistical approach based on a vector autoregressive moving average (VARMA) model for a short term forecasting of daily attendances at an ED. The VARMA model has been validated using an experimental data from the paediatric emergency department (PED) at Lille regional hospital centre, France. The results obtained indicate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in forecasting patient demands.

  13. Quality Management in Tourism and Hospitality: an Exploratory Study among Tourism Stakeholders

    OpenAIRE

    Soultana Kapiki

    2012-01-01

    Quality in the tourism and hospitality industry involves consistent delivery of products and guest services according to expected standards. Delivering quality service is one of the major challenges the hospitality managers will be facing in the following years as it is an essential condition for success in the emerging, keenly competitive, global hospitality markets. There are various tools that measure and improve quality service, as well as mechanisms for quality recognition in the tourism...

  14. [The development of hospital medical supplies information management system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shaoping; Gu, Hongqing; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Qiang

    2010-05-01

    The information management of medical materials by using high-tech computer, in order to improve the efficiency of the consumption of medical supplies, hospital supplies and develop a new technology way to manage the hospital and material support. Using C # NET, JAVA techniques to develop procedures for the establishment of hospital material management information system, set the various management modules, production of various statistical reports, standard operating procedures. The system is convenient, functional and strong, fluent statistical functions. It can always fully grasp and understand the whole hospital supplies run dynamic information, as a modern and effective tool for hospital materials management.

  15. Frailty in Older Adults Using Pre-hospital Care and the Emergency Department: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Judah P; Andrew, Melissa K; Travers, Andrew

    2012-03-01

    Older adults use more health-care services per capita than younger age groups and the older adult population varies greatly in its needs. Evidence suggests that there is a critical distinction between relative frailty and fitness in older adults. Here, we review how frailty is described in the pre-hospital literature and in the broader emergency medicine literature. PubMed was used as the primary database, but was augmented by searches of CINAHL and EMBASE. Articles were included if they focused on patients 60 years and older and implemented a definition of frailty or risk screening tool in the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) or Emergency Department setting. IN THE BROAD CLINICAL LITERATURE, THREE TYPES OF MEASURES CAN BE IDENTIFIED: frailty index measures, frailty scales, and a phenotypic definition. Each offers advantages and disadvantages for the EMS stakeholder. We identified no EMS literature on frailty conceptualization or management, although some risk measures from emergency medicine use terms that overlap with the frailty literature. There is a paucity of research on frailty in the Emergency Medical Services literature. No research was identified that specifically addressed frailty conceptualization or management in EMS patients. There is a compelling need for further research in this area.

  16. Surgical emergencies in obstetrics and gynaecology in a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Hanoon P; Dahal, Prerana; Rai, Rubina; Budhathoki, ShyamSundar

    2013-01-01

    The management of Obstetrics and Gynaecological Emergency is directed at the preservation of life, health, sexual function and the perpetuation of fertility. Main aim of the study was to access the burden of Surgical Emergency in Obstetrics and Gynaecology and their course of management at BPKIHS. A total of 314 women presenting at the emergency admission room of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Department of BPKIHS over two years, who required surgical intervention were included in this hospital based descriptive study. Clinical assessment and routine laboratory investigations were performed in all cases. All patients who presented with shock were resuscitated and surgery was done at earliest possible time. The age of patients ranged from 15- 55 years with approximately 43% in the 25-34 years category. Ninety two percent of them were married. Among the unmarried, 64% came with problems related to unsafe abortion. About 61% of females presenting as acute surgical abdomen had ruptured ectopic pregnancy, 7.64% had twisted ovarian cyst, and 6.26% had haemoperitoneum and pyoperitoneum following vaginal hysterectomies, total abdominal hysterectomies and caesarean section. Almost half (47.8%) of the cases underwent salphingectomy. Women present with wide range of complaints and conditions in the admission room of Obstetrics and Gynecology department of BPKIHS. Skilled clinicians, immediate investigation facilities and experienced specialty Obstetrical and Gynaecological surgeons are the main backbone of the emergency case management and saving lives. Study indicates there is need of some prospective study to establish the causes of rising trend in Ectopic Pregnancies.

  17. Management changes resulting from hospital accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, João Lucas Campos de; Gabriel, Carmen Silvia; Fertonani, Hosanna Pattrig; Matsuda, Laura Misue

    2017-03-02

    to analyze managers and professionals' perceptions on the changes in hospital management deriving from accreditation. descriptive study with qualitative approach. The participants were five hospital quality managers and 91 other professionals from a wide range of professional categories, hierarchical levels and activity areas at four hospitals in the South of Brazil certified at different levels in the Brazilian accreditation system. They answered the question "Tell me about the management of this hospital before and after the Accreditation". The data were recorded, fully transcribed and transported to the software ATLAS.ti, version 7.1 for access and management. Then, thematic content analysis was applied within the reference framework of Avedis Donabedian's Evaluation in Health. one large family was apprehended, called "Management Changes Resulting from the Accreditation: perspectives of managers and professionals" and five codes, related to the management changes in the operational, structural, financial and cost; top hospital management and quality management domains. the management changes in the hospital organizations resulting from the Accreditation were broad, multifaceted and in line with the improvements of the service quality. analizar las percepciones de gestores y trabajadores sobre los cambios en la gestión hospitalaria resultantes de la Acreditación. estudio descriptivo con aproximación cualitativa. Participaron cinco gestores de calidad hospitalaria y otros 91 trabajadores de las más diversas categorías profesionales, niveles jerárquicos y áreas de actuación de cuatro hospitales del sur de Brasil certificados por la Acreditación nacional de diferentes niveles, que contestaron la pregunta "Cuéntame sobre la gestión de este hospital, antes y después de la Acreditación". Los datos fueron grabados, transcritos por completo y transportados para acceso y manoseo en el software ATLAS.ti, versión 7.1. A seguir, fue aplicado el análisis de

  18. Emergency medicine: an operations management view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soremekun, Olan A; Terwiesch, Christian; Pines, Jesse M

    2011-12-01

    Operations management (OM) is the science of understanding and improving business processes. For the emergency department (ED), OM principles can be used to reduce and alleviate the effects of crowding. A fundamental principle of OM is the waiting time formula, which has clear implications in the ED given that waiting time is fundamental to patient-centered emergency care. The waiting time formula consists of the activity time (how long it takes to complete a process), the utilization rate (the proportion of time a particular resource such a staff is working), and two measures of variation: the variation in patient interarrival times and the variation in patient processing times. Understanding the waiting time formula is important because it presents the fundamental parameters that can be managed to reduce waiting times and length of stay. An additional useful OM principle that is applicable to the ED is the efficient frontier. The efficient frontier compares the performance of EDs with respect to two dimensions: responsiveness (i.e., 1/wait time) and utilization rates. Some EDs may be "on the frontier," maximizing their responsiveness at their given utilization rates. However, most EDs likely have opportunities to move toward the frontier. Increasing capacity is a movement along the frontier and to truly move toward the frontier (i.e., improving responsiveness at a fixed capacity), we articulate three possible options: eliminating waste, reducing variability, or increasing flexibility. When conceptualizing ED crowding interventions, these are the major strategies to consider. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  19. A governor's guide to emergency management. Volume one, Natural disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-02-27

    With lives, infrastructure, and resources at stake, governors must become instant experts in emergency management when their states are affected by natural disaster. The purpose of A Governor's Guide to Emergency Management is to provide governors an...

  20. The Profession of Emergency Management: Educational Opportunities and Gaps

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Darlington, Joanne D

    2008-01-01

    For the past several years, as the profession of emergency management has been evolving, there has been a growing interest in the need for more formalized training for the nation s hazards and emergency managers...

  1. Multiple Trauma and Emergency Room Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frink, Michael; Lechler, Philipp; Debus, Florian; Ruchholtz, Steffen

    2017-07-24

    The care of severely injured patients remains a challenge. Their initial treatment in the emergency room is the essential link between first aid in the field and definitive in-hospital treatment. We present important elements of the initial in-hospital care of severely injured patients on the basis of pertinent publications retrieved by a selective search in PubMed and the current German S3 guideline on the care of severely and multiply traumatized patients, which was last updated in 2016. The goal of initial emergency room care is the rapid recognition and prompt treatment of acutely life-threatening injuries in the order of their priority. The initial assessment includes physical examination and ultrasonography according to the FAST concept (Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma) for the recognition of intraperitoneal hemorrhage. Patients with penetrating chest injuries, massive hematothorax, and/or severe injuries of the heart and lungs undergo emergency thoracotomy; those with signs of hollow viscus perforation undergo emergency laparotomy. If the patient is hemo - dynamically stable, the most important diagnostic procedure that must be performed is computerized tomography with contrast medium. Therapeutic decision-making takes the patient's physiological parameters into account, along with the overall severity of trauma and the complexity of the individual injuries. Depending on the severity of trauma, the immediate goal can be either the prompt restoration of organ structure and function or so-called damage control surgery. The latter focuses, in the acute phase, on hemostasis and on the avoidance of secondary damage such as intra-abdominal contamination or compartment syndrome. It also involves the temporary treatment of fractures with external fixation and the planning of definitive care once the patient's organ functions have been securely stabilized. The care of the severely injured patient should be performed in structured fashion according to the

  2. Audit of emergency obstetric referrals from a secondary level hospital in Haryana, North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Kant

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The maternal mortality ratio in India is high. An effective emergency obstetric care (EmOC strategy has been identified as a priority to reduce maternal deaths. Since the capacity of different levels of public health facilities to provide EmOC is varied, an effective referral system is crucial. However, few studies have evaluated the functioning and quality of referral systems in India. A systematic monitoring of referrals helps to identify current gaps in the provision of essential obstetric care. Objective: This study was conducted to identify the medical and logistic reasons for emergency obstetric referrals from a subdistrict hospital (SDH. Methods: An audit of emergency referrals during the period January 2015–December 2015 was carried out. Records of all obstetric patients referred from the maternity ward during the study period were reviewed. Results: The referral rate was found to be 31.7%. Preterm labor (30.6%, pregnancy-induced hypertension (17%, and fetal distress (10.6% were the main reasons for referral. Deficiencies were found in critical determinants of functionality, that is, nonavailability of emergency cesarean, neonatal care unit, and blood bank. Conclusions: The referral rate at the SDH was high. Lack of workforce and infrastructural facilities led to referrals of women who ought to have been managed at this level of the hospital.

  3. Rural-Urban Disparities in Child Abuse Management Resources in the Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Esther K.; Spiro, David M.; Lowe, Robert A.; Newgard, Craig D.; Hall, Michael Kennedy; McConnell, Kenneth John

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize differences in child abuse management resources between urban and rural emergency departments (EDs). Methods: We surveyed ED directors and nurse managers at hospitals in Oregon to gain information about available abuse-related resources. Chi-square analysis was used to test differences between urban and rural EDs.…

  4. Financial management challenges for general hospital psychiatry 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, R J

    2001-01-01

    Psychiatry programs are facing significant business and financial challenges. This paper provides an overview of these management challenges in five areas: departmental, hospital, payment system, general finance, and policy. Psychiatric leaders will require skills in a variety of business management areas to ensure their program success. Many programs will need to develop new compensation models with more of an emphasis on revenue collection and overhead management. Programs which cannot master these areas are likely to go out of business. For academic programs, incentive systems must address not only clinical productivity, but academic and teaching output as well. General hospital programs will need to develop increased sophistication in differential cost accounting in order to be able to advocate for their patients and program in the current management climate. Clinical leaders will need the skills (ranging from actuarial to negotiations) to be at the table with contract development, since those decisions are inseparable from clinical care issues. Strategic planning needs to consider the value of improving integration with primary care, along with the ability to understand the advantages and disadvantages of risk-sharing models. Psychiatry leaders need to define and develop useful reports shared with clinical division leadership to track progress and identify problems and opportunities. Leaders should be responsible for a strategy for developing appropriate information system architecture and infrastructure. Finally, it is hoped that some leaders will emerge who can further our needs to address inequities in mental health fee schedules and parity issues which affect our program viability.

  5. Practices regarding hospital waste management at public and private sector hospitals of Lahore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, S.; Din, N.U.; Mohsin, J.

    2011-01-01

    Health care (Biomedical) waste is a term used for all waste arising from health care establishments. In most of health care centers of Pakistan, including Lahore, hospital wastes are simply mixed with the municipal waste in collecting bins at road-sides and disposed off similarly. Proper Management of biomedical waste, especially the hazardous one, being produced in hospital settings is important in terms of their ability to cause harm to the related per-sons and the environment as well. To Observe and compare the practices regarding Hospital Waste management of the public sector hospital with private sector hospital. Descriptive, Cross sectional. Methodology: Standardized checklist was used to assess the practices of nursing and sanitary staff. Practices regarding waste segregation were same at both hospitals. While practices regarding waste collection and transportation were better at The Children's Hospital. Public sector hospital has, paradoxically, better practices regarding hospital waste management in comparison to private sector hospital. (author)

  6. Use of telehealth in the management of non-critical emergencies in rural or remote emergency departments: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Toit, Marie; Malau-Aduli, Bunmi; Vangaveti, Venkat; Sabesan, Sabe; Ray, Robin A

    2017-01-01

    Background Telehealth has been used extensively in emergency departments to improve healthcare provision. However, its impact on the management of non-critical emergency presentations within rural and remote emergency department settings has not been adequately explored. The objective of this systematic review is to identify how telehealth has been used to assist in the management of non-critical presentations in rural and remote emergency departments and the outcomes. Methods Articles were identified through database searches of CINAHL, Cochrane, MEDLINE (OVID), Informit and SCOPUS, as well as the screening of relevant article reference and citation lists. To determine how telehealth can assist in the management of non-critical emergencies, information was extracted relating to telehealth programme model, the scope of service and participating health professionals. The outcomes of telehealth programmes were determined by analysing the uptake and usage of telehealth, the impact on altering a diagnosis or management plan as well as patient disposition including patient transfer, discharge, local hospital admission and rates of discharge against medical advice. Results Of the 2532 identified records, 15 were found to match the eligibility criteria and were included in the review. Uptake and usage increased for telehealth programmes predominantly utilised by nursing staff with limited local medical support. Teleconsultation conservatively altered patient diagnosis or management in 18-66% of consultations. Although teleconsultation was associated with increased patient transfer rates, unnecessary transfers were reduced. Simultaneously, an increase in local hospital admission was noted and fewer patients were discharged home. Discharge against medical advice rates were low at 0.9-1.1%. Conclusion The most widely implemented hub-and-spoke telehealth model could be incorporated into existing referral frameworks. Telehealth programmes may assist in reducing unnecessary

  7. Emergency management of acute abdomen in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Binesh; Singhi, Sunit; Lal, Sadhna

    2013-03-01

    Acute abdomen can be defined as a medical emergency in which there is sudden and severe pain in abdomen with accompanying signs and symptoms that focus on an abdominal involvement. It accounts for about 8 % of all children attending the emergency department. The goal of emergency management is to identify and treat any life-threatening medical or surgical disease condition and relief from pain. In mild cases often the cause is gastritis or gastroenteritis, colic, constipation, pharyngo-tonsilitis, viral syndromes or acute febrile illnesses. The common surgical causes are malrotation and Volvulus (in early infancy), intussusception, acute appendicitis, and typhoid and ischemic enteritis with perforation. Lower lobe pneumonia, diabetic ketoacidosis and acute porphyria should be considered in patients with moderate-severe pain with little localizing findings in abdomen. The approach to management in ED should include, in order of priority, a rapid cardiopulmonary assessment to ensure hemodynamic stability, focused history and examination, surgical consult and radiologic examination to exclude life threatening surgical conditions, pain relief and specific diagnosis. In a sick patient the initial steps include rapid IV access and normal saline 20 ml/kg (in the presence of shock/hypovolemia), adequate analgesia, nothing per oral/IV fluids, Ryle's tube aspiration and surgical consultation. An ultrasound abdomen is the first investigation in almost all cases with moderate and severe pain with localizing abdominal findings. In patients with significant abdominal trauma or features of pancreatitis, a Contrast enhanced computerized tomography (CECT) abdomen will be a better initial modality. Continuous monitoring and repeated physical examinations should be done in all cases. Specific management varies according to the specific etiology.

  8. Collective response to public health emergencies and large-scale disasters: putting hospitals at the core of community resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paturas, James L; Smith, Deborah; Smith, Stewart; Albanese, Joseph

    2010-07-01

    Healthcare organisations are a critical part of a community's resilience and play a prominent role as the backbone of medical response to natural and manmade disasters. The importance of healthcare organisations, in particular hospitals, to remain operational extends beyond the necessity to sustain uninterrupted medical services for the community, in the aftermath of a large-scale disaster. Hospitals are viewed as safe havens where affected individuals go for shelter, food, water and psychosocial assistance, as well as to obtain information about missing family members or learn of impending dangers related to the incident. The ability of hospitals to respond effectively to high-consequence incidents producing a massive arrival of patients that disrupt daily operations requires surge capacity and capability. The activation of hospital emergency support functions provides an approach by which hospitals manage a short-term shortfall of hospital personnel through the reallocation of hospital employees, thereby obviating the reliance on external qualified volunteers for surge capacity and capability. Recent revisions to the Joint Commission's hospital emergency preparedness standard have impelled healthcare facilities to participate actively in community-wide planning, rather than confining planning exclusively to a single healthcare facility, in order to harmonise disaster management strategies and effectively coordinate the allocation of community resources and expertise across all local response agencies.

  9. Emergency management: Concepts and strategies for effective programs

    OpenAIRE

    Lucus, Valerie

    2007-01-01

    Review of Emergency Management: Concepts and Strategies for Effective Programs By Lucien G. Canton, CEM. By taking a different perspective on local government emergency management programs, this book presents the vision for a very different model--one that includes an independent emergency manager leading an enterprise-wide program focused on strategies that promote disaster resilient communities.

  10. Emerging technologies for knowledge resource management

    CERN Document Server

    Pandian, M

    2007-01-01

    Emerging Technologies for Knowledge Resource Management examines various factors that contribute to an enabled environment for optimum utilisation of information resources. These include the digital form of information resources, which are inherently sharable, consortia as a concept to bring people and materials together and unified portals as technology to bring together disparate and heterogeneous resources for sharing and access. The book provides a step-by-step guideline for system analysis and requirements analysis. The book also provides reviews of existing portal models for sharing reso

  11. Telemedicine for Trauma, Emergencies, and Disaster Management

    CERN Document Server

    Latifi, Rifat

    2010-01-01

    Telemedicine has evolved to become an important field of medicine and healthcare, involving everything from simple patient care to actual performance of operations at a distance. This groundbreaking volume addresses the complex technical and clinical development in the management of trauma, disaster, and emergency situations using telemedicine. The book explains how telemedicine and related technologies can be used to effectively handle a wide range of scenarios, from a situation as small as a car crash, to major disasters such as an earthquake. Professionals find critical discussions on the p

  12. Common geriatric emergencies in a rural hospital in South‑Eastern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common geriatric emergencies in a rural hospital in South‑Eastern Nigeria. ... by emergency health conditions that predispose them to higher risk of disability and ... The geriatric patients seen within the study period who met the selection ...

  13. The value of the pre-hospital learning environment as part of the emergency nursing programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonett van Wyk

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: The research findings support the value and continuation of utilising the pre-hospital clinical learning environment for placing post-basic emergency nursing students when enrolled in the emergency nursing programme.

  14. Pre-hospital management of mass casualty civilian shootings: a systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Conor D. A.; Lockey, David J.; Rehn, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Background Mass casualty civilian shootings present an uncommon but recurring challenge to emergency services around the world and produce unique management demands. On the background of a rising threat of transnational terrorism worldwide, emergency response strategies are of critical importance. This study aims to systematically identify, describe and appraise the quality of indexed and non-indexed literature on the pre-hospital management of modern civilian mass shootings to guide future p...

  15. Differences in emergency colorectal surgery in Medicaid and uninsured patients by hospital safety net status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Cathy J; Dahman, Bassam; Sabik, Lindsay M

    2015-02-01

    We examined whether safety net hospitals reduce the likelihood of emergency colorectal cancer (CRC) surgery in uninsured and Medicaid-insured patients. If these patients have better access to care through safety net providers, they should be less likely to undergo emergency resection relative to similar patients at non- safety net hospitals. Using population-based data, we estimated the relationship between safety net hospitals, patient insurance status, and emergency CRC surgery. We extracted inpatient admission data from the Virginia Health Information discharge database and matched them to the Virginia Cancer Registry for patients aged 21 to 64 years who underwent a CRC resection between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 2005 (n = 5488). We differentiated between medically defined emergencies and those that originated in the emergency department (ED). For each definition of emergency surgery, we estimated the linear probability models of the effects of being treated at a safety net hospital on the probability of having an emergency resection. Safety net hospitals reduce emergency surgeries among uninsured and Medicaid CRC patients. When defining an emergency resection as those that involved an ED visit, these patients were 15 to 20 percentage points less likely to have an emergency resection when treated in a safety net hospital. Our results suggest that these hospitals provide a benefit, most likely through the access they afford to timely and appropriate care, to uninsured and Medicaid-insured patients relative to hospitals without a safety net mission.

  16. Management of perforated peptic ulcer in a district general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, A C; Phillips, A W; Bawa, S M; Gallagher, P V

    2011-11-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has become increasingly popular for elective surgery but it has gained slow transference to emergency surgery. The management of perforated peptic ulcers (PPU) laparoscopically is an accepted strategy yet it still remains infrequently used. The purpose of this study was to analyse the utility and outcomes of laparoscopy versus open repair for PPU in a district general hospital. In addition, we evaluated whether the subspecialty of the on-call consultant affected the method of repair performed and the training opportunities for trainee surgeons. Between 2003 and 2009, 53 patients underwent laparoscopic repair, 89 patients underwent open repair and a further 20 patients had laparoscopic repair that was converted to open repair for PPU. The results from a prospectively compiled database were analysed with primary outcome measures including operative time, length of hospital stay and mortality. The median operating time in the laparoscopic group was 60.0 minutes compared with 50.5 minutes in the open group. Hospital stay in surviving patients was significantly shorter in patients treated completely laparoscopically (5 days) when compared with the open group (6 days) ( p management of PPU. Our findings support the view that this procedure can be successfully used as a training operation.

  17. Emergency nurses' knowledge of perceived barriers in pain management in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Feng-Ching; Tsai, Yun-Fang; Chien, Chih-Cheng; Lin, Chia-Chin

    2007-11-01

    To explore knowledge of and perceived barriers to pain management among emergency nurses in Taiwan. Pain is the most common patient complaint in emergency departments. Quality care of these patients depends on the pain knowledge and pain management skills of emergency nurses. However, no studies have explored emergency nurses' knowledge of and perceived barriers to pain management in Taiwan. Nurse subjects (n = 249) were recruited from nine hospitals chosen by stratified sampling across Taiwan. Data were collected using the Nurses' Knowledge and Attitudes Survey-Taiwanese version, a scale to assess perceived barriers to pain management and a background information form. The overall average correct response rate for the knowledge scale was 49.2%, with a range of 4.8-89.2% for each survey question. The top barrier to managing pain was identified by these nurses as 'the responsibility of caring for other acutely ill patients in addition to a patient with pain. Knowledge of pain management had a significant, negative relationship with perceived barriers to pain management and a significant, positive relationship with extent of clinical care experience and total hours of prior pain management education. In addition, scores for knowledge and perceived barriers differed significantly by the nursing clinical ladder. Perceived barriers also differed significantly by hospital accreditation category. Our results indicate an urgent need to strengthen pain education for emergency nurses in Taiwan. The pain education should target knowledge deficits and barriers to changing pain management approaches for Taiwanese emergency nurses.

  18. A proposed simulation optimization model framework for emergency department problems in public hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ireen Munira; Liong, Choong-Yeun; Bakar, Sakhinah Abu; Ahmad, Norazura; Najmuddin, Ahmad Farid

    2015-12-01

    The Emergency Department (ED) is a very complex system with limited resources to support increase in demand. ED services are considered as good quality if they can meet the patient's expectation. Long waiting times and length of stay is always the main problem faced by the management. The management of ED should give greater emphasis on their capacity of resources in order to increase the quality of services, which conforms to patient satisfaction. This paper is a review of work in progress of a study being conducted in a government hospital in Selangor, Malaysia. This paper proposed a simulation optimization model framework which is used to study ED operations and problems as well as to find an optimal solution to the problems. The integration of simulation and optimization is hoped can assist management in decision making process regarding their resource capacity planning in order to improve current and future ED operations.

  19. Technical information management in an emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, H.A.; Greve, C.; Best, R.G.; Phillipson, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    Through many experiences in responding to real radiation accidents and emergency response exercises, the Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a technical information management system that will be used in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) in the event of a major radiological accident. The core of the system is the Data Center in the FRMAC, utilizing a computerized database of all off-site environmental radiological data. The information contained and managed by the Data Center will be comprehensive, accountable, and traceable, providing information to the assessors for immediate health and safety needs as well as for long-term documentation requirements. A DOE task force has been formed to develop compatibility guidelines for video, automated data processing, and communication systems. An electronic mail, information status, and bulletin board system is also being developed to assist in the dissemination of information. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) offer a giant step forward in displaying and analyzing information in a geographically referenced system

  20. Otorhinolaryngological Emergencies in a Tertiary Hospital in Port ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-22

    May 22, 2017 ... 2017 Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice | Published by Wolters ... This includes referrals from the accident and emergency as well as the ... presented as emergencies, however only 2160 cases were real emergencies.

  1. Manager traits and quality-of-care performance in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aij, Kjeld Harald; Aernoudts, René L M C; Joosten, Gepke

    2015-07-06

    This paper aims to assess the impact of the leadership traits of chief executive officers (CEOs) on hospital performance in the USA. The effectiveness and efficiency of the CEO is of critical importance to the performance of any organization, including hospitals. Management systems and manager behaviours (traits) are of crucial importance to any organization because of their connection with organizational performance. To identify key factors associated with the quality of care delivered by hospitals, the authors gathered perceptions of manager traits from chief executive officers (CEOs) and followers in three groups of US hospitals delivering different levels of quality of care performance. Three high- and three low-performing hospitals were selected from the top and bottom 20th percentiles, respectively, using a national hospital ranking system based on standard quality of care performance measures. Three lean hospitals delivering intermediate performance were also selected. A survey was used to gather perceptions of manager traits (providing a modern or lean management system inclination) from CEOs and their followers in the three groups, which were compared. Four traits were found to be significantly different (alpha management inclination. No differences were found between lean (intermediate-) and high-performing hospitals, or between high- and low-performing hospitals. These findings support a need for hospital managers to acquire appropriate traits to achieve lean transformation, support a benefit of measuring manager traits to assess progress towards lean transformation and lend weight to improved quality of care that can be delivered by hospitals adopting a lean system of management.

