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Sample records for hornbeam cement bonded

  1. NATURAL DURABILITY AND PERFORMANCE OF HORNBEAM CEMENT BONDED PARTICLEBOARD

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Papadopoulos, Antonios N

    2008-01-01

    Cement bonded particleboards were manufactured from hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L.) wood particles. Hydration tests were carried out to determine the inhibitory index in order to characterise wood-cement compatibility...

  2. Mechanical Properties and Decay Resistance of Hornbeam Cement Bonded Particleboards

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Antonios N. Papadopoulos

    2008-01-01

    Cement bonded particleboards were manufactured from hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L.) wood particles. Hydration tests were carried out to determine the inhibitory index in order to characterise wood-cement compatibility...

  3. Mechanical Properties and Decay Resistance of Hornbeam Cement Bonded Particleboards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonios N. Papadopoulos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement bonded particleboards were manufactured from hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L. wood particles. Hydration tests were carried out to determine the inhibitory index in order to characterise wood-cement compatibility. The results revealed that the mixture of hornbeam-cement can be classified as moderate inhibition. Two wood: cement ratios were applied in this study, namely, 1 : 3 and 1 : 4, for the board manufacture. It was found that an increase of cement-wood ratio resulted in an improvement in all properties examined, except MOR. All properties of the boards made from 1 : 4 wood: cement ratio surpassed the minimum requirements set forth by the building type HZ code. Boards were exposed to brown and white rot fungi, Coniophora puteana, and Trametes versicolor, respectively. Overall, both fungi failed to attack the cement-bonded boards.

  4. Shear bond strength of cement to zirconia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosentritt, M.; Behr, M.; van der Zel, J.M.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the shear bond strength (SBS) of various cements to zirconia ceramic. CoCr-cylinders were bonded to zirconia plates (20 mm × 10 mm × 2 mm; n = 8 per group) using four self-adhesive resin cements (one capsule, three hand-mixed) and four resin cements, partly in combination

  5. Strength and sorption properties of cement-bonded composites ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Strength and sorption properties of cement-bonded composites produced from eucalyptus ( Eucalyptus tereticornis SM.) veneer waste. ... applications where sound absorption is important. Keywords: Eucalyptus, Veneer waste, Cement composite, Strength, dimensional stability. Journal of Applied Science, Engineering and ...

  6. Bonding of dual-curing resin cements to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmussen, Erik; Peutzfeldt, Anne

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of the study was three-fold: 1) to determine the strength of the bond between a number of dual-curing resin cements and dentin treated with corresponding adhesive systems, 2) to determine the effect on bond strength of not light curing the cements, and 3) to investigate whether application of a solution of sodium sulfinate or ascorbic acid would increase the bond strength in the cases where the manufacturer's version of an adhesive system resulted in low bond strength with chemically cured cement, ie, cement cured without light. The adhesive systems comprised 5 simplified systems (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT, ED Primer II, Excite DSC, OptiBond Solo Plus, and Prime and Bond NT), and as controls, two three-step etch and rinse systems (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus and Gluma Solid Bond). The corresponding dual-curing resin cements were RelyX ARC, Panavia F 2.0, Variolink II, Nexus 2, Calibra, RelyX ARC, and 2Bond2. The cements were either light and chemically cured or only chemically cured. The adhesive systems were used as recommended by the manufacturers, which for some systems involved inclusion of a so-called activator or catalyst when used with chemically cured cement. Sodium sulfinate and ascorbic acid were applied as a 1% ethanol solution. The bond strengths were measured in shear after storing specimens for 24 h in 37 degree C water. When the dual-curing resin cements had been both light and chemically cured, the bond strengths increased in this order: Gluma Solid Bond cements decreased the bond strengths with OptiBond Solo Plus and Prime and Bond NT. The use of activator in conjunction with OptiBond Solo Plus and Prime and Bond NT increased the bond strength to chemically cured cement, but not to the level obtained when the cement was both light and chemically cured. The use of the catalyst of Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus did not increase the bond strength with chemically cured cement. Pretreatment with a solution of sodium sulfinate or

  7. Bond strength and cement-tooth interfacial characterization of self-adhesive composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, U Burak; Van Ende, Annelies; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Ermis, R Banu

    2017-08-01

    (1) To determine the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of self-adhesive (SA) composite cements to unetched/etched enamel and dentin, and (2) to characterize the cements' interaction with tooth tissue. 51 composite blocks were bonded to smear layer-covered enamel and dentin (three teeth per group). Four SA composite cements (Clearfil SA, G-CEM, RelyX Unicem, SmartCem2), and three multi-step composite cements, two used following an etch-and-rinse (E&R) approach (RelyX ARC, Variolink II 'E&R') and one used following a self-etch (SE) approach (Variolink II ' SE') were investigated. The cement-tooth specimens were perpendicularly sectioned into micro-specimens (1.0 × 1.0 mm) in order to measure the µTBS. The data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD (Pcomposite cements were applied to dentin free of a smear layer, regular and long resin tags were formed. No significant differences in bonding effectiveness were recorded for the self-adhesive composite cements when bonded to unetched/etched enamel and to dentin. Multi-step etch-and-rinse composite cements showed a better bonding effectiveness to enamel, although this could be approximated by the self-adhesive composite cements when enamel was acid-etched beforehand. On dentin, however, the bond strength of the etch-and-rinse composite cement RelyX ARC was superior.

  8. [Dentin bonding of cements. The bonding of cements with dentin in combination with various indirect restorative materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peutzfeldt, Anne; Sahafi, Alireza; Flury, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The number of both luting agents and restorative materials available on the market has rapidly increased. This study compared various types of luting agents when used to bond different indirect, laboratory restorative materials to dentin. Cylinders were produced of six restorative materials (gold alloy, titanium, feldspathic porcelain, leucite-glass ceramic, zirconia, and an indirect resin composite). Following relevant pretreatment, the end surface of the cylinders were luted to ground, human dentin with eight different luting agents (DeTrey Zinc [zinc phosphate cement], Fuji I [conventional glass ionomer cement], Fuji Plus [resin-modified glass ionomer cement], Variolink II [conventional etch-and-rinse resin cement], Panavia F2.0 and Multilink [self-etch resin cements], RelyX Unicem Aplicap and Maxcem [self-adhesive resin cements]). After water storage at 37 °C for one week, the shear bond strength of the specimens was measured and the fracture mode was examined stereo-microscopically. Restorative material and luting agent both had a significant effect on bond strength and there was a significant interaction between the two variables. The zinc phosphate cement and the glass ionomer cements resulted in the lowest bond strengths, whereas the highest bond strengths were found with the two self-etch and one of the self-adhesive resin cements.

  9. Immediate bonding effectiveness of contemporary composite cements to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarr, Mouhamed; Mine, Atsushi; De Munck, Jan; Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; Kane, Abdoul Wakhabe; Vreven, José; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the one-week bonding effectiveness of nine contemporary composite cements used to lute ceramic to dentin and to determine an appropriate processing method for pretesting failures. The microtensile bond strengths (µTBS) of different luting agents including five self-adhesive cements (Unicem, 3 M ESPE; Maxcem, Kerr; Monocem, Shofu; G-Cem, GC; and Multilink Sprint, Ivoclar-Vivadent), two self-etch cements (Panavia F2.0 and Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Kuraray), and two etch-and-rinse cements (Calibra, Dentsply, and Variolink II, Ivoclar-Vivadent) were measured using a standardized protocol. As control, a two-step self-etch adhesive combined with a restorative composite (Clearfil SE+Clearfil APX, Kuraray) were included as luting material. Depending on the processing of the pretesting failures, two groups of cements could be distinguished: (1) those with low bond strength and many pretesting failures and (2) those with relatively high bond strength and few pretesting failures. Nevertheless, the control luting procedure involving a self-etch adhesive combined with a restorative composite presented with a significantly higher µTBS. The µTBS was clearly product-dependent rather than being dependent on the actual adhesive approach. Fracture analysis indicated that failure usually occurred at the dentin-cement interface especially for the cements with low bond strength and many pretesting failures. Depending on the cement system, an adequate immediate ceramic-to-dentin bond strength can be obtained, even with self-adhesive cements that do not use a separate dental adhesive. Yet, the self-etch adhesive Clearfil SE combined with the restorative composite revealed a superior bonding performance and should therefore be preferred in clinical situations where the restoration transmits light sufficiently.

