WorldWideScience

Sample records for hospital based survey

  1. HCAHPS Hospital Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) Hospital Survey The intent of the HCAHPS initiative is to provide a standardized survey...

  2. Patient survey (HCAHPS) - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospital ratings for the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital...

  3. Understanding Patient Experience Using Internet-based Email Surveys: A Feasibility Study at Mount Sinai Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Matthew; Lau, Davina; Jivraj, Tanaz; Principi, Tania; Dietrich, Sandra; Bell, Chaim M

    2015-01-01

    Email is becoming a widely accepted communication tool in healthcare settings. This study sought to test the feasibility of Internet-based email surveys of patient experience in the ambulatory setting. We conducted a study of email Internet-based surveys sent to patients in selected ambulatory clinics at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, Canada. Our findings suggest that email links to Internet surveys are a feasible, timely and efficient method to solicit patient feedback about their experience. Further research is required to optimally leverage Internet-based email surveys as a tool to better understand the patient experience.

  4. Hospital-based pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD in Sweden--a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadell, K; Janaudis Ferreira, T; Arne, M; Lisspers, K; Ställberg, B; Emtner, M

    2013-08-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is an evidence-based, multidisciplinary and cost-effective intervention that leads to improved health in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, COPD. However, the availability of PR programs varies between and within different countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the availability and content of hospital-based PR programs in patients with COPD in Sweden. A cross-sectional descriptive design was applied using a web-based questionnaire which was sent out to all hospitals in Sweden. The questionnaire consisted of 32 questions that concerned availability and content of PR in patients with COPD during 2011. Seventy out of 71 hospitals responded the electronic survey. Forty-six (66%) hospitals offered PR for patients with COPD. Around 75% of the hospitals in southern and middle parts of Sweden and 33% of the hospitals in the northern part offered PR. Thirty-four percent of the patients declined participation. A total number of 1355 patients participated in PR which represents 0.2% of the COPD population in Sweden. All hospitals had exercise training as major component and 76% offered an educational program. Not even half a percent of the patients with COPD in Sweden took part in a hospital-based PR program during 2011. There was a considerable geographic discrepancy in availability over the country. To enable a greater part of the increasing number of patients with COPD to take part in this evidence-based treatment, there is a need of evaluating other settings of PR programs; in primary care, at home and/or over the internet.

  5. [Current status of "hospital-clinic" and "hospital-pharmacy" cooperation for inhalation therapy -based on hospital surveys throughout Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Chie; Momose, Yasuyuki; Horie, Takeo; Komase, Yuko; Niimi, Akio; Dobashi, Kunio; Fujimoto, Keisaku; Tohda, Yuuji; Ohta, Ken; Adachi, Mitsuru

    2014-02-01

    The "zero death from asthma strategy" in the medical treatment for bronchial asthma has been promoted by the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare from 2006, and it indicates that medical and non-medical specialists, as well as pharmacists, should cooperate, and strives to build cooperation which is suited the actual conditions of an area. It is also important for COPD. Although hospitals in some areas cooperate with clinics and pharmacies, the overall concept of cooperation appears to be absent in most Japanese hospitals. A questionnaire was administered in early March, 2012 to 477 allergology institutions, and was authorized by an educational establishment. Among 246 replies from the institutions, cooperation between hospitals and clinics was carried out by 98 institutions (39.8%) specializing in bronchial asthma, and in 64 institutions (37.2%) specializing in COPD. However, cooperation tools were used in only 37 of these institutions (15.0%). The ability to fill prescriptions outside the hospital was available in 209 institutions (85.0%). One-hundred and seventeen institutions (47.6%) replied that they have no tools for hospital-pharmacy cooperation. Direct indications were written in prescriptions by 82 institutions (33.3). In order to build inter-regional association and to equalize medical treatment, we suggest that developing tools and organization for cooperation between health professionals who treat patients with bronchial asthma and COPD is necessary.

  6. Oral cancer in Myanmar: a preliminary survey based on hospital-based cancer registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oo, Htun Naing; Myint, Yi Yi; Maung, Chan Nyein; Oo, Phyu Sin; Cheng, Jun; Maruyama, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Manabu; Yagi, Minoru; Sawair, Faleh A; Saku, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of oral cancer is not clearly known in Myanmar, where betel quid chewing habits are widely spread. Since betel quid chewing has been considered to be one of the important causative factors for oral cancer, the circumstantial situation for oral cancer should be investigated in this country. We surveyed oral cancer cases as well as whole body cancers from two cancer registries from Yangon and Mandalay cities, both of which have representative referral hospitals in Myanmar, and we showed that oral cancer stood at the 6th position in males and 10th in females, contributing to 3.5% of whole body cancers. There was a male predominance with a ratio of 2.1:1. Their most frequent site was the tongue, followed by the palate, which was different from that in other countries with betel quid chewing habits. About 90% of male and 44% of female patients had habitual backgrounds of chewing and smoking for more than 15 years. The results revealed for the first time reliable oral cancer frequencies in Myanmar, suggesting that longstanding chewing and smoking habits are etiological backgrounds for oral cancer patients. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension and albuminuria in rural Zambia: a hospital-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jon B; Thomsen, Jakúp A; Rossing, Peter; Parkinson, Shelagh; Christensen, Dirk L; Bygbjerg, Ib C

    2013-09-01

    To assess albuminuria in rural Zambia among patients with diabetes mellitus only (DM group), hypertension only (HTN group) and patients with combined DM and HTN (DM/HTN group). A cross-sectional survey was conducted at St. Francis Hospital in the Eastern province of Zambia. Albumin-creatinine ratio in one urine sample was used to assess albuminuria. Other information obtained included age, sex, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), blood pressure (BP), glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c ), random capillary glucose, time since diagnosis, medication and family history of DM or HTN. A total of 193 participants were included (DM group: n = 33; HTN group: n = 92; DM/HTN group: n = 68). The participants in the DM group used insulin more frequently as diabetes medication than the DM/HTN group (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the DM group was younger and had lower BMI, WC and BP than the two other groups. In the DM group, HTN group and DM/HTN group, microalbuminuria was found in 12.1%, 19.6% and 29.4% (P = 0.11), and macroalbuminuria was found in 0.0%, 3.3% and 13.2% (P = 0.014), respectively. The urine albumin (P = 0.014) and albumin-creatinine ratio (P = 0.0006) differed between the three groups. This hospital-based survey in rural Zambia found a lower frequency of albuminuria among the participants than in previous studies of patients with DM or HTN in urban sub-Saharan Africa. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A questionnaire-based survey on nurse perceptions of patient handoffs in japanese hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Xiuzhu; Itoh, Kenji; Andersen, Henning Boje

    2012-01-01

    transfer, responsibility transfer, management goals, environment and handoff system. As an overall trend, Japanese nurses indicated that both information and responsibility for the patient were transferred moderately well within the hospital. They put a higher priority on the goal of patient safety...... and strategies contributing to effective handoffs. A questionnaire survey was conducted in 2011, collecting 1462 valid responses (74% response rate) from nurses in six Japanese hospitals. There were 17 questions, each with reply options on a five-point Likert scale, covering five main aspects: information...... and a relatively smaller on efficiency. Most respondents viewed their hospital's handoff system as immature. Significant differences were observed in nurses' perceptions not only across hospitals but also across wards/departments. In particular, during patient handoffs between different units, nurses working...

  9. Prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease in two districts of Sri Lanka: a hospital based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satharasinghe Raveendra L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is being increasingly diagnosed in Asia. However there are few epidemiological data from the region. Methods To determine prevalence and clinical characteristics of IBD, a hospital-based survey was performed in the Colombo and Gampaha districts (combined population 4.5 million in Sri Lanka. Patients with established ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn's disease (CD, who were permanent residents of these adjoining districts, were recruited from hospital registries and out-patient clinics. Clinical information was obtained from medical records and patient interviews. Results There were 295 cases of IBD (UC = 240, CD = 55, of which 34 (UC = 30, CD = 4 were newly diagnosed during the study year. The prevalence rate for UC was 5.3/100,000 (95% CI 5.0-5.6/100,000, and CD was 1.2/100,000 (95% CI 1.0-1.4/100,000. The incidence rates were 0.69/100,000 (95% CI 0.44-0.94/100,000 for UC and 0.09/100,000 (95% CI 0.002-0.18/100,000 for CD. Female:male ratios were 1.5 for UC and 1.0 for CD. Mean age at diagnosis was (males and females 36.6 and 38.1y for UC and 33.4 and 36.2y for CD. Among UC patients, 51.1% had proctitis and at presentation 58.4% had mild disease. 80% of CD patients had only large bowel involvement. Few patients had undergone surgery. Conclusions The prevalence of IBD in this population was low compared to Western populations, but similar to some in Asia. There was a female preponderance for UC. UC was mainly mild, distal or left-sided, while CD mainly involved the large bowel.

  10. A survey assessing the impact of a hospital-based general practice residency program on dentists and dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejani, Asif; Epstein, Joel B; Gibson, Gary; Le, Nhu

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to evaluate the outcome of completing a general practice hospital-based dental residency program. A survey was mailed to all individuals who had completed a general practice residency program (resident) between 1980 and 1996 and to dentists who had not completed a hospital program (undergraduate). The responses were evaluated by Fisher's exact test. Seventy-four percent of the resident group and 68% from the undergraduate sample group returned the questionnaire. Approximately half the residents were in general dental practice. Twenty-six percent were involved in specialty dentistry, 7% in hospital dentistry, and 20% in teaching at a dental school. Of the undergraduate dentists, more than three-quarters were in general practice, 5% were entered into specialty programs, 1% were involved in hospital dentistry, and 15% taught at a dental school. Half of the residents held staff privileges in a hospital or ambulatory setting, compared with 16% of undergraduates. Forty-three percent of the residents provided consultation in a hospital or long-term-care facility, compared with 21% of the undergraduates. Practice characteristics suggested enhanced clinical skills in oral surgery, periodontics, emergency dental care, and oral medicine/pathology in those completing the hospital program. The findings of this study confirm that the outcome of completing a hospital program is a change in practice profile, site of practice, services for complex patients, and continuing involvement in teaching.

  11. Sources of information used when prescribing for children, a survey of hospital based pediatricians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukattash, Tareq L; Nuseir, Khawla Q; Jarab, Anan S; Alzoubi, Karem H; Al-Azzam, Sayer I; Shara, Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Due to the lack of properly tested medicines for children, there is little available information with regards to indications and dosing of medications in children. To collect data on sources where hospital based pediatricians obtain prescribing information when treating children and the extent of collaboration with the hospital pharmacist. Two hundred and fifty pediatricians in different hospitals within different cities in Jordan were asked to fill in a structured questionnaire regarding information sources used when prescribing for children. Questionnaires were collected from 162 (64.8%) hospital based pediatricians, who have completed the questionnaire by the designated date. Most (75.5%) reported that the Lexi Comp's Drug Information Handbook was the source that they most frequently used for drug information when prescribing for in children. The BNF and the BNFc (British National Formulary for children) were found to be the most sources that contain sufficient information that aids pediatricians when prescribing for children. A minority (22%) claimed to consult with the hospital pharmacist when they face difficulties when prescribing for children. Pediatricians rely on different information sources when they prescribe for children. Those sources vary in their reliability in aiding pediatrician when prescribing. Further work should be done in the provision of useful information on pediatric drug therapy to pediatricians. More steps should be taking place to activate collaboration and interaction between pediatricians and pharmacists as well.

  12. Radiofrequency field surveys in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, K R; Soltys, M; Arnofsky, S; Doshi, P; Hanover, D; Mercado, R; Schleck, D

    1996-01-01

    The authors surveyed levels of radiofrequency (RF) fields in the frequency range 0.1-1,000 MHz in four hospitals in the Philadelphia area, to obtain background information related to the possible interference of radiofrequency fields with medical equipment. Two large center-city hospitals, a regional county hospital, and two suburban hospitals were surveyed. Measurements were made at six to 12 sites in each hospital, in each of the three frequency bands. More limited additional measurements were conducted in a fifth hospital as well. Sites were selected to include areas where strong RF signals from transmitting antennas might be expected to be present (e.g., locations close to windows in upper stories of buildings near paging antennas) as well as other representative sites in the hospital. The median RF field strengths were quite low (0.1-0.5 V/m), but at specific locations the RF signals from broadcast sources exceeded 1 V/m. Much stronger fields were recorded close to electrosurgical units and hand-held transmitters (cellular telephones and UHF transceivers).

  13. Incidence Rate of Community-Acquired Sepsis Among Hospitalized Acute Medical Patients-A Population-Based Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Laursen, Christian B; Jensen, Thøger Gorm

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: Sepsis is a frequent cause of admission, but incidence rates based on administrative data have previously produced large differences in estimates. The aim of the study was to estimate the incidence of community-acquired sepsis based on patients' symptoms and clinical findings at arrival...... to the hospital. DESIGN:: Population-based survey. SETTING:: Medical emergency department from September 1, 2010, to August 31, 2011. PATIENTS:: All patients were manually reviewed using a structured protocol in order to identify the presence of infection. Vital signs and laboratory values were collected...

  14. Clostridium difficile ribotypes in Austria: a multicenter, hospital-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indra, Alexander; Schmid, Daniela; Huhulescu, Steliana; Simons, Erica; Hell, Markus; Stickler, Karl; Allerberger, Franz

    2015-08-01

    A prospective, noninterventional survey was conducted among Clostridium difficile positive patients identified in the time period of July until October 2012 in 18 hospitals distributed across all nine Austrian provinces. Participating hospitals were asked to send stool samples or isolates from ten successive patients with C.difficile infection to the National Clostridium difficile Reference Laboratory at the Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety for PCR-ribotyping and in vitro susceptibility testing. A total of 171 eligible patients were identified, including 73 patients with toxin-positive stool specimens and 98 patients from which C. difficile isolates were provided. Of the 159 patients with known age, 127 (74.3%) were 65 years or older, the median age was 76 years (range: 9-97 years), and the male to female ratio 2.2. Among these patients, 73% had health care-associated and 20% community-acquired C. difficile infection (indeterminable 7%). The all-cause, 30-day mortality was 8.8% (15/171). Stool samples yielded 46 different PCR-ribotypes, of which ribotypes 027 (20%), 014 (15.8%), 053 (10.5%), 078 (5.3%), and 002 (4.7%) were the five most prevalent. Ribotype 027 was found only in the provinces Vienna, Burgenland, and Lower Austria. Severe outcome of C. difficile infection was found to be associated with ribotype 053 (prevalence ratio: 3.04; 95% CI: 1.24, 7.44), not with the so-called hypervirulent ribotypes 027 and 078. All 027 and 053 isolates exhibited in vitro resistance against moxifloxacin. Fluoroquinolone use in the health care setting must be considered as a factor favoring the spread of these fluoroquinolone resistant C. difficile clones.

  15. Estimates from two survey designs: national hospital discharge survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, B J; Kozak, L J

    1992-05-01

    The methodology for the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) has been revised in several ways. These revisions, which were implemented for the 1988 NHDS, included adoption of a different hospital sampling frame, changes in the sampling design (in particular the implementation of a three-stage design), increased use of data purchased from abstracting service organizations, and adjustments to the estimation procedures used to derive the national estimates. To investigate the effects of these revisions on the estimates of hospital use from the NHDS, data were collected from January through March of 1988 using both the old and the new survey methods. This study compared estimates based on the old and the new survey methods for a variety of hospital and patient characteristics. Although few estimates were identical across survey methodologies, most of the variations could be attributed to sampling error. Estimates from two different samples of the same population would be expected to vary by chance even if precisely the same methods were used to collect and process the data. Because probability samples were used for the old and new survey methodologies, sampling error could be measured. Approximate relative standard errors were calculated for the estimates using the old and new survey methods. Taking these errors into account, less than 10 percent of the estimates were found to differ across survey methodologies at the 0.05 level of significance. Because a large number of comparisons were made, 5 percent of the estimates could have been found to be significantly different by chance alone. When there were statistically significant differences in nonmedical data, the new methods appeared to produce more accurate estimates than the old methods did. Race was more likely to be reported using the new methods. "New" estimates for hospitals in the West Region and government-owned hospitals were more similar than the corresponding "old" estimates to data from the census of

  16. Public acceptance of a hypothetical Ebola virus vaccine in Aceh, Indonesia: A hospital-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harapan Harapan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the acceptance towards a hypothetical Ebola virus vaccine (EVV and associated factors in a non-affected country, Indonesia. Methods: A hospital-based, cross-sectional study was conducted in four regencies of Aceh, Indonesia. A set of pre-tested questionnaires was used to obtain information on acceptance towards EVV and a range of explanatory variables. Associations between EVV acceptance and explanatory variables were tested using multi-steps logistic regression analysis and the Spearman's rank correlation. Results: Participants who had knowledge on Ebola virus disease (EVD were 45.3% (192/424 and none of the participants achieved 80% correct answers on the knowledge regarding to EVD. About 73% of participants expressed their willingness to receive the EVV. Education attainment, occupation, monthly income, have heard regarding to EVD previously, socioeconomic level, attitude towards vaccination practice and knowledge regarding to EVD were associated significantly with acceptance towards EVV in univariate analysis (P < 0.05. In the final multivariate model, socio-economic level, attitude towards vaccination practice and knowledge regarding to EVD were the independent explanatory variables for EVV acceptance. Conclusions: The knowledge of EVD was low, but this minimally affected the acceptance towards EVV. However, to facilitate optimal uptake of EVV, dissemination of vaccine-related information prior to its introduction is required.

  17. Incidence of hospital referred head injuries in Norway: a population based survey from the Stavanger region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rommer, Bertil Roland; Heskestad, Ben; Baardsen, Roald;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In three previous Norwegian studies conducted between 1974 and 1993, the annual incidence rates of hospital admitted head injuries were 236, 200 and 169 per 100,000 population. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence of head injury in the Stavanger region and to compare......,317 inhabitants (2003). RESULTS: The annual incidence rate was 207/100,000 population for hospital referred head injury and 157/100,000 population for hospital admitted head injury. High age- and sex specific incidence rates were observed among the oldest, and the highest rate (882/100,000) among men above 90...

  18. Epidemiological Characteristics of Fatal Traumatic Accidents in Babol, Iran: A Hospital-Based Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Reza Modarres

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the epidemiological characteristics of fatal traumatic accidents in patients referred to a hospital in Babol, Northern Iran. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study being performed during a 1-year period including all the dead trauma patients referred to Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Babol. We included all those patients who were transferred to our center to trauma and injuries and passed away during the hospital stay. Those who died due to electrical shock, drowning and suffocation caused by hanging sand poisoning were excluded from the study. Demographic information such as age, sex, marital status, education, employment, the type, location, and time of injury, injured parts of body and treatment methods, the cause, location and time of death were recorded. Results: From the 92 dead patients, 76 were men (82.6% and 16 were women (17.4%. The cause of death in 53 cases (57.6% was head injury. Regarding the location,30patients (32.6% died at the scene of the accident, 62(67.4% died in the hospital. The maximum rate of trauma occurred in the afternoon shift between the hours of 13:30 to 19:30.The head and face were the most damaged organs. Road traffic accidents were the most common cause of injury related mortality recorded in 81 patients (88.0%. Most of the accidents occurred in intercity roads in 27 people (33.3% and the others in rural-urban roads. Pedestrians were the most common victims of road traffic accidents mortality being reported in 29 people (35.8%. Conclusion: Road traffic accidents are among the most common cause of injury related mortality in our region. Increasing the public knowledge and improve the traffic law enforcement measures should be considered for decreasing the morbidity and mortality.

  19. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) is designed to collect data on the utilization and provision of ambulatory care services in hospital...

  20. A questionnaire-based survey on nurse perceptions of patient handoffs in japanese hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Xiuzhu; Itoh, Kenji; Andersen, Henning Boje;

    2012-01-01

    Patient handoff is a critically important process in healthcare. However, there have been few studies investigated healthcare staff perceptions of its quality and safety. In the present paper, we seek to explore essential characteristics of patient handoff. We discuss critical factors and strateg......Patient handoff is a critically important process in healthcare. However, there have been few studies investigated healthcare staff perceptions of its quality and safety. In the present paper, we seek to explore essential characteristics of patient handoff. We discuss critical factors...... transfer, responsibility transfer, management goals, environment and handoff system. As an overall trend, Japanese nurses indicated that both information and responsibility for the patient were transferred moderately well within the hospital. They put a higher priority on the goal of patient safety...

  1. Prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among cancer patients – hospital-based, cross-sectional survey

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    Mohan Roy Gopalan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the prevalence of Psychiatric disorders in cancer patients and to find out the factors associated with Psychiatric disorders in Cancer Patients. Settings and Design: Department of Radiotherapy, Medical College, Thiruvananthapuram, cross sectional survey design was used. Methods and Material: Adult patients (18 years of age and above, having a diagnosis of carcinoma were selected by consecutive sampling method.A questionnaire which included back ground data, socio economic variables, treatment variables like type of malignancy, exposure to radiation & chemotherapy prior to the evaluation and current treatment, co occurring medical illness & treatment and past & family history of psychiatric illness was used to collect data. Delirium rating scale and MINI International neuropsychiatric interview were used to assess Psychiatric disorders and delirium. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi square and logistics regression tests were used for analysis. Results: Of the 384 assessed, 160(41.7% had psychiatric disorders. Adjustment disorders were seen in 22.6%. 10.9% of subjects had major depressive disorder. Thus a total of 33.5% of patients had a diagnosis of either anxiety or depressive disorder. Proportion of patients having delirium was 6.5%. Hypomania was seen in small (1.6% of patients. Multivariate analysis for various parameters for psychiatric disorders showed that age, past history of chemotherapy, past history of radiotherapy, & surgical treatment of carcinomas are significant predictors of psychiatric disorders. Conclusions: Psychiatric disorders are seen in a significant proportion of Psychiatric patients.

  2. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in HIV-infected, HAART-naïve Ugandan children: a hospital-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hestvik Elin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this survey was to determine the prevalence of and factors associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori colonization in HIV-infected, highly active antiretroviral therapy-naïve Ugandan children aged 0-12 years. Methods In a hospital-based survey, 236 HIV-infected children were tested for H. pylori colonization using a faecal antigen test. A standardized interview with socio-demographic information and medical history was used to assess risk factors. A cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4 cell percentage was prevalent in most children. Results The overall prevalence of H. pylori in the HIV-infected children was 22.5%. Age-specific prevalence was as follows: up to one year, 14.7%; 1-3 years, 30.9%; and 3-12 years, 20.7%. HIV-infected children who were more seriously affected by their disease (low CD4 cell percentage or WHO clinical stage II-IV were less likely to be colonized with H. pylori. There was a trend for a lower prevalence of H. pylori in children who had taken antibiotics for the preceding two weeks (21.6% than in those who had not taken antibiotics (35.7%. There was no statistically significant difference in prevalence by gender, housing, congested living, education of the female caretaker, drinking water or toilet facilities. Conclusions HIV-infected, HAART-naïve Ugandan children had a lower prevalence of H. pylori colonization compared with apparently healthy Ugandan children (44.3%. Children with a low CD4 cell percentage and an advanced clinical stage of HIV had an even lower risk of H. pylori colonization. Treatment with antibiotics due to co-morbidity with infectious diseases is a possible explanation for the relatively low prevalence.

  3. Determinants of second pregnancy among pregnant women: a hospital-based cross-sectional survey in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xianglong; Zuo, Hanxiao; Rao, Yunshuang; Wang, LianLian; Zeng, Huan; Zhang, Lei; Sharma, Manoj; Reis, Cesar; Zhao, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to explore determinants of second pregnancy and underlying reasons among pregnant Chinese women. Design The study was a population-based cross-sectional survey. Setting 16 hospitals in 5 provinces of Mainland China were included. Participants A total of 2345 pregnant women aged 18 years or above were surveyed face to face by investigators between June and August 2015. Main outcome measures The pregnancy statuses (first or second pregnancy) and reasons for entering second pregnancy. Results A total of 1755 (74.8%) and 590 (25.2%) women in their respective first and second pregnancies were enrolled in this study. The most common self-reported reasons for entering second pregnancy among participants included the benefits to the first child (26.1%), love of children (25.8%), adoption of the 2-child policy (11.5%), concerns about losing the first child (7.5%) and suggestions from parents (7.5%). Pregnant women with low (prevalence ratio (PR) 1.96; 95% CI 1.62 to 2.36) and moderate education level (PR 1.97; 95% CI 1.65 to 2.36) were more likely to have a second pregnancy than their higher educated counterparts. Income was inversely associated with second pregnancy. However, unemployed participants (PR 0.79; 95% CI 0.66 to 0.95) were less likely to enter a second pregnancy than those employed. Women with moderate education were 3 times more likely to have a second child following the ‘2-child policy’ than the low education level subgroup. Conclusions 1 in every 4 pregnant women is undergoing a second pregnancy. The benefits of the firstborn or the love of children were the key drivers of a second pregnancy. Low socioeconomic status was positively associated with a second pregnancy as well. The new 2-child policy will have an influence on China's demographics. PMID:28348193

  4. Hospital doctors' self-rated skills in and use of evidence-based medicine - a questionnaire survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveri, Roberto S; Gluud, Christian; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer A

    2004-01-01

    Problems in understanding basic aspects of evidence-based medicine (EBM) may form barriers to its implementation into clinical practice. We examined hospital doctors' skills in EBM terms and related these skills to their use of information sources, critical appraisal, and implementation of EBM...

  5. Prevalence of HTLV-1/2 infections in Spain: A cross-sectional hospital-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño, Ana; García, Juan; de Mendoza, Carmen; Benito, Rafael; Aguilera, Antonio; Ortíz de Lejarazu, Raul; Ramos, José M; Trigo, Matilde; Eirós, Jose M; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel; Torres, Alvaro; Calderón, Enrique; Hernandez, Araceli; Gomez, Cesar; Marcaida, Goizane; Soriano, Vincent

    2010-08-01

    The presence of antibodies to human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) types 1 and 2 was examined in 5742 sera belonging to consecutive adult outpatients attended during June 2008 at 13 different hospitals across Spain. Overall, 58.8% were female. Foreigners represented 8% of the study population. Seven individuals were seropositive for HTLV-2 (overall prevalence 0.12%). No cases of HTLV-1 infection were found. All HTLV-2(+) subjects were Spanish natives, of whom six were coinfected with HIV-1 and five with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Moreover, all but one of the HTLV-2(+) subjects had been intravenous drug users. In summary, this cross-sectional survey suggests that the rate of HTLV infection in Spain is low, and is mostly represented by HTLV-2. Infected individuals are generally Spanish natives with a prior history of intravenous drug use and are coinfected with HIV-1 and/or HCV.

  6. [Evaluation of suicide risk factors based on a survey of suicides and suicidal attempts at psychiatric hospitals in Aichi Prefecture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takao

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examined cases of suicide, suicidal attempts, and risk factors in 41 psychiatric hospitals of Aichi Prefecture. As a result, some characteristics of psychiatric wards considered to be effective in suicide prevention were shown. In addition, as for measures to resolve risk factors and the state of the patients, there were many which were effective in the prevention of suicide attempts. Regarding measures to reduce risk factors for symptoms and treat patients, there were many techniques which were effective in the prevention of suicidal attempts, but, for cases which did not respond to treatment, suicide was frequent. In addition, a "suicide preventive manual in a psychiatric hospital" produced based on these results was distributed.

  7. A survey report: how hospitals measure liquidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleverley, W O; Massar, G S

    1983-11-01

    Liquidity is an important financial concept that is widely understood although not authoritatively defined. In many situations the actual assessment of liquidity is based on the relationship of current assets and current liabilities. Nationally, a decline in traditional measures of liquidity such as current and quick ratios has occurred for both general industry and the hospital industry. There are a variety of possible explanations for this trend, but one of special interest in this article was the effect of financial reporting practices. A recent Principles & Practices Board survey of Financial Analysis Service subscribers indicated that there is a potential for underreporting working capital, (current assets less current liabilities), in the hospital industry. However, this does not necessarily imply that the recent decline in liquidity measures is in any way due to reporting practices. No information about changes in reporting practices was obtained in this study. Finally, the results of the study do suggest that examination of more than one liquidity indicator is useful. Specifically, restricting attention to just the current ratio could be misleading. In this vein, it is interesting to note that six measures of liquidity are used in the FAS. All may provide insight into an accurate assessment of liquidity.

  8. Hospital information system survey in qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ali, Rashid; Reti, Shane; Feldman, Henry; Safran, Charles; Niaz, Rashid; Erskine, Alistair; Elmagarmid, Ahmed; Al-Musleh, Abdulwahab

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare can be enhanced by the effective use of information technology to improve the quality and safety of care and many healthcare providers are adopting advanced health information technology to improve their healthcare delivery process. Qatar is a relatively young Middle Eastern country with an ambitious and progressive national strategy to develop its healthcare system, including an advanced e-health infrastructure delivering the right medical information at the right time to clinicians and patients. To assess the effectiveness of such programs, it is important to have a pre-intervention baseline from which comparisons, performance against target measures and forward thinking strategic planning can be grounded. This study presents the first published campus wide survey of Hospital Information Systems in large public and private hospitals in Qatar. To qualitatively assess and describe the current state of Hospital Information Systems in large hospitals in Qatar, and to establish a baseline or reference point for Qatar's readiness for, and adoption of Hospital Information Systems.

  9. A nationwide cluster randomized controlled trial of unanounced versus announced periodic hospital surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Katherina Beltoft

    2016-01-01

    based on DDKM version 2. Construction of the DDKM:  3-year cycle  One announced on-site accreditation survey  One announced periodic midterm survey  82 accreditation standards divided in three themes: organizational standards, continuity of care standards, and disease-specific standards  473......:  Nationwide block and cluster RCT  23 public hospitals (3 university hospitals, 15 general hospitals, and 5 psychiatric hospitals  11 hospitals received announced surveys (control group)  12 hospitals received unannounced surveys (intervention group)  9 surveyors randomly allocated in surveyor teams...

  10. Prevalence of hypertension and its risk factors in southwest Ethiopia: a hospital-based cross-sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudina, Esayas Kebede; Michael, Yadani; Assegid, Sahilu

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypertension is a common medical condition worldwide. It is an important public health challenge because of the associated morbidity, mortality, and the cost to the society. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of hypertension and its risk factors among attendants of adult outpatient departments at Jimma University Specialized Hospital in southwest Ethiopia. Materials and methods A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted on 734 participants aged 15 years or older from May 2012 to June 2012. A pretested structured questionnaire consisting of characteristics related to sociodemographic profiles and risk factors for hypertension was used for data collection. Three separate measurements of blood pressure and relevant anthropometric evaluation were taken according to current recommended standards. Chi-square test and other statistical analyses were done to employ appropriate interpretations of the findings. P-values of <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results The mean age of the participants was 42.3 ± 13.2 years and 71.7% of them were 35 years and older; 58% of them were females. Overall prevalence of hypertension – defined by systolic blood pressure ≥140 and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 or reporting history of hypertension – was found to be 13.2%. Only 35.1% of them were aware of their hypertension and only 23.7% were on treatment. The overall control rate was 15.5%. Family history of hypertension, having diabetes mellitus, being overweight, and oral contraceptive use were associated with high blood pressure. Conclusion Hypertension was found to be prevalent; morbidity, awareness, treatment, and control in those with hypertension were low. Hence, intervention measures should be undertaken at the community level; particular emphasis should be placed on prevention by introducing lifestyle modifications and creating awareness about the problem so that early detection and intervention is possible

  11. Patient Survey (HCAHPS) - PPS-Exempt Cancer Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospital ratings for the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital...

  12. The relative effectiveness of practice change interventions in overcoming common barriers to change: a survey of 14 hospitals with experience implementing evidence-based guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Fiona; Doig, Gordon S

    2007-10-01

    Changing practice to reflect current best evidence can be costly and time-consuming. The purpose of this survey was to determine the optimal combination of practice change interventions needed to overcome barriers to practice change commonly encountered in the intensive care unit (ICU). A survey instrument delivered by mail with email follow-up reminders. Fourteen hospitals throughout Australia and New Zealand. Individuals responsible for implementing an evidence-based guideline for nutritional support in the ICU. Practice change interventions were ranked in order of effectiveness and barriers to change were ranked in order of how frequently they were encountered. A response rate of 100% was achieved. Interventions traditionally regarded as strong (academic detailing, active reminders) were ranked higher than those traditionally regarded as moderate (audit and feedback), or weak (posters, mouse mats). The high ranks of the site initiation visit (educational outreach, modest) and in-servicing (didactic lectures, weak) were unexpected, as was the relatively low rank of educationally influential, peer-nominated opinion leaders. Four hospitals reported the same doctor-related barrier as 'most common' and the remaining 10 hospitals reported three different doctor-related barriers, two nursing-related barriers and three organizational barriers as most common. When designing a multifaceted, multi-centre change strategy, the selection of individual practice change interventions should be based on: (1) an assessment of available resources; (2) recognition of the importance of different types of barriers to different sites; (3) the potential for combinations of interventions to have a synergistic effect on practice change, and (4) the potential for combinations of interventions to actually reduce workload.

  13. Prevalence of hypertension and its risk factors in southwest Ethiopia: a hospital-based cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudina EK

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Esayas Kebede Gudina,1 Yadani Michael,1 Sahilu Assegid2 1Department of Internal Medicine, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia; 2Department of Epidemiology, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia Background: Hypertension is a common medical condition worldwide. It is an important public health challenge because of the associated morbidity, mortality, and the cost to the society. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of hypertension and its risk factors among attendants of adult outpatient departments at Jimma University Specialized Hospital in southwest Ethiopia. Materials and methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted on 734 participants aged 15 years or older from May 2012 to June 2012. A pretested structured questionnaire consisting of characteristics related to sociodemographic profiles and risk factors for hypertension was used for data collection. Three separate measurements of blood pressure and relevant anthropometric evaluation were taken according to current recommended standards. Chi-square test and other statistical analyses were done to employ appropriate interpretations of the findings. P-values of <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: The mean age of the participants was 42.3 ± 13.2 years and 71.7% of them were 35 years and older; 58% of them were females. Overall prevalence of hypertension – defined by systolic blood pressure ≥140 and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 or reporting history of hypertension – was found to be 13.2%. Only 35.1% of them were aware of their hypertension and only 23.7% were on treatment. The overall control rate was 15.5%. Family history of hypertension, having diabetes mellitus, being overweight, and oral contraceptive use were associated with high blood pressure. Conclusion: Hypertension was found to be prevalent; morbidity, awareness, treatment, and control in those with hypertension were low. Hence, intervention measures should be undertaken

  14. Development and validation of a web-based survey on the use of personal communication devices by hospital registered nurses: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Deborah L; Levasseur, Sandra A; Li, Dongmei

    2013-11-26

    The use of personal communication devices (such as basic cell phones, enhanced cell phones or smartphones, and tablet computers) in hospital units has risen dramatically in recent years. The use of these devices for personal and professional activities can be beneficial, but also has the potential to negatively affect patient care, as clinicians may become distracted by these devices. No validated questionnaire examining the impact of the use of these devices on patient care exists; thus, we aim to develop and validate an online questionnaire for surveying the views of registered nurses with experience of working in hospitals regarding the impact of the use of personal communication devices on hospital units. A 50-item, four-domain questionnaire on the views of registered nursing staff regarding the impact of personal communication devices on hospital units was developed based on a literature review and interviews with such nurses. A repeated measures pilot study was conducted to examine the psychometrics of a survey questionnaire and the feasibility of conducting a larger study. Psychometric testing of the questionnaire included examining internal consistency reliability and test-retest reliability in a sample of 50 registered nurses. The response rate for the repeated measures was 30%. Cronbach coefficient alpha was used to examine the internal consistency and reliability, and in three of the four question groups (utilization, impact, and opinions), the correlation was observed to be very high. This suggests that the questions were measuring a single underlying theme. The Cronbach alpha value for the questions in the performance group, describing the use of personal communication devices while working, was lower than those for the other question groups. These values may be an indication that the assumptions underlying the Cronbach alpha calculation may have been violated for this group of questions. A Spearman rho correlation was used to determine the test

  15. General surgery at rural Tennessee hospitals: a survey of rural Tennessee hospital administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofer, Joseph B; Petros, Tommy J; Burkholder, Hans C; Clarke, P Chris

    2011-07-01

    Rural communities face an impending surgical workforce crisis. The purpose of this study is to describe perceptions of rural Tennessee hospital administrators regarding the importance of surgical services to their hospitals. In collaboration with the Tennessee Hospital Association, we developed and administered a 13-item survey based on a recently published national survey to 80 rural Tennessee hospitals in August 2008. A total of 29 responses were received for an overall 36.3 per cent response rate. Over 44 per cent of rural surgeons were older than 50 years of age, and 27.6 per cent of hospitals reported they would lose at least one surgeon in the next 2 years. The responding hospitals reported losing 10.4 per cent of their surgical workforce in the preceding 2 years. Over 53 per cent were actively recruiting a general surgeon with an average time to recruit a surgeon of 11.8 months. Ninety-seven per cent stated that having a surgical program was very important to their financial viability with the mean and median reported revenue generated by a single general surgeon being $1.8 million and $1.4 million, respectively. Almost 11 per cent of the hospitals stated they would have to close if they lost surgical services. Although rural Tennessee hospitals face similar difficulties to national rural hospitals with regard to retaining and hiring surgeons, slightly more Tennessee hospitals (54 vs 36%) were actively attempting to recruit a general surgeon. The shortage of general surgeons is a threat to the accessibility of comprehensive hospital-based care for rural Tennesseans.

  16. A survey: Precepts and practices in drug use indicators at Government Healthcare Facilities: A Hospital-based prospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menik, Hettihewa L; Isuru, Amrasinghe I; Sewwandi, Subasinghe

    2011-01-01

    We planned to identify the difficulties in practicing the rational use of medicine in health facilities, using drug-use indicators. We studied the average consultation time (ACT), average number of drugs per encounter (ANDE), percentage of drugs by generic name (PDPG), percentage of encounters with antibiotics (PAP), percentage of encounters with injection (PIP), percentage of drugs prescribed from the essential drugs list (PEDL), using pretested questionnaires in different hospital types. There was a higher value of ACT in Teachin hospital (TH,2.31 min) and general hospital (GH,2.17 min) compared to district hospital (DH,0.83 min). ANDE was high in all three categories (3.24, 2.88, and 3.26 in TH, GH, and DH, respectively). There was a significant difference in ANDE in all three categories (P≤0.05). There was no significant difference in the PDPG among all categories of Hospitals. PAP was highest in DH (80%) and lowest in GH (46%). PIP was highest in DH (6%), 4% in GH, and lowest in TH (3%) in the Galle district. PEDL in TH, GH, and DH were 97, 100, and 99%, respectively. Prescribers use a short consultation time and practice polypharmacy, and the use of generic and essential drug lists is significantly high. Antibiotic usage is high, but usage of injections is low. We further noted prescriptions with absence of the diagnosis, sex, and prescriber's identity. : We conclude that some areas like polypharmacy, high usage of antibiotics, and poor prescription writing practices are high and they can be addressed by in-service awareness programs for noted prescriber errors.

  17. A survey: Precepts and practices in drug use indicators at government healthcare facilities: A hospital-based prospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hettihewa L Menik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : We planned to identify the difficulties in practicing the rational use of medicine in health facilities, using drug-use indicators. Materials and Methods : We studied the average consultation time (ACT, average number of drugs per encounter (ANDE, percentage of drugs by generic name (PDPG, percentage of encounters with antibiotics (PAP, percentage of encounters with injection (PIP, percentage of drugs prescribed from the essential drugs list (PEDL, using pretested questionnaires in different hospital types. Results : There was a higher value of ACT in Teachin hospital (TH,2.31 min and general hospital (GH,2.17 min compared to district hospital (DH ,0.83 min. ANDE was high in all three categories (3.24, 2.88, and 3.26 in TH, GH, and DH, respectively. There was a significant difference in ANDE in all three categories ( P≤0.05. There was no significant difference in the PDPG among all categories of Hospitals. PAP was highest in DH (80% and lowest in GH (46%. PIP was highest in DH (6%, 4% in GH, and lowest in TH (3% in the Galle district. PEDL in TH, GH, and DH were 97, 100, and 99%, respectively. Prescribers use a short consultation time and practice polypharmacy, and the use of generic and essential drug lists is significantly high. Antibiotic usage is high, but usage of injections is low. We further noted prescriptions with absence of the diagnosis, sex, and prescriber′s identity. Conclusion : We conclude that some areas like polypharmacy, high usage of antibiotics, and poor prescription writing practices are high and they can be addressed by in-service awareness programs for noted prescriber errors.

  18. Parent and caregiver knowledge, beliefs, and responses to convulsive seizures in children in Kingston, Jamaica - A hospital-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall-Parkinson, Debra; Tapper, Judy; Melbourne-Chambers, Roxanne

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the knowledge and beliefs about seizures and actions during seizures of parents/caregivers of Jamaican children hospitalized for convulsive seizures. This was a cross-sectional study of parents and caregivers of children with acute convulsive seizures hospitalized at the Bustamante Hospital, Kingston, Jamaica between May 1 and October 31, 2013. Subjects were identified by admission records. Parents/caregivers were invited to participate. A questionnaire on the demographics, knowledge, beliefs, and response of parents/caregivers during the child's current seizure episode was administered face to face. Data were analyzed for frequencies: groups were compared using chi-square analysis for categorical variables, Student's t-test for normally distributed data, and the Mann-Whitney U-test for data not normally distributed. There were fifty participants: 39 (78%) mothers, mean (SD) age - 33.8 (10.1) years. All sought medical care first. Twenty-two (44%) had plausible beliefs about the cause of seizures. Twenty-seven (54%) knew of appropriate actions during a seizure, 10 (20%) knew of appropriate precautions, and 11 (22%) responded appropriately during the seizure. Eleven (22%) reported receiving seizure education. Witnessing a previous seizure, education level, and seizure education were associated with knowledge of seizures (pSocioeconomic status was higher in those with plausible beliefs about seizures and lower in those who took appropriate action during a seizure (pParents/caregivers of children with convulsive seizures have appropriate health-care seeking behavior, but most do not have appropriate knowledge about seizures. Few take appropriate action during the episode. A public education program is needed to improve parental knowledge of and response to convulsive seizures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Patient safety culture in acute care: a web-based survey of nurse managers' and registered nurses' views in four Finnish hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turunen, Hannele; Partanen, Pirjo; Kvist, Tarja; Miettinen, Merja; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2013-12-01

    Nurse managers (NMs) and registered nurses (RNs) have key roles in developing the patient safety culture, as the nursing staff is the largest professional group in health-care services. We explored their views on the patient safety culture in four acute care hospitals in Finland. The data were collected from NMs (n = 109) and RNs (n = 723) by means of a Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture instrument and analyzed statistically. Both groups recognized patient safety problems and critically evaluated error-prevention mechanisms in the hospitals. RNs, in particular, estimated the situation more critically. There is a need to develop the patient safety culture of hospitals by discussing openly about them and learning from mistakes and by developing practices and mechanisms to prevent them. NMs have central roles in developing the safety culture at the system level in hospitals in order to ensure that nurses caring for patients do it safely.

  20. A survey of hospital outpatient services for chronic diseases in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of hospital outpatient services for chronic diseases in Gauteng. ... in particular aspects of the organisation of services, and indirect indicators of patient care. Design ... Management guidelines were used for all conditions in 5 hospitals.

  1. Syndromic approach to treatment of snake bite in Sri Lanka based on results of a prospective national hospital-based survey of patients envenomed by identified snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariaratnam, Christeine A; Sheriff, Mohamed H Rezvi; Arambepola, Carukshi; Theakston, R David G; Warrell, David A

    2009-10-01

    Of 860 snakes brought to 10 hospitals in Sri Lanka with the patients they had bitten, 762 (89%) were venomous. Russell's vipers (Daboia russelii) and hump-nosed pit vipers (Hypnale hypnale) were the most numerous and H. hypnale was the most widely distributed. Fifty-one (6%) were misidentified by hospital staff, causing inappropriate antivenom treatment of 13 patients. Distinctive clinical syndromes were identified to aid species diagnosis in most cases of snake bite in Sri Lanka where the biting species is unknown. Diagnostic sensitivities and specificities of these syndromes for envenoming were 78% and 96% by Naja naja, 66% and 100% by Bungarus caeruleus, 14% and 100% by Daboia russelii, and 10% and 97% by Hypnale hypnale, respectively. Although only polyspecific antivenoms are used in Sri Lanka, species diagnosis remains important to anticipate life-threatening complications such as local necrosis, hemorrhage and renal and respiratory failure and to identify likely victims of envenoming by H. hypnale who will not benefit from existing antivenoms. The technique of hospital-based collection, labeling and preservation of dead snakes brought by bitten patients is recommended for rapid assessment of a country's medically-important herpetofauna.

  2. A survey of the radiographic cassettes disinfection of university hospitals in seoul

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol; Park, Peom [College of School, Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moon Sun; Kim, Dong Sung [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to prevent nosocomial infection in patients through contact of radiographic cassettes. Data were collected from radiographers working in 29 university hospitals in Seoul in February and March 2001. Radiographic cassettes were disinfected daily in 5 hospitals, weekly in 4 hospitals, monthly in 5 hospitals, bimonthly in 1 hospital and once every three months in another hospital. 12 other hospitals do not practice regular disinfections of radiographic cassettes. Gauze soaked in disinfectant solution is used in 7 hospitals while 11 hospitals used cotton and cloth soaked in disinfectant solution to clean the radiographic cassettes. 26 hospitals used 99% alcohol based disinfectant solutions while 3 hospitals used 75% alcohol based disinfectant, 26 hospitals use of intercourse cassettes outpatients and in patients. In 26 hospitals, all patients shared the same set of radiographic cassettes used in the hospitals, or in 26 hospitals, separate sets of radiographic cassettes are used for outpatients and inpatients. Separate sets of cassettes are used for ICU and inpatients in 6 others hospitals. 23 hospitals used the same sets of radiographic cassettes for all their patients. radiographic cassettes are cleaned in wash area in the study room of the radiographic department in 17 hospitals. 12 other hospitals do not have designated cleaning areas for the cassettes. All radiographers practiced hands washing with soap. All 29 hospitals surveyed have infection control committee. However, only 9 out of the 29 hospitals surveyed provided Infection {center_dot} disinfections control education to radiographers. Only 3 hospitals have radiographers sitting in the infection control committee. Infection management education is conducted in 63 hospitals annually, twice a year in 1 hospital and once every 3 months in 2 hospitals.

  3. Internet and technology transfer in acute care hospitals in the United States: survey-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, M

    2001-12-01

    This paper provides the results of the survey-2000 measuring technology transfer and, specifically, Internet usage. The purpose of the survey was to measure the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business-to-business and customers. These results are compared with responses to the same questions in survey-1997. Changes in response are noted and discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the third of three articles based upon the results of the survey-2000. Readers are referred to prior articles by the author, which discuss the survey design and provide a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals. (1) Thefirst article based upon the survey results discusses technology transfer, system design approaches, user involvement, and decision-making purposes. (2)

  4. Effectiveness, safety, and standard of service delivery: A patient-based survey at a pancha karma therapy unit in a secondary care Ayurvedic hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Rastogi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancha karma is a modality of treatments commonly used in Ayurvedic hospitals. It has elaborate textual reference of its usage in various clinical conditions forming the basis of its extensive use in Ayurvedic clinical practice. Unfortunately, despite its unquestionable popularity and usage among Ayurvedic physicians and patients, it has not been evaluated rigorously on scientific parameters to identify its effectiveness, safety, and procedural standards. Considering the patient′s opinion as an important determinant in this perspective, this study aims at identifying the patient′s (actual recipients of pancha karma therapy perception toward the effectiveness, safety, and standard of service delivery concerning pancha karma through a structured survey at a pre-identified pancha karma therapy unit in a secondary care Ayurvedic hospital. Majority of the survey respondents considered these therapies as safe and effective (88%. Ninety-four percent respondents have expressed their satisfaction to the standard of services provided to them at the pancha karma unit of the hospital concerned.

  5. Hospital Value-Based Purchasing

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) is part of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) long-standing effort to link Medicares payment system to a...

  6. The psychometric properties of the 'Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture' in Dutch hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Cordula

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many different countries the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS is used to assess the safety culture in hospitals. Accordingly, the questionnaire has been translated into Dutch for application in the Netherlands. The aim of this study was to examine the underlying dimensions and psychometric properties of the questionnaire in Dutch hospital settings, and to compare these results with the original questionnaire used in USA hospital settings. Methods The HSOPS was completed by 583 staff members of four general hospitals, three teaching hospitals, and one university hospital in the Netherlands. Confirmatory factor analyses were performed to examine the applicability of the factor structure of the American questionnaire to the Dutch data. Explorative factor analyses were performed to examine whether another composition of items and factors would fit the data better. Supplementary psychometric analyses were performed, including internal consistency and construct validity. Results The confirmatory factor analyses were based on the 12-factor model of the original questionnaire and resulted in a few low reliability scores. 11 Factors were drawn with explorative factor analyses, with acceptable reliability scores and a good construct validity. Two items were removed from the questionnaire. The composition of the factors was very similar to that of the original questionnaire. A few items moved to another factor and two factors turned out to combine into a six-item dimension. All other dimensions consisted of two to five items. Conclusion The Dutch translation of the HSOPS consists of 11 factors with acceptable reliability and good construct validity. and is similar to the original HSOPS factor structure.

  7. A Survey of Quality Assurance Practices in Nonmilitary Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    160 ° ) Power (1600) Scrambled Egg (1450) Final Rinse (1900) SF Scrambled Egg (145) Rinse (190_) Broth ( 190) Hot Beverage (1850) 1 Juices (40-450...control section Ingredient inspection steward Standardized recipes Microbiological testing Nutritional data of recipes____ Patient acceptability surveys...ingredients and these hospitals emphasized the use of weights rather than volume. Recipes . All hospitals except one used standardized recipes . Those

  8. Prevalence of chronic complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus in outpatients - a cross-sectional hospital based survey in urban China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Weibing

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic complications are the major outcome of type 2 diabetes mellitus progress, which reduce the quality of life of patients, incur heavy burdens to the health care system, and increase diabetic mortality. The aims of this study were to describe the prevalence of chronic complications among urban Chinese type 2 diabetic outpatients; and to analyze the associations between chronic complications and patients' demographics, diabetic related clinical characteristics. Methods This cross-sectional hospital-based study was carried out in 4 major Chinese cities: - Shanghai, Chengdu, Beijing and Guangzhou. The survey was conducted from March to July in 2007 among 1,524 type 2 diabetic outpatients. The subjects were interviewed face-to-face by trained interviewers using a questionnaire to capture information on demographics, disease presentations and complications. All the subjects were invited to have a HbA1c test free of charge by the standardized method with Bio-Rad Variant II. Results Of the 1,524 study subjects, 637 (41.8% were male, and the mean age was 63.3 ± 10.2 years. At least one chronic complication was diagnosed in 792 individuals (52.0% of the study subjects; 509 (33.4% presented with macrovascular complications and 528 (34.7% with microvascular complications. The prevalence of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular conditions, neuropathy, nephropathy, ocular lesions and foot disease were 30.1%, 6.8%, 17.8%, 10.7%, 14.8% and 0.8%, respectively. The prevalence of chronic complications varied between cities, and significantly increased with age and duration of diagnosed diabetes. The mean of HbA1c in diabetic patients with chronic complications was 8.2% ± 1.6% and 63.0% of the subjects with type 2 diabetes related complications had a poor glycemic control with the HbA1c > 7.5%. Conclusions Chronic complications are highly prevalent among type 2 diabetic outpatients, the glycemic control of diabetic patients with chronic

  9. Psychometric properties of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture for hospital management (HSOPS_M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeiffer Yvonne

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From a management perspective, it is necessary to examine how a hospital's top management assess the patient safety culture in their organisation. This study examines whether the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture for hospital management (HSOPS_M has the same psychometric properties as the HSOPS for hospital employees does. Methods In 2008, a questionnaire survey including the HSOPS_M was conducted with 1,224 medical directors from German hospitals. When assessing the psychometric properties, we performed a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA. Additionally, we proved construct validity and internal consistency. Results A total of 551 medical directors returned the questionnaire. The results of the CFA suggested a satisfactory global data fit. The indices of local fit indicated a good, but not satisfactory convergent validity. Analyses of construct validity indicated that not all safety culture dimensions were readily distinguishable. However, Cronbach's alpha indicated that the dimensions had an acceptable level of reliability. Conclusion The analyses of the psychometric properties of the HSOPS_M resulted in reasonably good levels of property values. Although the set of dimensions within the HSOPS_M needs further scale refinement, the questionnaire covers a broad range of sub-dimensions and supplies important information on safety culture. The HSOPS_M, therefore, is eligible to measure safety culture from the hospital management's points of view and could be used in nationwide hospital surveys to make inter-organisational comparisons.

  10. Sustaining health workforce recruitment and retention in township hospitals: a survey on 110 directors of township hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jingmin; Li, Jie; Jiang, Xingxing; Zhang, Bin

    2015-06-01

    Township hospitals, the main provider of rural primary healthcare in China, are severely understaffed. International studies on factors influencing rural working are increasing; however, studies on factors affecting the recruitment and retention of health workers in Chinese township hospitals are limited. The current study aims to understand the motivation of health workers and arrive at a systematic framework of pluralistic factors that would help support health workers in terms of receiving posts and remaining in posts in township hospitals. A three-stage integrated quantitative and qualitative methodology was employed. First, a survey on 120 directors of township hospitals was conducted to learn the latest status of health workers in township hospitals and distinguish existing problems. Second, after sending these problems back to the directors, an open-ended pen-and-paper survey was conducted to ask the directors to identify the factors influencing the attraction and retention of health workers in township hospitals. Third, four focus groups were conducted to gauge the underlying reasons. Five problems from the questionnaire survey were recognized, and numbers of thematic factors were identified at the individual, professional, and treatment environment from the pen-and-paper survey and focus group. Similar to other studies, this framing of both non-financial and financial elements affected the attraction and retention of health workers in township hospitals, thereby filling the gap in a Chinese context. Although several factors had been recognized earlier, our findings further highlighted the importance of these factors. Meanwhile, the factors identified in this study were barely explored in literature. This paper identifies and develops multi-faceted factors to call for a bundled package of multidimensional incentives if decision-makers get interested. The evidence-based findings in our study can be used to provide China-specific policy recommendations on how

  11. Correlates of in-hospital deaths among hospitalizations with pulmonary embolism: findings from the 2001-2008 National Hospital Discharge Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Tsai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (PE are responsible for substantial mortality, morbidity, and impaired health-related quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlates of in-hospital deaths among hospitalizations with a diagnosis of PE in the United States. METHODS: By using data from the 2001-2008 National Hospital Discharge Survey, we assessed the correlates of in-hospital deaths among 14,721 hospitalizations with a diagnosis of PE and among subgroups stratified by age, sex, race, days of hospital stay, type of admission, cancer, pneumonia, and fractures. We produced adjusted rate ratios (aRR and 95% confidence intervals using log-linear multivariate regression models. RESULTS: Regardless of the listing position of diagnostic codes, we observed an increased likelihood of in-hospital death in subgroups of hospitalizations with ages 50 years and older (aRR = 1.82-8.48, less than 7 days of hospital stay (aRR = 1.43-1.57, cancer (aRR = 2.10-2.28, pneumonia (aRR = 1.79-2.20, or fractures (aRR = 2.18 (except for first-listed PE, when compared to the reference groups with ages 1-49 years, 7 days or more of hospital stay, without cancer, pneumonia, or fractures while adjusting for covariates. In addition, we observed an increased likelihood of in-hospital death for first-listed PE in hospitalizations of women, when compared to those of men (aRR = 1.45. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study provide support for identifying, developing, and implementing effective, evidence-based clinical assessment and management strategies to reduce PE-related morbidity and mortality among hospitalized PE patients who may have concurrent health conditions including cancer, pneumonia, and fractures.

  12. Using the hospital as a venue for reproductive health interventions: a survey of hospitalized adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guss, Carly E; Wunsch, Caroline A; McCulloh, Russell; Donaldson, Abigail; Alverson, Brian K

    2015-02-01

    Less than one-half of sexually active adolescents have received counseling regarding contraception and sexually transmitted disease (STD) from their health care provider. We hypothesized that hospitalized adolescents would be interested in receiving reproductive health education and/or STD testing. In addition, we assessed the opinion of female adolescents on initiation of contraception during hospitalization. A convenience sample of 13- to 18-year-old male and female adolescent patients hospitalized at a tertiary pediatric hospital were approached for inclusion. Consenting patients completed a self-administered anonymous questionnaire. Questionnaires from 49 female adolescents and from 51 male adolescents were collected. Based on their answers, 37% of female adolescents and 44% of male adolescents want to learn more about contraception and/or abstinence in the hospital independent of sexual activity. Thirty percent of respondents reported a desire for STD testing in the hospital. Fifty-seven percent of female subjects answered that adolescents should be offered contraception while in the hospital. Among hospitalized adolescents in this study, there was an interest in reproductive health education and contraception even among those with a primary care provider and without sexual experience. Thus, hospital-based pediatricians can play a pivotal role in expanding critical sexual health services by discussing and offering sexual health care to hospitalized adolescents. We recommend that hospitals make a brochure available to all admitted adolescents, with opportunity for follow-up discussions with their hospitalist. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to explore hospital-based nurses' intention to use peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC): a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, Laura; Carone, Maria; Caricati, Luca; Demaria, Serena; Fantuzzi, Silvia; Guarasci, Alessandro; Pirazzoli, Luca

    2016-11-22

    The peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) have become an alternative to the traditional CVC. PICCs are usually inserted by trained nurses who decided to attend and complete a special training on PICC insertion and management. The present work aimed to investigate the intention of using PICC in a sample of hospital-based nurses using the theory of planned behavior as theoretical framework. A cross-sectional design was used in which a questionnaire was delivered to 199 nurses. According to the theory of planned behavior, the attitude toward the use of PICC, subjective norms and perceived self-efficacy predicted the intention to use PICC. Contrary to the expectations, the effect of subjective norms on intention to use PICC was mediated by attitude and self-efficacy. Finally, age of participants was negatively related to the intention to use the PICC. The theory of planned behavior offers a useful framework to explain nurses' intention to use PICC. Shared norms favoring the use of PICC seem to increase both nurse's positive attitudes and self-efficacy whit respect to the use of these devices. Thus, it appears that to train professionals individually does not necessarily results in an increased use of PICC.

  14. Questionnaire-based survey on structural quality of hospitals and nursing homes for the elderly, their staffing with infection control personal, and implementation of infection control measures in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramer, A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] From January to May 2012, 1,860 hospitals throughout Germany received a questionnaire encompassing 77 items. Additionally, 300 outpatient care services and 310 nursing homes for elderly in Berlin also received a 10-item questionnaire asking on their implemented infection control practices. All questionnaires were anonymous. A total of 229 completed questionnaires from hospitals, 14 questionnaires from outpatient care services, and 16 questionnaires from nursing homes were eligible for further analysis.The lack of Infection Control physicians was identified as the largest issue. In hospitals sized 400–999 beds a gap of 71%, and in hospitals sized ≥1,000 beds a gap of 17% was reported. Depending on the number of hospital beds, 13–29% of hospitals sized ≥100 beds reported not havening one infection control nurse. Since based on the number of beds in larger institutions or in facilities caring for high-risk patients several infection control nurses may be required, the deficiency in infection control nurses may even be higher, particularly in secondary and tertiary care facilities. Furthermore, the analysis revealed that the legal requirements for surveillance and reporting of notifiable infectious diseases have not yet been implemented in 11% of the facilities. The implementation of antibiotic strategies did show significant gaps. However, deficiencies in the implemented measures for the prevention of surgical site infections were less frequent. Yet 12% of the participants did not have a dedicated infection control concept for their surgical services. Eight percent of hospitals were not prepared for an outbreak management and 10% did not have established regulations for wearing surgical scrubs. Deficiencies in waste disposal and the control of air-conditioning systems were also noted. Based on the results of this survey, conclusions on the optimal resource allocation for further improvement of patient safety may be drawn.While all

  15. Questionnaire-based survey on structural quality of hospitals and nursing homes for the elderly, their staffing with infection control personal, and implementation of infection control measures in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, A; Assadian, O; Helfrich, J; Krüger, C; Pfenning, I; Ryll, S; Perner, A; Loczenski, B

    2013-01-01

    From January to May 2012, 1,860 hospitals throughout Germany received a questionnaire encompassing 77 items. Additionally, 300 outpatient care services and 310 nursing homes for elderly in Berlin also received a 10-item questionnaire asking on their implemented infection control practices. All questionnaires were anonymous. A total of 229 completed questionnaires from hospitals, 14 questionnaires from outpatient care services, and 16 questionnaires from nursing homes were eligible for further analysis. The lack of Infection Control physicians was identified as the largest issue. In hospitals sized 400-999 beds a gap of 71%, and in hospitals sized ≥1,000 beds a gap of 17% was reported. Depending on the number of hospital beds, 13-29% of hospitals sized ≥100 beds reported not havening one infection control nurse. Since based on the number of beds in larger institutions or in facilities caring for high-risk patients several infection control nurses may be required, the deficiency in infection control nurses may even be higher, particularly in secondary and tertiary care facilities. Furthermore, the analysis revealed that the legal requirements for surveillance and reporting of notifiable infectious diseases have not yet been implemented in 11% of the facilities. The implementation of antibiotic strategies did show significant gaps. However, deficiencies in the implemented measures for the prevention of surgical site infections were less frequent. Yet 12% of the participants did not have a dedicated infection control concept for their surgical services. Eight percent of hospitals were not prepared for an outbreak management and 10% did not have established regulations for wearing surgical scrubs. Deficiencies in waste disposal and the control of air-conditioning systems were also noted. Based on the results of this survey, conclusions on the optimal resource allocation for further improvement of patient safety may be drawn. While all participating nursing homes had

  16. A questionnaire-based survey to ascertain the views of clinicians regarding rational use of antibiotics in teaching hospitals of Kolkata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dattatreyo Chatterjee

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Clinicians acknowledge that the misuse of antibiotics is an important problem in their hospitals. A system of clinical audit of antibiotic usage, improved microbiology support and implementation of antibiotic policy can help to promote rational use of antimicrobial agents.

  17. Smart Hospital based on Internet of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose an architecture and a scheme of smart hospital based on Internet of Things (IOT in order to overcome the disadvantages of the present hospital information system, such as the fixed information point, inflexible networking mode and so on. The key technologies and construction of smart hospital is presented based on understanding of the connotation and architecture of smart hospital. Furthermore, taking a third grade-A hospital as an example, a scheme of smart hospital is given, and its logic structure, application framework, the construction of basic network environment etc. are described in detail. Experiment proves that deployment of smart hospital can effectively solve the prominent problems existing the diagnosis and treatment of hospital and it brings a positive and profound effect for the present diagnosis and treatment mode in hospital.

  18. Industry Based Monkfish Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monkfish industry leaders expressed concerns that the NEFSC bottom trawl surveys did not sample in all monkfish habitats; particularly the deeper water outside the...

  19. [A survey on nosocomial tuberculosis infection control in hospitals in Osaka City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimouchi, Akira; Konishi, Shozaburo; Tanaka, Takashi

    2005-12-01

    To ascertain nosocomial tuberculosis (TB) infection control practice in hospitals in Osaka City. A questionnaire was distributed in the orientation meeting and collected at the occasion of medical inspection in all 196 hospitals in Osaka City in 2003. TB patients were diagnosed in about half of hospitals in the past 3 years. Basic TB infection control measures were taken in the majority of hospitals; such as chest X-ray screening for all inpatients, health check for employees, tuberculin skin test (TST) for newly employed staff, and nomination of a person in charge of TB infection control. Control measures were practiced more often in hospitals where TB patients were diagnosed, such as "fiberoptic bronchoscopy is to be conducted last in the working hours to avoid contamination of TB bacilli in a room," "TST (including two-step method) for all newly employed staff," "Staff wear N95 mask when they deal with TB patients/suspects," and the differences were statistically significant. It is necessary in hospitals in Osaka City to strengthen nosocomial TB infection control as TB patients were diagnosed in about half of hospitals in the past 3 years. Low cost infection control measures were undertaken more often among hospitals where TB patients were diagnosed. Introduction of high cost equipment or improvement of facilities should be considered in hospitals of high TB risk. Guidelines formulated based on analysis of the survey should facilitate all hospitals to introduce at least low cost effective tuberculosis infection control measures.