  2. Pediatric emergency care capacity in a low-resource setting: An assessment of district hospitals in Rwanda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celestin Hategeka

    Full Text Available Health system strengthening is crucial to improving infant and child health outcomes in low-resource countries. While the knowledge related to improving newborn and child survival has advanced remarkably over the past few decades, many healthcare systems in such settings remain unable to effectively deliver pediatric advance life support management. With the introduction of the Emergency Triage, Assessment and Treatment plus Admission care (ETAT+-a locally adapted pediatric advanced life support management program-in Rwandan district hospitals, we undertook this study to assess the extent to which these hospitals are prepared to provide this pediatric advanced life support management. The results of the study will shed light on the resources and support that are currently available to implement ETAT+, which aims to improve care for severely ill infants and children.A cross-sectional survey was undertaken in eight district hospitals across Rwanda focusing on the availability of physical and human resources, as well as hospital services organizations to provide emergency triage, assessment and treatment plus admission care for severely ill infants and children.Many of essential resources deemed necessary for the provision of emergency care for severely ill infants and children were readily available (e.g. drugs and laboratory services. However, only 4/8 hospitals had BVM for newborns; while nebulizer and MDI were not available in 2/8 hospitals. Only 3/8 hospitals had F-75 and ReSoMal. Moreover, there was no adequate triage system across any of the hospitals evaluated. Further, guidelines for neonatal resuscitation and management of malaria were available in 5/8 and in 7/8 hospitals, respectively; while those for child resuscitation and management of sepsis, pneumonia, dehydration and severe malnutrition were available in less than half of the hospitals evaluated.Our assessment provides evidence to inform new strategies to enhance the capacity of

  3. Pediatric emergency care capacity in a low-resource setting: An assessment of district hospitals in Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoveller, Jean; Tuyisenge, Lisine; Kenyon, Cynthia; Cechetto, David F.; Lynd, Larry D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Health system strengthening is crucial to improving infant and child health outcomes in low-resource countries. While the knowledge related to improving newborn and child survival has advanced remarkably over the past few decades, many healthcare systems in such settings remain unable to effectively deliver pediatric advance life support management. With the introduction of the Emergency Triage, Assessment and Treatment plus Admission care (ETAT+)–a locally adapted pediatric advanced life support management program–in Rwandan district hospitals, we undertook this study to assess the extent to which these hospitals are prepared to provide this pediatric advanced life support management. The results of the study will shed light on the resources and support that are currently available to implement ETAT+, which aims to improve care for severely ill infants and children. Methods A cross-sectional survey was undertaken in eight district hospitals across Rwanda focusing on the availability of physical and human resources, as well as hospital services organizations to provide emergency triage, assessment and treatment plus admission care for severely ill infants and children. Results Many of essential resources deemed necessary for the provision of emergency care for severely ill infants and children were readily available (e.g. drugs and laboratory services). However, only 4/8 hospitals had BVM for newborns; while nebulizer and MDI were not available in 2/8 hospitals. Only 3/8 hospitals had F-75 and ReSoMal. Moreover, there was no adequate triage system across any of the hospitals evaluated. Further, guidelines for neonatal resuscitation and management of malaria were available in 5/8 and in 7/8 hospitals, respectively; while those for child resuscitation and management of sepsis, pneumonia, dehydration and severe malnutrition were available in less than half of the hospitals evaluated. Conclusions Our assessment provides evidence to inform new strategies

  4. Quality improvement in emergency service delivery: Assessment of knowledge and skills amongst emergency nurses at Connaught Hospital, Sierra Leone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedda Bøe Nyhus

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: This study has identified key aspects of emergency nursing speciality training to be developed through theoretical and skill-based education provided by the nursing schools and hospital clinical facilities in Sierra Leone.

  5. The 2012 derecho: emergency medical services and hospital response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Randy D; Wigal, Mark S; Fernandez, Antonio; Tucker, March A; Zuidgeest, Ginger R; Mills, Michael R; Cairns, Bruce A; Cairns, Charles B

    2014-10-01

    During the early afternoon of June 29, 2012, a line of destructive thunderstorms producing straight line winds known as a derecho developed near Chicago (Illinois, USA). The storm moved southeast with wind speeds recorded from 100 to 160 kilometers per hour (kph, 60 to 100 miles per hour [mph]). The storm swept across much of West Virginia (USA) later that evening. Power outage was substantial as an estimated 1,300,000 West Virginians (more than half) were without power in the aftermath of the storm and approximately 600,000 citizens were still without power a week later. This was one of the worst storms to strike this area and occurred as residents were enduring a prolonged heat wave. The wind damage left much of the community without electricity and the crippling effect compromised or destroyed critical infrastructure including communications, air conditioning, refrigeration, and water and sewer pumps. This report describes utilization of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and hospital resources in West Virginia in response to the storm. Also reported is a review of the weather phenomena and the findings and discussion of the disaster and implications.

  6. Hospital emergency on-call coverage: is there a doctor in the house?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Ann S; Draper, Debra A; Felland, Laurie E

    2007-11-01

    The nation's community hospitals face increasing problems obtaining emergency on-call coverage from specialist physicians, according to findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) 2007 site visits to 12 nationally representative metropolitan communities. The diminished willingness of specialist physicians to provide on-call coverage is occurring as hospital emergency departments confront an ever-increasing demand for services. Factors influencing physician reluctance to provide on-call coverage include decreased dependence on hospital admitting privileges as more services shift to non-hospital settings; payment for emergency care, especially for uninsured patients; and medical liability concerns. Hospital strategies to secure on-call coverage include enforcing hospital medical staff bylaws that require physicians to take call, contracting with physicians to provide coverage, paying physicians stipends, and employing physicians. Nonetheless, many hospitals continue to struggle with inadequate on-call coverage, which threatens patients' timely access to high-quality emergency care and may raise health care costs.

  7. Towards emergence phenomenon in business process management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koryl Maciej

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A standard solution regarding business process management automation in enterprises is the use of workflow management systems working by the Rule-Based Reasoning approach. In such systems, the process model which is designed entirely before the implementation has to meet all needs deriving from business activity of the organization. In practice, it means that great limitations arise in process control abilities, especially in the dynamic business environment. Therefore, new kinds of workflow systems may help which typically work in more agile way e.g. following the Case-Based Reasoning approach. The paper shows another possible solution – the use of emergence theory which indicates among other conditions required to fulfill stimulation of the system (for example the business environment to run grass-roots processes that lead to arising of new more sophisticated organizing forms. The paper also points the using opportunity of such techniques as the processing of complex events to fulfill key conditions pointed by the emergence theory.

  8. Managing Emergencies in Rural North Queensland: The Feasibility of Teletraining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarsh Pandit

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Historically, the use of videoconference technologies in emergency medicine training has been limited. Whilst there are anecdotal reports of the use of teletraining for emergency medicine by rural doctors in Australia, minimal evidence exists in the literature. This paper aimed to explore the use of teletraining in the context of managing emergency presentations in rural hospitals. Methods. Using a qualitative approach, a mixture of junior and senior doctors were invited to participate in semistructured interviews. Data were transcribed and analysed line by line. Applying the grounded theory principles of open and axial coding, themes and subthemes were generated. Results. A total of 20 interviews were conducted with rural doctors, rural doctors who are medical educators, and emergency medicine specialists. Two major themes—(1 teletraining as education and (2 personal considerations—and ten subthemes were evident from the data. Most participants had some previous experience with teletraining. Access to peer teaching over videoconference was requested by rural generalist registrars. There was a preference for interactive training sessions, over didactic lectures with little mention of technical barriers to engagement. The ability of teletraining to reduce professional isolation was a major benefit for doctors practicing in remote locations. Discussion. For these rural doctors, teletraining is a feasible method of education delivery. Wider application of teletraining such as its use in peer teaching needs to be explored. The benefits of teletraining suggest that teletraining models need to be core business for health services and training providers, including specialist colleges.

  9. Patient experience shows little relationship with hospital quality management strategies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groene, O.; Arah, O.A.; Klazinga, N.S.; Wagner, C.; Bartels, P.D.; Kristensen, S.; Saillour, F.; Thompson, C.A.; Pfaff, H.; DerSarkissian, M.; Suñol, R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Patient-reported experience measures are increasingly being used to routinely monitor the quality of care. With the increasing attention on such measures, hospital managers seek ways to systematically improve patient experience across hospital departments, in particular where outcomes

  10. Research in Hospitality Management - Vol 7, No 2 (2017)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Change as a travel benefit: Exploring the impact of travel experiences on Italian ... Workers in the luxury hospitality industry and motivation – the influence of gender, ... competency and career development of hospitality management students ...

  11. the biomedical waste management in selected hospitals of chittoor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    management in Government and Private Hospitals. Materials and .... supply of the color coded bags has many deficiencies in both types of .... Journal of Academy of Hospital Administration ... Resource Centre, National Rural Health. Mission: ...

  12. Emergency thoracic ultrasound and clinical risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Interrigi MC

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Maria Concetta Interrigi,1 Francesca M Trovato,2,3 Daniela Catalano,3,4 Guglielmo M Trovato3,5 1Accident and Emergency Department, Ospedale Cannizzaro, Catania, 2Accident and Emergency Department, Ospedale Civile, Ragusa, 3Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, The School of Medicine, University of Catania, 4Postgraduate School of Clinical Ultrasound, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Policlinico, University of Catania, 5Postgraduate School of e-Learning and ICT in Health Sciences, The School of Medicine, University of Catania, Catania, Italy Purpose: Thoracic ultrasound (TUS has been proposed as an easy-option replacement for chest X-ray (CXR in emergency diagnosis of pneumonia, pleural effusion, and pneumothorax. We investigated CXR unforeseen diagnosis, subsequently investigated by TUS, considering its usefulness in clinical risk assessment and management and also assessing the sustainability of telementoring. Patients and methods: This observational report includes a period of 6 months with proactive concurrent adjunctive TUS diagnosis telementoring, which was done using freely available smartphone applications for transfer of images and movies. Results: Three hundred and seventy emergency TUS scans (excluding trauma patients were performed and telementored. In 310 cases, no significant chest pathology was detected either by CXR, TUS, or the subsequent work-up; in 24 patients, there was full concordance between TUS and CXR (ten isolated pleural effusion; eleven pleural effusion with lung consolidations; and three lung consolidation without pleural effusion; in ten patients with lung consolidations, abnormalities identified by CXR were not detected by TUS. In 26 patients, only TUS diagnosis criteria of disease were present: in 19 patients, CXR was not diagnostic, ie, substantially negative, but TUS detected these conditions correctly, and these were later confirmed by computed

  13. Emergency Management for Disasters in Malaysian Hotel Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlBattat Ahmad Rasmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to identify major emergencies that have the potential to place Malaysian hotels in emergency and disaster situations; investigate how hotels were prepared for emergencies, how they manage and overcome emergencies when occurred; and limitations and factors influencing successful emergency planning and adoption emergency management in Malaysian hotels. Face-to-face interview with managers from three, four and five star hotels from different backgrounds: local; regional; and International in Kuala Lumpur, Subang, and Putrajaya are undertaken. The result revealed that Malaysian hotels are exposed to a wide range of natural and man-made disasters. Malaysian hotels lack proactive emergency planning and a lot of constraints which impede successful emergency planning for disasters in the hotel industry in Malaysia, with emphasizing on the relevant authority’s role to demonstrate emergency management to hotels convincing them to adopt such practices, so they can be able to cope with emergencies effectively.

  14. Hospital Management of Severe Hypertriglyceridemia in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valaiyapathi, Badhma; Ashraf, Ambika P

    2017-01-01

    Severe Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG), i.e., plasma triglyceride levels exceeding 1000 mg/dL, is one of the established causes of acute pancreatitis and severe abdominal pain. There are no established pediatric guidelines regarding treatment of children and adolescents with severe HTG. To review the pathophysiology and etiology of severe HTG in the pediatric age group, and to discuss management options. Severe HTG is usually due to deficient or absent Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL) activity, which can be due to primary genetic etiology or secondary causes triggering HTG in those with underlying genetic susceptibility. Hospitalization is indicated for patients with severe HTG who are symptomatic with abdominal pain or pancreatitis, in those with uncontrolled diabetes requiring insulin, or, in those with substantial elevations of plasma TG. Fasting followed by fat free diet until plasma TG declines to severe pancreatitis, shock or multi-organ failure. Medications such as fibrates and omega-3 fatty acids are not effective if LPL activity is absent or when plasma TG is >1800 mg/dL. Medications only have an adjunct role in the management. Low fat diet, lifestyle changes, weight loss, control of secondary causes, and patient education form the mainstay of management once the patient is discharged. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. A study on the drug utilization trends in the cardiovascular emergencies in a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendhari, Shabbir Rafiq; Chaudhari, Devendra Ramesh; Burute, Shreyas Ramchandra; Bite, Bapurao Motiram

    2013-04-01

    To observe the cardiovascular emergencies which were most frequently treated and to quantify the drug utilization trends in the cardiovascular emergencies, in terms of the Defined Daily Doses [DDD] and the prescribing prevalence in the cardiovascular emergencies. This prescription based study was undertaken in the Medicine ICU of the government medical hospital. The age, sex, diagnosis (only cardiovascular) and the drugs which were prescribed, were recorded for each patient. Also, the brand names and the generic names of the prescribed drugs were noted. The collected data was analyzed to study the drug utilization trends. It was observed that the most commonly treated cardiovascular disease was IHD. The IHD was more in males than in females who were below 50 years of age and it was nearly equal in the age groups which were above 50 years. The use of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) inhibitors was higher than that of the beta blockers and the calcium channel blockers. The patients with cardiovascular emergencies also had preceding associated diseases like diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The protocol of the management which was followed by the college in the treatment of cardiovascular emergencies was competent enough, as the clinical outcomes of the patients were favourable. But there was a guideline incongruent prescribing behaviour which was statistically significant, for which there is a need to undertake large scale studies.

  16. Emergence of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia nosocomial isolates in a Saudi children's hospital. Risk factors and clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Jobran M

    2017-05-01

      To describe the clinical characteristics of pediatric patients colonized or infected by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S. maltophilia) at a Saudi children's hospital, to identify risk factors associated with infection, and to investigate the antimicrobial resistance patterns of this emerging pathogen.  Methods: In this cross-sectional observational study, 64 non-duplicating S. maltophilia strains were isolated  in Najran Maternity and Children's Hospital, Najran,  Saudi Arabia between January 2015 to February 2016. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the reference broth microdilution method.  Results: In this study, 48 (75%) isolates were identified in true infections and 16 (25%) isolates were considered colonization. The main types of S. maltophilia infection were pneumonia in 22 (45.8%) patients and bloodstream infection in 14 (29.2%) patients. The significant risk factors included exposure to invasive procedure (p=0.02), and presence of acute leukemia as an underlying disease (p=0.02). The most active antimicrobials were trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (100% sensitivity) and tigecycline (93.7% sensitivity). Conclusions: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an emerging nosocomial pathogen among pediatric patients. Accurate identification and susceptibility testing of this emerging pathogen are crucial for the management of infected patients and prevention of spread of this nosocomial pathogen.

  17. Nurse scheduling in a hospital emergency department: A case study at a Thai university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aussadavut Dumrongsiri

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Common problems of Thai nurses are low quality of life, working long hours, and a high turnover rate. The workload imbalance among nurses also worsens the turnover rate. With careful schedule planning, nurses do not have to work in consecutive shifts and can rest more. We interviewed and collected data from an emergency department at a hospital administered by a Thai university, related to objectives and constraints of monthly nurse scheduling, and actual monthly schedules. A multi-objective mathematical model was developed using the open source “OpenSolver” software in MS-Excel for nurse schedulers to freely use. We tested the model using actual data collected from the department and found that the schedules created by the model tended to provide more balanced workloads and more days off compared to the schedules created manually by a real scheduler. The model also suggested an easy policy to increase the number of nurses for future expansion.

  18. 14 CFR 135.271 - Helicopter hospital emergency medical evacuation service (HEMES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Helicopter hospital emergency medical....271 Helicopter hospital emergency medical evacuation service (HEMES). (a) No certificate holder may... certificate holder may assign a helicopter flight crewmember, and no flight crewmember may accept an...

  19. Emerging trends in disaster management and the Ethiopian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emerging trends in disaster management and the Ethiopian experience: genesis, reform and transformation. ... Journal of Business and Administrative Studies ... Key words: disaster management, drought, pre-disaster action, post-disaster action, hazards, disaster, Ethiopian disaster management system, Ethiopia.

  20. Characteristics of out-of-hospital paediatric emergencies attended by ambulance- and helicopter-based emergency physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eich, Christoph; Russo, Sebastian G.; Heuer, Jan F.; Timmermann, Arnd; Gentkow, Uta; Quintel, Michael; Roessler, Markus

    Background: In Germany, as in many other countries, for the vast majority of cases, critical out-of-hospital (OOH) paediatric emergencies are attended by non-specialised emergency physicians (EPs). As it is assumed that this may lead to deficient service we aimed to gather robust data on the

  1. Using principles from emergency management to improve emergency response plans for research animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelweid, Catherine M

    2013-10-01

    Animal research regulatory agencies have issued updated requirements for emergency response planning by regulated research institutions. A thorough emergency response plan is an essential component of an institution's animal care and use program, but developing an effective plan can be a daunting task. The author provides basic information drawn from the field of emergency management about best practices for developing emergency response plans. Planners should use the basic principles of emergency management to develop a common-sense approach to managing emergencies in their facilities.

  2. Text mining approach to predict hospital admissions using early medical records from the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucini, Filipe R; S Fogliatto, Flavio; C da Silveira, Giovani J; L Neyeloff, Jeruza; Anzanello, Michel J; de S Kuchenbecker, Ricardo; D Schaan, Beatriz

    2017-04-01

    Emergency department (ED) overcrowding is a serious issue for hospitals. Early information on short-term inward bed demand from patients receiving care at the ED may reduce the overcrowding problem, and optimize the use of hospital resources. In this study, we use text mining methods to process data from early ED patient records using the SOAP framework, and predict future hospitalizations and discharges. We try different approaches for pre-processing of text records and to predict hospitalization. Sets-of-words are obtained via binary representation, term frequency, and term frequency-inverse document frequency. Unigrams, bigrams and trigrams are tested for feature formation. Feature selection is based on χ 2 and F-score metrics. In the prediction module, eight text mining methods are tested: Decision Tree, Random Forest, Extremely Randomized Tree, AdaBoost, Logistic Regression, Multinomial Naïve Bayes, Support Vector Machine (Kernel linear) and Nu-Support Vector Machine (Kernel linear). Prediction performance is evaluated by F1-scores. Precision and Recall values are also informed for all text mining methods tested. Nu-Support Vector Machine was the text mining method with the best overall performance. Its average F1-score in predicting hospitalization was 77.70%, with a standard deviation (SD) of 0.66%. The method could be used to manage daily routines in EDs such as capacity planning and resource allocation. Text mining could provide valuable information and facilitate decision-making by inward bed management teams. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Management of a radiological emergency. Organization and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubiau, Ph.

    2007-01-01

    After a recall of potential radiological emergency situations and their associated risks, this article describes the organization in France of the crisis management and its operation at the national and international scale: 1 - Nuclear or radiological emergency situations and their associated risks: inventory of ionising radiation sources, accidental situations, hazards; 2 - crisis organization in situation of radiological or nuclear emergency: organization at the local scale, organization at the national scale; 3 - management of emergency situations: accident at a facility, action circle, radiological emergency situations outside nuclear facilities, international management of crisis, situations that do not require the implementation of an emergency plan. (J.S.)

  4. Emergency management of ureteral stones: Recent advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Osorio

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Most ureteral stones can be observed with reasonable expectation of uneventful stone passage. When an active ureteral stone treatment is warranted, the best procedure to choose is dependent on several factors, besides stone size and location, including operators′ experience, patients′ preference, available equipment and related costs. Placement of double-J stent or nephrostomy tube represents the classical procedures performed in a renal colic due to acute ureteral obstruction when the conservative drug therapy does not resolve the symptoms. These maneuvers are usually followed by ureteroscopy or extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, which currently represent the mainstay of treatment for ureteral stones. In this review paper a literature search was performed to identify reports dealing with emergency management of renal colic due to ureteral stones. The main aspects related to this debated issue are analyzed and the advantages and disadvantages of each treatment option are carefully discussed.

  5. Emergency management of ureteral stones: Recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Luis; Lima, Estêvão; Autorino, Riccardo; Marcelo, Filinto

    2008-10-01

    Most ureteral stones can be observed with reasonable expectation of uneventful stone passage. When an active ureteral stone treatment is warranted, the best procedure to choose is dependent on several factors, besides stone size and location, including operators' experience, patients' preference, available equipment and related costs. Placement of double-J stent or nephrostomy tube represents the classical procedures performed in a renal colic due to acute ureteral obstruction when the conservative drug therapy does not resolve the symptoms. These maneuvers are usually followed by ureteroscopy or extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, which currently represent the mainstay of treatment for ureteral stones. In this review paper a literature search was performed to identify reports dealing with emergency management of renal colic due to ureteral stones. The main aspects related to this debated issue are analyzed and the advantages and disadvantages of each treatment option are carefully discussed.

  6. Chernobyl experience of emergency data management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolshov, L.; Linge, I.; Arutyunyan, R.; Ilushkin, A.; Kanevsky, M.; Kiselev, V.; Melikhova, E.; Ossipiants, I.; Pavlovsky, O.

    1997-01-01

    The use of the Chernobyl experience in emergency data management is presented. Information technologies for the generalization of practical experience in the protection of the population after the Chernobyl accident are described. The two main components of this work are the development of the administrative information system (AIS) and the creation of the central data bank. The current state of the AIS, the data bank and the bank of models is described. Data accumulated and models are used to estimate the consequences of radiation accidents and to provide different types of prognosis. Experience of accumulated analysis data allows special software to be developed for large-scale simulation of radiation consequences of major radiation accidents and to organize practical exercises. Some examples of such activity are presented. (orig.)

  7. Waste management in small hospitals: trouble for environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Deepak

    2012-07-01

    Small hospitals are the grassroots for the big hospital structures, so proper waste management practices require to be initiated from there. Small hospitals contribute a lot in the health care facilities, but due to their poor waste management practices, they pose serious biomedical waste pollution. A survey was conducted with 13 focus questions collected from the 100 hospital present in Dehradun. Greater value of per day per bed waste was found among the small hospitals (178 g compared with 114 g in big hospitals), indicating unskilled waste management practices. Small hospitals do not follow the proper way for taking care of segregation of waste generated in the hospital, and most biomedical wastes were collected without segregation into infectious and noninfectious categories.

  8. Risk assessment of pre-hospital trauma airway management by anaesthesiologists using the predictive Bayesian approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakstad Anders R

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Endotracheal intubation (ETI has been considered an essential part of pre-hospital advanced life support. Pre-hospital ETI, however, is a complex intervention also for airway specialist like anaesthesiologists working as pre-hospital emergency physicians. We therefore wanted to investigate the quality of pre-hospital airway management by anaesthesiologists in severely traumatised patients and identify possible areas for improvement. Method We performed a risk assessment according to the predictive Bayesian approach, in a typical anaesthesiologist-manned Norwegian helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS. The main focus of the risk assessment was the event where a patient arrives in the emergency department without ETI despite a pre-hospital indication for it. Results In the risk assessment, we assigned a high probability (29% for the event assessed, that a patient arrives without ETI despite a pre-hospital indication. However, several uncertainty factors in the risk assessment were identified related to data quality, indications for use of ETI, patient outcome and need for special training of ETI providers. Conclusion Our risk assessment indicated a high probability for trauma patients with an indication for pre-hospital ETI not receiving it in the studied HEMS. The uncertainty factors identified in the assessment should be further investigated to better understand the problem assessed and consequences for the patients. Better quality of pre-hospital airway management data could contribute to a reduction of these uncertainties.

  9. Emergency Management of Hypertension in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic arterial hypertension in children has traditionally been thought to be secondary in origin. Increased incidence of risk factors like obesity, sedentary life-styles, and faulty dietary habits has led to increased prevalence of the primary arterial hypertension (PAH, particularly in adolescent age children. PAH has become a global epidemic worldwide imposing huge economic constraint on health care. Sudden acute increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure can lead to hypertensive crisis. While it generally pertains to secondary hypertension, occurrence of hypertensive crisis in PAH is however rare in children. Hypertensive crisis has been further subclassified depending on presence or absence of end-organ damage into hypertensive emergency or urgency. Both hypertensive emergencies and urgencies are known to cause significant morbidity and mortality. Increasing awareness among the physicians, targeted at investigation of the pathophysiology of hypertension and its complications, better screening methods, generation, and implementation of novel treatment modalities will impact overall outcomes. In this paper, we discuss the etiology, pathogenesis, and management of hypertensive crisis in children. An extensive database search using keywords was done to obtain the information.

  10. What accounting leaves out of hospital financial management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boles, K E; Glenn, J K

    1986-01-01

    As PPS and other fixed-price initiatives replace cost-based reimbursement in the hospital industry, the burden of assuming the risk for business success or failure shifts from the payor to the hospital. As a consequence, theories of risk to the business firm which have found application in other industries now deserve attention by hospital management. Incorporating such risk concepts into hospital strategies and actions requires a view of financial management that goes beyond the generally accepted accounting principles of managing and assigning costs for maximum revenue and profitability. This article examines the financial theory of risk in business firms, illustrates the various components of risk as they apply to a hospital business, and discusses how the hospital management strategies of cost-reduction, marketing, diversification, and multiorganizational affiliation can alter the risk characteristics of a hospital business.

  11. Dental Emergencies: Management Strategies That Improve Outcomes [Digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedigo, Ryan Anthony; Zaurova, Milana

    2017-06-22

    Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice . Acute dental emergencies are a common chief complaint presenting to emergency departments, and they are increasing substantially in frequency. The diagnosis and management of dental emergencies is a core competency of the emergency clinician, and proper therapeutic strategies can significantly improve cosmetic and functional outcomes for patients. This issue provides a systematic review of the literature on common acute traumatic and atraumatic dental emergencies with a focus on the historical and physical examination findings that must be understood to identify life-threatening infections, relieve pain, salvage natural teeth, and communicate with specialists in the further management of patients after emergency treatment.