  10. A study on provisional cements, cementation techniques, and their effects on bonding of porcelain laminate veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod Kumar, G; Soorya Poduval, T; Bipin Reddy; Shesha Reddy, P

    2014-03-01

    Minimal tooth preparation is required for porcelain laminate veneers, but interim restorations are a must to protect their teeth against thermal insult, chemical irritation, and to provide aesthetics. Cement remaining after the removal of the provisional restoration can impair the etching quality of the tooth surface and fit and final bonding of the porcelain laminate veneer. This in vitro study examined the tooth surface for remaining debris of cement after removal of a provisional restoration. Determine the presence of cement debris on prepared tooth surface subsequent to the removal of provisional restoration. Determine the cement with the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Determine the effect of smear layer on the amount of residual luting cement. Eighty-four extracted natural anterior teeth were prepared for porcelain laminate veneers. For half of the teeth, the smear layer was removed before luting provisional restorations. Veneer provisional restorations were fabricated and luted to teeth with six bonding methods: varnish combined with glass ionomer cement (GIC), varnish combined with resin modified GIC, varnish, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement, adhesive combined with GIC, adhesive combined with resin modified GIC, and adhesive, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement. After removal of provisional restorations 1 week later, the tooth surface was examined for residual luting material with SEM. Traces of cement debris were found on all the prepared teeth surfaces for all six groups which were cemented with different methods. Cement debris was seen on teeth subsequent to the removal of provisional's. Dual-cure cement had the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Presence of smear layer had no statistical significance in comparison with cement residue. With the use of adhesive the cement debris was always found to be more than with the use of varnish. GIC showed maximum residual cement followed by dual-cure.

  11. Bond durability of self-adhesive composite cements to dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Yuji; de Munck, Jan; Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; Yamada, Toshimoto; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2013-10-01

    Clinically, the most easy-to-use composite cements are the so-called self-adhesive composite cements (SAC's). Hardly any data is however today available on the long-term bonding effectiveness of such luting composites. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond durability of different composite cements used to lute feldspathic ceramic blocks onto dentine. Four SAC's (Clearfil SA Cement, Kuraray; G-CEM, GC; SmartCem2, Dentsply; Unicem 3M ESPE), one 'self-etch' (Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Kuraray) and one 'etch-and-rinse' (Variolink ll, Ivoclar-Vivadent) multi-step composite cement were used to lute feldspathic ceramic blocks (Vita Mark II, Vita) onto dentine surfaces. Teeth were distributed randomly in 24 experimental groups according to two different surface-preparation techniques ('SMEAR-COVERED' versus 'SMEAR-FREE') and storage conditions ('IMMEDIATE' versus 'AGED'). Failure patterns were evaluated with a stereomicroscope, and afterwards imaged using Feg-SEM. Two additional specimens were processed for cement-dentine interfacial analysis using TEM. A linear mixed effects statistical model revealed significant differences for the variables 'composite cement', 'surface preparation' and 'ageing'. All self-adhesive composite cements, except Unicem (3M ESPE), did bond less favourably to fractured dentine. TEM revealed an ultra-structurally different interaction of the composite cements with 'SMEAR-COVERED' and 'SMEAR-FREE' dentine. All SAC's suffered most when luted to 'SMEAR-FREE' (fractured) dentine, fortunately of no clinical relevance and most likely due to enhanced water sorption through the open tubules. When luted to 'SMEAR-COVERED' dentine, all SACs appeared equally effective and durable as the 'etch-and-rinse' and 'self-etch' multi-step composite cements. Solely the SAC SmartCem2 (Dentsply) appeared clearly less favourable and consistent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Porous surface modified bioactive bone cement for enhanced bone bonding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang He

    Full Text Available Polymethylmethacrylate bone cement cannot provide an adhesive chemical bonding to form a stable cement-bone interface. Bioactive bone cements show bone bonding ability, but their clinical application is limited because bone resorption is observed after implantation. Porous polymethylmethacrylate can be achieved with the addition of carboxymethylcellulose, alginate and gelatin microparticles to promote bone ingrowth, but the mechanical properties are too low to be used in orthopedic applications. Bone ingrowth into cement could decrease the possibility of bone resorption and promote the formation of a stable interface. However, scarce literature is reported on bioactive bone cements that allow bone ingrowth. In this paper, we reported a porous surface modified bioactive bone cement with desired mechanical properties, which could allow for bone ingrowth.The porous surface modified bioactive bone cement was evaluated to determine its handling characteristics, mechanical properties and behavior in a simulated body fluid. The in vitro cellular responses of the samples were also investigated in terms of cell attachment, proliferation, and osteoblastic differentiation. Furthermore, bone ingrowth was examined in a rabbit femoral condyle defect model by using micro-CT imaging and histological analysis. The strength of the implant-bone interface was also investigated by push-out tests.The modified bone cement with a low content of bioactive fillers resulted in proper handling characteristics and adequate mechanical properties, but slightly affected its bioactivity. Moreover, the degree of attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblast cells was also increased. The results of the push-out test revealed that higher interfacial bonding strength was achieved with the modified bone cement because of the formation of the apatite layer and the osseointegration after implantation in the bony defect.Our findings suggested a new bioactive

  13. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Huan, E-mail: huanzhou@cczu.edu.cn [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu (China); Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Luchini, Timothy J.F.; Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Agarwal, Anand K.; Goel, Vijay K. [Department of Bioengineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Bhaduri, Sarit B. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Division of Dentistry, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5 ± 1 min. The compressive strength after 24 h of incubation was approximately 8.45 ± 1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10 ± 1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16 ± 4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics. - Highlights: • Cement raw powder is derived from egg shells. • A microwave assisted system is used for preparing monetite bone cement. • Colloidal silica is used to reinforce cement.

  14. Influence of temporary cement contamination on the surface free energy and dentine bond strength of self-adhesive cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takimoto, Masayuki; Ishii, Ryo; Iino, Masayoshi; Shimizu, Yusuke; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Ando, Susumu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2012-02-01

    The surface free energy and dentine bond strength of self-adhesive cements were examined after the removal of temporary cements. The labial dentine surfaces of bovine mandibular incisors were wet ground with #600-grit SiC paper. Acrylic resin blocks were luted to the prepared dentine surfaces using HY Bond Temporary Cement Hard (HY), IP Temp Cement (IP), Fuji TEMP (FT) or Freegenol Temporary Cement (TC), and stored for 1 week. After removal of the temporary cements with an ultrasonic tip, the contact angle values of five specimens per test group were determined for the three test liquids, and the surface-energy parameters of the dentine surfaces were calculated. The dentine bond strengths of the self-adhesive cements were measured after removal of the temporary cements in a shear mode at a crosshead speed of 1.0mm/min. The data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's HSD test. For all surfaces, the value of the estimated surface tension component γ(S)(d) (dispersion) was relatively constant at 41.7-43.3 mJm(-2). After removal of the temporary cements, the value of the γ(S)(h) (hydrogen-bonding) component decreased, particularly with FT and TC. The dentine bond strength of the self-adhesive cements was significantly higher for those without temporary cement contamination (8.2-10.6 MPa) than for those with temporary cement contamination (4.3-7.1 MPa). The γ(S) values decreased due to the decrease of γ(S)(h) values for the temporary cement-contaminated dentine. Contamination with temporary cements led to lower dentine bond strength. The presence of temporary cement interferes with the bonding performance of self-adhesive cements to dentine. Care should be taken in the methods of removal of temporary cement when using self-adhesive cements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Push-out bond strengths of different dental cements used to cement glass fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Lins do Valle, Accácio; Ghizoni, Janaina Salomon; Lorenzoni, Fábio César; Ramos, Marcelo Barbosa; Barbosa, Marcelo Ramos; Dos Reis Só, Marcus Vinícius