  20. Patient Survey (PCH - HCAHPS) PPS-exempt Cancer Hospital – National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospital ratings for the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital...

  1. Patient safety and nursing implication: Survey in Catalan hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freixas Sala, Núria; Monistrol Ruano, Olga; Espuñes Vendrell, Jordi; Sallés Creus, Montserrat; Gallardo González, Mónica; Ramón Cantón, Carme; Bueno Domínguez, María José; Llinas Vidal, Montserrat; Campo Osaba, María Antonia

    This study aims to describe the implementation of the patient safety (PS) programs in catalan hospitals and to analyze the level of nursing involvement. Multicenter cross-sectional study. To obtain the data two questionnaires were developed; one addressed to the hospital direction and another to the nurse executive in PS. The survey was distributed during 2013 to the 65 acute care hospitals in Catalonia. The questionnaire was answered by 43 nursing directors and 40 nurse executive in PS. 93% of the hospitals responded that they had a PS Program and 81.4% used a specific scoreboard with PS indicators. The referent of the hospital in PS was a nurse in 55.8% of the centres. 92.5% had a system of notification of adverse effects with an annual average of 190.3 notifications. In 86% of the centres had a nurse involved in the PS program but only in the 16% of the centres the nurse dedication was at full-time. The nurse respondents evaluate the degree of implementation of the PBS program with a note of approved and they propound as improvement increase the staff dedicated to the PS and specific academic training in PS. The degree of implementation of programs for patient safety is high in Catalan acute hospitals, while the organizational structure is highly diverse. In more than half of the hospitals the PS referent was a nurse, confirming the nurse involvement in the PS programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Data mining based hospital management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TSUMOTO Yuko; TSUMOTO Shusaku

    2008-01-01

    Rapid progress in information technology has come to enable us to store all the information in a hospital in- formation system, including management data, patient records, discharge summary and laboratory data. Although the reuse of those data has not started, it has been expected that the stored data will contribute to analysis of hospi-tal management. In this paper, the diseharge summary of Chiba University Hospital, which has been stored since 980's were analyzed to characterize the university hospital. The results show several interesting results, which uggests that the reuse of stored data will give a powerful tool to support a long-period management of a university ospital.

  3. A Vignette-Based Survey to Assess Clinical Decision Making Regarding Antibiotic Use and Hospitalization of Patients with Probable Aseptic Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Patriquin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The many etiologies of meningitis influence disease severity – most viral causes are self-limiting, while bacterial etiologies require antibiotics and hospitalization. Aided by laboratory findings, the physician judges whether to admit and empirically treat the patient (presuming a bacterial cause, or to treat supportively as if it were viral.

  4. Web-Based Surveys: Not Your Basic Survey Anymore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertot, John Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Web-based surveys are not new to the library environment. Although such surveys began as extensions of print surveys, the Web-based environment offers a number of approaches to conducting a survey that the print environment cannot duplicate easily. Since 1994, the author and others have conducted national surveys of public library Internet…

  5. Emergency Contraception: a survey of Hospital Emergency Departments Staffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization defines emergency contraception (EC as a means to prevent unwanted pregnancy. In countries where EC is dispensed behind the counter, emergency departments are a preferred point of care for its prescription and dispensing. In light of this situation and as no studies on emergency contraception in emergency departments in Italy have been conducted to date, this study was designed with a view to analyze the responses of emergency room physicians in relation to their prescribing habits and knowledge about the drug and in relation to frequency and profile of women arriving for care at hospital emergency departments in Piedmont and requesting prescription for the morning-after pill. This cross-sectional survey involved 29 hospital emergency departments in Piedmont where no gynecologists are on active duty. The survey instrument was a 24-item questionnaire. Analysis of responses revealed that in the physicians’ opinion the vast majority of requests came from Italian nationals (97% ranging in age from 18 to 30 years (76%, single and not cohabiting with a partner (60%, and nulliparous (64.0%. Women mostly request EC for first-time and the most common reasons were condom breakage or slippage. Just over half the physicians (52% stated that emergency contraception prescription was not an appropriate part of care provided at an emergency department and 72% stated they felt uneasy about prescribing emergency contraception. The survey also revealed gaps in physician knowledge about the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of emergency contraception pills.

  6. Emergency Contraception: a survey of Hospital Emergency Departments Staffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization defines emergency contraception (EC as a means to prevent unwanted pregnancy. In countries where EC is dispensed behind the counter, emergency departments are a preferred point of care for its prescription and dispensing. In light of this situation and as no studies on emergency contraception in emergency departments in Italy have been conducted to date, this study was designed with a view to analyze the responses of emergency room physicians in relation to their prescribing habits and knowledge about the drug and in relation to frequency and profile of women arriving for care at hospital emergency departments in Piedmont and requesting prescription for the morning-after pill. This cross-sectional survey involved 29 hospital emergency departments in Piedmont where no gynecologists are on active duty. The survey instrument was a 24-item questionnaire. Analysis of responses revealed that in the physicians’ opinion the vast majority of requests came from Italian nationals (97% ranging in age from 18 to 30 years (76%, single and not cohabiting with a partner (60%, and nulliparous (64.0%. Women mostly request EC for first-time and the most common reasons were condom breakage or slippage. Just over half the physicians (52% stated that emergency contraception prescription was not an appropriate part of care provided at an emergency department and 72% stated they felt uneasy about prescribing emergency contraception. The survey also revealed gaps in physician knowledge about the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of emergency contraception pills.

  7. [Survey in hospitals. Nursing errors, error culture and error management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermann, Monika; Cramer, Henning

    2010-09-01

    Knowledge on errors is important to design safe nursing practice and its framework. This article presents results of a survey on this topic, including data of a representative sample of 724 nurses from 30 German hospitals. Participants predominantly remembered medication errors. Structural and organizational factors were rated as most important causes of errors. Reporting rates were considered low; this was explained by organizational barriers. Nurses in large part expressed having suffered from mental problems after error events. Nurses' perception focussing on medication errors seems to be influenced by current discussions which are mainly medication-related. This priority should be revised. Hospitals' risk management should concentrate on organizational deficits and positive error cultures. Decision makers are requested to tackle structural problems such as staff shortage.

  8. Estimation of Surgery Capacity in Haiti: Nationwide Survey of Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tu M; Saint-Fort, Mackenson; Jose, Marie-Djenane; Henrys, Jean Hugues; Pierre Pierre, Jacques B; Cherian, Meena N; Gosselin, Richard A

    2015-09-01

    Haiti's surgical capacity was significantly strained by the 2010 earthquake. As the government and its partners rebuild the health system, emergency and essential surgical care must be a priority. A validated, facility-based assessment tool developed by WHO was completed by 45 hospitals nationwide. The hospitals were assessed for (1) infrastructure, (2) human resources, (3) surgical interventions and emergency care, and (4) material resources for resuscitation. Fisher's exact test was used to compare hospitals by sectors: public compared to private and mixed (public-private partnerships). The 45 hospitals included first-referral level to the national referral hospital: 20 were public sector and 25 were private or mixed sector. Blood banks (33% availability) and oxygen concentrators (58%) were notable infrastructural deficits. For human resources, 69% and 33% of hospitals employed at least one full-time surgeon and anaesthesiologist, respectively. Ninety-eight percent of hospitals reported capacity to perform resuscitation. General and obstetrical surgical interventions were relatively more available, for example 93% provided hernia repairs and 98% provided cesarean sections. More specialized interventions were at a deficit: cataract surgery (27%), cleft repairs (31%), clubfoot (42%), and open treatment of fractures (51%). Deficiencies in infrastructure and material resources were widespread and should be urgently addressed. Physician providers were mal-distributed relative to non-physician providers. Formal task-sharing to midlevel and general physician providers should be considered. The parity between public and private or mixed sector hospitals in availability of Ob/Gyn surgical interventions is evidence of concerted efforts to reduce maternal mortality. This ought to provide a roadmap for strengthening of surgical care capacity.

  9. One year survey of hospitalized psoriatic patients and their treatment in Razi Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaghi F

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available During one year survey, 77 psoriatic patients were hospitalized in the dermatology department of Razi Hospital. This comprised 19% of admitted patients in this period. 29% (n=22 of psoriatic patients had previous history of hospitalization. On admission, the mean age of patients was 32.8 years, the mean and peak age of disease onset were 26.46 and between 11-20 years, respectively. 14% (n=10 of the patients had a family history of psoriasis and 70% (n=7 of those with a positive family history had their age of onset under 20 years. Involvement of different regions was as follows: Scalp: 88% (n=68, nails: 53% (n=41 and joints (arthritis: 10% (n=8. Psoriasis was associated with scrotal tongue in 19% (n=13 and with geographic tongue in 10% (n=8 of patients. Regarding the medical treatment, the drugs which were used most frequently were tigason in 34% (n=41 and ditranol in 22% (n=26 of the cases. The mean duration of hospitalization was 39.29 days and most patients were discharged from the hospital in a good condition without any serious complication. During this period 9% of patients had a relapse of their disease.

  10. Industry Based Survey (IBS) Cod

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The "Gulf of Maine Atlantic Cod Industry-Based Survey" was a collaboration of the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries and the fishing industry, with support...

  11. Industry Based Survey (IBS) Yellowtail

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The "Southern New England Yellowtail Flounder Industry-Based Survey" was a collaboration between the Rhode Island Division of Fish and Wildlife and the fishing...

  12. Survey on Attitudes and Medical Knowledge at Hospital Palliative Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Rafael López Sánchez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Palliative care is defined as the total active care of patients whose disease is not responsive to curative treatment, therefore this study aims to identify the level of attitudes and knowledge in palliative care hospital with high level of complexity. Materials and methods: Observational, cross-sectional method; using a validated survey. It was self-supplied via web. Per­spective practice, knowledge degree, comfort level, perspective relevance and appropriateness of the respondents (doctors in palliative care were assessed. General characteristics, reliability and scores per item and domain were described. Results: 145 physicians, mostly males, were surveyed, most of them with 0-5 years of professional practice and working in the emergency department (51.03 %. Appropriate reliability coefficients were found; overall level of attitudes and knowledge of palliative care was 59.09 points out of 100; lowest score domains were the prospects suitabil­ity (40.73 points and practice (47.04 points. Conclusions: The survey showed moderate to low degrees in attitudes and knowledge, the weakest points were practical perspective and expertise in decision-making. Training aimed at establishing prognosis and improving decision making as to referring to palliative care service must be carried out. Survey results of inspection after train­ing will allow an assessment of the improvements in knowledge and attitudes of palliative care.

  13. A Survey on Wallman Bases

    OpenAIRE

    Adalberto García-Máynez

    2007-01-01

    [EN] Wallman bases are frequently used in compactification processes of topological spaces. However, they are also related with quasi–uniform structures and they are useful to characterize some topological properties. We present a brief survey on the subject which supports these statements. García-Máynez, A. (2007). A Survey on Wallman Bases. Applied General Topology. 8(2):223-237. doi:10.4995/agt.2007.1886. 223 237 8 2

  14. Surveying Substance Abuse Frequency in Hospitalized Patients in Psychiatric Ward of Farshchian Hospital in Hamadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ghaleiha

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Substance abuse is believed to be one of the greatest social, economical ,and cultural problems all over the world and it is commonly observed among all social classes especially among mental disorder patients. Substance abuse can influence on the receptive-mental states such as mood and on the external visible activities such as behaviors. The aim of this study is to survey the frequency of Substance abuse in hospitalized mental-psychic patients in psychiatric ward of Farshchian hospital in Hamadan. Materials & Methods: In this descriptive and retrospective study, available sampling method was used along with examining filed records in which the records of 400 hospitalized patients (293 men and 107 women from September 2000 to 2001 were checked and required data such as demographic information, infliction duration, substance abuse duration, psychiatric diagnosis were extracted and registered. The data were analyzed with descriptive statistical methods.Results: About half of the hospitalized patients in the psychiatric ward had simultaneous substance abuse. Men had substance abuse more than women and the youths aged 20-39 more than the other groups. The study showed that widowing had positive relationship and higher education negative relationship with substance abuse.Conclusion: Mood disorders with 90.53%, schizophrenia with 8.29%, and other diagnostics with 1.18% were observed in persons with substance abuse and these diagnostics in non substance abuse persons were 79.22% ,11.26% and 9.52% respectively.

  15. Compliance with the clinical practice guidelines for the management of hepatitis B and C virus-related chronic liver disease: a survey based on hospitalized cirrhotic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele La Spada

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, significant progress has been made in furthering our knowledge of chronic liver disease (CLD and evaluating the therapeutic approaches. These have been updated in the form of recommendations by international scientific societies. Through a retrospective analysis, this study aimed to verify whether these recommendations have been applied in real practice. The study design included data gathered from all patients consecutively hospitalized for decompensated liver cirrhosis during one year. A pre-made master form was used to record data on the patients’ past knowledge of the etiology and management of their liver disease. As expected, hepatitis C virus (HCV was the most frequent cause of CLD, while 41 cases were cryptogenic. In 69 of 263 patients with HCV infection, viral genotyping had been performed, although only 39 of these cases had been treated. Only 3 of 44 patients suffering from hepatitis B virus (HBV-related liver cirrhosis had been treated in the past, while 11 patients were still being treated. Among the remaining patients, 15 were not aware that they had CLD and 15 had never been considered for antiviral treatment. In 81 cases, the disease had progressed to hepatocellular carcinoma, but only 19 patients had discovered the tumor following regular ultrasound screening. Thirty-seven patients were receiving specific treatment consistent with the stage of their disease. The management of HBV- and HCV-related CLD in Sicily is far from optimal, and although the natural history and management practices of these diseases are well known, this knowledge is a long way from being applied in our daily practice.

  16. Trust-based or performance-based management: a study of employment contracting in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Inger Johanne

    2011-01-01

    Hospitals are frequently changing managerial practices due to numerous public sector reforms taking place. In general, these reforms include the making and monitoring of contracts that regulate relations between the hospitals and their professional staffs. The aim of this paper is to discuss some main characteristics of the contracts that regulate the perceived relations between physicians as employees and the public hospital as employer. The theoretical framework is based on a contract theory approach. The empirical data is based on survey data from full-time employed physicians in the medical and surgical divisions in one of the largest university hospitals in Norway. This study shows that perceived obligations and psychological contracts indicate high degree of relational contracts between the hospital and the physicians. These socio-cultural elements should be recognized as important mechanisms of coordination and communication when policy makers and hospital managers are designing hospital management control systems.

  17. [The "best" hospitals in the Netherlands; comments on results from the Elsevier survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Everdingen, J J

    2000-12-30

    Health care workers are increasingly asked to disclose the achievements and failures of their medical interventions. Comparative evaluation of hospitals seems to be inevitable. In July 2000 about 6000 health care workers in the Netherlands received a questionnaire from the general lay weekly Elsevier asking them to grade the hospitals in their area: specialists, general practitioners, heads of departments in hospitals, nursing staff and hospital directors. The questionnaire has serious methodological flaws, e.g. regarding the items included (such as 'press sensitivity' and 'waiting lists'), the way in which the score was determined (hospitals that were scored by less than 14 respondents were excluded), the way the questions were formulated (there was no way respondents could indicate their level of experience with the hospitals involved) and the very low response rate (13%). In addition there were no data to determine the accuracy of the questionnaire, the distribution of the respondents, or whether the answers had been adjusted. The questionnaire appears to be primarily aimed at creating sensation. It received little attention in the health care sector, probably because the results were contrary to the expectations. Hospital care will undoubtedly benefit from surveys applying a limited number of well-designed indicators for quality of service, but a questionable public qualification based on a competitive model such as the Elsevier questionnaire will probably do more harm than good.

  18. Technology transfer with system analysis, design, decision making, and impact (Survey-2000) in acute care hospitals in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, M

    2001-10-01

    This paper provides the results of the Survey-2000 measuring technology transfer for management information systems in health care. The relationships with systems approaches, user involvement, usersatisfaction, and decision-making were measured and are presented. The survey also measured the levels Internet and Intranet presents in acute care hospitals, which will be discussed in future articles. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business to business and customers. These results are compared, where appropriate, with results from survey 1997 and changes are discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the first of three articles based upon the results of the Srvey-2000. Readers are referred to a prior article by the author that discusses the survey design and provides a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals.

  19. Ergonomic assessment among radiology technologists: a survey in a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Fernando Lima; Azevedo, Paulo Roberto; Medeiros, Lícia Helena de Oliveira; de Freitas, Iraí Borges; Stamato, Cláudia

    2012-01-01

    This article is the result of an Ergonomic Diagnosis in a study for a Specialization Course in Ergonomics. The research is being done in a public hospital in the city of Rio de Janeiro, where the target system is the radiology sector. For diagnosis purposes, subjective techniques were used, such as an open-ended survey, Corlett questionnaire and techniques for evaluating ergonomic risk such as Owas and Rula. Systematic observation was emphasized using photos and films. Preliminary observations made to the radiographers found that these professionals suffer risks of physical and verbal harassment, as well as sexual harassment. Most of them feel discriminated against in terms of race and accumulate activities demanding a lot of attention, as the medical diagnosis and subsequent procedures will depend on the outcome of this task. They accumulate tension due to the weight of responsibility, since there are cases where the patient has risk of death.

  20. Utilization of noninvasive ventilation in acute care hospitals: a regional survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maheshwari, Vinay; Paioli, Daniela; Rothaar, Robert; Hill, Nicholas S

    2006-01-01

    ...) in the United States. Accordingly, we performed a survey on the use of NPPV at acute care hospitals in a region of the United States to determine variations in utilization and between hospitals, the reasons for lower...

  1. Towards best practice in acute stroke care in Ghana: a survey of hospital services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baatiema, Leonard; Otim, Michael; Mnatzaganian, George; Aikins, Ama De-Graft; Coombes, Judith; Somerset, Shawn

    2017-02-02

    Stroke and other non-communicable diseases are important emerging public health concerns in sub-Saharan Africa where stroke-related mortality and morbidity are higher compared to other parts of the world. Despite the availability of evidence-based acute stroke interventions globally, uptake in low-middle income countries (LMIC) such as Ghana is uncertain. This study aimed to identify and evaluate available acute stroke services in Ghana and the extent to which these services align with global best practice. A multi-site, hospital-based survey was conducted in 11 major referral hospitals (regional and tertiary - teaching hospitals) in Ghana from November 2015 to April 2016. Respondents included neurologists, physician specialists and medical officers (general physicians). A pre-tested, structured questionnaire was used to gather data on available hospital-based acute stroke services in the study sites, using The World Stroke Organisation Global Stroke Services Guideline as a reference for global standards. Availability of evidence-based services for acute stroke care in the study hospitals were varied and limited. The results showed one tertiary-teaching hospital had a stroke unit. However, thrombolytic therapy (thrombolysis) using recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke care was not available in any of the study hospitals. Aspirin therapy was administered in all the 11 study hospitals. Although eight study sites reported having a brain computed tomographic (CT) scan, only 7 (63.6%) were functional at the time of the study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan) services were also limited to only 4 (36.4%) hospitals (only functional in three). Acute stroke care by specialists, especially neurologists, was found in 36.4% (4) of the study hospitals whilst none of the study hospitals had an occupational or a speech pathologist to support in the provision of acute stroke care. This study confirms previous reports of limited and variable

  2. A survey of hospitals to determine the prevalence and characteristics of healthcare coalitions for emergency preparedness and response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambhia, Kunal J; Waldhorn, Richard E; Selck, Frederick; Mehta, Ambereen Kurwa; Franco, Crystal; Toner, Eric S

    2012-09-01

    Previous reports have identified the development of healthcare coalitions as the foundation for disaster response across the United States. This survey of acute care hospitals characterizes the current status of participation by US hospitals in healthcare coalitions for emergency preparedness planning and response. The survey results show the nearly universal nature of a coalition approach to disaster response. The results suggest a need for wide stakeholder involvement but also for flexibility in structure and organization. Based on the survey results, the authors make recommendations to guide the further development of healthcare coalitions and to improve local and national response to disasters.

  3. Patient Survey (PCH - HCAHPS) PPS-exempt Cancer Hospital – State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of the state averages for the HCAHPS survey responses. HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital patients about their experiences during a recent...

  4. A survey of rotational use of biocides in hospital pharmacy aseptic units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtough, S M; Hiom, S J; Palmer, M; Russell, A D

    2002-03-01

    A postal survey of biocide rotation in UK hospital pharmacy aseptic units was carried out. Seventy per cent of respondents stated that biocides were rotated, most frequently in areas outside critical work zones. High-level disinfection was employed when 'aseptic' conditions were required. Decisions on frequency of rotation were most often based on in-house validation or consultation with colleagues. Toxicity and corrosiveness were the criteria rated most important in a rotation policy. Microbiological monitoring was carried out most frequently in critical work zones but less often for handwashing. Most QC hospital pharmacists supported rotation and would prefer a standard period for all applications (monthly). Guidelines need to be clarified to assist staff in decisions regarding biocide rotation. Copyright 2002 The Hospital Infection Society.

  5. The association between survey timing and patient-reported experiences with hospitals: results of a national postal survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjertnaes Oyvind A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on the effect of survey timing on patient-reported experiences and patient satisfaction with health services has produced contradictory results. The objective of this study was thus to assess the association between survey timing and patient-reported experiences with hospitals. Methods Secondary analyses of a national inpatient experience survey including 63 hospitals in the 5 health regions in Norway during the autumn of 2006. 10,912 (45% patients answered a postal questionnaire after their discharge from hospital. Non-respondents were sent a reminder after 4 weeks. Multilevel linear regression analysis was used to assess the association between survey timing and patient-reported experiences, both bivariate analysis and multivariate analysis controlling for other predictors of patient experiences. Results Multivariate multilevel regression analysis revealed that survey time was significantly and negatively related to three of six patient-reported experience scales: doctor services (Beta = -0.424, pp p Conclusions Survey time was significantly and negatively related to three of the six scales for patient-reported experiences with hospitals. Large differences in survey time across hospitals could be problematic for between-hospital comparisons, implying that survey time should be considered as a potential adjustment factor. More research is needed on this topic, including studies with other population groups, other data collection modes and a longer time span.

  6. Multilevel psychometric properties of the AHRQ hospital survey on patient safety culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was designed to assess staff views on patient safety culture in hospital settings. The purpose of this study was to examine the multilevel psychometric properties of the survey. Methods Survey data from 331 U.S. hospitals with 2,267 hospital units and 50,513 respondents were analyzed to examine the psychometric properties of the survey's items and composites. Item factor loadings, intraclass correlations (ICCs), design effects, internal consistency reliabilities, and multilevel confirmatory factor analyses (MCFA) were examined as well as intercorrelations among the survey's composites. Results Psychometric analyses confirmed the multilevel nature of the data at the individual, unit and hospital levels of analysis. Results provided overall evidence supporting the 12 dimensions and 42 items included in the AHRQ Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture as having acceptable psychometric properties at all levels of analysis, with a few exceptions. The Staffing composite fell slightly below cutoffs in a number of areas, but is conceptually important given its impact on patient safety. In addition, one hospital-level model fit indicator for the Supervisor/Manager Expectations & Actions Promoting Patient Safety composite was low (CFI = .82), but all other psychometrics for this scale were good. Average dimension intercorrelations were moderate at .42 at the individual level, .50 at the unit level, and .56 at the hospital level. Conclusions Psychometric analyses conducted on a very large database of hospitals provided overall support for the patient safety culture dimensions and items included in the AHRQ Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. The survey's items and dimensions overall are psychometrically sound at the individual, unit, and hospital levels of analysis and can be used by researchers and hospitals interested in assessing patient safety culture

  7. ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings: Prescribing and transcribing-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Craig A; Schneider, Philip J; Scheckelhoff, Douglas J

    2017-09-01

    The results of the 2016 ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings are presented. A stratified random sample of pharmacy directors at 1,315 general and children's medical-surgical hospitals in the United States were surveyed using a mixed-mode method offering a choice of completing a paper survey or an online survey. IMS Health supplied data on hospital characteristics; the survey sample was drawn from IMS's hospital database. The survey response rate was 29.8%. Drug policy development by pharmacy and therapeutics committees continues to be an important strategy for improving prescribing. Strict formulary systems are maintained in 63.0% of hospitals, and 89.7% of hospitals use clinical practice guidelines that include medications. Pharmacists have the authority to order laboratory tests in 89.9% of hospitals and order medications in 86.8% of hospitals. Therapeutic interchange policies are used in 89.2% of hospitals. Electronic health records (EHRs) have been implemented partially or completely in most hospitals (99.1%). Computerized prescriber-order-entry systems with clinical decision support are used in 95.6% of hospitals, and 92.6% of hospitals have barcode-assisted medication administration systems. Transitions-of-care programs are increasing in number, with 34.6% of hospitals now offering discharge prescription services. Pharmacists practice in 39.5% of hospital ambulatory or primary care clinics. The most common service offered by pharmacists to outpatients is anticoagulation management (26.0%). When pharmacists practice in ambulatory care clinics, 64.5% have prescribing authority through collaborative practice agreements. Pharmacists continue to expand their role in improving the prescribing of medications in both hospital and outpatient settings. The adoption of EHRs and medication-use technologies has contributed to this growth. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A comparison of antibiotic point prevalence survey data from four Irish regional/general hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Naughton, C

    2011-06-01

    Point prevalence surveys (PPS) are increasingly used to examining and compare hospital antibiotic consumption. The aim of this study was to identify the (1) point prevalence of antibiotic use in one regional hospital and (2) compare PPS data from similar regional\\/general hospitals.

  9. Association between value-based purchasing score and hospital characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borah Bijan J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medicare hospital Value-based purchasing (VBP program that links Medicare payments to quality of care will become effective from 2013. It is unclear whether specific hospital characteristics are associated with a hospital’s VBP score, and consequently incentive payments. The objective of the study was to assess the association of hospital characteristics with (i the mean VBP score, and (ii specific percentiles of the VBP score distribution. The secondary objective was to quantify the associations of hospital characteristics with the VBP score components: clinical process of care (CPC score and patient satisfaction score. Methods Observational analysis that used data from three sources: Medicare Hospital Compare Database, American Hospital Association 2010 Annual Survey and Medicare Impact File. The final study sample included 2,491 U.S. acute care hospitals eligible for the VBP program. The association of hospital characteristics with the mean VBP score and specific VBP score percentiles were assessed by ordinary least square (OLS regression and quantile regression (QR, respectively. Results VBP score had substantial variations, with mean score of 30 and 60 in the first and fourth quartiles of the VBP score distribution. For-profit status (vs. non-profit, smaller bed size (vs. 100–199 beds, East South Central region (vs. New England region and the report of specific CPC measures (discharge instructions, timely provision of antibiotics and beta blockers, and serum glucose controls in cardiac surgery patients were positively associated with mean VBP scores (p Conclusions Although hospitals serving the poor and the elderly are more likely to score lower under the VBP program, the correlation appears small. Profit status, geographic regions, number and type of CPC measures reported explain the most variation among scores.

  10. Present situation of retinopathy of prematurity management in mainland China: a survey based on 109 hospitals%国内109家医院早产儿视网膜病防治现状调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    中国内地新生儿专业发展现状调查协作组

    2013-01-01

    (highest hospital rank in China) hospitals were capable of performing the retina screening test.In contrast,there was only 25.00% of the rest of the hospitals for which the screening tests were able to be conducted.A total of 63 hospitals provided detailed retina test protocols.Of them,34 hospitals adopted indirect ophthalmoscope,9 hospitals used Retcam camera system,20 hospitals still used direct ophthalmoscope.Fifty-nine hospitals (54.13% of all the hospitals in this study) were equipped with oxygen analysers.Nineteen hospitals reported the incidence of ROP in their premature infants(gestational age ≤34 weeks) in 2008,the mean rate was 3.87% with a range from O.17% to 16.31%.Nine hospitals offered ROP treatment.Four of which used laser photocoagulation,1 hospital performed cryotherapy,and the rest 4 hospitals used both of the modalities.There were 12 infants developed blindness in 109 hospitals between Jun.2004 and Jun.2009.During the same period,there were 22 cases of ROP related medical liability cases reported in 7 hospital,15 cases of the 22 cases occurred in 1 hospital.Conclusions According to the survey,the current management of ROP in level-Ⅲ A hospitals appears to be better than the other hospitals.However,the overall capability and actual conduction rate of ROP screening are low,the screening instruments and measures are not up to date,oxygen therapy in premature infants is not standard,subsequent treatment is not provided in most of the cases,there are a considerable number of blindness and medical liabilities related to ROP.

  11. Hospital resources are associated with value-based surgical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn, Richard S; Hanseman, Dennis J; Go, Derek; Wima, Koffi; Chang, Alex; Ertel, Audrey E; Shah, Shimul A; Abbott, Daniel E

    2016-07-01

    We have previously shown that inferior outcomes at safety-net hospitals are largely dependent on hospital factors. We hypothesized that hospitals providing "high value" care (low cost and better outcomes) would have advantages in human and financial resources. The University HealthSystems Consortium Clinical Database and the American Hospital Association Annual Survey were used to examine hospitals performing eight complex surgical procedures from 2009 to 2013. Hospitals in the lowest quartiles of both mortality rate and cost were characterized as high value (n = 45), whereas those in the highest quartiles of both cost and mortality were low value (n = 45). Hospital size, staffing, and financial characteristics were compared between these two groups. On average, high-value hospitals had lower proportions of Medicaid patient days (17% versus 30%; P < 0.01), higher proportions of outpatient surgery (63% versus 53%; P < 0.01), and spent more on capital expenditures per bed ($155,710 versus $62,434; P < 0.05). Also, high-value hospitals employed more hospitalists (0.08 versus 0.04 per bed; P < 0.01), had more privileged physicians (2.04 versus 1.25 per bed; P < 0.01), and had more full-time equivalent personnel (8.48 versus 6.79 per bed; all P < 0.05). As a result, these hospitals appeared to be more efficient; high-value hospitals had more total admissions per bed (46 versus 38; P < 0.01), fewer days per admission (5.20 versus 5.77; P < 0.01), and more inpatient surgeries per bed (15.7 versus 12.6; all P < 0.05). Hospitals that invest in more human resources and demonstrate increased throughput perform complex surgery at higher "value" (i.e., lower costs and mortality). Value-based purchasing initiatives that link hospital reimbursement to unadjusted surgical outcomes may exacerbate, rather than improve, disparities in surgical care that currently exist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Collaboration between physicians and a hospital-based palliative care team in a general acute-care hospital in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishikitani Mariko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continual collaboration between physicians and hospital-based palliative care teams represents a very important contributor to focusing on patients' symptoms and maintaining their quality of life during all stages of their illness. However, the traditionally late introduction of palliative care has caused misconceptions about hospital-based palliative care teams (PCTs among patients and general physicians in Japan. The objective of this study is to identify the factors related to physicians' attitudes toward continual collaboration with hospital-based PCTs. Methods This cross-sectional anonymous questionnaire-based survey was conducted to clarify physicians' attitudes toward continual collaboration with PCTs and to describe the factors that contribute to such attitudes. We surveyed 339 full-time physicians, including interns, employed in a general acute-care hospital in an urban area in Japan; the response rate was 53% (N = 155. We assessed the basic characteristics, experience, knowledge, and education of respondents. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the main factors affecting the physicians' attitudes toward PCTs. Results We found that the physicians who were aware of the World Health Organization (WHO analgesic ladder were 6.7 times (OR = 6.7, 95% CI = 1.98-25.79 more likely to want to treat and care for their patients in collaboration with the hospital-based PCTs than were those physicians without such awareness. Conclusion Basic knowledge of palliative care is important in promoting physicians' positive attitudes toward collaboration with hospital-based PCTs.

  13. Potential resource and cost saving analysis of subcutaneous versus intravenous administration for rituximab in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and for trastuzumab in breast cancer in 17 Italian hospitals based on a systematic survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponzetti C

    2016-05-01

    : ±9.42] vs 21.6 hours subcutaneous [95% CI: ±9.9]. Furthermore, in both settings, the time of medical staff was reduced and could hence be used elsewhere. Finally, in case wastage was experienced with intravenous therapies, there were potential significant reductions in wastage through the subcutaneous administration (93%–100% with cost savings of €6,057 with rituximab subcutaneous and €28,399 with trastuzumab subcutaneous administration for the full treatment course. Conclusion: There are significant resource and cost savings due to subcutaneous administration with rituximab and trastuzumab in Italy based on a systematic survey. With the availability of a subcutaneous use of rituximab and trastuzumab, hospitals, patients and payers in general still have the current standard of care therapies available in the approved indications for a more efficient use of time and resources. Keywords: health economics, cost savings, oncology, intravenous therapy, subcutaneous therapy

  14. ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings: monitoring and patient education--2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Craig A; Schneider, Philip J; Scheckelhoff, Douglas J

    2013-05-01

    The results of the 2012 American Society of Health-System Pharmacists national survey of pharmacy practice in U.S. hospital settings are presented. A stratified random sample of pharmacy directors at 1413 general and children's medical-surgical hospitals were surveyed by mail. SDI Health supplied data on hospital characteristics; the survey sample was drawn from SDI's hospital database. In this national probability sample survey, the response rate was 34.0%. The rate of pharmacist monitoring of most patients (i.e., >75%) in hospitals has increased, from 20.3% in 2000 to 46.5% in 2012. Therapeutic drug monitoring programs are in place at most hospitals; at more than 80% of hospitals, pharmacists have the authority to order laboratory tests and adjust medication dosages. A safety culture assessment has been conducted at 72.4% of hospitals. Pharmacists routinely perform discharge counseling in 24.7% of hospitals. At most hospitals, nurses are primarily responsible for medication reconciliation, but 65.9% of pharmacy directors would like pharmacy to have this responsibility. Computerized prescriber order entry is now used in 54.4% of hospitals, with barcode-assisted medication administration used in 65.5% and smart pumps used in 77% of hospitals. The majority of hospitals have fully or partially implemented electronic health records. An increase in the use of remote pharmacist review of medication orders has reduced the percentage of hospitals where orders are not reviewed before a dose is administered to 32%. Pharmacists continue to improve medication use in U.S. hospitals through patient monitoring and education, safety initiatives, collaborative practices with other health care professionals, assisting in the adoption of technologies, and the provision of pharmacy services to outpatients.

  15. A survey of rural hospitals' perspectives on health information technology outsourcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas; Murphy, Alison; McNeese, Nathan; Reddy, Madhu; Purao, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    A survey of rural hospitals was conducted in the spring of 2012 to better understand their perspectives on health information technology (HIT) outsourcing and the role that hospital-to-hospital HIT partnerships (HHPs) can play as an outsourcing mechanism. The survey sought to understand how HHPs might be leveraged for HIT implementation, as well as the challenges with forming them. The results suggest that HHPs have the potential to address rural hospitals' slow rate of HIT adoption, but there are also challenges to creating these partnerships. These issues, as well as avenues for further research, are then discussed.

  16. Hospital clinicians' information behaviour and attitudes towards the 'Clinical Informationist': an Irish survey.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flynn, Maura G

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospital clinicians are increasingly expected to practice evidence-based medicine (EBM) in order to minimize medical errors and ensure quality patient care, but experience obstacles to information-seeking. The introduction of a Clinical Informationist (CI) is explored as a possible solution. AIMS: This paper investigates the self-perceived information needs, behaviour and skill levels of clinicians in two Irish public hospitals. It also explores clinicians\\' perceptions and attitudes to the introduction of a CI into their clinical teams. METHODS: A questionnaire survey approach was utilised for this study, with 22 clinicians in two hospitals. Data analysis was conducted using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Analysis showed that clinicians experience diverse information needs for patient care, and that barriers such as time constraints and insufficient access to resources hinder their information-seeking. Findings also showed that clinicians struggle to fit information-seeking into their working day, regularly seeking to answer patient-related queries outside of working hours. Attitudes towards the concept of a CI were predominantly positive. CONCLUSION: This paper highlights the factors that characterise and limit hospital clinicians\\' information-seeking, and suggests the CI as a potentially useful addition to the clinical team, to help them to resolve their information needs for patient care.

  17. Quality indicators for the hospital transfusion chain : A national survey conducted in 100 dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlker-Jansen, Pauline Y.; Janssen, M. P.; van Tilborgh-de Jong, A. J W; Schipperus, M. R.; Wiersum-Osselton, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The 2011 Dutch Blood Transfusion Guideline for hospitals incorporates seven internal quality indicators for evaluation of the hospital transfusion chain. The indicators aim to measure guideline compliance as shown by the instatement of a hospital transfusion committee and transfusion saf

  18. ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings: Monitoring and patient education--2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Craig A; Schneider, Philip J; Scheckelhoff, Douglas J

    2010-04-01

    Results of the 2009 ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings that pertain to monitoring and patient education are presented. A stratified random sample of pharmacy directors at 1364 general and children's medical-surgical hospitals in the United States were surveyed by mail. SDI Health supplied data on hospital characteristics; the survey sample was drawn from SDI's hospital database. The response rate was 40.5%. Virtually all hospitals (97.3%) had pharmacists regularly monitor medication therapy in some capacity; nearly half monitored 75% or more of their patients. Over 92% had pharmacists routinely monitor serum medication concentrations or their surrogate markers, and most hospitals allowed pharmacists to order initial serum concentrations (80.1%) and adjust dosages (79.2%). Interdisciplinary committees reviewed adverse drug events in 89.3% of hospitals. Prospective analysis was conducted by 66.2% of hospitals, and retrospective analysis was performed by 73.6%. An assessment of safety culture had been conducted by 62.8% of hospitals. Most hospitals assigned oversight for patient medication education to nursing (89.0%), but many hospitals (68.9%) reported that pharmacists provided medication education to 1-25% of patients. Computerized prescriber-order-entry systems with clinical decision support were in place in 15.4%, bar-code-assisted medication administration systems were used by 27.9%, smart infusion pumps were used in 56.2%, and complete electronic medical record systems were in place in 8.8% of hospitals. The majority of hospitals (64.7%) used an integrated pharmacy practice model using clinical generalists. Pharmacists were significantly involved in monitoring medication therapy. Pharmacists were less involved in medication education activities. Technologies to improve the use of medications were used in an increasing percentage of hospitals. Hospital pharmacy practice was increasingly integrated, with pharmacists having both

  19. Physicians' perceptions regarding the detection and management of malnutrition in Canadian hospitals: results of a Canadian Malnutrition Task Force survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerksen, Donald R; Keller, Heather H; Vesnaver, Elisabeth; Allard, Johane P; Bernier, Paule; Gramlich, Leah; Payette, Hélène; Laporte, Manon; Jeejeebhoy, Khursheed

    2015-05-01

    Since malnutrition is common in Canadian hospitals, physicians frequently encounter patients with significantly impaired nutrition status. The objective of this study was to determine physician attitudes and perceptions regarding the detection and management of malnutrition in Canadian hospitals. A survey based on a previously developed questionnaire that focused on guidelines for nutrition support of hospitalized patients was completed by Canadian physicians working on wards in the 18 hospitals participating in the Canadian Malnutrition Task Force study. Data were analyzed descriptively and according to ward (medical vs surgical) and hospital type (academic vs community). The survey was completed by 428 of the 1220 physicians who were provided with a questionnaire and asked to participate (response rate 35%). While physicians believe that nutrition assessment should be performed at admission (364/419 [87%]), during hospitalization (363/421 [86%]), and at discharge (327/418 [78%]), most felt that this was not being done on a regular basis (admission, 140/423 [33%]; during hospitalization, 175/423 [41%]; at discharge, 121/424 [29%]). Similarly there was a gap between what was perceived to be the ideal management of hospital-related malnutrition and current practices. Physicians felt that the team's nutrition education and use of dietetic resources could be increased, and although their nutrition knowledge was limited, they felt that hospital-associated malnutrition was very relevant to the care they provided. A multidisciplinary team is needed to address hospital malnutrition, and educational strategies that target physicians are needed to promote better detection and management throughout the hospital stay. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  20. Staffing for infectious diseases, clinical microbiology and infection control in hospitals in 2015: results of an ESCMID member survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickstein, Y; Nir-Paz, R; Pulcini, C; Cookson, B; Beović, B; Tacconelli, E; Nathwani, D; Vatcheva-Dobrevska, R; Rodríguez-Baño, J; Hell, M; Saenz, H; Leibovici, L; Paul, M

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to assess the current status of infectious diseases (ID), clinical microbiology (CM) and infection control (IC) staffing in hospitals and to analyse modifiers of staffing levels. We conducted an Internet-based survey of European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases members and affiliates, collecting data on hospital characteristics, ID management infrastructure, ID/IC-related activities and the ratio of physicians per 100 hospital beds. Regression analyses were conducted to examine factors associated with the physician-bed ratio. Five hundred sixty-seven hospital responses were collected between April and June 2015 from 61 countries, 81.2% (384/473) from Europe. A specialized inpatient ward for ID patients was reported in 58.4% (317/543) of hospitals. Rates of antibiotic stewardship programmes (ASP) and surveillance activities in survey hospitals were high, ranging from 88% to 90% for local antibiotic guidelines and 70% to 82% for programmes monitoring hospital-acquired infections. The median ID/CM/IC physician per 100 hospital beds ratio was 1.12 (interquartile range 0.56-2.13). In hospitals performing basic ASP and IC (including local antibiotic guidelines and monitoring device-related or surgical site infections), the ratio was 1.21 (interquartile range 0.57-2.14). Factors independently associated with higher ratios included compliance with European Union of Medical Specialists standards, smaller hospital size, tertiary-care institution, presence of a travel clinic, beds dedicated to ID and a CM unit. More than half of respondents estimated that additional staffing is needed for appropriate IC or ID management. No standard of physician staffing for ID/CM/IC in hospitals is available. A ratio of 1.21/100 beds will serve as an informed point of reference enabling ASP and infection surveillance.

  1. QUALITY AND QUANTITY SURVEY OF HOSPITAL WASTEWATERS IN HORMOZGAN PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Sarafraz, M. R. Khani, K. Yaghmaeian

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hospital wastewaters are one of the most contaminating wastewaters and need to be paid more attention due to containing infectious agents. In this study, which had been conducted in a period of one year, 7 public hospitals were selected out of 12 public hospitals in Hormozgan Province of Iran. For studying quality of wastewater in hospitals, both influent and effluent wastewaters of treatment plant, if any, were sampled once in each season and totally 30 mixed samples were obtained. In order to determine the quality of hospital wastewaters in all samples, parameters such as pH, BOD5, COD, TSS and temperature were measured. Results of investigation on annual water consumption indicated that average water consumption in hospitals of the province was 194m3/d., considering water-to-wastewater conversion ratio of 0.8 and green yard ratio of 0.3. Wastewater production rate had been estimated to be 47m3/d and 0.362 m3/d.bed. Results indicated that in 7 hospitals of Hormozgan province, mean values of BOD5 ,COD ,TSS in raw wastewater were 242.25 mg/L, 628.1 mg/L and 231.25 mg/L, respectively, pH=7.42 and temperature=30.17 ºC. In Khalij-e-Fars hospital which had wastewater treatment plant, values of these parameters in effluent were 12.53 mg/L and 51.7 mg/L, 19.68 mg/L, respectively, with pH=7.39 and temperature=26.1 ºC. Comparison between values of influent and effluent wastewaters indicated that in understudy cases, contamination rate was higher than determined limits, as compared to environmental standards of the country and it was necessary to establish appropriate treatment plants in these units.

  2. Survey Based Reviewof Elicitation Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidra Arshad

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Any software development process is the combination of multiple development activities and each activity has a vital role in the software development cycle. Requirement Engineering is the main and basic branch of Software Engineering, it has many phases but the most initial phase is Requirement Elicitation. In this phase requirements are gathered for system development. This paper provides a literature review of the requirements engineering processes performed in traditional and modern development processes and analyses the problems in the requirements elicitation phase. This problem analysis is based on a survey which was conducted in University. A questionnaire posing questions regarding the problems in requirement elicitation was given to final year computer science graduate students who are working on their final year project as a requirement for their degree. The theoretical analysis of the questionnaire further clarifies the problems. This problems analysis will help to find out the main problems which are faced by the perspective software developers.

  3. Student Opinions about the Seven-Step Procedure in Problem-Based Hospitality Management Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwaal, Wichard; Otting, Hans

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates how hospitality management students appreciate the role and application of the seven-step procedure in problem-based learning. A survey was developed containing sections about personal characteristics, recall of the seven steps, overall report marks, and 30 statements about the seven-step procedure. The survey was…

  4. Ranking hospitals for outcomes in total hip replacement - administrative data with or without patient surveys? - Part 2: Patient survey and administrative data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schäfer, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many hospital rankings rely on the frequency of adverse outcomes and are based on administrative data. In the study presented here, we tried to find out, to what extent available administrative data of German Sickness Funds allow for an adequate hospital ranking and compared this with rankings based on additional information derived from a patient survey. Total hip replacement was chosen as an example procedure. In part II of the publication, we present the results of the approach based on administrative and patient-derived data. Methods: We used administrative data from a large health insurance (AOK-Lower Saxony of the year 2002 and from a patient survey. The study population comprised mainly beneficiaries, who received primary total hip replacement in the year 2002, were mailed a survey 6 month post-operatively and participated in the survey. Performance indicators used where “Revision”, “Complications” and “Change of functional impairment”. Hospitals were ranked if they performed at least 20 procedures on AOK-beneficiaries. Multivariate modelling (logistic regression and generalized linear models was used to estimate the performance indicators by case-mix variables (a.o. age, sex, co-morbidity, medical history and hospital characteristics (hospital size, surgical volume. The actual ranking was based on these multivariate models, excluding hospital variables and adding dummy-variables for each hospital. Hospitals were ranked by their case-mix adjusted odds ratio or Standardized Difference (SDR with respect to a pre-selected reference hospital. The resulting rankings were compared with each other and with regard to the impact of case-mix variables. Results: 4089 beneficiaries received primary total hip replacement in 2002. 3293 patients participated in the survey (80.5%. The ranking included 60 hospitals. The agreement of rankings based on different performance indicators in the same year was low to high (a correlation

  5. Guam Shore-based Creel Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Similar in basic design to other shore-based creel surveys in the region, the Guam survey has been ongoing since the early 1980s and is continuing today. Creel...

  6. American Samoa Shore-based Creel Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The DMWR staff has also conducted shore-based creel surveys which also have 2 major sub-surveys; one to estimate participation (fishing effort), and one to provide...

  7. Artificial-intelligence-based hospital-acquired infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter; Blacky, Alexander; Koller, Walter

    2009-01-01

    Nosocomial or hospital-acquired infections (NIs) are a frequent complication in hospitalized patients. The growing availability of computerized patient records in hospitals permits automated identification and extended monitoring for signs of NIs. A fuzzy- and knowledge-based system to identify and monitor NIs at intensive care units (ICUs) according to the European Surveillance System HELICS (NI definitions derived from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria) was developed and put into operation at the Vienna General Hospital. This system, named Moni, for monitoring of nosocomial infections contains medical knowledge packages (MKPs) to identify and monitor various infections of the bloodstream, pneumonia, urinary tract infections, and central venous catheter-associated infections. The MKPs consist of medical logic modules (MLMs) in Arden syntax, a medical knowledge representation scheme, whose definition is part of the HL7 standards. These MLM packages together with the Arden software are well suited to be incorporated in medical information systems such as hospital information or intensive-care patient data management systems, or in web-based applications. In terms of method, Moni contains an extended data-to-symbol conversion with several layers of abstraction, until the top level defining NIs according to HELICS is reached. All included medical concepts such as "normal", "increased", "decreased", or similar ones are formally modeled by fuzzy sets, and fuzzy logic is used to process the interpretations of the clinically observed and measured patient data through an inference network. The currently implemented cockpit surveillance connects 96 ICU beds with Moni and offers the hospital's infection control department a hitherto unparalleled NI infection survey.

  8. Tactical hospital marketing: a survey of the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, P K; Shields, L A

    1985-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of acute care hospitals which was undertaken to: (1) identify and establish the organizational positioning of key hospital marketing personnel; (2) measure the role of these personnel in influencing the traditional marketing mix decisions; and, (3) identify tactical marketing activities most frequently undertaken.

  9. Predictors of adherence to safe handling practices for antineoplastic drugs: A survey of hospital nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Sharon R; Steege, Andrea L; Boiano, James M

    2016-01-01

    Despite growing awareness of the hazards of exposure to antineoplastic drugs (ADs), surveys continue to find incomplete adherence to recommended safe handling guidelines. A 2011 survey of healthcare workers presents an opportunity to examine factors associated with adherence among 1094 hospital nurses who administered ADs. Data for these hypothesis-generating analyses were taken from an anonymous, web-based survey of healthcare workers. Regression modeling was used to examine associations between a number of predictors (engineering controls, work practices, nurse perceptions, and nurse and hospital characteristics) and three outcomes reported by nurses: use of personal protective equipment (PPE); activities performed with gloves previously worn to administer ADs; and spills of ADs. Adherence to safe handling guidelines was not universal, and AD spills were reported by 9.5% of nurses during the week prior to the survey. Familiarity with safe handling guidelines and training in safe handling were associated with more reported PPE use. Nurse-perceived availability of PPE was associated with more reported PPE use and lower odds of reported spills. Use of closed system drug-transfer devices and luer-lock fittings also decreased the odds of self-reported AD spills, while more frequent AD administration increased the risk. AD administration frequency was also associated with performing more activities with gloves previously worn to administer ADs, and nurse perception of having adequate time for taking safety precautions with fewer such activities. The results suggest that training and familiarity with guidelines for safe handling of ADs, adequate time to adhere to guidelines, and availability of PPE and certain engineering controls are key to ensuring adherence to safe handling practices. Further assessment of training components and engineering controls would be useful for tailoring interventions targeting these areas.

  10. Multilevel psychometric properties of the AHRQ hospital survey on patient safety culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorra Joann S

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was designed to assess staff views on patient safety culture in hospital settings. The purpose of this study was to examine the multilevel psychometric properties of the survey. Methods Survey data from 331 U.S. hospitals with 2,267 hospital units and 50,513 respondents were analyzed to examine the psychometric properties of the survey's items and composites. Item factor loadings, intraclass correlations (ICCs, design effects, internal consistency reliabilities, and multilevel confirmatory factor analyses (MCFA were examined as well as intercorrelations among the survey's composites. Results Psychometric analyses confirmed the multilevel nature of the data at the individual, unit and hospital levels of analysis. Results provided overall evidence supporting the 12 dimensions and 42 items included in the AHRQ Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture as having acceptable psychometric properties at all levels of analysis, with a few exceptions. The Staffing composite fell slightly below cutoffs in a number of areas, but is conceptually important given its impact on patient safety. In addition, one hospital-level model fit indicator for the Supervisor/Manager Expectations & Actions Promoting Patient Safety composite was low (CFI = .82, but all other psychometrics for this scale were good. Average dimension intercorrelations were moderate at .42 at the individual level, .50 at the unit level, and .56 at the hospital level. Conclusions Psychometric analyses conducted on a very large database of hospitals provided overall support for the patient safety culture dimensions and items included in the AHRQ Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. The survey's items and dimensions overall are psychometrically sound at the individual, unit, and hospital levels of analysis and can be used by researchers and hospitals interested in assessing

  11. Implementing TQM/CQI at rehabilitation hospitals: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carefoote, R

    1994-01-01

    The quality movement in healthcare is here to stay. Total quality management (TQM) and continuous quality improvement (CQI) approaches are no longer considered fads or transitory trends; they are being woven into the very fabric of hospital operations. What has been unclear, however, is the extent to which the underlying TQM/CQI philosophy, tools, and techniques are being implemented and whether hospitals are noticeably changing as a result of TQM/CQI programs. The results of a study of 14 rehabilitation hospitals indicate that the rehabilitation setting is a natural one for TQM/CQI but that these settings are just beginning to implement the needed structures and processes and to use the relevant tools and techniques.

  12. The Aalborg Survey / Part 1 - Web Based Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Henrik; Christensen, Cecilie Breinholm

    Background and purpose The Aalborg Survey consists of four independent parts: a web, GPS and an interview based survey and a literature study, which together form a consistent investigation and research into use of urban space, and specifically into young people’s use of urban space: what young......) and the research focus within the cluster of Mobility and Tracking Technologies (MoTT), AAU. Summary / Part 1 Web Base Survey The 1st part of the research project Diverse Urban Spaces (DUS) has been carried out during the period from December 1st 2007 to February 1st 2008 as a Web Based Survey of the 27.040 gross...... people do in urban spaces, where they are in the urban spaces and when the young people are in the urban spaces. The answers to these questions form the framework and enable further academic discussions and conclusions in relation to the overall research project Diverse Urban Spaces (DUS). The primary...

  13. Orthopedic Surgery in Rural American Hospitals: A Survey of Rural Hospital Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichel, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Rural American residents prefer to receive their medical care locally. Lack of specific medical services in the local community necessitates travel to a larger center which is less favorable. This study was done to identify how rural hospitals choose to provide orthopedic surgical services to their communities. Methods: All hospitals in 5 states…

  14. Orthopedic Surgery in Rural American Hospitals: A Survey of Rural Hospital Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichel, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Rural American residents prefer to receive their medical care locally. Lack of specific medical services in the local community necessitates travel to a larger center which is less favorable. This study was done to identify how rural hospitals choose to provide orthopedic surgical services to their communities. Methods: All hospitals in 5 states…

  15. Survey of the Information-Seeking Behaviour of Hospital Professionals at a Public Cancer Hospital in Greece Proves the Value of Hospital Libraries. A Review of: Kostagiolas, P. A., Ziavrou, K., Alexias, G., & Niakas, D. (2012. Studying the information-seeking behavior of hospital professionals: The case of METAXA Cancer Hospital in Greece. Journal of Hospital Librarianship, 12(1, 33-45.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio DeRosa

    2013-06-01

    time (3.7 score on Likert scale. A lack of information services was second to the time issue with a Likert scale score of 3.6.Conclusion – Based on the research results, the authors affirmed the invaluable role of hospital libraries. The hospital library can help to eliminate the obstacles faced by healthcare professionals by providing support in the areas of weakness based on the survey results. This can be made possible through the hospital library’s involvement in educational activities, investigation of information technologies, and development of information services to accommodate the difficulties regularly experienced by hospital staff. Researchers revealed that funding for hospital libraries in Greece is an issue preventing many new initiatives, that there is no association to represent hospital libraries in Greece, that the few libraries operating in hospitals in Greece are understaffed with no administrative control, and the majority of Greek hospitals do not have adequate library facilities. These drawbacks contribute to the information-seeking challenges experienced by Greek healthcare professionals.

  16. Deterioration of Parkinson's disease during hospitalization: survey of 684 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerlach Oliver HH

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A substantial fraction of Parkinson's disease patients deteriorate during hospitalisation, but the precise proportion and the reasons why have not been studied systematically and the focus has been on surgical wards and on Accident & Emergency departments. We assessed the prevalence and risk factors of deterioration of Parkinson's disease symptoms during hospitalization, including all wards. Methods We invited Parkinson's disease patients from three neurology departments in The Netherlands to answer a standardised questionnaire on general, disease and hospital related issues. Patients who had been hospitalized in the previous year were included and analysed. Possible risk factors for Parkinson's disease deterioration were identified. Proportions were analysed using the Chi-Square test and a logistic regression analysis was performed. Results Eighteen percent of 684 Parkinson's disease patients had been hospitalized at least once in the last year. Twenty-one percent experienced deterioration of motor symptoms, 33% did have one or more complications and 26% had received incorrect anti-Parkinson's medication. There were no statistically significant differences for these variables between admissions on neurologic or non-neurologic wards and between having surgery or not. Incorrect medication during hospitalization was significantly associated with higher risk (OR 5.8, CI 2.5-13.7 of deterioration, as were having infections (OR 6.7 CI 1.8-24.7. A higher levodopa equivalent dose per day was a significant risk factor for deterioration. When adjusting for different variables, wrong medication distribution was the most important risk factor for deterioration. Conclusions Incorrect medication and infections are the important risk factors for deterioration of Parkinson's disease patients both for admissions with and without surgery and both for admissions on neurologic and non-neurologic wards. Measures should be taken to improve care

  17. Hospital-based influenza vaccination of children: an opportunity to prevent subsequent hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerr, Danielle M; Englund, Janet A; Robertson, Andrea S; Marcuse, Edgar K; Garrison, Michelle M; Christakis, Dimitri A

    2008-02-01

    We performed this study to determine the frequency of previous hospitalization among children hospitalized with influenza. The Pediatric Health Information System database (discharges that occurred between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2006) was used to determine the proportion of children hospitalized with influenza or respiratory illness who had a previous hospitalization during the most recent influenza-vaccination season. Subjects included pediatric patients (through 18 years of age). The index hospitalization was defined as the first influenza or respiratory illness hospitalization for a child that occurred during the study period and between November 1 and April 30. A previous hospitalization during the most recent influenza-vaccination season was defined as a hospitalization for any reason in the 0.5 to 6 months before the index hospitalization but not before September 1 or on or after March 1. Overall, 16% of children hospitalized with influenza and 12% of children hospitalized with influenza or a respiratory illness had a previous hospitalization during the most recent influenza-vaccination season. Approximately 23% of the children hospitalized with influenza and a comorbidity had a previous hospitalization during the most recent influenza-vaccination season. Hospital-based programs for influenza vaccination have the potential to reach children at highest risk of influenza complications and to reduce the rates of pediatric hospitalization for treatment of influenza-related illness.

  18. Fact-finding Survey of Nosocomial Infection Control in Hospitals in Kathmandu, Nepal-A Basis for Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Hiroshi; Pokhrel, Bharat M; Dahal, Rajan K; Mishra, Shyam K; Kattel, Hari P; Shrestha, Dharma L; Haneishi, Yumiko; Sherchand, Jeevan B

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the actual conditions of nosocomial infection control in Kathmandu City, Nepal as a basis for the possible contribution to its improvement. The survey was conducted at 17 hospitals and the methods included a questionnaire, site visits and interviews. Nine hospitals had manuals on nosocomial infection control, and seven had an infection control committee (ICC). The number of hospitals that met the required amount of personal protective equipment preparation was as follows: gowns (13), gloves (13), surgical masks (12). Six hospitals had carried out in-service training over the past one year, but seven hospitals responded that no staff had been trained. Eight hospitals were conducting surveillance based on the results of bacteriological testing. The major problems included inadequate management of ICC, insufficient training opportunities for hospital staff, and lack of essential equipment. Moreover, increasing bacterial resistance to antibiotics was recognized as a growing issue. In comparison with the results conducted in 2003 targeting five governmental hospitals, a steady improvement was observed, but further improvements are needed in terms of the provision of high quality medical care. Particularly, dissemination of appropriate manuals, enhancement of basic techniques, and strengthening of the infection control system should be given priority.

  19. Clinical and conventional pharmacy services in Polish hospitals: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowska, Iga; Pawłowski, Leszek; Kocić, Ivan; Krzyżaniak, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    Pharmacist-led care services within the hospital pharmacy setting have a significant impact on efficient drug management processes. The work of pharmacists is directly associated with the provision of drugs and medical supplies along with additional clinical, administrative, organizational and educational duties. Depending on the country, these practice roles may differ to a significant extent. The aim of this research was to explore the role of the hospital pharmacist and the provision of both clinical and traditional pharmaceutical services for patients and medical staff in Polish general hospitals. Hospital pharmacies from all general hospitals in Poland. A cross-sectional study was conducted, utilizing an anonymous questionnaire as the research instrument. Heads of hospital pharmacies were requested to participate in this study and complete the questionnaire. The survey was initially piloted to improve the research method. The types of pharmaceutical services performed in Polish general hospitals. 166 hospital pharmacies took part in this survey. The overall response rate was 60.8 %. The total number of full-time equivalent (FTE) professionals employed within the surveyed hospital pharmacies was approximately 833. The procurement and distribution of drugs were identified as pharmaceutical services performed by most of the participants. The significant majority of pharmacists were also involved in compounding, adverse drug reaction monitoring and rational drug management services. Eleven (7 %) of the responding pharmacists had direct contact with patients and 7 (4 %) pharmacists took part in ward rounds. More precise legal regulations regarding hospital pharmacy practice were measures indicated by most pharmacists as necessary changes required in the hospital pharmacy system. Polish hospital pharmacists provide various pharmaceutical services. Their work is closely related with direct provision of drugs. There is an observed inadequate level of clinical services

  20. The relationship between transformational leadership and social capital in hospitals--a survey of medical directors of all German hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Antje; Ommen, Oliver; Röttger, Julia; Pfaff, Holger

    2012-01-01

    The German hospital market has been undergoing major changes in recent years. Success in this new market is determined by a multitude of factors. One is the quality of the social relationships between staff and the presence of shared values and rules. This factor can be considered an organization's "social capital." This study investigates the relationship between social capital and leadership style in German hospitals using a written survey of medical directors. In 2008, a cross-sectional representative study was conducted with 1224 medical directors from every hospital in Germany with at least 1 internal medicine unit and 1 surgery unit. Among the scales included in the standardized questionnaire were scales used to assess the medical directors' evaluation of social capital and transformational leadership in the hospital. We used a multiple linear regression model to examine the relationship between social capital and internal coordination. We controlled for hospital ownership, teaching status, and number of beds. In total, we received questionnaires from 551 medical directors, resulting in a response rate of 45.2%. The participating hospitals had an average of 345 beds. The sample included public (41.3%), not-for-profit (46.9%), and for-profit (11.7%) hospitals. The data, which exclusively represent the perceptions of the medical directors, indicate a significant correlation between a transformational leadership style of the executive management and the social capital as perceived by medical directors. A transformational leadership style of the executive management accounted for 36% of variance of the perceived social capital. The perceived social capital in German hospitals is closely related to the leadership style of the executive management. A transformational leadership style of the executive management appears to successfully strengthen the hospital's social capital.

  1. Physician-owned Surgical Hospitals Outperform Other Hospitals in the Medicare Value-based Purchasing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Adriana G; Tracci, Margaret C; Stukenborg, George J; Turrentine, Florence E; Kozower, Benjamin D; Jones, R Scott

    2016-01-01

    Background The Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program measures value of care provided by participating Medicare hospitals while creating financial incentives for quality improvement and fostering increased transparency. Limited information is available comparing hospital performance across healthcare business models. Study Design 2015 hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program results were used to examine hospital performance by business model. General linear modeling assessed differences in mean total performance score, hospital case mix index, and differences after adjustment for differences in hospital case mix index. Results Of 3089 hospitals with Total Performance Scores (TPS), categories of representative healthcare business models included 104 Physician-owned Surgical Hospitals (POSH), 111 University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC), 14 US News & World Report Honor Roll (USNWR) Hospitals, 33 Kaiser Permanente, and 124 Pioneer Accountable Care Organization affiliated hospitals. Estimated mean TPS for POSH (64.4, 95% CI 61.83, 66.38) and Kaiser (60.79, 95% CI 56.56, 65.03) were significantly higher compared to all remaining hospitals while UHC members (36.8, 95% CI 34.51, 39.17) performed below the mean (p UHC members (mean =1.99, p<0.0001) while Kaiser Permanente hospitals had lower case mix value (mean =1.54, p<0.0001). Re-estimation of TPS did not change the original results after adjustment for differences in hospital case mix index. Conclusions The Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program revealed superior hospital performance associated with business model. Closer inspection of high-value hospitals may guide value improvement and policy-making decisions for all Medicare Value-Based Purchasing Program Hospitals. PMID:27502368

  2. A survey on the status of nutrition care process implementation in korean hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Mi; Baek, Hee Joon

    2013-07-01

    The Nutrition Care Process (NCP), developed by the American Dietetic Association, is a significant issue to dietetic professionals in many countries and there are rising needs for NCP implementation in Korea. We surveyed clinical nutrition managers of Korean general hospitals regarding the perception of NCP, the status of NCP implementation, and the opinions on NCP. The questionnaire was collected from 35 hospitals. Most clinical nutrition managers perceived NCP, but NCP implementation in hospital was at early stage. NCP was implemented in a fourth of the surveyed hospitals and many clinical nutrition managers responded that the lack of knowledge and the concern on increasing working time were major barriers to implementing NCP. To successfully implement NCP in Korean hospital, ongoing education and training programs should be developed to provide adequate knowledge and help dietitians to cope with the barriers.