  12. [A guide to successful public relations for hospitals and emergency medical services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausserer, J; Schwamberger, J; Preloznik, R; Klimek, M; Paal, P; Wenzel, V

    2014-04-01

    Tragic accidents, e.g. involving celebrity patients or severe incidents in hospital occur suddenly without any advance warning, often produce substantial interest by the media and quickly overburden management personnel involved in both hospitals and emergency medical services. While doctors, hospitals and emergency medical services desire objective media reports, the media promote emotionalized and dramatized reports to ensure maximum attention and circulation. When briefing the media, the scales may quickly tilt from professional, well-deliberated information to unfortunate, often unintended disinformation. Such phenomena may result in continuing exaggerated reports in the tabloid press, which in the presence of aggressive lawyers and a competitive hospital environment can turn into image and legal problems. In this article, several aspects are discussed in order to achieve successful public relations.Interviews should be given only after consultation with the responsible press officer and the director of the respective department or hospital director. Requests for information by the media should always be answered as otherwise one-sided, unintentional publications can result that are extremely difficult to correct later. One should be available to be contacted easily by journalists, regular press conferences should be held and critics should be taken seriously and not be brushed off. Questions by journalists should be answered in a timely manner as journalists are continuously under time pressure and do not understand unnecessary delays. Information for the media should always be provided at the same time, no publication should be given preference and an absolutely current list of E-mail contacts is required. When facing big events a press conference is preferred as many questions can be answered at once. Always be well prepared for an interview or even for just a statement. Each interview should be regarded as an opportunity to put a story forward which you

  13. [Evaluation of hospital admissions: admission guidelines implementation in a pediatric emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Manuel; Warshawsky, Sheila S; Rosen, Shirley; Barak, Nurit; Press, Joseph

    2004-10-01

    To develop and implement locally tailored pediatric admission guidelines for use in a pediatric emergency department and evaluate the appropriateness of admissions based on these guidelines. Our Study was based on the development of admission guidelines by senior physicians, using the Delphi Consensus Process, for use in the Pediatric Emergency Department (PED) at Soroka University Medical Center (Soroka). We evaluated the appropriateness of admissions to the pediatric departments of Soroka on 33 randomly selected days in 1999 and 2000 prior to guideline implementation and 30 randomly selected days in 2001, after guideline implementation. A total of 1037 files were evaluated. A rate of 12.4% inappropriate admissions to the pediatric departments was found based on locally tailored admission guidelines. There was no change in the rate of inappropriate admissions after implementation of admission guidelines in PED. Inappropriate admissions were associated with age above 3 years, hospital stay of two days or less and the season. The main reasons for evaluating an admission as inappropriate were that the admission did not comply with the guidelines and that the case could be managed in an ambulatory setting. There were distinctive differences in the characteristics of the Bedouin and Jewish populations admitted to the pediatric departments, although no difference was found in the rate of inappropriate admissions between these populations. Patient management in Soroka PED is tailored to the conditions of this medical center and to the characteristics of the population it serves. The admission guidelines developed reflect these special conditions. Lack of change in the rate of inappropriate admissions following implementation of the guidelines indicates that the guidelines reflect the physicians' approach to patient management that existed in Soroka PED prior to guideline implementation. Hospital admission guidelines have a role in the health management system; however

  14. Abdominal emergencies after liver transplantation: Presentation and surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaretti, Manuela; Dioguardi Burgio, Marco; Zarzavadjian Le Bian, Alban

    2017-11-01

    With an increasing number of liver transplantation (LT) and an enhanced overall survival, LT recipients are more likely to be admitted in emergency departments of general hospitals. Yet, in LT recipients, common but also benign symptoms may reveal a LT-related (or not) severe condition. To improve management of LT recipients by emergency physicians and general surgeons and potentially improve long-term outcomes, a clinical review was performed. Overall, CT scan and blood tests should be systematically performed. Immunosuppressive side effects should be excluded using blood tests. LT-related complications are more likely to occur during the first three months after LT, including mainly bile leak, arterial aneurysm, and pseudoaneurysm. Patients should be referred in emergency to tertiary centers. Non-LT-related complications and common abdominal conditions may also be diagnosed in LT recipients. Except in case of diffuse peritonitis or in hemodynamically unstable patients when surgical procedure should be performed, most conditions should be reassessed regarding the immunosuppressive treatment and the adhesive abdominal cavity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Quality management system in hospital radiopharmacy laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poch, Carolina; Rabiller, Graciela; Basualdo, Daniel A.; El Tamer, Elias A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: 1) To determine the necessary conditions for increasing the complexity of the Radiopharmacy Laboratory and reach an operational level defined by the IAEA as 3a (Operational Guidance on Hospital Radiopharmacy). Our aim is that, within a framework of quality, last generation radiopharmaceuticals can be used, by sophisticated techniques such as labeling with bifunctional chelating agents, like HYNIC; 2) Consequently, we decided to implement a Quality Management System (QMS) in the field of Hospital Radiopharmacy in order to guarantee the safe and effective preparation and handling of radiopharmaceuticals for the diagnosis of patients, based on recommendations of the IAEA. Procedure For the implementation of the QMS, the sector of Radiopharmacy was capacitated in the application of ISO 9001. In a first stage it had begun with the formulation of the main documents and their enumeration. According to the recommendations of the IAEA Operational Guide, this year we proceeded to the optimization of the documents produced in the first stage and formulation of new documents essential to the improvement of work in the Radiopharmacy Laboratory. Results: Corrections were made to the performed procedures, and new ones were composed such as: Reception of raw materials, Control dose calibrator (Activity meter), General procedure of dosage, Procedure for decontamination, for Using the bio safety cabinet, for Cleaning the hot laboratory, etc. The Quality Controls were added to each of the Work Instructions of radiopharmaceuticals to be undertaken and how and when to carry out, with their respective references. Records were modified and new ones incorporated, in order to ensure traceability of the results before and after injection. Finally, the require documentation has been completed with the addition of the Staff Training Plan, and other records such as Nonconformance and Corrective and Preventive Actions. Conclusion: With the application of a QMS correctly implemented

  16. Tracheal intubation in the emergency department: the Scottish district hospital perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, A G M; Graham, C A; Hall, R; Korsah, P; McGuffie, A C

    2007-06-01

    Tracheal intubation is the accepted gold standard for emergency department (ED) airway management. It may be performed by both anaesthetists and emergency physicians (EPs), with or without drugs. To characterise intubation practice in a busy district general hospital ED in Scotland over 40 months between 2003 and 2006. Crosshouse Hospital, a 450-bed district general hospital serving a mixed urban and rural population; annual ED census 58,000 patients. Prospective observational study using data collection sheets prepared by the Scottish Trauma Audit Group. Proformas were completed at the time of intubation and checked by investigators. Rapid-sequence induction (RSI) was defined as the co-administration of an induction agent and suxamethonium. 234 intubations over 40 months, with a mean of 6 per month. EPs attempted 108 intubations (46%). Six patients in cardiac arrest on arrival were intubated without drugs. 29 patients were intubated after a gas induction or non-RSI drug administration. RSI was performed on 199 patients. Patients with trauma constituted 75 (38%) of the RSI group. 29 RSIs (15%) were immediate (required on arrival at the ED) and 154 (77%) were urgent (required within 30 min of arrival at the ED). EPs attempted RSI in 88 (44%) patients and successfully intubated 85 (97%). Anaesthetists attempted RSI in 111 (56%) patients and successfully intubated 108 (97%). Anaesthetists had a higher proportion of good views at first laryngoscopy and there was a trend to a higher rate of successful intubation at the first attempt for anaesthetists. Complication rates were comparable for the two specialties. Tracheal intubations using RSI in the ED are performed by EPs almost as often as by anaesthetists in this district hospital. Overall success and complication rates are comparable for the two specialties. Laryngoscopy training and the need to achieve intubation at the first (optimum) attempt needs to be emphasised in EP airway training.

  17. Hospital operations management: improving organizational efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Reducing operational inefficiencies represents one of the most promising sources of potential savings in hospitals today. Health Forum convened a panel of hospital executives and industry experts to discuss the daunting challenges and big opportunities that lie ahead.

  18. The management of constipation in hospital inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Simon M

    2007-03-01

    This article reviews the causes of constipation in hospital and how it can be prevented with simple measures. A review of laxatives available on hospital words is provided for the reader and recommendations are made.

  19. Addressing geographic access barriers to emergency care services: a national ecologic study of hospitals in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Thiago Augusto Hernandes; da Silva, Núbia Cristina; Amaral, Pedro Vasconcelos; Barbosa, Allan Claudius Queiroz; Rocha, João Victor Muniz; Alvares, Viviane; de Almeida, Dante Grapiuna; Thumé, Elaine; Thomaz, Erika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca; de Sousa Queiroz, Rejane Christine; de Souza, Marta Rovery; Lein, Adriana; Lopes, Daniel Paulino; Staton, Catherine A; Vissoci, João Ricardo Nickenig; Facchini, Luiz Augusto

    2017-08-22

    Unequal distribution of emergency care services is a critical barrier to be overcome to assure access to emergency and surgical care. Considering this context it was objective of the present work analyze geographic access barriers to emergency care services in Brazil. A secondary aim of the study is to define possible roles to be assumed by small hospitals in the Brazilian healthcare network to overcome geographic access challenges. The present work can be classified as a cross-sectional ecological study. To carry out the present study, data of all 5843 Brazilian hospitals were categorized among high complexity centers and small hospitals. The geographical access barriers were identified through the use of two-step floating catchment area method. Once concluded the previous step an evaluation using the Getis-Ord-Gi method was performed to identify spatial clusters of municipalities with limited access to high complexity centers but well covered by well-equipped small hospitals. The analysis of accessibility index of high complexity centers highlighted large portions of the country with nearly zero hospital beds by inhabitant. In contrast, it was possible observe a group of 1595 municipalities with high accessibility to small hospitals, simultaneously with a low coverage of high complexity centers. Among the 1595 municipalities with good accessibility to small hospitals, 74% (1183) were covered by small hospitals with at least 60% of minimum emergency service requirements. The spatial clusters analysis aggregated 589 municipalities with high values related to minimum emergency service requirements. Small hospitals in these 589 cities could promote the equity in access to emergency services benefiting more than eight million people. There is a spatial disequilibrium within the country with prominent gaps in the health care network for emergency services. Taking this challenge into consideration, small hospitals could be a possible solution and foster equity in access

  20. Patterns of ophthalmic emergencies presenting to a referral hospital in Medina City, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar M. Alabbasi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Data are required on ophthalmic cases that present to the emergency eye clinics in Madinah, Saudi Arabia for proper allocation of healthcare resources. Objectives: To determine the frequency and various diagnoses of patients presenting to the A&E at Ohud Hospital, Madinah, Saudi Arabia. Methods: Data was collected prospectively for all patients who presented to the A&E ophthalmology clinic from June 2014 to September 2014. The data was analyzed and presented using frequency of incidence and percentages. Chi-square tests were used to evaluate the diagnoses based on age, sex and nationality. P ≤ 0.05 indicated statistical significance. Results: The study sample included 868 patients. The male-to-female ratio was 1.1:1.0. The main age categories included patients ≥45 years of age (256 patients and 251 patients between the ages of 15–30 years. Various types of Conjunctivitis was the most common diagnosis, reported in 282 patients (32.5%, and followed by dry eye syndrome in 156 (18% patients. Nasolacrimal duct obstruction in 156 patients (18%. Eyelid infections were detected in 102 patients (12%, corneal abrasion in 102 patients (9.3%. Various eye traumas was diagnosed in 30 patients (3.5%, increased intraocular pressure (IOP in 17 patients (2%, ruptured globe in 2 patients (0.2% and various other non-emergency pathologies in the remaining eyes. There were no significant differences in patient’s characteristics and categories of diagnoses. Conclusion: Non-emergent ophthalmic cases were the most common reason for the ophthalmology emergency room visits. It was observed that most cases could be referred to outpatient departments and potentially be managed by primary healthcare providers. This would be more cost effective and will also allow for better management of vision threatening ocular emergencies.

  1. [Management of malnutrition in geriatric hospital units in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoliner, C; Volkert, D; Wirth, R

    2013-01-01

    Elderly hospitalized patients have a high risk for developing malnutrition. The causes for an impaired nutritional status in old age are various and the impact is far-reaching. Malnutrition is a comorbidity that is well treatable and various studies show the favorable effect of nutrition therapy on nutritional status and prognosis. In the past few years, several guidelines have been developed to improve nutritional management and to ensure standardized procedures to identify patients at nutritional risk who will benefit from nutrition therapy. However, it is still not clear to what extent nutrition management has been implemented in geriatric wards in Germany. This survey is intended to give an overview on the situation of the current diagnosis and therapy of malnutrition and nutritional management in geriatric hospital units for acute and rehabilitative care. In 2011, the task force of the German Geriatric Society ("Deutsche Gesellschaft für Geriatrie", DGG) developed a questionnaire which was sent out to 272 directors of geriatric hospital and rehabilitational units. Included were questions regarding the size and staffing of the hospital and wards, food provision, diagnosis and therapy of malnutrition, as well as communication of malnutrition and nutrition therapy in the doctor's letter. A total of 38% of the questioned units answered. The following information was compiled: 31% of the geriatric facilities employed a doctor with training in clinical nutrition, 42% employ dieticians or nutritional scientists, and 90% speech and language pathologists. In 36% of the wards, a so-called geriatric menu is offered (small portions, rich in energy and/or protein, easy to chew). In 89% of the wards, snacks are available between meals. Diagnosis of malnutrition is mainly done by evaluation of weight and BMI. Validated and established screening tools are only used in 40% of the geriatric wards. Food records are carried out in 64% of the units when needed. Diagnosed

  2. Improving emergency preparedness and crisis management capabilities in transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-30

    Despite the heightened attention disaster preparedness and emergency management have received over the past decade, serious weaknesses in the United States emergency response capabilities remain at all levels of government and across a wide range ...

  3. Management of information within emergencies departments in developing countries: analysis at the National Emergency Department in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahanhanzo, Yolaine Glèlè; Kpozehouen, Alphonse; Sopoh, Ghislain; Sossa-Jérôme, Charles; Ouedraogo, Laurent; Wilmet-Dramaix, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    The management of health information is a key pillar in both emergencies reception and handling facilities, given the strategic position and the potential of these facilities within hospitals, and in the monitoring of public health and epidemiology. With the technological revolution, computerization made the information systems evolve in emergency departments, especially in developed countries, with improved performance in terms of care quality, productivity and patient satisfaction. This study analyses the situation of Benin in this field, through the case of the Academic Clinic of Emergency Department of the National University Teaching Hospital of Cotonou, the national reference hospital. The study is cross-sectional and evaluative. Collection techniques are literature review and structured interviews. The components rated are resources, indicators, data sources, data management and the use-dissemination of the information through a model adapted from Health Metrics Network framework. We used quantitative and qualitative analysis. The absence of a regulatory framework restricts the operation of the system in all components and accounts for the lack and inadequacy of the dedicated resources. Dedication of more resources for this system for crucial needs such as computerization requires sensitization and greater awareness of the administrative authorities about the fact that an effective health information management system is of prime importance in this type of facility.

  4. Surgical management of colonic volvulus during same hospital admission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, Mohammed K.; Fahim, F.; Qazi, Shabir A.; Al-Akeely, Mohammad H.A.; Al-Dossary, Nasser F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective was to study the local patient profile, diagnostic methods and treatment outcome in patients with large bowel volvulus to recommend a management plan. A retrospective study of patient's record with a final diagnosis of large bowel volvulus treated at King Saud Medical Complex, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between January 2000 and December 2007 were performed for patient demography, clinical presentations, co-morbidity, diagnostic methods, anatomical types, management and outcome. Forty-two patients with large bowel volvulus were reviewed. They presented 8.5% of all intestinal obstructions treated. Most had sigmoid volvulus (83%), were less than 60 years of age and were male. Recognized risk factors were present in 12 (29%) patients. Diagnosis was suspected on plain abdominal x-ray in 28 patients (69%), although the characteristic signs of omega and coffee bean were seen only in 16 patients. Eight patients required emergency surgery. Endoscopic decompression was successful in 34 patients, followed by a definitive surgery in 24 patients. Seven patients refused surgery; 3 of them were readmitted with recurrence and were operated. Three patients were unfit for surgery. There were 3 deaths. Large bowel volvulus is uncommon in this area. Abdominal distension with pain, constipation and characteristic gas pattern in plain x-ray can help diagnose most cases. Decompression can be achieved in most patients with sigmoid volvulus, followed by surgery during the same hospital admission. Transverse colon and cecal volvulus usually need emergency surgery. (author)

  5. Implementation of quality management systems: the role of hospital (management) boards.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botje, D.; Klazinga, N.S.; Suñol, R.; Wagner, C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Hospitals are putting tremendous efforts in implementing evidence-based management systems and organisational innovations for patient-centred care. Having a hospital quality management system is a prerequisite to successfully implement these innovations. Previous studies showed that the

  6. A Respiratory Therapist Disease Management Program for Subjects Hospitalized With COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Patty C; Kollef, Marin H; Clinkscale, Darnetta; Watts, Peggy; Kidder, Robin; Eads, Brittany; Bennett, Debbie; Lora, Carolyn; Quartaro, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Patients with COPD often require repeated emergency department visits and hospitalizations for COPD exacerbations. Such readmissions increase health-care costs and expose COPD patients to the added risks of nosocomial infections and increased mortality. To determine whether a respiratory therapist (RT) disease management program could reduce re-hospitalization and emergency department visits, a prospective, single-center, unblinded, randomized trial was performed. We enrolled 428 subjects (214 intervention, 214 control). The primary outcome (combined non-hospitalized emergency department visits and hospital readmissions for a COPD exacerbation during the 6-month follow-up) was similar for the study groups (91 vs 159, P = .08). When the 2 components of the primary end point were analyzed individually, the percentage of subjects with non-hospitalized emergency department visits for COPD exacerbations was similar between groups (15.0% vs 15.9%, P = .79). Readmission for a COPD exacerbation was significantly lower in the intervention group (20.1% vs 28.5%, P = .042). The median (interquartile range) duration of hospitalization for a COPD exacerbation was less for the intervention group (5 [3-11] d vs 8 [4-18.5] d, P = .045). In-patient hospital days (306 d vs 523 d, P = .02) and ICU days (17 d vs 53 d, P = .02) due to COPD exacerbations were significantly less for the intervention group. Mortality was similar for both groups (1.4% vs 0.9%, P > .99). Our RT disease management program was associated with less readmission, fewer ICU days, and shorter hospital stays due to COPD exacerbations. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal utilization of RT disease management teams for patients with COPD to optimize outcomes and prevent return hospital visits. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration NCT01543217.). Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  7. Department of Energy Emergency Management Functional Requirements Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    This Study, the Emergency Management Functional Requirements Study (EMFRS), identifies the physical environment, information resources, and equipment required in the DOE Headquarters Emergency Operations Center (EOC) to support the DOE staff in managing an emergency. It is the first step toward converting the present Forrestal EOC into a practical facility that will function well in each of the highly diverse types of emergencies in which the Department could be involved. 2 figs

  8. Implementation of a clinical pathway for emergency department out-patient management of deep vein thrombosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kidney, R

    2010-09-01

    There is good evidence demonstrating that outpatient management of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is feasible and safe. However, few emergency departments in Ireland have implemented care pathways for outpatient management of DVT. The aim of this study was to examine the safety and efficacy of implementing an Emergency Department (ED)- care pathway for outpatient management of patients with DVT. A retrospective observational study of this care pathway introduced at our institution was performed. The primary outcome measure was the number of hospital admissions avoided by using the care pathway. Two hundred and eighty-four patients presenting to the ED with suspected lower limb DVT, were managed using the care pathway over a 6 month period. Forty-nine patients (17%) had a DVT diagnosed. Thirty-nine patients (81%) were suitable for outpatient DVT management. Ten patients (19%) were admitted to hospital. At 3 months there were no reported cases of the following complications: missed DVT, pulmonary embolism or death.

  9. [In-hospital management of victims of chemical weapons of mass destruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barelli, Alessandro; Gargano, Flavio; Proietti, Rodolfo

    2005-01-01

    Emergency situations caused by chemical weapons of mass destruction add a new dimension of risk to those handling and treating casualties. The fundamental difference between a hazardous materials incident and conventional emergencies is the potential for risk from contamination to health care professionals, patients, equipment and facilities of the Emergency Department. Accurate and specific guidance is needed to describe the procedures to be followed by emergency medical personnel to safely care for a patient, as well as to protect equipment and people. This review is designed to familiarize readers with the concepts, terminology and key operational considerations that affect the in-hospital management of incidents by chemical weapons.

  10. Strategic management of Public Hospitals' medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Aimin; Yi, Tao; Li, Xia; Wei, Lei; Huang, Pei; Xu, Xinzhou; Yi, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The quality of medical services provided by competing public hospitals is the primary consideration of the public in determining the selection of a specific hospital for treatment. The main objective of strategic planning is to improve the quality of public hospital medical services. This paper provides an introduction to the history, significance, principles and practices of public hospital medical service strategy, as well as advancing the opinion that public hospital service strategy must not merely aim to produce but actually result in the highest possible level of quality, convenience, efficiency and patient satisfaction.

  11. Initial management of hospital evacuations caused by Hurricane Rita: a systematic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Erin L; Andress, Knox; Schultz, Carl H

    2013-06-01

    Hurricanes remain a major threat to hospitals throughout the world. The authors attempted to identify the planning areas that impact hospital management of evacuations and the challenges faced when sheltering-in-place. This observational, retrospective cohort study examined acute care institutions from one hospital system impacted by Hurricane Rita in 2005. Investigators used a standardized survey instrument and interview process, previously used in the hospital evacuation context, to examine hospitals' initial internal situational awareness and subsequent decision making that resulted in evacuation due to Hurricane Rita. Participants from each hospital included representatives from senior leadership and clinical and nonclinical staff that comprised the Incident Management Team (IMT). The main measured outcomes were responses to 95 questions contained in the survey. Seven of ten eligible hospitals participated in the study. All facilities evacuated the sickest patients first. The most significant factors prompting evacuation were the issuing of mandatory evacuation orders, storm dynamics (category, projected path, storm surge), and loss of regional communications. Hospitals that sheltered-in-place experienced staff shortages, interruptions to electrical power, and loss of water supplies. Three fully-evacuated institutions experienced understaffing of 40%-60%, and four hospitals sustained depressed staffing levels for over four weeks. Five hospitals lost electricity for a mean of 4.8 days (range .5-11 days). All facilities continued to receive patients to their Emergency Departments (EDs) while conducting their own evacuation. Hospital EDs should plan for continuous patient arrival during evacuation. Emergency Operation Plans (EOPs) that anticipate challenges associated with evacuation will help to maximize initial decision making and management during a crisis situation. Hospitals that shelter-in-place face critical shortages and must provide independent patient

  12. Simulation as a hospital management support tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemesio Rodrigues Capocci

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to demonstrate the use of the discrete event simulation technique as a hospital management support tool, as well as all complex processes existing in a health unit. There must be an analysis of the system as a whole from the perspective of service level provided to patients regarding waiting times. The role of this technique is to show the behavior of a given system. Data were collected from employees of a public Polyclinic, located in a city of the greater São Paulo, by means of interviews which questions were prepared to determine the time spent in the processes of the service system. Such data were inserted in the software Arena in flowchart format for analysis and identification of the problem. Since the person responsible for the screening process was overloaded, thus causing longer waiting times for patients submitted for screening, some changes were made in the model in order to propose an improvement, to balance the occupancy levels of the health unit’s staff and, at the same time, reach a shorter withdrawal period of patients throughout the system. Results showed a significant improvement in the performance of the Polyclinic’s system, as well as a subsequent improvement in the level of service provided to patients. Based on this study, one can note that simulation allows for evaluating scenarios and projecting changes that will impact the behavior of a certain system with no physical changes, thus preventing the lack of scientific basis when making management decisions and allowing for improvements.

  13. Social Media's New Role in Emergency Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ethan Huffman; Sara Prentice

    2008-03-01

    As technology continues to evolve, emergency management organizations must adapt to new ways of responding to the media and public. This paper examines a brief overview of social media's new role in emergency management. This includes definitions of social media, the benefits of utilizing social media, examples of social media being used and finally a discussion of how agencies, such as Department of Energy national laboratories, can begin including social media in their emergency management plans.

  14. Management of headache disorders in the Emergency Department setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pari, Elisa; Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Gipponi, Stefano; Venturelli, Elisabetta; Liberini, Paolo; Rao, Renata; Padovani, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    Headache is a common presenting complaint in the Emergency Department. The aim of this study was to delineate the demographic profile of patients presenting a chief complaint of headache and to assess the application of diagnostic algorithms for the management of these patients. We examined patients admitted to the Spedali Civili Hospital ED between January 2005 and December 2009 who complained of headache not related to trauma and all patients hospitalized for headache in Neurological Clinic, from ED, between January 2008 and December 2009. 7495 patients were examined at ED for headaches. 72 % of patients were discharged, 22 % were admitted. From 2005 to 2009, there was a definite decrease in the rate of hospitalization due to headache (15 vs 9.9 % in Department of Neurology and 26 vs 18.9 % in all Departments). Considering the decrease year by year, this reduction was significant from 2007 to 2008, when the algorithms were adopted. The most common diagnosis in the ED was "Non-specific headache" (41 %), followed by "Primary headaches and complications of primary headaches" (20.8 %), "Secondary headaches not associated with risk of serious disease" (20.4 %) and "Secondary headache associated with risk of serious disease" (5 %). Over 2-year period (2008-2009) we found an increase in the diagnosis of "Primary headaches and complications of primary headaches" and "Secondary headaches associated with risk of serious disease" compared with a decrease of "nonspecific headache" and "secondary headaches not associated with risk of serious disease". The use of the diagnostic algorithms and collaborative network between the ED and the Headache Center can improve the management of patients with headache in ED.

  15. The management of hospital waste products in hospitals of Bushehr Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    kamran Mirzaie

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospital waste contains a large quantity of dangerous pathogenic agents, which are hazardous to the health of man, animal, plant and the environment. In Iran, like many other developing countries, not enough attention is paid to this matter and available information regarding the generation and disposal of medical wastes are low. The existing information about production and disposal of wastes in our hospitals is little and incomplete. In this study, a survey on hospital waste management system in Bushehr province hospitals was conducted. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 8 hospitals in Bushehr province were investigated during a period of 6 months using a questionnaire, interviews and direct observations. The questionnaire had 93 questions (open and closed about general information on the hospitals and about various systems of managing hospital waste according to the World Health Organization suggested survey questionnaire for hospital waste management in developing countries. Results: In hospitals of bushehr province, waste generation rate was 2615 kg/day, including domestic waste (51.7%, infectious waste (20.8%, sharps (15.2% and chemical and drugs wastes (12.3%. In almost all hospitals, segregation of infectious waste from domestic waste at the place of origin and putting them in special containers had been done but this segregation wasn’t complete and sometimes some hazardous waste were disposed of in domestic waste containers. All hospitals used a color coding system for waste containers, 75 % of hospitals had incinerators. In others, waste was carried out by municipal service daily. In all hospitals, all workers were trained about hospital waste management. In none of the surveyed hospitals, there was an obvious policy and plan for purchasing equipment and necessary facilities in order to dispose hospital waste correctly and also no clear budget was allocated for hospital waste management. In none of these hospitals

  16. Los Alamos National Laboratory emergency management plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, G.F.

    1998-07-15

    The Laboratory has developed this Emergency Management Plan (EMP) to assist in emergency planning, preparedness, and response to anticipated and actual emergencies. The Plan establishes guidance for ensuring safe Laboratory operation, protection of the environment, and safeguarding Department of Energy (DOE) property. Detailed information and specific instructions required by emergency response personnel to implement the EMP are contained in the Emergency Management Plan Implementing Procedure (EMPIP) document, which consists of individual EMPIPs. The EMP and EMPIPs may be used to assist in resolving emergencies including but not limited to fires, high-energy accidents, hazardous material releases (radioactive and nonradioactive), security incidents, transportation accidents, electrical accidents, and natural disasters.