    2013-08-01

    Since the introduction of glass fiber posts, irreversible vertical root fractures have become a rare occurrence; however, adhesive failure has become the primary failure mode. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts cemented with different luting agents on 3 segments of the root. Eighty human maxillary canines with similar root lengths were randomly divided into 8 groups (n=10) according to the cement assessed (Rely X luting, Luting and Lining, Ketac Cem, Rely X ARC, Biscem, Duo-link, Rely X U100, and Variolink II). After standardized post space preparation, the root dentin was pretreated for dual-polymerizing resin cements and untreated for the other cements. The mixed luting cement paste was inserted into post spaces with a spiral file and applied to the post surface that was seated into the canal. After 7 days, the teeth were sectioned perpendicular to their long axis into 1-mm-thick sections. The push-out test was performed at a speed of 0.5 mm/min until extrusion of the post occurred. The results were evaluated by 2-way ANOVA and the all pairwise multiple comparison procedures (Tukey test) (α=.05). ANOVA showed that the type of interaction between cement and root location significantly influenced the push-out strength (Pglass ionomer cements showed significantly higher values compared to dual-polymerizing resin cements. In all root segments, dual-polymerizing resin cements provided significantly lower bond strength. Significant differences among root segments were found only for Duo-link cement. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Microshear bond strength between restorative composites and resin cements

    OpenAIRE

    Rubens Nazareno GARCIA; Góes,Mário Fernando de; Giannini,Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    Introduction and objective: The techniques of adhesive cementationhave been widely used in dental restoration. The purpose of this studywas to evaluate the microshear bond strength between restorativecomposites and resin cements. Material and methods: Twenty composites blocks were prepared in order to obtain a flat surface, using 600-grid sandpaper. The samples were randomly divided in four groups(n=15) according to the experimental groups: [1] Z250 block + Single Bond + cylinder of RelyX ARC...

  17. Microtensile bond strength between adhesive cements and root canal dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Bouillaguet, Serge; Troesch, Sabra; Wataha, John C.; Krejci, Ivo; Meyer, Jean Marc; Pashley, David H

    2003-01-01

    The hypotheses tested were that the bond strength of adhesive cements to root canal dentin (1) would be reduced as a function of configuration factor, polymerization process and type of luting material and (2) would be lowered near the apex of the tooth.

  18. Evaluation of Calcium Silicate Cement Bond Strength after Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-24

    Jan 24, 2018 ... Objectives: To determine the effect of different gutta‑percha solvents. (chloroform, Endosolv E, orange oil, and eucalyptol) on the push‑out bond strength of calcium silicate cements (CSCs; white mineral trioxide aggregate. [WMTA]; capsule‑form mineral trioxide aggregate [CMTA], and Biodentine). Materials ...

  19. Effect of temporary cements on the microtensile bond strength of self-etching and self-adhesive resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Edilausson Moreno; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Lima, Darlon Martins; Bauer, José

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of self-etching and self-adhesive resin cement systems to dentin affected by the presence of remnants of either eugenol-containing or eugenol-free temporary cements. Thirty extracted teeth were obtained and a flat dentin surface was exposed on each tooth. Acrylic blocks were fabricated and cemented either with one of two temporary cements, one zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE) and one eugenol free (ZOE-free), or without cement (control). After cementation, specimens were stored in water at 37°C for 1 week. The restorations and remnants of temporary cements were removed and dentin surfaces were cleaned with pumice. Resin composite blocks were cemented to the bonded dentin surfaces with one of two resin cements, either self-etching (Panavia F 2.0) or self-adhesive (RelyX U-100). After 24 h, the specimens were sectioned to obtain beams for submission to µTBS. The fracture mode was evaluated under a stereoscopic loupe and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Data from µTBS were submitted to two-way repeated-measure ANOVA and the Tukey test (alpha = 0.05). The cross-product interaction was statistically significant (p cements reduced the bond strength to Panavia self-etching resin cements only (p cements did not interfere in the bond strength to dentin of self-adhesive resin cements.

  20. Bond strength of different resin cement and ceramic shades bonded to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; Kimpara, Estevão Tomomitsu; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Júnior, Gildo Coelho; Rizkalla, Amin S

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of ceramic cemented to dentin varying the resin cement and ceramic shades. Two VITA VM7 ceramic shades (Base Dentine 0M1 and Base Dentine 5M3) were used. A spectrophotometer was used to determine the percentage translucency of ceramic (thickness: 2.5 mm). For the MTBS test, 80 molar dentin surfaces were etched and an adhesive was applied. Forty blocks (7.2 x 7.2 x 2.5 mm) of each ceramic shade were produced and the ceramic surface was etched (10% hydrofluoric acid) for 60 s, followed by the application of silane and resin cement (A3 yellow and transparent). The blocks were cemented to dentin using either A3 or transparent cement. Specimens were photoactivated for 20 s or 40 s, stored in distilled water (37°C/24 h), and sectioned. Eight experimental groups were obtained (n = 10). Specimens were tested for MTSB using a universal testing machine. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests (α cement that was photocured for 20 s exhibited the lowest MTBS, while the transparent cement that was photocured for 40 s presented the highest MTBS. For the 2.5-mm-thick 5M3 ceramic restorations, the MTBS of ceramic cemented to dentin significantly increased. The dual-curing cement Variolink II photocured for 40 s is not recommended for cementing the Base Dentine 5M3 feldspathic ceramic to dentin.

  1. Dental Cements for Luting and Bonding Restorations: Self-Adhesive Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Adriana P; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2017-10-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements combine easy application of conventional luting materials with improved mechanical properties and bonding capability of resin cements. The presence of functional acidic monomers, dual cure setting mechanism, and fillers capable of neutralizing the initial low pH of the cement are essential elements of the material and should be understood when selecting the ideal luting material for each clinical situation. This article addresses the most relevant aspects of self-adhesive resin cements and their potential impact on clinical performance. Although few clinical studies are available to establish solid clinical evidence, the information presented provides clinical guidance in the dynamic environment of material development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huan; Luchini, Timothy J F; Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri; Agarwal, Anand K; Goel, Vijay K; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2015-05-01

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5±1 min. The compressive strength after 24h of incubation was approximately 8.45±1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10±1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16±4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Research on bond durability among different core materials and zirconia ceramic cemented by self-adhesive resin cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinyu, Luo; Xiangfeng, Meng

    2017-02-01

    This research estimated shear bond durability of zirconia and different substrates cemented by two self-adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA Luting and RelyX U100) before and after aging conditioning. Machined zirconia ceramic discs were cemented with four kinds of core material (cobalt-chromium alloy, flowable composite resin core material, packable composite resin, and dentin) with two self-adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA Luting and RelyX U100). All specimens were divided into eight test groups, and each test group was divided into two subgroups. Each subgroup was subjected to shear test before and after 10 000 thermal cycles. All factors (core materials, cements, and thermal cycle) significantly influenced bond durability of zirconia ceramic (P0.05); observed shear bond strength was significantly higher than those of other substrates (P0.05). Different core materials and self-adhesive resin cements can significantly affect bond durability of zirconia ceramic. 
.

  4. Influence of Bovine Dentin Site on the Bond Strength of Resin Cement

    OpenAIRE

    Tohru, HAYAKAWA; Hiroyuki, Mishima; Shuichi, YAMAKAWA; Mikiko, MASUDA; Masahiro, AIDA; Kimiya, NEMOTO; Yukishige, Kozawa; Department of Crown and Bridge Prosthodontics, Research Institute of Oral Science, Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo; Department of Dental Materials, Research Institute of Oral Science, Nihon Univerity School of Dentistry at Matsudo; Department of Anatomy, Research Institute of Oral Science, Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the influences of types of resin cements and dentin site(crown and root part)on the adhesion of resin cement to dentin. Three types of resin cements; Super-Bond C&B, Bistite II and Scotchbond Resin Cement were used. The tensile bond strength of each resin cement to crown and root dentin of bovine incisors was measured after 24 hours immersion in water at 37℃. Super-Bond C&B showed no significant difference in bond strength between crown and root den...

  5. Bond strength between zirconium ceramic and dual resinous cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Galan Junior

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the influence of different surface treatments on the bond strength between the resinous cement Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan and the structure of In-Ceram YZ (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany. Methods: Fifteen ceramic blocks were assessed: Group 1, finishing with abrasive paper; Group 2, finishing, airborne Al2O3 particle abrasion and silanization; Group 3, finishing, airborne particle abrasion, silicatization and silanization. After treatment, the blocks received cementation of resin composite cylinders with Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan and were submitted to the shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine. Results: The results were statistically analyzed (ANOVA and multiple comparison Student-Newman-Keuls test: Group 1 (9.66 ± 1.67 MPa < Group 2 (16.61 ± 3.38 MPa = Group 3 (19.23 ± 5.69 MPa, with p = 0.007. Conclusion: The structures of the In-Ceram YZ system (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany associated with Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan require previous etching to achieve greater bond strength between the ceramic and cement, and this treatment may be performed with airborne particle abrasion I or traditional silicatization, both followed by silanization.