  3. A cross-sectional survey of emergency and essential surgical care capacity among hospitals with high trauma burden in a Central African country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouo-Ngamby, Marquise; Dissak-Delon, Fanny Nadia; Feldhaus, Isabelle; Juillard, Catherine; Stevens, Kent A; Ekeke-Monono, Martin

    2015-10-23

    As the overwhelming surgical burden of injury and disease steadily increases, disproportionately affecting low- and middle-income countries, adequate surgical and trauma care systems are essential. Yet, little is known about the emergency and essential surgical care (EESC) capacity of facilities in many African countries. The objective of this study was to assess the EESC capacity in different types of hospitals across Cameroon. This cross-sectional survey used the WHO Tool for Situational Analysis to Assess EESC, investigating four key areas: infrastructure, human resources, interventions, and equipment and supplies. Twelve hospitals were surveyed between August and September 2009. Facilities were conveniently sampled based on proximity to road traffic and sociodemographic composition of population served in four regions of Cameroon. To complete the survey, investigators interviewed heads of facilities, medical advisors, and nursing officers and consulted hospital records and statistics at each facility. Seven district hospitals, two regional hospitals, two general hospitals, and one missionary hospital completed the survey. Infrastructure for EESC was generally inadequate with the largest gaps in availability of oxygen concentrator supply, an on-site blood bank, and pain relief management guidelines. Human resources were scarce with a combined total of six qualified surgeons, seven qualified obstetrician/gynecologists, and no anesthesiologists at district, regional, and missionary hospitals. Of 35 surgical interventions, 16 were provided by all hospitals. District hospitals reported referring patients for 22 interventions. Only nine of the 67 pieces of equipment were available at all hospitals for all patients all of the time. Severe shortages highlighted by this survey demonstrate the significant gaps in capacity of hospitals to deliver EESC and effectively address the increasing surgical burden of disease and injury in Cameroon. This data provides a foundation

  4. Assessing the magnitude and trends in hospital acquired infections in Canadian hospitals through sequential point prevalence surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Taylor

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare acquired infections (HAI are an important public health problem in developed countries, but comprehensive data on trends over time are lacking. Prevalence surveys have been used as a surrogate for incidence studies and can be readily repeated. Methods The Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program conducted prevalence surveys in 2002 and 2009 in a large network of major Canadian acute care hospitals. NHSN definitions of HAI were used. Use of isolation precautions on the survey day was documented. Results In 2009, 9,953 acute care inpatients were surveyed; 1,234 infections (124/1000 were found, compared to 111/1000 in 2002, (p < 0.0001. There was increased prevalence of urinary tract infection (UTI and Clostridium difficile, offset by decreases in pneumonia and bloodstream infection. Use of isolation precautions increased from 77 to 148 per 1000 patients (p < 0.0001, attributable to increased use of contact precautions in patients infected or colonized with antimicrobial resistant organisms. Conclusion Between 2002 and 2009 HAI prevalence increased by 11.7 % in a network of major Canadian hospitals due to increases in Clostridium difficile and urinary tract infection. The use of isolation precautions increased by 92.2 % attributable to increased contact isolation. National prevalence surveys are useful tools to assess evolving trends in HAI.

  5. Rapid Response Systems Reduce In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest: A Pilot Study and Motivation for a Nationwide Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonhee Park

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Early recognition of the signs and symptoms of clinical deterioration could diminish the incidence of cardiopulmonary arrest. The present study investigates outcomes with respect to cardiopulmonary arrest rates in institutions with and without rapid response systems (RRSs and the current level of cardiopulmonary arrest rate in tertiary hospitals. Methods This was a retrospective study based on data from 14 tertiary hospitals. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR rate reports were obtained from each hospital to include the number of cardiopulmonary arrest events in adult patients in the general ward, the annual adult admission statistics, and the structure of the RRS if present. Results Hospitals with RRSs showed a statistically significant reduction of the CPR rate between 2013 and 2015 (odds ratio [OR], 0.731; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.577 to 0.927; P = 0.009. Nevertheless, CPR rates of 2013 and 2015 did not change in hospitals without RRS (OR, 0.988; 95% CI, 0.868 to 1.124; P = 0.854. National university-affiliated hospitals showed less cardiopulmonary arrest rate than private university-affiliated in 2015 (1.92 vs. 2.40; OR, 0.800; 95% CI, 0.702 to 0.912; P = 0.001. High-volume hospitals showed lower cardiopulmonary arrest rates compared with medium-volume hospitals in 2013 (1.76 vs. 2.63; OR, 0.667; 95% CI, 0.577 to 0.772; P < 0.001 and in 2015 (1.55 vs. 3.20; OR, 0.485; 95% CI, 0.428 to 0.550; P < 0.001. Conclusions RRSs may be a feasible option to reduce the CPR rate. The discrepancy in cardiopulmonary arrest rates suggests further research should include a nationwide survey to tease out factors involved in in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest and differences in outcomes based on hospital characteristics.

  6. Ethics policies on euthanasia in hospitals--A survey in Flanders (Belgium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemiengre, Joke; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette; Verbeke, Geert; Guisson, Catherine; Schotsmans, Paul; Gastmans, Chris

    2007-12-01

    To determine the prevalence, development, stance, and communication of written institutional ethics policies on euthanasia in Flemish hospitals. Cross-sectional mail survey of general directors of all hospitals (n=81) in Flanders, Belgium. Of the 81 hospitals invited to participate, 71 (88%) completed the questionnaire. Of these, 45 (63%) had a written ethics policy on euthanasia. The Belgian Act on Euthanasia and centrally developed guidelines of professional organisations were the most frequently mentioned reasons for and sources used in developing ethics policies on euthanasia in hospitals. Up to one-third of hospitals reported that they developed the policy upon request from physicians or nurses, or after being confronted with a euthanasia request. Development and approval of institutional ethics policies occurred within a multidisciplinary context involving clinicians, ethicists, and hospital administrators. The majority of hospitals restrictively applied the euthanasia law by introducing palliative procedures in addition to legal due care criteria. Private Catholic hospitals, in particular, were more likely to be restrictive: euthanasia is not permitted or is permitted only in exceptional cases (in accordance with legal due care criteria and additional palliative care procedures). The majority of hospitals took the initiative to communicate the policy to hospital physicians and nurses. Since the enactment of the Belgian Act on Euthanasia in 2002, the debate on how to deal with euthanasia requests has intensified in Flemish hospitals. The high prevalence of written institutional ethics policies on euthanasia and other medical end-of-life decisions is one possible outcome of this debate.

  7. Combined audit of hospital antibiotic use and a prevalence survey of healthcare-associated infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, E

    2010-05-01

    Appropriate antibiotic use improves patient outcome and prevents the emergence of antibiotic resistance. A point-prevalence audit of antibiotic use at Beaumont Hospital, Dublin was carried out during the collection of data for the 2006 Hospital Infection Society (HIS) Prevalence Survey of Healthcare-Associated Infection. All inpatients who met the HIS survey entry criteria were included in the HIS survey, and all inpatients who were receiving antibiotics at the time of the survey were included in the point-prevalence audit of antibiotic use. Among these, 7.18% and 36.8% of patients had a healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) and were on antibiotics, respectively. Unnecessary collection of duplicate data was avoided by conducting an audit of antibiotic use and a national survey of HCAI simultaneously.

  8. Radiation Protection in Pediatric Radiology: Results of a Survey Among Dutch Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijwaard, Harmen; Valk, Doreth; de Waard-Schalkx, Ischa

    2016-10-01

    A survey about radiation protection in pediatric radiology was conducted among 22 general and seven children's hospitals in the Netherlands. Questions concerned, for example, child protocols used for CT, fluoroscopy and x-ray imaging, number of images and scans made, radiation doses and measures taken to reduce these, special tools used for children, and quality assurance issues. The answers received from 27 hospitals indicate that radiation protection practices differ considerably between general and children's hospitals but also between the respective general and children's hospitals. It is recommended that hospitals consult each other to come up with more uniform best practices. Few hospitals were able to supply doses that can be compared to the national Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs). The ones that could be compared exceeded the DRLs in one in five cases, which is more than was expected beforehand.

  9. Occupational burnout and work factors in community and hospital midwives: a survey analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yukiko; Sandall, Jane

    2013-08-01

    community-based midwifery practice has been promoted in the UK maternity policy over the last decade as a means of increasing continuity of care. However, there have been growing concerns to suggest that the community-based continuity model may not be sustainable due to the high levels of occupational burnout in midwives resulted by increased on-call work. this paper attempted to identify work factors associated with the levels of burnout in community midwives as compared to hospital midwives, aiming at contributing to the debate of organising sustainable midwifery care. a statistical analysis was conducted drawing on data from a survey of all midwives working at one Hospital Trust in England (n=238). Occupational burnout was measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). the sample midwives (n=128, 54%) had significantly higher levels of burnout compared to the reference groups. Multiple regression analysis identified as follows: (1) high levels of occupational autonomy were a key protective factor of burnout, and more prevalent in the community, (2) working hours were positively associated with burnout, and community midwives were more likely to have higher levels of stress recognition, and (3) support for work-life-balance from the Trust had a significant protective effect on the levels of burnout. the results should be taken into account in the maternity policy in order to incorporate continuity of care and sustainable organisation of midwifery care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A survey of four years intrauterine insemination at Shariati Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghahosseini M

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Intrauterine insemination (IUI has been practiced since the late 1800's primarily for idiopathic infertility, and in men with deficient semen parameters. The procedure is done by placing washed sperm in uterus a few hours before ovulation. The records of 427 couples receiving IUI for treatment of infertility at Shariati hospital in 1370-74 were reviewed retrospectively. These patients had IUI in 574 cycles. Eighty patients became pregnant and delivery rate was 14% per cycle. Pregnancy rate is impressive when ovulation induction is combined with insemination timed just before ovulation. The success rate in Shariati hospital is comparable to other infertility centers in the world and cost of a cycle of IUI with HMG superovulation is approximately one third the cost of IVF-ET or GIFT cycle and avoids invasive oocyte retrieval and extracorporeal fertilization. So we suggest that women with refractory infertility without anatomic distortion of pelvis can have at least 3-6 cycles of IUI before IVF or GIFT.

  11. Workforce Perceptions of Hospital Safety Culture: Development and Validation of the Patient Safety Climate in Healthcare Organizations Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Sara; Meterko, Mark; Baker, Laurence; Gaba, David; Falwell, Alyson; Rosen, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Objective To describe the development of an instrument for assessing workforce perceptions of hospital safety culture and to assess its reliability and validity. Data Sources/Study Setting Primary data collected between March 2004 and May 2005. Personnel from 105 U.S. hospitals completed a 38-item paper and pencil survey. We received 21,496 completed questionnaires, representing a 51 percent response rate. Study Design Based on review of existing safety climate surveys, we developed a list of key topics pertinent to maintaining a culture of safety in high-reliability organizations. We developed a draft questionnaire to address these topics and pilot tested it in four preliminary studies of hospital personnel. We modified the questionnaire based on experience and respondent feedback, and distributed the revised version to 42,249 hospital workers. Data Collection We randomly divided respondents into derivation and validation samples. We applied exploratory factor analysis to responses in the derivation sample. We used those results to create scales in the validation sample, which we subjected to multitrait analysis (MTA). Principal Findings We identified nine constructs, three organizational factors, two unit factors, three individual factors, and one additional factor. Constructs demonstrated substantial convergent and discriminant validity in the MTA. Cronbach's α coefficients ranged from 0.50 to 0.89. Conclusions It is possible to measure key salient features of hospital safety climate using a valid and reliable 38-item survey and appropriate hospital sample sizes. This instrument may be used in further studies to better understand the impact of safety climate on patient safety outcomes. PMID:17850530

  12. Arduino based radiation survey meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Nur Aira Abd, E-mail: nur-aira@nm.gov.my; Lombigit, Lojius; Abdullah, Nor Arymaswati; Azman, Azraf; Dolah, Taufik; Jaafar, Zainudin; Mohamad, Glam Hadzir Patai; Ramli, Abd Aziz Mhd; Zain, Rasif Mohd; Said, Fazila; Khalid, Mohd Ashhar; Taat, Muhamad Zahidee [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, 43000, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Muzakkir, Amir [Sinaran Utama Teknologi Sdn Bhd, 43650, Bandar Baru Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    This paper presents the design of new digital radiation survey meter with LND7121 Geiger Muller tube detector and Atmega328P microcontroller. Development of the survey meter prototype is carried out on Arduino Uno platform. 16-bit Timer1 on the microcontroller is utilized as external pulse counter to produce count per second or CPS measurement. Conversion from CPS to dose rate technique is also performed by Arduino to display results in micro Sievert per hour (μSvhr{sup −1}). Conversion factor (CF) value for conversion of CPM to μSvhr{sup −1} determined from manufacturer data sheet is compared with CF obtained from calibration procedure. The survey meter measurement results are found to be linear for dose rates below 3500 µSv/hr.

  13. Arduino based radiation survey meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nur Aira Abd; Lombigit, Lojius; Abdullah, Nor Arymaswati; Azman, Azraf; Dolah, Taufik; Muzakkir, Amir; Jaafar, Zainudin; Mohamad, Glam Hadzir Patai; Ramli, Abd Aziz Mhd; Zain, Rasif Mohd; Said, Fazila; Khalid, Mohd Ashhar; Taat, Muhamad Zahidee

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design of new digital radiation survey meter with LND7121 Geiger Muller tube detector and Atmega328P microcontroller. Development of the survey meter prototype is carried out on Arduino Uno platform. 16-bit Timer1 on the microcontroller is utilized as external pulse counter to produce count per second or CPS measurement. Conversion from CPS to dose rate technique is also performed by Arduino to display results in micro Sievert per hour (μSvhr-1). Conversion factor (CF) value for conversion of CPM to μSvhr-1 determined from manufacturer data sheet is compared with CF obtained from calibration procedure. The survey meter measurement results are found to be linear for dose rates below 3500 µSv/hr.

  14. A survey of five first-level hospital ethics committees in Urumqi, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian LIU; Jie SHEN; Pei-zhen LIU

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results from a survey of first-level hospitals in Urumqi,China.The survey had two parts:the first part was aimed at understanding the operation of the ethics committees of first-level hospitals,including the process for electing members and the variety of members' backgrounds.Information was also gathered about the establishment of criteria,operational rules and regulations,and standard operational procedures.The aim of the second part was to investigate the level of understanding among technicians and doctors about the function of the ethics committees.This paper identifies and analyzes some deficiencies found in the operation of hospital ethics committees,offers some constructive suggestions for improvement,and promotes the role of the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region hospital ethics committees.

  15. Identifying reasons for delays in acute hospitals using the Day-of-Care Survey method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Erica; King, Andrew; Mathieson, Alex; Woodcock, Thomas; Watkin, Simon W

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a new tool called 'Day-of-Care Survey', developed to assess inpatient delays in acute hospitals. Using literature review, iterative testing and feedback from professional groups, a national multidisciplinary team developed the survey criteria and methodology. Review teams working in pairs visited wards and used case records and bedside charts to assess the patient's status against severity of illness and service intensity criteria. Patients who did not meet the survey criteria for acute care were identified and delays were categorised. From March 2012 to December 2013, nine acute hospitals across Scotland, Australia and England were surveyed. A total of 3,846 adult general inpatient beds (excluding intensive care and maternity) were reviewed. There were 145 empty beds at the time of surveys across the nine sites, with 270 definite discharges planned on the day of the survey. The total number of patients not meeting criteria for acute care was 798/3,431 (23%, range 18-28%). Six factors accounted for 61% (490/798) of the reasons why patients not meeting acute care criteria remained in hospital. This survey gives important insights into the challenges of managing inpatient flow using system level information as a method to target interventions designed to address delay.

  16. Patterns of Stroke Between University Hospitals and Nonuniversity Hospitals in Mainland China: Prospective Multicenter Hospital-Based Registry Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Deren; Liu, Junfeng; Liu, Ming; Lu, Chuanzhen; Brainin, Michael; Zhang, Juying

    2017-02-01

    In China, stroke has risen to the first commonest cause of death. Currently published data on stroke come mainly from university hospitals and less from community hospitals, especially lacking information on stroke focusing on the differences between university hospitals and nonuniversity hospitals. Therefore we aimed to investigate the patterns and differences of acute stroke between university hospitals and nonuniversity hospitals in China. The survey was conducted in 281 hospitals in China: 62 in the west, 85 in the middle, and 134 in the eastern regions. The participating hospitals were sorted into university hospitals (n = 93) and nonuniversity hospitals (n = 118). We prospectively registered patients with acute stroke within 7 days of symptom onset between 1 April and 20 May 2006. The diagnosis of stroke was defined by World Health Organization criteria, and the pathologic types of stroke were determined by clinical and computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging findings. The demographic data, pathologic types of stroke, and outcomes (death or disability) at discharge (or 30 days if not discharged) were collected. Disability was defined as modified Rankin Scale (mRs) score >2. Basic characteristics, pathologic types of stroke, and functional outcomes were compared between university hospitals and nonuniversity hospitals. We enrolled 5273 patients (3135 males; mean age, 65 ± 12 years), of which ischemic stroke accounted for 70.8% (3733), intracranial hemorrhage for 25.7% (1357), and subarachnoid hemorrhage for 3.5% (183). Most of the patients (3555, or 67.4%) were from nonuniversity hospitals, and 1718 patients (32.6%) came from university hospitals. There were no significant differences between university hospitals and nonuniversity hospitals in terms of age, sex, pathologic types of stroke, and history of stroke (all P > 0.05), except the less stroke severity (mRS) on admission (3.1 ± 1.4 vs. 3.2 ± 1.3; P = 0.005) in patients from nonuniversity

  17. Survey of pharmacy involvement in hospital medication reconciliation programs across the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory R Stein

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study is to conduct a review of pertinent literature, assess pharmacy involvement in medication reconciliation, and offer insight into best practices for hospitals to implement and enhance their medication reconciliation programs. Method: Pharmacists in hospitals nationwide were asked to complete an anonymous survey via the American College of Clinical Pharmacy online database. The multiple choice survey analyzed the roles that healthcare professionals play in medication reconciliation programs at hospitals. Results: Of the survey responses received, 32/91 (35% came from pharmacists at hospitals with a pharmacy-led medication reconciliation program. Of these pharmacy-led programs, 17/32 (53% have a dedicated pharmacist or pharmacy staff to perform medication reconciliation. Conclusion: A comprehensive review of literature suggests that pharmacy involvement has the potential to reduce medication reconciliation errors and may improve patient satisfaction. Focused, full-time medication reconciliation pharmacists can help hospitals save time and money, improve outcomes, and meet higher standards issued by the Joint Commission. Data obtained in this study show the extent to which pharmacists contribute to achieving these goals in healthcare systems nationwide. This baseline study provides a strong case for hospitals to implement a pharmacy-led medication reconciliation program.

  18. Validity and reliability of Turkish version of "Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture" and perception of patient safety in public hospitals in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Filiz Emel; Bodur Said

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS) is used to assess safety culture in many countries. Accordingly, the questionnaire has been translated into Turkish for the study of patient safety culture in Turkish hospitals. The aim of this study is threefold: to determine the validity and reliability of the translated form of HSOPS, to evaluate physicians' and nurses' perceptions of patient safety in Turkish public hospitals, and to compare finding with U.S. hospit...

  19. Security Personnel Practices and Policies in U.S. Hospitals: Findings From a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfisch, Ashley L; Pompeii, Lisa A

    2016-06-27

    Concerns of violence in hospitals warrant examination of current hospital security practices. Cross-sectional survey data were collected from members of a health care security and safety association to examine the type of personnel serving as security in hospitals, their policies and practices related to training and weapon/restraint tool carrying/use, and the broader context in which security personnel work to maintain staff and patient safety, with an emphasis on workplace violence prevention and mitigation. Data pertaining to 340 hospitals suggest security personnel were typically non-sworn officers directly employed (72%) by hospitals. Available tools included handcuffs (96%), batons (56%), oleoresin capsicum products (e.g., pepper spray; 52%), hand guns (52%), conducted electrical weapons (e.g., TASERs®; 47%), and K9 units (12%). Current workplace violence prevention policy components, as well as recommendations to improve hospital security practices, aligned with Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines. Comprehensive efforts to address the safety and effectiveness of hospital security personnel should consider security personnel's relationships with other hospital work groups and hospitals' focus on patients' safety and satisfaction. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. 基于员工满意度的公立医院管理模式探讨%Exploration on Management Mode of Public Hospital based on Employee Satisfaction Survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张柱; 聂溶; 于颂颂; 胡霄阳

    2016-01-01

    目的了解某公立医院影响员工满意度的影响因素,为后续提高员工满意度提供决策依据。方法设计调查问卷,进行员工满意度调查,并使用SPSS19.0进行数据分析。结果与分析员工整体满意度较高;人口统计学变量对员工满意度有影响;回归分析中工作本身因素对员工满意度的影响最大。结论针对特殊人群和重点方面加强管理改进,不断提高员工满意度。%Objective To investigate the influence factors of employee satisfaction in a public hospital and to provide decision-making basis for the follow-up measures to improve employee satisfaction.Methods Employee Satisfaction Survey was designed to investigate employee satisfaction level, and SPSS 19.0 was used to analyze data.Results The overall employee satisfaction level was relatively high; the demographic variables had an impact on employee satisfaction; in regression analysis, job itself had the greatest impact on employee satisfaction. Discussion Management of special groups and important aspects should be strengthened, and employee satisfaction should be improved constantly.

  1. Nurse perceptions of safety climate in Australian acute hospitals: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Sze-Ee; Morello, Renata; Rifat, Sheral; Brand, Caroline; Barker, Anna

    2017-03-16

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to explore nurse perceptions of safety climate in acute Australian hospitals.Methods Participants included 420 nurses who have worked on 24 acute wards from six Australian hospitals. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) Short Form was used to quantify nurse perceptions of safety climate and benchmarked against international data. Generalised linear mixed models were used to explore factors that may influence safety climate.Results On average, 53.5% of nurses held positive attitudes towards job satisfaction followed by teamwork climate (50.5%). There was variability in SAQ domain scores across hospitals. The safety climate and perceptions of hospital management domains also varied across wards within a hospital. Nurses who had worked longer at a hospital were more likely to have poorer perceptions of hospital management (β=-5.2; P=0.014). Overall, nurse perceptions of safety climate appeared higher than international data.Conclusions The perceptions of nurses working in acute Victorian and New South Wales hospitals varied between hospitals as well as across wards within each hospital. This highlights the importance of surveying all hospital wards and examining the results at the ward level when implementing strategies to improve patient safety and the culture of safety in organisations.What is known about the topic? Prior studies in American nursing samples have shown that hospitals with higher levels of safety climate have a lower relative incidence of preventable patient complications and adverse events. Developing a culture of safety in hospitals may be useful in targeting efforts to improve patient safety.What does this paper add? This paper has shown that the perceptions of safety climate among nurses working in acute Australian hospitals varied between hospitals and across wards within a hospital. Only half the nurses also reported positive attitudes towards job satisfaction and teamwork climate.What are the

  2. Exploring improvements in patient logistics in Dutch hospitals with a survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Research showed that promising approaches such as benchmarking, operations research, lean management and six sigma, could be adopted to improve patient logistics in healthcare. To our knowledge, little research has been conducted to obtain an overview on the use, combination and effects of approaches to improve patient logistics in hospitals. We therefore examined the approaches and tools used to improve patient logistics in Dutch hospitals, the reported effects of these approaches on performance, the applied support structure and the methods used to evaluate the effects. Methods A survey among experts on patient logistics in 94 Dutch hospitals. The survey data were analysed using cross tables. Results Forty-eight percent of all hospitals participated. Ninety-eight percent reported to have used multiple approaches, 39% of them used five or more approaches. Care pathways were the preferred approach by 43% of the hospitals, followed by business process re-engineering and lean six sigma (both 13%). Flowcharts were the most commonly used tool, they were used on a regular basis by 94% of the hospitals. Less than 10% of the hospitals used data envelopment analysis and critical path analysis on a regular basis. Most hospitals (68%) relied on external support for process analyses and education on patient logistics, only 24% had permanent internal training programs on patient logistics. Approximately 50% of the hospitals that evaluated the effects of approaches on efficiency, throughput times and financial results, reported that they had accomplished their goals. Goal accomplishment in general hospitals ranged from 63% to 67%, in academic teaching hospitals from 0% to 50%, and in teaching hospitals from 25% to 44%. More than 86% performed an evaluation, 53% performed a post-intervention measurement. Conclusions Patient logistics appeared to be a rather new subject as most hospitals had not selected a single approach, they relied on external support and they did

  3. Exploring improvements in patient logistics in Dutch hospitals with a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Lent Wineke AM

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research showed that promising approaches such as benchmarking, operations research, lean management and six sigma, could be adopted to improve patient logistics in healthcare. To our knowledge, little research has been conducted to obtain an overview on the use, combination and effects of approaches to improve patient logistics in hospitals. We therefore examined the approaches and tools used to improve patient logistics in Dutch hospitals, the reported effects of these approaches on performance, the applied support structure and the methods used to evaluate the effects. Methods A survey among experts on patient logistics in 94 Dutch hospitals. The survey data were analysed using cross tables. Results Forty-eight percent of all hospitals participated. Ninety-eight percent reported to have used multiple approaches, 39% of them used five or more approaches. Care pathways were the preferred approach by 43% of the hospitals, followed by business process re-engineering and lean six sigma (both 13%. Flowcharts were the most commonly used tool, they were used on a regular basis by 94% of the hospitals. Less than 10% of the hospitals used data envelopment analysis and critical path analysis on a regular basis. Most hospitals (68% relied on external support for process analyses and education on patient logistics, only 24% had permanent internal training programs on patient logistics. Approximately 50% of the hospitals that evaluated the effects of approaches on efficiency, throughput times and financial results, reported that they had accomplished their goals. Goal accomplishment in general hospitals ranged from 63% to 67%, in academic teaching hospitals from 0% to 50%, and in teaching hospitals from 25% to 44%. More than 86% performed an evaluation, 53% performed a post-intervention measurement. Conclusions Patient logistics appeared to be a rather new subject as most hospitals had not selected a single approach, they relied on

  4. Encuesta sobre bioética en un historial de pediatría: Bases para futuras estrategias Survey on bioethics in a pediatric hospital: Basis for new strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Lynch Pueyrredon

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available La ética médica (EM forma parte de la medicina desde sus comienzos pero recién en las últimas décadas se la reconoce como disciplina independiente. Se realizó un estudio observacional y descriptivo a médicos del Hospital de Niños Ricardo Gutiérrez para determinar: a el conocimiento de conceptos básicos de EM entre sus miembros, b la inserción y función del comité de bioética (CB en dicha institución. Se repartieron 150 encuestas, se recuperaron 90 (60%. Los conceptos teóricos de EM (definiciones de bioética, paciente terminal, autonomía, justicia, beneficencia, y consentimiento informado fueron respondidos correctamente por el 75.2%. Conocía la existencia del CB el 97.8%. Lo había consultado alguna vez el 61.1%. De aquellos que consultaron, la recomendación sugerida por el CB para resolver el dilema ético presentado fue: totalmente útil, para el 23.6%, parcialmente útil para el 45.5%, y no útil para el 27.3%. Nunca había consultado al CB el 37.8%, del cual el 64.7% refería no haber tenido dilema, el 11.7% consideraba no útil"a priori" la posible respuesta del CB, el 11.7% no justificó la causa, el 2.9% no distinguió los dilemas y a otro 2.9% no se le ocurrió consultar. La mayoría de los que respondieron tenía información adecuada sobre conceptos básicos de EM. Tanto el índice de consultas al CB como la valoración de sus dictámenes como total o parcialmente útiles (69.1% avalan la acción del mismo. Es llamativo que el principal argumento por el cual no se consultó al CB fue el no tener dilemas éticos. Tanto el CB en el HNRG como las universidades deberían intensificar la docencia en EM, fundamentalmente en los aspectos prácticos, que facilitaría a los integrantes del equipo de salud detectar dilemas éticos.Although medical ethics is part of medicine since its beginning, it is only in the last decades that it is recognized as a necessary discipline. A survey of pediatricians of Hospital de Ni

  5. Survey on distributing situation in nursing group working in Tehran Medical Science University Emam Khomeinee Hospital During2013-14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azari S

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays justice in health and injustice elimination in health section turns out to a most important concern of health systems in the world, especially for developing countries. So current research happened with purpose to survey manner of distribution and dedication ofTehran Medical Science University Emam Khomeinee (may rest in peace Hospital nursing staff. Analysis method: The studying society of this descriptive analytical research in Tehran Medical Science University Emam Khomeinee Hospital During 2013-14 includes entire units nursing group personnel (Nurse, Paramedic and Nurse Aid. Information has been gathered by self-made forms and data analyzing has done by EXCEL Software, Descriptive statistical indexes and suggested standard guidance from Ministry of Health. Findings: Results of done estimation in 27 units of studying hospital and comparing that to current situation shows that based on suggested pattern of Health Ministry just one unit (3.7% from manpower staff matches this pattern, 18 units (66.67% were lower and 8 units (29.62% were far upon this pattern. Conclusion: Generally in studying hospital lack of nursing staff was obvious that combination and distribution of nursing forces in their different units was uneven and they didn’t match the current situation. Hereupon, intended hospitals require correct management and planning in this field, so that will cause increase in hospital performance and presenting service quality to patients.

  6. Surveying the hidden attitudes of hospital nurses' towards poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenauer, James; Ludwick, Ruth; Baughman, Kristin; Fishbein, Rebecca

    2015-08-01

    To explore the attitudes held by registered nurses about persons living in poverty. As a profession, nursing has strong commitment to advocating for the socioeconomically disadvantaged. The links among poverty and health disparities are well established and research demonstrates that attitudes of providers can influence how those in poverty use health services. Although nurses are the largest sector of healthcare providers globally, little research has been published on their attitudes towards patients they care for who live in poverty. Cross-sectional survey. Used a convenience sample of 117 registered nurses who completed the Attitudes Towards Poverty Short Form that contained three subscales. Regression analysis was used to examine the associations between the nurses' age, education, and years of experience, political views and financial security with their total score and subscale scores. Nurses were more likely to agree with stigmatising statements than statements that attributed poverty to personal deficiency or structural factors. In the multivariate analysis, years of experience were associated with more positive attitudes towards those living in poverty. Nurses with the most experience had less stigmatising beliefs about poverty and were more likely to endorse structural explanations. Those with a baccalaureate education were also more likely to endorse structural explanations for poverty. Gaining knowledge about attitudes towards and the factors influencing those attitudes, for example, education, are important in helping combat the disparities associated with poverty. Nurses have a duty to evaluate their individual attitudes and biases towards those living in poverty and how those attitudes and biases may influence daily practice. Assessing nurses' attitudes towards poverty may aid in better means of empowering nurses to seek solutions that will improve health conditions for those living in poverty. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Best Practices for Interdisciplinary Care Management by Hospital Glycemic Teams: Results of a Society of Hospital Medicine Survey Among 19 U.S. Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Annabelle; Magee, Michelle; Ramos, Pedro; Seley, Jane Jeffrie; Nolan, Ann; Kulasa, Kristen; Caudell, Kathryn Ann; Lamb, Aimee; MacIndoe, John; Maynard, Greg

    2014-08-01

    Objective. The Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM) conducted a survey of U.S. hospital systems to determine how nonphysician providers (NPPs) are utilized in interdisciplinary glucose management teams. Methods. An online survey grouped 50 questions into broad categories related to team functions. Queries addressed strategies that had proven successful, as well as challenges encountered. Fifty surveys were electronically distributed with an invitation to respond. A subset of seven respondents identified as having active glycemic committees that met at least every other month also participated in an in-depth telephone interview conducted by an SHM Glycemic Advisory Panel physician and NPP to obtain further details. The survey and interviews were conducted from May to July 2012. Results. Nineteen hospital/hospital system teams completed the survey (38% response rate). Most of the teams (52%) had existed for 1-5 years and served 90-100% of noncritical care, medical critical care, and surgical units. All of the glycemic control teams were supported by the use of protocols for insulin infusion, basal-bolus subcutaneous insulin orders, and hypoglycemia management. However, > 20% did not have protocols for discontinuation of oral hypoglycemic agents on admission or for transition from intravenous to subcutaneous insulin infusion. About 30% lacked protocols assessing A1C during the admission or providing guidance for insulin pump management. One-third reported that glycemic triggers led to preauthorized consultation or assumption of care for hyperglycemia. Institutional knowledge assessment programs were common for nurses (85%); intermediate for pharmacists, nutritionists, residents, and students (40-45%); and uncommon for fellows (25%) and attending physicians (20%). Many institutions were not monitoring appropriate use of insulin, oral agents, or insulin protocol utilization. Although the majority of teams had a process in place for post-discharge referrals and specific

  8. Best Practices for Interdisciplinary Care Management by Hospital Glycemic Teams: Results of a Society of Hospital Medicine Survey Among 19 U.S. Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Michelle; Ramos, Pedro; Seley, Jane Jeffrie; Nolan, Ann; Kulasa, Kristen; Caudell, Kathryn Ann; Lamb, Aimee; MacIndoe, John; Maynard, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM) conducted a survey of U.S. hospital systems to determine how nonphysician providers (NPPs) are utilized in interdisciplinary glucose management teams. Methods. An online survey grouped 50 questions into broad categories related to team functions. Queries addressed strategies that had proven successful, as well as challenges encountered. Fifty surveys were electronically distributed with an invitation to respond. A subset of seven respondents identified as having active glycemic committees that met at least every other month also participated in an in-depth telephone interview conducted by an SHM Glycemic Advisory Panel physician and NPP to obtain further details. The survey and interviews were conducted from May to July 2012. Results. Nineteen hospital/hospital system teams completed the survey (38% response rate). Most of the teams (52%) had existed for 1–5 years and served 90–100% of noncritical care, medical critical care, and surgical units. All of the glycemic control teams were supported by the use of protocols for insulin infusion, basal-bolus subcutaneous insulin orders, and hypoglycemia management. However, > 20% did not have protocols for discontinuation of oral hypoglycemic agents on admission or for transition from intravenous to subcutaneous insulin infusion. About 30% lacked protocols assessing A1C during the admission or providing guidance for insulin pump management. One-third reported that glycemic triggers led to preauthorized consultation or assumption of care for hyperglycemia. Institutional knowledge assessment programs were common for nurses (85%); intermediate for pharmacists, nutritionists, residents, and students (40–45%); and uncommon for fellows (25%) and attending physicians (20%). Many institutions were not monitoring appropriate use of insulin, oral agents, or insulin protocol utilization. Although the majority of teams had a process in place for post-discharge referrals

  9. Hospital Safety Culture in Taiwan: A Nationwide Survey Using Chinese Version Safety Attitude Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Wui-Chiang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Safety activities have been initiated at many hospitals in Taiwan, but little is known about the safety culture at these hospitals. The aims of this study were to verify a safety culture survey instrument in Chinese and to assess hospital safety culture in Taiwan. Methods The Taiwan Patient Safety Culture Survey was conducted in 2008, using the adapted Safety Attitude Questionnaire in Chinese (SAQ-C. Hospitals and their healthcare workers participated in the survey on a voluntary basis. The psychometric properties of the five SAQ-C dimensions were examined, including teamwork climate, safety climate, job satisfaction, perception of management, and working conditions. Additional safety measures were asked to assess healthcare workers' attitudes toward their collaboration with nurses, physicians, and pharmacists, respectively, and perceptions of hospitals' encouragement of safety reporting, safety training, and delivery delays due to communication breakdowns in clinical areas. The associations between the respondents' attitudes to each SAQ-C dimension and safety measures were analyzed by generalized estimating equations, adjusting for the clustering effects at hospital levels. Results A total of 45,242 valid questionnaires were returned from 200 hospitals with a mean response rate of 69.4%. The Cronbach's alpha was 0.792 for teamwork climate, 0.816 for safety climate, 0.912 for job satisfaction, 0.874 for perception of management, and 0.785 for working conditions. Confirmatory factor analyses demonstrated a good model fit for each dimension and the entire construct. The percentage of hospital healthcare workers holding positive attitude was 48.9% for teamwork climate, 45.2% for perception of management, 42.1% for job satisfaction, 37.2% for safety climate, and 31.8% for working conditions. There were wide variations in the range of SAQ-C scores in each dimension among hospitals. Compared to those without positive attitudes

  10. Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation Data (BASE)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) study was a five year study to characterize determinants of indoor air quality and occupant perceptions in...

  11. Guam Boat-based Creel Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Similar to other boat-based survey in basic design, this system is run by the Div. of Aquatic and Wildlife Resources (DAWR) and has been in operation since about...

  12. American Samoa Boat-based Creel Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Boat-based creel survey data have been collected and processed by the American Samoa Department of Marine and Wildlife Resources (DMWR) staff since about 1982 and...

  13. CNMI Shore-based Creel Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), Division of Fish and Wildlife (DFW) staff conducted shore-based creel surveys which have 2 major...

  14. A Survey on Clinical Research Training Status and Needs in Public Hospitals from Shenzhen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ping; Wang, Haibo; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Min; Zhou, Liping; Xiao, Ping; Wang, Yanfang; Wu, Yangfeng

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To obtain information on the current clinical research training status and evaluate the training needs comprehensively for medical staff in hospitals. Methods: This survey was initiated and conducted by the Health and Family Planning Commission of Shenzhen in conjunction with the Peking University Clinical Research Institute (Shenzhen)…

  15. The definition of life: a survey of obstetricians and neonatologists in New York City hospitals regarding extremely premature births.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Sharon M; Santella, Regina M

    2011-05-01

    Among obstetricians and neonatologists in administrative roles in New York City hospitals, a survey was initiated to compare the physicians' definitions of live birth and fetal death, the gestational age at which they consider infants viable, and the resuscitation practices of the neonatologists. The target survey population was 34 neonatologists, and 39 obstetricians representing 41 of the City's 43 maternity hospitals. A telephone survey was used to gather qualitative data from the physicians regarding their definitions of live birth, fetal death, and viability, and their practices regarding extremely premature births. Surveys were completed for 58 physicians, a response rate of 79% (94% for neonatologists and 67% for obstetricians). Physicians' definitions of live birth and fetal death varied, with almost a third (29%) of physicians including gestational age as part of their live birth criteria. Most of the physicians (90%) consider infants born at ≥23 weeks gestation viable. Most neonatologists (97%) said they always resuscitate infants born at ≥23 weeks gestation, and most (94%) said they would never resuscitate infants born at death. Whereas reporting requirements are based on definitions of live birth and fetal death, physicians make resuscitation and other clinical decisions regarding extremely premature infants based on definitions of viability.

  16. Social responsibility of the hospitals in Isfahan city, Iran: Results from a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyvanara, Mahmoud; Sajadi, Haniye Sadat

    2015-02-12

    Changes in modern societies develop the perception that the external environment is essential in organization's practices, especially in the way they deal with aspects such as human rights, community needs, market demands and environmental interests. These issues are usually under the umbrella of the concept of social responsibility. Given the importance of this concept in the context of health care delivery, suggesting a new paradigm in hospital governance, the aim of this study was to measure the social responsibility in hospitals. A cross-sectional survey was employed to collect data from a sample of 946 hospital staff of Isfahan city. Data was obtained by structured and valid self-administrated questionnaire and analyzed by descriptive and analytic statistics using SPSS. The mean score of hospitals' social responsibility was 3.0 compared with the justified range from 1.0 to 5.0. Results showed that there was a significant relationship between social responsibility score and hospitals' ownership (public or private). Also, there was no significant relationship between social responsibility and type of hospital specialty. It is recommended that hospital managers develop and apply appropriate policies and strategies to improve their hospitals' social responsibility level, especially through concentrating on their staff's working environment. © 2015 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  17. A survey of flood disaster preparedness among hospitals in the central region of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanakanlaya, Kanittha; Sukonthasarn, Achara; Wangsrikhun, Suparat; Chanprasit, Chawapornpan

    2016-11-01

    In 2011, Thailand was affected by the one of the worst flood disasters in recent times. Hospitals in Thailand were faced with the challenge of managing the health impacts from this natural disaster. The purpose of this study was to assess flood disaster preparedness among hospitals in the central region of Thailand. A survey questionnaire was given to twenty-seven key people responsible for hospital disaster preparedness that experienced disruptions to health services (severely, moderately and slightly) during the flood disaster in 2011 in the central region of Thailand. Of the twenty-four participating hospitals, not one had satisfied the standards in all the dimensions of flood disaster preparedness. All respondent hospitals were deficiently prepared with regard to surge capacity, the management of healthcare services and the management of the supporting systems. The availability of supplies and equipment were found to be in place but preparations were found to be inadequate in organizing staff at all participating hospitals. Trained staff members regarding disaster response were reported to be present in all respondent hospitals. Hospitals that experienced slightly disruptions to their health services did not elect to do any exercises to meet the set standards. None of the hospitals that experienced slightly disruptions to their health services performed any evaluation and improvement in terms of disaster preparedness. Many hospitals were not up to standard in terms of disaster preparedness. Hospitals should prioritize disaster preparedness to fulfill their responsibility during crisis situations and improve their flood disaster preparedness. Copyright © 2016 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Ranking hospitals for outcomes in total hip replacement - administrative data with or without additional patient surveys? - Part 1: Administrative data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörning, Hans

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many hospital rankings rely on the frequency of adverse outcomes and are based on administrative data. In the study presented here, we tried to find out, to what extent available administrative data of German Sickness Funds allow for an adequate hospital ranking and compared this with rankings based on additional information derived from a patient survey. Total hip replacement was chosen as an example procedure. In part I of the publication, we present the results of the approach based on administrative data. Methods: We used administrative data from the AOK-Lower Saxony of the years 2000, 2001 and 2002. The study population comprised all beneficiaries, who received total hip replacement in the years 2000 or 2001. Performance indicators used where “critical incident (Mortality or revision” and “number of revisions” within the first year. Hospitals were ranked if they performed at least 20 procedures on AOK-beneficiaries in each of the two years. Multivariate modelling (logistic and poisson regression was used to estimate the performance indicators by case-mix variables (age, sex, co-diagnoses and hospital characteristics (hospital size, surgical volume. The actual ranking was based on these multivariate models, excluding hospital variables and adding dummy-variables for each hospital. Hospitals were ranked by their case-mix adjusted odds ratio or SMR respectively with respect to a pre-selected reference hospital. The resulting rankings were compared with each other, with regard to temporal stability, and the impact of case-mix variables.Results: About 4500 beneficiaries received total hip replacement in each year (n2000: 4482; n2001: 4579. The ranking included 65 hospitals. Comparing the years 2000 and 2001, the temporal stability of the rankings based on a single performance indicator was low (Spearman rang correlation coefficients 0.158 and 0.191. The agreement of rankings based on different performance indicators in the

  19. Utilization of noninvasive ventilation in acute care hospitals: a regional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Vinay; Paioli, Daniela; Rothaar, Robert; Hill, Nicholas S

    2006-05-01

    Little information is available on the utilization of noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV) in the United States. Accordingly, we performed a survey on the use of NPPV at acute care hospitals in a region of the United States to determine variations in utilization and between hospitals, the reasons for lower rates of utilization, and the techniques used for application. Using survey methodology, we developed a questionnaire consisting of 19 questions and distributed it by mail to directors of respiratory care at all 82 acute care hospitals in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Nonresponders were contacted by phone to complete the survey. Responses were analyzed using standard statistics, including t tests and Mann-Whitney U tests where appropriate. We obtained responses from 71 of the 82 hospitals (88%). The overall utilization rate for NPPV was 20% of ventilator starts, but we found enormous variation in the estimated utilization rates among different hospitals, from none to > 50%. The top two reasons given for lower utilization rates were a lack of physician knowledge and inadequate equipment. In the 19 hospitals that provided detailed information, COPD and congestive heart failure constituted 82% of the diagnoses of patients receiving NPPV, but NPPV was still used in only 33% of patients with these diagnoses receiving any form of mechanical ventilation. The utilization rates for NPPV vary enormously among different acute care hospitals within the same region. The perceived reasons for lower utilization rates include lack of physician knowledge, insufficient respiratory therapist training, and inadequate equipment. Educational programs directed at individual institutions may be useful to enhance utilization rates.

  20. Tinnitus: A hospital-based retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanifa Akhtar Laskar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To find out age, sex, laterality distribution of patients with tinnitus, to investigate the type and characteristics of associated hearing loss and to find different etiology causing tinnitus. Materials and Methods: Retrospective hospital-based study. Data collected for 154 patients who attended tinnitus clinic of Department of ENT of our institute during the year 2013. Patients with incomplete data were excluded from the study. Results: Among 154 patients included for study, 73 were male and 81 were female. The highest percentage of patients were in the middle age group of 41-50 years (27.9% followed by 31-40 years (18.83% and 51-60 years (16.2% with decreasing number of patients in both younger and elderly age group. Conclusion: Tinnitus can affect any age group but its prevalence increases with age without any gender predilection. Left ear involvement is slightly more common among unilateral tinnitus. Sensorineural hearing loss is most common factor associated but in one-sixth of the cases no cause has been found for tinnitus.

  1. Human Cystic Echinococcosis in Yasuj: A Survey of Ten Year Hospital Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sarkari

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Cystic echinococcosis (CE is a zoonotic infection of humans and domestic animals caused by larvae of the cestode Echinococcus granulosus. Echinococcosis has a world-wide geographic distribution and occurs in all continents. CE is one of the most important zoonotic diseases prevalent in different parts of Iran and human cases are repeatedly reported from medical centers in different regions of Iran. This study was conducted to survey the hospital records of hydatidosis between 1996 and 2006 in Yasuj, southwest of Iran. Materials & Methods: Hospital records of CE patients from 1996-2006 in three hospitals in Yasuj were carefully studied. Data such as age, sex, occupation, place of residence, number of cyst, cyst location, clinical signs and other related features were recorded in a predestined information sheet. Collected data were statistically analyzed. Results: Results of this study showed that during 1996 to 2006 (10 years 105 cases of hydatidosis have been admitted in Yasuj hospitals, out of which 70 cases (66.7% were women and 35 cases (33.3% were men. Considering the age of patients, the highest rate of infection was recorded in 31-40 year old patients. Female housekeepers with 66.7% of cases were found to be the main victims of the disease. Hepatic cyst was recorded in 81% of cases where nephrotic cyst was the second most prevalent one. Most of the patients (87.8% had only one cyst, though 11.4% of the patients had 2 cysts and in one case 18 cysts have been isolated from the patient. Recurrence of the disease, based of number of patient's operation, was noted in 14.3% of cases and in one case five times of surgery for removing of hydatid cyst were noted. Conclusion: Results of this study indicate that CE is an endemic disease in the studied area. Data also suggest that the trend and number of CE cases remained unchanged during the 10 years in this area. Therefore, effective steps should be taken to control the

  2. The Aalborg Survey / Part 2 - GPS Based Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Henrik; Reiter, Ida Maria; Christensen, Cecilie Breinholm

    Background and purpose The Aalborg Survey consists of four independent parts: a web, GPS and an interview based survey and a literature study, which together form a consistent investigation and research into use of urban space, and specifically into young people’s use of urban space: what young...... people do in urban spaces, where they are in the urban spaces and when the young people are in the urban spaces. The answers to these questions form the framework and enable further academic discussions and conclusions in relation to the overall research project Diverse Urban Spaces (DUS). The primary...... aim of the DUS research project is to investigate why young people do what they do in the urban spaces, and how this knowledge can contribute to an increase in young people’s use of urban spaces. It is the overall aim of the DUS research project to facilitate an increased and more diverse use of urban...

  3. The Aalborg Survey / Part 3 - Interview Based Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Henrik; Christensen, Cecilie Breinholm; Jensen, Maria Vestergaard

    Background and purpose The Aalborg Survey consists of four independent parts: a web, GPS and an interview based survey and a literature study, which together form a consistent investigation and research into use of urban space, and specifically into young people’s use of urban space: what young...... people do in urban spaces, where they are in the urban spaces and when the young people are in the urban spaces. The answers to these questions form the framework and enable further academic discussions and conclusions in relation to the overall research project Diverse Urban Spaces (DUS). The primary...... aim of the DUS research project is to investigate why young people do what they do in the urban spaces, and how this knowledge can contribute to an increase in young people’s use of urban spaces. It is the overall aim of the DUS research project to facilitate an increased and more diverse use of urban...

  4. Pattern of unintentional burns: A hospital based study from Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adil, Syed Omair; Ibran, Ehmer-Al; Nisar, Nighat; Shafique, Kashif

    2016-09-01

    Burns are major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Better understanding of the nature and extent of injury remains the major and only available way to halt the occurrence of the event. The present study was conducted to determine the prevalence of by self and by other unintentional burn, their comparison and the possible mode of acquisition by obtaining the history of exposure to known risk factors. A cross-sectional questionnaire based survey was conducted in Burns Centre of Civil Hospital Karachi, Pakistan and 324 hospitalized adult patients with unintentional burns were consecutively interviewed during August 2013 to February 2014. Information was collected on socio-demographic profile. The source of burn, affected body part and place of injury acquisition in terms of home, outside or work were also noted. Logistic regression model was conducted using SPSS software. Out of 324 patients, 295 (91%) had unintentional burn by self and 29 (9%) had unintentional burn by others. Male gender were 2.37 times and no schooling were 1.75 times more likely to have self-inflicted unintentional burn. Lower limb and head and neck were less likely to involve in unintentional burn by self. The burden of unintentional burn by self was considerably higher. Male gender and no schooling were found more at risk to have unintentional burn by self. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  5. The study on the outsourcing of Taiwan's hospitals: a questionnaire survey research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chih-Tung; Pai, Jar-Yuan; Chiu, Hero

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the outsourcing situation in Taiwanese hospitals and compares the differences in hospital ownership and in accreditation levels. Methods This research combined two kinds of methods: a questionnaire survey and the in-depth interview to two CEOs of the sample hospitals. One hospital is not-for-profit, while the other is a public hospital and the research samples are from the hospital data from Taiwan's 2005 to 2007 Department of Health qualifying lists of hospital accreditation. The returned questionnaires were analyzed with STATISTICA® 7.1 version software. Results The results for non-medical items showed medical waste and common trash both have the highest rate (94.6 percent) of being outsourced. The gift store (75 percent) and linen (73 percent) follow close behind, while the lowest rate of outsourcing is in utility maintenance (13.5 percent). For medical items, the highest rate of outsourcing is in the ambulance units (51.4 percent), while the hemodialysis center follows close behind with a rate of 50 percent. For departments of nutrition, pharmacy, and nursing however, the outsourcing rate is lower than 3 percent. This shows that Taiwan's hospitals are still conservative in their willingness to outsource for medical items. The results of the satisfaction paired t-test show that the non-medical items have a higher score than the medical items. The factor analysis showed the three significant factors in of non medical items' outsourcing are "performance", "finance", and "human resource". For medical items, the two factors are "operation" and satisfaction". To further exam the factor validity and reliability of the satisfaction model, a confirmative factor analysis (CFA) was conducted using structure equation modeling (SEM) method and found the model fitting well. Conclusion Hospitals, especially for public hospitals, can get benefits from outsourcing to revive the full-time-equivalent and human resource limitation

  6. The study on the outsourcing of Taiwan's hospitals: a questionnaire survey research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai Jar-Yuan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to assess the outsourcing situation in Taiwanese hospitals and compares the differences in hospital ownership and in accreditation levels. Methods This research combined two kinds of methods: a questionnaire survey and the in-depth interview to two CEOs of the sample hospitals. One hospital is not-for-profit, while the other is a public hospital and the research samples are from the hospital data from Taiwan's 2005 to 2007 Department of Health qualifying lists of hospital accreditation. The returned questionnaires were analyzed with STATISTICA® 7.1 version software. Results The results for non-medical items showed medical waste and common trash both have the highest rate (94.6 percent of being outsourced. The gift store (75 percent and linen (73 percent follow close behind, while the lowest rate of outsourcing is in utility maintenance (13.5 percent. For medical items, the highest rate of outsourcing is in the ambulance units (51.4 percent, while the hemodialysis center follows close behind with a rate of 50 percent. For departments of nutrition, pharmacy, and nursing however, the outsourcing rate is lower than 3 percent. This shows that Taiwan's hospitals are still conservative in their willingness to outsource for medical items. The results of the satisfaction paired t-test show that the non-medical items have a higher score than the medical items. The factor analysis showed the three significant factors in of non medical items' outsourcing are "performance", "finance", and "human resource". For medical items, the two factors are "operation" and satisfaction". To further exam the factor validity and reliability of the satisfaction model, a confirmative factor analysis (CFA was conducted using structure equation modeling (SEM method and found the model fitting well. Conclusion Hospitals, especially for public hospitals, can get benefits from outsourcing to revive the full-time-equivalent and human

  7. The study on the outsourcing of Taiwan's hospitals: a questionnaire survey research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chih-Tung; Pai, Jar-Yuan; Chiu, Hero

    2009-05-13

    The aim of this study was to assess the outsourcing situation in Taiwanese hospitals and compares the differences in hospital ownership and in accreditation levels. This research combined two kinds of methods: a questionnaire survey and the in-depth interview to two CEOs of the sample hospitals. One hospital is not-for-profit, while the other is a public hospital and the research samples are from the hospital data from Taiwan's 2005 to 2007 Department of Health qualifying lists of hospital accreditation. The returned questionnaires were analyzed with STATISTICA 7.1 version software. The results for non-medical items showed medical waste and common trash both have the highest rate (94.6 percent) of being outsourced. The gift store (75 percent) and linen (73 percent) follow close behind, while the lowest rate of outsourcing is in utility maintenance (13.5 percent). For medical items, the highest rate of outsourcing is in the ambulance units (51.4 percent), while the hemodialysis center follows close behind with a rate of 50 percent. For departments of nutrition, pharmacy, and nursing however, the outsourcing rate is lower than 3 percent. This shows that Taiwan's hospitals are still conservative in their willingness to outsource for medical items. The results of the satisfaction paired t-test show that the non-medical items have a higher score than the medical items. The factor analysis showed the three significant factors in of non medical items' outsourcing are "performance", "finance", and "human resource". For medical items, the two factors are "operation" and satisfaction". To further exam the factor validity and reliability of the satisfaction model, a confirmative factor analysis (CFA) was conducted using structure equation modeling (SEM) method and found the model fitting well. Hospitals, especially for public hospitals, can get benefits from outsourcing to revive the full-time-equivalent and human resource limitation.

  8. Exploring the phenomenon of spiritual care between hospital chaplains and hospital based healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Janie J; Hodgson, Jennifer L; Kolobova, Irina; Lamson, Angela L; Sira, Natalia; Musick, David

    2015-01-01

    Hospital chaplaincy and spiritual care services are important to patients' medical care and well-being; however, little is known about healthcare providers' experiences receiving spiritual support. A phenomenological study examined the shared experience of spiritual care between hospital chaplains and hospital-based healthcare providers (HBHPs). Six distinct themes emerged from the in-depth interviews: Awareness of chaplain availability, chaplains focus on building relationships with providers and staff, chaplains are integrated in varying degrees on certain hospital units, chaplains meet providers' personal and professional needs, providers appreciate chaplains, and barriers to expanding hospital chaplains' services. While HBHPs appreciated the care received and were able to provide better patient care as a result, participants reported that administrators may not recognize the true value of the care provided. Implications from this study are applied to hospital chaplaincy clinical, research, and training opportunities.

  9. Multi-unit Providers Survey. For-profits report decline in acute-care hospitals ... newcomers to top 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellandi, D; Kirchheimer, B

    1999-05-24

    For-profit hospital systems cleaned house last year. After years of adding hospitals, investor-owned operators shed facilities in 1998, recording the first decline in the number of acute-care hospitals they've owned or managed since 1991, according to our 23rd annual Multi-unit Providers Survey.

  10. Internal Medicine Residents' Perceived Responsibility for Patients at Hospital Discharge: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eric; Stickrath, Chad; McNulty, Monica C; Calderon, Aaron J; Chapman, Elizabeth; Gonzalo, Jed D; Kuperman, Ethan F; Lopez, Max; Smith, Christopher J; Sweigart, Joseph R; Theobald, Cecelia N; Burke, Robert E

    2016-12-01

    Medical residents are routinely entrusted with transitions of care, yet little is known about the duration or content of their perceived responsibility for patients they discharge from the hospital. To examine the duration and content of internal medicine residents' perceived responsibility for patients they discharge from the hospital. The secondary objective was to determine whether specific individual experiences and characteristics correlate with perceived responsibility. Multi-site, cross-sectional 24-question survey delivered via email or paper-based form. Internal medicine residents (post-graduate years 1-3) at nine university and community-based internal medicine training programs in the United States. Perceived responsibility for patients after discharge as measured by a previously developed single-item tool for duration of responsibility and novel domain-specific questions assessing attitudes towards specific transition of care behaviors. Of 817 residents surveyed, 469 responded (57.4 %). One quarter of residents (26.1 %) indicated that their responsibility for patients ended at discharge, while 19.3 % reported perceived responsibility extending beyond 2 weeks. Perceived duration of responsibility did not correlate with level of training (P = 0.57), program type (P = 0.28), career path (P = 0.12), or presence of burnout (P = 0.59). The majority of residents indicated they were responsible for six of eight transitional care tasks (85.1-99.3 % strongly agree or agree). Approximately half of residents (57 %) indicated that it was their responsibility to directly contact patients' primary care providers at discharge. and 21.6 % indicated that it was their responsibility to ensure that patients attended their follow-up appointments. Internal medicine residents demonstrate variability in perceived duration of responsibility for recently discharged patients. Neither the duration nor the content of residents' perceived responsibility was

  11. Evaluation of a survey tool to measure safety climate in Australian hospital pharmacy staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpola, Ramesh L; Chen, Timothy F; Fois, Romano A; Ashcroft, Darren M; Lalor, Daniel J

    Safety climate evaluation is increasingly used by hospitals as part of quality improvement initiatives. Consequently, it is necessary to have validated tools to measure changes. To evaluate the construct validity and internal consistency of a survey tool to measure Australian hospital pharmacy patient safety climate. A 42 item cross-sectional survey was used to evaluate the patient safety climate of 607 Australian hospital pharmacy staff. Survey responses were initially mapped to the factor structure previously identified in European community pharmacy. However, as the data did not adequately fit the community pharmacy model, participants were randomly split into two groups with exploratory factor analysis performed on the first group (n = 302) and confirmatory factor analyses performed on the second group (n = 305). Following exploratory factor analysis (59.3% variance explained) and confirmatory factor analysis, a 6-factor model containing 28 items was obtained with satisfactory model fit (χ(2) (335) = 664.61 p  0.643) and model nesting between the groups (Δχ(2) (22) = 30.87, p = 0.10). Three factors (blame culture, organisational learning and working conditions) were similar to those identified in European community pharmacy and labelled identically. Three additional factors (preoccupation with improvement; comfort to question authority; and safety issues being swept under the carpet) highlight hierarchical issues present in hospital settings. This study has demonstrated the validity of a survey to evaluate patient safety climate of Australian hospital pharmacy staff. Importantly, this validated factor structure may be used to evaluate changes in safety climate over time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Equipment to prevent, diagnose, and treat hypothermia: a survey of Norwegian pre-hospital services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Anders M; Thomassen, Oyvind; Vikenes, Bjarne H; Brattebø, Guttorm

    2013-08-12

    Hypothermia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in trauma patients and poses a challenge in pre-hospital treatment. The aim of this study was to identify equipment to prevent, diagnose, and treat hypothermia in Norwegian pre-hospital services. In the period of April-August 2011, we conducted a survey of 42 respondents representing a total of 543 pre-hospital units, which included all the national ground ambulance services, the fixed wing and helicopter air ambulance service, and the national search and rescue service. The survey explored available insulation materials, active warming devices, and the presence of protocols describing wrapping methods, temperature monitoring, and the use of warm i.v. fluids. Throughout the services, hospital duvets, cotton blankets and plastic "bubble-wrap" were the most common insulation materials. Active warming devices were to a small degree available in vehicle ambulances (14%) and the fixed wing ambulance service (44%) but were more common in the helicopter services (58-70%). Suitable thermometers for diagnosing hypothermia were lacking in the vehicle ambulance services (12%). Protocols describing how to insulate patients were present for 73% of vehicle ambulances and 70% of Search and Rescue helicopters. The minority of Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (42%) and Fixed Wing (22%) units was reported to have such protocols. The most common equipment types to treat and prevent hypothermia in Norwegian pre-hospital services are duvets, plastic "bubble wrap", and cotton blankets. Active external heating devices and suitable thermometers are not available in most vehicle ambulance units.

  13. Psychometric properties of the Persian version of the "Hospital Ethical Climate Survey".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalesi, Nader; Arabloo, Jalal; Khosravizadeh, Omid; Taghizadeh, Sanaz; Heyrani, Ali; Ebrahimian, Abbasali

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the ethical climate in health care organizations, it is important to apply a valid measure. This study aimed to investigate the psychometric properties of the Persian version of the Hospital Ethical Climate Survey (HECS) and to assess nurses' perceptions of the ethical climate in teaching hospitals of Iran. A cross-sectional study of randomly selected nurses (n = 187) was conducted in three teaching general hospitals of Tehran, capital of Iran. Olson's Hospital Ethical Climate Survey (HECS), a self-administered questionnaire, was used to assess the nurses' perceptions of the hospital ethical climate. Descriptive statistics, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), internal consistency, and correlation were used to analyze the data. CFA showed acceptable model fit: an standardized root mean square residual (SRMR) of 0.064, an non-normalized fit index (NNFI) of 0.96, a comparative fit index (CFI) of 0.96, and an root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) of 0.075. The Cronbach's alpha values were acceptable and ranging from 0.69 to 0.85. The overall Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.94. The factor loadings for all ethical climate items were between 0.50 and 0.80, which revealed good structure of the Persian version of the HECS. Survey findings showed that the "managers" subscale had the highest score and the subscale of "doctors" had the lowest score. This study shows that the Persian version of the HECS is a valid and reliable instrument for measuring nurses' perceptions of the ethical climate in hospitals of Iran.

  14. [Survey of adolescent perception of hospital admission. The importance of hospital humanisation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butragueño Laiseca, Laura; González Martínez, Felipe; Oikonomopoulou, Niki; Pérez Moreno, Jimena; Toledo Del Castillo, Blanca; González Sánchez, María Isabel; Rodríguez Fernández, Rosa

    The humanisation of health care involves considering the patient as an integral human being, providing assistance beyond medical care, and covering other fields such as social, emotional, spiritual, or relational areas. To evaluate the requirements and concerns of the hospitalised children. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted using an anonymous questionnaire on children aged 12-16. The study included 39 patients, with a median age of 14 years. The most unpleasant experience during the hospitalisation was the invasive procedures. Almost all (95%) of patients suffered from pain, and 17% of them felt at some point that a procedure was performed without them being fully aware. More than 75% of children asked for more entertainment, with the lack of Wi-Fi being the more demanded item. The needs of the population included in this survey, showed the importance to consider cognitive (necessity of obtaining clear and extensive information), social (maintaining everyday relationships), emotional (illness and its diagnostic and therapeutic procedures often generate mood disorders), and practical (environmental and architectural aspects can lead to either an improvement or a worsening of the hospitalisation perception) factors. All of these factors have shown a beneficial contribution, leading to an earlier recovery of health. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Double reading rates and quality assurance practices in Norwegian hospital radiology departments: two parallel national surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, Peter M; Hurlen, Petter; Sandbæk, Gunnar; Gulbrandsen, Pål

    2015-01-01

    Double reading as a quality assurance (QA) tool is employed extensively in Norwegian hospital radiology departments. The practice is resource consuming and regularly debated. To investigate the rates of double reading in Norwegian hospital radiology departments, to identify department characteristics associated with double reading rates, and to investigate associations between double reading and other quality improvement. We issued two parallel national surveys to management and to consultant radiologists, respectively. Management was defined as the chief medical officer and/or the head of the radiology department. The management survey covered staffing, perceived resource situation, double reading, guidelines, and quality improvement. The radiologist survey served to validate management responses concerning double reading. Management survey items concerning practices of quality improvement were organized into three indices reflecting different quality approaches, namely: appropriateness of investigations; personal performance feedback; and system performance feedback. The response rates of the surveys were 100% (45/45) for management and 55% (266/483) for radiologists. Of all exams read by consultants, 33% were double read. The double reading rate was highest in university hospital departments (59%), intermediate in other teaching departments (30%), and lowest in non-teaching departments (11%) (P = 0.01). Among the quality indices, mean scores were highest on appropriateness index (68%), intermediate on the person index (56%), and lowest on system index (37%). There were no correlations between double reading rates and scores on any of the quality indices. The rate of double reading in Norwegian hospital radiology is significantly correlated to department teaching status, but not to other practices of quality work. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  16. Patients' priorities for ambulant hospital care centres: a survey and discrete choice experiment among elderly and chronically ill patients of a Dutch hospital.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, A.; Triemstra, M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study established patients' preferences regarding the facilities in an adjacent centre for ambulatory hospital care. It also identified determinants of patients' choice to visit this centre instead of the regional hospital. Methods: A questionnaire survey among 1477 elderly and

  17. Patients' priorities for ambulant hospital care centres: a survey and discrete choice experiment among elderly and chronically ill patients of a Dutch hospital.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, A.; Triemstra, M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study established patients' preferences regarding the facilities in an adjacent centre for ambulatory hospital care. It also identified determinants of patients' choice to visit this centre instead of the regional hospital. Methods: A questionnaire survey among 1477 elderly and chron

  18. Assessment of hospital-based adult triage at emergency receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. ... support were the major barriers to improvement/development of formal triage in ... surveyed had established and functional triage systems in ..... attendants, spectators and media teams and this situation .... hospitals for their co-operations during data collection.