  17. Gastrointestinal Fistula: Audit of management in a remote hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The management of gastrointestinal fistula continues to present considerable challenge to the surgeon in general and gastrointestinal surgeon in particular. Objectives: To audit the management and report the outcome of the gastrointestinal fistula in a remote hospital. Setup: Eldamazeen Hospital is a regional ...

  18. [Hospital hygiene - outbreak management of nosocomial infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerwat, Klaus; Wulf, Hinnerk

    2012-04-01

    According to §6, section 3 of the German Protection against Infections Act [Infektionsschutzgesetz (IfSG)] an outbreak is defined as the occurrence in large numbers of nosocomial infections for which an epidemiological relationship is probable or can be assumed. About 2-10% of nosocomial infections in hospitals (about 5% in intensive care wards) occur within the framework of an outbreak. The heaped occurrence of nosocomial infections can be declared according to the prescribed surveillance of nosocomial infections (§23 IfSG) when, in the course of this assessment, a statistically significant increase in the rate of infections becomes apparent. On the other hand, the occurrence of an outbreak can also be recognized through the vigilance of all involved personnel and a general sensibilization towards this subject. The names of patients involved in outbreaks need not be reported to the responsible health authorities. As a consequence of the report the health authorities become involved in the investigation to determine the cause and its elimination, and to provide support and advice. The outbreak management should be oriented on the respective recommendations of the Robert Koch Institute. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Management Commitment to Safety, Teamwork, and Hospital Worker Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    McGonagle, Alyssa K.; Essenmacher, Lynnette; Hamblin, Lydia; Luborsky, Mark; Upfal, Mark; Arnetz, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Although many studies link teamwork in health care settings to patient safety, evidence linking teamwork to hospital worker safety is lacking. This study addresses this gap by providing evidence linking teamwork perceptions in hospital workers to worker injuries, and further, finds a linkage between manager commitment to safety and teamwork. Organizational records of worker injuries and survey responses regarding management commitment to safety and teamwork from 446 hospital workers within 42...

  20. Managed Care, Distance Traveled, and Hospital Market Definition

    OpenAIRE

    Frech, Ted E

    1998-01-01

    Most scholars and antitrust cases have defined hospital service markets as primarily local. But, two recent decisions have greatly expanded geographic markets, incorporating hospitals as far as 100 miles apart. Managed care plans, now important in most markets, were believed to shift patients to distant hospitals to capture lower prices. We examine distance traveled and its connection to managed care penetration. In contrast to earlier literature, we examine both direct and indirect effects. ...

  1. The Information Management Platform on Nuclear Emergency Resources of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, L.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The Chinese government has always attached great importance to nuclear emergency work, and has invested to form lots of nuclear emergency resources. Meanwhile, there also exist some management problems such as repeated investment, fragmented inventory list, inefficient management, etc. To achieve integrated management on the nuclear emergency resources of China, the Chinese government initiated the project “The Information Management Platform on Nuclear Emergency Resources of China”. The goal of the project is to support a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response while the resources managing process remains economically efficient. The project team firstly completed the nuclear emergency resources classification and encoding. Based on these, the nuclear emergency resources information management software system was developed. The pilot operation in the system was carried out both in Guangxi and Liaoning Province at the same time. Nuclear emergency resources survey was done as the relevant information was put into the database in these regions. The evaluation result on the pilot operation showed that, the information management platform on emergency resources would apparently improve efficiency of nuclear emergency preparedness and response, and it also would increase economical efficiency on inventory list, information management and invest decision. (author

  2. Emergency department nurses' experiences of occupational stress: A qualitative study from a public hospital in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuwanich, Nuttapol; Sandmark, Hélène; Akhavan, Sharareh

    2015-10-30

    Occupational stress has been a health-related issue among nurses for many decades. Emergency department nurses are frequently confronted with occupational stress in their workplace; in particular, they encounter stressful situations and unpredictable events. These encounters could make them feel more stressed than nurses in other departments. Research considering occupational stress from the perspective of Thai emergency department nurses is limited. This study aimed to explore nurses' perceptions of occupational stress in an emergency department. A qualitative approach was used to gain an understanding of nurses' experiences and perceptions regarding stress in their workplace. Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection. Twenty-one emergency department nurses working in a public hospital in Thailand were interviewed, and the data were analyzed using content analysis. The findings comprised three themes: (1) perceived stress, (2) consequences of stress, and (3) stress management. The results of this study can be used by hospital management to help them adopt effective strategies, such as support programs involving co-workers/supervisors, to decrease occupational stress among emergency department nurses. Future research that explores each of the themes found in this study could offer a more comprehensive understanding of nurses' occupational stress in the emergency department.

  3. Wait Time for Treatment in Hospital Emergency Departments: 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Care Survey: 2003 emergency department summary. Advance data from vital and health statistics; no 358. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2005. Burt CW, McCaig LF, Valverde RH. Analysis of ambulance diversions in U.S. emergency departments. Ann ...

  4. Hospital waste management in developing countries: A mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mustafa; Wang, Wenping; Chaudhry, Nawaz; Geng, Yong

    2017-06-01

    Health care activities can generate different kinds of hazardous wastes. Mismanagement of these wastes can result in environmental and occupational health risks. Developing countries are resource-constrained when it comes to safe management of hospital wastes. This study summarizes the main issues faced in hospital waste management in developing countries. A review of the existing literature suggests that regulations and legislations focusing on hospital waste management are recent accomplishments in many of these countries. Implementation of these rules varies from one hospital to another. Moreover, wide variations exist in waste generation rates within as well as across these countries. This is mainly attributable to a lack of an agreement on the definitions and the methodology among the researchers to measure such wastes. Furthermore, hospitals in these countries suffer from poor waste segregation, collection, storage, transportation and disposal practices, which can lead to occupational and environmental risks. Knowledge and awareness regarding proper waste management remain low in the absence of training for hospital staff. Moreover, hospital sanitary workers, and scavengers, operate without the provision of safety equipment or immunization. Unsegregated waste is illegally recycled, leading to further safety risks. Overall, hospital waste management in developing countries faces several challenges. Sustainable waste management practices can go a long way in reducing the harmful effects of hospital wastes.

  5. Factors Associated with Decision to Hospitalize Emergency Department Patients with Skin and Soft Tissue Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talan, David A.

    2014-12-01

    and rarely do they suffer serious complications. The most common reason for admission is administration of intravenous antibiotics, which is frequently the only reason for hospitalization. With the increasing outpatient intravenous antibiotic therapy options, these results suggest that many hospitalized patients with SSTI could be managed safely and effectively as outpatients. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(1:89–97.

  6. [Development and application of emergency medical information management system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Zhu, Baofeng; Chen, Jianrong; Wang, Jian; Gu, Chaoli; Liu, Buyun

    2011-03-01

    To meet the needs of clinical practice of rescuing critical illness and develop the information management system of the emergency medicine. Microsoft Visual FoxPro, which is one of Microsoft's visual programming tool, is used to develop computer-aided system included the information management system of the emergency medicine. The system mainly consists of the module of statistic analysis, the module of quality control of emergency rescue, the module of flow path of emergency rescue, the module of nursing care in emergency rescue, and the module of rescue training. It can realize the system management of emergency medicine and,process and analyze the emergency statistical data. This system is practical. It can optimize emergency clinical pathway, and meet the needs of clinical rescue.

  7. Quality assurance measurement for emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlowski, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    Under the Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950, as amended, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is charged with maintenance of a nationwide inventory of 4.3 million radiological instruments procured and granted by the federal government to state and local governments. These instruments are used by trained state Radiological Response Team Members, first responders, and critical workers to support the population from a national security or large-scale peacetime radiological disaster, e.g., Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, Satellite Reentry, etc. The inventory is maintained through a network of 100% federally funded state maintenance and calibration facilities, with overall technical guidance and standardization provided by the FEMA Radiological Instrumentation Test Facility. The system used to support maintenance and standardized calibration of the inventory consists of CDV-794 Radiation Calibrator (High Range), CDV-765 Model 2 Gamma Transfer Standard, CDV-790 Model 1 Calibrator (Low Range), and Dosimeter Transfer Standards. Past studies have indicated the open-quotes Readinessclose quotes and open-quotes Reliabilityclose quotes of the inventory to meet mission requirements based upon a standardized system of maintenance and calibration. FEMA has just initiated a new instrument Readiness and Reliability study with the State of Ohio Radiological Instrument Maintenance and Calibration Program to provide data to reassess the capability of the current inventory to support all types of peacetime and national security missions

  8. Quality assurance measurement for emergency management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlowski, M.S. [SL-OE-SD-IN Federal Emergency Management Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Under the Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950, as amended, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is charged with maintenance of a nationwide inventory of 4.3 million radiological instruments procured and granted by the federal government to state and local governments. These instruments are used by trained state Radiological Response Team Members, first responders, and critical workers to support the population from a national security or large-scale peacetime radiological disaster, e.g., Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, Satellite Reentry, etc. The inventory is maintained through a network of 100% federally funded state maintenance and calibration facilities, with overall technical guidance and standardization provided by the FEMA Radiological Instrumentation Test Facility. The system used to support maintenance and standardized calibration of the inventory consists of CDV-794 Radiation Calibrator (High Range), CDV-765 Model 2 Gamma Transfer Standard, CDV-790 Model 1 Calibrator (Low Range), and Dosimeter Transfer Standards. Past studies have indicated the {open_quotes}Readiness{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Reliability{close_quotes} of the inventory to meet mission requirements based upon a standardized system of maintenance and calibration. FEMA has just initiated a new instrument Readiness and Reliability study with the State of Ohio Radiological Instrument Maintenance and Calibration Program to provide data to reassess the capability of the current inventory to support all types of peacetime and national security missions.

  9. Special event planning for the emergency manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, Peter T

    2009-11-01

    In the domain of emergency management and homeland security there is a lack of a formal planning process at the local level when it comes to special event planning. The unique nature of special event planning demands an understanding of the planning process for both traditional and non-traditional planning partners. This understanding will make certain that local governments apply due diligence when planning for the safety of the public. This paper offers a practical roadmap for planning at the local level. It will address those 'special events' that are beyond routine local events but not of a sufficient scale to be granted National Special Security Event status. Due to the infrequency of 'special events' in most communities, it is imperative that deliberate planning takes place. Upon conclusion, the reader will be able to construct a planning process tailored to the needs of their community, guide both traditional and non-traditional planning partners through the planning process, determine priorities, explore alternatives, plan for contingencies, conduct a confirmation brief, facilitate operations and assemble an after-action report and improvement plan.

  10. Emergency management of acute colonic cancer obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainant, A

    2012-02-01

    Emergency management of obstructing colonic cancer depends on both tumor location and stage, general condition of the patient and surgeon's experience. Right sided or transverse colon obstructing cancers are usually treated by right hemicolectomy-extended if necessary to the transverse colon-with primary anastomosis. For left-sided obstructing cancer, in patients with low surgical risk, primary resection and anastomosis associated with on-table irrigation or manual decompression can be performed. It prevents the confection of a loop colostomy but presents the risk of anastomotic leakage. Subtotal or total colectomy allows the surgeon to encompass distended and fecal-loaded colon, and to perform one-stage resection and anastomosis. Its disadvantage is an increased daily frequency of stools. It must be performed only in cases of diastatic colon perforation or synchronous right colonic cancer. In patients with high surgical risk, Hartmann procedure must be preferred. It allows the treatment of both obstruction and cancer, and prevents anastomotic leakage but needs a second operation to reverse the colostomy. Colonic stenting is clinically successful in up to 90% in specialized groups. It is used as palliation in patients with disseminated disease or bridge to surgery in the others. If stent insertion is not possible, loop colostomy is still indicated in patients at high surgical risk. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Emerging carbon constraints for corporate risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, Timo; Hoffmann, Volker H.

    2007-01-01

    While discussions about global sustainability challenges abound, the financial risks that they incur, albeit important, have received less attention. We suggest that corporate risk assessments should include sustainability-related aspects, especially with relation to the natural environment, and encompass the flux of critical materials within a company's value chain. Such a comprehensive risk assessment takes into account input- as well as output-related factors. With this paper, we focus on the flux of carbon and define carbon constraints that emerge due to the disposition of fossil fuels in the input dimension and due to direct and indirect climate change effects in the output dimension. We review the literature regarding the financial consequences of carbon constraints on the macroeconomic, sector, and company level. We conclude that: a) financial consequences seem to be asymmetrically distributed between and within sectors, b) the individual risk exposure of companies depends on the intensity of and dependency on carbon-based materials and energy, and c) financial markets have only started to incorporate these aspects in their valuations. This paper ends with recommendations on how to incorporate our results in an integrated carbon risk management framework. (author)

  12. [Refractory heart failure. Models of hospital, ambulatory, and home management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Fabrizio; Alunni, Gianfranco

    2002-08-01

    Chronic heart failure is an enormous and growing public health problem and is reaching epidemic proportions. Its economic impact is dramatic; two thirds of expenses are for hospitalizations and relatively little is being spent for medications and outpatient visits. Most of the hospitalizations, deaths and costs are incurred by a relatively small minority of patients who may be described as having "complex", "advanced", "refractory" or "end-stage" heart failure; however, in essence they are patients who have severe symptoms and/or recurrent hospitalizations and/or emergency department visits despite maximal oral therapy. Many of the recommendations regarding the management of these patients are based more on experience than on evidence from controlled trials. This, because such patients require an individualized therapy which limits their inclusion in large trials and because support is less easily available when testing specific strategies than when testing specific agents. Improving the treatment of this group of patients by optimizing their medical regimen, aggressive monitoring and providing early intervention to avert heart failure can reduce their morbidity, mortality and costs of care. Refractory heart failure is not a single disease and it is extremely unlikely that all patients should be treated in a similar manner; before selecting the appropriate therapy, the clinician must categorize and profile the patient. The first step should be a re-evaluation of the previous treatment because many patients are treated suboptimally. It is also important to identify reversible or precipitating factors. For patients with advanced heart failure, the initial goal of therapy is to improve symptoms; the next goal is to maintain the improvement and to prevent later deterioration. The appropriate treatment plan will reflect the presence of comorbidities, the patients' history regarding previous responses to therapy, their own expectations with regard to daily life. The most

  13. Off-site nuclear emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miska, H.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Urgent protective measures for the possibly affected population are the main items to be addressed here, that means actions to be planned and taken in the pre-release and release phase of a nuclear accident. Since we will focus an off-site nuclear emergency management, the utility or licensee only plays a subordinate role, but nevertheless may be the potential cause of all actions. At the other end, there is the possible affected population, the environment, and also economic values. Emergency preparedness and response aims at minimizing adverse effects from the power plant to the values to protect. In the early phase of an accident under consideration here, prompt and sharp actions are necessary to ensure efficacy. On the other hand, the available information on the situation is most limited in this phase such that pre-determined actions based on simple criteria are indispensable. The responsibility for early response actions normally rest with a regional authority which may have some county administrations at subordinate level. The leader of the regional staff has to decide upon protective measures to be implemented at county or municipal level; thus, coherence of the response is ensured at least at a regional level. The decision will be governed at the one side by the existing or predicted radiological situation, on the other side an practical limitations like availability of teams and means. The radiological situation has to be assessed by an advisory team that compiles all information from the utility, the weather conditions, and monitoring results. While the staff leader is experienced through response to major non-nuclear events, the advisors mainly come from the environmental side, having no experience in taking swift decisions in an emergency, but are used to control and prevent. This might be the source of conflicts as observed in several exercises. The radiation protection advisors collect information from the utility, especially about time

  14. Auditing emergency management programmes: Measuring leading indicators of programme performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsic, Heather

    Emergency Management Programmes benefit from review and measurement against established criteria. By measuring current vs required programme elements for their actual currency, completeness and effectiveness, the resulting timely reports of achievements and documentation of identified gaps can effectively be used to rationally support prioritised improvement. Audits, with their detailed, triangulated and objectively weighted processes, are the ultimate approach in terms of programme content measurement. Although Emergency Management is often presented as a wholly separate operational mechanism, distinct and functionally different from the organisation's usual management structure, this characterisation is only completely accurate while managing an emergency itself. Otherwise, an organisation's Emergency Management Programme is embedded within that organisation and dependent upon it. Therefore, the organisation's culture and structure of management, accountability and measurement must be engaged for the programme to exist, much less improve. A wise and successful Emergency Management Coordinator does not let the separate and distinct nature of managing an emergency obscure their realisation of the need for an organisation to understand and manage all of the other programme components as part of its regular business practices. This includes its measurement. Not all organisations are sufficiently large or capable of supporting the use of an audit. This paper proposes that alternate, less formal, yet effective mechanisms can be explored, as long as they reflect and support organisational management norms, including a process of relatively informal measurement focused on the organisation's own perception of key Emergency Management Programme performance indicators.

  15. Management of neutropenic patients in the intensive care unit (NEWBORNS EXCLUDED) recommendations from an expert panel from the French Intensive Care Society (SRLF) with the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies (GFRUP), the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care (SFAR), the French Society of Hematology (SFH), the French Society for Hospital Hygiene (SF2H), and the French Infectious Diseases Society (SPILF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, David; Azoulay, Elie; Benoit, Dominique; Clouzeau, Benjamin; Demaret, Pierre; Ducassou, Stéphane; Frange, Pierre; Lafaurie, Matthieu; Legrand, Matthieu; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Mokart, Djamel; Naudin, Jérôme; Pene, Frédéric; Rabbat, Antoine; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Ribaud, Patricia; Richard, Jean-Christophe; Vincent, François; Zahar, Jean-Ralph; Darmon, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Neutropenia is defined by either an absolute or functional defect (acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome) of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and is associated with high risk of specific complications that may require intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Specificities in the management of critically ill neutropenic patients prompted the establishment of guidelines dedicated to intensivists. These recommendations were drawn up by a panel of experts brought together by the French Intensive Care Society in collaboration with the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies, the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, the French Society of Hematology, the French Society for Hospital Hygiene, and the French Infectious Diseases Society. Literature review and formulation of recommendations were performed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Each recommendation was then evaluated and rated by each expert using a methodology derived from the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method. Six fields are covered by the provided recommendations: (1) ICU admission and prognosis, (2) protective isolation and prophylaxis, (3) management of acute respiratory failure, (4) organ failure and organ support, (5) antibiotic management and source control, and (6) hematological management. Most of the provided recommendations are obtained from low levels of evidence, however, suggesting a need for additional studies. Seven recommendations were, however, associated with high level of evidences and are related to protective isolation, diagnostic workup of acute respiratory failure, medical management, and timing surgery in patients with typhlitis.

  16. Adult surgical emergencies in a developing country: the experience of Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Anambra State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chianakwana, Gabriel U; Ihegihu, Chima C; Okafor, Pius I S; Anyanwu, Stanley N C; Mbonu, Okechukwu O

    2005-06-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the adult surgical emergencies seen at the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH), Nnewi, with a view to proffering preventive solutions where appropriate and improving outcome. From the register of patients seen at the Casualty department and from the operations register in the main operation room of NAUTH, names and hospital numbers of adult patients treated as emergencies over a 5-year period, from 7 September 1998 to 6 September 2003, were obtained. The hospital folders were then retrieved from the Records Department. From each folder, the following details about each patient were extracted: age, sex, diagnosis at presentation, causative factors, treatment given, and outcome. A total of 902 adult patients were treated during the period. The commonest emergency operation was appendectomy for acute appendicitis in 139 patients (97 women and 42 men), followed closely by road traffic accidents (RTAs) involving 137 patients (103 men and 34 women). Gunshot injuries, which resulted mainly from armed robbery attacks, accounted for 127 cases. More men (113) sustained gunshot injuries than women (14). Of the 92 cases of acute intestinal obstruction seen, 62 occurred in women and 30 in men. Some 126 men presented with acute urinary retention, and two others presented with priapism. Governments at various levels should provide modern diagnostic tools for the accurate preoperative diagnosis of surgical emergencies in hospitals. Governments should also inculcate strict discipline into drivers using the highways, particularly in relation to abuse of alcohol and drugs. Good roads and adequate security should be provided for the people. The need for Pre-Hospital Care for the efficient evacuation of accident victims is emphasized. These measures will help to improve the management and outcome of surgical emergencies, and decrease the number of surgical emergencies resulting from RTAs and gunshot wounds.

  17. Pre-hospital care after a seizure: Evidence base and United Kingdom management guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Andrew; Taylor, Louise; Reuber, Markus; Grünewald, Richard A; Parkinson, Martin; Dickson, Jon M

    2015-01-01

    Seizures are a common presentation to pre-hospital emergency services and they generate significant healthcare costs. This article summarises the United Kingdom (UK) Ambulance Service guidelines for the management of seizures and explores the extent to which these guidelines are evidence-based. Summary of the Clinical Practice Guidelines of the UK Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee relating to the management of seizures. Review of the literature relating to pre-hospital management of seizure emergencies. Much standard practice relating to the emergency out of hospital management of patients with seizures is drawn from generic Advanced Life Support (ALS) guidelines although many patients do not need ALS during or after a seizure and the benefit of many ALS interventions in seizure patients remains to be established. The majority of studies identified pertain to medical treatment of status epilepticus. These papers show that benzodiazepines are safe and effective but it is not possible to draw definitive conclusions about the best medication or the optimal route of administration. The evidence base for current pre-hospital guidelines for seizure emergencies is incomplete. A large proportion of patients are transported to hospital after a seizure but many of these may be suitable for home management. However, there is very little research into alternative care pathways or criteria that could be used to help paramedics avoid transport to hospital. More research is needed to improve care for people after a seizure and to improve the cost-effectiveness of the healthcare systems within which they are treated. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Gynaecological emergencies seen in a referral hospital in Northwest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017 Tropical Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow. Address for ... gynaecological emergencies giving an institutional prevalence of 43.8%. The highest (44.5%) ..... Reported Sexual violence among.

  19. [Quality management in emergency departments: Lack of uniform standards for fact-based controlling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, M; Christ, M

    2015-11-01

    The general high occupancy of emergency departments during the winter months of 2014/2015 outlined deficits in health politics. Whether on the regional, province, or federal level, verifiable and accepted figures to enable in depth analysis and fact-based controlling of emergency care systems are lacking. As the first step, reasons for the current situation are outlined in order to developed concrete recommendations for individual hospitals. This work is based on a selective literature search with focus on quality management, ratio driven management, and process management within emergency departments as well as personal experience with implementation of a key ratio system in a German maximum care hospital. The insufficient integration of emergencies into the DRG systematic, the role as gatekeeper between inpatient and outpatient care sector, the decentralized organization of emergency departments in many hospitals, and the inconsistent representation within the medical societies can be mentioned as reasons for the lack of key ratio systems. In addition to the important role within treatment procedures, emergency departments also have an immense economic importance. Consequently, the management of individual hospitals should promote implementation of key ratio systems to enable controlling of emergency care processes. Thereby the perspectives finance, employees, processes as well as partners and patients should be equally considered. Within the process perspective, milestones could be used to enable detailed controlling of treatment procedures. An implementation of key ratio systems without IT support is not feasible; thus, existing digital data should be used and future data analysis should already be considered during implementation of new IT systems.

  20. Parental Decisions regarding pre-hospital therapy and costing of the Emergency Department Visit

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGovern, M

    2017-02-01

    Paediatric patients represent a large percentage of Emergency Department (ED) visits and there is often a perception that the acuity of these presentations is low. The decision-making process that results in parents attending the ED is poorly understood. We designed a cross-sectional cohort study to explore the reasons for attendance, the treatment initiated at home and to assess parental perception of the economic cost of attendance. Data was collected on 200 patients using a survey administered to parents in ED with a follow-up phone call 4-6 weeks later. Our results suggest that attendances are often prompted by parental anxiety rather than clinical deterioration and that prior ED usage is common among those presenting for assessment. Many parents had attempted community therapy with 128\\/200 patients (64%) having been referred by a healthcare professional and medical therapy at home having been employed by 114\\/200 (57%) parents before attendance. Parental knowledge of the safety of over-the-counter medications was variable the economic cost of an ED visit was poorly understood by participants. The results of our study suggest that parental desire for control over worrisome symptoms drives much of their management strategy prior to hospital attendance. Strategies in the ED may need to focus more on managing parental expectations than on managing the illness itself and management strategies employed should focus not only on medical therapy of the child’s illness but on educating and empowering the parent.

  1. Burnout among physicians and nursing staff working in the emergency hospital of Tanta University, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, S A M; El-Sallamy, R M; El-Sherbiny, A A M; Kabbash, I A

    2016-03-15

    Little is known about professional burnout among health-care workers in Egypt. The current study aimed to reveal the extent of burnout among physicians and nursing staff working in the emergency hospital of Tanta University and to identify some of its determinants. A cross-sectional study was carried out on all physicians (n = 266) and a systematic random sample of nurses (n = 284). Burnout was assessed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory and its subscales. Most of the participants (66.0%)had a moderate level of burnout and 24.9% of them had high burnout. Multivariate analysis of variables affecting burnout showed that age, sex, frequency of exposure to work-related violence, years of experience, work burden, supervision and work activities were significant predictors of burnout among the respondents. The authors recommend health education interventions during pre-employment training programmes for prevention of burnout syndrome and periodic screening for early detection and management of burnout.

  2. Diagnosis-Related Groups (DRG and Hospital Business Performance Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szynkiewicz Piotr

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to present the possibility of using Diagnosis- Related Groups (DRG in the hospital management process and to analyse the need for business performance management on the part of hospital management staff. The following research methods were used: literature analysis, case studies, and poll analysis. It is not possible to increase the effectiveness of operation of healthcare entities without increasing the importance of IT systems and using DRG more effectively in the management process. Training users in IT and the use of DRGs is important to achieving hospital effectiveness. The increased importance of analyses and planning in a hospital should be reflected in the organisational structure of service providers. Hospital controllers should have a similar role to those present in most companies in other industries.

  3. Rates of TBI-related Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths - United States, 2001 – 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In general, total combined rates for traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations and deaths have increased over the past...

  4. French hospital response to an emergency radioactive situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telion, C.; Carli, P.

    2006-01-01

    Anticipating exceptional risks and training to deal with serious and violent events which are given massive media coverage is a very real challenge for hospital staff, and one that AP-HP decided to face. The R*53 exercise involved dealing with radiation contaminated victims requiring organisation of a specific, protected care circuit within the hospital. It was designed as a pedagogical exercise as part of a collective learning process with the aim of providing data which could be used as the basis for subsequent training. (authors)

  5. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Regions

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Regional Offices manage, operate and maintain all delegated programs, functions and activities not managed, operated or maintained by headquarters organizational...

  6. Challenges of measuring quality in emergency management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynette, Jennifer Elyse

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the challenges and importance of measuring quality within the field of emergency response. Using quality as a standard of measurement to evaluate response efforts of trained personnel in emergency situations is necessary to increase effectiveness in the response phase...... of an emergency event. The intended outcome of utilizing quality as a tool of measurement is to save additional lives, property, and resources. The adoption of a system to measure quality can be utilized by multiple professions under the broader field of emergency response services. Quality is discussed in terms...