  6. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to tooth structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Hattar

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Regardless of their clinical simplicity, the self-adhesive resin cements examined in this study exhibit limited bond performance to tooth structures; therefore, these cements must be used with caution.

  7. Effect of Curing Mode on Shear Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Cement to Composite Blocks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jin-Young Kim; Ga-Young Cho; Byoung-Duck Roh; Yooseok Shin

    2016-01-01

    .... The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength and fracture pattern of indirect CAD/CAM composite blocks cemented with two self-etch adhesive cements with different curing modes...

  8. Bonding to glass ionomer cements using resin-based adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Burrow, M F; Palamara, J E A; Thomas, C D L

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the microshear bond strengths (MSBS) of four self-etching adhesives (Adper Scotchbond SE [SSE], Clearfil SE Bond [CSE], Clearfil S3 Bond [CS3] and One Coat 7.0 [OC]) and an etch-and-rinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond Plus [SB]) when bonded to two conventional glass ionomer cements (GICs) (Fuji IX GP EXTRA and Riva Self Cure). The null hypothesis tested was there is no difference in the adhesive ability of an etch-and-rinse adhesive and self-etching adhesives when bonded to GIC for up to 6 months. The GICs were embedded in type III dental stone and wet ground with 1200-grit SiC paper. Twenty specimens were bonded for each adhesive according to manufacturers' instructions with a 1.5-mm bonding diameter. Specimens were stored at 100% humidity for 24 hours, 1 month, or 6 months. Microshear bond strengths were obtained using a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The results were calculated and analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD test. SB had significantly lower MSBS than the four self-etching adhesives for all storage periods. MSBS at 6 months for SB was significantly lower than at 1 month. There were no significant differences in MSBS among the self-etching adhesives. Cohesive failure within GIC was the most common failure mode observed. SB showed a lower bond strength than the self-etching adhesives when bonded to conventional GICs for all storage periods. This might be a result of the phosphoric acid etching. However, cohesive strength of GIC was a limiting factor for the MSBS outcomes.

  9. The effect of repeated bonding on the shear bond strength of different resin cements to enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Ali Can; Atsü, Saadet Sağlam

    2017-02-01

    Cementation failures of restorations are frequently observed in clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of initial and repeated bonding on the bond strengths of different resin cements to enamel and dentin. Ninety human maxillary central incisors were bisected longitudinally. The 180 tooth halves were divided into 2 groups (n = 90) for enamel and dentin bonding. The enamel and dentin groups were further divided into 3 groups (n = 30) for different resin cement types. Composite resin (Filtek Ultimate) cylinders (3 × 3 mm) were prepared and luted to enamel and dentin using Variolink II (Group V), RelyX ARC (Group R), or Panavia F 2.0 (Group P) resin cement. After 24 hours, initial shear bond strengths of the resin cements to enamel and dentin were measured. Using new cylinders, the specimens were de-bonded and re-bonded twice to measure the first and the second bond strengths to enamel and dentin. Failure modes and bonding interfaces were examined. Data were statistically analyzed. Initial and repeated bond strengths to enamel were similar for all the groups. The first (15.3 ± 2.2 MPa) and second (10.4 ± 2.2 MPa) bond strengths to dentin were significantly higher in Group V (Pdentin groups were significantly lower than initial and first bond strengths to dentin (Pdentin. Bond strength to dentin decreases after the first re-bonding for all resin cements.

  10. Bond durability of resin cements to Au-Pd-Ag alloy under cyclic impact load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, Masahiro; Yokota, Hiroaki; Yoshihiko, Hayashi

    2004-06-01

    The bond durability of resin cements to a 12% Au-Pd-Ag alloy was studied through cyclic impact tests with different loads. A piece of casting alloy was bonded to a cast block with two types of resin cements, Super Bond C&B and Bistite II. A shear load was applied onto a small piece of alloy until debonding of the specimen, using different weights of plungers, 130 g, 230 g, 330 g and 430 g. The specimen bonded with Super Bond exhibited a higher resistance than that with Bistite II. The fracture modes of the debonded cements were completely different from each other. That is, Bistite II showed a bulk fracture of cement by the crack penetrating through the cement layer. On the other hand, Super Bond showed damages limited to the surface and no bulk fracture. The mode of fracture was dependent not on the loading weight but the types of resin cements used.

  11. Effect of Bonding Application Time on Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Glass Ionomer Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Panahandeh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This experimental study evaluated the effect of bonding application time on the microshear bond strength of composite resin to different types of glass ionomer cements (GICs.Materials and Methods: One-hundred and sixty specimens (two conventional and two resin-modified GICs were prepared and divided into 16 groups. The surface of all specimens was prepared using two different bonding systems (Frog and Stea at three different times. After setting, the composite resin (Z100 was placed over the GICs. The specimens were then stored in distilled water for 24 hours (37oC and exposed to microshear stresses at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The results were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (P˂0.05.Results: In conventional GICs, bond strength was affected by the type of bonding system at different times, and bond strength was significantly higher in the Fuji II group compared to Riva Self Cure group. In the Riva Self Cure group, bond strength was significantly affected by time; whereas, the type of bonding system failed to exert a significant effect on bond strength. There was no significant correlation between the type of bonding system and the two brands of resin-modified GICs. Bond strength was not affected by the type of bonding agent; however, among the two brands of resin-modified GICs, Fuji II LC yielded a significantly stronger bond.Conclusion: It appears that the type of bonding agent does not affect the microshear bond strength, and the bonding application time affects the microshear bond strength in Riva Self Cure GICs.

  12. Association of different primers and resin cements for adhesive bonding to zirconia ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Fernando Akio; Bello-Silva, Marina Stella; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos; Miranda Junior, Walter Gomes; Cesar, Paulo Francisco

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) to zirconia ceramics using different associations of primers and resin cements. Two blocks of LAVA zirconia (3Y-TZP) were randomly submitted to an application of three different commercially available primers: Alloy Primer (AP), Z-Prime Plus (ZP), and Signum Zirconia Bond (SZB). Nonprimed specimens were considered controls. After treatment, the 80 specimens (5 mm × 5 mm × 2 mm) were randomly cemented with one of the resin cements: Panavia F, Multilink, seT, and NX3. For cementation, cylinders of resin cement were built on the ceramic surfaces using the SDI SBS apparatus. The specimens were submitted to the SBS test. Fractured surfaces were observed under stereomicroscopy to determine the failure mode, and mean bond strength values were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α = 0.05). Signum Zirconia Bond had the highest SBS compared to all other primers and the control group, regardless of the resin cement used. The highest values were obtained when associating Panavia F with Signum Zirconia Bond. Alloy Primer increased bonding values when associated with seT cement only. When no primer was used, no statistical difference was observed among resin cements. All specimens fractured due to adhesive failure. Signum Zirconia Bond is capable of increasing bonding values of resin cements to zirconia ceramics. Its association with Panavia F shows enhanced results when considering short-term adhesion to zirconia.

  13. The effect of repeated bonding on the shear bond strength of different resin cements to enamel and dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Bulut, Ali Can; Ats?, Saadet Sa?lam

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE Cementation failures of restorations are frequently observed in clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of initial and repeated bonding on the bond strengths of different resin cements to enamel and dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS Ninety human maxillary central incisors were bisected longitudinally. The 180 tooth halves were divided into 2 groups (n = 90) for enamel and dentin bonding. The enamel and dentin groups were further divided into 3 groups (n = 30)...

  14. Effect of mode of polymerization of bonding agent on shear bond strength of autocured resin composite luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Cecilia C S; McComb, Dorothy; Anderson, James D; Tam, Laura E

    2003-04-01

    There have been anecdotal reports of low bond strength with autocured resin composite materials, particularly when light-cured bonding agents that combine primer and adhesive in a 1-bottle preparation are used. The objective of this study was to determine if the mode of polymerization of the bonding agent influences the strength of the attachment of autocured resin composite luting cements to dentin. The shear bond strength of 2 resin luting cements, Calibra and RelyX ARC, polymerized by autocuring, in combination with 4 different bonding agents, Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus, Prime & Bond NT, IntegraBond and Single Bond, polymerized to bovine dentin by light-curing, autocuring or dual-curing, was determined. The pH of each bonding agent and its components was measured. Two-way analysis of variance was used to test the effect of cement and adhesive on shear bond strength. For each bonding agent, the adhesive variable combined the factors product brand and mode of polymerization. With significant interaction among the above variables, the least square means of the 16 combinations of resin cement and adhesive were compared. There was no consistent relationship between shear bond strength and mode of polymerization of the bonding agent. Significant differences in bond strength were specific to the proprietary brand of bonding agent. The pH of the bonding agent depends on the manufacturer's formulation, and low pH may contribute to low bond strength. The low in vitro bond strength occurring with some combinations of bonding agent and resin cement could be clinically significant.