  19. National survey on the activity of internists in shared care-interconsultations in spanish hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco Martínez, J; Montero Ruíz, E; Fernández Pérez, C; Méndez Bailón, M; García Klepzig, J L; Garrachón Vallo, F

    2016-11-01

    To analyse the activity of interconsultations conducted by the departments of internal medicine, communicating their importance to managers and offering information to these departments to improve their organisation. A cross-sectional study was conducted using an interconsultation activity survey (on-demand consulting activity for other departments) and shared care (consulting activity provided in a regulated manner to other departments). We received 120 surveys that corresponded to 108 public and 12 private hospitals. Forty-five percent of the surveyed hospitals had a specialised interconsultation unit, and 31% had shared care. The department most frequently helped by the presence of a stable consultation unit (65% of the cases) was orthopaedic and trauma surgery. Fifty-five percent of the departments of internal medicine surveyed had an interconsultation activity record since the start of their activity. Ninety-two percent of the departments lacked a protocol that regulated interconsultations, and in 74% of the cases, the interconsultation was on demand. The interconsultation activity is generalised in the departments of internal medicine, but only 45% of these departments have interconsultation units, and only 33% provide the shared care modality. The survey reflects the shortcomings of training and some confusion in the concept of interconsultations. The considerable majority of departments lack organisational interconsultation protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  20. Pain issues from the palliative perspective: a survey among doctors in Hospital Melaka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taye, G A W C

    2006-10-01

    This survey was intended to gauge the management of pain in palliative cancer patients by the doctors in Melaka Hospital. It also sought to identify possible barriers to adequate pain management among doctors and gauge their response to the adequacy of medical school teaching on cancer pain issues. A 39 item survey was used to cover the issues involved. Overall, the doctors displayed a lack of systematic approach to cancer pain management with inadequate knowledge of analgesia handling. Medical school exposure to cancer pain issues was lacking. Formulation of accepted clinical practice guidelines and new education strategies can improve cancer pain management.

  1. Smoke-free hospitals – the English experience: results from a survey, interviews, and site visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britton John

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to the provisions of the Health Act 2006, NHS acute Trusts had to become smoke-free by July 2007. Mental health Trusts were granted a further year before all indoor smoking areas have to be removed. This study was carried out to determine the extent of smoke-free policy implementation in English NHS acute and mental health Trusts, and to explore challenges and impacts related to policy implementation. Methods Questionnaire-based survey of all English NHS acute and mental health hospital settings, supplemented by semi-structured telephone interviews with 22 respondents and direct observation at a sample of 15 Trusts (22 different sites. Human Resources Directors of all 245 English NHS Trusts providing acute and/or mental health inpatient care were identified as potential study participants. Main outcome measures comprised the proportions of Trusts reporting smoke-free policy implementation; whether these relate to buildings only or to whole premises including grounds; most frequently reported exemptions; reported and observed frequencies of policy breaches. Results Smoke-free policies were reported to be implemented in all mental health and 98% of acute settings studied. They applied to whole premises including grounds in 84% of acute, and 64% of mental health settings. However, exemptions were granted by 50% of acute and 78% of mental health settings, typically for bereaved relatives or psychiatric patients, in sheltered outdoor areas and smoking rooms. Reported challenges included policy enforcement and related risks of abuse, and litter on premises and adjacent public grounds. Nearly two thirds of acute and over a third of mental health trusts reported that policy infringements occurred on a daily basis. Indeed, patients and visitors were observed smoking at 94% of acute sites visited and staff smoking at 35% of them. Conclusion NHS hospitals should play an exemplary role in making a smoke-free environment the

  2. A survey of digital radiography practice in four South African teaching hospitals: an illuminative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyathi, T; Chirwa, TF; van der Merwe, DG

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess radiographer familiarity and preferences with digital radiography in four teaching hospitals and thereafter make recommendations in line with the migration from screen film to digital radiography. Materials and methods: A questionnaire was designed to collect data from either qualified or student radiographers from four teaching hospitals. From the four teaching hospitals, there were a total of 205 potential respondents. Among other things, responses regarding experiences and preferences with digital radiography, quality control procedures, patient dose, advantages and disadvantages of digital radiography were sought. The information collected was based on self-reporting by the participants. The study is exploratory in nature and descriptive statistics were generated from the collected data using Microsoft Excel 2007 and StatsDirect software. Results: Sixty-three out of 205 (31%) radiographers from all the four radiology centers responded to the circulated questionnaire. Only 15% (8) of the qualified radiographers had 4 or more years of experience with digital radiography compared to 68% (36) for the same amount of experience with screen-film radiography. Sixty-one percent (38) of the participants had been exposed to digital radiography during their lectures while at university. A small proportion, 16% (10) of the respondents underwent formal training in quality control procedures on the digital X-ray units they were using. Slightly more than half (55%) of the participants felt it was easier for them to retake an image in digital radiography than in screen film radiography. Conclusion: The results of this survey showed that the participants are familiar with digital radiography and have embraced this relatively new technology as shown by the fact that they can identify both its advantages and disadvantages as applied to clinical practice. However, there are minimal quality control procedures specific to digital

  3. Hidden Costs of Hospital Based Delivery from Two Tertiary Hospitals in Western Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Jeevan; Kaehler, Nils; Marahatta, Sujan Babu; Mishra, Shiva Raj; Subedi, Sudarshan; Adhikari, Bipin

    2016-01-01

    Hospital based delivery has been an expensive experience for poor households because of hidden costs which are usually unaccounted in hospital costs. The main aim of this study was to estimate the hidden costs of hospital based delivery and determine the factors associated with the hidden costs. A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted among 384 post-partum mothers with their husbands/house heads during the discharge time in Manipal Teaching Hospital and Western Regional Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal. A face to face interview with each respondent was conducted using a structured questionnaire. Hidden costs were calculated based on the price rate of the market during the time of the study. The total hidden costs for normal delivery and C-section delivery were 243.4 USD (US Dollar) and 321.6 USD respectively. Of the total maternity care expenditures; higher mean expenditures were found for food & drinking (53.07%), clothes (9.8%) and transport (7.3%). For postpartum women with their husband or house head, the total mean opportunity cost of "days of work loss" were 84.1 USD and 81.9 USD for normal delivery and C-section respectively. Factors such as literate mother (p = 0.007), employed house head (p = 0.011), monthly family income more than 25,000 NRs (Nepalese Rupees) (p = 0.014), private hospital as a place of delivery (p = 0.0001), C-section as a mode of delivery (p = 0.0001), longer duration (>5days) of stay in hospital (p = 0.0001), longer distance (>15km) from house to hospital (p = 0.0001) and longer travel time (>240 minutes) from house to hospital (p = 0.007) showed a significant association with the higher hidden costs (>25000 NRs). Experiences of hidden costs on hospital based delivery and opportunity costs of days of work loss were found high. Several socio-demographic factors, delivery related factors (place and mode of delivery, length of stay, distance from hospital and travel time) were associated with hidden costs. Hidden costs can be a

  4. Hidden Costs of Hospital Based Delivery from Two Tertiary Hospitals in Western Nepal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeevan Acharya

    Full Text Available Hospital based delivery has been an expensive experience for poor households because of hidden costs which are usually unaccounted in hospital costs. The main aim of this study was to estimate the hidden costs of hospital based delivery and determine the factors associated with the hidden costs.A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted among 384 post-partum mothers with their husbands/house heads during the discharge time in Manipal Teaching Hospital and Western Regional Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal. A face to face interview with each respondent was conducted using a structured questionnaire. Hidden costs were calculated based on the price rate of the market during the time of the study.The total hidden costs for normal delivery and C-section delivery were 243.4 USD (US Dollar and 321.6 USD respectively. Of the total maternity care expenditures; higher mean expenditures were found for food & drinking (53.07%, clothes (9.8% and transport (7.3%. For postpartum women with their husband or house head, the total mean opportunity cost of "days of work loss" were 84.1 USD and 81.9 USD for normal delivery and C-section respectively. Factors such as literate mother (p = 0.007, employed house head (p = 0.011, monthly family income more than 25,000 NRs (Nepalese Rupees (p = 0.014, private hospital as a place of delivery (p = 0.0001, C-section as a mode of delivery (p = 0.0001, longer duration (>5days of stay in hospital (p = 0.0001, longer distance (>15km from house to hospital (p = 0.0001 and longer travel time (>240 minutes from house to hospital (p = 0.007 showed a significant association with the higher hidden costs (>25000 NRs.Experiences of hidden costs on hospital based delivery and opportunity costs of days of work loss were found high. Several socio-demographic factors, delivery related factors (place and mode of delivery, length of stay, distance from hospital and travel time were associated with hidden costs. Hidden costs can be a

  5. Survey of in-house coverage by pediatric intensivists: characterization of 24/7 in-hospital pediatric critical care faculty coverage*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehder, Kyle J; Cheifetz, Ira M; Markovitz, Barry P; Turner, David A

    2014-02-01

    To characterize the current state of 24/7 in-hospital pediatric intensivist coverage in academic PICUs, including perceptions of faculty and trainees regarding the advantages and disadvantages of in-hospital coverage. Cross-sectional observational study via web-based survey. PICUs at North American academic institutions. Pediatric intensivists, pediatric critical care fellows, and pediatric residents. None. A total of 1,323 responses were received representing a center response rate of 74% (147 of 200). Ninety percent of respondents stated that in-hospital coverage is good for patient care, and 85% stated that in-hospital coverage provides safer care. Sixty-three percent of intensivists stated that working in in-hospital models limits academic productivity, and 65% stated that in-hospital models interfere with nonclinical responsibilities. When compared with intensivists in home coverage models, intensivists working in in-hospital models generally had more favorable perceptions of the effects of in-hospital on patient care (p quality of life. Physician burnout was measured with the abbreviated Maslach Burnout Inventory. Although 57% of intensivists responded that working in in-hospital models increases burnout risk, burnout scores were not different between coverage models. Seventy-nine percent of intensivists currently working at institutions with in-hospital coverage stated that they would prefer to work in an in-hospital coverage model, compared with 31% of those working in a home coverage model (p < 0.0001). Although concerns exist regarding the effect of 24/7 in-hospital coverage on faculty, the majority of pediatric intensivists and critical care trainees responded that in-hospital coverage by intensivists is good for patient care. The majority of intensivists also state that they would prefer to work at an institution with in-hospital coverage. Further research is needed to objectively delineate the effects of in-hospital coverage on both patients and

  6. The Hospital-Based Drug Information Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Leigh

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the rise of drug information centers in hospitals and medical centers, highlighting staffing, functions, typical categories of questions received by centers, and sources used. An appendix of drug information sources included in texts, updated services, journals, and computer databases is provided. Thirteen references are listed. (EJS)

  7. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Eva Helena; Kjaergaard, H; Schmiegelow, K

    2012-01-01

    . Our study highlights the importance of providing hospital-based home care with consideration for the family members' need for the sense of security achieved by home care by experienced paediatric oncology nurses and regular contact with the doctor. In future studies, interviews with children......The study aims to describe the experiences of a hospital-based home care programme in the families of children with cancer. Fourteen parents, representing 10 families, were interviewed about their experiences of a hospital-based home care programme during a 4-month period in 2009 at a university...... hospital in Denmark. Five children participated in all or part of the interview. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. The findings indicate that hospital-based home care enabled the families to remain intact throughout the course of treatment...

  8. Unified Modeling Language (UML) for hospital-based cancer registration processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiki, Naomi; Ohno, Yuko; Fujii, Ayumi; Murata, Taizo; Matsumura, Yasushi

    2008-01-01

    Hospital-based cancer registry involves complex processing steps that span across multiple departments. In addition, management techniques and registration procedures differ depending on each medical facility. Establishing processes for hospital-based cancer registry requires clarifying specific functions and labor needed. In recent years, the business modeling technique, in which management evaluation is done by clearly spelling out processes and functions, has been applied to business process analysis. However, there are few analytical reports describing the applications of these concepts to medical-related work. In this study, we initially sought to model hospital-based cancer registration processes using the Unified Modeling Language (UML), to clarify functions. The object of this study was the cancer registry of Osaka University Hospital. We organized the hospital-based cancer registration processes based on interview and observational surveys, and produced an As-Is model using activity, use-case, and class diagrams. After drafting every UML model, it was fed-back to practitioners to check its validity and improved. We were able to define the workflow for each department using activity diagrams. In addition, by using use-case diagrams we were able to classify each department within the hospital as a system, and thereby specify the core processes and staff that were responsible for each department. The class diagrams were effective in systematically organizing the information to be used for hospital-based cancer registries. Using UML modeling, hospital-based cancer registration processes were broadly classified into three separate processes, namely, registration tasks, quality control, and filing data. An additional 14 functions were also extracted. Many tasks take place within the hospital-based cancer registry office, but the process of providing information spans across multiple departments. Moreover, additional tasks were required in comparison to using a

  9. [Team approaches to critical bleeding (massive bleeding and transfusion) - chairmen's introductory remarks. Questionnaire survey on current status of hospital clinical laboratories evaluating critical hemorrhage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kino, Shuichi; Suwabe, Akira

    2014-12-01

    In 2007, "the Guidelines for Actions against Intraoperative Critical Hemorrhage" were established by the Japanese Society of Anaesthesiologists and the Japanese Society of Blood transfusion and Cell Therapy. The documentation of in-hospital procedures for critical hemorrhage, especially about how to select RBC units, has widely standardized hospital practice. Patients with intraoperative critical hemorrhage sometimes suffer from massive blood loss. In this situation, some patients develop coagulopathy. To treat them, we need to evaluate their coagulation status based on laboratory test results. So, we performed a nationwide questionnaire survey on the current status of hospital clinical laboratories evaluating critical hemorrhage. From the results of this survey, it was recommended that central hospital laboratories should try to reduce the turn-around time required to test for coagulation parameters as much as possible for appropriate substitution therapy. (Review).

  10. Measuring patient safety culture in Taiwan using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen I-Chi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient safety is a critical component to the quality of health care. As health care organizations endeavour to improve their quality of care, there is a growing recognition of the importance of establishing a culture of patient safety. In this research, the authors use the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC questionnaire to assess the culture of patient safety in Taiwan and attempt to provide an explanation for some of the phenomena that are unique in Taiwan. Methods The authors used HSOPSC to measure the 12 dimensions of the patient safety culture from 42 hospitals in Taiwan. The survey received 788 respondents including physicians, nurses, and non-clinical staff. This study used SPSS 15.0 for Windows and Amos 7 software tools to perform the statistical analysis on the survey data, including descriptive statistics and confirmatory factor analysis of the structural equation model. Results The overall average positive response rate for the 12 patient safety culture dimensions of the HSOPSC survey was 64%, slightly higher than the average positive response rate for the AHRQ data (61%. The results showed that hospital staff in Taiwan feel positively toward patient safety culture in their organization. The dimension that received the highest positive response rate was "Teamwork within units", similar to the results reported in the US. The dimension with the lowest percentage of positive responses was "Staffing". Statistical analysis showed discrepancies between Taiwan and the US in three dimensions, including "Feedback and communication about error", "Communication openness", and "Frequency of event reporting". Conclusions The HSOPSC measurement provides evidence for assessing patient safety culture in Taiwan. The results show that in general, hospital staffs in Taiwan feel positively toward patient safety culture within their organization. The existence of discrepancies between the US data and the Taiwanese data

  11. A Questionnaire based Survey on the Knowledge, Attitude and Practises about Antimicrobial Resistance and Usage among the Second year MBBS Students of a Teaching tertiary care Hospital in Central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Manali Mangesh Mahajan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Context: Antibiotic resistance(ABR is an important growing global health issue which needs urgent addressal. Judicious use of antibiotics is the only solution. Awareness of this fact among UG students is vital. Aims: To assess the knowledge, attitude and practices related to antibiotic resistance and usage in UG students.Settings and Design: cross sectional, questionnaire based survey. Methods and Material: The questionnaire was distributed to a batch of 86 medical students in their second year of MBBS,  whereby their KAP regarding antibiotic use and resistance was assessed by a five point Likert scale, whose responses ranged from ‘strongly agree’ to ‘strongly disagree,’ and  ‘always’ to ‘never. Some questions were of true and false type.Statistical analysis used: The data was analyzed by using simple descriptive statistics to generate frequencies, percentages and proportions. Wherever it was relevant, the Chi-square test was used to determine any significant difference Results: Indiscriminate antimicrobial use leads to the emergence of the growing problem of resistance was known to all n=86(100% of the participants. The number of respondents who agreed that ABR was an important and a serious global public health issue was 83(96.51%.Ninety four per cent (n = 81 of the respondents were aware that bacteria were not responsible for causing colds and flu. Conclusions: Our study provides an important insight regarding the knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding antibiotic resistance and usage among the future doctors, which can be considered, in order to plan for an effective undergraduate curriculum. 

  12. Nurses' caring and empathy in Jordanian psychiatric hospitals: A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhadidi, Majdi M B; Abdalrahim, Maysoon S; Al-Hussami, Mahmoud

    2016-08-01

    Nurses working in psychiatric hospitals need to acquire the skills of therapeutic communication and empathy, and have higher levels of caring. The present study aims to investigate the level of caring and empathy among nurses working in psychiatric hospitals. A cross-sectional survey was utilized to collect data from 205 nurses recruited from three psychiatric hospitals in Jordan. The Background Information Questionnaire, Modified Caring Dimensions Inventory, and Toronto Empathy Questionnaire were administered to the recruited participants. The findings revealed that the sampled nurses had a high level of caring and empathy. Significant correlations were found between caring and having a specialized training in mental health nursing, and having organizational and managerial support. However, no significant correlations were found between empathy and participants' characteristics. Specialized training in mental health nursing, having organizational and managerial support, and empathy were found predictors for caring. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  13. A survey on information seeking behaviour of nurses at a private hospital in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyri, Paraskevi; Kostagiolas, Petros; Diomidous, Marianna

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the investigation of the information seeking behavior of nursing staff of a private hospital in Greece. It is assumed that the information seeking behaviour has an effect on the nursing care and practices. A survey was conducted through a specially designed questionnaire distributed within 2013 to registered nurses of a major private Hospital in Athens. Nonparametric descriptive statistics have been carried out through SPSS version 20. The information needs of nurses are related to their work role and include information for nursing interventions and hospital infections control. The online scientific content is considered as the main source of information, while lack of time is considered as the main obstacle when seeking information. Regarding the effects of information, nurses believe that information quality and availability influences nursing care as well as nursing practices. Development of appropriate information services and information literacy skills for nurses is required.

  14. [The information needs of non-hospital based physicians regarding admissions and transfers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermeling, P; de Cruppé, W; Geraedts, M

    2013-07-01

    This study examines the quality criteria which, from the perspective of non-hospital based physicians, are relevant in order to give patients quality-oriented recommendations in the selection of a suitable hospital or specialist. A primary telephone survey of 300 physicians from 5 specialist groups collected relevance assessments of 59 quality criteria for hospitals, GPs and specialist practices. A descriptive bi- and multivariate analysis was performed using McNemar tests, correlation and regression analysis. Next to the personal experiences which the physician and his patients made with the hospital or non-hospital based colleague in the past, there is a general interest in vital structural and outcome parameters of hospitals and medical practices. Physicians deem the nature and scope of services offered by the hospitals and medical practices as less relevant. In 12 of the 59 examined quality criteria, the relevance assessments differ depending on whether the physician is dealing with an elective admission to hospital or a referral to a GP or specialist. In the analysis of possible correlations between preferences and factors which might be influencing the physician, gender, age and specialisation were found to have an effect. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. [Survey of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus control measures in hospitals participating in the VINCat program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopena-Galindo, Nieves; Hornero-Lopez, Anna; Freixas-Sala, Núria; Bella-Cueto, Feliu; Pérez-Jové, Josefa; Limon-Cáceres, Enric; Gudiol-Munté, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    VINCat is a nosocomial infection surveillance program in hospitals in Catalonia. The aim of the study was to determine the surveillance and control measures of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in these centres. An e-mail survey was carried out from January to March 2013 with questions related to the characteristics of the hospitals and their control measures for MRSA. A response was received from 53 hospitals (>500 beds: 7; 200-500 beds: 14;<200 beds: 32; had ICU: 29). Computer alert of readmissions was available in 63%. There was active surveillance of patients admitted from another hospital (46.2%) or a long-term-care centre (55.8%), both being significantly more common measures in hospitals with a rate of MRSA≤22% (global median). Compliance with hand hygiene was observed in 77.4% of the centres, and was greater than 50% in 69.7% of them. All hospitals had contact precautions, although 62.3% did not have exclusive frequently used clinical material in bedrooms. The room cleaning was performed more frequently in 54.7% of hospitals, and 67.9% of them had programs for the appropriate use of antibiotics. This study provides information on the implementation of measures to prevent MRSA in hospitals participating in the VINCat program. Most of the centres have an MRSA protocol, however compliance with it should be improved, especially in areas such as active detection on admission in patients at risk, hand hygiene adherence, cleaning frequency and optimising the use of antibiotics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. Wall finish selection in hospital design: a survey of facility managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavy, Sarel; Dixit, Manish K

    2012-01-01

    This paper seeks to analyze healthcare facility managers' perceptions regarding the materials used for interior wall finishes and the criteria used to select them. It also examines differences in wall finish materials and the selection process in three major hospital spaces: emergency, surgery, and in-patient units. These findings are compared with healthcare designers' perceptions on similar issues, as currently documented in the literature. Hospital design and the materials used for hospital construction have a considerable effect on the environment and health of patients. A 2002 survey revealed which characteristics healthcare facility designers consider when selecting materials for healthcare facilities; however, no similar study has examined the views of facility managers on building finish selection. A 22-question survey questionnaire was distributed to 210 facility managers of metropolitan, for-profit hospitals in Texas; IRB approval was obtained. Respondents were asked to rank 10 interior wall finish materials and 11 selection criteria for wall finishes. Data from 48 complete questionnaires were analyzed using descriptive statistics and nonparametric statistical analysis methods. The study found no statistically significant differences in terms of wall finish materials or the characteristics for material selection in the three major spaces studied. It identified facility managers' four most-preferred wall finish materials and the five-most preferred characteristics, with a statistical confidence level of greater than 95%. The paper underscores the importance of incorporating all perspectives: facility designers and facility managers should work together toward achieving common organizational goals.

  17. The Survey of Hospitals Affiliated with Kerman University of Medical Sciences in Preparedness Response to Disasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Nekoei-Moghadam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : Natural and man-made disasters always threaten human lives and properties. Iran as one of the disastrous countries has experienced both natural and man-made disasters. Preparedness is one of the vital elements in response to disasters. So, this study was arranged and carried out with the aim of measuring preparedness of hospitals affiliated with Kerman University of Medical Sciences in response to disasters. Material and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was performed in four hospitals affiliated with Kerman University of Medical Sciences in 2015. A satisfactorily valid (kappa: 0.8 and reliable checklist was used. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics in SPSS version 17. Results: The surveyed hospitals with the total score of 67 % were in good condition in response to disasters. The emergency departments (83%, reception (75%, communication (69%, education (70%, supply services (61%, human sources (71% and command (79% also acquired good scores. Discharge units (60%, traffic (55% and security (53% were in moderate condition in preparedness. In necessary fields for response to disasters, the whole research units acquired 67% which showed good condition in this field. Conclusion: The surveyed hospitals were in prepared and suitable condition in the emergency departments, reception, communication, education, human sources and command. In order to improve and enhance the preparedness, a schedule plan should be programmed for some elements such as discharge, transfer, traffic, security and six-crucial elements of the field.

  18. Patient safety culture in teaching hospitals in Iran: assessment by the hospital survey on patient safety culture (HSOPSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zakaria Kiaei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient safety culture is an important part of improvement in the safety of health care. Knowing its present status is required for development of safety culture. The present study aimed to evaluate the current status of Patient safety culture in hospitals of three central provinces of Iran. Method: The present cross-sectional study was performed in teaching hospitals of Tehran, Alborz, and Qazvin provinces. The standard HSOPSC questionnaire was used for evaluation of the patient safety culture from the viewpoint of 522(Qazvin: 200, Tehran: 312, Alborz: 40 individuals who were randomly selected as workers of the hospitals. The collected data were analyzed using Chi-square and ANOVA tests. Results:The mean positive response to 12 aspects of the patient safety was 62.9%. “Organizational learning” had the highest proportion of positive response (71.18% and “Handoffs & Transitions” had the lowest (54.49%. There was a statistically significant difference in scores of “Teamwork within Units”(p=0.006(,”Manager Expectations & actions promoting”(p=0.014,”organizational learning and continuous improvement”(p=0.001, “Management support”(p=0.007, “Feedback and communication”(p=0.012, and “Communication openness”(p=0.003 among the provinces, respectively. Conclusion: We performed a full assessment of the patient safety culture in the studied provinces. Organizational learning was satisfactory in the hospitals. The studied hospitals need arrangement of safety-based programs and supports of senior administrators to perform more sophisticated efforts and improve the patient safety culture.

  19. Drug and Therapeutics (D & T) committees in Dutch hospitals : a nation-wide survey of structure, activities, and drug selection procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijn, R; Brouwers, JRBJ; Knaap, RJ; De Jong-Van den Berg, LTW

    1999-01-01

    Aims To determine structure, activities and drug selection processes used by Dutch hospital drug and therapeutics (D & T) committees. Methods A pretested structured survey questionnaire based on the Australian process and impact indicators, previous research, and consultation of professionals was de

  20. Sustained Hospital-based Wellness Program

    OpenAIRE

    Danielson, Karen; Jeffers, Katharine; Kaiser, Leslie; McKinley, Lee; Kuhn, Thomas; Voorhies, Gigi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Beginning as a grassroots initiative, a community hospital employing 2800 celebrates the stress-transforming benefits of HeartMath for its employees and community. Initially introduced to address the deleterious effects of personal stress experienced by the high healthcare claimants of the organization, HeartMath was eventually introduced to every stratification of the organization's population health management. The ensuing depth and breadth of HeartMath's presence in the organ...

  1. Culinary and hospitality teaching as a research-based profession ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Culinary and hospitality teaching as a research-based profession. ... prepare and deliver a programme of learning in ways that foster and support student learning. It is also an important point of entry for enquiry into the nature of hospitality ...

  2. From customer satisfaction survey to corrective actions in laboratory services in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oja, Paula I; Kouri, Timo T; Pakarinen, Arto J

    2006-12-01

    To find out the satisfaction of clinical units with laboratory services in a university hospital, to point out the most important problems and defects in services, to carry out corrective actions, and thereafter to identify the possible changes in satisfaction. and Senior physicians and nurses-in-charge of the clinical units at Oulu University Hospital, Finland. Customer satisfaction survey using a questionnaire was carried out in 2001, indicating the essential aspects of laboratory services. Customer-specific problems were clarified, corrective actions were performed, and the survey was repeated in 2004. In 2001, the highest dissatisfaction rates were recorded for computerized test requesting and reporting, turnaround times of tests, and the schedule of phlebotomy rounds. The old laboratory information system was not amenable to major improvements, and it was renewed in 2004-05. Several clinical units perceived turnaround times to be long, because the tests were ordered as routine despite emergency needs. Instructions about stat requesting were given to these units. However, no changes were evident in the satisfaction level in the 2004 survey. Following negotiations with the clinics, phlebotomy rounds were re-scheduled. This resulted in a distinct increase in satisfaction in 2004. Satisfaction survey is a screening tool that identifies topics of dissatisfaction. Without further clarifications, it is not possible to find out the specific problems of customers and to undertake targeted corrective actions. Customer-specific corrections are rarely seen as improvements in overall satisfaction rates.

  3. Social Responsibility of the Hospitals in Isfahan City, Iran: Results from a Cross-Sectional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Keyvanara

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Changes in modern societies develop the perception that the external environment is essential in organization’s practices, especially in the way they deal with aspects such as human rights, community needs, market demands and environmental interests. These issues are usually under the umbrella of the concept of social responsibility. Given the importance of this concept in the context of health care delivery, suggesting a new paradigm in hospital governance, the aim of this study was to measure the social responsibility in hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional survey was employed to collect data from a sample of 946 hospital staff of Isfahan city. Data was obtained by structured and valid self-administrated questionnaire and analyzed by descriptive and analytic statistics using SPSS. Results The mean score of hospitals’ social responsibility was 3.0 compared with the justified range from 1.0 to 5.0. Results showed that there was a significant relationship between social responsibility score and hospitals’ ownership (public or private. Also, there was no significant relationship between social responsibility and type of hospital specialty. Conclusion It is recommended that hospital managers develop and apply appropriate policies and strategies to improve their hospitals’ social responsibility level, especially through concentrating on their staff’s working environment.

  4. In-hospital organization of primary care of patients presenting a life-threatening emergency: A French national survey in 32 university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintard, Hervé; Severac, Mathilde; Martin, Claude; Ichai, Carole

    2015-08-01

    The development of specialized units dedicated to life-threatening management has demonstrated to improve the prognosis of patients requiring such treatments. However, apart those focused on trauma and stroke, networks are still lacking in France. Despite, the implementation of standardisation of practices and guidelines, particularly in prehospital care, in-hospital clinical practices at admission remain heterogenous. This survey aimed to assess the structural and human organization of teaching hospitals in France concerning the primary in-hospital care for critically ill patients. A questionnaire of 45 items was sent by e-mail to 32 teaching hospitals between January and March 2013. It included information related to the description of the emergency department, of ICUs, and both structural and human organizations for primary in-hospital care of life-threatening patients. Seventy-five percent of teaching hospitals answered to the survey. Seven hundred to 1400 patients were admitted to emergency units per week and among them 10 to 20 were admitted for critically ill conditions. These latter were addressed in a specialized room of the emergency unit (Service d'admission des urgences vitales [SAUV]) in 40% of hospitals and in specialized room in ICU in 18% of cases. Intensivists were involved in 50% of hospitals, emergency physicians in 26% and it was mixed in 24% of hospitals. This survey is the first to assess the in-hospital organization of primary care for instable and life-threatening patients in France. Our results confirmed the extreme heterogeneity of structural and human organizations for primary in-hospital care of patients presenting at least one organ failure. Thus, a consensus is probably needed to homogenize and improve our practices. Copyright © 2015 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. The importance of code status discussions in the psychiatric hospital: results of a single site survey of psychiatrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, Alastair J S; Lapid, Maria I; Geske, Jennifer R; Kung, Simon

    2015-04-01

    Documentation of code status is a requirement with hospital admission, yet this discussion may present unique challenges with psychiatric inpatients. Currently, no standards exist on conducting these discussions with psychiatric inpatients. The authors surveyed psychiatry trainees and faculty regarding their perceptions and practice to gain further insight into the types of approaches used. The authors conducted an IRB-approved, Web-based survey of psychiatry faculty and trainees using a 25-item questionnaire of demographics and opinions about code status among psychiatric inpatients. The response rate was 36.1 % (n = 30; 15 faculty and 15 trainees). Respondents felt that it was important to discuss code status with each admission. Faculty placed a higher emphasis on assessing patients with a recent suicide attempt (p = 0.024). Psychiatric faculty and trainees endorsed the importance of assessing code status with each admission. The authors suggest that educational programs are needed on strategies to conduct code status discussions properly and effectively in psychiatric populations.

  6. A Comparison of Web-Based and Paper-Based Survey Methods: Testing Assumptions of Survey Mode and Response Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlaw, Corey; Brown-Welty, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Web-based surveys have become more prevalent in areas such as evaluation, research, and marketing research to name a few. The proliferation of these online surveys raises the question, how do response rates compare with traditional surveys and at what cost? This research explored response rates and costs for Web-based surveys, paper surveys, and…

  7. A Comparison of Web-Based and Paper-Based Survey Methods: Testing Assumptions of Survey Mode and Response Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlaw, Corey; Brown-Welty, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Web-based surveys have become more prevalent in areas such as evaluation, research, and marketing research to name a few. The proliferation of these online surveys raises the question, how do response rates compare with traditional surveys and at what cost? This research explored response rates and costs for Web-based surveys, paper surveys, and…

  8. MUSCULOSKELETAL MORBIDITIES IN CLASS 4 WOMEN EMPLOYEES OF A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL: A CROSS-SECTIONAL SURVEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verma Chhaya

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: A job is a piece of work done as a part of the routine of one’s occupation for an agreed price. Every occupation is associated with one or more ill effects on the health of the worker. Musculoskeletal morbidity is the commonest cause for occupational health problems & accounts for large number of workers’ compensation days & disabilities. Aim: To conduct a survey on prevalence of musculoskeletal pain & dysfunction in class 4 female hospital employees Materials & Methodology: Settings & Design: Interview based randomized cross sectional survey. 80 female class 4 employees working at the Lokmanya Tilak municipal medical college & general hospital (LTMMC & LTMGH participated in the study. Based on work pattern, a semi-structured questionnaire was prepared and validated. An informed consent was obtained before the interview. The data thus collected over a period of 3 months was analyzed to determine the prevalence & intensity of musculoskeletal dysfunction, pain & its influence on daily activity. Data was spread in Microsoft Excel 2010 & statistically analyzed using percentages. Results & Conclusion: This study shows that considerable musculoskeletal pain & dysfunction was observed among the women sweepers & aayabai. The back & the knee appear to be affected more than rest of the joints mainly attributed to the combined effect of occupational & psychological stress.

  9. Is social capital as perceived by the medical director associated with coordination among hospital staff? A nationwide survey in German hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloede, Tristan D; Hammer, Antje; Ommen, Oliver; Ernstmann, Nicole; Pfaff, Holger

    2013-03-01

    Effective coordination among all members of hospital staff has been shown to be associated with better quality of care. The literature indicates that social capital, a form of organizational resource, may facilitate the task of coordination. However, to the best of our knowledge, no study has yet examined this link within a healthcare setting. Thus, the objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between social capital and coordination among hospital staff, as perceived by the medical director being a key informant of the hospital. In 2008, we surveyed the medical directors of 1224 German hospitals by the use of a standardized questionnaire. We conducted stepwise multivariate linear regression and controlled for hospital size, ownership and teaching status. In total, 551 medical directors (45%) responded to the survey. We found social capital to be a significant predictor of coordination (β = 0.444, p social capital can be associated with better coordination among members of hospital staff, as perceived by the medical director. Therefore, investment in social capital may facilitate better organization of work processes in hospitals and may therefore help to improve patient outcomes. However, longitudinal studies are needed in order to explain the causal relationship between social capital and coordination among hospital staff.

  10. What Do Patients Want? Survey of Patient Desires for Education in an Urban University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Seibert

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study examines the emergency department (ED waiting room (WR population’s knowledge about the ED process and hospital function and explores the types of educational materials that might appeal to patients and their companions in an ED waiting room. Our goal was to identify potential high-impact opportunities for patient education. Methods: A 32-question survey about demographics, usage of primary care physicians (PCP, understanding of the ED and triage process, desire to know about delays, health education and understanding of teaching hospitals was offered to all qualified individuals. Results: Five hundred and forty-four surveys were returned. Fifty-five percent reported having a PCP, of which 53% (29% of all WR patients called a PCP prior to coming to the ED. It was found that 51.2% can define triage; 51% as an acuity assessment and 17% as a vital signs check. Sixty-nine percent knew why patients were seen according to triage priority. Seventy-two percent wanted to know about delays, yet only 25% wanted to know others’ wait times. People wanted updates every 41 minutes and only three percent wanted a physician to do this. Forty-one percent wanted information on how the ED functions, 60% via handouts and 43% via video. Information on updates and common medical emergencies is significantly more important than material on common illnesses, finding a PCP, or ED function (p<0.05. Median estimated time for medical workup ranged from 35 minutes for radiographs, to one hour for lab results, computed tomography, specialist consult, and admission. Sixty-nine percent knew the definition of a teaching hospital and of those, 87% knew they were at a teaching hospital. Subgroup analysis between racial groups showed significantly reduced knowledge of the definitions of triage and teaching hospitals and significantly increased desire for information on ED function in minority groups (p<0.05. Conclusion: The major findings in this study

  11. Closing the quality gap: promoting evidence-based breastfeeding care in the hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartick, Melissa; Stuebe, Alison; Shealy, Katherine R; Walker, Marsha; Grummer-Strawn, Laurence M

    2009-10-01

    Evidence shows that hospital-based practices affect breastfeeding duration and exclusivity throughout the first year of life. However, a 2007 CDC survey of US maternity facilities documented poor adherence with evidence-based practice. Of a possible score of 100 points, the average hospital scored only 63 with great regional disparities. Inappropriate provision and promotion of infant formula were common, despite evidence that such practices reduce breastfeeding success. Twenty-four percent of facilities reported regularly giving non-breast milk supplements to more than half of all healthy, full-term infants. Metrics available for measuring quality of breastfeeding care, range from comprehensive Baby-Friendly Hospital Certification to compliance with individual steps such as the rate of in-hospital exclusive breastfeeding. Other approaches to improving quality of breastfeeding care include (1) education of hospital decision-makers (eg, through publications, seminars, professional organization statements, benchmark reports to hospitals, and national grassroots campaigns), (2) recognition of excellence, such as through Baby-Friendly hospital designation, (3) oversight by accrediting organizations such as the Joint Commission or state hospital authorities, (4) public reporting of indicators of the quality of breastfeeding care, (5) pay-for-performance incentives, in which Medicaid or other third-party payers provide additional financial compensation to individual hospitals that meet certain quality standards, and (6) regional collaboratives, in which staff from different hospitals work together to learn from each other and meet quality improvement goals at their home institutions. Such efforts, as well as strong central leadership, could affect both initiation and duration of breastfeeding, with substantial, lasting benefits for maternal and child health.

  12. ASHP national survey on informatics: assessment of the adoption and use of pharmacy informatics in U.S. hospitals--2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Craig A; Gumpper, Karl F

    2008-12-01

    Results of the 2007 ASHP national survey on informatics are presented. All types and sizes of hospitals in the United States were included in the sample of 4112 pharmacy directors surveyed using an online data collection tool. The survey included over 300 data elements and was designed to assess the adoption and use of pharmacy informatics and technology within the medication-use process. In this national probability sample survey, the response rate was 25.9%. Hospitals appear to be moving toward an enterprise approach to information technology adoption and away from a best-of-breed approach. Although nearly half of hospitals have components of an electronic medical record (EMR), a complete digital hospital with a fully implemented EMR is far in the future, with only 5.9% of hospitals being fully digital (without paper records). An estimated 12.0% of hospitals use computerized prescriber-order-entry systems with decision support, 24.1% use bar-code medication administration, and 44.0% use intelligent infusion devices (smart pumps). Many of these technologies were not optimally configured, and significant advances must be made for hospitals to fully realize the benefits of these technologies. Hospitals have implemented many technologies in drug distribution, with 82.8% of hospitals having automated dispensing cabinets, 10.1% having robots, and 12.7% having carousel systems to manage inventory. Finally, most hospitals reported plans to adopt most of these technologies. This survey found that informatics and medication-use system technologies are widely present in all steps of the medication-use process. These technologies touch all health care professionals in the hospital and demonstrate the significant responsibility the pharmacy department holds for these technologies.

  13. Practices of infectious control management during neutropenia: A survey from 149 French hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequilliec, N; Raymond, R; Vanjak, D; Baghdadi, N; Boulestreau, H; Zahar, J-R; Gangneux, J-P

    2017-06-01

    Neutropenic patients represent a growing and fragile population in our hospitals. Numerous treatments induce neutropenia in haematology wards and elsewhere. Although strict isolation is recommended during post-haematopoietic stem cell transplantation neutropenia, this may not be the current practice in other situations. In this study, our objective was to analyse what protective measures are applied in neutropenic patients in a French survey. A questionnaire was sent out to infection control teams of 400 public and private French hospitals to enquire about their local recommendations regarding infection prevention in neutropenic patients. Among the 166 (41%) responders, 134 (81%) managed neutropenic patients. All of the centres recommended protective isolation for neutropenic patients. However, only 46 (34%) had clearly defined patients warranting specific isolation measures in terms of the level of neutropenia. All of the centres recommended several barrier measures, but these were highly variable according to the type of air treatment in the wards (note that only 72% of haematology wards are equipped with air treatment). Gowns, gloves, masks, hats and shoe covers were respectively recommended in 128 (95%), 79 (59%), 132 (98%), 87 (65%), and 34 (25%) of the establishments. Surprisingly, the recommendations vary both among hospitals and within the same hospital among different clinical wards. In conclusion, protective measures for neutropenic patients are applied variably and urgently require a consensus to homogenize practices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Questionnaire survey of working relationships between nurses and doctors in University Teaching Hospitals in Southern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebamowo Clement A

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smooth working relationships between nurses and doctors are necessary for efficient health care delivery. However, previous studies have shown that this is often absent with negative impact on the quality of health care delivery. In 2002, we studied factors that affect nurse-doctor working relationships in University Teaching Hospitals (UTH in Southern Nigeria in order to characterize it and identify managerial and training needs that might be used to improve it. Method Questionnaire survey of doctors and nurses working in four UTH in Southern Nigeria was done in 2002. The setting and subjects were selected by random sampling procedures. Information on factors in domains of work, union activities, personnel and hospital management were studied using closed and open-ended questionnaires. Results Nurse-doctor working relationships were statistically significantly affected by poor after-work social interaction, staff shortages, activist unionism, disregard for one's profession, and hospital management and government policies. In general, nurses had better opinion of doctors' work than doctors had about nurses' work. Conclusion Working relationships between doctors and nurses need to be improved through improved training and better working conditions, creation of better working environment, use of alternative methods of conflict resolution and balanced hospital management and government policies. This will improve the retention of staff, job satisfaction and efficiency of health care delivery in Nigeria.

  15. Diagnostic virology practices for respiratory syncytial virus and influenza virus among children in the hospital setting: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafri, Hasan S; Ramilo, Octavio; Makari, Doris; Charsha-May, Deborah; Romero, José R

    2007-10-01

    A survey was sent to the emergency room and laboratory directors of 400 randomly selected US hospitals to assess the diagnostic testing practices for respiratory syncytial virus and influenza virus in children. The results demonstrate that the majority of hospitals routinely perform viral testing for both viruses and use virology testing practices appropriate for the reasons reported for testing.

  16. Designing HIGH-COST medicine: hospital surveys, health planning, and the paradox of progressive reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Barbara Bridgman

    2010-02-01

    Inspired by social medicine, some progressive US health reforms have paradoxically reinforced a business model of high-cost medical delivery that does not match social needs. In analyzing the financial status of their areas' hospitals, for example, city-wide hospital surveys of the 1910s through 1930s sought to direct capital investments and, in so doing, control competition and markets. The 2 national health planning programs that ran from the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s continued similar strategies of economic organization and management, as did the so-called market reforms that followed. Consequently, these reforms promoted large, extremely specialized, capital-intensive institutions and systems at the expense of less complex (and less costly) primary and chronic care. The current capital crisis may expose the lack of sustainability of such a model and open up new ideas and new ways to build health care designed to meet people's health needs.

  17. Problem based Learning in surveying Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    The challenge of the future will be that the only constant is change. Therefore, the educational base must be flexible. The graduates must possess skills to adapt to a rapidly changing labour market and they must possess skills to deal with even the unknown problems of the future. The point is...... that opportunity. The basis principles of this educational model are presented using the surveying programme at Aalborg University as an example....

  18. Working after a tornado: a survey of hospital personnel in Joplin, Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charney, Rachel; Rebmann, Terri; Flood, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, an EF5 tornado hit Joplin, MO, requiring complete evacuation of 1 hospital and a patient surge to another. We sought to assess the resilience of healthcare workers in these hospitals as measured by number reporting to work, willingness to work, personal disaster preparedness, and childcare responsibilities following the disaster. In May 2013, a survey was distributed to healthcare workers at both Joplin hospitals that asked them to report their willingness to work and personal disaster preparedness following various disaster scenarios. For those with childcare responsibilities, scheduling, costs, and impact of hypothetical alternative childcare programs were considered in the analyses. A total of 1,234 healthcare workers completed the survey (response rate: 23.4%). Most (87.8%) worked the week following the Joplin tornado. Healthcare workers report more willingness to work during a future earthquake or tornado compared to their pre-Joplin tornado attitudes (86.2 vs 88.4%, t=-4.3, ptornado personal disaster preparedness, but only preevent preparedness was a significant predictor of postevent preparedness. Nearly half (48.5%, n=598) had childcare responsibilities; 61% (n=366) had childcare needs the week of the tornado, and 54% (n=198) required the use of alternative childcare. If their hospital had provided alternative childcare, 51% would have used it and 42% felt they would have been more willing to report to work. Most healthcare workers reported to work following this disaster, demonstrating true resilience. Disaster planners should be aware of these perceptions as they formulate their own emergency operation plans.

  19. Hospital occupancy and discharge strategies: a simulation-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shaowen; Thompson, Campbell; Bogomolov, Tim; Ward, Dale; Hakendorf, Paul

    2017-08-01

    Increasing demand for hospital services has resulted in more arrivals to emergency department (ED), increased admissions, and, quite often, access block and ED congestion, along with patients' dissatisfaction. Cost constraints limit an increase in the number of hospital beds, so alternative solutions need to be explored. To propose and test different discharge strategies, which, potentially, could reduce occupancy rates in the hospital, thereby improving patient flow and minimising frequency and duration of congestion episodes. We used a simulation approach using HESMAD (Hospital Event Simulation Model: Arrivals to Discharge) - a sophisticated simulation model capturing patient flow through a large Australian hospital from arrival at ED to discharge. A set of simulation experiments with a range of proposed discharge strategies was carried out. The results were tabulated, analysed and compared using common hospital occupancy indicators. Simulation results demonstrated that it is possible to reduce significantly the number of days when a hospital runs above its base bed capacity. In our case study, this reduction was from 281.5 to 22.8 days in the best scenario, and reductions within the above range under other scenarios considered. Some relatively simple strategies, such as 24-h discharge or discharge/relocation of long-staying patients, can significantly reduce overcrowding and improve hospital occupancy rates. Shortening administrative and/or some treatment processes have a smaller effect, although the latter could be easier to implement. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  20. Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of Hospitals for 50 states and Washington D.C. , Puerto Rico and US territories. The dataset only includes hospital facilities and...

  1. Physically-based fluid animation: A survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Jie; YANG XuBo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we give an up-to-date survey on physically-based fluid animation research. As one of the most popular approaches to simulate realistic fluid effects, physically-based fluid animation has spurred a large number of new results in recent years. We classify and discuss the existing methods within three categories: Lagrangian method, Eulerian method and Lattice-Boltzmann method. We then introduce techniques for seven different kinds of special fluid effects. Finally we review the latest hot research areas and point out some future research trends, including surface tracking, fluid control, hybrid method, model reduction, etc.

  2. Psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the hospital-level consumer assessment of health plans survey (R) instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.A. Arah; A.H.A. ten Asbroek; D.M.J. Delnoij; J.S. de Koning; P.J.A. Stam; A.H. Poll; B. Vriens; P.F. Schmidt; N.S. Klazinga

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the reliability and validity of a translated version of the American Hospital-level Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Survey (R) (H-CAHPS) instrument for use in Dutch health care. Data Sources/Study Setting. Primary survey data from adults aged 18 years or more who were recen

  3. The risk of unintentional out-of-network encounters with hospital-based physicians at in-network hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lawrence H; Weston, Robert A; Gough, John E

    2017-09-01

    When hospital-based specialists including emergency physicians, anesthesiologists, pathologists and radiologists are not included in the same insurance networks as their parent hospitals, it creates confusion and leads to unexpected costs for patients. This study explored the frequency with which hospital-based physicians at academic medical centers are not included in the network directories for the same insurance networks as their parent teaching hospitals. We studied teaching hospitals with residency programs in all four hospital-based specialties. Using insurance plan provider directories, we determined whether each teaching hospital was in-network for randomly selected locally available insurance plans offered through the federal and state marketplace exchanges. For each established hospital-network relationship, we then determined whether hospital-based specialists were included in the provider network directory by searching for the name of each specialty's residency program director and the name of the physician practice group. We identified 79 teaching hospitals participating in 144 locally available insurance plan networks. Hospital-based specialist inclusion in these hospital-network relationships was: emergency physicians: 50.0% (CI: 40%-59%); anesthesiologists: 50.0% (CI: 42%-58%); pathologists: 45.4% (CI: 37%-54%); and radiologists: 55.1% (46%-64%). Inclusion of all four hospital-based specialties occurred in only 45.0% (CI: 36%-54%) of the hospital-network relationships. For insurance plans offered through the federal and state marketplace exchanges, hospital-based specialists frequently are not included in the directories for the insurance networks in which their parent teaching hospitals participate. Further research is needed to explore this issue at non-academic hospitals and for off-exchange insurance products, and to determine effective policy solutions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of Smoking on Cost of Hospitalization and Length of Stay among Patients with Lung Cancer in Iran: a Hospital-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Ali Akbari; Rezaei, Satar; Arab, Mohammad; Majdzadeh, Reza; Matin, Behzad Karami; Zandian, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is recognized as a main leading preventable cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. It is responsible for a considerable nancial burden both on the health system and in society. This study aimed to examine the effect of smoking on cost of hospitalization and length of stay (LoS) among patients with lung cancer in Iran in 2014. A total of 415 patients were included in the study. Data on age, sex, insurance status, type of hospitals, type of insurance, geographic local, length of stay and cost of hospitalization was extracted by medical records and smoking status was obtained from a telephone survey. To compare cost of hospitalization and LoS for different smoking groups, current smokers, former smokers, and never smokers, a gamma regression model and zero-truncated poisson regression were used, respectively. Compared with never smokers, current and former smokers showed a 48% and 35% increase in hospitalization costs, respectively. Also, hospital LoS for current and former smokers was 72% and 31% higher than for never smokers, respectively. Our study indicated that cigarette smoking imposes a signi cant nancial burden on hospitals in Iran. It is, however, recommended that more research should be done to implement and evaluate hospital based smoking cessation interventions to better increase cessation rates in these settings.

  5. Development and applicability of Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujita Shigeru

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient safety culture at healthcare organizations plays an important role in guaranteeing, improving and promoting overall patient safety. Although several conceptual frameworks have been proposed in the past, no standard measurement tool has yet been developed for Japan. Methods In order to examine possibilities to introduce the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS in Japan, the authors of this study translated the HSOPS into Japanese, and evaluated its factor structure, internal consistency, and construct validity. Healthcare workers (n = 6,395 from 13 acute care general hospitals in Japan participated in this survey. Results Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the Japanese HSOPS' 12-factor model was selected as the most pertinent, and showed a sufficiently high standard partial regression coefficient. The internal reliability of the subscale scores was 0.46-0.88. The construct validity of each safety culture sub-dimension was confirmed by polychoric correlation, and by an ordered probit analysis. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that the factor structures of the Japanese and the American HSOPS are almost identical, and that the Japanese HSOPS has acceptable levels of internal reliability and construct validity. This shows that the HSOPS can be introduced in Japan.

  6. Yelp Reviews Of Hospital Care Can Supplement And Inform Traditional Surveys Of The Patient Experience Of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranard, Benjamin L; Werner, Rachel M; Antanavicius, Tadas; Schwartz, H Andrew; Smith, Robert J; Meisel, Zachary F; Asch, David A; Ungar, Lyle H; Merchant, Raina M

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about how real-time online rating platforms such as Yelp may complement the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey, which is the US standard for evaluating patients' experiences after hospitalization. We compared the content of Yelp narrative reviews of hospitals to the topics in the HCAHPS survey, called domains in HCAHPS terminology. While the domains included in Yelp reviews covered the majority of HCAHPS domains, Yelp reviews covered an additional twelve domains not found in HCAHPS. The majority of Yelp topics that most strongly correlate with positive or negative reviews are not measured or reported by HCAHPS. The large collection of patient- and caregiver-centered experiences found on Yelp can be analyzed with natural language processing methods, identifying for policy makers the measures of hospital quality that matter most to patients and caregivers. The Yelp measures and analysis can also provide actionable feedback for hospitals.

  7. A Multidisciplinary Hospital-based Antimicrobial Use Program: Impact on Hospital Pharmacy Expenditures and Drug Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzette Salama

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors’ hospital embarked on a three-component, multidisciplinary, hospital-based antimicrobial use program to cut costs and reduce inappropriate antimicrobial use. Initially, antimicrobial use patterns and costs were monitored for 12 months. For the next two years, an antimicrobial use program was implemented consisting of three strategies: automatic therapeutic interchanges; antimicrobial restriction policies; and parenteral to oral conversion. The program resulted in a reduction in the antimicrobial portion of the total pharmacy drug budget from 41.6% to 28.2%. Simultaneously, the average cost per dose per patient day dropped from $11.88 in 1991 to $10.16 in 1994. Overall, mean monthly acquisition cost savings rose from $6,810 in 1992 to $27,590 in 1994. This study demonstrates that a multidisciplinary antimicrobial use program in a Canadian hospital can effect dramatic cost savings and serve as a quality assurance activity of physician antimicrobial prescribing behaviour.

  8. Breastfeeding rates and hospital breastfeeding practices in Canada: a national survey of women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Beverley; Levitt, Cheryl; Heaman, Maureen; O'Brien, Beverley; Sauve, Reg; Kaczorowski, Janusz

    2009-06-01

    The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative was launched by the World Health Organization and UNICEF in 1989 to promote, protect, and support breastfeeding worldwide. The objective of this study was to report breastfeeding rates and adherence to the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative of the World Health Organization and UNICEF in Canada, as reported by participants in the Maternity Experiences Survey of the Canadian Perinatal Surveillance System. Eligible women (n = 8,244) were identified from a randomly selected sample of infants born 3 months before the May 2006 Canadian Census, and stratified by province or territory. Birth mothers living with their infants at the time of interview were invited to participate in a computer-assisted telephone interview conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of the Public Health Agency of Canada. Interviews took approximately 45 minutes and were completed when infants were between 5 and 10 months old (between 9 and 14 months in the territories). Completed responses were obtained from 6,421 women (78% response rate). Nineteen of 309 questions concerned early mother-infant contact and breastfeeding practices. Breastfeeding intention (90.0%) and initiation (90.3%) rates were high, although exclusive breastfeeding rates at 6 months after birth (14.4%) were lower than desirable. The findings suggested a low adherence to several best practices advocated by the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. Although breastfeeding initiation rates were relatively high in Canada, exclusive breastfeeding duration fell short of globally recommended standards.

  9. Survey on hospital-acquired urinary tract infection in neurological intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Xing, Tao; Li, Junhui; He, Yingzi; Bai, Mei; Wang, Niansong

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to explore the causes, incidence, and risk factors of urinary tract infection patients in neurological intensive care unit (ICU). Patients (n = 916) admitted to the neurological ICU from January 2005 to December 2010 were retrospectively surveyed for urinary tract infections. There were 246 patients in neurological ICU who were diagnosed with hospital-acquired urinary tract infection during that period of time (26.9%). Forty-three cases were upper urinary tract infection, and 203 cases were lower urinary tract infection. The top three strains were Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Older age (UTI rate, 22.6%), female patients (21.7%), hospital stay for more than 7 days (16.7%), diabetes (11.7%), and catheterization (21.1%) were the risk factors for hospital-acquired urinary tract infection. There is a high incidence of nosocomial urinary tract infection in the neurological intensive care unit. Active prevention program and surveillance need to be carried out in neurological ICU, especially in those with risk factors.

  10. Survey Evaluation of the Indoor Environment Quality in a Large Romanian Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana CROITORU

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The medical units represent a challenge for the building services engineers who are often put in difficulty to ensure the indoor optimal conditions. The destination variety of the indoor environment in such buildings and the different internal thermal loads lead to discomfort zones, for all involved users. The requirements imposed by standards lead often to dissatisfaction for the users: while some of the medical staff asks for low temperatures, others feel discomfort and often the patients have thermoregulatory problems due to this non-homogeneity of thermal conditions found.Several sets of survey studies were made in a large emergency hospital located in Romania of 1070 beds. Medical and non-medical team participated in this study regarding the indoor quality from different work-zones of this hospital. The zones studied were: internal medicine, cardiology, gastroenterology, hematology, neurology, neurological recovery, the emergency unit, and also functional and auxiliary areas: dietetics, administrative, statistics, etc.All the queried persons had to response to a 15 minutes questionnaire, where local and global comfort questions were asked, in addition to specific characteristics like gender, age etc.The results have shown high differences from one zone to another and more of that, high differences between the categories of personnel. Uncomfortable thermal sensations, lack of fresh air and important level of polluted air, noise or lack of space are just some of the problems met in hospital environment.

  11. [Hospital organizational analysis based on the Mintzberg model: the case of Sheikh Zayed Hospital, Rabat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhloufi, Imane; Saadi, Janad; El Hiki, Lahcen; El Hassani, Amine

    2012-01-01

    The new system of hospital governance requires health institutions to develop new managerial, financial and social skills beyond their public service duties. As part of this new approach, the organizational modernization of hospitals involves introducing good management practices. However, managing the transition requires taking into account the specificities of existing organizational systems. Organizational systems are generally difficult to model and involve diverse and sometimes competing interests, concerns, habits, languages, cultures, tools and representations. This explains the high failure rate observed in hospital development projects at an organizational level. A number of organizational theories from a range of disciplines (sociology, biology, history, etc.) have examined the question of organization in hospitals. The many theories developed in this area are not incompatible. Rather, they form a set of useful tools for the analysis of organizational management. The purpose of this study was to conduct an organizational analysis of Sheikh Zayed Hospital (Rabat) based on the Mintzberg model as a prerequisite for the development and implementation of a restructuring plan.

  12. Getting satisfaction: drivers of surgical Hospital Consumer Assessment of Health care Providers and Systems survey scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannuzzi, James C; Kahn, Steven A; Zhang, Linlin; Gestring, Mark L; Noyes, Katia; Monson, John R T

    2015-07-01

    Hospital consumer assessment of health care providers and systems (HCAHPS) survey scores formally recognize that patients are central to health care, shifting quality metrics from the physician to patient perspective. This study describes clinical predictors of patient satisfaction in surgical patients. Analysis of a single institution's Surgical Department HCAHPS responses was performed from March 2011-October 2012. The end points were top box satisfaction on two global domains. Multivariable regression was used to determine satisfaction predictors including HCAHPS domains, demographics, and clinical variables such as comorbidities, intensive care unit stay, emergency case, discharge day, floor transfers, complications, and ancillary procedures. In total, 978 surveys were evaluated representing admissions to Acute care and/or Trauma (n = 177, 18.1%), Thoracic (n = 169, 17.3%), Colorectal (n = 107, 10.9%), Transplant (n = 95, 9.7%), Vascular (n = 92, 9.4%), Oncology (n = 88, 9.0%), Plastic (n = 49, 5.0%), and Cardiac (n = 201, 20.6%) divisions. Overall, 658 patients (67.3%) had high satisfaction and 733 (74.9%) gave definite hospital recommendations. Hospital satisfaction was positively associated with an intensive care unit admission (odds ratio [OR] = 1.64, confidence interval [CI]: 1.20-2.23, P = 0.002) and satisfaction with provider and pain domains. Factors associated with decreased satisfaction were race (non-black minority compared with whites; OR = 0.41, CI: 0.21-0.83, P = 0.012), self-reported poor health (OR = 0.43, CI: 0.27-0.68, P nurse-patient interactions. These results help inform future quality improvement and resource allocation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Value-based design and management of hospital buildings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Voordt, T.J.M.; Van der Zwart, J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper it to explore the concept of adding value by real estate and related performance indicators, and the way it is or could be applied in value-based design and management of buildings. The concept is being illustrated with research findings on hospital buildings, based on a

  14. Survey of pediatric MDCT radiation dose from university hospitals in Thailand. A preliminary for national dose survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritsaneepaiboon, Supika [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla Univ., Hat Yai (Thailand)], e-mail: supikak@yahoo.com; Trinavarat, Panruethai [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand); Visrutaratna, Pannee [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai Univ., Chiang Mai (Thailand)

    2012-09-15

    Background: Increasing pediatric CT usage worldwide needs the optimization of CT protocol examination. Although there are previous published dose reference level (DRL) values, the local DRLs should be established to guide for clinical practice and monitor the CT radiation. Purpose: To determine the multidetector CT (MDCT) radiation dose in children in three university hospitals in Thailand in four age groups using the CT dose index (CTDI) and dose length product (DLP). Material and Methods: A retrospective review of CT dosimetry in pediatric patients (<15 years of age) who had undergone head, chest, and abdominal MDCT in three major university hospitals in Thailand was performed. Volume CTDI (CTDIvol) and DLP were recorded, categorized into four age groups: <1 year, 1- < 5 years, 5- <10 years, and 10- <15 years in each scanner. Range, mean, and third quartile values were compared with the national reference dose levels for CT in pediatric patients from the UK and Switzerland according to International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendation. Results: Per age group, the third quartile values for brain, chest, and abdominal CTs were, respectively, in terms of CTDIvol: 25, 30, 40, and 45 mGy; 4.5, 5.7, 10, and 15.6 mGy; 8.5, 9, 14, and 17 mGy; and in terms of DLP: 400, 570, 610, and 800 mGy cm; 80, 140, 305, and 470 mGy cm; and 190, 275, 560,765 mGy cm. Conclusion: This preliminary national dose survey for pediatric CT in Thailand found that the majority of CTDIvol and DLP values in brain, chest, and abdominal CTs were still below the diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) from the UK and Switzerland regarding to ICRP recommendation.

  15. [Motivations of parents taking their children to the hospital in emergencies. Results of a psychosocial survey at the Regional University Hospital Center of Grenoble].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguet, M C; Lejosne, G; Berthier, N; Bost, M

    1988-01-01

    A psycho-social survey by questionnaire was conducted among parents accompanying their children to the Pediatric Emergency Ward of the Medical Center of Grenoble, in order to identify the motivations of those who do not seek a medical advice prior to their coming to the hospital. From this survey, several motivating factors were identified: an economical factor, the difficulty to rapidly call a physician, the place of residence, an insufficient knowledge of the medical services, the familiarity of parents with the hospital, the advice of relatives, the anxiety caused by the child's illness and the comforting image of the hospital. In a synthetic analysis, several types of parents are distinguished according to their behavior.

  16. A nationwide hospital survey on patient safety culture in Belgian hospitals: setting priorities at the launch of a 5-year patient safety plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlayen, Annemie; Hellings, Johan; Claes, Neree; Peleman, Hilde; Schrooten, Ward

    2012-09-01

    To measure patient safety culture in Belgian hospitals and to examine the homogeneous grouping of underlying safety culture dimensions. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was distributed organisation-wide in 180 Belgian hospitals participating in the federal program on quality and safety between 2007 and 2009. Participating hospitals were invited to submit their data to a comparative database. Homogeneous groups of underlying safety culture dimensions were sought by hierarchical cluster analysis. 90 acute, 42 psychiatric and 11 long-term care hospitals submitted their data for comparison to other hospitals. The benchmark database included 55 225 completed questionnaires (53.7% response rate). Overall dimensional scores were low, although scores were found to be higher for psychiatric and long-term care hospitals than for acute hospitals. The overall perception of patient safety was lower in French-speaking hospitals. Hierarchical clustering of dimensions resulted in two distinct clusters. Cluster I grouped supervisor/manager expectations and actions promoting safety, organisational learning-continuous improvement, teamwork within units and communication openness, while Cluster II included feedback and communication about error, overall perceptions of patient safety, non-punitive response to error, frequency of events reported, teamwork across units, handoffs and transitions, staffing and management support for patient safety. The nationwide safety culture assessment confirms the need for a long-term national initiative to improve patient safety culture and provides each hospital with a baseline patient safety culture profile to direct an intervention plan. The identification of clusters of safety culture dimensions indicates the need for a different approach and context towards the implementation of interventions aimed at improving the safety culture. Certain clusters require unit level improvements, whereas others demand a hospital-wide policy.