  7. Services quality in emergency department of Nemazee Hospital: Using SERVQUAL model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Gholami

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient satisfaction is crucial to the long-run success in health care center. With regard to the highest patients’ referral to the emergency department and the existing challenges due to the patient’s need to urgent care, we aimed to evaluate health care services quality in this unit to find out whether the patients have different expectations from health care providers and if they perceive some dimensions of care more important than others. Method: The SERVQUAL scale method was used in this cross-sectional study on 100 patients in June 2015. Patient satisfaction questionnaire based on SERVQUAL model was evaluated with high content validity and the reliability was 0.97 and 0.81. The data collected were analyzed using SPSS, version 20.0 (IBM, USA. Statistical analyses included descriptive statistics, paired and independence sample t-test and ANOVA at the significance level 0.05. Results:The results showed that the quality gap in all dimensions was significant (P<0.001. The largest quality gap was related to responsiveness (-1.08 and the lowest belonged to assurance (-0.8. Demographic characteristics were analyzed and the number of referrals was significant in tangibility and assurance dimensions (P = 0.04; also, in all cases the patients’ expectations (total Mean=4.35 were higher than their perception (total Mean = 3.295. Conclusion: In order to improve emergency services, it is recommended that the hospital management should provide appropriate facilities, reduce waiting time, increase in attention to ordering system based on the patients’ condition, and improve the behavior of health care personnel to patient is placed on the agenda of hospital management.

  8. Quality Management Systems Implementation Compared With Organizational Maturity in Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Tayebeh; Jafari, Mehdi; Maleki, Mohammad Reza; Naghdi, Seyran; Ghiasvand, Hesam

    2015-07-27

    A quality management system can provide a framework for continuous improvement in order to increase the probability of customers and other stakeholders' satisfaction. The test maturity model helps organizations to assess the degree of maturity in implementing effective and sustained quality management systems; plan based on the current realities of the organization and prioritize their improvement programs. We aim to investigate and compare the level of organizational maturity in hospitals with the status of quality management systems implementation. This analytical cross sectional study was conducted among hospital administrators and quality experts working in hospitals with over 200 beds located in Tehran. In the first step, 32 hospitals were selected and then 96 employees working in the selected hospitals were studied. The data were gathered using the implementation checklist of quality management systems and the organization maturity questionnaire derived from ISO 10014. The content validity was calculated using Lawshe method and the reliability was estimated using test - retest method and calculation of Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data using SPSS 18 software. According to the table, the mean score of organizational maturity among hospitals in the first stage of quality management systems implementation was equal to those in the third stage and hypothesis was rejected (p-value = 0.093). In general, there is no significant difference in the organizational maturity between the first and third level hospitals (in terms of implementation of quality management systems). Overall, the findings of the study show that there is no significant difference in the organizational maturity between the hospitals in different levels of the quality management systems implementation and in fact, the maturity of the organizations cannot be attributed to the implementation of such systems. As a result, hospitals

  9. Serious Games as Experiments for Emergency Management Research : A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ruijven, T.W.J.

    2011-01-01

    Serious games and virtual environments are increasingly used for emergency management training and research. The development of these technologies seems to contribute to a solution to some problems in the existing literature on emergency management which is mainly based on case study research.

  10. Syndromic surveillance: hospital emergency department participation during the Kentucky Derby Festival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrico, Ruth; Goss, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Electronic syndromic surveillance may have value in detecting emerging pathogens or a biological weapons release. Hospitals that have an agile process to evaluate chief complaints of patients seeking emergency care may be able to more quickly identify subtle changes in the community's health. An easily adaptable prototype system was developed to monitor emergency department patient visits during the Kentucky Derby Festival in Louisville, Kentucky, from April 16-May 14, 2002. Use of the system was continued during the same festival periods in 2003 and 2004. Twelve area hospitals in Louisville, Kentucky, participated in a prospective analysis of the chief symptoms of patients who sought care in the emergency department during the Kentucky Derby Festival during 2002. Six hospitals were classified as computer record groups (CRG) and used their existing computerized record capabilities. The other 6 hospitals used a personal digital assistant (PDA) with customized software (PDA group). Data were evaluated by the health department epidemiologist using SaTScan, a modified version of a cancer cluster detection program, to look for clusters of cases above baseline over time and by Zip code. All 12 hospitals were able to collect and provide data elements during the study period. The 6 CRG hospitals were able to perform daily data transmission; however, 3 CRG hospitals were unable to interpret their data because it was transmitted in pure text format. In contrast, data from all 6 PDA group hospitals were interpretable. Real-time data analysis was compared with post-event data, and it was found that the real-time evaluation correctly identified no unusual disease activity during the study period. The 12 hospitals participating in this study demonstrated that community-wide surveillance using computerized data was possible and that the 6 study hospitals using a PDA could quickly interpret emergency department patients' chief complaints. The emergency department chief complaints

  11. AFEM Consensus Conference, 2013. AFEM Out-of-Hospital Emergency Care Workgroup Consensus Paper: Advancing Out-of-Hospital Emergency Care in Africa-Advocacy and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.K. Mould-Millman

    2014-06-01

    Future directions of the AFEM Out-of-Hospital Emergency Care Workgroup include creating an online Toolkit. This will serve as a repository of template documents to guide implementation and development of clinical care, education, transportation, public access, policy and governance.

  12. Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) Data Management Guide for FEMIS Version 1.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bower, John C.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Burnett, Robert A.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Carter, Richard J.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Holter, Nancy A.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Hoza, Mark (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Johnson, Daniel M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Johnson, Ranata L.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Johnson, Sharon M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Loveall, Robert M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Schulze, Stacy A.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Stephan, Alex J.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Wood, Blanche M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2001-12-01

    The Federal Emergency Management System (FEMIS) is an emergency management planning and response tool. The FEMIS Data Management Guide provides the information needed to manage the data used to support the administrative, user-environment, database management, and operational capabilities of FEMIS.

  13. Provision of an emergency theatre in tertiary hospitals is cost ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Cancellations of planned elective surgical operations increase financial cost to the patient and the hospital. Objectives. To determine the rate and reasons for cancellations, estimate the cost incurred by such cancellations and recommend possible solutions. Methods. We did a prospective descriptive study of ...

  14. Facial palsy in children: emergency department management and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Hsien; Chang, Yu-Che; Shih, Hong-Mo; Chen, Chun-Yu; Chen, Jih-Chang

    2010-02-01

    To describe the characteristics of children who present to an emergency department (ED) with facial palsy and determine the association of outcome with etiology, degree of initial paralysis, and ED management. This was a retrospective cohort study of children who presented to an ED with facial nerve paralysis (FNP). There were 85 patients with a mean age of 8.0 (SD, 6.1) years; 60% (n = 51) of the patients were male, and 65.9% (n = 56) were admitted to the hospital. Bell palsy (50.6%) was the most common etiology followed by infectious (22.4%), traumatic (16.5%), congenital (7.1%), and neoplastic etiologies (3.5%). Patients with Bell palsy had shorter recovery times (P = 0.049), and traumatic cases required a longer time for recovery (P = 0.016). Acute otitis media (AOM)-related pediatric FNP had shorter recovery times than non-AOM-related cases (P = 0.005) in infectious group. Patients given steroid therapy did not have a shorter recovery time (P = 0.237) or a better recovery (P = 0.269). There was no difference in recovery rate of pediatric patients with Bell palsy between hospitalization or not (P = 0.952). Bell palsy, infection, and trauma were most common etiologies of pediatric FNP. Recovery times were shorter in pediatric patients with Bell palsy and AOM-related FNP, whereas recovery took longer in traumatic cases. Steroid therapy did not seem beneficial for pediatric FNP. Hospitalization is not indicated for pediatric patients with Bell palsy.

  15. Segmenting hospitals for improved management strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, N K

    1989-09-01

    The author presents a conceptual framework for the a priori and clustering-based approaches to segmentation and evaluates them in the context of segmenting institutional health care markets. An empirical study is reported in which the hospital market is segmented on three state-of-being variables. The segmentation approach also takes into account important organizational decision-making variables. The sophisticated Thurstone Case V procedure is employed. Several marketing implications for hospitals, other health care organizations, hospital suppliers, and donor publics are identified.

  16. Mapping Best and Emerging Practices of Project Management

    OpenAIRE

    Thuesen, Christian; Aaris Boas, Charlotte; Thorslund, Michael V.; Marmier, Francois; Grex, Sara; Lybecker, Søren

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results of a study of the connection between Best and Emerging practices of project management. Drawing upon network mapping as an analytical strategy, cases of Best and Emerging practices is analysed and juxtaposed. The case of Best practice is represented by the newly published ISO 21500 standard and the case for the Emerging practices by a deconstruction of the practices of a group of experienced project managers. The network analysis reveals a substantial difference be...

  17. Care management in nursing within emergency care units

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Juliane Tono de Oliveira; Patrícia Madalena Vieira Hermida; Fernanda Hannah da Silva Copelli; José Luís Guedes dos Santos; Alacoque Lorenzini Erdmann; Selma Regina de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Objective.Understand the conditions involved in the management of nursing care in emergency care units. Methodology. Qualitative research using the methodological framework of the Grounded Theory. Data collection occurred from September 2011 to June 2012 through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants of the two emergency care units in the city of Florianopolis, Brazil. Results. Hindering factors to care management are: lack of experience and knowledge of professionals in emergency se...

  18. Nurse management skills required at an emergency care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Montezeli, Juliana Helena; Peres, Aida Maris; Bernardino, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify the management skills needed for this professional at an emergency care unit. Method: An exploratory descriptive qualitative study conducted with eight nurses in which semi-structured interviews with nonparticipating systematic observation were conducted; the data was processed by content analysis. Results: The categories which emerged from the content analysis served as a list of management skills necessary to their work at the emergency care unit: leadership, decision...

  19. Municipal resilience: A paradigm shift in emergency and continuity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solecki, Greg; Luchia, Mike

    More than a decade of emergency and continuity management vision was instrumental in providing the unprecedented level of response and recovery from the great flood of 2013. Earlier assessments, planning and validation promulgated development of corporate continuity, emergency and contingency plans along with tactical, strategic and recovery operations centres that all led to a reliable emergency management model that will continue to provide the backbone for municipal resilience.

  20. The 'unnecessary' use of emergency departments by older people: findings from hospital data, hospital staff and older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Debbie; Law, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Increasing demands are being placed on emergency departments in Australia and there is a view that older Australians are more likely than other age groups to attend for non-urgent conditions. The objective of this paper is to compare and contrast administrative data with the views of hospital staff and older people with regard to their presentation at two emergency departments in metropolitan Adelaide and how this aligns with the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare definition of 'potentially avoidable general practitioner-type presentations'. The study used three sources of data from two emergency departments: hospital data for the financial year 2010-11 for patients aged 65 years and over and identified as triage category four or five; three focus groups with medical, nursing and allied staff from these two hospitals; and interviews with 58 older people who presented at the two emergency departments over a two-week period. The hospital administrative data provided a very limited insight into why older people attended the emergency department, other than the medical diagnosis. Professional staff identified individual determinants, societal determinants and the health services system as explanations. Older people attended the emergency department for a range of reasons that may not necessarily reflect the opinions of health professionals. For many older people the emergency department was an appropriate place to attend considering their condition, though some presentations could be circumvented with appropriate and increased services in the community. However, as many older people suffer comorbidities, careful consideration needs to be given as to the best possible practices to achieve this.

  1. A prospective audit of emergency urology activity in a university teaching hospital

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2014-06-01

    Urology cover is commonly available out-of-hours in most teaching hospitals. However, increased pressure to reduce hospital expenditure has forced many institutions to consider removing middle grade cover outside of normal working hours. The aim of this study was to audit the emergency urology activity in our institution over a 12-month period.

  2. [Obstetric emergency and non-emergency transfers to the university teaching hospital Yalgado ouedraogo of Ouagadougou: A 3-year study of their epidemiologic, clinical, and prognostic aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouattara, A; Ouedraogo, C M; Ouedraogo, A; Lankoande, J

    2015-01-01

    to describe the epidemiologic, clinical, and prognostic aspects of the emergency and non-emergency transfers of obstetric patients to Yalgado Ouédraogo University Hospital Center (UHC-YO) in Ouagadougou. this retrospective descriptive study looked at the outcomes of women transferred, on an emergency basis or not, to the obstetrics department of the UHC-YO. The study population comprised all women transferred to the department during 2010, 2011, and 2012. during the study period, there were 9,806 admissions for obstetric disorders: 43% were transfers. The patients' mean age was 26.11 years [(13-49]. Women transferred from health care facilities within the city of Ouagadougou accounted for 96% of the sample. The leading reason for these transfers - emergency or not - was preeclampsia and eclampsia (24.57%). We recorded a total of 161 maternal deaths, for a mortality rate of 3.9%. Approximately 26.55% of the newborns received immediate intensive care and were then transferred to the neonatology department. maternal and neonatal prognosis is always poor in cases transferred to UHC-YO, despite increased funding for emergency obstetric and neonatal care. Increased population awareness of the importance of prenatal consultation and adequate funding for health care facilities to provide equipment for emergency transfers and staff training in the management of obstetric and neonatal emergencies would probably improve these mortality and morbidity rates.

  3. The effects of hospital reforms on the management of public hospitals in Tanzania: Challenges and lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shwekerela, Byera

    2014-01-01

    Although hospital reforms are being advocated internationally as part of a solution to hospital management problems in developing countries, studies have shown that they do give rise to some challenges. A study was undertaken that used in-depth interviews, focus group discussion and document review to examine hospital reforms. The article examines the effects of reforms on the management of Level II public hospitals in Tanzania and documents the related challenges and lessons Learnt. It is shown that hospital reforms have mixed effects in resource-strained hospitals, and that hospital reform actions may have replaced the bureaucratic inefficiencies associated with hospitals being managed from the central level (MoHSW) with the equally bureaucratic inefficiencies that characterize the management of these hospitals from a supposedly local level, the office of the Regional Administrative Secretary (RAS). Managing hospitals from this level seems to cause many hospital management problems to be left unattended.

  4. Best practices in managing child and adolescent behavioral health emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuer, Vera; Rocker, Joshua; Saggu, Babar M; Andrus, Jason M

    2018-01-01

    Behavioral health emergencies most commonly present as depression, suicidal behavior, aggression, and severe disorganization. Emergency clinicians should avoid relying solely on past medical history or previous psychiatric diagnoses that might prematurely rule out medical pathologies. Treatments for behavioral health emergencies consist of de-escalation interventions aimed at preventing agitation, aggression, and harm. This issue reviews medical pathologies and underlying causes that can result in psychiatric presentations and summarizes evidence-based practices to evaluate, manage, and refer patients with behavioral health emergencies.

  5. Short-term incentive schemes for hospital managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Malambe

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Short-term incentives, considered to be an extrinsic motivation, are commonly used to motivate performance. This study explored hospital managers’ perceptions of short term incentives in maximising performance and retention. Research purpose: The study explored the experiences, views and perceptions of private hospital managers in South Africa regarding the use of short-term incentives to maximise performance and retention, as well as the applicability of the findings to public hospitals. Motivation for the study: Whilst there is an established link between performance reward schemes and organisational performance, there is little understanding of the effects of short term incentives on the performance and retention of hospital managers within the South African context. Research design, approach, and method: The study used a qualitative research design: interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 19 hospital managers, and a thematic content analysis was performed. Main findings: Short-term incentives may not be the primary motivator for hospital managers, but they do play a critical role in sustaining motivation. Participants indicated that these schemes could also be applicable to public hospitals. Practical/managerial implications: Hospital managers are inclined to be more motivated by intrinsic than extrinsic factors. However, hospital managers (as middle managers also seem to be motivated by short-term incentives. A combination of intrinsic and extrinsic motivators should thus be used to maximise performance and retention. Contribution/value-add: Whilst the study sought to explore hospital managers’ perceptions of short-term incentives, it also found that an adequate balance between internal and external motivators is key to implementing an effective short-term incentive scheme.

  6. Motorcycle crash-related emergency department visits and hospitalizations for traumatic brain injury in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Katherine J; Marshall, Stephen W; Proescholdbell, Scott K; Naumann, Rebecca B; Waller, Anna E

    2015-01-01

    To examine statewide emergency department (ED) visit data for motorcycle crash morbidity and healthcare utilization due to traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) and non-TBIs. North Carolina ED data (2010-2012) and hospital discharge data (2009-2011). Statewide ED visits and hospitalizations due to injuries from traffic-related motorcycle crashes stratified by TBI status. Descriptive study. Descriptive statistics include age, sex, mode of transport, disposition, expected source of payment, hospital length of stay, and hospital charges. Over the study period, there were 18 780 ED visits and 3737 hospitalizations due to motorcycle crashes. Twelve percent of ED visits for motorcycle crashes and 26% of hospitalizations for motorcycle crashes had a diagnosis of TBI. Motorcycle crash-related hospitalizations with a TBI diagnosis had median hospital charges that were nearly $9000 greater than hospitalizations without a TBI diagnosis. Emergency department visits and hospitalizations due to motorcycle crashes with a TBI diagnosis consumed more healthcare resources than motorcycle crash-related ED visits and hospitalizations without a TBI diagnosis. Increased awareness of motorcyclists by other road users and increased use of motorcycle helmets are 2 strategies to mitigate the incidence and severity of motorcycle crash injuries, including TBIs.

  7. Establishing functional requirements for emergency management information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, J.H.; Rogers, G.O.; Sorensen, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    The advancement of computer technologies has led to the development of a number of emergency management information systems (e.g., EIS, CAMEO, IEMIS). The design of these systems has tended to be technologically driven rather than oriented to meeting information management needs during an emergency. Of course, emergency management needs vary depending on the characteristics of the emergency. For example, in hurricanes, onset is typically slow enough to allow emergency managers to simulate evacuations dynamically while in chemical disasters onset may be sufficiently rapid to preclude such simulation(s). This paper describes a system design process in which the analysis of widely recognized emergency management functions was used to identify information requirements and the requisite software and hardware capabilities to deal with rapid onset, low probability, high consequence events. These requirements were then implemented as a prototype emergency management system using existing hardware and software to assure feasibility. Data, hardware, and software requirements were further developed, refined, and made more concrete through an iterative prototyping effort. This approach focuses attention directly on meeting emergency management information needs while avoiding unneeded technological innovations. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. New compliance management system of the University Hospital Frankfurt, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Irmscher, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    The meaning of Corporate Governance is all values and principles guiding or regulating good and responsible business management. Clearly defined roles and responsibilities for managing compliance, risks and checks is the prerequisite for the latter. For that reason, a compliance management system was set up at the University Hospital Frankfurt in 2015.

  9. Using online analytical processing to manage emergency department operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Bradley D; Asplin, Brent R

    2004-11-01

    The emergency department (ED) is a unique setting in which to explore and evaluate the utility of information technology to improve health care operations. A potentially useful software tool in managing this complex environment is online analytical processing (OLAP). An OLAP system has the ability to provide managers, providers, and researchers with the necessary information to make decisions quickly and effectively by allowing them to examine patterns and trends in operations and patient flow. OLAP software quickly summarizes and processes data acquired from a variety of data sources, including computerized ED tracking systems. It allows the user to form a comprehensive picture of the ED from both system-wide and patient-specific perspectives and to interactively view the data using an approach that meets his or her needs. This article describes OLAP software tools and provides examples of potential OLAP applications for care improvement projects, primarily from the perspective of the ED. While OLAP is clearly a helpful tool in the ED, it is far more useful when integrated into the larger continuum of health information systems across a hospital or health care delivery system.

  10. Emergence of ampicillin-resistant Enterococcus faecium in Danish hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lester, Camilla H; Sandvang, Dorthe; Olsen, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ampicillin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates are reported in increasing numbers in many European hospitals. The clonal complex 17 (CC17) characterized by ampicillin resistance has been associated with nosocomial E. faecium outbreaks and infections in five continents. The aim...... in the number of infections caused by enterococci was observed from 2002 through 2006. The increase was mainly caused by E. faecium isolates, which tripled, whereas the number of E. faecalis isolates increased by only 23% during the same period. There was also a significant increase in the number of ampicillin......-resistant E. faecium isolates. MLST showed that 98% of the tested ampicillin-resistant E. faecium isolates belonged to CC17. PFGE showed eight different clusters and we found indications of clonal spread within the hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: Ampicillin-resistant E. faecium isolates have increased in frequency...

  11. Effectiveness of asthma education with and without a self-management plan in hospitalized children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Palma, Tatiana; Zamorano, Alejandra; Arancibia, Francisca; Bustos, María-Francisca; Silva, Maria José; Cardenas, Consuelo; De La Barra, Pedro; Puente, Victoria; Cerda, Jaime; Castro-Rodriguez, José A; Prado, Francisco

    2009-11-01

    Background. Formal education in primary care can reduce asthma exacerbations. However, there are few studies in hospitalized children, with none originating in Latin America. Methods. A prospective randomized study was designed to evaluate whether a full education with self-management plan (ESM) was more effective than an education without self-management plan (E) in reducing asthma hospitalization. Children (5 to 15 years of age) who were hospitalized for an asthma attack were divided in two groups. Children in the E group received general instructions based on a booklet. Those in the ESM group received the same booklet plus a self-management guide and a puzzle game that reinforces the lessons learned in the booklet. Patients were interviewed every 3 months, by telephone, for one year. Interviewers recording the number of hospitalizations, exacerbations, and emergency visits for asthma and oral steroid burst uses. Results. From 88 children who met the inclusion criteria, 77 (86%) completed one year of follow-up (41 from E and 36 from ESM group). Overall, after one year, the hospitalization decreased by 66% and the inhaled corticosteroids therapy increased from 36% to 79%. At the end of the study, there was no difference in exacerbations, emergency visits, oral steroid burst uses, or hospitalizations between the two groups. Conclusions. Asthma education with or without a self-management plan during asthma hospitalization were effective in reducing exacerbations, emergency visits, oral steroid burst uses, and future rehospitalizations. This evidence supports the importance of providing a complete asthma education plan in any patient who is admitted for asthma exacerbation.

  12. An early view of the impact of deregulation and managed care on hospital profitability and net worth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, W J

    2001-01-01

    This study shows the impact of the removal of hospital rate regulation followed by the growth of managed care on hospitals' profitability and net worth. New Jersey emerged from a regulated prospective payment system in 1992. The transition to a freely competitive market structure had a negative impact on hospital profitability, net worth, patient length of stay, and other measures of capacity utilization. Similarly, the doubling of the HMO penetration rate in the state between 1995 and 1997 is shown to have negatively influenced hospital financial viability. Hospitals have responded in part by increasing usage of outpatient services. The use of discounted fee-for-service instead of per diem reimbursement for outpatient services provides an incentive for hospitals to favor outpatient over inpatient services. The effect of these changes is detailed, along with data showing that the larger discounts given by hospitals to managed care organizations, Medicare, and Medicaid played an important role in explaining the diminished profitability of hospitals.

  13. 77 FR 5213 - Medicare Program; Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA): Applicability to Hospital...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... [CMS-1350-NC] RIN 0938-AQ51 Medicare Program; Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA... the applicability of the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA) to hospital inpatients... available to persons without Federal government identification, commenters are encouraged to leave their...

  14. Optimizing antibiotic usage in hospitals: a qualitative study of the perspectives of hospital managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broom, A; Gibson, A F; Broom, J; Kirby, E; Yarwood, T; Post, J J

    2016-11-01

    Antibiotic optimization in hospitals is an increasingly critical priority in the context of proliferating resistance. Despite the emphasis on doctors, optimizing antibiotic use within hospitals requires an understanding of how different stakeholders, including non-prescribers, influence practice and practice change. This study was designed to understand Australian hospital managers' perspectives on antimicrobial resistance, managing antibiotic governance, and negotiating clinical vis-à-vis managerial priorities. Twenty-three managers in three hospitals participated in qualitative semi-structured interviews in Australia in 2014 and 2015. Data were systematically coded and thematically analysed. The findings demonstrate, from a managerial perspective: (1) competing demands that can hinder the prioritization of antibiotic governance; (2) ineffectiveness of audit and monitoring methods that limit rationalization for change; (3) limited clinical education and feedback to doctors; and (4) management-directed change processes are constrained by the perceived absence of a 'culture of accountability' for antimicrobial use amongst doctors. Hospital managers report considerable structural and interprofessional challenges to actualizing antibiotic optimization and governance. These challenges place optimization as a lower priority vis-à-vis other issues that management are confronted with in hospital settings, and emphasize the importance of antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programmes that engage management in understanding and addressing the barriers to change. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Emergency room management of ureteral calculi: current practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Elizabeth; Kieley, Sam; Johnson, Elizabeth B; Monga, Manoj

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate current practice patterns in U.S. emergency departments (EDs) for the diagnosis, treatment, and counseling of patients with ureteral calculi. Hospital-based ED physicians were invited by e-mail to participate in a Survey-Monkey survey. E-mails were delivered in March 2008 by Direct Medical Data using a listserv provided by the American Medical Association. Of the e-mails sent, 173 e-mails were opened, and 135 physicians responded. Physicians were compensated with a $10 Amazon.com gift card. Ninety percent of ED physicians use noncontrast CT as their initial imaging modality, and 63% use alpha-blockers for medical expulsive therapy. Only 13% of evaluated EDs have guidelines for the management of renal colic, and only 58% of these guidelines that recommend the use of an alpha-blocker. Alpha-blocker use was more common with physicians who have been practicing fewer than 5 years (81%) compared with those with more than 10 years of experience (56%). The majority of physicians used ketorolac and morphine to achieve effective analgesia. Although the average responses concerning the chance of spontaneous stone passage for stones 4 mm (44%) were close to evidence-based values, great variation in the answers was noted (standard deviations: 12% and 22%, respectively). Indeed, 38% of respondents stated that stones 95% chance of passage. Twenty-eight percent of ED physicians would arrange follow-up with a primary care physician, while the remainder would arrange follow-up with a urologist. This study establishes a need for educational opportunities for ED physicians in the management of renal colic. The development of collaborative practice guidelines between urology and emergency medicine associations may be warranted.

  16. The relationship between intention to leave the hospital and coping methods of emergency nurses after workplace violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, In-Young; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2018-04-01

    To identify the relationship between emergency nurses' intention to leave the hospital and their coping methods following workplace violence. Emergency departments report a high prevalence of workplace violence, with nurses being at particular risk of violence from patients and patients' relatives. Violence negatively influences nurses' personal and professional lives and increases their turnover. This is a cross-sectional, descriptive survey study. Participants were nurses (n = 214) with over one year of experience of working in an emergency department. We measured workplace violence, coping after workplace violence experiences and job satisfaction using scales validated through a preliminary survey. Questionnaires were distributed to all nurses who signed informed consent forms. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify the relationships between nurses' intention to leave the hospital and their coping methods after workplace violence. Verbal abuse was the most frequent violence experience and more often originated from patients' relatives than from patients. Of the nurses who experienced violence, 61.0% considered leaving the hospital. As for coping, nurses who employed problem-focused coping most frequently sought to identify the problems that cause violence, while nurses who employed emotion-focused coping primarily attempted to endure the situation. The multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that female sex, emotion-focused coping and job satisfaction were significantly related to emergency nurses' intention to leave. Emotion-focused coping seems to have a stronger effect on intention to leave after experiencing violence than does job satisfaction. Nurse managers should begin providing emergency nurses with useful information to guide their management of violence experiences. Nurse managers should also encourage nurses to report violent experiences to the administrative department rather than resorting to emotion-focused coping

  17. Real-time information support for managing plant emergency responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, D.G.; Lord, R.J.; Wilkinson, C.D.