  15. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to tooth structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattar, Susan; Hatamleh, Muhanad M; Sawair, Faleh; Al-Rabab'ah, Mohammad

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the strength of the bond between newly introduced self-adhesive resin cements and tooth structures (i.e., enamel and dentin). Three self-adhesive cements (SmartCem2, RelyX Unicem, seT SDI) were tested. Cylindrical-shaped cement specimens (diameter, 3 mm; height, 3 mm) were bonded to enamel and dentin. Test specimens were incubated at 37 °C for 24 h. The shear bond strength (SBS) was tested in a Zwick Roll testing machine. Results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and t-test. Statistically significant differences were defined at the α = 0.05 level. Bond failures were categorized as adhesive, cohesive, or mixed. The SBS values ranged from 3.76 to 6.81 MPa for cements bonded to enamel and from 4.48 to 5.94 MPa for cements bonded to dentin (p > 0.05 between surfaces). There were no statistically significant differences between the SBS values to enamel versus dentin for any given cement type. All cements exhibited adhesive failure at the resin/tooth interface. Regardless of their clinical simplicity, the self-adhesive resin cements examined in this study exhibit limited bond performance to tooth structures; therefore, these cements must be used with caution.

  16. Shear bond strength of a self‑etched resin cement to an indirect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... however there were not statistical difference among the tested surface treatment methods. Conclusion: In Shear bond strength of resin, cement was independent of the surface conditioning methods applied on tested indirect resin composite. Key words: Composite resins, dental bonding, resin cements, surface properties ...

  17. Effect of provisional cements on shear bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Subutay Han; Tak, Onjen; Secilmis, Asli; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of three provisional cements and two cleaning techniques on the final bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers. The occlusal third of the crowns of forty molar teeth were sectioned and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. Dentin surfaces were polished and specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Provisional restorations were fabricated and two provisional restorations were cemented onto each tooth. Restorations were fixed with one of three different provisional cements: eugenol-free provisional cement (Cavex), calcium hydroxide (Dycal), and light-cured provisional cement (Tempond Clear). Provisional restorations were removed with either a dental explorer and air-water spray, or a cleaning bur (Opticlean). In the control group, provisional restorations were not used on the surfaces of specimens. IPS Empress 2 ceramic discs were luted with a dual-cured resin cement (Panavia F). Shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey's HSD and Dunnett tests. Surfaces were examined by scanning electronic microscopy. Significant differences were found between the control group and both the light-cured provisional cement groups and the eugenol-free provisional cement-cleaning bur group (Pprovisional cement showed the lowest bond strength values. Selection of the provisional cement is an important factor in the ultimate bond strength of the final restoration. Calcium hydroxide provisional cement and cleaning with a dental explorer are advisable.

  18. Factors affecting bond cement across casing leak zones in oil and gas wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasr, Mohamed; Edbeib, Said [Al-Fateh University, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    2004-07-01

    Casing leaks have been a major concern to the oil industry because of their effect on lowering the production rate in many oil and gas wells. The leaks are the result of deterioration of the casing in the well, which is caused by severe corrosion due to the contact of the casing with high salinity foreign fluid. The objective of this study is to determine the factors influencing the mechanical properties of the hardened cement opposite the casing leak zones. This study is conducted by laboratory measurements of the compressive strength of the hardened cement when the cement slurry was mixed with different percentages of formation water and different concentrations of different cement additives. The results of this study indicate that the compressive strength readings obtained from the cement bond log and the cement evaluation tool against the casing leak zones are lower than those readings recorded in adjacent formations. The low cement compressive strength values observed across casing leak zones are due to the contamination of the cement with saline water present in these formations which, in turn, effects the hardening properties of the cement. The experimental results indicated that the salinity of the formation water when mixed with the cement slurry in the presence of cement additives, decreased the compressive strength of the bond cement and also decreased the thickening time of the cement slurry. It is concluded that casing leaks found in many wells observed in oil fields in Libya were due to the mixing of the cement with high salinity formation water present in the lost circulation zones. The high water salinity in these zones effects the setting time of the cement slurry which, therefore, decreased the hardening properties of the bond cement and caused cracks and channels in the hardened cement across lost circulation zones. (author)

  19. The effect of dentin-cleaning agents on resin cement bond strength to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraç, Duygu; Bulucu, Bilinc; Saraç, Y Sinasi; Kulunk, Safak

    2008-06-01

    Provisional cement remnants on dentin affect the bond strength of resin cements to dentin. The authors investigated the effects of dentin-cleaning agents and etching systems on the bond strength of adhesive resin cement. The authors removed the provisional cement from the dentin surfaces of the specimens and then cleaned the surfaces with the dentin-cleaning agents Sikko Tim (VOCO GmbH, Cuxhaven, Germany), Cavity Cleanser (Bisco, Schaumburg, Ill.) or Consepsis Scrub (Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah). They used adhesive resin cement after applying the different etching adhesive systems. Then they examined the dentin surfaces by using scanning electron microscopy. The authors analyzed data by means of a two-way analysis of variance with Tukey honestly significant difference tests (alpha= .05). They found that specimens cleaned with Sikko Tim and Consepsis Scrub had higher shear bond strength values than did those in the no-treatment control group or the group cleaned with Cavity Cleanser. The specimens treated with the total-etching adhesive system had higher shear bond strength than did those treated with the self-etching adhesive systems. Sikko Tim and Consepsis Scrub were effective in removing provisional cement. Adhesive resin cement showed higher bond strength when used in conjunction with the total-etching adhesive system. The use of an effective dentin cleaner before cementation with resin cement can increase bond strength.

  20. Effect of cement shade and light-curing unit on bond strength of a ceramic cemented to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Humberto Lago; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Zogheib, Lucas Villaça; Bona, Alvaro Della

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of cement shade, light-curing unit, and water storage on tensile bond strength (σ) of a feldspathic ceramic resin bonded to dentin. The dentin surface of 40 molars was exposed and etched with 37% phosphoric acid, then an adhesive system was applied. Forty blocks of feldspathic ceramic (Vita VM7) were produced. The ceramic surface was etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 60 s, followed by the application of a silane agent and a dual-curing resin cement (Variolink II). Ceramic blocks were cemented to the treated dentin using either A3 or transparent (Tr) shade cement that was activated using either halogen or LED light for 40 s. All blocks were stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 h before cutting to obtain non-trimmed bar-shaped specimens (adhesive area = 1 mm2 ± 0.1) for the microtensile bond strength test. The specimens were randomly grouped according to the storage time: no storage or stored for 150 days in 37°C distilled water. Eight experimental groups were obtained (n = 30). The specimens were submitted to the tensile bond strength test using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's posthoc tests (a = 0.05). The mean bond strength values were significantly lower for the corresponding water stored groups, except for the specimens using A3 resin cement activated by halogen light. There was no significance difference in mean bond strength values among all groups after water storage. Water storage had a detrimental effect under most experimental conditions. For both cement shades investigated (Tr and A3) under the same storage condition, the light-curing units (QTH and LED) did not affect the mean microtensile bond strengths of resin-cemented ceramic to dentin.

  1. Microtensile bond strength of two self-adhesive cements to enamel and dentin: bonding efficiency and thermocycling effect

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes Jr, Virgílio Vilas Boas; Faculdade de Odontologia de São José dos Campos; Rodrigues, José Roberto; Faculdade de Odontologia de São José dos Campos; Silva, João Maurício Ferraz da; Faculdade de Odontologia de São José dos Campos; Pagani, Clóvis; Faculdade de Odontologia de São José dos Campos; Malaquias, Henderson; Faculdade de Odontologia de São José dos Campos; Balducci, Ivan; Faculdade de Odontologia de São José dos Campos

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bonding efficiency between two self-adhesive cements to enamel and dentine, with and without previous dental surface conditioning, before and after thermocycling. Thirty-six molars were divided into 3 experimental groups and 01 control group. The self-adhesive resin cements selected for the experimental groups were: RelyX Unicem (subgroups RE and RD) and Bifix SE (subgroups BE and BD). For control groups, a conventional resin cement, Variolin...