  17. Physical Violence against General Practitioners and Nurses in Chinese Township Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Kai; Jiao, Mingli; Ma, Hongkun; Qiao, Hong; Hao, Yanhua; Li, Ye; Gao, Lijun; Sun, Hong; Kang, Zheng; Liang, Libo; Wu, Qunhong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to identify risk factors of physical violence in Chinese township hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional survey was used in a sample of 442 general practitioners and 398 general nurses from 90 township hospitals located in Heilongjiang province, China (response rate = 84.8%). Results A total of 106 of the 840 (12.6%) respondents reported being physically attacked in their workplace in the previous 12 months. Most perpetrators were the patients’ relatives (62.3%), followed by the patient (22.6%); 73.6% of perpetrators were aged between 20 and 40 years. Of the physical violence incidents, about 56.6% (n = 60) resulted in a physical injury, and 45.4% of respondents took two or three days of sick leave. Reporting workplace violence in hospitals to superiors or authorities was low (9.4%). Most respondents (62.8%) did not receive training on how to avoid workplace violence. Logistic regression analyses indicated that general nurses, aged 35 years or younger, and with a higher-level professional title were more likely to experience physical violence. Healthcare workers with direct physical contact (washing, turning, lifting) with patients had a higher risk of physical violence compared to other health care workers. Procedures for reporting workplace violence were a protective factor for physical violence; when in place, reporting after psychological violence (verbal abuse, bullying/mobbing, harassment, and threats) was more protective than waiting until an instance of physical violence (beating, kicking, slapping, stabbing, etc.). Conclusions Physical violence in Chinese township hospitals is an occupational hazard of rural public health concern. Policies, procedures, and intervention strategies should be undertaken to manage this issue. PMID:26571388

  18. Physical Violence against General Practitioners and Nurses in Chinese Township Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Xing

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to identify risk factors of physical violence in Chinese township hospitals.A cross-sectional survey was used in a sample of 442 general practitioners and 398 general nurses from 90 township hospitals located in Heilongjiang province, China (response rate = 84.8%.A total of 106 of the 840 (12.6% respondents reported being physically attacked in their workplace in the previous 12 months. Most perpetrators were the patients' relatives (62.3%, followed by the patient (22.6%; 73.6% of perpetrators were aged between 20 and 40 years. Of the physical violence incidents, about 56.6% (n = 60 resulted in a physical injury, and 45.4% of respondents took two or three days of sick leave. Reporting workplace violence in hospitals to superiors or authorities was low (9.4%. Most respondents (62.8% did not receive training on how to avoid workplace violence. Logistic regression analyses indicated that general nurses, aged 35 years or younger, and with a higher-level professional title were more likely to experience physical violence. Healthcare workers with direct physical contact (washing, turning, lifting with patients had a higher risk of physical violence compared to other health care workers. Procedures for reporting workplace violence were a protective factor for physical violence; when in place, reporting after psychological violence (verbal abuse, bullying/mobbing, harassment, and threats was more protective than waiting until an instance of physical violence (beating, kicking, slapping, stabbing, etc..Physical violence in Chinese township hospitals is an occupational hazard of rural public health concern. Policies, procedures, and intervention strategies should be undertaken to manage this issue.

  19. Managerial competencies of hospital managers in South Africa: a survey of managers in the public and private sectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillay Rubin

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background South Africa has large public and private sectors and there is a common perception that public sector hospitals are inefficient and ineffective while the privately owned and managed hospitals provide superior care and are more sustainable. The underlying assumption is that there is a potential gap in management capacity between the two sectors. This study aims to ascertain the skills and competency levels of hospital managers in South Africa and to determine whether there are any significant differences in competency levels between managers in the different sectors. Methods A survey using a self administered questionnaire was conducted among hospital managers in South Africa. Respondents were asked to rate their proficiency with seven key functions that they perform. These included delivery of health care, planning, organizing, leading, controlling, legal and ethical, and self-management. Ratings were based on a five point Likert scale ranging from very low skill level to very high skill level. Results The results show that managers in the private sector perceived themselves to be significantly more competent than their public sector colleagues in most of the management facets. Public sector managers were also more likely than their private sector colleagues to report that they required further development and training. Conclusion The findings confirm our supposition that there is a lack of management capacity within the public sector in South Africa and that there is a significant gap between private and public sectors. It provides evidence that there is a great need for further development of managers, especially those in the public sector. The onus is therefore on administrators and those responsible for management education and training to identify managers in need of development and to make available training that is contextually relevant in terms of design and delivery.

  20. Managerial competencies of hospital managers in South Africa: a survey of managers in the public and private sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Rubin

    2008-01-01

    Background South Africa has large public and private sectors and there is a common perception that public sector hospitals are inefficient and ineffective while the privately owned and managed hospitals provide superior care and are more sustainable. The underlying assumption is that there is a potential gap in management capacity between the two sectors. This study aims to ascertain the skills and competency levels of hospital managers in South Africa and to determine whether there are any significant differences in competency levels between managers in the different sectors. Methods A survey using a self administered questionnaire was conducted among hospital managers in South Africa. Respondents were asked to rate their proficiency with seven key functions that they perform. These included delivery of health care, planning, organizing, leading, controlling, legal and ethical, and self-management. Ratings were based on a five point Likert scale ranging from very low skill level to very high skill level. Results The results show that managers in the private sector perceived themselves to be significantly more competent than their public sector colleagues in most of the management facets. Public sector managers were also more likely than their private sector colleagues to report that they required further development and training. Conclusion The findings confirm our supposition that there is a lack of management capacity within the public sector in South Africa and that there is a significant gap between private and public sectors. It provides evidence that there is a great need for further development of managers, especially those in the public sector. The onus is therefore on administrators and those responsible for management education and training to identify managers in need of development and to make available training that is contextually relevant in terms of design and delivery. PMID:18257936

  1. Health-promoting organization and organizational effectiveness of health promotion in hospitals: a national cross-sectional survey in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yea-Wen; Lin, Yueh-Ysen

    2011-09-01

    To assess the organizational health-promotion (HP) status and its effect on the organizational effectiveness of HP in a national cross-sectional survey of all hospitals above the local community hospital level in Taiwan's hospitals, questionnaires were sent to 474 hospitals, of which 162 (34.18%) hospitals returned them and were rendered valid. The results of the organizational HP status reveal that the standardized overall score achieved is 76.26, suggesting that there is considerable room for improvement. The results of correlation analysis partially support the proposition of this study, suggesting that the higher the organizational HP status, the better the self-evaluated overall organizational and administrative effectiveness of its HP. When hierarchical multiple regression was performed, support for ownership (private hospitals), hospital accreditation grades (academic medical centers) and overall score of the Organizational Health of Hospital Assessment Scale were significant predicators of self-evaluated overall organizational effectiveness (F = 11.097, p organizational effectiveness. The results contribute to clarify the conception of health-promoting hospital organizations and to identify a number of dimensions of health-promoting organizations related to the organizational effectiveness of HP in hospitals, which could allow hospitals to establish a healthier organization and more effective HP programs. This study also supplies the research field with important data and insights that can be used in future research.

  2. A Survey of Grid Based Clustering Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR ILANGO

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Cluster Analysis, an automatic process to find similar objects from a database, is a fundamental operation in data mining. A cluster is a collection of data objects that are similar to one another within the same cluster and are dissimilar to the objects in other clusters. Clustering techniques have been discussed extensively in SimilaritySearch, Segmentation, Statistics, Machine Learning, Trend Analysis, Pattern Recognition and Classification [1]. Clustering methods can be classified into i Partitioning methods ii Hierarchical methods iii Density-based methods iv Grid-based methods v Model-based methods. Grid based methods quantize the object space into a finite number of cells (hyper-rectangles and then perform the required operations on the quantized space. The main advantage of Grid based method is its fast processing time which depends on number of cells in each dimension in quantized space. In this research paper, we present some of the grid based methods such as CLIQUE (CLustering In QUEst [2], STING (STatistical INformation Grid [3], MAFIA (Merging of Adaptive Intervals Approach to Spatial Data Mining [4], Wave Cluster [5]and O-CLUSTER (Orthogonal partitioning CLUSTERing [6], as a survey andalso compare their effectiveness in clustering data objects. We also present some of the latest developments in Grid Based methods such as Axis Shifted Grid Clustering Algorithm [7] and Adaptive Mesh Refinement [Wei-Keng Liao etc] [8] to improve the processing time of objects.

  3. A Web-Based Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT) to Assess Patient Perception in Hospitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Tsair-Wei; Wang, Wen-Chung; Huang, Sheng-Yun; Lai, Wen-Pin

    2011-01-01

    Background Many hospitals have adopted mobile nursing carts that can be easily rolled up to a patient’s bedside to access charts and help nurses perform their rounds. However, few papers have reported data regarding the use of wireless computers on wheels (COW) at patients’ bedsides to collect questionnaire-based information of their perception of hospitalization on discharge from the hospital. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative efficiency of computerized adaptive testing (CAT) and the precision of CAT-based measures of perceptions of hospitalized patients, as compared with those of nonadaptive testing (NAT). An Excel module of our CAT multicategory assessment is provided as an example. Method A total of 200 patients who were discharged from the hospital responded to the CAT-based 18-item inpatient perception questionnaire on COW. The numbers of question administrated were recorded and the responses were calibrated using the Rasch model. They were compared with those from NAT to show the advantage of CAT over NAT. Results Patient measures derived from CAT and NAT were highly correlated (r = 0.98) and their measurement precisions were not statistically different (P = .14). CAT required fewer questions than NAT (an efficiency gain of 42%), suggesting a reduced burden for patients. There were no significant differences between groups in terms of gender and other demographic characteristics. Conclusions CAT-based administration of surveys of patient perception substantially reduced patient burden without compromising the precision of measuring patients’ perceptions of hospitalization. The Excel module of animation-CAT on the wireless COW that we developed is recommended for use in hospitals. PMID:21844001

  4. [Nationwide survey of the use of class 2 infectious disease beds for in-hospital care of tuberculosis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kunihiko; Nagata, Yohko; Urakawa, Minako; Kato, Seiya

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the possibility of employing in-hospital care for tuberculosis (TB) patients in beds meant for patients with Class 2 infectious diseases and determine the obstacles facing the same. We conducted a questionnaire survey of all 225 hospitals that had beds meant for patients with Class 2 infectious disease but did not have tuberculosis wards. Responses were obtained from 83.1% of the targeted hospitals. Around 60% of the hospitals had used these beds for patients other than those with Class 2 infectious disease (including TB patients). Around 50% and 30% of the hospitals had used these beds for suspected TB patients to ensure hospital infection control, and for treatment of patients diagnosed with TB, respectively. In response to the question on how they would use these hospital beds for TB or suspected TB patients if the regulations allowed such use, around 60% of the hospitals answered that the beds will be used for suspected TB patients until their diagnosis was confirmed, and 25% of the hospitals responded that they will never use their beds for TB patients. Only 10% of the hospitals answered that the beds will be used for in-hospital care of TB patients. With regard to the reasons why the beds cannot be easily used for in-hospital care of TB patients, several issues were pointed out, such as difficulty in appointing sufficient staff for care of TB patients, and a lack of doctors who had sufficient experience in TB medicine. However, there was no single predominant reason. To ensure that hospital beds for patients with Class 2 infectious diseases are utilized for in-hospital TB care, we need a flexible policy, which is suited to the specific conditions in each community and hospital.

  5. Evaluating Hospital-Based Surveillance for Outbreak Detection in Bangladesh: Analysis of Healthcare Utilization Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolay, Birgit; Salje, Henrik; Sturm-Ramirez, Katharine; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Homaira, Nusrat; Iuliano, A. Danielle; Paul, Repon C.; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Cauchemez, Simon; Gurley, Emily S.

    2017-01-01

    Background The International Health Regulations outline core requirements to ensure the detection of public health threats of international concern. Assessing the capacity of surveillance systems to detect these threats is crucial for evaluating a country’s ability to meet these requirements. Methods and Findings We propose a framework to evaluate the sensitivity and representativeness of hospital-based surveillance and apply it to severe neurological infectious diseases and fatal respiratory infectious diseases in Bangladesh. We identified cases in selected communities within surveillance hospital catchment areas using key informant and house-to-house surveys and ascertained where cases had sought care. We estimated the probability of surveillance detecting different sized outbreaks by distance from the surveillance hospital and compared characteristics of cases identified in the community and cases attending surveillance hospitals. We estimated that surveillance detected 26% (95% CI 18%–33%) of severe neurological disease cases and 18% (95% CI 16%–21%) of fatal respiratory disease cases residing at 10 km distance from a surveillance hospital. Detection probabilities decreased markedly with distance. The probability of detecting small outbreaks (three cases) dropped below 50% at distances greater than 26 km for severe neurological disease and at distances greater than 7 km for fatal respiratory disease. Characteristics of cases attending surveillance hospitals were largely representative of all cases; however, neurological disease cases aged <5 y or from the lowest socioeconomic group and fatal respiratory disease cases aged ≥60 y were underrepresented. Our estimates of outbreak detection rely on suspected cases that attend a surveillance hospital receiving laboratory confirmation of disease and being reported to the surveillance system. The extent to which this occurs will depend on disease characteristics (e.g., severity and symptom specificity) and

  6. Nurses and opioids: results of a bi-national survey on mental models regarding opioid administration in hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guest C

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Charlotte Guest,1 Fabian Sobotka,2 Athina Karavasopoulou,3 Stephen Ward,3 Carsten Bantel4,5 1Pain Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 2Division of Epidemiology and Biometry, Department of Health Services Research, Faculty 6, Medicine and Health Sciences, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany; 3Pain Service, Barts Health, St Bartholomew’s Hospital, London, UK; 4Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Pain Therapy, Oldenburg University, Klinikum Oldenburg Campus, Oldenburg, Germany; 5Department of Surgery and Cancer, Anaesthetics Section, Imperial College London, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital Campus, London, UK Objective: Pain remains insufficiently treated in hospitals. Increasing evidence suggests human factors contribute to this, due to nurses failing to administer opioids. This behavior might be the consequence of nurses’ mental models about opioids. As personal experience and conceptions shape these models, the aim of this prospective survey was to identify model-influencing factors. Material and methods: A questionnaire was developed comprising of 14 statements concerning ideations about opioids and seven questions concerning demographics, indicators of adult learning, and strength of religious beliefs. Latent variables that may underlie nurses’ mental models were identified using undirected graphical dependence models. Representative items of latent variables were employed for ordinal regression analysis. Questionnaires were distributed to 1,379 nurses in two London, UK, hospitals (n=580 and one German (n=799 hospital between September 2014 and February 2015. Results: A total of 511 (37.1% questionnaires were returned. Mean (standard deviation age of participants were 37 (11 years; 83.5% participants were female; 45.2% worked in critical care; and 51.5% had more than 10 years experience. Of the nurses, 84% were not scared of opioids, 87

  7. Trauma-informed care for children in the ambulance: international survey among pre-hospital providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisic, Eva; Tyler, Mark P; Giummarra, Melita J; Kassam-Adams, Rahim; Gouweloos, Juul; Landolt, Markus A; Kassam-Adams, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pre-hospital providers, such as paramedics and emergency medical technicians, are in a position to provide key emotional support to injured children and their families. Objective: Our goal was to examine (a) pre-hospital providers' knowledge of traumatic stress in children, attitudes towards psychosocial aspects of care, and confidence in providing psychosocial care, (b) variations in knowledge, attitudes, and confidence according to demographic and professional characteristics, and (c) training preferences of pre-hospital providers regarding psychosocial care to support paediatric patients and their families. Method: We conducted a cross-sectional, online survey among an international sample of 812 pre-hospital providers from high-income countries. The questionnaire was adapted from a measure for a similar study among Emergency Department staff, and involved 62 items in 7 main categories (e.g. personal and work characteristics, knowledge of paediatric traumatic stress, and confidence regarding 18 elements of psychosocial care). The main analyses comprised descriptive statistics and multiple regression analyses. Results: On average, respondents answered 2.7 (SD = 1.59) out of seven knowledge questions correctly. Respondents with higher knowledge scores were more often female, parent of a child under 17, and reported that at least 10% of their patients were children. A majority of participants (83.5%) saw all 18 aspects of psychosocial care as part of their job. Providers felt moderately confident (M = 3.2, SD = 0.45) regarding their skills in psychosocial care, which was predicted by gender (female), having more experience, having a larger proportion of child patients, and having received training in psychosocial care in the past five years. Most respondents (89.7%) wanted to gain more knowledge and skills regarding psychosocial care for injured children. In terms of training format, they preferred an interactive website or a one-off group

  8. Trauma-informed care for children in the ambulance: international survey among pre-hospital providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisic, Eva; Tyler, Mark P.; Giummarra, Melita J.; Kassam-Adams, Rahim; Gouweloos, Juul; Landolt, Markus A.; Kassam-Adams, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Pre-hospital providers, such as paramedics and emergency medical technicians, are in a position to provide key emotional support to injured children and their families. Objective: Our goal was to examine (a) pre-hospital providers’ knowledge of traumatic stress in children, attitudes towards psychosocial aspects of care, and confidence in providing psychosocial care, (b) variations in knowledge, attitudes, and confidence according to demographic and professional characteristics, and (c) training preferences of pre-hospital providers regarding psychosocial care to support paediatric patients and their families. Method: We conducted a cross-sectional, online survey among an international sample of 812 pre-hospital providers from high-income countries. The questionnaire was adapted from a measure for a similar study among Emergency Department staff, and involved 62 items in 7 main categories (e.g. personal and work characteristics, knowledge of paediatric traumatic stress, and confidence regarding 18 elements of psychosocial care). The main analyses comprised descriptive statistics and multiple regression analyses. Results: On average, respondents answered 2.7 (SD = 1.59) out of seven knowledge questions correctly. Respondents with higher knowledge scores were more often female, parent of a child under 17, and reported that at least 10% of their patients were children. A majority of participants (83.5%) saw all 18 aspects of psychosocial care as part of their job. Providers felt moderately confident (M = 3.2, SD = 0.45) regarding their skills in psychosocial care, which was predicted by gender (female), having more experience, having a larger proportion of child patients, and having received training in psychosocial care in the past five years. Most respondents (89.7%) wanted to gain more knowledge and skills regarding psychosocial care for injured children. In terms of training format, they preferred an interactive website or a one

  9. Survey of the major sources of waste in the health care units of a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho, Valéria; Castro, Liliana Cristina de; Couto, Andréa Tamancoldi; Maia, Flávia de Oliveira Motta; Sasaki, Nair Yoko; Nomura, Felicía Hiromi; Lima, Antonio Fernandes Costa; Mira, Vera Lúcia; Loyolla, Paula Manzatti

    2011-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to survey the different types of waste, their causes and suggestions to eliminate them according to the opinion of the nursing and medical staff from the Clinical Medicine, Surgery, Pediatrics, Rooming-In, and Nursery Units; and estimate the cost of the major source of waste found in the referred units. This descriptive, explorative study was performed at the University of São Paulo Teaching Hospital using a quantitative approach. The study sample consisted of 189 medical and nursing professionals. Material waste (36%) was the most often reported by all professional categories, followed by physical structure waste (27%). The most reported wasted materials were medicines, dressing packs, stationary paper, and infusion devices The estimated annual cost of material waste in the studied units is about R$ 479.262,86.

  10. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Helena; Hallström, Inger; Kjaergaard, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    Hospital-based home care (HBHC) is widely applied in Pediatric Oncology. We reviewed the potential effect of HBHC on children's physical health and risk of adverse events, parental and child satisfaction, quality of life of children and their parents, and costs. A search of PubMed, CINAHL...... for children with cancer....

  11. Evaluation of Viewpoints of Health Care Professionals on the Role of Ethics Committees and Hospitals in the Resolution of Clinical Ethical Dilemmas Based on Practice Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Brian S; Carlson, Jestin N; Hegde, Gajanan G; Shang, Jennifer; Venkat, Arvind

    2016-03-01

    We sought to evaluate whether health care professionals' viewpoints differed on the role of ethics committees and hospitals in the resolution of clinical ethical dilemmas based on practice location. We conducted a survey study from December 21, 2013 to March 15, 2014 of health care professionals at six hospitals (one tertiary care academic medical center, three large community hospitals and two small community hospitals). The survey consisted of eight clinical ethics cases followed by statements on whether there was a role for the ethics committee or hospital in their resolution, what that role might be and case specific queries. Respondents used a 5-point Likert scale to express their degree of agreement with the premises posed. We used the ANOVA test to evaluate whether respondent views significantly varied based on practice location. 240 health care professionals (108-tertiary care center, 92-large community hospitals, 40-small community hospitals) completed the survey (response rate: 63.6 %). Only three individual queries of 32 showed any significant response variations across practice locations. Overall, viewpoints did not vary across practice locations within question categories on whether the ethics committee or hospital had a role in case resolution, what that role might be and case specific queries. In this multicenter survey study, the viewpoints of health care professionals on the role of ethics committees or hospitals in the resolution of clinical ethics cases varied little based on practice location.

  12. Individual and institutional determinants of caesarean section in referral hospitals in Senegal and Mali: a cross-sectional epidemiological survey

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Two years after implementing the free-CS policy, we assessed the non-financial factors associated with caesarean section (CS) in women managed by referral hospitals in Senegal and Mali. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey nested in a cluster trial (QUARITE trial) in 41 referral hospitals in Senegal and Mali (10/01/2007–10/01/2008). Data were collected regarding women’s characteristics and on available institutional resources. Individual and institutional factors ...

  13. Hospital-acquired infection rate in a tertiary care teaching hospital in China: a cross-sectional survey involving 2434 inpatients

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    Xiu-Bin Tao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A single-day hospital-acquired infections (HAIs point prevalence study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital in China. The overall prevalence rate of HAIs was 3.53% (95% confidence interval 2.80–4.26% among 2434 inpatients surveyed. Respiratory system infection was the most common type of HAI (49.43%, followed by surgical site infection (22.99%. The pathogen detection results for 50 patients showed Pseudomonas aeruginosa to account for 24.00% of isolates, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.00% and Escherichia coli (14.00%.

  14. Determining Family Needs on an Oncology Hospital Unit Using Interview, Art, and Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlin, Anita; Ford, Marilee; Maloney, Carrie

    2016-04-01

    A movement worldwide, and specifically new to our hospital, is the implementation of Patient- and Family-Centered Care. We were unsure, however, what the needs were of our patients' families. This triangulated study, on a 28-bed oncology unit, studied family members at the bedside. We asked family members what their needs were in a three-step process (open-ended interview, use of the Draw a Bridge art therapy technique, and the Family Inventory of Needs survey). Nineteen interviews revealed needs for physical comfort, emotional support, cultural sensitivity, recognition of help provided by family members and improved pain management. Art therapy revealed the stress of caregiving and helped to uncover unmet needs for interviewers to explore. The FIN identified that care at home after discharge was a major worry. Knowledge of family members' needs while a loved one is in the hospital allows for planning and provision of modalities to assist them in their caregiving. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Influenza pandemic and professional duty: family or patients first? A survey of hospital employees

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    Hanses Frank

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conflicts between professional duties and fear of influenza transmission to family members may arise among health care professionals (HCP. Methods We surveyed employees at our university hospital regarding ethical issues arising during the management of an influenza pandemic. Results Of 644 respondents, 182 (28% agreed that it would be professionally acceptable for HCP to abandon their workplace during a pandemic in order to protect themselves and their families, 337 (52% disagreed with this statement and 125 (19% had no opinion, with a higher rate of disagreement among physicians (65% and nurses (54% compared with administrators (32%. Of all respondents, 375 (58% did not believe that the decision to report to work during a pandemic should be left to the individual HCP and 496 (77% disagreed with the statement that HCP should be permanently dismissed for not reporting to work during a pandemic. Only 136 (21% respondents agreed that HCW without children should primarily care for the influenza patients. Conclusion Our results suggest that a modest majority of HCP, but only a minority of hospital administrators, recognises the obligation to treat patients despite the potential risks. Professional ethical guidelines allowing for balancing the needs of society with personal risks are needed to help HCP fulfil their duties in the case of a pandemic influenza.

  16. Influenza pandemic and professional duty: family or patients first? A survey of hospital employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenstein, Boris P; Hanses, Frank; Salzberger, Bernd

    2006-12-28

    Conflicts between professional duties and fear of influenza transmission to family members may arise among health care professionals (HCP). We surveyed employees at our university hospital regarding ethical issues arising during the management of an influenza pandemic. Of 644 respondents, 182 (28%) agreed that it would be professionally acceptable for HCP to abandon their workplace during a pandemic in order to protect themselves and their families, 337 (52%) disagreed with this statement and 125 (19%) had no opinion, with a higher rate of disagreement among physicians (65%) and nurses (54%) compared with administrators (32%). Of all respondents, 375 (58%) did not believe that the decision to report to work during a pandemic should be left to the individual HCP and 496 (77%) disagreed with the statement that HCP should be permanently dismissed for not reporting to work during a pandemic. Only 136 (21%) respondents agreed that HCW without children should primarily care for the influenza patients. Our results suggest that a modest majority of HCP, but only a minority of hospital administrators, recognises the obligation to treat patients despite the potential risks. Professional ethical guidelines allowing for balancing the needs of society with personal risks are needed to help HCP fulfil their duties in the case of a pandemic influenza.

  17. hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of congenital orthopaedic malformations in an African teaching hospital ... malformation in this environment while congenital hip dislocation (CDH) is rare when .... malformations of radial dysplasia and other congenital malformations.

  18. Animal-assisted interventions: A national survey of health and safety policies in hospitals, eldercare facilities, and therapy animal organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Deborah E; Siebens, Hannah C; Mueller, Megan K; Gibbs, Debra M; Freeman, Lisa M

    2017-08-01

    Animal-assisted intervention (AAI) programs are increasing in popularity, but it is unknown to what extent therapy animal organizations that provide AAI and the hospitals and eldercare facilities they work with implement effective animal health and safety policies to ensure safety of both animals and humans. Our study objective was to survey hospitals, eldercare facilities, and therapy animal organizations on their AAI policies and procedures. A survey of United States hospitals, eldercare facilities, and therapy animal organizations was administered to assess existing health and safety policies related to AAI programs. Forty-five eldercare facilities, 45 hospitals, and 27 therapy animal organizations were surveyed. Health and safety policies varied widely and potentially compromised human and animal safety. For example, 70% of therapy animal organizations potentially put patients at risk by allowing therapy animals eating raw meat diets to visit facilities. In general, hospitals had stricter requirements than eldercare facilities. This information suggests that there are gaps between the policies of facilities and therapy animal organizations compared with recent guidelines for animal visitation in hospitals. Facilities with AAI programs need to review their policies to address recent AAI guidelines to ensure the safety of animals and humans involved. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Factors associated with postpartum hemorrhage maternal death in referral hospitals in Senegal and Mali: a cross-sectional epidemiological survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tort, Julie; Rozenberg, Patrick; Traoré, Mamadou; Fournier, Pierre; Dumont, Alexandre

    2015-09-30

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is the leading cause of maternal mortality in Sub-Saharan-Africa (SSA). Although clinical guidelines treating PPH are available, their implementation remains a great challenge in resource poor settings. A better understanding of the factors associated with PPH maternal mortality is critical for preventing risk of hospital-based maternal death. The purpose of this study was thus to assess which factors contribute to maternal death occurring during PPH. The factors were as follows: women's characteristics, aspects of pregnancy and delivery; components of PPH management; and organizational characteristics of the referral hospitals in Senegal and Mali. A cross-sectional survey nested in a cluster randomized trial (QUARITE trial) was carried out in 46 referral hospitals during the pre-intervention period from October 2007 to September 2008 in Senegal and Mali. Individual and hospital characteristics data were collected through standardized questionnaires. A multivariable logistic mixed model was used to identify the factors that were significantly associated with PPH maternal death. Among the 3,278 women who experienced PPH, 178 (5.4%) of them died before hospital discharge. The factors that were significantly associated with PPH maternal mortality were: age over 35 years (adjusted OR = 2.16 [1.26-3.72]), living in Mali (adjusted OR = 1.84 [1.13-3.00]), residing outside the region location of the hospital (adjusted OR = 2.43 [1.29-4.56]), pre-existing chronic disease before pregnancy (adjusted OR = 7.54 [2.54-22.44]), prepartum severe anemia (adjusted OR = 6.65 [3.77-11.74]), forceps or vacuum delivery (adjusted OR = 2.63 [1.19-5.81]), birth weight greater than 4000 grs (adjusted OR = 2.54 [1.26-5.10]), transfusion (adjusted OR = 2.17 [1.53-3.09]), transfer to another hospital (adjusted OR = 13.35 [6.20-28.76]). There was a smaller risk of PPH maternal death in hospitals with gynecologist

  20. Problem based Learning in surveying Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    The challenge of the future will be that the only constant is change. Therefore, the educational base must be flexible. The graduates must possess skills to adapt to a rapidly changing labour market and they must possess skills to deal with even the unknown problems of the future. The point is......, that professional and technical skills can be acquired and updated at a later stage in ones career while skills for problem-solving and skills for learning to learn can only be achieved through the process of academic training at he universities. The concept of project-organised education provides just...... that opportunity. The basis principles of this educational model are presented using the surveying programme at Aalborg University as an example....

  1. Clostridium difficile infection in Europe: a hospital-based survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Martijn P; Notermans, Daan W; van Benthem, Birgit H B;

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the extent of Clostridium difficile infection in Europe. Our aim was to obtain a more complete overview of C difficile infection in Europe and build capacity for diagnosis and surveillance....

  2. Assessment of surveys for the management of hospital clinical pharmacy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čufar, Andreja; Mrhar, Aleš; Robnik-Šikonja, Marko

    2015-06-01

    Survey data sets are important sources of data, and their successful exploitation is of key importance for informed policy decision-making. We present how a survey analysis approach initially developed for customer satisfaction research in marketing can be adapted for an introduction of clinical pharmacy services into a hospital. We use a data mining analytical approach to extract relevant managerial consequences. We evaluate the importance of competences for users of a clinical pharmacy with the OrdEval algorithm and determine their nature according to the users' expectations. For this, we need substantially fewer questions than are required by the Kano approach. From 52 clinical pharmacy activities we were able to identify seven activities with a substantial negative impact (i.e., negative reinforcement) on the overall satisfaction of clinical pharmacy services, and two activities with a strong positive impact (upward reinforcement). Using analysis of individual feature values, we identified six performance, 10 excitement, and one basic clinical pharmacists' activity. We show how the OrdEval algorithm can exploit the information hidden in the ordering of class and attribute values, and their inherent correlation using a small sample of highly relevant respondents. The visualization of the outputs turns out highly useful in our clinical pharmacy research case study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Justification in clinical radiological practice: a survey among staff of five London hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutalonis, M; Horrocks, J

    2012-04-01

    This study represents a survey performed among staff who, according to the Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposures) Regulations of 2000 (IRMER), are responsible for justifying radiological examinations in the UK. The aim of the survey is to map the current situation regarding knowledge of risks from X-ray exposures and the criteria used for their justification. An anonymous electronic questionnaire was emailed to 219 radiologists and radiographers of five National Health Service hospitals. The questions were designed to investigate the way the sample group defines/assesses risk and benefit when justifying medical exposures, and to test their knowledge on radiation doses, risk communication, and on relevant national legislation. The majority of the respondents are aware of the relevant legislation/guidelines. Patient's medical condition, age and sex, and alternative techniques using less or no ionising radiation are the main criteria used for justification. However, when estimating the effective dose of various examinations in chest radiograph equivalents, the majority of the responses were incorrect. Although there is good knowledge of legislation around justification of medical exposures, there seems to be a lack of knowledge on radiation doses and risks among IRMER practitioners.

  4. A Survey of Job Satisfaction among Health Sector Staff of Tabriz Taleghani Educational Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Rastgar-Farajzadeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : Job satisfaction is one of the most important variables in organizational behavior and the key variable in organizational researches and theories as well. The aim of present investigation was to determine the level of job satisfaction among health sector staff of Tabriz Taleghani Educational Hospital. Material and Methods : This cross-sectional study was performed in 2014. Health sector staffs of Taleghani Educational Hospital were studied through census method. Data collection tool was a questionnaire based on previous studies and consisted of 3 parts: demographic information (7 items, job satisfaction (21 questions and factors related to employee dissatisfaction (10 items. After collecting and entering data into IBM SPSS software, independent t tests, chi-square and ANOVA were applied. Results : The highest level of job satisfaction was in the field of relationship with colleagues and lowest level of job satisfaction was related to salary and benefits. The most common cause of employee dissatisfaction was pressure and stressful working environment and the least cause was the improper distribution of employees based on workload . Conclusion : According to the findings, the majority of job satisfaction among staff was at low and medium-level. Since job satisfaction is an important factor in the performance and quality of services provided by the hospital staff, it is recommended that managers and officials pay attention to defects and shortcomings and remove barriers.

  5. [Occupational and environmental cancer in southern Sardinia: a survey on ten years of hospitalizations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argiolas, F; Marras, V; Porcu, S; Senis, G; Saderi, L; Spada, L; Santus, S; Coppola, R C; Cocco, P; Campagna, M; Steri, G

    2012-01-01

    Based on hospital discharges in 1001-2010, we calculated risk of tumours with an elevated occupational and environmental etiological fraction by health district of residence within the Local Health Unit (LHU) N. 8 of Sardinia. With reference to the age and gender-specific hospitalization rates of the whole LHU, residents in the urban Cagliari health district showed an excess risk of haemolymphopoietic cancer (RR = 1.07; 95% CI 1.03-1.12) and bladder cancer (RR = 1.10; 95% CI 1.05-1.16); in both instances, risks were higher among female residents. The highest excess risk for lung cancer was observed among residents in the Quartu-Parteolla health district (RR = 1.13; 95% CI 1.05-1.21), and it was slightly higher among male residents. The results appear to confirm the role of urban factors in increasing cancer risk.

  6. Survey study: The antibacterial drugs used for treatment of the animals in the teaching veterinary hospital in Kirkuk province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.J. Mousa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this survey is to collect data relating to antibacterial drugs used to treat different animals in the veterinary teaching hospital in the province of Kirkuk, which is taking place for the first time at the province level for the purpose of knowing the types of drugs most commonly used and the outcome whether these drugs used are optimal. Data were collected from the veterinary teaching hospital in Kirkuk province for 6 consecutive months and for the period between 1/7/2016 and until 1/1/2017 period included both the summer and autumn and winter seasons. The results show that the most commonly used drugs were Oxytetracycline, Oxytetracycline, Doxycycline-Colistin compound by 26, 57 and 36% in cattle, sheep-goats and Poultry, respectively. While the least commonly used drugs were Tylosin, Gentamicin and Gentamicin-Tylosin compound by 10, 5 and 4% in cattle, sheep-goats and poultry, respectively. Based on the results obtained from this survey, we recommend the use of Penicillin-Streptomycin compound because it has a synergistic effect against most of the resistant bacteria and not to increase usage of Oxytetracycline because of its side effects and lack of effectiveness in recent times due to the abundance of resistant germs. Also, using antibacterial drugs, we would like to note the need for optimal scientific use of these drugs and to give attention to the period in which it takes the medicine to withdraw from the animal body before milking animals or slaughtering it, so that the bacterial resistance does not develop against these drugs in the future.

  7. Students’ perceptions of the instructional quality of district hospital-based training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Shehla Jabbar; Louw, Jakobus Murray; Hugo, Jannie; Rauf, Waqar-un Nisa; Sandars, John Edward

    2016-01-01

    Background An innovative, three-year training programme, the Bachelor of Clinical Medical Practice (BCMP), for mid-level medical healthcare workers was started in 2009 by the Department of Family Medicine, University of Pretoria. Aim To measure the students’ perceptions of the instructional quality of district hospital-based training. Setting Training of students took place at clinical learning centres in rural district hospitals in the Mpumalanga and Gauteng provinces. Methods A survey using the MedEd IQ questionnaire was performed in 2010 and 2011 to measure BCMP second- and third-year students’ perceptions of instructional quality of district hospital-based training. The MedEd IQ questionnaire is composed of four subscales: preceptor activities, learning opportunities, learner involvement and the learning environment. Composite scores of instructional quality were used to present results. Results The preceptor activities, learning opportunities and the learning environment were considered by second- and third-year BCMP students to be of consistently high instructional quality. In the area of learner involvement, instructional quality increased significantly from second to third year. Conclusion Overall, instructional quality of district hospital-based training was high for both second- and third-year BCMP students, and the instructional quality of learner involvement being significantly higher in third year students. The MedEd IQ tool was a useful tool for measuring instructional quality and to inform programme quality improvement. PMID:27543282

  8. The Psychometric Properties of the Farsi Version of “Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture” In Iran’s Hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Ghiasvand, H; A Rahimi Forooshani; Nateqi, E; A Akbari Saari; M. Arab; J Moghri; Sohrabi, R; R Goudarzi

    2012-01-01

    Background If you want to start a long journey towards patient safety, you should create a good culture of patient safety among employees alongside structural interventions. The first step in doing so is the assessment of current culture in the organization using different tools. One of the most commonly used instruments of measuring patient safety culture is Hospital Survey of Patient Safety culture (HSOPS). The aim of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of Farsi version of...

  9. [Have Case Loads of Radical Surgery for Prostate Cancer Been Concentrated in Hospitals with Robotic Equipment ?--Analyses with Questionnaire Survey and Diagnostic Procedure Combination (DPC) Data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Taiji; Tanaka, Shigeru

    2016-04-01

    We investigated whether installation of robot-assisted surgical equipment in hospitals resulted in concentration of the case loads of radical prostatectomy. We selected 11 areas with populations of around 1 million or more where there were one or more hospitals with robotic equipment and 4 or more without it. In addition, annual changes of case loads for prostatectomy over 4 years from 2010 to 2013 were clearly determined in these areas. The case loads were determined based on the results of a questionnaire survey for the hospitals with robots and on the Diagnostic Procedures Combination data provided by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Wealth for those without such equipment. The concentration of the case loads was principally defined as when hospitals with robots had more predominant proportion of cases than those without them in the comparison between case loads prior to instillation of robots (or in the initial year of the study) and those in the final years. The 11 selected areas included 44 hospitals with robots and 156 without them. Concentration of case loads was found in 5 areas. In 4 areas, installation of robots did not have a specific relation to the distribution pattern s of case loads in hospitals with or without the equipment. The remaining 2 areas tended to have a weak but not definite concentration of case loads. In the areas in which installation did not influence case loads the further analysis revealed that their case loads had already been concentrated in the initial year (2010) of the study. Although the current results were found in a single department of the hospital, robotic installation may result in concentration of prostatectomy case loads for such hospitals in some areas. The current results are intriguing when we consider the future roles of acute care hospitals and beds in our country where the number of aged patients having chronic diseases will increase. In conclusion, installation of robotic equipment may result in concentration

  10. Activity-based computing for medical work in hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind

    2009-01-01

    Studies have revealed that people organize and think of their work in terms of activities that are carried out in pursuit of some overall objective, often in collaboration with others. Nevertheless, modern computer systems are typically single-user oriented, that is, designed to support individual...... tasks such as word processing while sitting at a desk. This article presents the concept of Activity-Based Computing (ABC), which seeks to create computational support for human activities. The ABC approach has been designed to address activity-based computing support for clinical work in hospitals....... In a hospital, the challenges arising from the management of parallel activities and interruptions are amplified because multitasking is now combined with a high degree of mobility, collaboration, and urgency. The article presents the empirical and theoretical background for activity-based computing, its...

  11. Performance Based Supplementary Payment Systems in Istanbul Public Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül YILDIRIM KAPTANOĞLU

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2003 new healthcare reforms have been implemented in Turkey. Although, the healthcare system has gone through modifications for the past several years; there is insufficient research to demonstrate the effects of these changes. This paper aims to address the issues in the supplementary payment systems, which are one of the recent changes of the healthcare system in the country. This study is mainly based on a review of the relevant professional literature, a research and interpretation of supplementary payment in the public hospitals. This is a research as well as an assessment work done in secondary and tertiary care hospitals. Performance based supplementary payment system in public hospitals aims to provide bonuses to health care employees like physicians, nurses, etc. The bonus is given to professionals, who produce the qualified health services based on records by the evaluation of the whole institution. Financing of supplementary payment system in Turkey is mainly based on social security premiums. Consequently, balance of income and expenditures at hospitals is needed to be followed sensitively. According to this study, physicians' productivity has increased but number of patients per physician has decreased. Also, the amount of performance paid to the physician for their specialty has decreased. Physicians like cardiologists can benefit more from the pay for performance system as their work contributions are paid more compared to internist work. Also secondary care hospital staffs were better paid compared to tertiary care hospitals because more critical cases are sent to tertiary care and treatment of such cases are of high cost. The reforms resulted satisfactory and very successful improvement in healthcare performance. The main health indicators are now better than at the beginning of the transition period. The sustainability of the reform processes will cause further improvement in the near future. The number of treatments per

  12. Improving infant sleep safety through a comprehensive hospital-based program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodstein, Michael H; Bell, Theodore; Krugman, Scott D

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated a comprehensive hospital-based infant safe sleep education program on parental education and safe sleep behaviors in the home using a cross-sectional survey of new parents at hospital discharge (HD) and 4-month follow-up (F/U). Knowledge and practices of infant safe sleep were compared to the National Infant Sleep Position Study benchmark. There were 1092 HD and 490 F/U surveys. Supine sleep knowledge was 99.8% at HD; 94.8% of families planned to always use this position. At F/U, 97.3% retained supine knowledge, and 84.9% maintained this position exclusively (P < .01). Knowledge of crib as safest surface was 99.8% at HD and 99.5% F/U. Use in the parents' room fell to 91.9% (HD) and 68.2% (F/U). Compared to the National Infant Sleep Position Study, the F/U group was more likely to use supine positioning and a bassinette or crib. Reinforcing the infant sleep safety message through intensive hospital-based education improves parental compliance with sudden infant death syndrome risk reduction guidelines.

  13. Patient safety in surgical environments: Cross-countries comparison of psychometric properties and results of the Norwegian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nortvedt Monica W

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How hospital health care personnel perceive safety climate has been assessed in several countries by using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety (HSOPS. Few studies have examined safety climate factors in surgical departments per se. This study examined the psychometric properties of a Norwegian translation of the HSOPS and also compared safety climate factors from a surgical setting to hospitals in the United States, the Netherlands and Norway. Methods This survey included 575 surgical personnel in Haukeland University Hospital in Bergen, an 1100-bed tertiary hospital in western Norway: surgeons, operating theatre nurses, anaesthesiologists, nurse anaesthetists and ancillary personnel. Of these, 358 returned the HSOPS, resulting in a 62% response rate. We used factor analysis to examine the applicability of the HSOPS factor structure in operating theatre settings. We also performed psychometric analysis for internal consistency and construct validity. In addition, we compared the percent of average positive responds of the patient safety climate factors with results of the US HSOPS 2010 comparative data base report. Results The professions differed in their perception of patient safety climate, with anaesthesia personnel having the highest mean scores. Factor analysis using the original 12-factor model of the HSOPS resulted in low reliability scores (r = 0.6 for two factors: "adequate staffing" and "organizational learning and continuous improvement". For the remaining factors, reliability was ≥ 0.7. Reliability scores improved to r = 0.8 by combining the factors "organizational learning and continuous improvement" and "feedback and communication about error" into one six-item factor, supporting an 11-factor model. The inter-item correlations were found satisfactory. Conclusions The psychometric properties of the questionnaire need further investigations to be regarded as reliable in surgical environments. The operating

  14. Validity and reliability of Turkish version of "Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture" and perception of patient safety in public hospitals in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Emel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS is used to assess safety culture in many countries. Accordingly, the questionnaire has been translated into Turkish for the study of patient safety culture in Turkish hospitals. The aim of this study is threefold: to determine the validity and reliability of the translated form of HSOPS, to evaluate physicians' and nurses' perceptions of patient safety in Turkish public hospitals, and to compare finding with U.S. hospital settings. Methods Physicians and nurses working in all public hospitals in Konya, a large city in Turkey, were asked to complete a self-administrated patient safety culture survey (n = 309. Data collection was carried out using the Turkish version of HSOPS, developed by Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ. Data were summarized as percentages, means, and SD values. Factor analysis, correlation coefficient, Cronbach's alpha, ANOVA, and t tests were employed in statistical analyses. Items on patient safety were categorized into 10 factors. Factor loadings and internal consistencies of dimension items were high. Results Most of the scores related to dimensions, and the overall patient safety score (44% were lower than the benchmark score. "Teamwork within hospital units" received the highest score (70%, and the lowest score belonged to the "frequency of events reported" (15%. The study revealed that more than three quarters of the physicians and nurses were not reporting errors. Conclusion The Turkish version of HSOPS was found to be valid and reliable in determining patient safety culture. This tool will be helpful in tracking improvements and in heightening awareness on patient safety culture in Turkey.

  15. Hand hygiene perception among health care workers in Hungarian hospitals: prior to a nationwide microbiological survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Rita; Böröcz, Karolina; Nagy, Orsolya; Takács, Mária; Szomor, Katalin N

    2013-03-01

    Transmission of pathogens via healthcare workers' (HCWs) hands is one of the most frequent means of spreading multi-resistant organisms and occurring healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) in hospitals. The role of contaminated hands in pathogen transmission was recognized by Hungarian physician, Ignác Semmelweis. Hand hygiene prevents cross-infections in hospitals, but numerous epidemiological and microbiology-based studies have documented low compliance of HCWs with this simple procedure. Furthermore, hand hygiene perception of HCWs plays an important role in determining hand hygiene compliance. Our aim was to describe the opinion of HCWs about their perception regarding hand hygiene practice. Our further goal was to strengthen a laboratory basis for bacterial backup control of nosocomial pathogens. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted between December 2010 and February 2011 in 13 participating hospitals in Hungary. HCWs know that there is correlation between contaminated hands and HAIs (83%), but neither the frequency (62%) nor the implementation (73%) of their hand hygiene performance are satisfying.We recommend that multimodal interventions - highlighted active microbiological surveillance of HCWs' hands - are the most suitable strategies to reduce the occurrence of HAIs and to determine their impact on cross-transmission of microorganisms and to overcome barriers of HCWs.

  16. "Against the silence": Development and first results of a patient survey to assess experiences of safety-related events in hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwappach David LB

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Involvement of patients in the detection and prevention of safety related events and medical errors have been widely recommended. However, it has also been questioned whether patients at large are willing and able to identify safety-related events in their care. The aim of this study was to develop and pilot test a brief patient safety survey applicable to inpatient care in Swiss hospitals. Methods A survey instrument was developed in an iterative procedure. The instrument asks patients to report whether they have experienced specific undesirable events during their hospital stay. The preliminary version was developed together with experts and tested in focus groups with patients. The adapted survey instrument was pilot-tested in random samples of patients of two Swiss hospitals (n = 400. Responders to the survey that had reported experience of any incident were sampled for qualitative interviews (n = 18. Based on the interview, the researcher classified the reported incidents as confirmed or discarded. Results The survey was generally well accepted in the focus groups and interviews. In the quantitative pilot test, 125 patients returned the survey (response rate: 31%. The mean age of responders was 55 years (range 17–91, SD 18 years and 62.5% were female. The 125 participating patients reported 94 "definitive" and 34 "uncertain" events. 14% of the patients rated any of the experienced events as "serious". The definitive and uncertain events reported with highest frequency were phlebitis, missing hand hygiene, allergic drug reaction, unavailability of documents, and infection. 23% of patients reported some or serious concerns about their safety. The qualitative interviews indicate that both, the extent of patients' uncertainty in the classification of events and the likelihood of confirmation by the interviewer vary very much by type of incident. Unexpectedly, many patients reported problems and incidents related to food

  17. Procedures for prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal diseases: a multicenter questionnaire survey of hospitals in the Kyoto Neonatal Disease Study Group, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Kousaku; Kawai, Masahiko; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Kato, Fumihide; Tsukahara, Hirokazu; Yamakawa, Masaru; Hashimoto, Kazuhiro; Shimada, Seiichi; Maeda, Shinji; Okumura, Mitsuyoshi; Kanaoka, Hiroo

    2007-02-01

    To explore clinical protocols for the prevention of early-onset group B Streptococcus (EOGBS) disease of the newborn in Japan, we conducted a multicenter questionnaire survey. Of 32 regional centers participating in the Kyoto Neonatal Study Group, 28 provided usable data concerning prevention practices undertaken between 2000 and 2004. Twenty-three (82%) of the 28 hospitals implemented bacteriological screening to identify maternal GBS carriage, and all 23 hospitals administered intrapartum antibiotics to all screening-positive pregnant women. There were no institutes that used risk-based strategies. In the 23 hospitals, bacteriological screening was conducted mostly by lower vaginal swab alone (n = 18). Eighteen hospitals performed screening once during pregnancy, either before 34 weeks' gestation (n = 6) or between 35 and 37 weeks' gestation (n = 12). Oral antepartum antibiotics, when carriage was identified, were administered at 12 (52%) hospitals. Twenty institutes used penicillins for intrapartum prophylaxis. However, the loading dose for chemoprophylaxis ranged from 0.5 to 2 g, and the interval between repeat administrations ranged from 4 to 12 h. Although the results indicated that more than 80% of the hospitals surveyed had introduced some screening-based prevention practices, the timing of the bacteriological screening during the pregnancy, the number of screenings, and the screening sites, as well as the antibiotics used, and their dosage, varied widely. Because of these highly variable methods, the efficacy of the implementation of preventive practices could not be determined. This study is the first to have described preventive practices for EOGBS disease in Japan in the era of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. In light of the above results, a larger study under a unifying protocol would be warranted.

  18. HCAHPS - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospital ratings for the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital...

  19. [Guidelines for a prevalence survey of nosocomial infections in the University Hospital "Madre Teresa" in Tirana, Albania].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodano, L; Faria, S; Gjata, A; Kasneci, A; Byku, B; Schinaia, N

    2003-01-01

    The authors present guidelines for the first prevalence survey of nosocomial infections in the University Hospital "Madre Teresa" in Tirana (almost 1,600 beds), the only tertiary health-care centre in Albania. The survey is a joint project involving Italy and Albania, to be coordinated by the Italian National Health Institute. The paper describes goals, methodology and organization of the prevalence survey. The improvement of local expertise in epidemiology and microbiology is one of the most important goals. Therefore, Albanian personnel training and improvement of the infection microbiological diagnosis are fundamental aspects of the project.

  20. Hospital Based Health Technology Assessment: an example from Siena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Manzi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Health Technology Assessment (HTA has emerged in recent years as a useful tool in healthcare decision-making. It is a multidisciplinary process that summarizes information about the medical, social, economic and ethical issues related to the use of a health technology and provides evidence-based information on how to allocate resources. The experience of Siena University Hospital is an example of multidisciplinary hospital-based HTA. In the present paper we summarize the organization of HTA commission and the assessment methodology of the purchase, rental or sale of medical equipment and medical devices. Furthermore we illustrate the data concerning the commission activities in 2013.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/fe.v16i1.943

  1. A survey of attitudes toward clinical research among physicians at Kyoto University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, Eriko; Murayama, Toshinori; Yokode, Masayuki

    2009-12-22

    In Japan, only clinical research related to investigational new drug trials must be notified to regulatory bodies, and this lack of a uniform standard for clinical research has caused a number of difficulties. The objective of this study was to assess the willingness of physicians to participate in clinical research and to identify effective methods to promote and enhance clinical research. We conducted a cross-sectional survey by administrating questionnaires to physicians in 31 departments in Kyoto University Hospital from October through November 2007. A total of 51.5% (310 of 602) of physicians completed the questionnaire. More than two-thirds of them reported currently participating in clinical research, and nearly all believed that clinical research is necessary for physicians. Less than 20% of respondents had specific training regarding clinical research, and most reported a need to acquire concepts and skills regarding clinical research, especially those related to statistics. "Paperwork was complicated and onerous" was the most frequently cited obstacle in conducting clinical research, followed by "few eligible patients" and "lack of time". Previous participation in and prospective participation in clinical research, previous writing a research protocol were positively associated with current participation in clinical research. Physicians in university hospitals need more training regarding clinical research, particularly in biostatistics. They also require administrative assistance. Our findings indicate that the quality of clinical research could be improved if training in clinical research methodology and biostatistics were provided, and if greater assistance in the preparation of study documents requested by the institutional Independent Ethics Committee were available.

  2. A survey of attitudes toward clinical research among physicians at Kyoto University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokode Masayuki

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Japan, only clinical research related to investigational new drug trials must be notified to regulatory bodies, and this lack of a uniform standard for clinical research has caused a number of difficulties. The objective of this study was to assess the willingness of physicians to participate in clinical research and to identify effective methods to promote and enhance clinical research. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey by administrating questionnaires to physicians in 31 departments in Kyoto University Hospital from October through November 2007. Results A total of 51.5% (310 of 602 of physicians completed the questionnaire. More than two-thirds of them reported currently participating in clinical research, and nearly all believed that clinical research is necessary for physicians. Less than 20% of respondents had specific training regarding clinical research, and most reported a need to acquire concepts and skills regarding clinical research, especially those related to statistics. "Paperwork was complicated and onerous" was the most frequently cited obstacle in conducting clinical research, followed by "few eligible patients" and "lack of time". Previous participation in and prospective participation in clinical research, previous writing a research protocol were positively associated with current participation in clinical research. Conclusions Physicians in university hospitals need more training regarding clinical research, particularly in biostatistics. They also require administrative assistance. Our findings indicate that the quality of clinical research could be improved if training in clinical research methodology and biostatistics were provided, and if greater assistance in the preparation of study documents requested by the institutional Independent Ethics Committee were available.

  3. A survey of blood utilization in children and adolescents in a German university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, R; Handtrack, D; Zingsem, J; Weisbach, V; Neidhardt, B; Glaser, A; Eckstein, R

    1998-09-01

    There are no detailed data on blood use with regard to diagnoses of recipients during infancy, childhood and adolescence. Available information on this issue is incomplete and no longer current. We conducted a survey of blood component use in children and adolescents in an acute-care university hospital in the greater area of Nuremberg between June 1994 and September 1996. Packed red blood cells (RBCs), fresh-frozen plasmas (FFPs) and platelet (PLT) components were evaluated for the recipients discharge diagnoses. Source study files were extracted from the hospital transfusion service and the medical records department. Transfused units were listed by broad diagnostic categories and leading diagnostic groups formed from principal diagnoses of the recipients according to the International Classification of Diseases, 9th edn (ICD-9). 34.3% of 2869 RBC cell units, 35.0% of 1095 FFP units and 5.0% of 1028 PLT components were used in patients with congenital diseases, mainly cardiac defects. The disease category neoplastic diseases was next most frequently associated with blood transfusion diagnosed in recipients of 23.9% of all RBCs, 15.6% of all FFP units and in 66.4% of all PLT units. Malignant diseases and benign haematological diseases (diagnostic categories II and IV) accounted for 68.9% of all costs of blood component transfusion. These findings demonstrate the increased importance of platelet transfusion for the organization of local and regional blood donation programmes and for cost analysis exercises. The study shows that detailed information on local blood use may be obtained quickly using available data collections of transfusion services and medical record departments.

  4. From intermittent antibiotic point prevalence surveys to quality improvement: experience in Scottish hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm William

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2008, the Scottish Antimicrobial Prescribing Group (SAPG was established to coordinate a national antimicrobial stewardship programme. In 2009 SAPG led participation in a European point prevalence survey (PPS of hospital antibiotic use. We describe how SAPG used this baseline PPS as the foundation for implementation of measures for improvement in antibiotic prescribing. Methods In 2009 data for the baseline PPS were collected in accordance with the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption [ESAC] protocol. This informed the development of two quality prescribing indicators: compliance with antibiotic policy in acute admission units and duration of surgical prophylaxis. From December 2009 clinicians collected these data on a monthly basis. The prescribing indicators were reviewed and further modified in March 2011. Data for the follow up PPS in September 2011 were collected as part of a national PPS of healthcare associated infection and antimicrobial use developed using ECDC protocols. Results In the baseline PPS data were collected in 22 (56% acute hospitals. The frequency of recording the reason for treatment in medical notes was similar in Scotland (75.9% and Europe (75.7%. Compliance with policy (81.0% was also similar to Europe (82.5% but duration of surgical prophylaxis Conclusions The baseline PPS identified priorities for quality improvement. SAPG has demonstrated that implementation of regularly reviewed national prescribing indicators, acceptable to clinicians, implemented through regular systematic measurement can drive improvement in quality of antibiotic use in key clinical areas. However, our data also show that the ESAC PPS method may underestimate the proportion of surgical prophylaxis with duration

  5. Increasing Response Rates to Web-Based Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Martha C.; Adams, Damian C.

    2012-01-01

    We review a popular method for collecing data--Web-based surveys. Although Web surveys are popular, one major concern is their typically low response rates. Using the Dillman et al. (2009) approach, we designed, pre-tested, and implemented a survey on climate change with Extension professionals in the Southeast. The Dillman approach worked well,…

  6. A prospective survey of blood products transferred with patients during inter-hospital transfers in the East of England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamber, J H; O'Brien, J; Foukaneli, D; Dhesi, A

    2015-10-01

    A prospective survey was undertaken of blood products transferred with patients during inter-hospital transfers by ambulance in the East of England (population six million) There is little published information on the number and fate of blood products transferred with patients during inter-hospital transfers, although there are concerns about quality assurance and traceability of these blood products. Recent national guidance has been issued, but adherence to this guidance is uncertain. A 6-month survey was undertaken of all inter-hospital transfers of blood products with patients within the East of England using routine data captured by established transfer of blood documentation. There were 45 transfer episodes of which 44 involved the transfer of red blood cells. In total, 148 units of red blood cells were transferred, of which 6% were transfused en route, 3% transfused at the destination hospital, 35% were wasted and for 18% the fate could not be established. The remainder were transferred into the blood stock of the destination hospital. The small proportion of blood products that were transfused raises questions about the necessity of the transfer of blood products with some patients particularly considering the higher percentage of wasted or untraced products. When transfers occur, there should be better communication between hospital transfusion laboratories assisted by adherence to national and regionally agreed policies. © 2015 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  7. Hospital-based surveillance of congenital rubella syndrome in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herini, Elisabeth Siti; Gunadi; Triono, Agung; Mulyadi, Asal Wahyuni Erlin; Mardin, Niprida; Rusipah; Soenarto, Yati; Reef, Susan E

    2017-03-01

    Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) has serious consequences, such as miscarriage, stillbirth, and severe birth defects in infants, resulting from rubella virus infection during pregnancy. However, rubella vaccine has not yet been implemented in Indonesia. This study aimed (1) to estimate the incidence of CRS in Indonesia, (2) describe the clinical features of CRS at our referral hospital, and (3) pilot a CRS surveillance system to be extended to other hospitals. We conducted a 4-month prospective surveillance study of infants aged Indonesia. Conducting hospital-based surveillance of CRS in other hospitals in Indonesia may be appropriate. What is Known: •Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) has serious consequences in infants resulting from rubella virus infection during pregnancy. •The incidence of CRS in most developed countries has greatly decreased since implementation of rubella vaccination. •Rubella vaccine has not yet been implemented in many developing countries. What is New: •The number of laboratory-confirmed CRS cases among Indonesian infants was high. •Implementation of rubella vaccine into immunization programs in Indonesia is important because of the high number of CRS cases. •Our study highlights the need for ongoing prospective surveillance of CRS in Indonesia.

  8. Information presentation features and comprehensibility of hospital report cards: design analysis and online survey among users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Uwe; Emmert, Martin; Dickel, Jochen; Meszmer, Nina; Kolb, Benjamin

    2015-03-16

    Improving the transparency of information about the quality of health care providers is one way to improve health care quality. It is assumed that Internet information steers patients toward better-performing health care providers and will motivate providers to improve quality. However, the effect of public reporting on hospital quality is still small. One of the reasons is that users find it difficult to understand the formats in which information is presented. We analyzed the presentation of risk-adjusted mortality rate (RAMR) for coronary angiography in the 10 most commonly used German public report cards to analyze the impact of information presentation features on their comprehensibility. We wanted to determine which information presentation features were utilized, were preferred by users, led to better comprehension, and had similar effects to those reported in evidence-based recommendations described in the literature. The study consisted of 5 steps: (1) identification of best-practice evidence about the presentation of information on hospital report cards; (2) selection of a single risk-adjusted quality indicator; (3) selection of a sample of designs adopted by German public report cards; (4) identification of the information presentation elements used in public reporting initiatives in Germany; and (5) an online panel completed an online questionnaire that was conducted to determine if respondents were able to identify the hospital with the lowest RAMR and if respondents' hospital choices were associated with particular information design elements. Evidence-based recommendations were made relating to the following information presentation features relevant to report cards: evaluative table with symbols, tables without symbols, bar charts, bar charts without symbols, bar charts with symbols, symbols, evaluative word labels, highlighting, order of providers, high values to indicate good performance, explicit statements of whether high or low values indicate

  9. The Survey of Hospitals Managers’ Attitude about Patient Complaints Investigating System in Hospitals Affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboubeh Asadi

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: According to the findings and relatively positive attitude of managers, it is necessary to organize a team for improving and revising patient complaints investigating system in each hospital. Also managers’ attention to staff satisfaction and their educational needs is important for reducing patient complaints.

  10. Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Program: Hospital-Based Stroke Outpatient Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Danielle; Janzen, Shannon; McIntyre, Amanda; Vermeer, Julianne; Britt, Eileen; Teasell, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Few studies have considered the effectiveness of outpatient rehabilitation programs for stroke patients. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a hospital-based interdisciplinary outpatient stroke rehabilitation program with respect to physical functioning, mobility, and balance. The Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Program provides a hospital-based interdisciplinary approach to stroke rehabilitation in Southwestern Ontario. Outcome measures from physiotherapy and occupational therapy sessions were available at intake and discharge from the program. A series of paired sample t-tests were performed to assess patient changes between time points for each outcome measure. A total of 271 patients met the inclusion criteria for analysis (56.1% male; mean age = 62.9 ± 13.9 years). Significant improvements were found between admission and discharge for the Functional Independence Measure, grip strength, Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment, two-minute walk test, maximum walk test, Timed Up and Go, Berg Balance Scale, and one-legged stance (P rehabilitation program was effective at improving the physical functioning, mobility, and balance of individuals after a stroke. A hospital-based, stroke-specific rehabilitation program should be considered when patients continue to experience deficits after inpatient rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Reliability and validity of the Brazilian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC): a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Cláudia Tartaglia; Laguardia, Josué; Vasconcelos, Ana Glória Godoi; Martins, Mônica

    2016-12-01

    The evaluation of the culture of patient safety in hospitals is nowadays considered as a management too, since it helps to identify problem areas and provide valuable information for planning improvements. This study explored the reliability and validity of the Brazilian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, an instrument that evaluates characteristics of patient safety culture among hospital staff. The reliability of the instrument was evaluated by analyzing the internal consistency of each dimension. The validity of the tool was carried out by means of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. The sample was made up of 322 questionnaires that were collected in two Brazilian hospitals in 2012. Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.52 to 0.91 for the different dimensions, with the exception of two, for which it was much lower. After excluding four items, the exploratory factor analysis presented adjusted indices that were appropriate for a 10 factor model.

  12. Reliability and validity of the Brazilian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Tartaglia Reis

    Full Text Available Abstract: The evaluation of the culture of patient safety in hospitals is nowadays considered as a management too, since it helps to identify problem areas and provide valuable information for planning improvements. This study explored the reliability and validity of the Brazilian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, an instrument that evaluates characteristics of patient safety culture among hospital staff. The reliability of the instrument was evaluated by analyzing the internal consistency of each dimension. The validity of the tool was carried out by means of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. The sample was made up of 322 questionnaires that were collected in two Brazilian hospitals in 2012. Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.52 to 0.91 for the different dimensions, with the exception of two, for which it was much lower. After excluding four items, the exploratory factor analysis presented adjusted indices that were appropriate for a 10 factor model.