    1983-01-01

    The Three Mile Island Unit 2 accident highlighted the need to develop a systematic approach to managing plant emergency responses, to identify a better decision-making process, and to implement real-time information support for decision-making. The overall process management function is described and general information requirements for management of plant emergencies are identified. Basic information systems are being incorporated and future extensions and problem areas are discussed. (U.K.)

  18. Data Mining Application in Customer Relationship Management for Hospital Inpatients

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eun Whan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to discover patients loyal to a hospital and model their medical service usage patterns. Consequently, this study proposes a data mining application in customer relationship management (CRM) for hospital inpatients. Methods A recency, frequency, monetary (RFM) model has been applied toward 14,072 patients discharged from a university hospital. Cluster analysis was conducted to segment customers, and it modeled the patterns of the loyal customers' medical services us...

  19. The impact of managed care penetration and hospital quality on efficiency in hospital staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Lee R; Magnussen, Jon

    2002-01-01

    The state of California has recently mandated minimum nurse-staffing ratios, raising concerns about possible affects on hospital efficiency. In this study, we examine how market factors and quality were related to staffing levels in California hospitals in 1995 (prior to implementation of the new law). We are particularly interested in the affect of managed care penetration on this aspect of hospital efficiency because the call to legislative action was predicated on fears that hospitals were reducing staffing below optimal levels in response to managed care pressures. We derive a unique measure of excess staffing in hospitals based on a data envelopment analysis (DEA) production function model, which explicitly includes ancillary care among the inputs and outputs. This careful specification of production is important because ancillary care use has risen relative to daily hospital services, with the spread of managed care and advances in medical technology. We find that market share (adjusted for size) and market concentration are the major determinants of excess staffing while managed care penetration is insignificant. We also find that poor quality (outcomes worse than expected) is associated with less efficient staffing. These findings suggest that the larger, more efficient urban hospitals will be penalized more heavily under binding staffing ratios than smaller, less-urban hospitals.

  20. The CRASH report: emergency management dilemmas facing acute physicians in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Laura C; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Marino, Philip; Alonso-Gonzalez, Rafael; McCabe, Colm; Kemnpy, Aleksander; Swan, Lorna; Boutsikou, Maria; Al Zahrani, Ahmed; Coghlan, Gerry J; Schreiber, Benjamin E; Howard, Luke S; Davies, Rachel; Toshner, Mark; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Church, Alistair C; Peacock, Andrew; Corris, Paul A; Lordan, James L; Gaine, Sean; Condliffe, Robin; Kiely, David G; Wort, Stephen John

    2017-11-01

    Treatment of acute emergencies in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) can be challenging. In the UK and Ireland, management of adult patients with PAH is centred in eight nationally designated pulmonary hypertension (PH) centres. However, many patients live far from these centres and physicians in local hospitals are often required to manage PAH emergencies. A committee of physicians from nationally designated PH centres identified the 'most common' emergency clinical scenarios encountered in patients with PAH. Thereafter, a review of the literature was performed centred on these specified topics and a management approach was developed based on best available evidence and expert consensus. Management protocols were developed on the following PAH emergencies: chest pain (including myocardial ischaemia), right ventricular failure, arrhythmias, sepsis, haemoptysis ('CRASH'), as well as considerations relevant to surgery, anaesthesia and pregnancy. Emergencies are not uncommon in PAH. While expertise in PAH management is essential, all physicians involved in acute care should be aware of the principles of acute management of PAH emergencies. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary, with physicians from tertiary PH centres supporting care locally and planning safe transfer of patients to PH centres when appropriate. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. A multivariate time series approach to forecasting daily attendances at hospital emergency department

    KAUST Repository

    Kadri, Farid; Harrou, Fouzi; Sun, Ying

    2018-01-01

    Efficient management of patient demands in emergency departments (EDs) has recently received increasing attention by most healthcare administrations. Forecasting ED demands greatly helps ED's managers to make suitable decisions by optimally

  2. Financial Management: Emergency Steel Loan Guarantee Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    In a February 1, 2001 letter, you expressed concerns about repayments of federally guaranteed loans by borrowers under the Emergency Steel Loan Guarantee Program and the effect of the program on the U.S. steel industry...

  3. [First aid and management of multiple trauma: in-hospital trauma care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschin, Matthias; Vordemvenne, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    Injuries remain the leading cause of death in children and young adults. Management of multiple trauma patients has improved in recent years by quality initiatives (trauma network, S3 guideline "Polytrauma"). On this basis, strong links with preclinical management, structured treatment algorithms, training standards (ATLS®), clear diagnostic rules and an established risk- and quality management are the important factors of a modern emergency room trauma care. We describe the organizational components that lead to successful management of trauma in hospital. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Mapping Best and Emerging Practices of Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian; Aaris Boas, Charlotte; Thorslund, Michael V.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results of a study of the connection between Best and Emerging practices of project management. Drawing upon network mapping as an analytical strategy, cases of Best and Emerging practices is analysed and juxtaposed. The case of Best practice is represented by the newly...... published ISO 21500 standard and the case for the Emerging practices by a deconstruction of the practices of a group of experienced project managers. The network analysis reveals a substantial difference between the Best and Emerging practices. Only two central concepts where shared namely Communication...... and Planning. Of these two concepts Communication where found to be the most central to both the Emerging and Best practices. The analysis further reveals a soft side of project management that is central in the Emerging practice but absent from the Best practices. Although this soft side might be interpreted...

  5. Managing chronic conditions care across primary care and hospital systems: lessons from an Australian Hospital Avoidance Risk Program using the Flinders Chronic Condition Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawn, Sharon; Zabeen, Sara; Smith, David; Wilson, Ellen; Miller, Cathie; Battersby, Malcolm; Masman, Kevin

    2017-08-24

    Objective The study aimed to determine the impact of the Flinders Chronic Condition Management Program for chronic condition self-management care planning and how to improve its use with Bendigo Health's Hospital Admission Risk Program (HARP). Methods A retrospective analysis of hospital admission data collected by Bendigo Health from July 2012 to September 2013 was undertaken. Length of stay during admission and total contacts post-discharge by hospital staff for 253 patients with 644 admissions were considered as outcome variables. For statistical modelling we used the generalised linear model. Results The combination of the HARP and Flinders Program was able to achieve significant reductions in hospital admissions and non-significant reduction in emergency department presentations and length of stay. The generalised linear model predicted that vulnerable patient groups such as those with heart disease (P=0.037) and complex needs (Pmanage chronic conditions through a greater focus on coordination and integration of care across primary care and hospital systems. In support of HARP, self-management interventions such as the Flinders Program aim to help individuals better manage their medical treatment and cope with the impact of the condition on their physical and mental wellbeing and thus reduce health services utilisation. What does this paper add? This paper sheds light on which patients might be more or less likely to benefit from the combination of the HARP and Flinders Program, with regard to their impact on reductions in hospital admissions, emergency department presentations and length of stay. This study also sheds light on how the Flinders Program could be better targeted towards and implemented among high-need and high-cost patients to lessen chronic disease burden on Australia's health system. What are the implications for practitioners? Programs targeting vulnerable populations and applying evidence-based chronic condition management and self-management

  6. THE PRE-HOSPITAL TRAUMA AND EMERGENCY DOCTOR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    paramedics) can provide advanced airway management (including intubation, ... the basic and intermediate level personnel, are grateful for the medical assis- tance ... tions, has no equipment and is rusty in advanced life support techniques.

  7. Management of sigmoid volvulus in Polokwane-Mankweng Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To evaluate the outcome of treatment of patients with sigmoid volvulus in the Polokwane- Mankweng Hospital and to identify the best management options for these patients. Methods. A retrospective study was undertaken of 85 patients with sigmoid volvulus treated in Polokwane- Mankweng Hospital during the ...

  8. Patient Experience Shows Little Relationship with Hospital Quality Management Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groene, Oliver; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Klazinga, Niek S.; Wagner, Cordula; Bartels, Paul D.; Kristensen, Solvejg; Saillour, Florence; Thompson, Andrew; Thompson, Caroline A.; Pfaff, Holger; Dersarkissian, Maral; Sunol, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Patient-reported experience measures are increasingly being used to routinely monitor the quality of care. With the increasing attention on such measures, hospital managers seek ways to systematically improve patient experience across hospital departments, in particular where outcomes are used for

  9. Certain Hospital Waste Management Practices in Isfahan, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdowsi, Ali; Ferdosi, Masoud; Mehrani, Zeinab; Narenjkar, Parisa

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Infected hospital wastes are among hazardous wastes, and special treatment methods are needed for their disposal. Having information about present status of medical waste management systems is of great importance in finding weak, and for future planning. Such studies have not been done for most of the hospitals in Iran. Methods: This paper reports the results of a study on the present status of medical waste management in Isfahan hospitals. A ten page researcher made questionnaire was used to collect data in terms of collection, transportation, segregation, treatment and disposal. For assessment of autoclaves, standard tests including TST (Time, Steam, and Temperature) strip test and spore tests were used. Samples were made of stack gases of incinerators. Quantity and composition of hospital wastes in Isfahan were also measured manually. Results: Of all wastes in selected hospitals, 40% were infected wastes (1.59 kg/day/bed), which is 15 to 20% higher than World Health Organization (WHO) standards. TST and Spore test results were negative in all samples. Stack gases analysis showed high concentration of CO in some samples. Besides, the combustion efficiency in some samples is less than 99.5%, which is the standard criterion in Iran. Conclusions: This study may create awareness regarding the magnitude of the problem of waste management in hospitals of Isfahan and may stimulate interests for systematic control efforts for hospital waste disposal. Hospital waste management cannot succeed without documented plans, certain equipment, defined staff trainings, and periodic evaluations. PMID:22826762

  10. Hospital marketing orientation and managed care processes: are they coordinated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K R; Thompson, J M; Patel, U B

    2001-01-01

    The hospital marketing function has been widely adopted as a way to learn about markets, attract sufficient resources, develop appropriate services, and communicate the availability of such goods to those who may be able to purchase such services. The structure, tasks, and effectiveness of the marketing function have been the subject of increased inquiry by researchers and practitioners alike. A specific understanding of hospital marketing in a growing managed care environment and the relationship between marketing and managed care processes in hospitals is a growing concern. Using Kotler and Clarke's framework for assessing marketing orientation, we examined the marketing orientation of hospitals in a single state at two points in time--1993 and 1999. Study findings show that the overall marketing orientation score decreased from 1993 to 1999 for the respondent hospitals. The five elements of the Kotler and Clarke definition of marketing orientation remained relatively stable, with slightly lower scores related to customer philosophy. In addition, we evaluated the degree to which selected managed care activities are carried out as part of its marketing function. A significant (p marketing function was evident from 1993 to 1999. With increasing numbers of managed care plan enrollees, hospitals are likely focusing on organizational buyers as important customers. In order to appeal to organizational buyers, hospital executives may be focusing more on clinical quality and cost efficiency in the production of services, which will improve a hospital's position with organizational buyers.

  11. Management of incomplete abortions at South African public hospitals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 87, No 4 (1997) > ... Length of hospital stay, details of medical management, details of surgical ... Of these, 767 (95.9%) were in hospital for 1 day or more, and 753 (95.3%) women underwent evacuation of the uterus.

  12. Addressing geographic access barriers to emergency care services: a national ecologic study of hospitals in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, Thiago Augusto Hernandes; da Silva, N?bia Cristina; Amaral, Pedro Vasconcelos; Barbosa, Allan Claudius Queiroz; Rocha, Jo?o Victor Muniz; Alvares, Viviane; de Almeida, Dante Grapiuna; Thum?, Elaine; Thomaz, Erika B?rbara Abreu Fonseca; de Sousa Queiroz, Rejane Christine; de Souza, Marta Rovery; Lein, Adriana; Lopes, Daniel Paulino; Staton, Catherine A.; Vissoci, Jo?o Ricardo Nickenig

    2017-01-01

    Background Unequal distribution of emergency care services is a critical barrier to be overcome to assure access to emergency and surgical care. Considering this context it was objective of the present work analyze geographic access barriers to emergency care services in Brazil. A secondary aim of the study is to define possible roles to be assumed by small hospitals in the Brazilian healthcare network to overcome geographic access challenges. Methods The present work can be classified as a c...

  13. Is hospital care of major importance for outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest? Experience acquired from patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest resuscitated by the same Emergency Medical Service and admitted to one of two hospitals over a 16-year period in the municipality of Göteborg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engdahl, J; Abrahamsson, P; Bång, A; Lindqvist, J; Karlsson, T; Herlitz, J

    2000-02-01

    To describe patient characteristics, hospital investigations and interventions and early mortality among patients being hospitalized after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in two hospitals. Municipality of Göteborg, Sweden. All patients suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who were successfully resuscitated and admitted to hospital between 1 October 1980 and 31 December 1996. All patients were resuscitated by the same Emergency Medical Service and admitted alive to one of the two city hospitals in Göteborg. Of 579 patients admitted to Sahlgrenska Hospital, 253 (44%) were discharged alive and of 459 patients admitted to Ostra Hospital, 152 (33%) were discharged alive (P percentage of patients admitted to Sahlgrenska Hospital underwent coronary angiography (P < 0.001), electrophysiological testing (P < 0.001), Holter recording (P < 0.001), echocardiography (P = 0.004), percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA, P = 0.009), implantation of automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (AICD, P = 0.03) and exercise stress tests (P = 0.003). Inhabitants in the catchment area of Ostra Hospital had a less favourable socio-economic profile. Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest may be affected by the course of hospital management. Other variables that might influence survival are socio-economic factors and cardiorespiratory status on admission to hospital. Further investigation is called for as more patients are being hospitalised alive after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

  14. Perceptions of hospital managers regarding the impact of doctors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Family Practice ... In 1997, the South African government introduced compulsory community service (CS) to ... CS has improved health services delivery, alleviated work pressure, and improved the image of hospital managers.

  15. Management Commitment to Safety, Teamwork, and Hospital Worker Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonagle, Alyssa K; Essenmacher, Lynnette; Hamblin, Lydia; Luborsky, Mark; Upfal, Mark; Arnetz, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Although many studies link teamwork in health care settings to patient safety, evidence linking teamwork to hospital worker safety is lacking. This study addresses this gap by providing evidence linking teamwork perceptions in hospital workers to worker injuries, and further, finds a linkage between manager commitment to safety and teamwork. Organizational records of worker injuries and survey responses regarding management commitment to safety and teamwork from 446 hospital workers within 42 work units in a multi-site hospital system were examined. Results underscored the particular importance of teamwork on worker injuries as well as the importance of management commitment to safety as relating to teamwork. To improve worker safety, organizational leaders and unit managers should work to maintain environments wherein teamwork can thrive.

  16. Research in Hospitality Management - Vol 5, No 2 (2015)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in Hospitality Management - Vol 5, No 2 (2015) ... Hotel quality in the European Capital of Culture: Leeuwarden 2018 · EMAIL FREE FULL ... Consumer patronage and willingness-to-pay at different levels of restaurant attributes: A ...

  17. Editorial: Maiden Edition | Craig | Research in Hospitality Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in Hospitality Management. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 1, No 1 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  18. Hospital wastes management containing in radioactive refusals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campi, F.

    1999-01-01

    In large hospitals, featuring a nuclear medicine department, diagnostic examinations and metabolic therapies are performed using an amount of radio drugs per day averaging around some hundreds mCi. Part of these drugs are disposed in the conventional patient related waste and collected within the hospital itself. Before directing the wastes to the disposal, it is necessary verify that they do not contain radioactive materials. This article refers a study on the possibility to perform this verification by means of an automatic radio-metric system, in order to improve the efficiency, the speed and the safety of the control. Measures devoted to determined the minimum detectable activities for the main radionuclides used in the hospitals have been executed, and it has been designed a comprehensive device able to operate automatically, and unattended by any operator, the selection of radioactive refusals [it

  19. IAIMS and JCAHO: implications for hospital librarians. Integrated Academic Information Management Systems. Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations.

    OpenAIRE

    Doyle, J D

    1999-01-01

    The roles of hospital librarians have evolved from keeping print materials to serving as a focal point for information services and structures within the hospital. Concepts that emerged from the Integrated Academic Information Management Systems (IAIMS) as described in the Matheson Report and the 1994 Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) standards have combined to propel hospital libraries into many new roles and functions. This paper will review the relations...

  20. EMERGING ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE IN HOSPITAL A THREAT TO PUBLIC HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vichal Rastogi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antimicrobial resistance(AMR threatens the health of many throughout the world, since both old and new infectious diseases remain a formidable public health threat. When pathogenic microorganisms can multiply beyond some critical mass in the face of invading antimicrobials, treatment outcome is compromised. This phenomenon is referred as antimicrobial resistance (AMR. Objective: This retrospective study was conducted to assess the overall antimicrobial resistance in bacterial isolates from tertiary care hospitals as majority of patients here receive empirical antibiotics therapy. Method: This retrospective study was carried out in teaching hospital, Greater Noida to determine prevalence of multidrug resistance in patients in relation to empirical antibiotic therapy in hospital. Various samples (pus,urine,blood were collected for bacterial culture and antibiotic sensitivity. Results: Total 500 bacterial strains isolated from ICU, surgery, obstetrics & gynaecology and orthopaedics and their sensitivity pattern was compared in this study. The highest number of resistant bacterias were of pseudomonas sp. i.e. 21(33.87% followed by 16(25.80% of staphylococcus aureus, 12(19.35% of Escherichia coli, Klebseilla sp & Proteus vulgaris were 05(8.06% each & Citrobacter sp. 03(4.83%. Total 62(12.4% bacterial isolates were found to be resistant to multiple drugs. The 31 (50% of these resistant bacteria were prevalent in ICU, 12(19.35% in Surgery, 11(17.74% in Gynaecology, 08(12.90% in Orthopaedics.. All the bacterial strains were resistant to common antibiotics like Penicillin, Amoxicillin, Doxycycline & Cotrimoxazole and some were even resistant to Imipenem. Conclusion: Therefore we have outlined the nature of the antimicrobial resistance problem as an important health issue for national and international community. It is advised to avoid use of empirical antibiotics therapy.

  1. Hospital management of community-acquired pneumonia in Malta

    OpenAIRE

    Callus, Roberta; Micallef, Josef; Mamo, Jonathan; Montefort, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains a common diagnosis requiring hospital admission and a leading cause of death worldwide. No local guideline is currently available for the management of CAP. Our aim was to evaluate current practices in the management of CAP at Mater Dei Hospital, Malta. In this prospective study we looked at all adult patients admitted with CAP in winter and summer (105 consecutive days for both seasons). Data collected and analysed included: basic patient demographi...

  2. [Basic research on digital logistic management of hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui

    2010-05-01

    This paper analyzes and explores the possibilities of digital information-based management realized by equipment department, general services department, supply room and other material flow departments in different hospitals in order to optimize the procedures of information-based asset management. There are various analytical methods of medical supplies business models, providing analytical data for correct decisions made by departments and leaders of hospital and the governing authorities.

  3. Utilization of emergency medical transports and hospital admissions among persons with behavioral health conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddeback, Gary; Patterson, P Daniel; Moore, Charity Galena; Brice, Jane H

    2010-04-01

    Emergency medical services transport and emergency department misuse among persons with behavioral health conditions is a concern. Administrative data were used to examine medical transports and hospital admissions among persons with behavioral health conditions. Data on 70,126 medical transports to emergency departments in three southeastern counties were analyzed. Compared with general medical transports, fewer behavioral health transports resulted in a hospital admission. Among behavioral health transports, persons with schizophrenia were 2.62 times more likely than those with substance use disorders to be admitted, and persons with mood disorders were 4.36 times more likely than those with substance use disorders to be admitted. Also, among behavioral health transports, rural transports were less likely than more urban transports to result in a hospital admission. More training of emergency medical services personnel and more behavioral health crisis resources, especially targeting rural areas and substance use disorders, are needed.

  4. Another look at roles and functions: has hospital case management lost its way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, John J

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the roles, functions, and types of activities that hospital case managers engage in on a day-to-day basis and that leverage the most amounts of time. Previous studies superimpose a priori categories on research tools. Hospital case management. This study analyzes 4,064 spontaneous, unstructured list serve postings from the American Case Management Association Learning Link list serve from August 15, 2011, to August 18, 2012. The study group was a cross section of 415 case management professionals. The data suggest that hospital case managers' time is inordinately leveraged by issues related to observation status/leveling of patients and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services compliance. The data also suggest that hospital case management has taken a conceptual trajectory that has deviated significantly from what was initially conceived (quality, advocacy, and care coordination) and what is publicly purported. Case management education and practical orientation will need to be commensurate with this emerging emphasis. Case management leadership will need to be adept at mitigating the stresses of role confusion, role conflict, and role ambiguity.

  5. Characteristics of effective interventions supporting quality pain management in Australian emergency departments: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaban, Ramon Z; Holzhauser, Kerri; Gillespie, Kerri; Huckson, Sue; Bennetts, Scott

    2012-02-01

    It is well established that pain is the most common presenting complaint in Emergency Departments. Despite great improvements in available pain management strategies, patients are left waiting for longer than 60min for pain relief on arrival to the emergency department. The aim of this study was to describe interventions that lead to successful implementation of the National Health and Medical Research Council approved guidelines Acute Pain Management: Scientific Evidence (2nd Edition) that include specific recommendations for best practice pain management. A two-phased, mixed-method, exploratory study of all 52 Australian hospital emergency departments participating in the National Emergency Care Pain Management Initiative incorporating interview and document analysis was undertaken. Interventions used by clinicians to improve pain management included nurse initiated analgesia, intranasal fentanyl for paediatric patients and lignocaine, and facio illiaca block. Education formed a major part of the intervention and the development of a working group of key stakeholders was critical in the successful implementation of change. Staff perceptions of patients' pain level and attitudes toward pain assessment and pain management were identified as barriers. This study highlighted how an effective framework to plan and implement practice change and tailored interventions, including education and training systems and products using the best available evidence, best equipped clinicians to manage pain in the ED. Copyright © 2011 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A management plan for hospitals and medical centers facing radiation incidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Davari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, application of nuclear technology in different industries has largely expanded worldwide. Proportionately, the risk of nuclear incidents and the resulting injuries have, therefore, increased in recent years. Preparedness is an important part of the crisis management cycle; therefore efficient preplanning seems crucial to any crisis management plan. Equipped with facilities and experienced personnel, hospitals naturally engage with the response to disasters. The main purpose of our study was to present a practical management pattern for hospitals and medical centers in case they encounter a nuclear emergency. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive qualitative study, data were collected through experimental observations, sources like Safety manuals released by the International Atomic Energy Agency and interviews with experts to gather their ideas along with Delphi method for polling, and brainstorming. In addition, the 45 experts were interviewed on three targeted using brainstorming and Delphi method. Results: We finally proposed a management plan along with a set of practicality standards for hospitals and medical centers to optimally respond to nuclear medical emergencies when a radiation incident happens nearby. Conclusion: With respect to the great importance of preparedness against nuclear incidents adoption and regular practice of nuclear crisis management codes for hospitals and medical centers seems quite necessary.

  7. A management plan for hospitals and medical centers facing radiation incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davari, Fereshteh; Zahed, Arash

    2015-09-01

    Nowadays, application of nuclear technology in different industries has largely expanded worldwide. Proportionately, the risk of nuclear incidents and the resulting injuries have, therefore, increased in recent years. Preparedness is an important part of the crisis management cycle; therefore efficient preplanning seems crucial to any crisis management plan. Equipped with facilities and experienced personnel, hospitals naturally engage with the response to disasters. The main purpose of our study was to present a practical management pattern for hospitals and medical centers in case they encounter a nuclear emergency. In this descriptive qualitative study, data were collected through experimental observations, sources like Safety manuals released by the International Atomic Energy Agency and interviews with experts to gather their ideas along with Delphi method for polling, and brainstorming. In addition, the 45 experts were interviewed on three targeted using brainstorming and Delphi method. We finally proposed a management plan along with a set of practicality standards for hospitals and medical centers to optimally respond to nuclear medical emergencies when a radiation incident happens nearby. With respect to the great importance of preparedness against nuclear incidents adoption and regular practice of nuclear crisis management codes for hospitals and medical centers seems quite necessary.

  8. Rehospitalizations and Emergency Department Visits after Hospital Discharge in Patients Receiving Maintenance Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Ziv; Wald, Ron; McArthur, Eric; Chertow, Glenn M; Harel, Shai; Gruneir, Andrea; Fischer, Hadas D; Garg, Amit X; Perl, Jeffrey; Nash, Danielle M; Silver, Samuel; Bell, Chaim M

    2015-12-01

    Clinical outcomes after a hospital discharge are poorly defined for patients receiving maintenance in-center (outpatient) hemodialysis. To describe the proportion and characteristics of these patients who are rehospitalized, visit an emergency department, or die within 30 days after discharge from an acute hospitalization, we conducted a population-based study of all adult patients receiving maintenance in-center hemodialysis who were discharged between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2011, from 157 acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. For patients with more than one hospitalization, we randomly selected a single hospitalization as the index hospitalization. Of the 11,177 patients included in the final cohort, 1926 (17%) were rehospitalized, 2971 (27%) were treated in the emergency department, and 840 (7.5%) died within 30 days of discharge. Complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus were the most common reason for rehospitalization, whereas heart failure was the most common reason for an emergency department visit. In multivariable analysis using a cause-specific Cox proportional hazards model, the following characteristics were associated with 30-day rehospitalization: older age, the number of hospital admissions in the preceding 6 months, the number of emergency department visits in the preceding 6 months, higher Charlson comorbidity index score, and the receipt of mechanical ventilation during the index hospitalization. Thus, a large proportion of patients receiving maintenance in-center hemodialysis will be readmitted or visit an emergency room within 30 days of an acute hospitalization. A focus on improving care transitions from the inpatient setting to the outpatient dialysis unit may improve outcomes and reduce healthcare costs. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  9. Management of hospitals solid waste in Khartoum State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Suhair A Gayoum

    2013-10-01

    This research had been conducted during year 2012 to review existing data on hospital waste management for some of Khartoum town hospitals and to try to produce appropriate proposals acceptable for waste management and final treatment methods. The overall status of hospital waste management in Khartoum has been assessed through direct visits and designated questionnaires. Eight main hospitals were covered in the study with an overall bed capacity of 2,978. The current waste management practice observed at all studied hospitals was that most of waste, office, general, food, construction debris, and hazardous chemical materials were all mixed together as they are generated, collected, and finally disposed of. Only a small portion of waste in some hospitals (part of potentially infectious, body parts, and sharps) are collected separately and treated in a central incinerator. The estimated value of per bed generation rate in the studied hospitals was found to be 0.87 kg/day, which lies within the range for the low-income countries. In all studied hospitals, it was found that workers were working under very poor unsafe conditions with very low salaries ($35 to $45 per month on average). About 90 % were completely illiterate or had very low education levels. At the national level, no laws considering hospital waste, or even hazardous waste, were found; only some federal general environmental regulations and some procedures from town and city localities for controlling general municipal waste exist. At the hospital level, no policies or rules were found, except in the radiotherapy center, where they manage radioactive wastes under the laws of the Sudanese Atomic Agency. Urgent actions are needed for the remediation and prevention of hazards associated with this type of waste.