  2. Phosphate-bonded glass cements for geothermal wells. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockett, T.J.

    1979-09-01

    Calcium aluminosilicate glasses were found to react with phosphoric acid in three ways depending upon silica content. Above 55% SiO/sub 2/ they are insoluble while below 50% they dissolve readily. The transition compositions release calcium and aluminum ions and a silica gel phase replaces the glass. Activation energies in the order of 10 kcal/mole are associated with the dissolution. Equilibrium studies in the systems CaO-P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-H/sub 2/O, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-H/sub 2/O, and CaO-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-H/sub 2/O were made to determine the phases which are stable at 200/sup 0/C in excess water. The CaO system shows hydroxylapatite, monetite and monocalcium orthophosphate are the stable phases. The Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ system contains augelite, berlinite, and a high phosphate aluminum hydrate. The quaternary system shows the above phase plus a lime alumina hydrogarnet and crandallite. Cement made from a glass frit of the composition 45% SiO/sub 2/: 24% CaO: 24% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ has a compressive strength of 500 psi after several days in steam at 200/sup 0/C and 800 psi after months in steam. Bonding of cements to mild steel are discussed.

  3. Strengthening of Concrete Structures with cement based bonded composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Täljsten, Björn; Blanksvärd, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Due to demands on higher loads, degradation, re-construction etc. there is a constant need for repair or strengthening of existing concrete structures. Many varying methods exist to strengthen concrete structures, one such commonly used technique utilizes surface epoxy bonded FRPs (Fibre Reinforced...... with improved working environment and better compatibility to the base concrete structure. This study gives an overview of different cement based systems, all with very promising results for structural upgrading. Studied parameters are structural retrofit for bending, shear and confinement. It is concluded...... that the use of carbon FRPs provides the highest strengthening effect and that the fibres should be imbedded into a matrix for enhanced utilisation of inherent strain capacity...

  4. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, María-Victoria; Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-02-01

    No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (pcement applied and surface treatment did not significantly affect dentin bond strength (p>0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Bond strength, self-adhesive cement, silane, dentin, indirect composite.

  5. Effect of polymerization mode of adhesive and cement on shear bond strength to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latta, Mark A; Kelsey, William P; Kelsey, William P

    2006-04-01

    To investigate the shear bond strength to dentin when two resin adhesive systems in light-cure, dual-cure, and auto-cure modes were used with three resin cements. This was done to determine the degree of compatibility that exists when resin products with different polymerization mechanisms are used together. Three hundred non-carious human molars were divided into 30 test groups in which Prime & Bond NT and ScotchBond Multi-Purpose were used as adhesives with Calibra, Nexxus and Variolink cements to attach Rexillium III posts to flattened dentin surfaces. Debonding was achieved with an Instron testing machine and mean shear bond strengths were determined for each test group. The data were subjected to three-way ANOVA and post-hoc LSD testing to determine whether significant differences existed between the test groups. Bond strengths achieved were affected by the adhesive, the cement, and the cement curing mode. In general, the auto-cure application of the three cements demonstrated reduced shear bond strengths, both with respect to the different adhesives and their curing modes as well as compared to the dual-cure technique of the same cement. Additionally, Prime & Bond NT demonstrated considerably more variability than ScotchBond Multi-Purpose when used with both dual-cure and auto-cure varieties of the three cements. The bond strengths of resin cements depend on the curing mode of the cement and the adhesive. Unlike with direct light-cured resin composites, combining adhesive systems and dual-cured resin cements from different manufacturers may be contraindicated.

  6. Bond durability of different resin cements to caries-affected dentin under simulated intrapulpal pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, M F; El Deeb, H A; Gomaa, I E; Mobarak, E H

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the durability of the bond of different resin cement systems to normal dentin (ND) and caries-affected dentin (CAD) with and without simulated intrapulpal pressure (IPP). Molars with midcoronal caries were used. Occlusal enamel was cut to expose both dentin substrates (ND and CAD). Dentin substrates were differentiated using visual, tactile, caries-detecting dye, and dye-permeability methods. Prepared crown segments were equally divided according to the tested resin cement systems: etch-and-rinse resin cement, self-etch resin cement containing methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP), and self-adhesive resin cement. In addition to the dentin substrates and the resin cement types, the effect of application/storage conditions (with or without simulated IPP and with or without thermocycling) were tested. A microtensile bond strength test was done using a universal testing machine. Failure modes were determined using a scanning electron microscope. Etch-and-rinse resin cement strength values were significantly affected by the difference in the dentin substrates as well as the different application/storage conditions. Self-etch adhesive containing MDP bonded equally to ND and CAD and remained stable under all tested conditions. Self-adhesive resin cement revealed a similar bond to ND and CAD; however, its values were the lowest, especially when IPP and thermocycling were combined. Mixed failure was the predominant failure mode. Etch-and-rinse resin cement was sensitive to dentin substrate and application/storage conditions. Resin cement with self-etch adhesive containing MDP revealed more reliable bonding to ND/CAD even when IPP and thermocycling were combined. The bonding of the self-adhesive resin cement could not compete with other resin cements.

  7. Immediate shear bond strength of resin cements to sodium hypochlorite-treated dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Clinton D

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the immediate shear bond strength of different categories of resin cements on sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl)-treated dentin and to evaluate if the bond was improved by a subsequent treatment with 10% sodium ascorbate before adhesive procedures. This study tested immediate shear bond strengths to human dentin of 5 resin cements: Variolink II (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein), Multilink (Ivoclar Vivadent), Clearfil Esthetic Cement EX (Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan), SpeedCEM (Ivoclar Vivadent), and Clearfil SA Cement (Kuraray). All cements were tested with no NaOCl pretreatment of the dentin (negative control) and with a 20-minute exposure of the dentin to 6% NaOCl before bonding procedures. The cements found to have decreased bond strengths to NaOCl-treated dentin were tested with the dentin exposed to 10% sodium ascorbate after NaOCl exposure. The sodium ascorbate exposure times tested were 5 seconds and 1 minute. The mean and standard deviation values for immediate shear bond strength (MPa) for the negative control group were as follows: Variolink II, 18.8 ± 4.2; Multilink, 29.1 ± 7.1; Clearfil Esthetic Cement EX, 20.7 ± 4.9; SpeedCEM, 17.8 ± 4.2; and Clearfil SA Cement, 7.2 ± 2.8. The results for the NaOCl exposure group were as follows: Variolink II, 24.0 ± 6.7; Multilink, 34.1 ± 6.1; Clearfil Esthetic Cement EX, 20.7 ± 6.8; SpeedCEM, 0.0 ± 0.0; and Clearfil SA Cement, 0.1 ± 0.1. The results for the 5-second sodium ascorbate group were the following: SpeedCEM, 8.5 ± 2.6, and Clearfil SA Cement, 4.3 ± 2.0. The following results were found for the 1-minute sodium ascorbate group: SpeedCEM, 12.2 ± 3.2, and Clearfil SA Cement, 4.8 ± 1.0. The resin cements tested varied in their capacity to adhere to NaOCl-treated dentin. Some resin cements exhibited equal or improved bond strengths (P cements, a rinse of 10% sodium ascorbate provided an immediate restoration of at least 50% of the original bond strength

  8. Microtensile Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Luting Cements to Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Tomoko Abo; Shigeru Uno; Masahiro Yoshiyama; Toshimoto Yamada; Nobuhiro Hanada

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to compare the bond strengths of the self-adhesive luting cements between ceramics and resin cores and examine their relation to the cement thickness. Three self-adhesive luting cements (Smartcem, Maxcem, and G-CEM) and a resin cement (Panavia F 2.0) for control were used in the paper. The thickness of the cements was controlled in approximately 25, 50, 100, or 200  μ m. Each 10 specimens were made according to the manufacturers' instructions and stored in water ...