  13. Screening, testing, and reporting for drug and alcohol use on labor and delivery: a survey of Maryland birthing hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Catherine; Lanham, Amy; Welsh, Christopher; Ramanadhan, Shaalini; Terplan, Mishka

    2014-01-01

    Recent amendments to the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act tie the receipt of federal block grants to mandatory reporting of substance-exposed newborns. To determine rates of screening, testing, and reporting of drug and alcohol use at the time of delivery, we administered a telephone survey of nursing managers and perinatal social workers at Maryland birthing hospitals. Of the 34 hospitals, 31 responded (response rate 91%). Although 97% of hospitals reported universal screening, only 6% used a validated instrument. Testing was reported by 94% with 45% reporting universal maternal testing and 7% universal newborn testing. Only 32% reported obtaining maternal consent prior to testing. There is significant heterogeneity in screening and testing for substance use in birthing hospitals. Given federal reporting mandates, state-level practices need to be standardized.

  14. Results of a survey on the implementation of diagnostic reference levels for X-rays among Dutch hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijwaard, Harmen; Valk, Doreth; de Waard-Schalkx, Ischa

    2015-04-01

    Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for medical x-ray procedures are being implemented currently in the Netherlands. By order of the Dutch Healthcare Inspectorate, a survey has been conducted among 20 Dutch hospitals to investigate the level of implementation of the Dutch DRLs in current radiological practice. It turns out that hospitals are either well underway in implementing the DRLs or have already done so. However, the DRLs have usually not yet been incorporated in the QA system of the department nor in the treatment protocols. It was shown that the amount of radiation used, as far as it was indicated by the hospitals, usually remains below the DRLs. A procedure for comparing dose levels to the DRLs has been prescribed but is not always followed in practice. This is especially difficult in the case of children, as most general hospitals receive few children.

  15. The activity of palliative care team pharmacists in designated cancer hospitals: a nationwide survey in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ise, Yuya; Morita, Tatsuya; Katayama, Shirou; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki

    2014-03-01

    The role of pharmacists in palliative care has become more important now that they are able to provide medication review, patient education, and advice to physicians about a patient's pharmacotherapy. However, there is little known about pharmacists' activity on palliative care teams. The present study aimed to examine the clinical, educational, and research activities of pharmacists on palliative care teams and pharmacist-perceived contributions to a palliative care team or why they could not contribute. We sent 397 questionnaires to designated cancer hospitals, and 304 responses were analyzed (response rate 77%). Of the pharmacists surveyed, 79% and 94% reported attending ward rounds and conferences, respectively. Half of the pharmacists provided information/suggestions to the team about pharmacology, pharmaceutical production, managing adverse effects, drug interactions, and/or rotation of drugs. In addition, 80% of the pharmacists organized a multidisciplinary conference on palliative care education. Furthermore, 60% of the pharmacists reported on palliative care research to a scientific society. Seventy percent of the pharmacists reported some level of contribution to a palliative care team, whereas 16% reported that they did not contribute, with the main perceived reasons for no contribution listed as insufficient time (90%) and/or staff (68%). In Japan, pharmacists exercise a moderate level of clinical activity on palliative care teams. Many pharmacists believe that they contribute to such a team and generally place more emphasis on their educational and research roles compared with clinical work. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Continuing professional development and Irish hospital doctors: a survey of current use and future needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Bridget; Faruqui, Adnan; Horgan, Mary; Bergin, Colm; Tuathaigh, Colm O; Bennett, Deirdre

    2017-07-01

    Doctors rate clinical relevance and applicability as the most important determinants of continuing professional development (CPD) course selection. This study examined patterns of current CPD practice and perceived CPD needs among hospital doctors in Ireland across various clinical specialties. A cross-sectional survey was administered to doctors, focusing on the areas of training needs analysis, CPD course content and preferred course format. In total, 547 doctors identified doctor-patient communication as the skill ranked highest for importance and level of current performance. Workload/time organisation and stress management were areas where a skills deficiency was identified. Non-clinical CPD topics, including resilience training, management and communication skills, were preferred areas for future CPD offerings. All respondents favoured interactive, hands-on sessions. CPD course completion and preference patterns differed significantly across clinical specialties. These results highlight the importance of considering the individual needs and preferences of clinicians across clinical specialties to facilitate more effective CPD programmes. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  17. Retrospective survey of Chikungunya disease in Réunion Island hospital staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    STAIKOWSKY, F.; Le ROUX, K.; SCHUFFENECKER, I.; LAURENT, P.; GRIVARD, P.; DEVELAY, A.; MICHAULT, A.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Réunion Island (Indian Ocean) has been suffering from its first known Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) epidemic since February 2005. To achieve a better understanding of the disease, a questionnaire was drawn up for hospital staff members and their household. CHIKV infected about one-third of the studied population, the proportion increasing with age and being higher in women. Presence of a garden was associated with CHIKV infection. The geographical distribution of cases was concordant with insect vector Aedes albopictus distribution. The main clinical signs were arthralgia and fever. The disease evolved towards full recovery in 34·4% of cases, a relapse in 55·6%, or a chronic form in 10%. Paracetamol was used as a painkiller in 95% of cases, sometimes associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticoids, or traditional herbal medicine. The survey provided valuable information on the factors that favour transmission, the clinical signs, the importance of relapses and the therapies used. PMID:17433130

  18. A SURVEY OF ELECTIVE SURGICAL PATIENTS' ATTITUDES TOWARD ANESTHESIA IN PUMC HOSPITAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄宇光; 杨克勤; 任洪智; 罗爱伦

    2002-01-01

    Objective.To assess patients' knowledge,attitudes,and concerns regarding anesthetic management.Method.A survey of 55 items was developed and administered preoperatively to 500 patients including 190 men and 310 women in our hospital.Patients were interviewed on their knowledge of the role of anesthesiologists,their preferences regarding anesthetic management,and also their concern about potential anesthetic complications.Results.Patients' perceptions of anesthesiologists' training and role have reached a certain level.Most significant preoperative concerns regarding the anesthesiologists focused on experience,qualifications,and presence or absence during the anesthesia.Patients' concerns also included the possibility of not being waken up following anesthesia,experiencing postoperative pain,and becoming paralyzed.The variations of concerns depended partially on patients' sex,type of anesthesia,and proposed surgical procedure,partially on their education and living environments.Conclusion.It is suggested that anesthesiologists address significant patient concerns during the preoperative visit to enhance their effectiveness in patient care.Efforts to educate the public on the anesthesiologists' role in preoperative care would improve patients' confidence.

  19. Rural hospital web-based, evidence-based practice professional development: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, Kathleen S; Fink, Regina M; Krugman, Mary; Goode, Colleen J; Traditi, Lisa K

    2013-01-01

    To provide quality patient care and achieve positive patient outcomes, it is widely recognized that organizations must develop a supportive environment that encourages individuals to practice from a research- and evidence-based framework. This article describes a Web-based professional educational program designed to teach principles of evidence-based practice to nurses in rural hospitals. Nurses working in staff development will find this useful for designing educational programs for staff in rural hospitals.

  20. Information Presentation Features and Comprehensibility of Hospital Report Cards: Design Analysis and Online Survey Among Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background Improving the transparency of information about the quality of health care providers is one way to improve health care quality. It is assumed that Internet information steers patients toward better-performing health care providers and will motivate providers to improve quality. However, the effect of public reporting on hospital quality is still small. One of the reasons is that users find it difficult to understand the formats in which information is presented. Objective We analyzed the presentation of risk-adjusted mortality rate (RAMR) for coronary angiography in the 10 most commonly used German public report cards to analyze the impact of information presentation features on their comprehensibility. We wanted to determine which information presentation features were utilized, were preferred by users, led to better comprehension, and had similar effects to those reported in evidence-based recommendations described in the literature. Methods The study consisted of 5 steps: (1) identification of best-practice evidence about the presentation of information on hospital report cards; (2) selection of a single risk-adjusted quality indicator; (3) selection of a sample of designs adopted by German public report cards; (4) identification of the information presentation elements used in public reporting initiatives in Germany; and (5) an online panel completed an online questionnaire that was conducted to determine if respondents were able to identify the hospital with the lowest RAMR and if respondents’ hospital choices were associated with particular information design elements. Results Evidence-based recommendations were made relating to the following information presentation features relevant to report cards: evaluative table with symbols, tables without symbols, bar charts, bar charts without symbols, bar charts with symbols, symbols, evaluative word labels, highlighting, order of providers, high values to indicate good performance, explicit statements

  1. CNMI Boat-based Creel Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) Creel surveys are operated by the Division of Fish and Wildlife (DFW) and are only on the island of Saipan....

  2. Causes of blindness among adult Yemenis: A Hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Akily Saleh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This hospital-based retrospective study was aimed to assess the causes of blindness among adults aged 17 years and over who attended a teaching eye hospital in Yemen. Methods: The case notes of 3845 consecutive new patients over 12 months attending Ibn Al-Haitham Eye Center which is affiliated to the University of Science and Technology in Sana′a (the capital of Yemen were retrieved and analysed. Data collected included age, gender, chief complaint and complete eye examination. Results: 7.7 percent (296 were uniocularly blind and 11.2 percent (432 were binocularly blind (best corrected visual acuity < 3/60 in the better eye. The leading causes of uniocular blindness were cataract, trauma related ocular complications, corneal opacity, amblyopia and glaucoma. Binocular blindness was mainly due to cataract, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration and corneal opacity. Conclusions: These data imply that the preliminary results give us some insight about the magnitude of the problem of blindness in Yemen while awaiting a national survey on the prevalence and causes of blindness. Cataract was found to be the main cause of unilateral and bilateral blindness and this will require surgical relief, either in public hospitals, private hospitals and clinics, or in eye camps. Trauma related ocular complications were found to be the second most common cause of uniocular blindness. Health education, implementing work safety measures and bringing ophthalmological care to the doorstep of underprivileged rural community will improve their level of awareness.

  3. Information-seeking behavior of health professionals in Hong Kong: a survey of thirty-seven hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, G Y; Lam, L M

    1996-01-01

    Shortly after the establishment of Hong Kong's Hospital Authority (HA) in 1990, ten library service networks supported by the Library Information Systems (HALIS) were established to pool resources. A survey was undertaken to investigate the information-seeking behavior of health professionals working in thirty-seven public hospitals, examine their information needs, assess user satisfaction with and the impact of library services (including HALIS), and examine why hospital libraries sometimes fail to meet user needs. The findings revealed disparate use patterns among different groups of health professionals and confirmed that medical staff were most satisfied with the library collections and services. The nurses and hospital executives were found to be underserved. They needed information not only for work-related reasons but also to support self-study and development. The new HALIS service was neither well known nor widely used, especially among nurses. The findings provided valuable measures of performance for comparing different hospitals and assessing changes over time. Survey results also highlighted areas in which improvements are needed, such as collection enhancement, promotion and user training, and assessment of the impact of library service on patient care. Subsequent developments in these directions have led to increased awareness and use of library services and confirmed the direction of strategic plans for growth.

  4. Satisfaction survey in general hospital personnel involved in blood transfusion: implementation of the ISO 9001: 2000 standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chord-Auger, S; Tron de Bouchony, E; Moll, M C; Boudart, D; Folléa, G

    2004-10-01

    As part of its policy of constant quality improvement, Etablissement francais du sang (EFS) des pays de la Loire (Pays de la Loire Regional Blood Transfusion Centre) carried out a satisfaction survey among the hospital personnel involved in prescribing and using immunohaematological tests and labile blood products (LBP). The polling tool selected by agreement between the Saint Nazaire's hospital management and Quality Assurance (QA) Department was a questionnaire that permitted item rating and free commentary. It addressed the personnel's perception of the quality of erythrocyte immunohaematological (EIH) testing and of the products administered, as well as their perception of the quality of communications with the local EFS. The questionnaire was sent to 26 physicians and 32 senior nurses in 15 hospital departments. The reply rate was 60% and expressed an 85% overall satisfaction level. Dissatisfaction causes were more specifically analysed, the main one involving LBP distribution in emergency situations. A joint undertaking by the EFS and the hospital led to the implementation of corrective measures, including the writing and implementation of a common standard operating procedure for emergency transfusion management. The results obtained demonstrated the feasibility of this type of survey and the interest, to a blood transfusion centre and the hospital personnel involved in transfusion, of assessing their very own perception of service quality.

  5. [Satisfaction survey in general hospital personnel involved in blood transfusion: implementation of the ISO 9001: 2000 standard].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chord-Auger, S; de Bouchony, E Tron; Moll, M-C; Boudart, D; Folléa, G

    2004-07-01

    As part of its policy of constant quality improvement, Etablissement Français du Sang (EFS) des Pays de la Loire (Pays de la Loire Regional blood transfusion institution) carried out a satisfaction survey among the hospital personnel involved in prescribing and using immuno-hematological tests and labile blood products. The polling tool selected by agreement between the hospital management and quality assurance department was a questionnaire that permitted item rating and free commentary. It addressed the personnel's perception of the quality of erythrocyte immuno-hematological (EIH) testing and of the products administered, as well as their perception of the quality of communications with the local EFS. The questionnaire was sent to 26 physicians and 32 senior nurses in 15 hospital departments. The reply rate was 60% and expressed a 85% overall satisfaction level. Dissatisfaction causes were more specifically analysed, the main one involving labile blood product distribution in emergency situations. A joint undertaking by the EFS and the hospital led to the implementation of corrective measures, including the writing and implementation of a common standard operating procedure for emergency transfusion management. The results obtained demonstrated the feasibility of this type of survey and the interest, to a blood transfusion centre and the hospital personnel involved in transfusion, of assessing their very own perception of service quality.

  6. Notifications of hospital events to outpatient clinicians using health information exchange: a post-implementation survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Altman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The trend towards hospitalist medicine can lead to disjointed patient care. Outpatient clinicians may be unaware of patients’ encounters with a disparate healthcare system. Electronic notifications to outpatient clinicians of patients’ emergency department (ED visits and inpatient admissions and discharges using health information exchange can inform outpatient clinicians of patients’ hospital-based events.Objective Assess outpatient clinicians’ impressions of a new, secure messaging-based, patient event notification system.Methods Twenty outpatient clinicians receiving notifications of hospital-based events were recruited and 14 agreed to participate. Using a semi-structured interview, clinicians were asked about their use of notifications and the impact on their practices.Results Nine of 14 interviewed clinicians (64% thought that without notifications, they would have heard about fewer than 10% of ED visits before the patient’s next visit. Nine clinicians (64% thought that without notifications, they would have heard about fewer than 25% of inpatient admissions and discharges before the patient’s next visit. Six clinicians (43% reported that they call the inpatient team more often because of notifications. Eight users (57% thought that notifications improved patient safety by increasing their awareness of the patients’ clinical events and their medication changes. Key themes identified were the importance of workflow integration and a desire for more clinical information in notifications.Conclusions The notification system is perceived by clinicians to be of value. These findings should instigate further message-oriented use of health information exchange and point to refinements that can lead to even greater benefits.

  7. Acute-on-chronic kideny injury in hospitalized patients:a clinical survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王琴

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the incidence and risk factors of acute-on-chronic kidney(A-on-C) in hospitalized patients. Methods We did a retrospective study on the clinical profiles of patients with A-on-C hospitalized in Affiliated Renji Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University

  8. Joint analyses of open comments and quantitative data: Added value in a job satisfaction survey of hospital professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, Ingrid; Mayer, Mauro; Courvoisier, Nelly; Peytremann-Bridevaux, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Objective To obtain a comprehensive understanding of the job opinions of hospital professionals by conducting qualitative analyses of the open comments included in a job satisfaction survey and combining these results with the quantitative results. Design A cross-sectional survey targeting all Lausanne University Hospital professionals was performed in the fall of 2013. Material and methods The survey considered ten job satisfaction dimensions (e.g. self-fulfilment, workload, management, work-related burnout, organisational commitment, intent to stay) and included an open comment section. Computer-assisted qualitative analyses were conducted on these comments. Satisfaction rates on the included dimensions and professional groups were entered as predictive variables in the qualitative analyses. Participants Of 10 838 hospital professionals, 4978 participated in the survey and 1067 provided open comments. Data from 1045 respondents with usable comments constituted the analytic sample (133 physicians, 393 nurses, 135 laboratory technicians, 247 administrative staff, including researchers, 67 logistic staff, 44 psycho-social workers, and 26 unspecified). Results Almost a third of the comments addressed scheduling issues, mostly related to problems and exhaustion linked to shifts, work-life balance, and difficulties with colleagues’ absences and the consequences for quality of care and patient safety. The other two-thirds related to classic themes included in job satisfaction surveys. Although some comments were provided equally by all professional groups, others were group specific: work and hierarchy pressures for physicians, healthcare quality and patient safety for nurses, skill recognition for administrative staff. Overall, respondents’ comments were consistent with their job satisfaction ratings. Conclusion Open comment analysis provides a comprehensive understanding of hospital professionals’ job experiences, allowing better consideration of quality

  9. SNE's methodological basis - web-based software in entrepreneurial surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning

    This overhead based paper gives an introduction to the research methodology applied in the surveys carried out in the SNE-project.......This overhead based paper gives an introduction to the research methodology applied in the surveys carried out in the SNE-project....

  10. Survey says? A primer on web-based survey design and distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, Adam J; Pannucci, Christopher J; Kasten, Steven J; Haase, Steven C

    2011-07-01

    The Internet has changed the way in which we gather and interpret information. Although books were once the exclusive bearers of data, knowledge is now only a keystroke away. The Internet has also facilitated the synthesis of new knowledge. Specifically, it has become a tool through which medical research is conducted. A review of the literature reveals that in the past year, over 100 medical publications have been based on Web-based survey data alone. Because of emerging Internet technologies, Web-based surveys can now be launched with little computer knowledge. They may also be self-administered, eliminating personnel requirements. Ultimately, an investigator may build, implement, and analyze survey results with speed and efficiency, obviating the need for mass mailings and data processing. All of these qualities have rendered telephone and mail-based surveys virtually obsolete. Despite these capabilities, Web-based survey techniques are not without their limitations, namely, recall and response biases. When used properly, however, Web-based surveys can greatly simplify the research process. This article discusses the implications of Web-based surveys and provides guidelines for their effective design and distribution.

  11. Healthcare professional perspectives on quality and safety in New Zealand public hospitals: findings from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauld, Robin; Horsburgh, Simon

    2014-02-01

    Few studies have sought to measure health professional perceptions of quality and safety across an entire system of public hospitals. Therefore, three questions that gauge different aspects of quality and safety were included in a national New Zealand survey of clinical governance. Three previously used questions were adapted. A total of 41040 registered health professionals employed in District Health Boards were invited to participate in an online survey. Analyses were performed using the R statistical environment. Proportional odds mixed models were used to quantify associations between demographic variables and responses on five-point scales. Relationships between other questions in the survey and the three quality and safety questions were quantified with the Pearson correlation coefficient. A 25% response rate delivered 10303 surveys. Fifty-seven percent of respondents (95% CI: 56-58%) agreed that health professionals in their District Health Board worked together as a team; 70% respondents (95% CI: 69-70%) agreed that health professionals involved patients and families in efforts to improve patient care; and 69% (95% CI: 68-70%) agreed that it was easy to speak up in their clinical area if they perceived a problem with patient care. Correlations showed links between perceptions of stronger clinical leadership and performances on the three questions, as well as with other survey items. The proportional mixed model also revealed response differences by respondent characteristics. The findings suggest positive commitment to quality and safety among New Zealand health professionals and their employers, albeit with variations by district, profession, gender and age, but also scope for improvement. The study also contributes to the literature indicating that clinical leadership is an important contributor to quality improvement. WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE TOPIC? Various studies have explored aspects of healthcare quality and safety, generally within a hospital or

  12. Key performance indicators in hospital based on balanced scorecard model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Rahimi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Performance measurement is receiving increasing verification all over the world. Nowadays in a lot of organizations, irrespective of their type or size, performance evaluation is the main concern and a key issue for top administrators. The purpose of this study is to organize suitable key performance indicators (KPIs for hospitals’ performance evaluation based on the balanced scorecard (BSC. Method: This is a mixed method study. In order to identify the hospital’s performance indicators (HPI, first related literature was reviewed and then the experts’ panel and Delphi method were used. In this study, two rounds were needed for the desired level of consensus. The experts rated the importance of the indicators, on a five-point Likert scale. In the consensus calculation, the consensus percentage was calculated by classifying the values 1-3 as not important (0 and 4-5 to (1 as important. Simple additive weighting technique was used to rank the indicators and select hospital’s KPIs. The data were analyzed by Excel 2010 software. Results: About 218 indicators were obtained from a review of selected literature. Through internal expert panel, 77 indicators were selected. Finally, 22 were selected for KPIs of hospitals. Ten indicators were selected in internal process perspective and 5, 4, and 3 indicators in finance, learning and growth, and customer, respectively. Conclusion: This model can be a useful tool for evaluating and comparing the performance of hospitals. However, this model is flexible and can be adjusted according to differences in the target hospitals. This study can be beneficial for hospital administrators and it can help them to change their perspective about performance evaluation.

  13. Is compliance with hospital accreditation Associated with length of stay and acute readmission? A Danish nationwide population-base study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falstie-Jensen, Anne Mette; Nørgaard, Mette; Hollnagel, Erik;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between compliance with hospital accreditation and length of stay (LOS) and acute readmission (AR). DESIGN: A nationwide population-based follow-up study from November 2009 to December 2012. SETTING: Public, non-psychiatric Danish hospitals. PARTICIPANTS: In......-patients admitted with one of 80 diagnoses. INTERVENTION: Accreditation by the first version of The Danish Healthcare Quality Programme. Using an on-site survey, surveyors assessed the level of compliance with the standards. The hospital was awarded either fully (n = 11) or partially accredited (n = 20). MAIN...... in-patients were included of whom 266 532 were discharged alive and included in the AR analyses. The mean LOS was 4.51 days (95% confidence interval (CI): 4.46-4.57) at fully and 4.54 days (95% CI: 4.50-4.57) at partially accredited hospitals, respectively. After adjusting for confounding factors...

  14. Content Based Image Retrieval Based on Color: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mussarat Yasmin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Information sharing, interpretation and meaningful expression have used digital images in the past couple of decades very usefully and extensively. This extensive use not only evolved the digital communication world with ease and usability but also produced unwanted difficulties around the use of digital images. Because of their extensive usage it sometimes becomes harder to filter images based on their visual contents. To overcome these problems, Content Based Image Retrieval (CBIR was introduced as one of the recent ways to find specific images in massive databases of digital images for efficiency or in other words for continuing the use of digital images in information sharing. In the past years, many systems of CBIR have been anticipated, developed and brought into usage as an outcome of huge research done in CBIR domain. Based on the contents of images, different approaches of CBIR have different implementations for searching images resulting in different measures of performance and accuracy. Some of them are in fact very effective approaches for fast and efficient content based image retrieval. This research highlights the hard work done by researchers to develop the image retrieval techniques based on the color of images. These techniques along with their pros and cons as well as their application in relevant fields are discussed in the survey paper. Moreover, the techniques are also categorized on the basis of common approach used.

  15. Validation of hospital register-based diagnosis of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wermuth, Lene; Lassen, Christina Funch; Himmerslev, Liselotte;

    2012-01-01

    (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and only 75-80% of patients with parkinsonism will have idiopathic PD (iPD). It is necessary to follow patients in order to determine if some of them will develop other neurodegenerative diseases and a one-time-only diagnostic code for iPD reported in the register......Denmark has a long-standing tradition of maintaining one of the world's largest health science specialized register data bases as the National Hospital Register (NHR). To estimate the prevalence and incidence of diseases, the correctness of the diagnoses recorded is critical. Parkinson's disease...

  16. Validation of hospital register-based diagnosis of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wermuth, Lene; Lassen, Christina Funch; Himmerslev, Liselotte

    2012-01-01

    Denmark has a long-standing tradition of maintaining one of the world's largest health science specialized register data bases as the National Hospital Register (NHR). To estimate the prevalence and incidence of diseases, the correctness of the diagnoses recorded is critical. Parkinson's disease...... (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and only 75-80% of patients with parkinsonism will have idiopathic PD (iPD). It is necessary to follow patients in order to determine if some of them will develop other neurodegenerative diseases and a one-time-only diagnostic code for iPD reported in the register...

  17. Nurses and opioids: results of a bi-national survey on mental models regarding opioid administration in hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Charlotte; Sobotka, Fabian; Karavasopoulou, Athina; Ward, Stephen; Bantel, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Objective Pain remains insufficiently treated in hospitals. Increasing evidence suggests human factors contribute to this, due to nurses failing to administer opioids. This behavior might be the consequence of nurses’ mental models about opioids. As personal experience and conceptions shape these models, the aim of this prospective survey was to identify model-influencing factors. Material and methods A questionnaire was developed comprising of 14 statements concerning ideations about opioids and seven questions concerning demographics, indicators of adult learning, and strength of religious beliefs. Latent variables that may underlie nurses’ mental models were identified using undirected graphical dependence models. Representative items of latent variables were employed for ordinal regression analysis. Questionnaires were distributed to 1,379 nurses in two London, UK, hospitals (n=580) and one German (n=799) hospital between September 2014 and February 2015. Results A total of 511 (37.1%) questionnaires were returned. Mean (standard deviation) age of participants were 37 (11) years; 83.5% participants were female; 45.2% worked in critical care; and 51.5% had more than 10 years experience. Of the nurses, 84% were not scared of opioids, 87% did not regard opioids as drugs to help patients die, and 72% did not view them as drugs of abuse. More English (41%) than German (28%) nurses were afraid of criminal investigations and were constantly aware of side effects (UK, 94%; Germany, 38%) when using opioids. Four latent variables were identified which likely influence nurses’ mental models: “conscious decision-making”; “medication-related fears”; “practice-based observations”; and “risk assessment”. They were predicted by strength of religious beliefs and indicators of informal learning such as experience but not by indicators of formal learning such as conference attendance. Conclusion Nurses in both countries employ analytical and affective mental

  18. [Survey on Information Sharing and Approaches to Cooperation between Hospitals and Community Pharmacies in the Care of Outpatients Receiving Chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Chika; Ogata, Kentaro; Nishida, Emi; Kakimoto, Hideki; Uchiyama, Masanobu; Fukuda, Mahiru; Oda, Mayumi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Tamura, Kazuo; Takamatsu, Yasushi; Kamimura, Hidetoshi

    2016-11-01

    Outpatients undergoing chemotherapy receive oral anticancer drugs, supportive care medicine, and drugs for complications from health insurance pharmacies(ie, drugstores). Therefore, drugstore personnel and patients were surveyed using a questionnaire to ascertain the current conditions of information sharing between drugstores and hospitals. Only 31% of the patients surveyed responded that they received cancer chemotherapy via the drugstores, while a few of them understood the need for information sharing with the drugstore. We also found that the drugstores required a considerable amount of patient information including prescribed therapeutic drugs, treatment regimens, disease conditions, and test value. Therefore, we held a study session and clinical conference to facilitate the creation of an information-sharing system. In conclusion, it is imperative for drugstores and hospitals to cooperate and establish a strategy for information sharing in the future.

  19. Convenience Sampling of Children Presenting to Hospital-Based Outpatient Clinics to Estimate Childhood Obesity Levels in Local Surroundings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Jason; Clark, Andrew F; Kobrzynski, Marta; Filler, Guido

    2015-07-01

    Childhood obesity is a critical public health matter associated with numerous pediatric comorbidities. Local-level data are required to monitor obesity and to help administer prevention efforts when and where they are most needed. We hypothesized that samples of children visiting hospital clinics could provide representative local population estimates of childhood obesity using data from 2007 to 2013. Such data might provide more accurate, timely, and cost-effective obesity estimates than national surveys. Results revealed that our hospital-based sample could not serve as a population surrogate. Further research is needed to confirm this finding.

  20. Health Insurance Reform and Efficiency of Township Hospitals in Rural China: An Analysis from Survey Data

    OpenAIRE

    Audibert, Martine; Xiao Xian HUANG; Mathonnat, Jacky; Pelissier, Aurore; Anning MA

    2012-01-01

    In the rural health-care organization of China, township hospitals ensure the delivery of basic medical services. Particularly damaged by the economic reforms implemented from 1975 to the end of the 1990s, township hospitals efficiency is questioned, mainly with the implementation since 2003 of the reform of health insurance in rural areas. From a database of 24 randomly selected township hospitals observed over the period 2000-2008 in Weifang prefecture (Shandong), the study examines the eff...

  1. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Eva Helena; Kjaergaard, Hanne; Johansen, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess the feasibility and psychosocial impact of a hospital-based home care (HBHC) program for children with cancer. PROCEDURE: A HBHC program was carried out with 51 children (0-18 years) with cancer to assess its feasibility in terms of satisfaction, care preferences, safety, an...... and the psychosocial burden on the family does not increase. Pediatr Blood Cancer © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.......BACKGROUND: To assess the feasibility and psychosocial impact of a hospital-based home care (HBHC) program for children with cancer. PROCEDURE: A HBHC program was carried out with 51 children (0-18 years) with cancer to assess its feasibility in terms of satisfaction, care preferences, safety......, and cost. A controlled trial was conducted to assess children's health-related quality of life (HRQOL) using the parent-reported and self-reported PedsQL Generic Core Scale and PedsQL Cancer Module, and the psychosocial impact on the family by PedsQL Family Impact Module comprising a subsample of 28...

  2. FACTORS AFFECTING IMPLEMENTATION OF EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE AMONG PHYSIOTHERAPISTS IN MOI TEACHING REFFERAL HOSPITAL KENYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Wanjiru

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The application of the concept of Evidenced Based Practice into clinical decision-making and practicehas outstanding benefits both to clinicians and the patient. However, the utilization of this concept has not been copiously utilized in most health facilities by the physiotherapists in Kenya. Therefore, the objectives for this study was to determine the level of awareness of evidence based practice among Physiotherapist, establish the availability of resource for Evidence Based Practice and to assess the challenges encountered by physiotherapist in engaging in evidence based practice at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital. Methods: All physiotherapists working in Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital (42 took part in a cross-sectional descriptive survey. Questionnaires were used for data collection and analyzed by SPSS version 22. Results: there was high level of awareness on Evidence Based Practice (95 % and confidence in EBP (72.5 %. However, lack of information resources, poor skills to implement EBP, poor organization support 90%, insufficient authority to induct change in the practice setting 85%, inadequate facilities 74% and lack of time were identified as the major challenges in implementation of EBP Conclusion: Strategies should be developed to provide PTs with EBP resources, such as access to databases or links to guidelines, and continuous education regarding specific topics. Professional organizations and Associations should aim at changing the current practice to ensure full utilization of EBP.

  3. Survey of quantity and quality of hospital wastes in Sistan and Balouchestan province, 1387-1388

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edris Bazrafshan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was performed to determine quantitative and qualitative characteristics of hospital wastes produced in Sistan and Balouchestan hospitals and to state health management information to improve environmental health level of hospitals and health safety of staff and personnel related to hospital environment.Materials and methods: This descriptive-cross sectional study was performed in 14 active hospitals in the province during 1387-88. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of hospital wastes was performed two times monthly for one year. The data were analyzed using statistical Excel and SPSS softwares.Results: The average of total quantity of waste produced in all hospitals was 6096.41 kg/day. Medical waste generation rate for total waste, infectious waste, general waste and sharp waste are 2.76±0.10, 1.36±0.66, 1.37±0.66 and 0.042±0.028 kg/bed-day, respectively, which is comprised of 51.6% (3142.05 kg/day of infectious waste, 47.2% (2880.25 kg/day general waste and 1.2% (74.11 kg/day sharps waste.Conclusion: Considering the high percentage of infectious waste, it can be concluded that despite plentiful efforts on the separation of hospital waste, yet there are various problems that requires more attention to this issue and also use of new methods for safe disposal of hospital wastes

  4. The role of leader behaviors in hospital-based emergency departments' unit performance and employee work satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Hsu, Chung-Ping C; Juan, Chi-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chen, Jih-Chang

    2011-01-01

    The role of the leader of a medical unit has evolved over time to expand from simply a medical role to a more managerial one. This study aimed to explore how the behavior of a hospital-based emergency department's (ED's) leader might be related to ED unit performance and ED employees' work satisfaction. One hundred and twelve hospital-based EDs in Taiwan were studied: 10 in medical centers, 32 in regional hospitals, and 70 in district hospitals. Three instruments were designed to assess leader behaviors, unit performance and employee satisfaction in these hospital-based EDs. A mail survey revealed that task-oriented leader behavior was positively related to ED unit performance. Both task- and employee-oriented leader behaviors were found to be positively related to ED nurses' work satisfaction. However, leader behaviors were not shown to be related to ED physicians' work satisfaction at a statistically significant level. Some ED organizational characteristics, however, namely departmentalization and hospital accreditation level, were found to be related to ED physicians' work satisfaction. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A survey of machine readable data bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlock, P.

    1981-01-01

    Forty-two of the machine readable data bases available to the technologist and researcher in the natural sciences and engineering are described and compared with the data bases and date base services offered by NASA.

  6. Barriers to healthy eating by National Health Service (NHS hospital doctors in the hospital setting: results of a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Sue

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With high levels of obesity and related illness, improving the health of the nation is a major public health concern. This study aimed to identify factors that prevent healthy eating among doctors, and that are associated with satisfaction with catering services. Findings Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 328 NHS doctors working in two NHS Trusts with on-site hospital canteen. Questionnaire to establish perceived barriers to healthy eating, weekly use and satisfaction with the hospital canteen, lifestyle and dietary habits, gender, age, height, weight, job details, and affect. Results: 70% of doctors reported using their hospital canteen each week, with 2 visits per week on average. Canteen opening times, lack of selection and lack of breaks were the most commonly perceived barriers to healthy eating. Availability of healthy options caused the most dissatisfaction. Only 12% felt the NHS was supportive of healthy eating. 74% did not feel their canteen advocated healthy eating. Canteen use is associated with younger age (r = -0.254, p Conclusion Interventions to encourage regular meal breaks, eating breakfast and drinking more water each day need developing. Improved canteen accessibility and availability of healthy options at evenings and weekends may be beneficial.

  7. Conducting Surveys and Data Collection: From Traditional to Mobile and SMS-based Surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iftikhar Alam

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fresh, bias-free and valid data collected using different survey modes is considered an essential requirement for smooth functioning and evolution of an organization. Surveys play a major role in making in-time correct decisions and generating reports. The aim of this study is to compare and investigate state-of-the-art in different survey modes including print, email, online, mobile and SMS-based surveys. Results indicated that existing methods are neither complete nor sufficient to fulfil the overall requirements of an organization which primarily rely on surveys. Also, it shows that SMS is a dominant method for data collection due to its pervasiveness. However, existing SMS-based data collection has limitations like limited number of characters per SMS, single question per SMS and lake of multimedia support. Recent trends in data collection emphasis on data collection applications for smart phones. However, in developing countries low-end mobile devices are still extensively used which makes the data collection difficult from man in the street. The paper conclude that existing survey modes and methods should be improved to get maximum responses quickly in low cost manner. The study has contributed to the area of surveying and data collection by analysing different factors such as cost, time and response rate. The results of this study can help practitioners in creating a more successful surveying method for data collection that can be effectively used for low budget projects in developed as well as developing countries.

  8. A Survey of Technologies Supporting Virtual Project Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a survey of technologies and to what extent they support virtual project based learning. The paper argues that a survey of learning technologies should be related to concrete learning tasks and processes. Problem oriented project pedagogy (POPP) is discussed, and a framework...... for evaluation is proposed where negotiation of meaning, coordination and resource management are identified as the key concepts in virtual project based learning. Three e-learning systems are selected for the survey, Virtual-U, Lotus Learningspace and Lotus Quickplace, as each system offers different strategies...... for e-learning. The paper concludes that virtual project based learning may benefit from facilities of all these systems....

  9. Assessing the roles of brokerage: an evaluation of a hospital-based Public Health epidemiologist program in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevc, Christine A; Markiewicz, Milissa L; Hegle, Jennifer; Horney, Jennifer A; MacDonald, Pia D M

    2012-11-01

    The North Carolina Division of Public Health established an innovative program in 2003 that placed public health epidemiologists (PHEs) in hospitals around the state to improve communication between hospitals and local public health departments (LHDs) and bolster public health surveillance and response. To use social network analysis to assess how the hospital-based PHE program in North Carolina facilitates the exchange of public health surveillance information. Using a Gould-Fernandez brokerage analysis, this study examines communication among organizational actors and their dependence on third parties to broker information and knowledge. Survey and interview data were collected to identify the interorganizational network among 220 organizational actors and their public health surveillance-related activities, including 11 PHEs, 100 county-level offices of North Carolina's 85 LHDs, and 109 hospitals. Social network analysis is used to calculate the frequency with which an actor serves as an intermediary in each of the 5 brokerage roles as well as total brokerage equal to the sum of the number of times an actor occupies each role. Results identify a frequent tendency for PHEs to serve as an intermediary between LHDs and hospitals. Interactions between these entities are frequently facilitated by PHEs, with a high measure of degree centrality by LHDs and a low frequency of brokerage among hospitals. Results validate PHEs' mission to enhance communication between LHDs and hospitals around communicable disease surveillance, reporting, and management.

  10. Nationwide epidemiological survey of childhood IgA vasculitis associated hospitalization in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Yusuke; Nochioka, Kotaro; Sakakibara, Hiroshi; Hataya, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Toshiro; Testa, Marcia; Sundel, Robert P

    2016-11-01

    At the national level, IgA vasculitis-related hospitalizations among children in the USA are scarce. Furthermore, nationwide epidemiology and hospital course of children with IgA vasculitis have not been fully described in the USA, and disparities by race/ethnicity remain unknown. Hospital discharge records of patients aged 19 years or younger were obtained from the 2003, 2006, 2009, and 2012 Kids' Inpatient Database, and they were weighted to estimate the annual hospitalization rates with respect to age, gender, and race/ethnicity in the USA. Annual hospitalization rates were calculated using weighted case estimates and US census data. Negative binomial regression was used to ascertain the factors associated with length of hospital stay. Total annual hospitalization rates showed a significant decreasing trend, ranging from 2.45 per 100,000 children in 2003 to 1.89 per 100,000 children in 2012 (p USA across multiple age groups. GI and renal manifestations are associated with increased length of hospital stay.

  11. Quality management and patient safety: survey results from 102 Hungarian hospitals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makai, P.; Klazinga, N.; Wagner, C.; Boncz, I.; Gulácsi, L.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to describe the development of quality management systems in Hungarian hospitals. It also aims to answer the policy question, whether a separate patient safety policy should be created additional to quality policies, on national as well as hospital level. METHOD:

  12. Quality management and patient safety: survey results from 102 Hungarian hospitals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makai, P.; Klazinga, N.; Wagner, C.; Boncz, I.; Gulácsi, L.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to describe the development of quality management systems in Hungarian hospitals. It also aims to answer the policy question, whether a separate patient safety policy should be created additional to quality policies, on national as well as hospital level. METHOD:

  13. Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (HVBP) – Heart Failure Scores

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospitals participating in the Hospital VBP Program and their performance rates and scores for the Clinical Process of Care Heart Failure measures.

  14. Lobotomy at a state mental hospital in Sweden. A survey of patients operated on during the period 1947-1958.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogren, Kenneth; Sandlund, Mikael

    2007-01-01

    This retrospective survey aims at describing patients subjected to prefrontal lobotomies and the general treatment conditions at Umedalen State Mental Hospital during the period 1947-1958. Data collected from psychiatric and surgical medical records was analysed using quantitative and qualitative content analysis. A total of 771 patients subjected to lobotomy during the years 1947-1958 were identified. From these, a sample of 105 patients was selected for the purpose of obtaining detailed data on socio-economic status, diagnosis, symptomatology, other psychiatric treatments applied before the pre-frontal lobotomy operation, time spent in hospital before operation, praxis of consent and mortality. The diagnosis of schizophrenia was found in 84% of the 771 lobotomized patients. The post-operative mortality was 7.4% (57 deaths), with the highest rate in 1949 (17%). The mean age of the patient at the time of operation was 44.8 years for females and 39.5 years for male patients. The average length of pre-operative time in hospital for females was 10.7 years and for males 3.5 years. It remains unclear why this mental hospital conducted the lobotomy operation to such a comparatively great extent. Factors such as overcrowding of wards and its status as a modern mental hospital may have contributed.

  15. Endemic Lassa fever in Liberia. V. Distribution of Lassa virus activity in Liberia: hospital staff surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, J D; Yalley-Ogunro, J E; Hanson, A P

    1984-01-01

    Serological testing of hospital personnel by the indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) technique was used to indicate the distribution of Lassa virus (LV) activity in Liberia. Determination of the places of origin of the staff members as well as the sites of the hospitals indicated that LV is active in throughout Liberia. Prevalences of IFA varied from 3.8% at the J. J. Dossen Hospital on the coast in the south-east to 22.3, 23.5 and 40.4% in Lofa County hospitals inland in the north-west. Rises in LV antibody prevalences, high prevalences and relatively high IFA titres in hospital personnel suggest the LV activity is particularly high in Lofa, Grand Cape Mount and Nimba Counties.

  16. Prescription errors in Brazilian hospitals: a multi-centre exploratory survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miasso, Adriana Inocenti; Oliveira, Regina Célia de; Silva, Ana Elisa Bauer de Camargo; Lyra Junior, Divaldo Pereira de; Gimenes, Fernanda Raphael Escobar; Fakih, Flávio Trevisan; Cassiani, Sílvia Helena De Bortoli

    2009-02-01

    In Brazil, millions of prescriptions do not follow the legal requirements necessary to guarantee the correct dispensing and administration of medication. This multi-centre exploratory study aimed to analyze the appropriateness of prescriptions at four Brazilian hospitals and to identify possible errors caused by inadequacies. The sample consisted of 864 prescriptions obtained at hospital medical clinics in January 2003. Data was collected by three nurse researchers during one week using a standard data sheet that included items about: the type of prescription; legibility; completeness; use of abbreviations; existence of changes and erasures. There were statistically significant differences between incomplete electronic prescriptions at hospital A, and handwritten ones from hospitals C (C2 = 12.703 and p system at the hospitals. Physicians, pharmacists and nurses should therefore jointly propose strategies to avoid these prescription errors.

  17. Urinary incontinence: hospital-based prevalence and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Nojomi

    2008-02-01

    trauma, constipation, chronic illnesses (specially diabetes, and gynecologic and other pelvic surgeries.

  18. KEY WORDS: Urinary incontinence, prevalence, risk factors, hospital-based.
  19. Rationale for hospital-based rehabilitation in obesity with comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capodaglio, P; Lafortuna, C; Petroni, M L; Salvadori, A; Gondoni, L; Castelnuovo, G; Brunani, A

    2013-06-01

    Severely obese patients affected by two or more chronic conditions which could mutually influence their outcome and disability can be defined as "complex" patients. The presence of multiple comorbidities often represents an obstacle for being admitted to clinical settings for the treatment of metabolic diseases. On the other hand, clinical Units with optimal standards for the treatment of pathological conditions in normal-weight patients are often structurally and technologically inadequate for the care of patients with extreme obesity. The aims of this review paper were to review the intrinsic (anthropometrics, body composition) and extrinsic (comorbidities) determinants of disability in obese patients and to provide an up-to-date definition of hospital-based multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs for severely obese patients with comorbidities. Rehabilitation of such patients require a here-and-now multidimensional, comprehensive approach, where the intensity of rehabilitative treatments depends on the disability level and severity of comorbidities and consists of the simultaneous provision of physiotherapy, diet and nutritional support, psychological counselling, adapted physical activity, specific nursing in hospitals with appropriate organizational and structural competences.

  20. Hyperbaric medicine for the hospital-based physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Lindell K

    2012-08-01

    associated with wound care centers and may be hospital based or nonhospital based. We review some of the disorders treated with HBO2 that hospital-based clinicians may be asked to evaluate.

  21. Characterizing hospital workers' willingness to report to duty in an influenza pandemic through threat- and efficacy-based assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catlett Christina L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospital-based providers' willingness to report to work during an influenza pandemic is a critical yet under-studied phenomenon. Witte's Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM has been shown to be useful for understanding adaptive behavior of public health workers to an unknown risk, and thus offers a framework for examining scenario-specific willingness to respond among hospital staff. Methods We administered an anonymous online EPPM-based survey about attitudes/beliefs toward emergency response, to all 18,612 employees of the Johns Hopkins Hospital from January to March 2009. Surveys were completed by 3426 employees (18.4%, approximately one third of whom were health professionals. Results Demographic and professional distribution of respondents was similar to all hospital staff. Overall, more than one-in-four (28% hospital workers indicated they were not willing to respond to an influenza pandemic scenario if asked but not required to do so. Only an additional 10% were willing if required. One-third (32% of participants reported they would be unwilling to respond in the event of a more severe pandemic influenza scenario. These response rates were consistent across different departments, and were one-third lower among nurses as compared with physicians. Respondents who were hesitant to agree to work additional hours when required were 17 times less likely to respond during a pandemic if asked. Sixty percent of the workers perceived their peers as likely to report to work in such an emergency, and were ten times more likely than others to do so themselves. Hospital employees with a perception of high efficacy had 5.8 times higher declared rates of willingness to respond to an influenza pandemic. Conclusions Significant gaps exist in hospital workers' willingness to respond, and the EPPM is a useful framework to assess these gaps. Several attitudinal indicators can help to identify hospital employees unlikely to respond. The

  1. 100 CHILDREN WITH ACUTE ATAXIA; A SURVEY IN MOFID CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Karimzadeh

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The term "Ataxia" refers to disturbances of body posture and movementthat are normally controlled by the cerebellum, frontal lobes and theposterior columns of the spinal cord. The primary symptom and themost prominent feature of ataxia is abnormal gait which is characterizedby lurching and wide base walking.Ataxia was considered acute, if it had occurred within the two precedingweeks. Knowing how frightening acute-onset Ataxia is for the familyis not surprising that the condition prompts an immediate visit to thephysician.Material & Methods:In view of the lack of information in our country, on the etiology ofsudden-onset Ataxia, the authors enrolled 100 children with the chiefcomplaint of acute loss of equilibrium, who came to the attention ofthe Pediatric Neurology Department over a two year duration(Sept.2001-Sept 2003; they were admitted to the Mofid Childrens'Hospital and all necessary investigations were carried out.Results & Conclusion:The results revealed that Acute Cerebellar Ataxia was the most commoncause of the problem, the second most frequent being drug intoxication,which most commonly occurred in patients, 2-4years old. The remainingcausative factors in order of descending frequency consisted ofinfectious polyneuropathy, migraine, opsoclonus-myoclonus, braintumor, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, multiple sclerosis, andepilepsy.

  2. The use of continuous improvement techniques: A survey-based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology ... The use of continuous improvement techniques: A survey-based study of current practices ... Prior research has focused mainly on the effect of continuous improvement practices ...

  3. Formatting a Paper-based Survey Questionnaire: Best Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Fanning

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes best practices with regard to paper-based survey questionnaire design. Initial design considerations, the cover and cover page, directions, ordering of questions, navigational path (branching, and page design are discussed.

  4. [Research on multi-agent based modeling and simulation of hospital system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junping; Yang, Hongqiao; Guo, Huayuan; Li, Yi; Zhang, Zhenjiang; Li, Shuzhang

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, the theory of complex adaptive system (CAS) and its modeling method are introduced. The complex characters of the hospital system is analyzed. The agile manufacturing and cell reconstruction technologies are used to reconstruct the hospital system. Then we set forth a research for simulation of hospital system based on the methodology of Multi-Agent technology and high level architecture (HLA). Finally, a simulation framework based on HLA for hospital system is presented.

  5. National survey of pediatric hospitalizations due to Kawasaki disease and coronary artery aneurysms in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Yusuke; Nochioka, Kotaro; Sakakibara, Hiroshi; Testa, Marcia; Sundel, Robert P

    2017-02-01

    Several studies revealed the epidemiology of Kawasaki disease-related hospitalizations among children in the USA and other countries. However, disparities of developing coronary artery aneurysms by race/ethnicity, patient socioeconomic status, and geographic locations remain unknown in the USA. Hospital discharge record data of patients with Kawasaki disease aged 19 years or younger were obtained from the 2003, 2006, 2009, and 2012 Kid's Inpatient Database. The data were weighted to estimate the annual hospitalization rates with respect to age, gender, and race/ethnicity in the USA. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to ascertain the factors associated with the development of coronary artery aneurysms. Total annual hospitalization rates of Kawasaki disease showed a decreasing trend, ranging from 6.54 per 100,000 children in 2003 to 6.11 per 100,000 children in 2012 (p aneurysms among patients with Kawasaki disease ranged from 2.25 to 3.20%. Factor associated with the development of coronary artery aneurysms was hospitals in West (OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.42-3.26). Race/ethnicity, health insurance status, and household income were not associated with the development of coronary artery aneurysms. Total hospitalization rates of Kawasaki disease showed a decreasing trend. Children admitted to hospitals in West region were more likely to develop coronary artery aneurysms.

  6. A hospital survey of the clinical features of diabetes in Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottini, G; D'Avola, D; Dimbelolo, J C; Lumu, R; Gallizioli, E; Nisita, J; Manfrini, S; De Clerck, M; Pozzilli, P

    2003-08-01

    The occurrence of diabetes mellitus is increasing throughout the world, both in industrialised nations and in developing countries. While this disease is not a leading cause of death in developing country populations, it must nevertheless be considered for its social and economic impact. This study examines the clinical and epidemiological situation of diabetes mellitus in the city of Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo, as based on data from two city hospitals: Saint Joseph's Hospital (SJH) and the Centre Hospitalier Monkole (CHM), two urban health facilities typical of those developing countries. The results show that diabetes is a real public health problem in Congo. Average blood glucose levels were above 300 mg/dl in 44.4% of patients at SJH and 41.5% at CHM, and hypertension (> or = 140/90 mmHg) was reported in 35.8% of patients at SJH and 20% at CHM. The management of diabetes and, in particular, its complications is suffering because of some cultural influences but mainly economic ones. In fact, incidence of disease complications is closely linked to the financial status of patients and facilities. SJH, which serves mainly the low-income community, has a greater incidence of severe diabetes-associated complications than CHM, which treats patients with a higher mean income level. SJH hospitalised patients had a 24.7% incidence of diabetic foot with 3 amputations as compared to only a 10% incidence and no amputations for CHM hospitalised patients. At SJH, 17.3% of patients died during the study, while at CHM none died. Overall, differences in the prevalence of complications between SJH and CHM patients were found not to be significant. For the large majority of Congo population, education on diabetes is not available, and due to the failure of the national health system, access to treatment is impossible. Furthermore, because most diabetic people in Congo go untreated, the mortality rate for the disease is high. Congo would greatly benefit from a national

  7. Evaluation of the association between Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS) measures and catheter-associated infections: results of two national collaboratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meddings, Jennifer; Reichert, Heidi; Greene, M Todd; Safdar, Nasia; Krein, Sarah L; Olmsted, Russell N; Watson, Sam R; Edson, Barbara; Albert Lesher, Mariana; Saint, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    Background The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) has funded national collaboratives using the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program to reduce rates of two catheter-associated infections—central-line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), using evidence-based intervention bundles to improve technical aspects of care and socioadaptive approaches to foster a culture of safety. Objective Examine the association between hospital units' results for the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS) and catheter-associated infection rates. Methods We analysed data from two prospective cohort studies from acute-care intensive care units (ICUs) and non-ICUs participating in the AHRQ CLABSI and CAUTI collaboratives. National Healthcare Safety Network catheter-associated infections per 1000 catheter-days were collected at baseline and quarterly postimplementation. The HSOPS was collected at baseline and again 1 year later. Infection rates were modelled using multilevel negative binomial models as a function of HSOPS components over time, adjusted for hospital-level characteristics. Results 1821 units from 1079 hospitals (CLABSI) and 1576 units from 949 hospitals (CAUTI) were included. Among responding units, infection rates declined over the project periods (by 47% for CLABSI, by 23% for CAUTI, unadjusted). No significant associations were found between CLABSI or CAUTI rates and HSOPS measures at baseline or over time. Conclusions We found no association between results of the HSOPS and catheter-associated infection rates when measured at baseline and postintervention in two successful large national collaboratives focused on prevention of CLABSI and CAUTI. These results suggest that it may be possible to improve CLABSI and CAUTI rates without making significant changes in safety culture, particularly as measured by instruments like HSOPS. PMID:27222593

  8. A nationwide population-based cross-sectional survey of health-related quality of life in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms in Denmark (MPNhealthSurvey)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brochmann Mortensen, Nana; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Christensen, Anne Illemann

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The Department of Hematology, Zealand University Hospital, Denmark, and the National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, created the first nationwide, population-based, and the most comprehensive cross-sectional health-related quality of life (HRQoL) survey...... the treatment. The aims of this article are to describe the survey design and the characteristics of respondents and nonrespondents. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Individuals with MPN diagnoses registered in the Danish National Patient Register (NPR) were invited to participate. The registers of the Danish Civil...

  9. Assessing the impact of community-based mobile crisis services on preventing hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S; Biegel, D E; Johnsen, J A; Dyches, H

    2001-02-01

    This study evaluated the impact of a community-based mobile crisis intervention program on the rate and timing of hospitalization. It also explored major consumer characteristics related to the likelihood of hospitalization. A quasi-experimental design with an ex post matched control group was used. A community-based mobile crisis intervention cohort (N=1,696) was matched with a hospital-based intervention cohort (N=4,106) on seven variables: gender, race, age at the time of crisis service, primary diagnosis, recency of prior use of services, indication of substance abuse, and severe mental disability certification status. The matching process resulted in a treatment group and a comparison group, each consisting of 1,100 subjects. Differences in hospitalization rate and timing between the two groups were assessed with a Cox proportional hazards model. The community-based crisis intervention reduced the hospitalization rate by 8 percentage points. A consumer using a hospital-based intervention was 51 percent more likely than one using community-based mobile crisis services to be hospitalized within the 30 days after the crisis (phomeless, and experiencing acute problems; they were referred by psychiatric hospitals, the legal system, or other treatment facilities; they showed signs of substance abuse, had no income, and were severely mentally disabled. Results indicate that community-based mobile crisis services resulted in a lower rate of hospitalization than hospital-based interventions. Consumer characteristics were also associated with the risk of hospitalization.

  10. [Hospital information system performance for road traffic accidents analysis in a hospital recruitment based area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannot, A-S; Fauconnier, J

    2013-06-01

    Road traffic accidents in France are mainly analyzed through reports completed by the security forces (police and gendarmerie). But the hospital information systems can also identify road traffic accidents via specific documentary codes of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). The aim of this study was therefore to determine whether hospital stays consecutive to road traffic accident were truly identified by these documentary codes in a facility that collects data routinely and to study the consistency of results from hospital information systems and from security forces during the 2002-2008 period. We retrieved all patients for whom a documentary code for road traffic accident was entered in 2002-2008. We manually checked the concordance of documentary code for road traffic accident and trauma origin in 350 patient files. The number of accidents in the Grenoble area was then inferred by combining with hospitalization regional data and compared to the number of persons injured by traffic accidents declared by the security force. These hospital information systems successfully report road traffic accidents with 96% sensitivity (95%CI: [92%, 100%]) and 97% specificity (95%CI: [95%, 99%]). The decrease in road traffic accidents observed was significantly less than that observed was significantly lower than that observed in the data from the security force (45% for security force data against 27% for hospital data). Overall, this study shows that hospital information systems are a powerful tool for studying road traffic accidents morbidity in hospital and are complementary to security force data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Use of Antibiotics in Pediatrics: 8-Years Survey in Italian Hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Buccellato; Mauro Melis; Chiara Biagi; Monia Donati; Domenico Motola; Alberto Vaccheri

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate antibiotic consumption in the pediatric wards of Emilia-Romagna Region, from 2004 to 2011, with a focus on the antibiotics reserved to the most serious infections, and to analyse the ADRs reported for antibiotics by the pediatric wards of Emilia-Romagna hospitals. Methods Reference population was represented by all the patients (0–14 years old) admitted to the pediatric wards of all the hospitals of Emilia-Romagna Region. Drug consumption was expressed as number of DDDs...

  12. Tutorial on technology transfer and survey design and data collection for measuring Internet and Intranet existence, usage, and impact (survey-2000) in acute care hospitals in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, M

    2001-02-01

    This paper provides a tutorial of technology transfer for management information systems in health care. Additionally it describes the process for a national survey of acute care hospitals using a random sample of 813 hospitals. The purpose of the survey was to measure the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business to business and with customers. The relationships with systems approaches, user involvement, user satisfaction and decision-making will be studied. Changes with results of a prior survey conducted in 1997 can be studied and enabling and inhabiting factors identified. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals.

  13. A five-year survey of dematiaceous fungi in a tropical hospital reveals potential opportunistic species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Mei Yew

    Full Text Available Dematiaceous fungi (black fungi are a heterogeneous group of fungi present in diverse environments worldwide. Many species in this group are known to cause allergic reactions and potentially fatal diseases in humans and animals, especially in tropical and subtropical climates. This study represents the first survey of dematiaceous fungi in Malaysia and provides observations on their diversity as well as in vitro response to antifungal drugs. Seventy-five strains isolated from various clinical specimens were identified by morphology as well as an internal transcribed spacer (ITS-based phylogenetic analysis. The combined molecular and conventional approach enabled the identification of three classes of the Ascomycota phylum and 16 genera, the most common being Cladosporium, Cochliobolus and Neoscytalidium. Several of the species identified have not been associated before with human infections. Among 8 antifungal agents tested, the azoles posaconazole (96%, voriconazole (90.7%, ketoconazole (86.7% and itraconazole (85.3% showed in vitro activity (MIC ≤ 1 µg/mL to the largest number of strains, followed by anidulafungin (89.3%, caspofungin (74.7% and amphotericin B (70.7%. Fluconazole appeared to be the least effective with only 10.7% of isolates showing in vitro susceptibility. Overall, almost half (45.3% of the isolates showed reduced susceptibility (MIC >1 µg/mL to at least one antifungal agent, and three strains (one Pyrenochaeta unguis-hominis and two Nigrospora oryzae showed potential multidrug resistance.

  14. Vision-based Vehicle Detection Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex David S

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays thousands of drivers and passengers were losing their lives every year on road accident, due to deadly crashes between more than one vehicle. There are number of many research focuses were dedicated to the development of intellectual driver assistance systems and autonomous vehicles over the past decade, which reduces the danger by monitoring the on-road environment. In particular, researchers attracted towards the on-road detection of vehicles in recent years. Different parameters have been analyzed in this paper which includes camera placement and the various applications of monocular vehicle detection, common features and common classification methods, motion- based approaches and nighttime vehicle detection and monocular pose estimation. Previous works on the vehicle detection listed based on camera poisons, feature based detection and motion based detection works and night time detection.

  15. A point-prevalence survey of public hospital inpatients with palliative care needs in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Niekerk, L; Raubenheimer, P J

    2014-02-01

    To assess the need for palliative care among inpatients occupying acute beds in the public sector hospitals of the Cape Town Metropole. A cross-sectional, contemporaneous, point-prevalence study was performed at 11 public sector hospitals in the Cape Town Metropole using a standardised palliative care identification tool. Data were collected on the socio-demographic characteristics, diagnoses, and prior and current care planning of patients. The case notes of 1 443 hospital inpatients were surveyed, and 16.6% were found to have an active life-limiting disease. The mean age of the group was 56 years. The diagnoses were cancer in 50.8%, organ failure in 32.5%, and HIV/tuberculosis in 9.6%. The greatest burden of disease was in the general medical wards, to which an overall 54.8% of patients meeting the requirements for palliative care were admitted. This study provides evidence for the need for palliative care services in public sector hospitals and in the health system as a whole. The young age of patients and the high prevalences of end-stage renal failure and HIV are unique, and the burden in the general medical wards suggests a focus for initial inpatient programmes.

  16. Strategic planning, implementation, and evaluation processes in hospital systems: a survey from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghifar, Jamil; Jafari, Mehdi; Tofighi, Shahram; Ravaghi, Hamid; Maleki, Mohammad Reza

    2014-09-28

    Strategic planning has been presented as an important management practice. However, evidence of its deployment in healthcare systems in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) is limited. This study investigated the strategic management process in Iranian hospitals. The present study was accomplished in 24 teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran from September 2012 to March 2013. The data collection instrument was a questionnaire including 130 items. This questionnaire measured the situation of formulation, implementation, and evaluation of strategic plan as well as the requirements, facilitators, and its benefits in the studied hospitals. All the investigated hospitals had a strategic plan. The obtained percentages for the items "the rate of the compliance to requirements" and "the quantity of planning facilitators" (68.75%), attention to the stakeholder participation in the planning (55.74%), attention to the planning components (62.22%), the status of evaluating strategic plan (59.94%) and the benefits of strategic planning for hospitals (65.15%) were in the medium limit. However, the status of implementation of the strategic plan (53.71%) was found to be weak. Significant statistical correlations were observed between the incentive for developing strategic plan and status of evaluating phase (P=0.04), and between status of implementation phase and having a documented strategic plan (P=0.03). According to the results, it seems that absence of appropriate internal incentive for formulating and implementing strategies led more hospitals to start formulation strategic planning in accordance with the legal requirements of Ministry of Health. Consequently, even though all the investigated hospital had the documented strategic plan, the plan has not been implemented efficiently and valid evaluation of results is yet to be achieved.

  17. Strategic Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation Processes in Hospital Systems: A Survey From Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghifar, Jamil; Jafari, Mehdi; Tofighi, Shahram; Ravaghi, Hamid; Maleki, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Aim & Background: Strategic planning has been presented as an important management practice. However, evidence of its deployment in healthcare systems in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) is limited. This study investigated the strategic management process in Iranian hospitals. Methods: The present study was accomplished in 24 teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran from September 2012 to March 2013. The data collection instrument was a questionnaire including 130 items. This questionnaire measured the situation of formulation, implementation, and evaluation of strategic plan as well as the requirements, facilitators, and its benefits in the studied hospitals. Results: All the investigated hospitals had a strategic plan. The obtained percentages for the items “the rate of the compliance to requirements” and “the quantity of planning facilitators” (68.75%), attention to the stakeholder participation in the planning (55.74%), attention to the planning components (62.22%), the status of evaluating strategic plan (59.94%) and the benefits of strategic planning for hospitals (65.15%) were in the medium limit. However, the status of implementation of the strategic plan (53.71%) was found to be weak. Significant statistical correlations were observed between the incentive for developing strategic plan and status of evaluating phase (P=0.04), and between status of implementation phase and having a documented strategic plan (P=0.03). Conclusion: According to the results, it seems that absence of appropriate internal incentive for formulating and implementing strategies led more hospitals to start formulation strategic planning in accordance with the legal requirements of Ministry of Health. Consequently, even though all the investigated hospital had the documented strategic plan, the plan has not been implemented efficiently and valid evaluation of results is yet to be achieved. PMID:25716385

  18. Postulating a dermal pathway for exposure to anti-neoplastic drugs among hospital workers. Applying a conceptual model to the results of three workplace surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromhout, H.; Hoek, F.; Uitterhoeve, R.; Huijbers, R.; Overmars, R.F.; Anzion, R.; Vermeulen, R.

    2000-01-01

    Dermal exposure to anti-neoplastic drugs has been suggested as a potentially important route of exposure of hospital workers. Three small-scale workplace surveys were carried out in several hospitals focusing on contamination by leakage from IV infusion systems; contamination by spilled urine of

  19. Postulating a dermal pathway for exposure to anti-neoplastic drugs among hospital workers. Applying a conceptual model to the results of three workplace surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromhout, H.; Hoek, F.; Uitterhoeve, R.; Huijbers, R.; Overmars, R.F.; Anzion, R.; Vermeulen, R.