  10. Organisational justice and employee perceptions on hospital management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiili-Peltola, Erja; Kivimäki, Mika; Elovainio, Marko; Virtanen, Marianna

    2007-01-01

    The purpose to clarify what kind of managerial challenges employees experience regarding organisational justice in hospitals. This exploratory study of 8,971 employees working in 14 hospitals and examines the concept of organisational justice in management with qualitative and quantitative methods. An inductive content analysis of the comments revealed five integrative frames describing challenges in hospital management at respondents' workplaces. These frames should be regarded as major managerial challenges in hospitals. These findings illustrate important antecedents of organisational justice and suggest that work units tend to share the same perceptions of justice. They also reveal that individually produced comments reflect collective experiences in organisational justice. Further, the results indicate that problems in management and policies are often experienced in a complex way, and people making justice judgements do not separate procedural and interactional factors. Although the commentators producing qualitative data represented many organisational hierarchy levels, the results should not be generalised to apply to horizontal, informal social relationships. This paper gives useful information regarding challenges in human resources management in hospitals. The paper suggests that people making fairness judgements do not make a distinction between procedural and interpersonal factors. Instead, they use any information available to judge the righteousness of the management events. This paper serves to guide hospital managers towards a better understanding of the importance of organisational justice and its collective nature.

  11. Analysis of the healthcare waste management status in Tehran hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekahmadi, Fariba; Yunesian, Masud; Yaghmaeian, Kamyar; Nadafi, Kazem

    2014-01-01

    Considering the importance of healthcare waste management, following the ratification of the Waste Management law in 2005 and the subsequent approval of its executive bylaw in 2006 and finally the healthcare waste management criteria passing by the parliament in 2008, a review on the status of healthcare waste management is needed to implement the mentioned law properly. In this retrospective study during six months period all public hospitals in Iran's capital city, Tehran, were selected to conduct the survey. Data collected through an expert-standardized questionnaire was analyzed by using SPSS software. The results of the current status of healthcare waste management in Tehran hospitals showed 5.6% of hospitals were ranked excellent, 50.7% good, 26.4% medium, and the 13.9% of hospitals were ranked weak and 3.5% ranked very poor. The findings showed that appropriate technologies should be used to have better disposal stage. As the ratified criteria were not fully observed by all the selected hospitals, training courses and comprehensive program conducting by each hospital could be enjoyed as practical tools to implement the all stages of healthcare waste management properly.

  12. [Classification and monitoring of the appropriateness of emergency admissions in a tertiary hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Picazo Ferrer, J J; Tomás García, N; Cubillana Herrero, J D; Gómez Company, J A; de Dios Cánovas García, J

    2014-01-01

    To measure the appropriateness of hospital admissions, to classify its Clinical Services (CS) according to the level of inappropriateness, and to determine the usefulness of applying rapid assessment techniques (lot quality assurance sampling) in these types of measurements. A descriptive, retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary hospital to assess the clinical records of emergency admissions to the 12 CS with a higher volume of admissions, using the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP). A four-level («A» to «D») increasingly inadequate admissions scale was constructed setting both standard and threshold values in every stratum. Every CS was classified in one of them using lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS). A total of 156 cases (13 cases from every CS) were assessed. The assessment effort (devoted time) was also estimated. There were 22.4±6.3% of inadequate admissions. In the CS classification, 9 (75%) got a good or acceptable appropriateness level, and only 1 (8%) got an inacceptable level. The time devoted was estimated at 17 hours. AEP is useful to assess the admission appropriateness and may be included in the «Emergencies» process management, although its variability prevents the use for external comparisons. If both LQAS and the appropriateness classification level and the global estimation (by unifying lot samples) are combined, the monitoring is affordable without a great effort. To extend these tools to other quality indicators requiring direct observation or clinical records, manual assessment could improve the monitoring efficiency. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Evidence of an emerging digital divide among hospitals that care for the poor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Ashish K; DesRoches, Catherine M; Shields, Alexandra E; Miralles, Paola D; Zheng, Jie; Rosenbaum, Sara; Campbell, Eric G

    2009-01-01

    Some hospitals that disproportionately care for poor patients are falling behind in adopting electronic health records (EHRs). Data from a national survey indicate early evidence of an emerging digital divide: U.S. hospitals that provide care to large numbers of poor patients also had minimal use of EHRs. These same hospitals lagged others in quality performance as well, but those with EHR systems seemed to have eliminated the quality gap. These findings suggest that adopting EHRs should be a major policy goal of health reform measures targeting hospitals that serve large populations of poor patients.

  14. Leveraging EHRs to improve hospital performance: the role of management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler-Milstein, Julia; Woody Scott, Kirstin; Jha, Ashish K

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies fail to find a consistent relationship between adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) and improved hospital performance. We sought to examine whether the quality of hospital management modifies the association between EHR adoption and outcomes related to cost and quality. Retrospective study of a random sample of US acute care hospitals. Management quality was assessed via phone interviews with clinical managers predominantly from cardiac units in a random sample of 325 hospitals using a validated scale of management practices in 4 areas: operations, performance monitoring, target setting, and talent management. American Hospital Association InformationTechnology Supplement data captured whether or not these hospitals had at least a basic EHR. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) outcomes included risk-adjusted 30-day mortality, average length-of-stay, and average payment per discharge measured using MedPAR data. Ordinary least squares regressions assessed whether management quality modifies the relationship between EHR adoption and AMI outcomes. While we found no association between EHR adoption and our outcomes, management quality modified the relationship in the predicted direction. For length of stay, the coefficient on the interaction between EHR and management was -1.48 (P = .05) and for payment, it was -7786.74 (P = .014). We did not find strong evidence of effect modification for mortality (coefficient = -0.05; P = .37). Coupled with ongoing policy efforts to achieve nationwide EHR adoption is a growing unease that our national investment may not result in better, more efficient care. Our study is among the first to offer empirical evidence that management quality may help explain why some hospitals see substantial gains from EHR adoption while others do not.

  15. Migrating from user fees to social health insurance: exploring the prospects and challenges for hospital management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atinga Roger A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003 Ghana introduced a social health insurance scheme which resulted in the separation of purchasing of health services by the health insurance authority on the one hand and the provision of health services by hospitals at the other side of the spectrum. This separation has a lot of implications for managing accredited hospitals. This paper examines whether decoupling purchasing and service provision translate into opportunities or challenges in the management of accredited hospitals. Methods A qualitative exploratory study of 15 accredited district hospitals were selected from five of Ghana’s ten administrative regions for the study. A semi-structured interview guide was designed to solicit information from key informants, Health Service Administrators, Pharmacists, Accountants and Scheme Managers of the hospitals studied. Data was analysed thematically. Results The results showed that under the health insurance scheme, hospitals are better-off in terms of cash flow and adequate stock levels of drugs. Adequate stock of non-drugs under the scheme was reportedly intermittent. The major challenges confronting the hospitals were identified as weak purchasing power due to low tariffs, non computerisation of claims processing, unpredictable payment pattern, poor gate-keeping systems, lack of logistics and other new and emerging challenges relating to moral hazards and the use of false identity cards under pretence for medical care. Conclusion Study’s findings have a lot of policy implications for proper management of hospitals. The findings suggest rationalisation of the current tariff structure, the application of contract based payment system to inject efficiency into hospitals management and piloting facility based vetting systems to offset vetting loads of the insurance authority. Proper gate-keeping mechanisms are also needed to curtail the phenomenon of moral hazard and false documentation.

  16. Migrating from user fees to social health insurance: exploring the prospects and challenges for hospital management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atinga, Roger A; Mensah, Sylvester A; Asenso-Boadi, Francis; Adjei, Francis-Xavier Andoh

    2012-06-22

    In 2003 Ghana introduced a social health insurance scheme which resulted in the separation of purchasing of health services by the health insurance authority on the one hand and the provision of health services by hospitals at the other side of the spectrum. This separation has a lot of implications for managing accredited hospitals. This paper examines whether decoupling purchasing and service provision translate into opportunities or challenges in the management of accredited hospitals. A qualitative exploratory study of 15 accredited district hospitals were selected from five of Ghana's ten administrative regions for the study. A semi-structured interview guide was designed to solicit information from key informants, Health Service Administrators, Pharmacists, Accountants and Scheme Managers of the hospitals studied. Data was analysed thematically. The results showed that under the health insurance scheme, hospitals are better-off in terms of cash flow and adequate stock levels of drugs. Adequate stock of non-drugs under the scheme was reportedly intermittent. The major challenges confronting the hospitals were identified as weak purchasing power due to low tariffs, non computerisation of claims processing, unpredictable payment pattern, poor gate-keeping systems, lack of logistics and other new and emerging challenges relating to moral hazards and the use of false identity cards under pretence for medical care. Study's findings have a lot of policy implications for proper management of hospitals. The findings suggest rationalisation of the current tariff structure, the application of contract based payment system to inject efficiency into hospitals management and piloting facility based vetting systems to offset vetting loads of the insurance authority. Proper gate-keeping mechanisms are also needed to curtail the phenomenon of moral hazard and false documentation.

  17. Migrating from user fees to social health insurance: exploring the prospects and challenges for hospital management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background In 2003 Ghana introduced a social health insurance scheme which resulted in the separation of purchasing of health services by the health insurance authority on the one hand and the provision of health services by hospitals at the other side of the spectrum. This separation has a lot of implications for managing accredited hospitals. This paper examines whether decoupling purchasing and service provision translate into opportunities or challenges in the management of accredited hospitals. Methods A qualitative exploratory study of 15 accredited district hospitals were selected from five of Ghana’s ten administrative regions for the study. A semi-structured interview guide was designed to solicit information from key informants, Health Service Administrators, Pharmacists, Accountants and Scheme Managers of the hospitals studied. Data was analysed thematically. Results The results showed that under the health insurance scheme, hospitals are better-off in terms of cash flow and adequate stock levels of drugs. Adequate stock of non-drugs under the scheme was reportedly intermittent. The major challenges confronting the hospitals were identified as weak purchasing power due to low tariffs, non computerisation of claims processing, unpredictable payment pattern, poor gate-keeping systems, lack of logistics and other new and emerging challenges relating to moral hazards and the use of false identity cards under pretence for medical care. Conclusion Study’s findings have a lot of policy implications for proper management of hospitals. The findings suggest rationalisation of the current tariff structure, the application of contract based payment system to inject efficiency into hospitals management and piloting facility based vetting systems to offset vetting loads of the insurance authority. Proper gate-keeping mechanisms are also needed to curtail the phenomenon of moral hazard and false documentation. PMID:22726666

  18. Manager impact on retention of hospital staff: Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taunton, R L; Krampitz, S D; Woods, C Q

    1989-04-01

    This is the second article in a two-part series based on a study of the impact of middle managers on retention of 71 hospital professionals. Research design, methods, and descriptive results were presented in Part 1 (March 1989). In Part 2, the impact of managers' motivation to manage, power, influence, and leadership style on retention is detailed. Recommendations for improving retention include interventions to increase employee job satisfaction and intent to stay, and to improve managers' performance and leadership.

  19. Analysis of the healthcare waste management status in Tehran hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Malekahmadi, Fariba; Yunesian, Masud; yaghmaeian, Kamyar; nadafi, Kazem

    2014-01-01

    Background Considering the importance of healthcare waste management, following the ratification of the Waste Management law in 2005 and the subsequent approval of its executive bylaw in 2006 and finally the healthcare waste management criteria passing by the parliament in 2008, a review on the status of healthcare waste management is needed to implement the mentioned law properly. Findings In this retrospective study during six months period all public hospitals in Iran’s capital city, Tehra...

  20. Nuclear emergency management: what is new?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, T.; Mundigl, S.

    2003-01-01

    Through the use of internationally organised, multinational drills, a wealth of experience and knowledge have been gained at both the national and international levels. The lessons learnt primarily concerned the early, urgent-communication phases of nuclear emergencies, and are currently in the process of being consolidated and incorporated into national structures and approaches. The focus of current works is shifting towards later accident phases, particularly to the mid-term phase, when control has been regained of the emergency situation but the accident consequences have yet to be addressed. In addition to these ''classic'' nuclear emergency response interests, since the 11 september 2001 national authorities have been concerned with accident response capabilities in case of terrorist acts that might involve radiation. (A.L.B.)

  1. Pre-hospital intubation by anaesthesiologists in patients with severe trauma: an audit of a Norwegian helicopter emergency medical service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lossius Hans

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaesthesiologists are airway management experts, which is one of the reasons why they serve as pre-hospital emergency physicians in many countries. However, limited data are available on the actual quality and safety of anaesthesiologist-managed pre-hospital endotracheal intubation (ETI. To explore whether the general indications for ETI are followed and what complications are recorded, we analysed the use of pre-hospital ETI in severely traumatised patients treated by anaesthesiologists in a Norwegian helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS. Methods A retrospective audit of prospectively registered data concerning patients with trauma as the primary diagnosis and a National Committee on Aeronautics score of 4 - 7 during the period of 1994-2005 from a mixed rural/urban Norwegian HEMS was performed. Results Among the 1255 cases identified, 238 successful pre-hospital ETIs out of 240 attempts were recorded (99.2% success rate. Furthermore, we identified 47 patients for whom ETI was performed immediately upon arrival to the emergency department (ED. This group represented 16% of all intubated patients. Of the ETIs performed in the ED, 43 patients had an initial Glasgow Coma Score (GCS Conclusions We found a very high success rate of pre-hospital ETI and few recorded complications in the studied anaesthesiologist-manned HEMS. However, a substantial number of trauma patients were intubated first on arrival in the ED. This delay may represent a quality problem. Therefore, we believe that more studies are needed to clarify the reasons for and possible clinical consequences of the delayed ETIs.

  2. Psychometric properties of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture for hospital management (HSOPS_M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeiffer Yvonne

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From a management perspective, it is necessary to examine how a hospital's top management assess the patient safety culture in their organisation. This study examines whether the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture for hospital management (HSOPS_M has the same psychometric properties as the HSOPS for hospital employees does. Methods In 2008, a questionnaire survey including the HSOPS_M was conducted with 1,224 medical directors from German hospitals. When assessing the psychometric properties, we performed a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA. Additionally, we proved construct validity and internal consistency. Results A total of 551 medical directors returned the questionnaire. The results of the CFA suggested a satisfactory global data fit. The indices of local fit indicated a good, but not satisfactory convergent validity. Analyses of construct validity indicated that not all safety culture dimensions were readily distinguishable. However, Cronbach's alpha indicated that the dimensions had an acceptable level of reliability. Conclusion The analyses of the psychometric properties of the HSOPS_M resulted in reasonably good levels of property values. Although the set of dimensions within the HSOPS_M needs further scale refinement, the questionnaire covers a broad range of sub-dimensions and supplies important information on safety culture. The HSOPS_M, therefore, is eligible to measure safety culture from the hospital management's points of view and could be used in nationwide hospital surveys to make inter-organisational comparisons.

  3. Access to primary care and the route of emergency admission to hospital: retrospective analysis of national hospital administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowling, Thomas E; Harris, Matthew; Watt, Hilary; Soljak, Michael; Richards, Emma; Gunning, Elinor; Bottle, Alex; Macinko, James; Majeed, Azeem

    2016-06-01

    The UK government is pursuing policies to improve primary care access, as many patients visit accident and emergency (A and E) departments after being unable to get suitable general practice appointments. Direct admission to hospital via a general practitioner (GP) averts A and E use, and may reduce total hospital costs. It could also enhance the continuity of information between GPs and hospital doctors, possibly improving healthcare outcomes. To determine whether primary care access is associated with the route of emergency admission-via a GP versus via an A and E department. Retrospective analysis of national administrative data from English hospitals for 2011-2012. Adults admitted in an emergency (unscheduled) for ≥1 night via a GP or an A and E department formed the study population. The measure of primary care access-the percentage of patients able to get a general practice appointment on their last attempt-was derived from a large, nationally representative patient survey. Multilevel logistic regression was used to estimate associations, adjusting for patient and admission characteristics. The analysis included 2 322 112 emergency admissions (81.9% via an A and E department). With a 5 unit increase in the percentage of patients able to get a general practice appointment on their last attempt, the adjusted odds of GP admission (vs A and E admission) was estimated to increase by 15% (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.17). The probability of GP admission if ≥95% of appointment attempts were successful in each general practice was estimated to be 19.6%. This probability reduced to 13.6% when <80% of appointment attempts were successful. This equates to 139 673 fewer GP admissions (456 232 vs 316 559) assuming no change in the total number of admissions. Associations were consistent in direction across geographical regions of England. Among hospital inpatients admitted as an emergency, patients registered to more accessible general practices were more

  4. Information Architecture for Quality Management Support in Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Álvaro; Freixo, Jorge

    2015-10-01

    Quality Management occupies a strategic role in organizations, and the adoption of computer tools within an aligned information architecture facilitates the challenge of making more with less, promoting the development of a competitive edge and sustainability. A formal Information Architecture (IA) lends organizations an enhanced knowledge but, above all, favours management. This simplifies the reinvention of processes, the reformulation of procedures, bridging and the cooperation amongst the multiple actors of an organization. In the present investigation work we planned the IA for the Quality Management System (QMS) of a Hospital, which allowed us to develop and implement the QUALITUS (QUALITUS, name of the computer application developed to support Quality Management in a Hospital Unit) computer application. This solution translated itself in significant gains for the Hospital Unit under study, accelerating the quality management process and reducing the tasks, the number of documents, the information to be filled in and information errors, amongst others.

  5. [Comprehensive quality management in hospitals--experience and recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, H J

    1999-03-01

    Total quality management concepts, increasingly being introduced into hospitals, offer opportunities for integrative leadership concepts because of their multidimensional character viewed from the aspects of results and from the standpoint of organisational design. Customized for leadership and organisation of hospitals in Germany, questions of introduction strategies as well as recommendations for the integration of total quality understanding into the daily practice of management and employees are discussed. The active support of top and middle management and a combination of radical change in selected problem areas and continual incremental improvements on a broad base have been proven as significant factors for the success in the introductory phase. For a lasting integration of the principles of a comprehensive quality management concept in a hospital, it will be necessary to carry out regularly relevant measurements of success. The results become an important part of agreements with management.

  6. Electronic health record adoption in US hospitals: the emergence of a digital "advanced use" divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler-Milstein, Julia; Holmgren, A Jay; Kralovec, Peter; Worzala, Chantal; Searcy, Talisha; Patel, Vaishali

    2017-11-01

    While most hospitals have adopted electronic health records (EHRs), we know little about whether hospitals use EHRs in advanced ways that are critical to improving outcomes, and whether hospitals with fewer resources - small, rural, safety-net - are keeping up. Using 2008-2015 American Hospital Association Information Technology Supplement survey data, we measured "basic" and "comprehensive" EHR adoption among hospitals to provide the latest national numbers. We then used new supplement questions to assess advanced use of EHRs and EHR data for performance measurement and patient engagement functions. To assess a digital "advanced use" divide, we ran logistic regression models to identify hospital characteristics associated with high adoption in each advanced use domain. We found that 80.5% of hospitals adopted at least a basic EHR system, a 5.3 percentage point increase from 2014. Only 37.5% of hospitals adopted at least 8 (of 10) EHR data for performance measurement functions, and 41.7% of hospitals adopted at least 8 (of 10) patient engagement functions. Critical access hospitals were less likely to have adopted at least 8 performance measurement functions (odds ratio [OR] = 0.58; P functions (OR = 0.68; P = 0.02). While the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act resulted in widespread hospital EHR adoption, use of advanced EHR functions lags and a digital divide appears to be emerging, with critical-access hospitals in particular lagging behind. This is concerning, because EHR-enabled performance measurement and patient engagement are key contributors to improving hospital performance. Hospital EHR adoption is widespread and many hospitals are using EHRs to support performance measurement and patient engagement. However, this is not happening across all hospitals. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  7. Performance evaluation of knowledge management among hospital employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying-Ying; Hsu, Pi-Fang; Li, Min-Hua; Chang, Ching-Ching

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the cognition of knowledge management (KM) among hospital employees and the relationship between KM and the KM enabler activities (financial, customer, internal business processes, learning and growth) in a regional hospital in Taiwan. Both qualitative and quantitative research were used in this study. The instrument was conducted using in-depth interviews of three policy-makers as participants. The quantitative data were collected from a regional hospital in the Northern part of Taiwan with a 77 percent effective response rate (n=154). The findings in this paper indicate that the cognition and demand for KM in subordinates is close to the expectations of policy-makers. The policy-makers expect subordinates working in the hospital to be brave in taking on new responsibilities and complying with hospital operation norms. KM is emphasized as a powerful and positive asset. Moreover, understanding KM predicts good performance in an organization. The findings in this paper can be generalized to other regional hospitals. The findings may be applied to a wider population. This study can provide insights into the perceptions and cognitions of workers in a hospital about KM and the activities of KM enablers. The responses and perceptions observed in the interviews in this study, as well as the quantitative research results could be useful to other hospitals and individuals who engage KM as a new management trend. This study suggested KM guidelines for policy-makers who are experienced managers.

  8. Managed care, vertical integration strategies and hospital performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B B; Wan, T T; Clement, J; Begun, J

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the association of managed care with hospital vertical integration strategies, as well as to observe the relationships of different types of vertical integration with hospital efficiency and financial performance. The sample consists of 363 California short-term acute care hospitals in 1994. Linear structure equation modeling is used to test six hypotheses derived from the strategic adaptation model. Several organizational and market factors are controlled statistically. Results suggest that managed care is a driving force for hospital vertical integration. In terms of performance, hospitals that are integrated with physician groups and provide outpatient services (backward integration) have better operating margins, returns on assets, and net cash flows (p < 0.01). These hospitals are not, however, likely to show greater productivity. Forward integration with a long-term-care facility, on the other hand, is positively and significantly related to hospital productivity (p < 0.001). Forward integration is negatively related to financial performance (p < 0.05), however, opposite to the direction hypothesized. Health executives should be responsive to the growth of managed care in their local market and should probably consider providing more backward integrated services rather than forward integrated services in order to improve the hospital's financial performance in today's competitive health care market.

  9. [Emergency care in the autonomous regions of Spain. Improvement in pre-hospital emergency care and welfare coordination. SESPAS Report 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel García, Félix; Fernández Quintana, Ana Isabel; Díaz Prats, Amadeo

    2012-03-01

    The present article describes the general organization of pre-hospital emergency care in the autonomous regions and provides data on activity corresponding to 2010, drawn from the information available in the Primary Care Information System of the Ministry of Health, Social Policy and Equality. Emergency care is provided through various organizational structures covering 24-hour periods. Family medicine attended 17.8 million emergency consultations and nursing attended 10.2 million (year 2010, 14 autonomous communities, 79.7% of the National Health System population). Emergency department utilization ranged between 0.11 and 0.83 urgent family physician consultations per inhabitant/year and between 0.05 and 0.57 nursing consultations per inhabitant/year. Any reform in the management of pre-hospital emergency care will involve organizational changes and aims to produce measurable improvements in healthcare coordination. In the new organizational designs, most of the responsibility lies with human resources in order to achieve the new goals for the future aims to be presented in an operational teamwork structure. Undoubtedly, the main challenge is to achieve optimal coordination with other welfare levels, including the police, social services, nursing homes, etc. If optimal care of the population needs to count on the efforts of all these groups, mobility, individual differences, consistent achievement of high standards, and -most of all- the use of these services by citizens will determine the final result. The results can be quantified in various ways, but evaluation should concentrate on the resources used, the degree of satisfaction among all the parties involved and optimal management of demand, which will help to disseminate the need for a rational resource use. Copyright © 2011 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Solid waste management in the hospitality industry: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirani, Sanaa I; Arafat, Hassan A

    2014-12-15

    Solid waste management is a key aspect of the environmental management of establishments belonging to the hospitality sector. In this study, we reviewed literature in this area, examining the current status of waste management for the hospitality sector, in general, with a focus on food waste management in particular. We specifically examined the for-profit subdivision of the hospitality sector, comprising primarily of hotels and restaurants. An account is given of the causes of the different types of waste encountered in this sector and what strategies may be used to reduce them. These strategies are further highlighted in terms of initiatives and practices which are already being implemented around the world to facilitate sustainable waste management. We also recommended a general waste management procedure to be followed by properties of the hospitality sector and described how waste mapping, an innovative yet simple strategy, can significantly reduce the waste generation of a hotel. Generally, we found that not many scholarly publications are available in this area of research. More studies need to be carried out on the implementation of sustainable waste management for the hospitality industry in different parts of the world and the challenges and opportunities involved. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Understanding hospital cafeterias: results from cafeteria manager interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, Ashley; Toner, Cassiopeia; Krepp, Erica M; Curtis, Christine J

    2014-01-01

    To describe the characteristics, nutrition-related knowledge, practices, and attitudes of staff managing cafeterias in New York City (NYC) hospitals. An in-person survey was administered over 7 months to cafeteria managers from hospitals participating in the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's Healthy Hospital Food Initiative. The survey assessed nutrition knowledge and attitudes; hospital cafeteria practices; and nutrition standards and policies. The majority of questions required a yes or no response, followed by an open-ended request for details related to the response. Other questions were multiple choice or used 5-point Likert scales to measure respondent perceptions. Seventeen cafeteria managers completed the survey. Less than a third of respondents had training in nutrition, and less than a quarter of hospitals followed nutrition standards for food offered in the cafeteria. Most respondents thought cafeterias could play a role in reducing sodium consumption, yet less than half correctly identified the largest sources of sodium in the average diet. The most commonly cited limitation to making healthy changes in the cafeteria was perceived lack of demand for healthy foods/customer support. Characteristics, nutrition knowledge, practices, and attitudes of hospital cafeteria managers vary. Communication with consumers and education of staff who lack training and experience in nutrition may be important focus areas for hospitals looking to improve their food environment.