  9. Effect of dentin adhesives used as sealers and provisional cementation on bond strength of a resin cement to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieffi, Nicoletta; Sadek, Fernanda; Monticelli, Francesca; Goracci, Cecilia; Grandini, Simone; Davidson, Carel; Tay, Franklin R; Ferrari, Marco

    2006-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of dentin adhesives employed as resin sealers and provisional cementation on the bond strengths of a resin cement to dentin. A two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (Excite DSC--Group 1) and two-step self-etch adhesive (AdheSE--Group 2) were applied to exposed dentin surfaces prepared from human molars (N=4). Water was used instead of a resin sealer in control Groups 3 and 4. A eugenol-free provisional cement (except for Group 4) was applied to the treated surfaces. After storing in distilled water for 1 week, the provisional cement was removed and cylindrical composite blocks were luted with a resin cement (Variolink II). 0.9 x 0.9 mm sticks were produced from these luted specimens for microtensile bond testing and SEM examination. One-way ANOVA revealed that neither the resin sealer nor the temporary eugenol-free cement had a negative effect on the final bond strength (P> 0.05). Mixed failures were predominantly identified from SEM.

  10. Hydrogen bonds of a novel resin cement contribute to high adhesion strength to human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Che; Wang, Da-Ming; Lin, Yu-Chen; Dai, Chi-An; Cheng, Kuo-Chung; Hu, Mei-Shan; Lee, Bor-Shiunn

    2016-01-01

    The detachment of fiber posts from root canals is primarily caused by the loss of adhesion between dentin and cement; therefore, the purpose of this study was to formulate a novel resin cement that improves the bond strength of fiber posts to the dentin-cement interface. Three concentrations (30, 35, and 40wt.%) of bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)-ethyl] phosphate (2MP) were prepared as dentin bonding agent components. Isobornyl acrylate (IBOA) and ethylhexylacrylate (EHA) were used as key components to fabricate the resin cement (named IE cement). The adhesive strengths of IE cement to coronal and root canal dentin were tested after placement of specimens in a water bath at 100% humidity and 37°C for either 24h or 5 months. The microtensile bond test, the push-out bond test, and the fracture toughness test were performed. Four commercially available resin cements (Nexus(®) third generation (NX3), Variolink II, RelyX Unicem, and Panavia F 2.0) were used for comparisons. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyze the interaction of collagen extracted from human dentin and 2MP as well as the fracture surfaces of the specimens submitted to the microtensile bond test. The 35% concentration of 2MP, in combination with IBOA and EHA, was the most effective for improving the IE cement's bond strength to dentin. The XPS results revealed that the phosphate groups of 2MP formed hydrogen bonds with the collagen and that such bonds prominently decreased in number in the specimens that were stored for 5 months. The combination of 2MP, IBOA, and EHA can effectively increase the adhesive strength of IE cement to dentin via hydrogen bond formation. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Zirconia Ceramic Using Adhesive Primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, Ariovaldo; Brito, Rui Barbosa; Kina, Sidney; Andrade, Oswaldo Scopin; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Carvalho, Andreia Assis; Giannini, Marcelo

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the influence of adhesive primers on the microshear bond strength of resin cements to zirconia ceramic. Fifty zirconia plates (12 mm × 5 mm × 1.5 mm thick) of a commercially available zirconium oxide ceramic (ZirCad) were sintered, sandblasted with aluminum oxide particles, and cleaned ultrasonically before bonding. The plates were randomly divided into five groups of 10. Three resin cements were selected (RelyX ARC, Multilink Automix, Clearfil SA Cement self-adhesive resin cement), along with two primers (Metal-Zirconia Primer, Alloy Primer) and one control group. The primers and resin cements were used according to manufacturers' recommendations. The control group comprised the conventional resin cement (RelyX ARC) without adhesive primer. Test cylinders (0.75 mm diameter × 1 mm high) were formed on zirconia surfaces by filling cylindrical Tygon tube molds with resin cement. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C, then tested for shear strength on a Shimadzu EZ Test testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. Bond strength data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Dunnett's test (5%). The bond strength means in MPa (± s.d.) were: RelyX ARC: 28.1 (6.6); Multilink Automix: 37.6 (4.5); Multilink Automix + Metal-Zirconia Primer: 55.7 (4.0); Clearfil SA Cement: 46.2 (3.3); and Clearfil SA Cement + Alloy Primer: 47.0 (4.1). Metal-Zirconia Primer increased the bond strength of Multilink Automix resin cement to zirconia, but no effect was observed for Alloy Primer using Clearfil SA Cement. RelyX ARC showed the lowest bond strength to zirconia. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  12. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to tooth structure

    OpenAIRE

    Hattar, Susan; Hatamleh, Muhanad M.; Sawair, Faleh; Al-Rabab’ah, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the strength of the bond between newly introduced self-adhesive resin cements and tooth structures (i.e., enamel and dentin). Methods: Three self-adhesive cements (SmartCem2, RelyX Unicem, seT SDI) were tested. Cylindrical-shaped cement specimens (diameter, 3 mm; height, 3 mm) were bonded to enamel and dentin. Test specimens were incubated at 37 °C for 24 h. The shear bond strength (SBS) was tested in a Zwick Roll testing machine. Results w...

  13. Tensile bond strength of ceramic crowns to dentin using resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, James F; de Rijk, Waldemar G; Hill, Jennifer; Hill, Nathaniel

    2011-01-01

    This study measured the bond strength of the self-adhesive resin cements and a bonded resin cement for crowns bonded to extracted teeth with preparations having a total taper greater than 30 degrees. A crown pull-off test was used with direction of pull along the path of insertion. The CAD/CAM system Cerec was used to create crowns with the pull-off loop as an integral part of the crown structure. One hundred extracted human molars were prepared for all-ceramic crowns with a 1.5-mm shoulder, greater than 30-degree axial wall convergence, a flat occlusal surface and 3 to 5 mm occlusal/ gingival height. All-ceramic crowns were cemented with five different self-adhesive cements (Rely X Unicem, Maxcem Elite, BisCem, SmartCem 2, and G-Cem) and one bonded resin cement (Multilink). Forfour cements (excluding GCem and Multilink) there were 2 groups, one with HF etching and one without ceramic surface treatment. The crowns were then subject to tensile stress until either the crown fractured or the crown was lifted off from the tooth. For several cements, the bond strength exceeded the tensile strength of the all-ceramic crown; thus, the crown fractured, leaving the cemented part of the crown on the tooth. The effect of ceramic surface etching was not statistically significant at p = 0.05; however, for each cement, the treated crowns showed a lower coefficient of variance (COV). For this study, the COV ranged from 24.9 % to 97.9 %. Loads ranged from 41.3 to 190.3 N. Some of the new self-etching resin cements can create bonds to non-retentive crown preparations that are stronger than the strength of a ceramic crown; however, these high bond strengths may not be able to be achieved consistently.

  14. Shear bond strength of a self‑etched resin cement to an indirect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-15

    Nov 15, 2014 ... using a silicon mold (14 mm diameter, 20 mm height). Shear bond strength test. Shear bond ... inhibited superficial layer of composite monomers and increased the exposure of fillers.[18]. Surface ... self‑adhesive resin cements include monomers that are capable of etching and bonding to the dental surface ...

  15. Innovations in bonding to zirconia based ceramics: part III. Phosphate monomer resin cements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirmohammadi, H.; Aboushelib, M.N.M.; Salameh, Z.; Feilzer, A.J.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare the bond strength values and the ranking order of three phosphate monomer containing resin cements using microtensile (μTBS) and microshear (μSBS) bond strength tests. Materials and methods Zirconia discs (Procera Zirconia) were bonded to resin composite discs (Filtek Z250) using

  16. Shear bond strengths of glass-ionomer cements to sound and to prepared carious dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Beata; Deregowska-Nosowicz, Patricia; Limanowska-Shaw, Honorata; Nicholson, John W

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was determine whether bonding of glass-ionomer cements to non-carious dentine differed from that to carious dentine. Five commercial cements were used, namely Fuji IX GP, Fuji IX capsulated, Fuji IX Fast capsulated (all GC, Japan), Ketac-Molar and Ketac-Molar Aplicap (both 3M-ESPE, Germany). Following conditioning of the substrate with 10% poly (acrylic acid) for 10 s, sets of 10 samples of the cements were bonded to prepared teeth that had been removed for orthodontic reasons. The teeth used had either sound dentine or sclerotic dentine. Shear bond strengths were determined following 24 h storage. For the auto-mixed cements, shear bond strength to sound dentine was found not to differ statistically from shear bond strength to sclerotic dentine whereas for hand-mixed cements, shear bond to sound dentine was found to be higher than to carious dentine (to at least p < 0.05). This shows that the chemical effects arising from interactions of glass-ionomer cements with the mineral phase of the tooth are the most important in developing strong bonds, at least in the shorter term.