    2000-01-01

    Dermal exposure to anti-neoplastic drugs has been suggested as a potentially important route of exposure of hospital workers. Three small-scale workplace surveys were carried out in several hospitals focusing on contamination by leakage from IV infusion systems; contamination by spilled urine of pat

  20. Achieving Adherence to Evidence-Based Practices: Are Health IT and Hospital-Physician Integration Complementary or Substitutive Strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everson, Jordan; Lee, Shoou-Yih Daniel; Adler-Milstein, Julia

    2016-12-01

    In response to evolving policies and conditions, hospitals have increased health information technology (HIT) adoption and strived to improve hospital-physician integration. While evidence suggests that both HIT and integration confer independent benefits, when combined, they may provide complementary means to achieve high performance or overlap to offset each other's contribution. We explore this relationship in the context of hospital adherence to evidence-based practices (EBPs). Using the American Hospital Association's Annual and IT Supplement surveys, and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services's Hospital Compare, we estimate the independent relationships and interactions between HIT and hospital-physician integration with respect to EBP adherence. HIT adoption and tight (but not loose) integration are independently associated with greater adherence to EBPs. The interaction between HIT adoption and tight integration is negative, consistent with an offsetting association between HIT adoption and integration in their relationship to EBP adherence. This finding reveals the need to be aware of potential substitutive effects from simultaneous pursuit of multiple approaches to performance improvement.

  1. Admission of foreign citizens to the general teaching hospital of bologna, northeastern Italy: An epidemiological and clinical survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Sabbatani

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The emergency regarding recent immigration waves into Italy makes continued healthcare monitoring of these populations necessary. METHODS: Through a survey of hospital admissions carried out during the last five years at the S. Orsola-Malpighi General Hospital of Bologna (Italy, all causes of admission of these subjects were evaluated, together with their correlates. Subsequently, we focused on admissions due to infectious diseases. All available data regarding foreign citizens admitted as inpatients or in Day-Hospital settings of our teaching hospital from January 1, 1999, to March 31, 2004, were assessed. Diagnosis-related group (DRG features, and single discharge diagnoses, were also evaluated, and a further assessment of infectious diseases was subsequently made. RESULTS: Within a comprehensive pool of 339,051 hospitalized patients, foreign citizen discharges numbered 7,312 (2.15%, including 2,542 males (34.8% and 4,769 females (65.2%. Males had a mean age of 36.8±14.7 years, while females were aged 30.8±12.2 years. In the assessment of the areas of origin, 34.6% of hospitalizations were attributed to patients coming from Eastern Europe, 15.3% from Northern Africa, 7.3% (comprehensively from Western Europe and United States, 6.9% from the Indian subcontinent, 5.9% from sub-Saharan Africa, 5.7% from Latin America, 4.1% from China, 2.5% from the Philippines, and 1.1% from the Middle East. Among women, most hospitalizations (58.8% were due to obstetrical-gynecological procedures or diseases, including assistance with delivery (27.1%, and pregnancy complications (18.7%, followed by psycho-social disturbances (5.9%, malignancies (5.1%, gastrointestinal diseases (4.7%, and voluntary pregnancy interruption (4.4%. Among men, the most frequent causes of admissions were related to trauma (15.9%, followed by gastroenteric disorders (12%, heart-vascular diseases (8.9%, psycho-social disorders (8.4%, respiratory (7.1%, kidney (6.1%, liver

  2. Admission of foreign citizens to the general teaching hospital of bologna, northeastern Italy: An epidemiological and clinical survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Sabbatani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The emergency regarding recent immigration waves into Italy makes continued healthcare monitoring of these populations necessary. METHODS: Through a survey of hospital admissions carried out during the last five years at the S. Orsola-Malpighi General Hospital of Bologna (Italy, all causes of admission of these subjects were evaluated, together with their correlates. Subsequently, we focused on admissions due to infectious diseases. All available data regarding foreign citizens admitted as inpatients or in Day-Hospital settings of our teaching hospital from January 1, 1999, to March 31, 2004, were assessed. Diagnosis-related group (DRG features, and single discharge diagnoses, were also evaluated, and a further assessment of infectious diseases was subsequently made. RESULTS: Within a comprehensive pool of 339,051 hospitalized patients, foreign citizen discharges numbered 7,312 (2.15%, including 2,542 males (34.8% and 4,769 females (65.2%. Males had a mean age of 36.8±14.7 years, while females were aged 30.8±12.2 years. In the assessment of the areas of origin, 34.6% of hospitalizations were attributed to patients coming from Eastern Europe, 15.3% from Northern Africa, 7.3% (comprehensively from Western Europe and United States, 6.9% from the Indian subcontinent, 5.9% from sub-Saharan Africa, 5.7% from Latin America, 4.1% from China, 2.5% from the Philippines, and 1.1% from the Middle East. Among women, most hospitalizations (58.8% were due to obstetrical-gynecological procedures or diseases, including assistance with delivery (27.1%, and pregnancy complications (18.7%, followed by psycho-social disturbances (5.9%, malignancies (5.1%, gastrointestinal diseases (4.7%, and voluntary pregnancy interruption (4.4%. Among men, the most frequent causes of admissions were related to trauma (15.9%, followed by gastroenteric disorders (12%, heart-vascular diseases (8.9%, psycho-social disorders (8.4%, respiratory (7.1%, kidney (6.1%, liver

  3. The hospital library as a "magnet force" for a research and evidence-based nursing culture: A case study of two magnet hospitals in one health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, Diane Ream

    2007-01-01

    When Baptist Hospital of Miami, then South Miami Hospital, became Magnet award-winning hospitals, their libraries' challenges increased. Could their librarians ease the transition of research and evidence-based practice into the "real world" of nursing? Did library services have a role in the ongoing Magnet re-credentialing process? This case study defines hospital library magnet force strategies that worked in the quest for this prestigious award for nursing excellence at two hospitals at Baptist Health South Florida.

  4. Comparisons of anti-diabetic prescriptions of private practitioners and hospital prescribers: A survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Mandal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Monotherapy as well as effective and safe combination therapy for diabetes is practiced widely by both private and government hospital prescribers. This study attempted to compare the prescriptions of government and private practitioners to obtain a fair idea of the trends of diabetes management in either group. Prescriptions for diabetic patients from both private practitioners and government medical college prescribers were collected. These were analyzed for parameters such as number and type of drugs, cost, and generic prescription. Private prescribers were not significantly different from hospital prescribers in terms of number of drugs per prescription, cost of therapy, and treatment regimens. However, there was a dearth of generic prescriptions from private consultants (33% vs. 9%. Metformin and Glimepiride were the most prescribed drugs in both groups. However, private practitioners preferred Gliclazide, Glipizide, and Glibenclamide more than hospital prescribers.

  5. Survey of WBSNs for Pre-Hospital Assistance: Trends to Maximize the Network Lifetime and Video Transmission Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Gonzalez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This survey aims to encourage the multidisciplinary communities to join forces for innovation in the mobile health monitoring area. Specifically, multidisciplinary innovations in medical emergency scenarios can have a significant impact on the effectiveness and quality of the procedures and practices in the delivery of medical care. Wireless body sensor networks (WBSNs are a promising technology capable of improving the existing practices in condition assessment and care delivery for a patient in a medical emergency. This technology can also facilitate the early interventions of a specialist physician during the pre-hospital period. WBSNs make possible these early interventions by establishing remote communication links with video/audio support and by providing medical information such as vital signs, electrocardiograms, etc. in real time. This survey focuses on relevant issues needed to understand how to setup a WBSN for medical emergencies. These issues are: monitoring vital signs and video transmission, energy efficient protocols, scheduling, optimization and energy consumption on a WBSN.

  6. Activity-based costing and its application in a Turkish university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yereli, Ayşe Necef

    2009-03-01

    Resource management in hospitals is of increasing importance in today's global economy. Traditional accounting systems have become inadequate for managing hospital resources and accurately determining service costs. Conversely, the activity-based costing approach to hospital accounting is an effective cost management model that determines costs and evaluates financial performance across departments. Obtaining costs that are more accurate can enable hospitals to analyze and interpret costing decisions and make more accurate budgeting decisions. Traditional and activity-based costing approaches were compared using a cost analysis of gall bladder surgeries in the general surgery department of one university hospital in Manisa, Turkey. Copyright (c) AORN, Inc, 2009.

  7. A NATIONAL SURVEY TO IDENTIFY HOW DISPLACEMENT VALUE INFORMATION IS USED AND PRESENTED TO CLINICAL STAFF IN NHS HOSPITALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Nanna; Kehk, Zinab; Keeling, Susan; Dean, Bryony

    2016-09-01

    The use of displacement values (DVs) when preparing intravenous (IV) medication for children enables accurate doses to be given1 and is assumed to be common paediatric practice. This survey aimed to assess views of UK paediatric pharmacists on DVs in practice to explore:▸ How prevalent is DV use in the paediatric hospital setting▸ Which type of IV administration guidelines were being used▸ Which form of DV presentation is perceived to be most practical▸ Which method of calculation is preferred A national cross-sectional survey study was undertaken. The questionnaire comprised of 13 closed and open questions as well as samples of how DVs are currently displayed on the Medusa Injectable Medicines Guide2. After piloting the questionnaire the survey was sent to 365 paediatric pharmacists across 120 UK hospitals utilising Qualtrics Survey Software. Fifty-five completed questionnaires covering 52 (43%) United Kingdom (UK) hospital trusts were received. Of 55 respondents, 52 (95%) reported the clinical significance of DVs in paediatric care. This was reflected in the fact that all local guides provided information on DVs. The majority (32;59%) used locally produced guides, while 15 (27%) of respondents used Medusa as a resource. All respondents commented on methods of presentation and calculation of DV information. Of four methods presented, the method involving presentation of reconstitution information in a brand-specific table was ranked as most practical (46;84% respondents). This method was viewed as being clear and concise. Respondents also expressed the importance of having this tabulated method visually embedded in the monograph to allow easy access to information on the wards. This concurs with suggested information presentation to aid error reduction in the literature.3 National standardisation of DV information was viewed as 'very useful' or 'preferred' by 52 (95%) of respondents; reasons for this preference were risk reduction due to errors or

  8. Trends in Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL) Producing Enterobacteriaceae and ESBL Genes in a Dutch Teaching Hospital, Measured in 5 Yearly Point Prevalence Surveys (2010-2014)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, Ina; Oome, Stijn; Verhulst, Carlo; Pettersson, Annika; Verduin, Kees; Kluytmans, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the trends in prevalence of ESBL producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) and ESBL genes, measured in five consecutive yearly Point Prevalence Surveys (PPS). All patients present in the hospital and in a day-care clinic (including patients on dialysis) on the day of the survey,

  9. Trends in Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL) Producing Enterobacteriaceae and ESBL Genes in a Dutch Teaching Hospital, Measured in 5 Yearly Point Prevalence Surveys (2010-2014)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, Ina; Oome, Stijn; Verhulst, Carlo; Pettersson, Annika; Verduin, Kees; Kluytmans, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the trends in prevalence of ESBL producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) and ESBL genes, measured in five consecutive yearly Point Prevalence Surveys (PPS). All patients present in the hospital and in a day-care clinic (including patients on dialysis) on the day of the survey, wer

  10. Patient safety, satisfaction, and quality of hospital care: cross sectional surveys of nurses and patients in 12 countries in Europe and the United States.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aiken, L.H.; Sermeus, W.; Heede, K. Van den; Sloane, D.M.; Busse, R.; McKee, M.; Bruyneel, L.; Rafferty, A.M.; Griffiths, P.; Moreno-Casbas, M.T.; Tishelman, C.; Scott, A.; Brzostek, T.; Kinnunen, J.; Schwendimann, R.; Heinen, M.M.; Zikos, D.; Sjetne, I.S.; Smith, H.L.; Kutney-Lee, A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether hospitals with a good organisation of care (such as improved nurse staffing and work environments) can affect patient care and nurse workforce stability in European countries. DESIGN: Cross sectional surveys of patients and nurses. SETTING: Nurses were surveyed in

  11. Patient safety, satisfaction, and quality of hospital care: cross sectional surveys of nurses and patients in 12 countries in Europe and the United States.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aiken, L.H.; Sermeus, W.; Heede, K. Van den; Sloane, D.M.; Busse, R.; McKee, M.; Bruyneel, L.; Rafferty, A.M.; Griffiths, P.; Moreno-Casbas, M.T.; Tishelman, C.; Scott, A.; Brzostek, T.; Kinnunen, J.; Schwendimann, R.; Heinen, M.M.; Zikos, D.; Sjetne, I.S.; Smith, H.L.; Kutney-Lee, A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether hospitals with a good organisation of care (such as improved nurse staffing and work environments) can affect patient care and nurse workforce stability in European countries. DESIGN: Cross sectional surveys of patients and nurses. SETTING: Nurses were surveyed in gen

  12. Web-based computer adaptive assessment of individual perceptions of job satisfaction for hospital workplace employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shih-Chung

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To develop a web-based computer adaptive testing (CAT application for efficiently collecting data regarding workers' perceptions of job satisfaction, we examined whether a 37-item Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ-37 could evaluate the job satisfaction of individual employees as a single construct. Methods The JCQ-37 makes data collection via CAT on the internet easy, viable and fast. A Rasch rating scale model was applied to analyze data from 300 randomly selected hospital employees who participated in job-satisfaction surveys in 2008 and 2009 via non-adaptive and computer-adaptive testing, respectively. Results Of the 37 items on the questionnaire, 24 items fit the model fairly well. Person-separation reliability for the 2008 surveys was 0.88. Measures from both years and item-8 job satisfaction for groups were successfully evaluated through item-by-item analyses by using t-test. Workers aged 26 - 35 felt that job satisfaction was significantly worse in 2009 than in 2008. Conclusions A Web-CAT developed in the present paper was shown to be more efficient than traditional computer-based or pen-and-paper assessments at collecting data regarding workers' perceptions of job content.

  13. Attitudes of hospitalized patients toward wearing patient clothing in Tianjin, China: A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Liu

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: More than half of the hospitalized patients dislike wearing patient clothing because they were unaware of its functions and were skeptical about its hygiene, comfortability, fit, and appearance. Therefore, these patients must be provided with comfortable, well fitting, hygienic, and aesthetically pleasing clothing.

  14. Thai Hospitals' Adoption of Information Technology: A Theory Development and Nationwide Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theera-Ampornpunt, Nawanan

    2011-01-01

    Background: With documented benefits and recent public policies, health information technology (IT) has received increasing attention in recent years. However, knowledge about Thailand's state of hospital IT adoption is lacking. The literature also identifies organizational management practices that are important to health IT implementation, but…

  15. Occupational injury history and universal precautions awareness: a survey in Kabul hospital staff

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    Garner Paul

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health staff in Afghanistan may be at high risk of needle stick injury and occupational infection with blood borne pathogens, but we have not found any published or unpublished data. Methods Our aim was to measure the percentage of healthcare staff reporting sharps injuries in the preceding 12 months, and to explore what they knew about universal precautions. In five randomly selected government hospitals in Kabul a total of 950 staff participated in the study. Data were analyzed with Epi Info 3. Results Seventy three percent of staff (72.6%, 491/676 reported sharps injury in the preceding 12 months, with remarkably similar levels between hospitals and staff cadres in the 676 (71.1% people responding. Most at risk were gynaecologist/obstetricians (96.1% followed by surgeons (91.1%, nurses (80.2%, dentists (75.4%, midwives (62.0%, technicians (50.0%, and internist/paediatricians (47.5%. Of the injuries reported, the commonest were from hollow-bore needles (46.3%, n = 361/780, usually during recapping. Almost a quarter (27.9% of respondents had not been vaccinated against hepatitis B. Basic knowledge about universal precautions were found insufficient across all hospitals and cadres. Conclusion Occupational health policies for universal precautions need to be implemented in Afghani hospitals. Staff vaccination against hepatitis B is recommended.

  16. Emergency department physician training in Jamaica: a national public hospital survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Eric W

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency Department (ED medical officers are often the first medical responders to emergencies in Jamaica because pre-hospital emergency response services are not universally available. Over the past decade, several new ED training opportunities have been introduced locally. Their precise impact on the health care system in Jamaica has not yet been evaluated. We sought to determine the level of training, qualifications and experience of medical officers employed in public hospital EDs across the nation. Methods A database of all medical officers employed in public hospital EDs was created from records maintained by the Ministry of Health in Jamaica. A specially designed questionnaire was administered to all medical officers in this database. Data was analyzed using SPSS Version 10.0. Results There were 160 ED medical officers across Jamaica, of which 47.5% were males and the mean age was 32.3 years (SD +/- 7.1; Range 23–57. These physicians were employed in the EDs for a mean of 2.2 years (SD +/- 2.5; Range 0–15; Median 2.5 and were recent graduates of medical schools (Mean 5.1; SD +/- 5.9; Median 3 years. Only 5.5% of the medical officers had specialist qualifications (grade III/IV, 12.8% were grade II medical officers and 80.5% were grade I house officers or interns. The majority of medical officers had no additional training qualifications: 20.9% were exposed to post-graduate training, 27.9% had current ACLS certification and 10.3% had current ATLS certification. Conclusion The majority of medical officers in public hospital EDs across Jamaica are relatively inexperienced and inadequately trained. Consultant supervision is not available in most public hospital EDs. With the injury epidemic that exists in Jamaica, it is logical that increased training opportunities and resources are required to meet the needs of the population.

  17. Survey of Communicable Diseases Surveillance System in Hospitals of Iran: A Qualitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehcheshmeh, Nayeb Fadaei; Arab, Mohammad; Foroushani, Abbas Rahimi; Farzianpour, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Communicable Disease Surveillance and reporting is one of the key elements to combat against diseases and their control. Fast and timely recognition of communicable diseases can be helpful in controlling of epidemics. One of the main sources of management of communicable diseases reporting is hospitals that collect communicable diseases’ reports and send them to health authorities. One of the focal problems and challenges in this regard is incomplete and imprecise reports from hospitals. In this study, while examining the implementation processes of the communicable diseases surveillance in hospitals, non-medical people who were related to the program have been studied by a qualitative approach. Methods: This study was conducted using qualitative content analysis method. Participants in the study included 36 informants, managers, experts associated with health and surveillance of communicable diseases that were selected using targeted sampling and with diverse backgrounds and work experience (different experiences in primary health surveillance and treatment, Ministry levels, university staff and operations (hospitals and health centers) and sampling was continued until arrive to data saturation. Results: Interviews were analyzed after the elimination of duplicate codes and integration of them. Finally, 73 codes were acquired and categorized in 6 major themes and 21 levels. The main themes included: policy making and planning, development of resources, organizing, collaboration and participation, surveillance process, and monitoring and evaluation of the surveillance system. In point of interviewees, attention to these themes is necessary to develop effective and efficient surveillance system for communicable diseases. Conclusion: Surveillance system in hospitals is important in developing proper macro - policies in health sector, adoption of health related decisions and preventive plans appropriate to the existing situation. Compilation, changing

  18. Hospital value-based purchasing (VBP) program: measurement of quality and enforcement of quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szablowski, Katarzyna M

    2014-01-01

    VBP program is a novel medicare payment estimatin tool used to encourage clinical care quality improvement as well as improvement of patient experience as a customer of a health care system. The program utilizes well established tools of measuring clinical care quality and patient satisfaction such as the hospital IQR program and HCAHPS survey to estimate Medicare payments and encourage hospitals to continuosly improve the level of care they provide.

  19. Is There a Relationship Between Value-Based Purchasing and Hospital Profitability? An Exploratory Study of Missouri Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason S. Turner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent US legislation is attempting to transition inpatient Medicare payments to a value-based purchasing (VBP program. The VBP program is a pay-for-performance (P4P system that incentivizes hospitals to improve patient satisfaction, health outcomes, and adherence to clinical protocols while simultaneously holding down costs. Our study evaluates (1 the impact of financial performance on the VBP adjustments and (2 whether there is a correlation between the VBP adjustment and the financial performance of Missouri hospitals that opted into the program. While upward and downward adjustments to the inpatient base rate may be related to hospital financial performance, prior financial performance may also be related to the adjustments. Financial health may allow facilities to invest and position the hospital for favorable future P4P adjustments. The results of our analysis indicate the VBP adjustment to the inpatient base rate is very small (±0.18%, clustered around zero, and is not correlated with financial performance. We also find that financial performance and improvement in the years prior to the adjustment are not related to the VBP adjustment or its respective components. This suggests that CMS is avoiding penalizing less profitable facilities, but the adjustment is also so small and tightly clustered around zero that it is failing to provide an adequate incentive to hospitals. The costs of improving patient satisfaction, clinical process adherence, health care outcomes, and efficiency above that of peers coupled with the growing number of metrics being used to calculate the VBP adjustments call into question the financial incentives of the hospital VBP program.

  20. A simulation model of hospital management based on cost accounting analysis according to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Koji; Sato, Junzo; Guo, Jinqiu; Takada, Akira; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2004-12-01

    Since a little before 2000, hospital cost accounting has been increasingly performed at Japanese national university hospitals. At Kumamoto University Hospital, for instance, departmental costs have been analyzed since 2000. And, since 2003, the cost balance has been obtained according to certain diseases for the preparation of Diagnosis-Related Groups and Prospective Payment System. On the basis of these experiences, we have constructed a simulation model of hospital management. This program has worked correctly at repeated trials and with satisfactory speed. Although there has been room for improvement of detailed accounts and cost accounting engine, the basic model has proved satisfactory. We have constructed a hospital management model based on the financial data of an existing hospital. We will later improve this program from the viewpoint of construction and using more various data of hospital management. A prospective outlook may be obtained for the practical application of this hospital management model.

  1. Adding A Spending Metric To Medicare's Value-Based Purchasing Program Rewarded Low-Quality Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anup; Norton, Edward C; Miller, David C; Ryan, Andrew M; Birkmeyer, John D; Chen, Lena M

    2016-05-01

    In fiscal year 2015 the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services expanded its Hospital Value-Based Purchasing program by rewarding or penalizing hospitals for their performance on both spending and quality. This represented a sharp departure from the program's original efforts to incentivize hospitals for quality alone. How this change redistributed hospital bonuses and penalties was unknown. Using data from 2,679 US hospitals that participated in the program in fiscal years 2014 and 2015, we found that the new emphasis on spending rewarded not only low-spending hospitals but some low-quality hospitals as well. Thirty-eight percent of low-spending hospitals received bonuses in fiscal year 2014, compared to 100 percent in fiscal year 2015. However, low-quality hospitals also began to receive bonuses (0 percent in fiscal year 2014 compared to 17 percent in 2015). All high-quality hospitals received bonuses in both years. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services should consider incorporating a minimum quality threshold into the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing program to avoid rewarding low-quality, low-spending hospitals.

  2. Retinal detachment in southwest Ethiopia: a hospital based prospective study.

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    Tsedeke Asaminew

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The incidence of retinal detachment in Blacks is generally considered to be low though there are few supporting studies in Africa. This study, thus, aimed at describing the clinical profile of patients with retinal detachment in Southwest Ethiopia. METHODS: A hospital-based study was done on all consecutive retinal detachment patients who presented to Jimma University Hospital over six months period. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect patients' sociodemographic characteristics and clinical history. Comprehensive anterior and posterior segment eye examinations were done and risk factors were sought for. Statistical tests were considered significant if P < 0.05. RESULTS: A total of 94 eyes of 80 patients (1.5% had retinal detachment (RD and about 69% of patients were symptomatic for over a month before presentation. The mean age was 41.4 years (SD ±16.5. Fourteen patients (17.5% had bilateral RD. At presentation, 61 eyes (64.9% were blind from RD and 11 (13.8% patients were bilaterally blind from RD. Rhegmatogenous RD was seen in 55 eyes (58.5% and tractional RD in 22 eyes (23.4%. The most common risk factors were ocular trauma (32 eyes, 34.0%, myopia (23 eyes, 24.5%, posterior uveitis (13 eyes, 13.8% and diabetic retinopathy (9 eyes, 9.6%. Most retinal breaks (25 eyes, 43.1% were superotemporal and horse-shoe tear was the most common (19 eyes, 20.2%. Macula was off in 77 eyes (81.9% and 38 eyes (69.1% of RRD eyes had grade C proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR. Macular status was significantly associated with PVR (P=0.011, and duration of symptoms (RR=1.25, 95%CI: 1.059-1.475, P=0.040. CONCLUSIONS: A significant numbers of patients with ocular problem had retinal detachment, and nearly two third of the patients presented late. Trauma and myopia were the most important risk factors. People should be educated to improve their health seeking behavior and use eye safety precautions to prevent ocular trauma.

  3. Repeated nationwide point-prevalence surveys of antimicrobial use in Swedish hospitals: data for actions 2003-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Gunilla; Struwe, Johan; Cars, Otto; Hanberger, Håkan; Odenholt, Inga; Prag, Mårten; Skärlund, Katarina; Ulleryd, Peter; Erntell, Mats

    2016-06-23

    This study sought to analyse antimicrobial pressure, indications for treatment, and compliance with treatment recommendations and to identify possible problem areas where inappropriate use could be improved through interventions by the network of the local Swedish Strategic Programme Against Antibiotic Resistance (Strama) groups. Five point-prevalence surveys were performed in between 49 and 72 participating hospitals from 2003 to 2010. Treatments were recorded for 19 predefined diagnosis groups and whether they were for community-acquired infection, hospital-acquired infection, or prophylaxis. Approximately one-third of inpatients were treated with antimicrobials. Compliance with guidelines for treatment of community-acquired pneumonia with narrow-spectrum penicillin was 17.0% during baseline 2003-2004, and significantly improved to 24.2% in 2010. Corresponding figures for quinolone use in uncomplicated cystitis in women were 28.5% in 2003-2004, and significantly improved, decreasing to 15.3% in 2010. The length of surgical prophylaxis improved significantly when data for a single dose and 1 day were combined, from 56.3% in 2003-2004 to 66.6% in 2010. Improved compliance was possibly the effect of active local feedback, repeated surveys, and increasing awareness of antimicrobial resistance. Strama groups are important for successful local implementation of antimicrobial stewardship programs in Sweden.

  4. A Survey of Knowledge and Practices of Transfusion Medicine Among Post Intern Doctors in Specialized Hospital in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarage, Samantha; Fernando, Rahal; Gunasekara, Lanka

    2017-02-01

    Knowledge of transfusion medicine is the key element of better transfusion practices. This deficit observed at the blood bank end on daily basis exposing the patients for redundant risk. We assessed the knowledge of transfusion medicine among post intern doctors. To assess the knowledge of transfusion medicine among post intern doctors in working in our hospital. Self administrated questionnaire was used. 45 questions of transfusion medicine included in the questioner. A total 57 post internship doctors participated in the survey. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS. In overall survey average score was 41.45%. Lowest score 19.8% was for the area of lab result interpretation. Highest score 56.63% obtained for the administration of blood component. Differences among the medical officers of various specialties were not statistically significant. Transfusion medicine knowledge among post internship doctors in our hospital need to be upgraded. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Migraine and risk of perioperative ischemic stroke and hospital readmission: hospital based registry study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Fanny P; Houle, Timothy T; Grabitz, Stephanie D; Lihn, Anne-Louise; Stokholm, Janne B; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Nozari, Ala; Kurth, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether patients with migraine are at increased risk of perioperative ischemic stroke and whether this may lead to an increased hospital readmission rate. Design Prospective hospital registry study. Setting Massachusetts General Hospital and two satellite campuses between January 2007 and August 2014. Participants 124 558 surgical patients (mean age 52.6 years; 54.5% women). Main outcome measures The primary outcome was perioperative ischemic stroke occurring within 30 days after surgery in patients with and without migraine and migraine aura. The secondary outcome was hospital readmission within 30 days of surgery. Exploratory outcomes included post-discharge stroke and strata of neuroanatomical stroke location. Results 10 179 (8.2%) patients had any migraine diagnosis, of whom 1278 (12.6%) had migraine with aura and 8901 (87.4%) had migraine without aura. 771 (0.6%) perioperative ischemic strokes occurred within 30 days of surgery. Patients with migraine were at increased risk of perioperative ischemic stroke (adjusted odds ratio 1.75, 95% confidence interval 1.39 to 2.21) compared with patients without migraine. The risk was higher in patients with migraine with aura (adjusted odds ratio 2.61, 1.59 to 4.29) than in those with migraine without aura (1.62, 1.26 to 2.09). The predicted absolute risk is 2.4 (2.1 to 2.8) perioperative ischemic strokes for every 1000 surgical patients. This increases to 4.3 (3.2 to 5.3) for every 1000 patients with any migraine diagnosis, 3.9 (2.9 to 5.0) for migraine without aura, and 6.3 (3.2 to 9.5) for migraine with aura.Patients with migraine had a higher rate of readmission to hospital within 30 days of discharge (adjusted odds ratio 1.31, 1.22 to 1.41). Conclusions Surgical patients with a history of migraine are at increased risk of perioperative ischemic stroke and have an increased 30 day hospital readmission rate. Migraine should be considered in the risk assessment for perioperative

  6. A statewide nurse training program for a hospital based infant abusive head trauma prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocera, Maryalice; Shanahan, Meghan; Murphy, Robert A; Sullivan, Kelly M; Barr, Marilyn; Price, Julie; Zolotor, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Successful implementation of universal patient education programs requires training large numbers of nursing staff in new content and procedures and maintaining fidelity to program standards. In preparation for statewide adoption of a hospital based universal education program, nursing staff at 85 hospitals and 1 birthing center in North Carolina received standardized training. This article describes the training program and reports findings from the process, outcome and impact evaluations of this training. Evaluation strategies were designed to query nurse satisfaction with training and course content; determine if training conveyed new information, and assess if nurses applied lessons from the training sessions to deliver the program as designed. Trainings were conducted during April 2008-February 2010. Evaluations were received from 4358 attendees. Information was obtained about training type, participants' perceptions of newness and usefulness of information and how the program compared to other education materials. Program fidelity data were collected using telephone surveys about compliance to delivery of teaching points and teaching behaviors. Results demonstrate high levels of satisfaction and perceptions of program utility as well as adherence to program model. These findings support the feasibility of implementing a universal patient education programs with strong uptake utilizing large scale systematic training programs.

  7. A national survey of the use of physical restraint in long-term care hospitals in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Yumi; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Kawasaki, Maki

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the prevalence of physical restraints in the long-term care hospitals in Japan and to examine the factors of physical restraint use, including the specific skills/techniques that the staff use to minimise the restraints. Background.  Despite the national efforts to nullify physical restraint, it is still prevalent in long-term care facilities in and out of Japan. More detailed information regarding what affects physical restraint is needed. Cross-sectional mail survey. A questionnaire was sent to a nursing ward manager of the random sample of long-term care facilities in Japan. The average rate of physical restraint was 25·5%. Altogether, 81·0% of the restrained clients were under restraint for more than one month. The most prevalent method of restraint was bilateral bedrails, followed by the use of coveralls and gloves. Factors of restraint were different depending on the type of restraint, suggesting specific approaches are needed for specific type of restraint. Physical restraint is still prevalent in Japanese long-term care hospitals, and nurses need to develop effective intervention approach to redesigning practice related to physical restraints. Specialised intervention approach seems needed depending on the types of restraint. Specific approach should be developed to minimise the physical restraint in long-term care hospitals in Japan. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. [Cost of hospitalization by the Activity Based Costing method in the neonatal department of Principal Hospital of Dakar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchamdja, T; Balaka, A; Tchandana, M; Agbétra, A

    2015-01-01

    To determine the cost of hospitalization per day in the neonatal department of Principal Hospital of Dakar. This prospective study took place during the month of July 2011 in the newborn unit. The activity-based costing method was used to analyze costs. During the study period, 52 newborns were hospitalized for a total of 590 days. The cost of the human resources during that month was 9,907,832 FCFA (US $ 19,815.66), the cost of depreciation of fixed assets was estimated at 571,952 FCFA (US $ 1143.90), and supplies at 112,084 FCFA (US $ 224.17). External services cost 386,753 FCFA (US $ 773.51) and support services 6,917,380.65 FCFA (US $ 13,834.7613). The monthly expenses incurred for the hospitalization of newborns totaled 17,896,002 FCFA (US $ 35,792), for a cost per patient per day of 30,332.20 FCFA (US $ 60.66) and an average cost of hospitalization 334,153.88 FCFA (US $ 668,31). This study is the first of its kind in Senegal and neighboring countries. By applying the ABC approach, we can obtain a more detailed and precise estimate of the cost of activities and services. Process improvements and corrective actions should make it possible to identify cost drivers, such as time.

  9. [A survey of the work load of the nursing personnel at the Cantu Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, A M; Baragiola, M; Bordoli, W; Civetta, G

    1996-01-01

    As needed to obtain data to evaluate charitable requirements of persons, who come into the hospital, our nurses decided to employ, for work burden study of department or services, a scientific method--Swiss method--appropriately modified, as required by themselves. This article describes: aim--method--development stages--fulfillment--evaluation and its correlative with statistical items cards used in departments/services and with the explications of each question, just to avoid incongrousness in compilation by hospital workers. In check-stage we reported the results obtained in six months research, with comparison data between actual need and nurses real presence in observed departments or services. We don't think to have exhausted nurse-need problem, but this six-months follow-up may give scientifical basis to matron for request of personnel new units or for mobility choices.

  10. A "Medical Physics" Course Based Upon Hospital Field Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onn, David G.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a noncalculus, medical physics'' course with a basic element of direct hospital field experience. The course is intended primarily for premedical students but may be taken by nonscience majors. (Author/PR)

  11. Antimicrobial Stewardship in Acute Care Centres: A Survey of 68 Hospitals in Quebec

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    Vincent Nault

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs and quantitative monitoring of antimicrobial use are required to ensure that antimicrobials are used appropriately in the acute care setting, and have the potential to reduce costs and limit the spread of antimicrobial-resistant organisms and Clostridium difficile. Currently, it is not known what proportion of Quebec hospitals have an ASP and/or monitor antimicrobial use.

  12. Pain management policies and practices in pediatric emergency care: a nationwide survey of Italian hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrante, Pierpaolo; Cuttini, Marina; Zangardi, Tiziana; Tomasello, Caterina; Messi, Gianni; Pirozzi, Nicola; Losacco, Valentina; Piga, Simone; Benini, Franca

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain experienced by children in emergency departments (EDs) is often poorly assessed and treated. Although local protocols and strategies are important to ensure appropriate staff behaviours, few studies have focussed on pain management policies at hospital or department level. This study aimed at describing the policies and reported practices of pain assessment and treatment in a national sample of Italian pediatric EDs, and identifying the assocoated structural and organisational...

  13. Workplace Violence against Health Care Workers in North Chinese Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peihang; Zhang, Xue; Sun, Yihua; Ma, Hongkun; Jiao, Mingli; Xing, Kai; Kang, Zheng; Ning, Ning; Fu, Yapeng; Wu, Qunhong; Yin, Mei

    2017-01-01

    This research aimed to determine the prevalence of workplace violence (WPV) against healthcare workers, explore the frequency distribution of violence in different occupational groups, and determine which healthcare occupation suffers from WPV most frequently. Furthermore, the current study aimed to compare risk factors affecting different types of WPV in Chinese hospitals. A cross-sectional design was utilized. A total of 1899 healthcare workers from Heilongjiang, a province in Northeastern China, completed the questionnaire. Of the respondents, 83.3% reported exposure to workplace violence, and 68.9% reported non-physical violence. Gender, education, shift work, anxiety level, and occupation were significantly correlated with physical violence (p < 0.05 for all correlations). Additionally, age, professional title, and occupation were correlated with non-physical violence, which critically affected doctors. Thus, gender, age, profession, anxiety, and shift work were predictive of workplace violence toward healthcare workers. Doctors appeared to experience non-physical workplace violence with particularly higher frequency when compared to nurses and other workers in hospitals. For healthcare workers, interventions aimed at WPV reduction should be enacted according to the types of violence, profession, and other factors underlying the various types of WPV in hospitals. PMID:28106851

  14. Workplace Violence against Health Care Workers in North Chinese Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peihang Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to determine the prevalence of workplace violence (WPV against healthcare workers, explore the frequency distribution of violence in different occupational groups, and determine which healthcare occupation suffers from WPV most frequently. Furthermore, the current study aimed to compare risk factors affecting different types of WPV in Chinese hospitals. A cross-sectional design was utilized. A total of 1899 healthcare workers from Heilongjiang, a province in Northeastern China, completed the questionnaire. Of the respondents, 83.3% reported exposure to workplace violence, and 68.9% reported non-physical violence. Gender, education, shift work, anxiety level, and occupation were significantly correlated with physical violence (p < 0.05 for all correlations. Additionally, age, professional title, and occupation were correlated with non-physical violence, which critically affected doctors. Thus, gender, age, profession, anxiety, and shift work were predictive of workplace violence toward healthcare workers. Doctors appeared to experience non-physical workplace violence with particularly higher frequency when compared to nurses and other workers in hospitals. For healthcare workers, interventions aimed at WPV reduction should be enacted according to the types of violence, profession, and other factors underlying the various types of WPV in hospitals.

  15. Rising cesarean deliveries among apparently low-risk mothers at university teaching hospitals in Jordan: analysis of population survey data, 2002–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifai, Rami Al

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cesarean delivery conducted without medical indication places mothers and infants at risk for adverse outcomes. This study assessed changes in trends of, and factors associated with, cesarean deliveries in Jordan, from 2002 to 2012. Methods: Data for ever-married women ages 15–49 years from the 2002, 2007, and 2012 Jordan Population and Family Health Surveys were used. Analyses were restricted to mothers who responded to a question regarding the hospital-based mode of delivery for their last birth occurring within the 5 years preceding each survey (2002, N = 3,450; 2007, N = 6,307; 2012, N = 6,365). Normal birth weight infants and singleton births were used as markers for births that were potentially low risk for cesarean delivery, because low/high birth weight and multiple births are among the main obstetric variables that have been documented to increase risk of cesareans. Weighted descriptive and multivariate analyses were conducted using 4 logistic regression models: (1) among all mothers; and among mothers stratified (2) by place of delivery; (3) by birth weight of infants; and (4) by singleton vs. multiple births. Results: The cesarean delivery rate increased significantly over time, from 18.2% in 2002, to 20.1% in 2007, to 30.3% in 2012. Place of delivery, birth weight, and birth multiplicity were significantly associated with cesarean delivery after adjusting for confounding factors. Between 2002 and 2012, the rate increased by 99% in public hospitals vs. 70% in private hospitals; by 93% among normal birth weight infants vs. 73% among low/high birth weight infants; and by 92% among singleton births vs. 29% among multiple births. The changes were significant across all categories except among multiple births. Further stratification revealed that the cesarean delivery rate was 2.29 times higher in university teaching hospitals (UTHs) than in private hospitals (Pcesarean delivery rate among births that may have been at low risk for

  16. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Hospital-based Case Management in Cancer Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Christian N; Vedsted, Peter; Søndergaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Case management (CM) models based on experienced nurses are increasingly used to improve coordination and continuity of care for patients with complex health care needs. Anyway, little is known about the effects of hospital-based CM in cancer care.Aim.To analyse the effects of hospital......-based CM on (i) GPs' evaluation of information from the hospital and collaboration with the hospital staff and (ii) patients' contacts with GPs during daytime and out of hours. DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial allocated 280 colorectal cancer patients 1:1 to either a control group or CM intervention...

  17. Current situation of hospital-based endocrinology and clinical nutrition in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeles Gálvez Moreno, M

    2008-01-01

    In 2006, the Healthcare Commission of Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition did a survey in order to know the actual situation of endocrinology and clinical nutrition healthcare in Public Sanitary Systems in Spain. The survey has been more extensive than the last and it has taken up number and geographical distribution of specialists in Spain in addition to data about clinical assistance. The mean of public hospitals with endocrinologist participation has been 50%.

  18. A Survey of Practices in Hospital Pharmacies. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Thomas D.; Henrich, Robert R.

    A survey was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project to determine what procedures are used in health care facility pharmacies for the performance of tasks previously selected for inclusion in a proposed curriculum for pharmacy technicians. Questionnaires were distributed to a national sample of 48 health care facilities,…

  19. Antecedents of hospital nurses' intention to leave the organization: A cross sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbio, Andrea; Manganelli, Anna Maria

    2015-07-01

    Leadership and perceived organizational support inspire trust in the leader and in the organization. Consequently, these aspects may contribute to a reduction in job burnout among nurses and, in the end, of the intention on their part to leave the hospital. It is crucial to develop models in order to simultaneously test the correlations between these relevant psychosocial variables, so that complexity of the nursing work environment may be better understood. We expected to give support to and to further corroborate results in the literature linking perceived leadership style – and particularly servant leadership – perceived organizational support, trust in the leader and in the organization, job burnout among nurses and their subsequent intention to leave the hospital. Cross-sectional study. Two Italian large size public hospitals. Two samples including both graduates and non-graduates members of the nursing staff. Overall mean age was equal to 42.06 years while the general mean for tenure was 12.99 years. Data were collected in 2012. A regression model with latent variables was tested via structural equation modeling using LISREL. The multi-sample procedure was also applied in order to test invariance of results between the two samples. Servant leadership was positively associated with trust in the leader and perceived organizational support was positively associated with trust in the organization. Trust in the leader and trust in the organization displayed a negative correlation with the emotional exhaustion and cynicism factors of job burnout, and a positive correlation with the professional efficacy factor. Furthermore, trust scores mediated the effects of servant leadership and perceived organizational support on job burnout factors. The cynicism factor was negatively associated with intention to leave the organization and it also mediated the effects of both trust in the leader and servant leadership on intention to leave. On the other hand, trust in the

  20. Maternal mortality ratio in Lebanon in 2008: a hospital-based reproductive age mortality study (RAMOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobeika, Elie; Abi Chaker, Samer; Harb, Hilda; Rahbany Saad, Rita; Ammar, Walid; Adib, Salim

    2014-01-01

    International agencies have recently assigned Lebanon to the group H of countries with "no national data on maternal mortality," and estimated a corresponding maternal mortality ratio (MMR) of 150 per 100,000 live births. The Ministry of Public Health addressed the discrepancy perceived between the reality of the maternal mortality ratio experience in Lebanon and the international report by facilitating a hospital-based reproductive age mortality study, sponsored by the World Health Organization Representative Office in Lebanon, aiming at providing an accurate estimate of a maternal mortality ratio for 2008. The survey allowed a detailed analysis of maternal causes of deaths. Reproductive age deaths (15-49 years) were initially identified through hospital records. A trained MD traveled to each hospital to ascertain whether recorded deaths were in fact maternal deaths or not. ICD10 codes were provided by the medical controller for each confirmed maternal deaths. There were 384 RA death cases, of which 13 were confirmed maternal deaths (339%) (numerator). In 2008, there were 84823 live births in Lebanon (denominator). The MMR in Lebanon in 2008 was thus officially estimated at 23/100,000 live births, with an "uncertainty range" from 153 to 30.6. Hemorrhage was the leading cause of death, with double the frequency of all other causes (pregnancy-induced hypertension, eclampsia, infection, and embolism). This specific enquiry responded to a punctual need to correct a clearly inadequate report, and it should be relayed by an on-going valid surveillance system. Results indicate that special attention has to be devoted to the management of peri-partum hemorrhage cases. Arab, postpartum hemorrhage, development, pregnancy management, verbal autopsy

  1. Development of a Croatian version of the US Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire: dimensionality and psychometric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brborović, Hana; Šklebar, Ivan; Brborović, Ognjen; Brumen, Vlatka; Mustajbegović, Jadranka

    2014-03-01

    The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC), originally developed in the USA, is used worldwide to assess patient safety culture in hospitals. A limited number of studies have provided data on psychometric properties outside of the US healthcare system. Our aim was to determine if all 12 dimensions of the US HSOPSC were applicable, valid and reliable to Croatian healthcare workers. The study was conducted from September 2010 to April 2011. Questions were translated into Croatian and then translated back into English. The questionnaires (ie, the Croatian translation of the US HSOPSC) were distributed in unmarked envelopes along with a consent form to all the doctors and nurses in four Croatian hospitals. The responses were analysed using explorative factor analyses, reliability testing, and confirmatory factor analyses. The study included 561 healthcare workers in four Croatian hospitals--a response rate of 32.69%. Our results are similar to the original US sample, but with some differences: 11 dimensions with acceptable reliability scores were identified by exploratory factor analysis compared with the original 12 in the US sample; five of 12 dimensions had a Cronbach's α higher than 0.7, suggesting a reasonable fit to the original US HSOPSC; the dimensions 'Staffing' and 'Organisational learning--continuous improvement' were found to have a Cronbach's α US model. Results show that the Croatian translation of the US HSOPSC is compatible in 11 of the original 12 dimensions. Results suggest that for the purposes of research in Croatia, the dimensions 'Staffing', 'Communication openness', and 'Organisational learning-continuous improvement' should be revised. For example, the use of question A7 ('We use more agency/temporary staff than is best for patient care') in the context of European healthcare systems should be adapted or removed for the Croatian version of the US HSOPSC questionnaire.

  2. Problem Based Internship in Surveying and Planning Curricula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Esben Munk; Enemark, Stig

    2006-01-01

    another consulting agency ore company with a surveying ore land management profile. The internship is not focusing on practice training alone. The student has to prepare the internship by formulating a problem reflecting what they want to learn and how the can contribute to develop products, procedures...... by the society to serve the community with still more new knowledge and technology transfer from the international research community. The internship and still more real world influenced problem based learning by writing thesis will be and important bridge builder in the following years.......The University Programme for the education of Masters in Surveying and Planning has been reorganized. First of all the basic concept of Problem Based Learning at Aalborg University is still dominating the full curricula of the Danish Master Programme in Surveying and Planning. The five year...

  3. PROFILE OF OCULAR TRAUMA IN UTTARAKHAND, A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Dhasmana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although ocular trauma is preventable public health problem throughout the world it is still one of the common causes of ophthalmic morbidity and monocular blindness. There are no published studies on pattern and severity of ocular trauma in Uttarakhand. The present study analyzes the pattern and visual outcome of ocular trauma in this region. Methods: Study design: Prospective hospital-based study. Settings: Patients of ocular trauma presenting to Ophthalmology OPD and emergency department of Himalayan Institute of Medical Sciences, Dehradun. Participants: All ocular injury patients seen for the first time during the period January to December 2008. Results: A total of 88 patients, and 103 eyes, were studied. Men had two fold higher rate of ocular injury than women. The mean age of presentation was 31.2 + 13.6 years (range: 6 - 80 years. The predominant age group of patients was 21-40 years, 55.29 % (n = 47. Eye injuries related to road traffic accident were seen in 37.86% of eyes. Industrial workers were more frequently involved in ocular trauma (23.86%. Closed globe injuries were noted in 55 eyes (53.39% and open globe injuries were noted in 40 eyes (38.83%. Eight eyes (7.76% suffered from chemical injuries. The initial presenting visual acuity of patients with blunt ocular trauma was better than penetrating injury. Eye with better visual acuity at presentation had better visual prognosis at 6 months. Conclusion: Ocular injuries were common in young males. Road traffic accidents related eye injuries were noted in significant number of cases. Strict implementation of traffic rules, health education and preventive strategies may help to decrease the occurrence of ocular injuries.

  4. SCREENING FOR GLAUCOMA IN RURAL POPULATION: A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhutuja A

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM To estimate the prevalence of blindness due to glaucoma in patients aged 40 years and above attending Tertiary Care Hospital. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study was conducted in the Department of Ophthalmology, Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sevagram. Visual acuity, anterior segment examination and anterior chamber depth assessment by slit lamp, digital tension, non-contact tonometry, confrontation field test, fundus examination, direct ophthalmoscopy and fundus imaging was done. Gonioscopy and automated perimetry was done in glaucoma suspects. RESULTS 7600 eyes of 3800 patients were examined, 108 eyes were diagnosed to have glaucoma. Based on the best corrected visual acuity, 15(13.8% eyes and 8(0.22% persons had visual impairment and 33(30.5% eyes and 20(31.7% persons were blind. The prevalence of glaucoma in eyes was 1.42%. The prevalence of blindness due to glaucoma in eyes was 0.43% and person was 0.52%. The prevalence of Primary Open Angle Glaucoma in eyes was 1%, Primary Angle Closure Glaucoma in eyes was 0.15%, Neovascular glaucoma in eyes was 0.07%, Lens Induced Glaucoma in eyes was 0.17% and Pseudoexfoliative Glaucoma in eyes was 0.03%. IOP>20mmHg was present in 50(36.1% glaucomatous eyes, majority of the eyes being in Open Angle Glaucoma 24(31.5% eyes; 58(53.7% glaucomatous eyes had IOP in the range 11-20mmHg, among them 38 eyes were on treatment and 20 eyes were operated. CONCLUSION Being an irreversible disease if diagnosed early, blindness can be avoided. So screening is very important for early diagnosis and their proper management thereon.

  5. An economic comparison of hospital-based and community-based glaucoma clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A; Jofre-Bonet, M; Panca, M; Lawrenson, J G; Murdoch, I

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We have established one model for community care of glaucoma clinic patients. Community optometrists received training and accreditation in glaucoma care. Once qualified they alternated between running half day glaucoma clinics in their own High Street practices and assisting in a hospital-based glaucoma clinic session. This paper reports the cost of this model. Methods Micro-costing was undertaken for the hospital clinic. A consensus meeting was held to agree costs for community clinics involving all optometrists in the project along with representatives of the multiple chain optometry practices who had participated. Costs to patients both indirect and direct were calculated following structured interviews of 197 patients attending hospital clinics and 194 attending community clinics. Results The estimated cost per patient attendance to the hospital clinic was £63.91 and the estimated cost per attendance to the community clinic was £145.62. For patients the combined direct and indirect cost to attend the hospital clinic was £6.15 and the cost to attend the community clinic £5.91. Discussion The principal reason for the higher cost in the community clinic was higher overhead costs in the community. Re-referral to the hospital system only occurred for 9% of patients and was not a large contribution to the increased cost. Time requested to next appointment was similar for the two clinics. Sensitivity analysis shows a strong effect of increasing patients seen per clinic. It would, however, require 25 patients to be seen per clinician per day in the community in order to make the costs comparable. PMID:22562188

  6. Methods for Evaluating Respondent Attrition in Web-Based Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochheimer, Camille J; Sabo, Roy T; Krist, Alex H; Day, Teresa; Cyrus, John; Woolf, Steven H

    2016-11-22

    Electronic surveys are convenient, cost effective, and increasingly popular tools for collecting information. While the online platform allows researchers to recruit and enroll more participants, there is an increased risk of participant dropout in Web-based research. Often, these dropout trends are simply reported, adjusted for, or ignored altogether. To propose a conceptual framework that analyzes respondent attrition and demonstrates the utility of these methods with existing survey data. First, we suggest visualization of attrition trends using bar charts and survival curves. Next, we propose a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) to detect or confirm significant attrition points. Finally, we suggest applications of existing statistical methods to investigate the effect of internal survey characteristics and patient characteristics on dropout. In order to apply this framework, we conducted a case study; a seventeen-item Informed Decision-Making (IDM) module addressing how and why patients make decisions about cancer screening. Using the framework, we were able to find significant attrition points at Questions 4, 6, 7, and 9, and were also able to identify participant responses and characteristics associated with dropout at these points and overall. When these methods were applied to survey data, significant attrition trends were revealed, both visually and empirically, that can inspire researchers to investigate the factors associated with survey dropout, address whether survey completion is associated with health outcomes, and compare attrition patterns between groups. The framework can be used to extract information beyond simple responses, can be useful during survey development, and can help determine the external validity of survey results.

  7. Caring for people with dementia in hospital: findings from a survey to identify barriers and facilitators to implementing best practice dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropea, Joanne; LoGiudice, Dina; Liew, Danny; Roberts, Carol; Brand, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    Best practice dementia care is not always provided in the hospital setting. Knowledge, attitudes and motivation, practitioner behavior, and external factors can influence uptake of best practice and quality care. The aim of this study was to determine hospital staff perceived barriers and enablers to implementing best practice dementia care. A 17-item survey was administered at two Australian hospitals between July and September 2014. Multidisciplinary staff working in the emergency departments and general medical wards were invited to participate in the survey. The survey collected data about the respondents' current role, work area, and years of experience, their perceived level of confidence and knowledge in dementia care and common symptoms of dementia, barriers and enablers to implementing best practice dementia care, job satisfaction in caring for people with dementia, and to rate the hospital's capacity and available resources to support best practice dementia care. A total of 112 survey responses were received. The environment, inadequate staffing levels and workload, time, and staff knowledge and skills were identified as barriers to implementing best practice dementia care. Most respondents rated their knowledge of dementia care and common symptoms of dementia, and confidence in recognizing whether a person has dementia, as moderate or high dementia. Approximately, half the respondents rated access to training and equipment as low or very low. The survey findings highlighted hospital staff perceived barriers to implementing best practice dementia care that can be used to inform locally tailored improvement interventions.

  8. Work related musculoskeletal disorders among hospital nurses in rural Maharashtra, India: a multi centre survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak B. Anap

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Nurses have one of the highest rates of MSD of any occupation. Although en number of studies were done to find out prevalence of Work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs among nurses across the world, there is limited information on its prevalence in Rural Maharashtra. This study investigated prevalence of WMSDs, job risk factors and the coping strategies towards reducing the risk of development of WMSDs among nurses from selected hospitals in rural Maharashtra, India. Validated questionnaires were distributed to 250 nurses working rural hospitals across Maharashtra but only 228 questionnaires were returned and 212 complete questionnaires were included for study. On Analysis we found that 89.1% nurses had experienced work-related musculoskeletal pain or discomfort at sometime in their occupational lives. WMSDs was highest in the low back (48.2%, followed by the shoulder (34.6%, neck (33.1 and knee (29 %. Other regions with less prevalence were Thoracic (10.5%, Feet and ankle (7.6%, Elbow ( 1.88% and Hip (1.6 %. Priority was given to getting help to handle heavy patients ( 57.1 %, nursing procedure modification in order to avoid stress injury ( 50.2 % coping strategies. Our study Concluded that high prevalence of LBP, Shoulder, neck and Knee pain over a 12-month period among nurses working in Rural hospitals in Maharashtra state , and certain risk factors like working in same position for long time, bending, twisting, lifting and treating excessive number of patients were strongly associated with WMSDs. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(2.000: 101-107

  9. [Utilization of antibiotics according to most frequent indications at Hungarian hospitals and results of surveys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternák, G; Almási, I

    1997-05-25

    Antibiotic utilisation of 8 Hungarian hospitals was analyzed examining the case histories of patients who were discharged between January 1 and 31, 1995. Usage of antibiotics in the most frequent indications is reported in this paper. Majority of the prescriptions for the treatment of upper and lower respiratory tract infections were broad spectrum beta lactams. Higher rate of penicillin usage was found only in tonsillitis cases. Besides II. generation cephalosporins (22.7% of 730 prescriptions), beta-lactamase inhibitor + aminopenicillin combinations (13.4%) and III. generation cephalosporins (9.5%) considerable quantity of aminoglycosides (14.9%) and quinolones (9.5%) were found in pneumonia. Relatively high rate of aminoglycosides in the treatment of lower respiratory infections is inconsistent with therapeutic guidelines in force. Co-trimoxazol and quinolones were most frequently prescribed for the treatment of lower urinary tract infections. Traditional urodesinficients were on the first place only at one hospital. Treatment of frequently occurring nosocomial infections was compared with those of community acquired at the same site. There was not significant difference in the utilisation rates of the most of antibiotic groups regarding place of disease acquisition. 44% of the 1373 prescriptions for perioperative profilaxis was indicated for clean operations where benefit of antibiotic administration is questionable. Duration of antibiotic profilaxis was more than 48 hours in 59% of prescriptions. Drugs most frequently used for perioperative profilaxis were II. generation cephalosporins (23.7%), metronidazol (16.7%), aminoglycosides (9.6%) and III. generation cephalosporines (9.6%). The authors compare their results to the literature. They suggest the setting up of "infection control committees" to organise the antibiotic policies in hospitals.

  10. Use of Antibiotics in Pediatrics: 8-Years Survey in Italian Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccellato, Elena; Melis, Mauro; Biagi, Chiara; Donati, Monia; Motola, Domenico; Vaccheri, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate antibiotic consumption in the pediatric wards of Emilia-Romagna Region, from 2004 to 2011, with a focus on the antibiotics reserved to the most serious infections, and to analyse the ADRs reported for antibiotics by the pediatric wards of Emilia-Romagna hospitals. Reference population was represented by all the patients (0-14 years old) admitted to the pediatric wards of all the hospitals of Emilia-Romagna Region. Drug consumption was expressed as number of DDDs per 100 Bed-Days (BD) and data were analysed by active substance, by therapeutic subgroups or by ward type. The time trends of antibiotic consumption were statistically analysed by linear regression. All the suspected ADR reports associated with antibiotics, reported between January 2004 and December 2011 were drawn by the Italian Spontaneous Reporting Database. Overall antibiotic consumption showed only a slight increase (p = 0.224). Among the pediatric wards, pediatric surgery showed the highest increase from 2004 to 2011 (p = 0.011). Penicillins and β-lactamase inhibitors was the first therapeutic group with a statistically significant increase over years (p = 0.038), whereas penicillins with extended spectrum presented a statistically significant reduction (p = 0.008). Moreover, only 5 drugs out of the 8 antibiotics reserved to the most serious infections were used. Pharmacovigilance data showed 27 spontaneous ADR reports associated to ATC J01 drugs. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid had the highest number of ADR reports (n = 7). The steadily increasing consumption in penicillins and β-lactamase inhibitors, in association with a considerable decrease of plain penicillins, raises a serious concern. Pharmacovigilance reports seem to suggest a safe use of antibiotics in the hospital setting of Emilia-Romagna. Further studies to investigate the reason for prescribing antibiotics in children inpatients are needed.

  11. Design and validation of a satisfaction survey with pharmaceutical care received in hospital pharmacyconsultation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Monje-Agudo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Object: To design and to validate a questionnaire to assess satisfaction with pharmaceutical care (PC received at the hospital pharmacy. Methods: Multicentric study in five andalusian hospital in January 2013. A bibliography search was performed in PUBMED; MESH term; pharmaceutical services, patients satisfaction and questionnaire. Next, the questionnaire was produced by Delphi methodology with ten items and with the following variables; demographics, socials, pharrmacologicals and clinics which the patient was asked for the consequences of the PC in his treatment and illness and for the acceptance with the received service. The patient could answer between one= very insufficient and five= excellent. Before the validation phase questionnaire, a pilot phase was carried out. Descriptive analysis, Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC were performed in both phases. Data analysis was conducted using the SPSS statistical software package release 20.0. Results: In the pilot phase were included 21 questionnaires and 154 of them in validation phase (response index of 100%. In the last phase, 62% (N=96 of patients were men. More than 50% of patients answered “excelent” in all items of questionnaire in both phases. The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and ICC were 0.921 and 0.915 (95%IC: 0.847-0.961 and 0.916 and 0,910 (95%IC: 0.886-0.931 in pilot and validation phases, respectively. Conclusions: A high reliability instrument was designed and validated to evaluate the patient satisfaction with PC received at hospital pharmacy.

  12. A Survey of the Epidemiology and Antibiotic Resistance Patterns of Enteropathogens Isolates in an Iranian Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjafari Tafti

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Infectious diarrhea is one of the most frequent diseases among children, especially in developing countries. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the etiological agents and drug resistance patterns of common enteric pathogens isolated in an Iranian 1000-bed tertiary care hospital. Patients and Methods In a retrospective study, we analyzed the etiology and drug resistance patterns of enteric pathogens associated with diarrheal cases. The study was carried out in the Milad hospital of Tehran over two years, from April of 2012 to January of 2014. Stool specimens from patients with diarrhea (n = 7321 were examined for enteric pathogens using routine microbiological culture methods. Strains of Salmonella, Shigella, and enteric pathogenic E. coli (EPEC were serotyped and their susceptibility to commonly used antimicrobial agents was determined by a disk diffusion method, as recommended by the clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI guidelines. Results Enteric pathogens were isolated from 310 (4.23% of the patients. The most frequently isolated microorganisms included enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC, Salmonella, and Shigella spp. The majority of the isolates of EPEC were resistant to commonly used antibiotics such as ampicillin (85.61%, cefixime (79.41%, and nalidixic acid. Resistance among other enteric pathogens was also prevalent. About 45.70% of the Salmonella isolates were resistant to chloramphenicol, and 87.95% were resistant to sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. Resistance of the Shigella isolates to nalidixic acid in comparison to the resistance recorded in previous studies was higher. Conclusions The results show that enteric bacteria, including EPEC, Salmonella spp., and Shigella spp. are the major causative agents of diarrhea in the hospital. The emergence of antimicrobial resistance among enteric pathogens is an important problem for public health. Considering the threat of emerging antimicrobial resistance

  13. Survey of Susceptibility of Cockroaches To Pyrethroids Insecticides in sari Hospital in 1383

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Enayati, Ph.D

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose: The medical importance of cockroaches is much greater than what has generally been realized. They are known to carry pathogenic viruses and bacteria such as escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and salmonella species including S.typhi and S.typhimurium. As a result, their eradication is very important.Materials and Methods: One of the best and effective ways of controlling cockoaches is thought to be the chemical method, which is performed by insecticides. It should be stated that the chemical treatment must be combined with enviromental sanitation, otherwise, the results will not be satisfactory. This study was carried out by using four different insecticides like: Permethrin 0.92% Deltamethrin 0.98% and Supermithrin 0.92% to evaluate their susceptibility and resistance.In this study, the cockroaches were collected from Imam Khomeini and Boo Ali Hospitals in Sari and were tested by different cocentrations of above -mentioned insecticides. Susecptibility of cockroaches was performed according to the standards of World Health Organization (W.H.O.Results: In this study, all the strains of cockroaches were exposed to the concentration of the above-mentioned insecticides through surface contact method. Imam Khomeini strain showed the LT50 of 20/24, 19/30, 19/64 minutes and Boo Ali hospitals 19/87, 17/6, 18/66 minutes. For susceptible strain, 8/89, 8/8, 8/64 minutes were obtained to Permethrin, Deltamethrin and Sumithrin respectively. On the other hand, LT90 for Imam Khomeini strain were 42/91, 41/21, 37/38 minutes and Boo Ali hospitals 42/59, 40/88, 34/05 minutes. For susceptible strain, 17/58, 18/43, 17/28 minutes were obtained to Permethrin, Deltamethrin and Supermithrin respectively. In surface contact, the resistance ratio (RR to pyrethroids insecticides (Permethrin, Deltamethrin and Supermithrin of BoAli hospitals strain was 2/23, 2 and 2/15 respectively, while this ratio for Imam Khomeini strain was 2/2, 2

  14. A Survey of Technologies Supporting Virtual Project Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone

    2002-01-01

    for evaluation is proposed where negotiation of meaning, coordination and resource management are identified as the key concepts in virtual project based learning. Three e-learning systems are selected for the survey, Virtual-U, Lotus Learningspace and Lotus Quickplace, as each system offers different strategies...

  15. Evaluating the performance of survey-based operational management procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomarede, M.; Hillary, R.; Ibaibarriaga, L.; Bogaards, J.A.; Apostolaki, P.