  12. Epilepsy management in older people: Lessons from National Audit of Seizure management in Hospitals (NASH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziso, B; Dixon, P A; Marson, A G

    2017-08-01

    Epilepsy is the third most common diagnosis in older people, however management in this group remains variable. National Audit of Seizure management in Hospitals (NASH) set out to assess care provided to patients attending hospitals in England following a seizure. 154 Emergency Departments (EDs) across the UK took part. 1256 patients aged 60 years or over were included for analysis (median age 74 years, 54% men). 51% were known to have epilepsy, 17% had history of previous seizure or blackout and 32% presented with a suspected first seizure. 14% of older patients with epilepsy were not on treatment, 59% were on monotherapy. Sodium valproate was the most commonly used antiepileptic, 28%. 35% of patients with epilepsy, aged 60 and over, had a CT during admission compared to only 17% of those under 60. 80% of patients aged 60 and over presenting with a likely first seizure were admitted to hospital, compared to 65% of those under 60. 34% of those with suspected first seizure were referred to a neurologist on discharge compared to 68% of patients under the age of 60. 52% of 60-69year olds with a suspected first seizure were referred to neurology compared to 25% of patients aged 80-89. Older patients presenting with seizures are more likely to be admitted to hospital and have imaging. They are less likely to be referred to specialist services on discharge. There appears to be significant disparity in patient age and rate of referral. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Emergency patients receiving anaesthesiologist-based pre-hospital treatment and subsequently released at the scene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højfeldt, S G; Sørensen, L P; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Mobile Emergency Care Unit in Odense, Denmark consists of a rapid response car, manned with an anaesthesiologist and an emergency medical technician. Eleven per cent of the patients are released at the scene following treatment. The aim of the study was to investigate which...... investigated. In each patient, diagnosis as well as any renewed contact with the Mobile Emergency Care Unit or the hospital within 24 h was registered. RESULTS: ONE THOUSAND SIX HUNDRED NINE: patients were released at the scene. Diagnoses within the category 'examination and investigation' [International...... with the Mobile Emergency Care Unit within 24 h. Of the 143 victims of traffic accidents, 19 (13%) required renewed contact with the emergency department and one required admission to hospital (0.7%). Of all 1609 patients, four died within 24 h of contact (0.2%). CONCLUSION: Patients treated and released...

  14. Hospital-Level Factors Associated with Pediatric Emergency Department Return Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittsenbarger, Zachary; Thurm, Cary; Neuman, Mark; Spencer, Sandra; Simon, Harold; Gosdin, Craig; Shah, Samir; McClead, Richard; Stack, Anne; Alpern, Elizabeth

    2017-07-01

    Return visits (RVs) and RVs with admission (RVAs) are commonly used emergency department quality measures. Visit- and patient-level factors, including several social determinants of health, have been associated with RV rates, but hospital-specific factors have not been studied. To identify what hospital-level factors correspond with high RV and RVA rates. Multicenter mixed-methods study of hospital characteristics associated with RV and RVA rates. Pediatric Health Information System with survey of emergency department directors. Adjusted return rates were calculated with generalized linear mixed-effects models. Hospitals were categorized by adjusted RV and RVA rates for analysis. Twenty-four hospitals accounted for 1,456,377 patient visits with an overall adjusted RV rate of 3.7% and RVA rate of 0.7%. Hospitals with the highest RV rates served populations that were more likely to have government insurance and lower median household incomes and less likely to carry commercial insurance. Hospitals in the highest RV rate outlier group had lower pediatric emergency medicine specialist staffing, calculated as full-time equivalents per 10,000 patient visits: median (interquartile range) of 1.9 (1.5-2.1) versus 2.9 (2.2-3.6). There were no differences in hospital population characteristics or staffing by RVA groups. RV rates were associated with population social determinants of health and inversely related to staffing. Hospital-level variation may indicate population-level economic factors outside the control of the hospital and unrelated to quality of care. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine

  15. The impact of medical tourism on Thai private hospital management: informing hospital policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Paul T J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help consolidate and understand management perceptions and experiences of a targeted group (n=7) of Vice-Presidents of international Private Thai hospitals in Bangkok regarding medical tourism impacts. The method adopted uses a small-scale qualitative inquiry. Examines the on-going development and service management factors which contribute to the establishment and strengthening of relationships between international patients and hospital medical services provision. Develops a qualitative model that attempts to conceptualize the findings from a diverse range of management views into a framework of main (8) - Hospital Management; Hospital Processes; Hospital Technology; Quality Related; Communications; Personnel; Financial; and Patients; and consequent sub-themes (22). Outcomes from small-scale qualitative inquiries cannot by design be taken outside of its topical arena. This inevitably indicates that more research of this kind needs to be carried out to understand this field more effectively. The evidence suggests that Private Thai hospital management have established views about what constitutes the impact of medical tourism on hospital policies and practices when hospital staff interact with international patients. As the private health service sector in Thailand continues to grow, future research is needed to help hospitals provide appropriate service patterns and appropriate medical products/services that meet international patient needs and aspirations. Highlights the increasing importance of the international consumer in Thailand's health industry. This study provides insights of private health service providers in Bangkok by helping to understand more effectively health service quality environments, subsequent service provision, and the integrated development and impacts of new medical technology.

  16. Managing emerging threats to spotted owls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho Yi Wan; Joseph L. Ganey; Christina D. Vojta; Samuel A. Cushman

    2018-01-01

    The 3 spotted owl (Strix occidentalis) subspecies in North America (i.e., northern spotted owl [S. o. caurina], California spotted owl [S. o. occidentalis], Mexican spotted owl [S. o. lucida]) have all experienced population declines over the past century due to habitat loss and fragmentation from logging. Now, the emerging influences of climate change, high-severity...

  17. Emergency Evacuation Management Requirements and Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    state government would assert positive leadership , motivate the public, and issue emergency directives. In other words, local officials assume...feasible way to implement such a program is for FEMA to assume leadership through subordinate units considered relevant and prestigous. Active...Supply and Organizations and recruits Organizations control per- D&C and organizatins ronitor Distribution control operations. ations. and reallocate

  18. Current management of surgical oncologic emergencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosscher, Marianne R. F.; van Leeuwen, Barbara L.; Hoekstra, Harald J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: For some oncologic emergencies, surgical interventions are necessary for dissolution or temporary relieve. In the absence of guidelines, the most optimal method for decision making would be in a multidisciplinary cancer conference (MCC). In an acute setting, the opportunity for

  19. Quantification classification and management of hospital waste in Lahore city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.R.; Riaz, M

    2010-01-01

    Systematic disposal of hospital waste is a major problem encountered by different countries including Pakistan. Efforts are on the way to achieve this objective techno-economically. To quantify infectious and total waste produced by the hospitals of Lahore, classify it to know the nature of their components and to collect information about its management. The background information and secondary data were collected by consultation of literature in the libraries and visiting different websites on Internet. The primary data were collected by gathering the responses of the Chief Executives, Medical Superintendents and Medical and Environmental Staff of all hospitals scheduled as reference models through interview. The total quantity of infectious waste produced by the hospitals and other health care units is approximately 785 million tons per annum while the total waste including municipal component is approximately 3,925 million tons per annum. The current status of awareness about proper health care waste disposal is improving but at a slow pace. It may be concluded that the management of hospital waste in five hospitals of Lahore city is systematic. However, the staff handling the waste was not fully trained for proper segregation of the hospital wastes. Incinerators being used for waste disposal are a major source of secondary air pollution therefore, this method should be discouraged. Instead, the feasibility of thermoelectric power generation may be looked into. Proper disposal of hospital wastes should be in placed in every hospital and trained staff should be employed for the job. (author)

  20. Impact of individualized pain plan on the emergency management of children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Smith-Packard, Bethanny; Gupta, Ashish; Campbell, Mary; Gunawardena, Sriya; Saladino, Richard

    2014-10-01

    Vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) the hallmark of sickle cell disease (SCD) is often treated inadequately in the emergency department (ED). We hypothesized that pain management plans individualized for each patient can improve pain management and lead to high levels of patient satisfaction. Starting in 2002, we treated all patients with SCD reporting to Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh (CHP) ED with VOC using a structured algorithm. We recorded regimens used successfully for each patient as an "individualized pain plan" and implemented it during subsequent VOC visits and adjusted it to patient response. We compared rates of hospitalization following an ED visit with VOC and readmission within 1 week after discharge for CHP with that of four comparable hospitals from Pediatric Health Information (PHIS) database. Patients and parents completed surveys of satisfaction with pain management and with care. Between 2002 and 2008 there was a greater decline in the rate of admission of patients presenting to the ED at CHP (78% to 52%) as compared to PHIS (71% to 68%), (P pain score during ED management was 2.0 or more on a Wong Baker scale of 0-5 (P pain management as very good or higher. Individualized pain management plans in the ED are effective in delivering high quality management of VOC and are associated with a high level of patient satisfaction and decreased avoidable hospitalizations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Therapeutic hypothermia following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; does it start in the emergency department?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, R; Sherren, P B

    2010-12-01

    The use of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest is a well-practised treatment modality in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, recent evidence points to advantages in starting the cooling process as soon as possible after the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). There are no data on implementation of this treatment in the emergency department. A telephone survey was conducted of the 233 emergency departments in the UK. The most senior available clinician was asked if, in cases where they have a patient with a ROSC after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, would therapeutic hypothermia be started in the emergency department. Of the 233 hospitals called, 230 responded, of which 35% would start cooling in the emergency department. Of this 35%, over half (56%) said the decision to start cooling was made by the emergency physician before consultation with the ICU. Also, of the 35% who would begin cooling in the emergency department, 55% would cool only for ventricular fibrillation/ventricular tachycardia, 66% would monitor temperature centrally, and 14% would use specialised cooling equipment. There is often a delay in getting patients to ICU from the emergency department, and thus the decision not to start cooling in the emergency department may impact significantly on patient outcome. The dissemination of these data may persuade emergency physicians that starting treatment in the emergency department is an appropriate and justifiable decision that is becoming a more accepted practice throughout the UK.

  2. Basic management of medical emergencies: recognizing a patient's distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Kenneth L

    2010-05-01

    Medical emergencies can happen in the dental office, possibly threatening a patient's life and hindering the delivery of dental care. Early recognition of medical emergencies begins at the first sign of symptoms. The basic algorithm for management of all medical emergencies is this: position (P), airway (A), breathing (B), circulation (C) and definitive treatment, differential diagnosis, drugs, defibrillation (D). The dentist places an unconscious patient in a supine position and comfortably positions a conscious patient. The dentist then assesses airway, breathing and circulation and, when necessary, supports the patient's vital functions. Drug therapy always is secondary to basic life support (that is, PABCD). Prompt recognition and efficient management of medical emergencies by a well-prepared dental team can increase the likelihood of a satisfactory outcome. The basic algorithm for managing medical emergencies is designed to ensure that the patient's brain receives a constant supply of blood containing oxygen.

  3. Care management in nursing within emergency care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Juliane Tono de Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective.Understand the conditions involved in the management of nursing care in emergency care units. Methodology. Qualitative research using the methodological framework of the Grounded Theory. Data collection occurred from September 2011 to June 2012 through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants of the two emergency care units in the city of Florianopolis, Brazil. Results. Hindering factors to care management are: lack of experience and knowledge of professionals in emergency services; inadequate number of professionals; work overload of emergency care units in the urgent care network; difficulty in implementing nursing care systematization, and need for team meetings. Facilitating factors are: teamwork; importance of professionals; and confidence of the nursing technicians in the presence of the nurse. Conclusion. Whereas the hindering factors in care management are related to the organizational aspects of the emergency care units in the urgency care network, the facilitating ones include specific aspects of teamwork.

  4. Care management in nursing within emergency care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tono de Oliveira, Roberta Juliane; Vieira Hermida, Patrícia Madalena; da Silva Copelli, Fernanda Hannah; Guedes Dos Santos, José Luís; Lorenzini Erdmann, Alacoque; Regina de Andrade, Selma

    2015-12-01

    Understand the conditions involved in the management of nursing care in emergency care units. Qualitative research using the methodological framework of the Grounded Theory. Data collection occurred from September 2011 to June 2012 through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants of the two emergency care units in the city of Florianopolis, Brazil. Hindering factors to care management are: lack of experience and knowledge of professionals in emergency services; inadequate number of professionals; work overload of emergency care units in the urgent care network; difficulty in implementing nursing care systematization, and need for team meetings. Facilitating factors are: teamwork; importance of professionals; and confidence of the nursing technicians in the presence of the nurse. Whereas the hindering factors in care management are related to the organizational aspects of the emergency care units in the urgency care network, the facilitating ones include specific aspects of teamwork.

  5. Tactical training of emergency management - the MUSTER concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Verner.

    1996-08-01

    The efficiency with which complex, large-scale organisations respon d to emergencies and critical situations depends crucially on the co-ordination of actions and communication among decision makers. However, decision makers have typically few opportunities to train distributed crisis management under artificial, yet realistic conditions; and at the same time, real emergencies occur fortunately so relatively infrequently that few decision makers have a chance of establishing a useful real-life experience of crisis management. There is therefore a need for having available realistic and flexible multi-user training environments in which co-ordinated response to crises or emergencies may be trained. The objective of the MUSTER project (Multi-User System for Training and Evaluating Environmental Emergency Response) is to produce specifications for a training system supporting collaborative training and evaluation directed to the special needs of environmental emergency management. The MUSTER project was partially funced by CEC

  6. Characterization of patients aged 45 or under admitted with hypertensive emergencies in the Hospital do Prenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Geovedy Martínez; Miúdo, Venâncio; Manuel Lopes, Conceição da Graça Alves; Vassuelela Gomes, Juliana

    2014-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of hypertensive emergency have been little addressed in the literature. However, over the last decade increasing numbers of young patients with different forms of hypertensive crisis have been observed in emergency departments. We performed this study to ascertain the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients aged ≤ 45 years admitted with a diagnosis of hypertensive emergency. We conducted an observational, descriptive, cross-sectional prospective study of 123 patients hospitalized for hypertensive emergency in the Hospital do Prenda, Luanda, between May 2011 and June 2012. Mean age was 36.62 ± 5.49 years, and most were male (52.85%). The main risk factor was hypertension (65.9%), with 17.3% complying with therapy. The most frequent forms of presentation were hypertensive encephalopathy and hemorrhagic stroke (9.8% and 82.1%, respectively). The main drugs used were diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and calcium channel blockers. Mortality during hospitalization was 25.2% (31 patients), hemorrhagic stroke being the most common cause. There was a significant association between age and in-hospital mortality. Of patients admitted with hypertensive emergency, 30.1% were aged ≤ 45 years. Hemorrhagic stroke was the most common presentation. There was a significant relationship between mode of presentation, age and in-hospital mortality. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. Telemental health evaluations enhance access and efficiency in a critical access hospital emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southard, Erik P; Neufeld, Jonathan D; Laws, Stephanie

    2014-07-01

    Mentally ill patients in crisis presenting to critical access hospital emergency rooms often face exorbitant wait times to be evaluated by a trained mental health provider. Patients may be discharged from the hospital before receiving an evaluation or boarded in a hospital bed for observation, reducing quality and increasing costs. This study examined the effectiveness of an emergency telemental health evaluation service implemented in a rural hospital emergency room. Retrospective data collection was implemented to consider patients presenting to the emergency room for 212 days prior to telemedicine interventions and for 184 days after. The study compared measures of time to treatment, length of stay (regardless of inpatient or outpatient status), and door-to-consult time. There were 24 patients seen before telemedicine was implemented and 38 seen using telemedicine. All patients had a mental health evaluation ordered by a physician and completed by a mental health specialist. Significant reductions in all three time measures were observed. Mean and median times to consult were reduced from 16.2 h (standard deviation=13.2 h) and 14.2 h, respectively, to 5.4 h (standard deviation =6.4 h) and 2.6 h. Similar reductions in length of stay and door-to-consult times were observed. By t tests, use of telemedicine was associated with a statistically significant reduction in all three outcome measures. Telemedicine appears to be an effective intervention for mentally ill patients by providing more timely access to mental health evaluations in rural hospital emergency departments.

  8. Strategic aspects of nuclear and radiological emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahier, B.

    2010-01-01

    Emergency situations demand that actions be taken by responsible organisations in a timely and effective manner to mitigate consequences for the population, infrastructure and the environment, and to support the return of affected areas to normal social and economic activity to the extent possible. To deliver an effective response over the emergency management time-line, it is necessary to make, maintain and exercise adequate plans and arrangements in advance of an emergency situation. These must contain appropriate elements and resources for preparedness, response and assistance to identified threats, recognize and include all implicated partners, and take account of international interfaces. Effective management of complex emergency situations that can lead to a wide range of consequences and involve multiple organisations at the local, national and international levels also requires anticipation of the range of decision-making needs, an understanding of the interactions between response organisations and a model for their co-ordination. Experience from managing emergency situations has shown that the integration of these factors into emergency preparedness and response arrangements should be based on a guiding strategic vision. Emergency response is a dynamic process that develops in time from a situation of little information to one of potentially overwhelming information. Within this context, emergency response organisations must be able to respond in an appropriate and timely manner at any point along the emergency management time-line. This will be facilitated by an overarching framework to guide the decision-making process. To contribute to work in this area, the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) Working Party on Nuclear Emergency Matters (WPNEM) reviewed its collective experience to extract key themes that could form a strategy for improving decision-making in emergency management. This focused on the NEA International Nuclear

  9. [Strategic management of hospitals in France: balance and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crémadez, Michel

    2010-08-01

    The strategic management was introduced in French hospitals in the late 80s, in a context of inefficiency and the need to control healthcare expenditure. This concept has inspired a series of government reforms, the organization and dynamics of hospitals and the mode of regulating the French health system, assuming a real change of professional culture. The changes in the economic context and in the finance of hospitals, the behavior of users, the population aging, the development of chronic diseases and increased competition, are the new challenges to be faced. The involvement of stakeholders is crucial and the strategic management, based on mobilizing these actors, is today, a method of administration particularly well adapted to the health area. This article aims to present the impact of the concept of strategic management in the evolution of French hospitals and the consequences of these developments on the outlook for the dissemination of strategic management in the health sector. To do so, it is examined the evolution of the French context until 2010, the new challenges that French hospitals must face and, finally, the consequences of these challenges on how to design services, manage the relationships between the actors of the health system and organize the operational functioning of hospitals.

  10. The mission of the well-managed community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J R

    1988-07-01

    The well-managed community hospital as an organization is in dynamic equilibrium with its geographic community and with other communities providing finance, physicians, nurses, other professionals and resources necessary to meet local health care needs. The hospital is "well-managed" when it develops an equilibrium that permits all of its various constituencies to be satisfied. Growth in market share results from good management. The hospital's ability to attract and satisfy the needs of health care professionals while simultaneously meeting the needs of patients and their families at competitive prices allows it to flourish. Its financial success allows it to reward its medical staff and employees in ways that attract the best of each work group. A central problem in achieving good management is communication. Hospitals must communicate their goals convincingly to a large number of doctors and employees. "The Well-Managed Community Hospital," winner of the James A. Hamilton Hospital Administration Book Award, argues that a well-structured mission statement is the essential first step in the communications process. According to the book, final responsibility for the mission statement lies with the governing board and is one of five non-delegable functions of the board. The nature of the mission setting function as described in the book follows.

  11. Changes in management actions after the Hospital Accreditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Guerra Siman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to understand the changes in the management actions after the Hospital Accreditation. Methods: a case study. The study included 12 managers of a hospital accredited with excellence. Data collection was carried out with interviews with semi-structured and subjected to content analysis. Results: about changes in management actions were recorded significantly three categories: Work organization with quality tools; management actions before and after the accreditation; and challenges faced by modifying the management actions. Conclusion: accreditation mobilized changes in management actions with quality instruments of adoption used to organize the work and accountability of those involved in the process. However, there were challenges to be overcome to achieve accreditation by managers.

  12. The influence of environmental conditions on safety management in hospitals: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alingh, Carien W; van Wijngaarden, Jeroen D H; Huijsman, Robbert; Paauwe, Jaap

    2018-05-02

    Hospitals are confronted with increasing safety demands from a diverse set of stakeholders, including governmental organisations, professional associations, health insurance companies, patient associations and the media. However, little is known about the effects of these institutional and competitive pressures on hospital safety management. Previous research has shown that organisations generally shape their safety management approach along the lines of control- or commitment-based management. Using a heuristic framework, based on the contextually-based human resource theory, we analysed how environmental pressures affect the safety management approach used by hospitals. A qualitative study was conducted into hospital care in the Netherlands. Five hospitals were selected for participation, based on organisational characteristics as well as variation in their reputation for patient safety. We interviewed hospital managers and staff with a central role in safety management. A total of 43 semi-structured interviews were conducted with 48 respondents. The heuristic framework was used as an initial model for analysing the data, though new codes emerged from the data as well. In order to ensure safe care delivery, institutional and competitive stakeholders often impose detailed safety requirements, strong forces for compliance and growing demands for accountability. As a consequence, hospitals experience a decrease in the room to manoeuvre. Hence, organisations increasingly choose a control-based management approach to make sure that safety demands are met. In contrast, in case of more abstract safety demands and an organisational culture which favours patient safety, hospitals generally experience more leeway. This often results in a stronger focus on commitment-based management. Institutional and competitive conditions as well as strategic choices that hospitals make have resulted in various combinations of control- and commitment-based safety management. A balanced

  13. STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT GUIDANCE IN HEALTH INSTITUTIONS MANAGEMENT: DETERMINATION OF MISSIONVISION- STRATEGY SELCUK UNIVERSITY MEDICAL FACULTY HOSPITAL SAMPLE

    OpenAIRE

    GÖKBEL, Hakkı; GÜLEŞ, Hasan Kürşat; ERGEN IŞIKLAR, Zeynep; ŞENER, Tuğba

    2016-01-01

    As the nature of the services they offer and areas in which they operate health care institutions are always in the process of change. Especially with the impact of technological advances, new techniques are constantly emerging in health care presentation, in parallel to innovation in health care change is also becoming necessary in the way of health care management. On the other hand today, research conducted in hospitals has reached a holisticand administrative size with the understanding t...

  14. Using ArcGIS software in the pre-hospital emergency medical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manole, M; Duma, Odetta; Custură, Maria Alexandra; Petrariu, F D; Manole, Alina

    2014-01-01

    To measure the accessibility to healtcare services in order to reveal their quality and to improve the overall coverage, continuity and other features. We used the software ESRI Arc GIS 9.3, the Network Analyst function and data provided by Ambulance Service of Iasi (A.S.I.) with emergencies statistics for the first four months of 2012, processed by Microsoft Office Excel 2010. As examples, we chose "St. Maria" Children's Emergency Hospital and "St. Spiridon" Emergency Hospital. ArcGIS Network Analyst finds the best route to get from one location to another or a route that includes multiple locations. Each route is characterized by three stops. The starting point is always the office of Ambulance Service of Iasi (A.S.I.), a second stop at the case address and the third to the hospital unit chosen according to the patient's diagnosis and age. Spatial distribution of emergency cases for the first four months of 2012 in these two examples is one unequable, with higher concentrations in districts located in two areas of the city. The presented examples highlight the poor coverage of healthcare services for the population of Iasi, Romania, especially the South-West area and its vulnerability in situations of emergency. Implementing such a broad project would lead to more complex analyses that would improve the situation of pre-hospital emergency medical services, with final goal to deserve the population, improve the quality of healthcare and develop the interdisciplinary relationships.

  15. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of ISO14001 on Hospital Wastes Management Using AHP in Tehran Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Noorisepehr

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lack of enough supervision, wrong and partial planning in the part of hospital residuals management cause high volume of production from variety of residuals which controlling them impose high costs to every society. In order to improve hospital wastes management, implementing a system of environmental management like ISO14001 can improve the environmental performance of organization and introduce the ways of solving problems to managers. The main objective of this study was to identify and prioritize the effective factors in the implementation of ISO 14001 and the benefits of its implementation in hospitals of Tehran. Methods: In this study, after the identification of success factors and benefits of ISO 14001 implementation in hospitals of Tehran, the method of analytical hierarchy process is used in order to understand the importance and relative priority of these successful important factors and their benefits. Results: Results show that the most important successful factors, based on the importance, are management commitment, education and training, communications and community relations and documentation and control.  Also, the most important benefits, of ISO 14001 implementation, are cost reduction in waste management, increasing the awareness and commitment of staff, risk management practices improvement and work process and procedures improvement. Conclusion: Findings of the study indicate that which success factors of ISO 14001 requires more attention by managers and are in priority while implementing them.

  16. A governor's guide to emergency management. Volume two : homeland security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-19

    Homeland security is a complex challenge that demands significant investment; collaboration among local, state, and federal governments; and integration with the private sector. The purpose of A Governor's Guide to Emergency Management Volume Two: Ho...

  17. Factors affecting the organization and management of emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors affecting the organization and management of emergency mass casualty ... service all under a unified command of leadership with a specified job description. Factors identified were: Political will, human resource planning, appropriate ...

  18. Real-time emergency forecasting technique for situation management systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopytov, V. V.; Kharechkin, P. V.; Naumenko, V. V.; Tretyak, R. S.; Tebueva, F. B.

    2018-05-01

    The article describes the real-time emergency forecasting technique that allows increasing accuracy and reliability of forecasting results of any emergency computational model applied for decision making in situation management systems. Computational models are improved by the Improved Brown’s method applying fractal dimension to forecast short time series data being received from sensors and control systems. Reliability of emergency forecasting results is ensured by the invalid sensed data filtering according to the methods of correlation analysis.

  19. A Model of Workflow Composition for Emergency Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Chen; Bin-ge, Cui; Feng, Zhang; Xue-hui, Xu; Shan-shan, Fu

    The common-used workflow technology is not flexible enough in dealing with concurrent emergency situations. The paper proposes a novel model for defining emergency plans, in which workflow segments appear as a constituent part. A formal abstraction, which contains four operations, is defined to compose workflow segments under constraint rule. The software system of the business process resources construction and composition is implemented and integrated into Emergency Plan Management Application System.

  20. Health information as an aid to effective hospital management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogli, G D

    2003-03-01

    No institution can be efficiently organized and managed unless one makes a critical analysis of organizational needs and takes appropriate action to develop the way one wishes it to be. It is, in fact, more true with hospital organization, usually the new hospital starts as a simple and small organization and with-in the space of few years, however, it evolves into a complex body governed by precise laws and regulations, especially as regards finances, facilities and organizations. In order to maintain any organization especially the hospital administration efficiently it is necessary to develop management tools that would reflect the true operation of the hospital and enable resources (personnel, equipment and buildings) to be fully utilized and adapted to the needs of the population serviced. These indicators of true hospital operation would then serve as a basis for determining hospital activity at any given time, in relation to the number and characteristics of the patients, as well as for evaluation hospital activity in terms of progress made towards good utilization of resources. A record of activities, related to the individual patient, would provide a valid basis for establishing a relationship with the morbidity observed in the hospital and would be a first step towards an evaluation of the services "rendered" by the hospital, or its impact on the demand for care in its own particular area. Thus, in its aims of establishing a hospital to adjusting supply to demand in the field of health care. The author had stressed too much emphasis on health information collection and interpretation because of valid reasons. Correct and timely administrative and clinical information which is a barometer of hospital efficiency could indicate whether the quality is balanced with expenditure or whether leading into financial crisis. So, whatever may be the motive behind establishing a hospital whether for profit making, or public-service, it is necessary the investors