    2010-01-01

    The design and evaluation of survey-based management strategies is addressed in this article, using three case-study fisheries: North Sea herring, Bay of Biscay anchovy and North Sea cod, with a brief history and the main management issues with each fishery outlined. A range of operational managemen

  16. Hospital-based health technology assessment in France: A focus on medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Nicolas; Puc, Cyril; Szwarcensztein, Karine; Beuscart, Régis; Coulonjou, Hélène; Degrassat-Théas, Albane; Dutot, Camille; Epis de Fleurian, Anne-Aurélie; Favrel-Feuillade, Florence; Hounliasso, Iliona; Lechat, Philippe; Luigi, Emmanuel; Mairot, Laurent; Nguyen, Thao; Piazza, Laurent; Roussel, Christophe; Vienney, Cécile

    2017-02-01

    Hospital-based health technology assessment (HTA) guides decisions as to whether new healthcare products should be made available within hospital structures. Its extension to medical devices (MDs) makes it possible to analyse several relevant aspects of these healthcare products in addition to their clinical value, and such evaluations are of interest to national health authorities, other healthcare establishments and industry. The aim of this work was to formulate several recommendations for a blueprint for hospital-based HTA for MDs in France. Five themes based on the work of the European Adopting hospital-based HTA in the EU (AdHopHTA) project were defined. Each member of the roundtable was then allocated a documentation task based on their experience of the theme concerned, and a literature review was carried out. An inventory of hospital-based HTA was performed and six recommendations aiming to strengthen and improve this approach were put forward: (1) encouragement of the spread of the hospital-based HTA culture and participation in communications and the promotion of this approach to hospital decision-makers; (2) adaptation of hospital-based HTA to the needs of decision-makers, taking into account the financial timetable and strategic objectives of the healthcare establishment; (3) harmonisation of the dossiers requested from industry between healthcare establishments, based on a common core; (4) promotion of the sharing of hospital-based HTA data under certain conditions, with data dissociable from the HTA report and the use of a validated methodology for the literature review; (5) creation of a composite indicator reflecting data production effort and the sharing of HTA activities, to be taken into account in the distribution of funds allocated for teaching, research and innovation missions considered of general interest; (6) the transmission of information directly from local to national level by pioneering centres. This work highlights the major issues

  17. The Attitudes of Physicians, Nurses, Physical Therapists, and Midwives Toward Complementary Medicine for Chronic Pain: A Survey at an Academic Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveni, Eléonore; Bauer, Brent; Ramelet, Anne-Sylvie; Kottelat, Yolande; Decosterd, Isabelle; Finti, Guillaume; Ballabeni, Pierluigi; Bonvin, Eric; Rodondi, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    To assess the attitudes of physicians, nurses, physical therapists, and midwives toward complementary medicine (CM) at a Swiss academic hospital and toward its use for treating chronic pain. The cross-sectional survey took place from October to December 2013. An e-mail sent to 4925 healthcare professionals (1969 physicians, 2372 nurses, 145 physical therapists, and 111 midwives) working at Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland, invited them to answer a web-based questionnaire. The questionnaire was answered by 1247 healthcare professionals (response rate: 25.3%). Of these, 96.1% strongly agreed or agreed that CM could be useful for the treatment of chronic pain, with more nurses (96.7%) and midwives (100%) than physicians (93.8%) agreeing that CM could be useful (P pain. Respondents listed migraine (74.7%), tension headaches (70.6%), and low back pain (70.1%) as three main conditions for which they would refer patients for acupuncture. The three therapies with which respondents were the most unfamiliar were neuraltherapy (57.2%), mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) (54.1%), and biofeedback (51.9%). Over half of respondents, 58.3%, had never referred a patient to a CM practitioner. A total of 84.3% of the respondents felt that they lacked the knowledge to inform their patients about CM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2018 Rates; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers; Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program Requirements for Eligible Hospitals, Critical Access Hospitals, and Eligible Professionals; Provider-Based Status of Indian Health Service and Tribal Facilities and Organizations; Costs Reporting and Provider Requirements; Agreement Termination Notices. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-14

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2018. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, the 21st Century Cures Act, and other legislation. We also are making changes relating to the provider-based status of Indian Health Service (IHS) and Tribal facilities and organizations and to the low-volume hospital payment adjustment for hospitals operated by the IHS or a Tribe. In addition, we are providing the market basket update that will apply to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2018. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2018. In addition, we are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific Medicare providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities). We also are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for eligible professionals (EPs), eligible hospitals, and critical access hospitals (CAHs) participating in the Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Programs. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program, the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and the Hospital-Acquired Condition (HAC) Reduction Program. We also are making changes relating to transparency of accrediting organization survey

  19. A survey on the pathogenic fungi in soil samples of potted plants from Sari hospitals, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, M T; Mohseni-Bandpi, A; Moradi, S

    2004-09-01

    A total of 23 soil samples of potted plants was collected from hospitals in Sari, Iran. Each sample contained approximately 200 g soil, taken from a depth of 0-10 cm of the pots. Samples were analysed by two different methods. (1) Culture on Sabouraud's dextrose agar medium containing chloramphenicol (SC); cultured fungi were identified by macroscopic and microscopic characterization. (2) The hair-baiting technique (HBT) was used to isolate the keratinophilic fungi. After culture on SC medium, 100% of plates were positive for fungal growth, and in total 1150 colonies with 13 different types of fungi were isolated. Penicillium spp. (52%), Acremonium spp. (20%), Paecilomyces spp. (11.9%), Cladsporium spp. (3.7%) and Aspergillus spp. (3.1%) were the predominant fungal species. Rhizopus spp. (0.1%) were less frequent. Keratinophilic fungi such as Microsporum gypseum, Microsporum cookei and Chrysosporium spp. were isolated using HBT. The presence of pathogenic fungi such as Cladosporium spp, Aspergillus spp, M. gypseum, and M. cookei in potted plants in hospitals represents a potential source of nosocomial infection.

  20. The relationship between transformational leadership and work engagement in governmental hospitals nurses: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, Davood; Charkhabi, Morteza; Naami, Abdolzahra

    2014-01-14

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of transformational leadership and its components on work engagement among hospital nurses. There are a few set of researches that have focused on the effects of transformational leadership on work engagement in nurses. A descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional design was used. In this study, 240 nurses have been chosen by stratified random sampling method which filled related self-reported scales include multifactor leadership questionnaire (MLQ) and work engagement scale. Data analysis has been exerted according to the statistical method of simple and multiple correlation coefficients. Findings indicated that the effect of this type of leadership on work engagement and its facets is positive and significant. In addition, the research illustrates that transformational leaders transfer their enthusiasm and high power to their subordinates by the way of modeling. This manner can increase the power as a component of work engagement in workers. Idealized influence among these leaders can result in forming a specific belief among employees toward those leaders and leaders can easily transmit their inspirational motivation to them. Consequently, it leads to make a positive vision by which, and by setting high standards, challenges the employees and establishes zeal along with optimism for attaining success in works. regarding to the results we will expand leadership and work engagement literature in hospital nurses. Also, we conclude with theoretical and practical implications and propose a clear horizon for future researches.

  1. The Relationship between Organizational Justice and Turnover Intention: A Survey on Hospital Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mobin Sokhanvar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: High organizational justice and its factors are associated with reduced turnover intention. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to examine the relationship between organizational justice and turnover intention among hospital nurses. Materials and Methods: This descriptive, analytical study was conducted on 135 nurses working in Labafi Nejad Hospital in Tehran, Iran, 2015. The data were collected using Beugre's (1998 questionnaire of organizational justice questionnaire. To analyze the data, Pearson’s correlation and ANOVA tests were performed using SPSS, version 20. Results: Mean organizational justice and turnover intention scores were 68.85±7.67 and 47.8±12.47, respectively. Among the different types of organizational justice, the highest mean score was pertinent to interactional justice (75.24±16.68. A significant inverse correlation was observed between turnover intention and organizational justice (r=-0.36, interactional justice (r=-0.38, and procedural justice (r=-0.36, while no association was noted between turnover intention and systemic and distributive types of justice. Furthermore, there was no link between demographic variables, organizational justice, and turnover intention. Conclusion: Considering the prominent role of organizational justice in personnel’s intention to leave their job, and given high costs of recruiting and training new staff, managers should pay especial attention to promoting justice and employees’ satisfaction and enhancing stability in their organizations by reinforcing positive attitudes in the employees.

  2. A survey on species and prevalence rate of bacterial agents isolated from cockroaches in three hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarchi, Ali Akbar Karimi; Vatani, Hadi

    2009-04-01

    The presence of cockroaches has health implications, such as nosocomial infection, as the insects move freely from areas within and around hospitals that may harbor pathogenic organisms. The goals of the present study were to determine species of bacteria isolated from cockroaches found in three Tehran hospitals, and to determine distribution of potential vectors by species and sex. The study is descriptive laboratory research. A total of 305 cockroaches from three species were trapped and identified: Periplaneta americana (65.6%), Blatella germanica (12.1%), and Blatta orientalis (22.3%). From these potential vectors, 19 species of bacteria were isolated and identified. After transportation of cockroaches to the laboratory, separation of the whole-homogenized suspension of each species was carried out. Identification of the isolated bacteria was performed according to Burgey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th Edition. The most common species of bacteria isolated from cockroaches were Escherichia coli, Streptococcus Group D, Bacillus spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus vulgaris. No statistical significance was found between sex and species of cockroach carrying bacteria (p > 0.05), but significance was found for sex in Citrobacter freundii, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus non-group A&B (p < 0.05).

  3. Vision-based Human Gender Recognition: A Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, Choon Boon; Goi, Bok Min

    2012-01-01

    Gender is an important demographic attribute of people. This paper provides a survey of human gender recognition in computer vision. A review of approaches exploiting information from face and whole body (either from a still image or gait sequence) is presented. We highlight the challenges faced and survey the representative methods of these approaches. Based on the results, good performance have been achieved for datasets captured under controlled environments, but there is still much work that can be done to improve the robustness of gender recognition under real-life environments.

  4. How Informative Are Interest Rate Survey-based Forecasts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus A. Feitosa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the information content of survey-based predictions for the Brazilian short-term interest rate. We perform vector autoregression analysis to test for the dynamic relationship between market expectations of interest rates and spot interest rates, and a single regression forecasting approach. Empirical results suggest that surveys may be useful in assessing market expectations (contain relevant information and in building Central Bank credibility. Within an inflation targeting framework they are crucial in order to receive timely feedback on market sentiment regarding the conduct of monetary policy.

  5. Home-Based versus Hospital-Based Rehabilitation Program after Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remedios López-Liria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To compare home-based rehabilitation with the standard hospital rehabilitation in terms of improving knee joint mobility and recovery of muscle strength and function in patients after a total knee replacement. Materials and Methods. A non-randomised controlled trial was conducted. Seventy-eight patients with a prosthetic knee were included in the study and allocated to either a home-based or hospital-based rehabilitation programme. Treatment included various exercises to restore strength and joint mobility and to improve patients’ functional capacity. The primary outcome of the trial was the treatment effectiveness measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC. Results. The groups did not significantly differ in the leg side (right/left or clinical characteristics (P>0.05. After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements (P<0.001 from the baseline values in the level of pain (visual analogue scale, the range of flexion-extension motion and muscle strength, disability (Barthel and WOMAC indices, balance, and walking. Conclusions. This study reveals that the rehabilitation treatments offered either at home or in hospital settings are equally effective.

  6. Reliability assessment of a hospital quality measure based on rates of adverse outcomes on nursing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staggs, Vincent S

    2015-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to develop methods for assessing the reliability of scores on a widely disseminated hospital quality measure based on nursing unit fall rates. Poisson regression interactive multilevel modeling was adapted to account for clustering of units within hospitals. Three signal-noise reliability measures were computed. Squared correlations between the hospital score and true hospital fall rate averaged 0.52 ± 0.18 for total falls (0.68 ± 0.18 for injurious falls). Reliabilities on the other two measures averaged at least 0.70 but varied widely across hospitals. Parametric bootstrap data reflecting within-unit noise in falls were generated to evaluate percentile-ranked hospital scores as estimators of true hospital fall rate ranks. Spearman correlations between bootstrap hospital scores and true fall rates averaged 0.81 ± 0.01 (0.79 ± 0.01). Bias was negligible, but ranked hospital scores were imprecise, varying across bootstrap samples with average SD 11.8 (14.9) percentiles. Across bootstrap samples, hospital-measure scores fell in the same decile as the true fall rate in about 30% of cases. Findings underscore the importance of thoroughly assessing reliability of quality measurements before deciding how they will be used. Both the hospital measure and the reliability methods described can be adapted to other contexts involving clustered rates of adverse patient outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Effects and repercussions of local/hospital-based health technology assessment (HTA): a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Desmartis, Marie; Poder, Thomas; Witteman, William

    2014-10-28

    Health technology assessment (HTA) is increasingly performed at the local or hospital level where the costs, impacts, and benefits of health technologies can be directly assessed. Although local/hospital-based HTA has been implemented for more than two decades in some jurisdictions, little is known about its effects and impact on hospital budget, clinical practices, and patient outcomes. We conducted a mixed-methods systematic review that aimed to synthesize current evidence regarding the effects and impact of local/hospital-based HTA. We identified articles through PubMed and Embase and by citation tracking of included studies. We selected qualitative, quantitative, or mixed-methods studies with empirical data about the effects or impact of local/hospital-based HTA on decision-making, budget, or perceptions of stakeholders. We extracted the following information from included studies: country, methodological approach, and use of conceptual framework; local/hospital HTA approach and activities described; reported effects and impacts of local/hospital-based HTA; factors facilitating/hampering the use of hospital-based HTA recommendations; and perceptions of stakeholders concerning local/hospital HTA. Due to the great heterogeneity among studies, we conducted a narrative synthesis of their results. A total of 18 studies met the inclusion criteria. We reported the results according to the four approaches for performing HTA proposed by the Hospital Based HTA Interest Sub-Group: ambassador model, mini-HTA, internal committee, and HTA unit. Results showed that each of these approaches for performing HTA corresponds to specific needs and structures and has its strengths and limitations. Overall, studies showed positive impacts related to local/hospital-based HTA on hospital decisions and budgets, as well as positive perceptions from managers and clinicians. Local/hospital-based HTA could influence decision-making on several aspects. It is difficult to evaluate the real

  8. Measuring the context of care in an Australian acute care hospital: a nurse survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schultz Timothy J

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study set out to achieve three objectives: to test the application of a context assessment tool in an acute hospital in South Australia; to use the tool to compare context in wards that had undergone an evidence implementation process with control wards; and finally to test for relationships between demographic variables (in particular experience of nurses being studied (n = 422 with the dimensions of context. Methods The Alberta Context Tool (ACT was administered to all nursing staff on six control and six intervention wards. A total of 217 (62% were returned (67% from the intervention wards and 56% from control wards. Data were analysed using Stata (v9. The effect of the intervention was analysed using nested (hierarchical analysis of variance; relationships between nurses' experience and context was examined using canonical correlation analysis. Results Results confirmed the adaptation and fit of the ACT to one acute care setting in South Australia. There was no difference in context scores between control and intervention wards. However, the tool identified significant variation between wards in many of the dimensions of context. Though significant, the relationship between nurses' experience and context was weak, suggesting that at the level of the individual nurse, few factors are related to context. Conclusions Variables operating at the level of the individual showed little relationship with context. However, the study indicated that some dimensions of context (e.g., leadership, culture vary at the ward level, whereas others (e.g., structural and electronic resources do not. The ACT also raised a number of interesting speculative hypotheses around the relationship between a measure of context and the capability and capacity of staff to influence it. We propose that context be considered to be dependent on ward- and hospital-level factors. Additionally, questions need to be considered about the unit of measurement

  9. Survey on infant hearing loss at Caritas Baby Hospital in Bethlehem-Palestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Corradin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the epidemiology of infants’ hearing loss (IHL among patients under 3 months of age at Caritas Baby Hospital, the only pediatric hospital in Palestine. It was aimed to demonstrate that IHL is a major health problem in Palestine and to assess the first available data of the newborn hearing screening program conducted between September 25, 2006 and December 31, 2011. Data was uploaded and analyzed using Microsoft Excel and the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software (SPSS version 21. A total of 8144 infants were tested, 4812 (59% were males and 3332 (41% were females. As to their origin, 72% (5886 came from the Bethlehem district, 25% (2044 from the Hebron district, while 3% (214 from the other Palestinian districts (Jericho, Ramallah, Nablus, Jenin and Jerusalem. The transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs and the automated auditory brainstem response were used according to the manufacturer guidelines. The results were interpreted according to the indications of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the National Institutes of Health, and the European Consensus Development Conference on Neonatal Hearing Screening. Out of the 8144 infants tested, 1507 (14.6% did not pass the 1st test, 477 (32.8% of these 1507 infants failed retesting, while 498 (33% patients were lost to follow-up. Only 152 (31.9% patients that failed retesting went to an audiologist. The audiologist evaluation revealed that 101 (66.4% patients presented with a mild-moderate or profound hearing loss according to the Bureau International of Audiophonologie standards, 44 (28.9% patients had otitis media, whereas 7 cases (4.7% had no hearing disorders. The overall unadjusted percentage of hearing loss was 1.24%, and the adjusted overall percentage was 1.85%. The chart review showed that jaundice, sepsis, prematurity, lung disease were more common among the affected patients. The high prevalence of childhood deafness in Palestine is of utmost

  10. Noise-based deterministic logic and computing: a brief survey

    CERN Document Server

    Kish, Laszlo B; Bezrukov, Sergey M; Peper, Ferdinand; Gingl, Zoltan; Horvath, Tamas

    2010-01-01

    A short survey is provided about our recent explorations of the young topic of noise-based logic. After outlining the motivation behind noise-based computation schemes, we present a short summary of our ongoing efforts in the introduction, development and design of several noise-based deterministic multivalued logic schemes and elements. In particular, we describe classical, instantaneous, continuum, spike and random-telegraph-signal based schemes with applications such as circuits that emulate the brain's functioning and string verification via a slow communication channel.

  11. Performance of the Seven-step Procedure in Problem-based Hospitality Management Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wichard Zwaal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on the seven-step procedure (SSP in problem-based learning (PBL. The way students apply the seven-step procedure will help us understand how students work in a problem-based learning curriculum. So far, little is known about how students rate the performance and importance of the different steps, the amount of time they spend on each step and the perceived quality of execution of the procedure. A survey was administered to a sample of 101 students enrolled in a problem-based hospitality management program. Results show that students consider step 6 (Collect additional information outside the group to be most important. The highest performance-rating is for step two (Define the problem and the lowest for step four (Draw a systemic inventory of explanations from step three. Step seven is classified as low in performance and high in importance implicating urgent attention. The average amount of time spent on the seven steps is 133 minutes with the largest part of the time spent on self-study outside the group (42 minutes. The assessment of the execution of a set of specific guidelines (the Blue Card did not completely match with the overall performance ratings for the seven steps. The SSP could be improved by reducing the number of steps and incorporating more attention to group dynamics.

  12. Culinary and hospitality teaching as a research-based profession

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cumulative, in part .... capital necessary to develop hospitality arts as a subject suitable for scholarship in .... training are viewed as profitable for both the individual and for ... group whose structure and authority derive from their pursuit of knowledge in ...

  13. Child fluorosis in Chhattisgarh, India: a community-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilasrao, Gitte Sunil; Kamble, K M; Sabat, Ramanath N

    2014-11-01

    To assess the prevalence and type of fluorosis among children from randomly selected villages of Chhattisgarh, and its relationship with fluoride levels in drinking water. A community based door-to-door survey was conducted in the sampled villages of seven districts of Chhattisgarh state during the year 2013-14. The field case definitions were used for labelling types of fluorosis. The fluoride concentration in drinking water was estimated by ion selective electrode method. The prevalence of fluorosis ranged between 12 to 44% in children of surveyed districts. The fluoride levels in drinking water of selected villages were in the range of 0.1-9.0 ppm. Dental and skeletal fluorosis is endemic among children in the surveyed districts of Chhattisgarh State, and is related to drinking water with fluoride content of =1.5 ppm.

  14. Are diagnosis specific outcome indicators based on administrative data useful in assessing quality of hospital care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, I; Youlden, D; Coory, M

    2004-01-01

    Background: Hospital performance reports based on administrative data should distinguish differences in quality of care between hospitals from case mix related variation and random error effects. A study was undertaken to determine which of 12 diagnosis-outcome indicators measured across all hospitals in one state had significant risk adjusted systematic (or special cause) variation (SV) suggesting differences in quality of care. For those that did, we determined whether SV persists within hospital peer groups, whether indicator results correlate at the individual hospital level, and how many adverse outcomes would be avoided if all hospitals achieved indicator values equal to the best performing 20% of hospitals. Methods: All patients admitted during a 12 month period to 180 acute care hospitals in Queensland, Australia with heart failure (n = 5745), acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (n = 3427), or stroke (n = 2955) were entered into the study. Outcomes comprised in-hospital deaths, long hospital stays, and 30 day readmissions. Regression models produced standardised, risk adjusted diagnosis specific outcome event ratios for each hospital. Systematic and random variation in ratio distributions for each indicator were then apportioned using hierarchical statistical models. Results: Only five of 12 (42%) diagnosis-outcome indicators showed significant SV across all hospitals (long stays and same diagnosis readmissions for heart failure; in-hospital deaths and same diagnosis readmissions for AMI; and in-hospital deaths for stroke). Significant SV was only seen for two indicators within hospital peer groups (same diagnosis readmissions for heart failure in tertiary hospitals and inhospital mortality for AMI in community hospitals). Only two pairs of indicators showed significant correlation. If all hospitals emulated the best performers, at least 20% of AMI and stroke deaths, heart failure long stays, and heart failure and AMI readmissions could be avoided

  15. A survey of Trace Metals Determination in Hospital Waste Incinerator in Lucknow City, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Kumar

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Information on the elemental content of incinerator burning of human organ, animal and medical waste is scanty in India Nineteen trace elements were analyzed in the incinerator ash from four major hospitals, one municipal waste incinerator and two R & D laboratories engaged in animal experiment in Lucknow city. Concentrations of Zinc and Lead were found to be very high in comparison to other metals due to burning of plastic products. The source of Ca, P and K are mainly bone, teeth and other animal organs. A wide variation in trace concentration of several toxic elements have been seen due to variation in initial waste composition, design of the incinerator and operating conditions.

  16. Urban women's socioeconomic status, health service needs and utilization in the four weeks after postpartum hospital discharge: findings of a Canadian cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciliska Donna

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postpartum women who experience socioeconomic disadvantage are at higher risk for poor health outcomes than more advantaged postpartum women, and may benefit from access to community based postpartum health services. This study examined socioeconomically disadvantaged (SED postpartum women's health, and health service needs and utilization patterns in the first four weeks post hospital discharge, and compared them to more socioeconomically advantaged (SEA postpartum women's health, health service needs and utilization patterns. Methods Data collected as part of a large Ontario cross-sectional mother-infant survey were analyzed. Women (N = 1000 who had uncomplicated vaginal births of single 'at-term' infants at four hospitals in two large southern Ontario, Canada cities were stratified into SED and SEA groups based on income, social support and a universally administered hospital postpartum risk screen. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire before hospital discharge and a telephone interview four weeks after discharge. Main outcome measures were self-reported health status, symptoms of postpartum depression, postpartum service needs and health service use. Results When compared to the SEA women, the SED women were more likely to be discharged from hospital within the first 24 hours after giving birth [OR 1.49, 95% CI (1.01–2.18], less likely to report very good or excellent health [OR 0.48, 95% CI (0.35–0.67], and had higher rates of symptoms of postpartum depression [OR 2.7, 95% CI(1.64–4.4]. No differences were found between groups in relation to self reported need for and ability to access services for physical and mental health needs, or in use of physicians, walk-in clinics and emergency departments. The SED group were more likely to accept public health nurse home visits [OR 2.24, 95% CI(1.47–3.40]. Conclusion Although SED women experienced poorer mental and overall health they reported similar

  17. Treatment incidence of and medical utilization for hospitalized subjects with pathologic fractures in Taiwan-Survey of the 2008 National Health Insurance data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phan Dinh-Van

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Almost all studies of pathologic fractures have been conducted based on patients with tumours and hospital-based data; however, in the present study, a nationwide epidemiological survey of pathologic fractures in Taiwan was performed and the medical utilization was calculated. Methods All claimants of Taiwan's National Health Insurance (NHI Program in 2008 were included in the target population of this descriptive cross-sectional study. The registration and inpatient expenditure claims data by admission of all hospitalized subjects of the target population were examined and the concomitant International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes were evaluated and classified into seven major categories of fracture. Results A total of 5,244 incident cases of pathologic fracture were identified from the 2008 hospitalized patient claims data. The incidence of pathologic fracture of the humerus, distal radius/ulna, vertebrae, femoral neck, other part of the femur, and tibia/fibula was 0.67, 0.08, 10.58, 1.11, 0.56, and 0.11 per 100,000 people, respectively, and patients with those fractures were hospitalized for 43.9 ± 42.9, 31.1 ± 32.9, 29. 4 ± 34.4, 43.3 ± 41.2, 42.4 ± 38.1, and 42.0 ± 32.8 days, respectively, incurring an average medical cost of US$11,049 ± 12,730, US$9,181 ± 12,115, US$6,250 ± 8,021, US$9,619 ± 8,906, US$10,646 ± 11,024, and US$9,403 ± 9,882, respectively. The percentage of patients undergoing bone surgery for pathologic fracture of the humerus, radius/ulna, vertebrae, femoral neck, other part of the femur, and tibia/fibula was 31.2%, 44.4%, 11.3%, 46.5%, 48.4%, and 52.5% respectively. Conclusions Comparing Taiwan to other countries, this study observed for Taiwan higher medical utilization and less-aggressive surgical intervention for patients hospitalized with pathologic fractures.

  18. Regional and supraregional biochemistry services in Scotland: a survey of hospital laboratory users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, M J; Dryburgh, F J; Shepherd, J

    1994-05-01

    To ascertain the views of Scottish hospital laboratory users on aspects of regional and supraregional biochemical services offered by the Institute of Biochemistry at Glasgow Royal Infirmary. A questionnaire was circulated asking questions or inviting opinions under various headings, including current patterns of usage of the services provided, availability of information on specimen collection requirements and reference ranges, current arrangements for transport of specimens, turnaround times for delivery of reports, layout and content of request and report forms, quantity and quality of interpretive advice, potential changes in laboratory services, and overall impression of the services provided. Opportunities were provided for free text comment. The questionnaire was circulated in 1992 to heads of department in 23 Scottish hospital biochemistry laboratories. Twenty one replies were received. Services used widely included trace metals/vitamins (n = 20) and specialised endocrine tests (n = 19). Other services also used included specialised lipid tests (n = 13), toxicology (n = 12), thyroid function tests (n = nine), and tumour markers (n = eight). Fifteen laboratories used one or more of the services at least weekly. Most (n = 20) welcomed the idea of a handbook providing information on specimen collection and reference ranges. Nine identified loss of specimens as a problem. Other perceived problems included the absence of reference ranges from report forms, quantity and quality of interpretive advice, and turnaround times of some tests. Overall impressions of the service(s) offered were very good (n = 12); adequate (n = seven); poor (n = one). Useful information was obtained about patterns of use and transport arrangements. Areas identified as requiring follow up included provision of information, alternative ways of communicating reports, and improvement in quantity and quality of interpretive advice.

  19. Hospital based patient coordination for ethnic minority patients - a health technology assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodemann, Morten

    especially on public medicine expenses and social services. Ethnic minority patients can achieve increased empowerment & Equity in type and quality of hospital care through cross dicplinary cross specialty cultural case management & support between hospital departments and primary sectors......A cross diciplinary, cross specialty, cross sectoral hospital based approach to cultural management of ethnic minority patients is effective in creating more approprite patient flows, better quality of care and increases functional level of patients. Surprisingly the aggregated effect saves...

  20. Specifics of the Activity-Based Costing applications in Hospital Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Popesko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The current paper analyses the specifics of the application of Activity-Based Costing method in hospital management. Primary objective of the paper is to outline the methodology of the ABC application in hospitals. First part of the paper analyzes the ways of ABC implementation in published foreign studies. Second part describes the individual steps in ABC application and discusses the differences in the application procedures between the manufacturing and hospital organization.

  1. Wellbore Surveying While Drilling Based on Kalman Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud ElGizawy

    2010-01-01

    by designing a reliable real-time low cost MWD surveying system based on MEMS inertial sensors miniaturized inside the RSS housing installed directly behind the drill bit. A continuous borehole surveying module based on MEMS inertial sensors integrated with other drilling measurements was developed using Kalman filtering.

  2. Survey of the initial management and imaging protocols for occult scaphoid fractures in UK hospitals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brookes-Fazakerley, S.D.; Kumar, A.J.S. [Countess of Chester Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, Chester (United Kingdom); Oakley, J. [Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic and District Hospital NHS Trust, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    The aim of this research was to survey how occult fractures of the scaphoid bone are both imaged and managed initially. A total of 832 questionnaires were sent via e-mail to active associate members of the British Orthopaedic Association. Included was a series of questions regarding the timing of initial and subsequent orthopaedic review of this group of patients and the use of serial radiographs and second-line imaging techniques. Nearly half of the UK's acute NHS trusts were represented (45%). The response rate was 16% (130 out of 832). Only 16% of respondents were aware of a local imaging protocol for the investigation of suspected fractures of the scaphoid. Ninety-four percent of respondents performed a second radiograph at first fracture clinic review. Fifty-eight percent used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a second-line investigation; with computed tomography scan and radionuclide isotope bone scan being performed by 26% and 16% respondents, respectively. The survey revealed a wide variation in the management of occult fractures of the scaphoid. MRI has been shown to be both sensitive and specific in diagnosing occult carpal bone fractures. There is a need to standardise the management of these injuries to ensure early diagnosis and limit unnecessary wrist immobilisation. (orig.)

  3. Prospective survey of indoor fungal contamination in hospital during a period of building construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sautour, M; Sixt, N; Dalle, F; L'ollivier, C; Calinon, C; Fourquenet, V; Thibaut, C; Jury, H; Lafon, I; Aho, S; Couillault, G; Vagner, O; Cuisenier, B; Besancenot, J-P; Caillot, D; Bonnin, A

    2007-12-01

    An 18-month survey of indoor fungal contamination was conducted in one haematology unit during a period of construction work. Air was sampled with a portable Air System Impactor and surfaces with contact Sabouraud plates. During this survey the mean concentration of viable fungi in air was 4.2 cfu/m(3) and that for surfaces was 1.7 cfu/plate. At the beginning of construction work, there were increases in airborne fungal spores (from 3.0 to 9.8 cfu/m(3)) in the unit, but concentrations did not exceed 10 cfu/m(3) during the 18-month period. The most frequently recovered airborne fungi were Penicillium spp. (27-38%), Aspergillus spp. (25%) and Bjerkandera adusta, a basidiomycete identified with molecular tools (7-12%). Blastomycetes accounted for more than 50% of the fungal flora on surfaces. Investigating the impact of a new air-treatment system (mobile Plasmair units), there were significant reductions in fungal contamination for the Plasmer -treated rooms, and in these rooms we observed the same level of fungal load whether construction work was in progress or not.

  4. Food is important for health and well-being. Results from a hospital survey in Norway with focus on organic food, and implications for future research needs

    OpenAIRE

    Koesling, Matthias; Solemdal, Liv; Birkeland, Liv

    2006-01-01

    A questionnaire survey was conducted at the university hospital in Trondheim, Norway in December 2005. In relation to former questionnaires conducted at the hospital, patients and guests were much more satisfied with the food served, especially potatoes and vegetables. Patients and guest express that food is important for their health and well-being. Good taste, appearance and right nutrition were understood as important qualities of food. The absence of pesticides, artificial fertilizers and...

  5. Proposed educational objectives for hospital-based dentists during catastrophic events and disaster response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psoter, Walter J; Herman, Neal G; More, Frederick G; Park, Patricia; Robbins, Miriam; Rekow, E Dianne; Ryan, James M; Triola, Marc M; Glotzer, David

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this project was to define education and training requirements for hospital-based dentists to efficiently and meaningfully participate in a hospital disaster response. Eight dental faculty with hospital-based training and/or military command and CBRNE (chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive) expertise were recruited as an expert panel. A consensus set of recommended educational objectives for hospital-based dentists was established using the following process: 1) identify assumptions supported by all expert panelists, 2) determine current advanced dental educational training requirements, and 3) conduct additional training and literature review by various panelists and discussions with other content and systems experts. Using this three-step process, educational objectives that the development group believed necessary for hospital-based dentists to be effective in treatment or management roles in times of a catastrophic event were established. These educational objectives are categorized into five thematic areas: 1) disaster systems, 2) triage/medical assessment, 3) blast and burn injuries, 4) chemical agents, and 5) biological agents. Creation of training programs to help dentists acquire these educational objectives would benefit hospital-based dental training programs and strengthen hospital surge manpower needs. The proposed educational objectives are designed to stimulate discussion and debate among dental, medical, and public health professionals about the roles of dentists in meeting hospital surge manpower needs.

  6. Individual and institutional determinants of caesarean section in referral hospitals in Senegal and Mali: a cross-sectional epidemiological survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briand Valérie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two years after implementing the free-CS policy, we assessed the non-financial factors associated with caesarean section (CS in women managed by referral hospitals in Senegal and Mali. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey nested in a cluster trial (QUARITE trial in 41 referral hospitals in Senegal and Mali (10/01/2007–10/01/2008. Data were collected regarding women’s characteristics and on available institutional resources. Individual and institutional factors independently associated with emergency (before labour, intrapartum and elective CS were determined using a hierarchical logistic mixed model. Results Among 86 505 women, 14% delivered by intrapartum CS, 3% by emergency CS and 2% by elective CS. For intrapartum, emergency and elective CS, the main maternal risk factors were, respectively: previous CS, referral from another facility and suspected cephalopelvic-disproportion (adjusted Odds Ratios from 2.8 to 8.9; vaginal bleeding near full term, hypertensive disorders, previous CS and premature rupture of membranes (adjusted ORs from 3.9 to 10.2; previous CS (adjusted OR=19.2 [17.2-21.6]. Access to adult and neonatal intensive care, a 24-h/day anaesthetist and number of annual deliveries per hospital were independent factors that affected CS rates according to degree of urgency. The presence of obstetricians and/or medical-anaesthetists was associated with an increased risk of elective CS (adjusted ORs [95%CI] = 4.8 [2.6-8.8] to 9.4 [5.1-17.1]. Conclusions We confirm the significant effect of well-known maternal risk factors affecting the mode of delivery. Available resources at the institutional level and the degree of urgency of CS should be taken into account in analysing CS rates in this context.

  7. Examination of cross contamination risks between hospitals by external medical staff via cross-sectional intercept survey of hand hygiene

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    Schiffers, Hank

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] Introduction: Work in hospitals is supported by contributions of life sciences industry representatives (IR in various ways of fields. Close contact between them, caretakers and patients is unavoidable, even in situations where hygiene is critical.The present study investigates whether IR display comparable levels of and methicillin-resistant (MRSA contamination after being exposed to a shared environment for a minimum of 4 hours.Material and methods: An anonymous survey to sample a group of healthcare professionals for traces of fingertip contamination was performed. We used dip slides ( and MRSA to evaluate professionals at the medical exhibition MEDICA. After applying exclusion criteria 298 participants remained valid, they consisted of 208 industry representatives, 49 nurses and 41 physicians.Results: IR where engaged in hospitals, operating rooms and outpatient clinics (82%, 41.8%, 51.9% respectively. 65.9% of IR (vs. 48.8% physicians and 40.8% nurses carried a microbiological burden ≥10 CFU (colony forming units. Neither (≥10 CFU in IR (40.9% did show statistical differences in contamination patterns in comparison to physicians (43.9%, p=0.346 and nurses (36.7%, p=0.878 nor did MRSA (physicians p=0.579, nurses p=0.908. We were unable to differentiate transient from pre-existing permanent colonization.Conclusion: Exposure to the same environment may result in similar hand contamination patterns of IR when compared caregivers. This supports the concern that industry representatives can cause cross infection between hospitals and hygiene sensitive areas like operation room, intensive care unit and central sterilization units particularly. Further study is required to clarify whether pre-existing bacterial colonization is an influencing factor and how industry is taking care of this to create a safe working environment for their employees, the customers and ultimately the patients.

  8. CYTOLOGICAL PATTERNS OF THYROID LESIONS: A HOSPITAL-BASED STUDY

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    Dharmakanta Kumbhakar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diverse cytological patterns of thyroid lesions may occur in the thyroid gland for its various diseases. The thyroid lesions may be nonneoplastic lesions or neoplastic lesions. Most of the thyroid lesions clinically present as thyroid swellings either as thyroid nodules or as diffuse enlargement of the gland itself. Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC is a rapid, easy to perform, minimally invasive and cost-effective first line high diagnostic accuracy test for cytological evaluation of thyroid lesions with minimum complications. The thyroid gland is easily accessible for Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA procedure due to its superficial location. The accurate cytological diagnosis of the thyroid lesions can direct the treatment modalities of the lesions and reduce unnecessary thyroid surgeries. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES A hospital-based study to determine the cytological patterns of thyroid lesions by FNAC and to correlate the cytological and histopathological diagnosis wherever possible. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was based on “FNAC analysis of 100 thyroid lesions presented as thyroid swellings” (study group in the period of two (02 years from June 1, 2014, to May 31, 2016, in the cytopathology section of the Pathology Department of Tezpur Medical College and Hospital, Tezpur, Assam. Histopathological correlation was done in the surgically treated thyroid lesions of the study group. RESULTS AND OBSERVATIONS Female patients (87 comprised majority of thyroid lesions (87.00%, while male patients (13 were only 13.00% of thyroid lesions with a male and female patients’ ratio of 6.69:1 in the study group. Maximum patients with thyroid lesions, irrespective of sex in the study group were in the age group of 31-40 years. The youngest patient in the study group was a 7 years old girl diagnosed as lymphocytic thyroiditis and the oldest patient in the study group was a 73 years old female diagnosed as colloid goitre. Out of 100 thyroid

  9. Recruitment for a hospital-based pragmatic clinical trial using volunteer nurses and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewer, Audrey L; Li, Jiaqi; Ikeda, Daniel J; Leary, Marion; Buckler, David G; Riegel, Barbara; Desai, Sunita; Groeneveld, Peter W; Putt, Mary E; Abella, Benjamin S

    2016-08-01

    Recruitment of subjects is critical to the success of any clinical trial, but achieving this goal can be a challenging endeavor. Volunteer nurse and student enrollers are potentially an important source of recruiters for hospital-based trials; however, little is known of either the efficacy or cost of these types of enrollers. We assessed volunteer clinical nurses and health science students in their rates of enrolling family members in a hospital-based, pragmatic clinical trial of cardiopulmonary resuscitation education, and their ability to achieve target recruitment goals. We hypothesized that students would have a higher enrollment rate and are more cost-effective compared to nurses. Volunteer nurses and student enrollers were recruited from eight institutions. Participating nurses were primarily bedside nurses or nurse educators while students were pre-medical, pre-nursing, and pre-health students at local universities. We recorded the frequency of enrollees recruited into the clinical trial by each enroller. Enrollers' impressions of recruitment were assessed using mixed-methods surveys. Cost was estimated based on enrollment data. Overall enrollment data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and generalized estimating equations. From February 2012 to November 2014, 260 hospital personnel (167 nurses and 93 students) enrolled 1493 cardiac patients' family members, achieving target recruitment goals. Of those recruited, 822 (55%) were by nurses, while 671 (45%) were by students. Overall, students enrolled 5.44 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.88, 10.27) more subjects per month than nurses (p students had a 2.85 (95% CI: 1.09, 7.43) increased chance of enrolling at least one family member (p = 0.03). Among those who enrolled at least one subject, nurses enrolled a mean of 0.51(95% CI: 0.42, 0.59) subjects monthly, while students enrolled 1.63 (95% CI: 1.37, 1.90) per month (p students), 168/198 (85%) felt confident conducting enrollment. The

  10. Exercise therapy for low back pain: a small-scale exploratory survey of current physiotherapy practice in the Republic of Ireland acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Karol; Doody, Catherine; Hurley, Deirdre A

    2006-11-01

    A small-scale exploratory cross-sectional survey investigated the current use of a range of exercise therapy approaches for low back pain (LBP) by outpatient physiotherapists in the acute hospital setting in the Republic of Ireland, where the majority of publicly funded treatment is delivered. Of the 120 postal questionnaires distributed to 24 physiotherapy departments, 87 were returned (72.5% response rate). The results showed specific spinal stabilization exercises were the most popular exercise therapy for acute (39%; n = 35) and chronic (51%; n = 48) LBP, followed by the McKenzie approach (acute LBP (ALBP) 35.6%; n = 32: chronic LBP (CLBP) 17%; n = 16), and abdominal exercise (ALBP 11.1%; n = 10: CLBP 9.6%; n = 9). The most popular forms of exercise therapy used by outpatient physiotherapists in acute hospital settings in Ireland lack support from evidence-based clinical guidelines, and further large-scale high quality randomized controlled trials of these approaches are warranted. Further research should also establish the use of exercise therapy and attitudes to clinical guidelines of physiotherapists in other countries and healthcare settings.

  11. Compulsory removal to and detention in hospital in the case of notifiable disease: a survey of public health doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, B; Bingham, P

    1993-05-01

    Compulsory detention of an individual in hospital, because they have a notifiable disease, is controversial. Difficulties experienced by the authors in applying Sections 37 and 38 of the Public Health (Control of Disease) Act 1984 led them to conduct a postal survey of the experience of Consultants in Communicable Disease Control/Medical Officers of Environmental Health (CCDC/MOEH) currently in post in England. Out of 138 respondents (80% response rate), 48 respondents (34.8%) had dealt with 'non-compliant' individuals posing an infectious risk to the community. Of the 48, 13 respondents achieved compliance by threatening to use Section 37/38 and only 6 respondents resorted to using Section 37/38, equivalent to less than one use of the sections for every hundred years of CCDC/MOEH experience. In most cases the notifiable disease in question was tuberculosis. In contrast to our experience and previously reported cases, the survey suggests generally satisfactory experience of Section 37/38 amongst CCDC/MOEH currently in post. Recommended guidelines for the use of Section 37/38 are given.

  12. Surveying the rate of tissue expander complications among reconstructive patients in Hazrat Fatima hospital between 1389-1391

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    Amirasadola Khajerahimi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tissue expansion is a common reconstructive surgery especially in burned patients. This study has been designed to evaluate the rate of complications of this method in Hazrat Fatima Hospital between 1389-1391. Materials & Methods: In this cross sectional and retrospective study, 150 patients' records have been studied between 1389-1391 years, frequency rate and types of complications related to tissue expander have been surveyed in these patients. Results: Complications have been observed in about 7% of the patients included in this study. Exposure of tissue expander was the most common complication (81.8%. Other complications which are resulted from this issue are capsular contracture and infection. Age was the only factor which had significant relation with increasing complication among the other surveyed factors including age, sex, indication of operation, wound location and duration of anaesthesia.(p=0.033 Conclusion: The incidence of complication in patients that required tissue expander was not high and it was less than 10%. It should be noted that patient selection should be carefully in paediatric group and also strict observance of surgical principles is necessary to avoid complication.

  13. Reduced pre-hospital and in-hospital survival rates after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus : An observational prospective community-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hoeijen, Daniel A.; Blom, Marieke T.; Bardai, Abdennasser; Souverein, Patrick C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/243074948; De Boer, Anthonius|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075097346; Tan, Hanno L.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains a major cause of death. We aimed to determine whether type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with reduced pre-hospital and in-hospital survival rates after OHCA. Methods and results An observational community-based cohort study was performed

  14. Poliomyelitis, measles and neonatal tetanus: a hospital based epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Shazly, M K; Atta, H Y; Kishk, N A

    1997-01-01

    Vaccine-preventable diseases constitute a major health problem contributing to the morbidity and mortality in many developing countries including Egypt. WHO adopted resolutions to eradicate poliomyelitis by the year 2000, eliminate neonatal tetanus by the year 1995, and reduce measles mortality by 95% and morbidity by 90%, compared to the pre-immunization levels by 1995. Evaluation of preventive programs for these diseases necessitates availability of up to date information on their occurrence. The present study was undertaken to determine the current epidemiological features of poliomyelitis, neonatal tetanus and measles, to identify the trends of these diseases as well as to determine their outcomes and hospital loads. Data about the admitted cases of poliomyelitis, neonatal tetanus and measles were collected from the hospital register of Alexandria fever hospital for five successive years (1992-96). Available information on age, sex, residence, diagnosis, outcome of treatment, dates of admission and discharge were collected. The total number of cases of the three diseases admitted to the hospital during the period 1992-96 were 1406, measles represented 85.4%, neonatal tetanus 13.9% and poliomyelitis 0.7%. The results revealed that in the year 1994 only one case of poliomyelitis was admitted and since then no other cases were reported. The number of measles cases increased gradually in the latter years and about 78% of them were older than five years of age. A significant increase in the age of measles occurrence was observed. A gradual decline in the number of neonatal tetanus cases was observed. These cases were more apt to occur among early neonates but still clustered in certain geographical areas. The results of the study pinpoint the long term impact of the well run program aiming at eradicating poliomyelitis in Alexandria. However, for elimination of neonatal tetanus and controlling measles morbidity, further activities are required including strengthening

  15. Extremity fractures in children: a hospital based study in Tehran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Khaji; Mousa Zargar; Mojgan Karbakhsh

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although long bone fracture in children is not life-threatening, it may cause major disability, loss of working days and severe psychological distress. We conducted this study to determine the pattern of extremity fracture due to trauma in children.Methods: During one year in six general hospitals in Tehran, trauma patients who were hospitalized for more than 24 hours and sustained injuries within seven days before admission were included in the study. The records of children (≤16 years old) hospitalized in six general hospitals in Tehran due to trauma were reviewed prospectively.Results: During the study period, 1274 children had sustained extremity fractures. Male to female ratio was 3.6/1, with the mean age of (10.3±4.2) years. Falls and traffic crashes were the main causes of injuries, with the percentages of 57.3% and 37.1%, respectively. Simple fall (falling on the ground) consisted 60% of patients that sustained fall-related injuries. Pedestrians and bicycle riders comprised most of the cases that were injured due to traffic crashes. Of our cases, 56.8% sustained fractures in the upper extremities and 43.2% in the lower extremities. Forearm was the most common fracture site (34.1%). Comparing our results in preschool and school-age children, falls were the main cause of injuries in both groups, but fractures of lower extremities were significantly more common in preschool children.Conclusions:Improvement of physical condition of sidewalks and crossings in roads will be necessary for prevention of injuries. More attention to safety of home environment should be paid for control of preschools' injury at home. Education of children and adults is necessary to reduce injuries resulting from road traffic crashes.

  16. An indoor radon survey of the X-ray rooms of Mexico City hospitals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juarez, Faustino [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100. Estado de Mexico, 50000, Mexico. Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito (Mexico); Reyes, Pedro G. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100. Estado de Mexico, 50000 (Mexico); Espinosa, Guillermo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico D.F. Cp.04510 (Mexico)

    2013-07-03

    This paper presents the results of measurements of indoor radon concentrations in the X-ray rooms of a selection of hospitals in the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The metropolitan area of Mexico City is Mexico's largest metropolitan area by population; the number of patients requiring the use of X-rays is also the highest. An understanding of indoor radon concentrations in X-ray rooms is necessary for the estimation of the radiological risk to which patients, radiologists and medical technicians are exposed. The indoor radon concentrations were monitored for a period of six months using nuclear track detectors (NTD) consisting of a closed-end cup system with CR-39 (Lantrack Registered-Sign ) polycarbonate as detector material. The indoor radon concentrations were found to be between 75 and 170 Bq m{sup -3}, below the USEPA-recommended indoor radon action level for working places of 400 Bq m{sup -3}. It is hoped that the results of this study will contribute to the establishment of recommended action levels by the Mexican regulatory authorities responsible for nuclear safety.

  17. An indoor radon survey of the X-ray rooms of Mexico City hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez, Faustino; Reyes, Pedro G.; Espinosa, Guillermo

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents the results of measurements of indoor radon concentrations in the X-ray rooms of a selection of hospitals in the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The metropolitan area of Mexico City is Mexico's largest metropolitan area by population; the number of patients requiring the use of X-rays is also the highest. An understanding of indoor radon concentrations in X-ray rooms is necessary for the estimation of the radiological risk to which patients, radiologists and medical technicians are exposed. The indoor radon concentrations were monitored for a period of six months using nuclear track detectors (NTD) consisting of a closed-end cup system with CR-39 (Lantrack®) polycarbonate as detector material. The indoor radon concentrations were found to be between 75 and 170 Bq m-3, below the USEPA-recommended indoor radon action level for working places of 400 Bq m-3. It is hoped that the results of this study will contribute to the establishment of recommended action levels by the Mexican regulatory authorities responsible for nuclear safety.

  18. Neuroinfection survey at a neurological ward in a Brazilian tertiary teaching hospital

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    Paulo E Marchiori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken to characterize the neuroinfection profile in a tertiary neurological ward. INTRODUCTION: Neuroinfection is a worldwide concern and bacterial meningitis, tetanus and cerebral malaria have been reported as the commonest causes in developing countries. METHODS: From 1999 to 2007, all patients admitted to the Neurology Ward of Hospital das Clínicas, São Paulo University School of Medicine because of neuroinfection had their medical records reviewed. Age, gender, immunological status, neurological syndrome at presentation, infectious agent and clinical outcome were recorded. RESULTS: Three hundred and seventy four cases of neuroinfectious diseases accounted for 4.2% of ward admissions and the identification of infectious agent was successful in 81% of cases. Mean age was 40.5 + 13.4 years, 63.8% were male, 19.7% were immunocompromised patients and meningoencephalitis was the most common clinical presentation despite infectious agent. Viruses and bacteria were equally responsible for 29.4% of neuroinfectious diseases; parasitic, fungal and prion infections accounted for 28%, 9.6% and 3.5% respectively. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Treponema pallidum, Taenia solium, Schistosoma mansoni, Cryptococcus neoformans and Histoplasma capsulatum were the more common infectious pathogens in the patients. Infection mortality rate was 14.2%, of which 62.3% occurred in immunocompetent patients. CONCLUSION: Our institution appeared to share some results with developed and developing countries. Comparison with literature may be considered as quality control to health assistance.

  19. Survey of hospital clinicians' preferences regarding the format of radiology reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plumb, A.A.O. [East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust, Blackburn (United Kingdom)], E-mail: aaoplumb@hotmail.com; Grieve, F.M.; Khan, S.H. [East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust, Blackburn (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    Aim: To determine hospital consultants' preferences for the format and content of radiology reports. Materials and methods: Ninety-nine questionnaires were sent to consultant staff with responsibility for requesting ultrasound examinations. The participants were invited to rank a variety of hypothetical reports in order of preference. They were also asked whether they felt other commonly included features of a radiology report were of value. Rank data were analysed by the Friedman statistic, Fisher's multiple comparisons least significant difference test, and the Kemeny-Young method. Results: Forty-nine responses were received. There was a preference for more detailed reports that included a clinical comment by the radiologist, for both normal and abnormal results (p < 0.05). Reports presented in tables were preferred. The combination of a detailed tabular report with a radiologist's comment was the most popular single structure, preferred by 43% of respondents for normal reports and 51% for abnormal reports. Conclusion: Detailed reports with a radiologists' comment are preferred to briefer reports, even for normal examinations. Tabular reports are preferred to prose, with the combination of a detailed report presented in a tabular format accompanied by a radiologist's comment being the most preferred style.

  20. Neuroinfection survey at a neurological ward in a Brazilian tertiary teaching hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiori, Paulo E; Lino, Angelina M M; Machado, Luis R; Pedalini, Livia M; Boulos, Marcos; Scaff, Milberto

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken to characterize the neuroinfection profile in a tertiary neurological ward. INTRODUCTION: Neuroinfection is a worldwide concern and bacterial meningitis, tetanus and cerebral malaria have been reported as the commonest causes in developing countries. METHODS: From 1999 to 2007, all patients admitted to the Neurology Ward of Hospital das Clínicas, S�o Paulo University School of Medicine because of neuroinfection had their medical records reviewed. Age, gender, immunological status, neurological syndrome at presentation, infectious agent and clinical outcome were recorded. RESULTS: Three hundred and seventy four cases of neuroinfectious diseases accounted for 4.2% of ward admissions and the identification of infectious agent was successful in 81% of cases. Mean age was 40.5±13.4 years, 63.8% were male, 19.7% were immunocompromised patients and meningoencephalitis was the most common clinical presentation despite infectious agent. Viruses and bacteria were equally responsible for 29.4% of neuroinfectious diseases; parasitic, fungal and prion infections accounted for 28%, 9.6% and 3.5% respectively. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Treponema pallidum, Taenia solium, Schistosoma mansoni, Cryptococcus neoformans and Histoplasma capsulatum were the more common infectious pathogens in the patients. Infection mortality rate was 14.2%, of which 62.3% occurred in immunocompetent patients. CONCLUSION: Our institution appeared to share some results with developed and developing countries. Comparison with literature may be considered as quality control to health assistance. PMID:21808869

  1. A survey of dental treatment under general anesthesia in a Korean university hospital pediatric dental clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Bisol; Yoo, Seunghoon; Kim, Jongsoo; Kim, Seungoh; Kim, Jongbin

    2016-09-01

    In South Korea, the number of cases of dental treatment for the disabled is gradually increasing, primarily at regional dental clinics for the disabled. This study investigated pediatric patients at a treatment clinic for the disabled within a university hospital who received dental treatment under general anesthesia. This data could assist those that provide dental treatment for the disabled and guide future treatment directions and new policies. This study was a retrospective analysis of 263 cases in which patients received dental treatment under general anesthesia from January 2011 to May 2016. The variables examined were gender, age, reason for anesthesia, type of disability, time under anesthesia, duration of treatment, type of procedure, treatment details, and annual trends in the use of general anesthesia. Among pediatric patients with disabilities who received dental treatment under general anesthesia, the most prevalent age group was 5-8 years old (124 patients, 47.1%), and the primary reason for administering anesthesia was dental anxiety or phobia. The mean time under anesthesia was 132.7 ± 77.6 min, and the mean duration of treatment was 101.9 ± 71.2 min. The most common type of treatment was restoration, accounting for 158 of the 380 treatments performed. Due to increasing demand, the number of cases of dental treatment performed under general anesthesia is expected to continue increasing, and it can be a useful method of treatment in patients with dental anxiety or phobia.

  2. A nationwide population-based cross-sectional survey of health-related quality of life in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms in Denmark (MPNhealthSurvey): survey design and characteristics of respondents and nonrespondents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochmann, Nana; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Christensen, Anne Illemann; Andersen, Christen Lykkegaard; Juel, Knud; Hasselbalch, Hans Carl; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2017-01-01

    Objective The Department of Hematology, Zealand University Hospital, Denmark, and the National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, created the first nationwide, population-based, and the most comprehensive cross-sectional health-related quality of life (HRQoL) survey of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). In Denmark, all MPN patients are treated in public hospitals and treatments received are free of charge for these patients. Therefore, MPN patients receive the best available treatment to the extent of its suitability for them and if they wish to receive the treatment. The aims of this article are to describe the survey design and the characteristics of respondents and nonrespondents. Material and methods Individuals with MPN diagnoses registered in the Danish National Patient Register (NPR) were invited to participate. The registers of the Danish Civil Registration System and Statistics Denmark provided information regarding demographics. The survey contained 120 questions: validated patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires and additional questions addressing lifestyle. Results A total of 4,704 individuals were registered with MPN diagnoses in the NPR of whom 4,236 were eligible for participation and 2,613 (62%) responded. Overall, the respondents covered the broad spectrum of MPN patients, but patients 70–79 years old, living with someone, of a Danish/Western ethnicity, and with a higher level of education exhibited the highest response rate. Conclusion A nationwide, population-based, and comprehensive HRQoL survey of MPN patients in Denmark was undertaken (MPNhealthSurvey). We believe that the respondents broadly represent the MPN population in Denmark. However, the differences between respondents and nonrespondents have to be taken into consideration when examining PROs from the respondents. The results of the investigation of the respondents’ HRQoL in this survey will follow in future articles. PMID:28280390

  3. Structured physical exercise improves neuropsychiatric symptoms in acute dementia care : a hospital-based RCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleiner, Tim; Dauth, Hannah; Gersie, Marleen; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Haussermann, Peter

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The primary objective of this trial is to investigate the effects of a short-term exercise program on neuropsychiatric signs and symptoms in acute hospital dementia care. METHODS: Within a hospital-based randomized controlled trial, the intervention group conducted a 2-week exercise

  4. Web Based Projects Enhancing English Language and Generic Skills Development for Asian Hospitality Industry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-jung

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated hospitality students' responses toward their learning experiences from undertaking group projects based upon a College web platform, the "Ubiquitous Hospitality English Learning Platform" (U-HELP). Twenty-six students in the Department of Applied Foreign Languages participated in this study. Their attitudes toward…

  5. Diversity in the scope and practice of hospital-based midwives in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cronie, D.; Rijnders, M.E.B.; Buitendijk,S.E.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Not all midwives in the Netherlands are independent practitioners. One in 4 midwives registered to practice is employed in the hospital setting, where 67% of all births occur. There has not yet been an in-depth examination of hospital-based midwives' practice in the Netherlands, in the

  6. Web Based Projects Enhancing English Language and Generic Skills Development for Asian Hospitality Industry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-jung

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated hospitality students' responses toward their learning experiences from undertaking group projects based upon a College web platform, the "Ubiquitous Hospitality English Learning Platform" (U-HELP). Twenty-six students in the Department of Applied Foreign Languages participated in this study. Their attitudes toward…

  7. National Trends in Foot and Ankle Arthrodesis: 17-Year Analysis of the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery and National Hospital Discharge Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Matthew J; Buller, Leonard T; Miranda, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Foot and ankle arthrodesis reliably reduces pain and functional disability among patients with arthritis and deformity. Since its introduction in 1953, improvements in surgical technique have enhanced the outcomes and reduced complications. However, little is known regarding US national trends of foot and ankle arthrodesis. The present study sought to use the most recently available Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data to investigate changes in the usage of inpatient and ambulatory foot and ankle arthrodesis. Cases of foot and ankle arthrodesis were identified using the National Hospital Discharge Survey and National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery, and the data were analyzed for trends in demographics, treatment, and usage. From 1994 to 2006, the population-adjusted rates of foot and ankle arthrodeses increased by 146% (8.2/100,000 capita to 20.2/100,000 capita). The number of outpatient arthrodeses performed with arthroscopic assistance increased by 858%. The population-adjusted rate of outpatient and inpatient procedures increased by 415% and 17%, respectively. The gender-adjusted rates increased by 59% for males and 209% for females. The age-adjusted rates increased among patients >35 years old in both settings. The use of peripheral nerve blocks during ambulatory procedures increased from 3.3% to 10.1%. Private insurance was the largest compensator. In conclusion, the rate of foot and ankle arthrodesis increased dramatically from 1990 to 2007 using the most up-to-date publicly available data. Knowledge of these national practice patterns could aid policy-makers and surgeons in appropriately allocating healthcare resources to ensure quality patient care.

  8. Understanding the impact of the Smoke-Free Ontario Act on hospitality establishments' outdoor environments: a survey of restaurants and bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ryan David; Elton-Marshall, Tara; Mutti, Seema; Dubray, Jolene; Fong, Geoffrey T

    2010-04-01

    The Smoke-Free Ontario Act (SFOA) came into effect in May 2006 and included restrictions to outdoor hospitality areas by only permitting smoking on a patio if the area had no roof. (1) To assess the impact of the SFOA on the prevalence of smoke-free patios in Ontario and (2) to determine the proportion of venues where structural alterations were made rather than going smoke-free in order to achieve compliance with the SFOA. A telephone survey of 403 hospitality sector operators/owners in four clustered samples of Ontario, Canada. Based on completed surveys, the SFOA resulted in an increase in prevalence of smoke-free patios, from 5% (n=21) to 25% (n=99). Of the patios where smoking was permitted before the SFOA (n=382), 42% (n=161) had physical structures that would make smoking not permissible under the new act. Operators of half of these venues (n=80) made their patios smoke-free, with most indicating they had no choice given the costs or physical limitations to changing their outdoor environment. The other half (n=81) reported making physical changes, including removing roof structures to achieve compliance. The SFOA resulted in greater protection from outdoor secondhand smoke; however, most patios still permitted smoking. Half of the venues that complied with the SFOA by going smoke-free did so involuntarily because of structural and/or financial limitations. The majority of venue operators preferred to permit smoking on their patios, and only made their patios smoke-free when they were required to do so by law.

  9. Design of the Hospital Integrated Information Management System Based on Cloud Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijing, L; Jin, Y

    2016-04-18

    At present, the outdated information management style cannot meet the needs of hospital management, and has become the bottleneck of hospital's management and development. In order to improve the integrated management of information, hospitals have increased their investment in integrated information management systems. On account of the lack of reasonable and scientific design, some hospital integrated information management systems have common problems, such as unfriendly interface, poor portability and maintainability, low security and efficiency, lack of interactivity and information sharing. To solve the problem, this paper carries out the research and design of a hospital information management system based on cloud platform, which can realize the optimized integration of hospital information resources and save money.

  10. Design of the Hospital Integrated Information Management System Based on Cloud Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijing, L; Jin, Y

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT At present, the outdated information management style cannot meet the needs of hospital management, and has become the bottleneck of hospital's management and development. In order to improve the integrated management of information, hospitals have increased their investment in integrated information management systems. On account of the lack of reasonable and scientific design, some hospital integrated information management systems have common problems, such as unfriendly interface, poor portability and maintainability, low security and efficiency, lack of interactivity and information sharing. To solve the problem, this paper carries out the research and design of a hospital information management system based on cloud platform, which can realize the optimized integration of hospital information resources and save money. PMID:27399033

  11. Pressure ulcer and wounds reporting in NHS hospitals in England part 2: Survey of monitoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Susanne; Smith, Isabelle L; Nixon, Jane; Wilson, Lyn; Brown, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    This is the second of a two related papers describing work undertaken to compare and contrast Pressure Ulcer (PU) monitoring systems across NHS in-patient facilities in England. The work comprised 1) a PU/Wound Audit (PUWA) and 2) a survey of PU monitoring systems. This second paper focusses on the survey which explores differences in the implementation of PU adverse event monitoring systems in 24 NHS hospital Trusts in England. The survey questionnaire comprised 41 items incorporating single and multiple response options and free-text items and was completed by the PUWA Trust lead in liaison with key people in the organisation. All 24 (100%) Trusts returned the questionnaire, with high levels of data completeness (99.1%). The questionnaire results showed variation between Trusts in relation to the recording of PUs and their reporting as part of NHS prevalence and incident monitoring systems and to Trust boards and healthcare commissioners including the inclusion (or not) of device ulcers, unstageable ulcers, Deep Tissue Injury, combined PUs/Incontinence Associated Dermatitis, category ≥ 1 ulcers or category ≥ 2 ulcers, inherited ulcers, acquired ulcers, avoidable and unavoidable ulcers and the definition of Present On Admission. These fundamental differences in reporting preclude Trust to Trust comparisons of PU prevalence and incident reporting and monitoring systems due to variation in local application and data collection methods. The results of this work and the PUWA led to the development of recommendations for PU monitoring practice, many of which are internationally relevant.

  12. Transforming a hospital nursing research fellowship into an evidence-based practice fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattuso, Jami S; Hinds, Pamela S; Beaumont, Cynthia; Funk, Adam J; Green, Jo; Max, Anita; Russell, Philisa; Windsor, Kelley

    2007-12-01

    An established hospital-based nursing research fellowship program was transformed into an evidence-based practice fellowship despite its previous high satisfaction ratings from nursing leaders and nurse fellow participants. The faculty for the fellowship program determined that the long-term outcomes of the research program were insufficient in light of the hospital resources committed to the fellowship program. An evidence-based practice approach was then created in anticipation that greater short-term and more sustained longer-term benefits for the hospital would be realized. The transformation of the fellowship and the short-term outcomes are described.

  13. Hospital organizational factors influence work-family conflict in registered nurses: Multilevel modeling of a nation-wide cross-sectional survey in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leineweber, C; Chungkham, H S; Westerlund, H; Tishelman, C; Lindqvist, R

    2014-05-01

    The present shortage of registered nurses (RNs) in many European countries is expected to continue and worsen, which poses a substantial threat to the maintenance of healthcare in this region. Work-family conflict is a known risk factor for turnover and sickness absence. This paper empirically examines whether the nurse practice environment is associated with experienced work-family conflict. A multilevel model was fit with the individual RN at the 1st, and the hospital department at the 2nd level using cross-sectional RN survey data from the Swedish part of RN4CAST, an EU 7th framework project. The data analyzed here is based on a national sample of 8356 female and 592 male RNs from 369 hospital departments. We found that 6% of the variability in work-family conflict experienced by RNs was at the department level. Organizational level factors significantly accounted for most of the variability at this level with two of the work practice environment factors examined, staffing adequacy and nurse involvement in hospital affairs, significantly related to work-family conflict. Due to the design of the study, factors on ward and work group levels could not be analyzed, but are likely to account for additional variance which in the present analysis appears to be on the individual level, with private life factors likely explaining another major part. These results suggest that higher level organizational factors in health care have a significant impact on the risk of work-family conflict among RNs through their impact on the nurse practice environment. Lower level organizational factors should be investigated in future studies using hierarchical multilevel sampling. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. A survey of death anxiety among personnel of a hospital in Sari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Masoudzadeh