  17. Push-out bond strength of different translucent fiber posts cemented with self-adhesive resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzo, João Fernando; Pedriali, Maria Beatriz Bergonse Pereira; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Moura, Sandra Kiss; de de Carvalho, Rodrigo Varella

    2016-01-01

    Evaluate the bond strength of different translucent fiber posts in the cervical, middle, and apical root thirds cemented with self-adhesive resin cement. Sixty single-rooted teeth were randomly divided into five groups according to the fiber post used: Reforpost (opaque [control]), exacto, white post, radix, and Macro-Lock Illusion X-RO. The roots were subjected to chemomechanical preparation and cemented with self-adhesive resin cement. The teeth were sectioned into slices of the different root thirds and tested for bond strength (push-out). Two-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni test were used to verify statistical differences between groups (P 0.05). However, the performance of the posts demonstrated a significant difference (P fiber posts had the same performance irrespective of the root third evaluated. The predominant failure pattern was adhesive between resin cement and root dentin. In general, the different translucent fiber posts showed the same performance. Yet, translucent fiber posts did not show superior bond strength compared with the opaque fiber post in any of the root thirds evaluated.

  18. Shear bond strength of a self‑etched resin cement to an indirect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-15

    Nov 15, 2014 ... Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice • May-Jun 2015• Vol 18 • Issue 3. Abstract ... Key words: Composite resins, dental bonding, resin cements, surface properties ... etching effect of Er, Cr: YSGG laser on indirect composite.

  19. Interfacial fracture toughness of different resin cements bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hooshmand, Tabassom; Rostami, Golriz; Behroozibakhsh, Marjan; Fatemi, Mostafa; Keshvad, Alireza; van Noort, Richard

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of HF acid etching and silane treatment on the interfacial fracture toughness of a self-adhesive and two conventional resin-based cements bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic...

  20. Evaluation of a thin-bonded Portland cement concrete pavement overlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses the performance of the Virginia Department of Transportation's first modern rehabilitation project involving a thin-bonded portland cement concrete overlay of an existing jointed concrete pavement. The performance of the rigid o...

  1. Microtensile Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Luting Cements to Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Abo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to compare the bond strengths of the self-adhesive luting cements between ceramics and resin cores and examine their relation to the cement thickness. Three self-adhesive luting cements (Smartcem, Maxcem, and G-CEM and a resin cement (Panavia F 2.0 for control were used in the paper. The thickness of the cements was controlled in approximately 25, 50, 100, or 200 μm. Each 10 specimens were made according to the manufacturers’ instructions and stored in water at 37°C. After 24 hours, microtensile bond strength (μTBS was measured. There were significant differences in cements. Three self-adhesive cements showed significantly lower μTBSs than control that required both etching and priming before cementation (Tukey, <0.05. The cement thickness of 50 or 100 μm tended to induce the highest μTBSs for each self-adhesive luting cements though no difference was found.

  2. Bond strength of a composite resin to glass ionomer cements using different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina de Oliveira BECCI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Glass ionomer cements are often used as a base or cavity lining prior to restorative material. Objective To evaluate the bond strength of a composite resin to different glass ionomer cements, when using a two-step conventional and self-etching adhesive systems. Material and method Three glass ionomer cements (Ketac Molar Easymix, Vitremer and Vitrebond, the composite resin Filtek Z350 XT and the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond 2, Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Easy One were used. As negative control, resin was bonded to cement without using an adhesive system. Holes (4 mm diameter, 2 mm deep prepared in acrilic bloks were filled with the glass ionomer cements (n=12/group. On the surface, an area of 1mm in diameter was delimited, the adhesive system was applied, and a specimen of composite resin with 1 mm height was made. After 24 hours storage (37 °C and 100% humidity, the microshear test was performed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test for comparison between groups (α=0.05. Result The adhesive systems significantly improved the bond strenght of composite resin to glass ionomer cements (p≤0.001. There was no significant difference in bond strength when self-etching adhesive systems were compared with the simplified etch-and-rinse adhesive, except for Vitrebond where Clearfil SE Bond determined higher bond strength when compared to Adper Single Bond 2 (p=0.003. Conclusion Self-etching adhesive systems are a good option for establishing the bond between the composite resin and the glass ionomer cement.

  3. Effect of antibacterial/adhesive approaches on bonding durability of fiber posts cemented with self-etch resin cement

    OpenAIRE

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Memarpour, Mahtab; Vafamand, Narges; Mohammadi, Mahsa

    2017-01-01

    Background Longevity of post-retained restoration is highly depended on bonding stability of fiber post (FP) to root dentin. This study evaluated the effect of different antibacterial/adhesive approaches on bonding durability of FPs luted into root canal with a self-etch cement. Material and Methods Seventy-two human maxillary central incisor roots were divided into six groups after endodontic treatment, based on the antibacterial/adhesive treatments as follows: 1)ED primer II (ED, control); ...

  4. Bonding between CAD/CAM resin and resin composite cements dependent on bonding agents: three different in vitro test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Simona; Keul, Christine; Roos, Malgorzata; Edelhoff, Daniel; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the bonding properties between CAD/CAM resin and three resin composite cements combined with different bonding agents using three test methods. Four hundred twenty CAD/CAM resin substrates were fabricated and divided into three test methods (shear bond strength (SBS, n = 180), tensile bond strength (TBS, n = 180) and work of adhesion (WA, n = 60)), further into four pretreatment methods (VP connect (VP), visio.link (VL), Clearfil Ceramic Primer (CP) and no pretreatment (CG)) and three cements (RelyX ARC, Variolink II and Clearfil SA Cement). Each subgroup contained 15 specimens. SBS and TBS were measured after 24 h H2O/37 °C + 5000 thermal-cycles (5/55 °C) and failure types were assessed. WA was determined for pretreated CAD/CAM resin and non-polymerized resin composite cements. Data were analysed with Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis H, Chi(2) and Spearman's Rho tests. Within SBS and TBS tests, CGs and groups pretreated with CP (regardless of resin composite cements), and VP pretreated with Clearfil SA Cement showed no bond. However, CG combined with RelyX ARC showed a TBS of 5.6 ± 1.3 MPa. In general, highest bond strength was observed for groups treated with VL. CG and groups pretreated using VL showed lower WA than the groups treated with VP or CP. Measured TBS values were higher than SBS ones. In general, SBS and TBS showed similar trends for the ranges of the values for the groups. WA results were not comparable with SBS/TBS results and admitted, therefore, no conclusions on it. For a clinical use of XHIP-CAD/CAM resin, the bond surface should be additionally pretreated with visio.link as bonding agent.

  5. Tensile fatigue of 4-META cement bonding three base metal alloys to enamel and comparison to other resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givan, D A; Fitchie, J G; Anderson, L; Zardiackas, L D

    1995-04-01

    The tensile median fatigue limits and fracture mode of 4-META cement were evaluated after bonding Ni-Cr, Ni-Cr-Be, and Co-Cr alloys to enamel. Alloy surfaces, 6 mm in diameter, were grit blasted with 50 microns Al2O3 and cemented to etched bovine enamel under a 2 kg load. Samples were cycled in tension to failure or 10(6) cycles at 5 Hz in Ringer's solution at 37 degrees C. Two-point strategy was used to determine median fatigue limits (S50). Fracture modes were evaluated by SEM on samples failing before 10(6) cycles. Results indicated differences between all sample groups where S50 (Ni-Cr-Be) > S50 (Co-Cr) > S50 (Ni-Cr). Failure analysis revealed mixed cohesive fractures near both interfaces with small areas of delamination within the cement. Comparison to reported median fatigue limits of two commercially available cements were discussed.

  6. Effect of Provisional Cements on Shear Bond Strength of Porcelain Laminate Veneers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Subutay Han; Tak, Onjen; Secilmis, Asli; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of three provisional cements and two cleaning techniques on the final bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers. Methods: The occlusal third of the crowns of forty molar teeth were sectioned and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. Dentin surfaces were polished and specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Provisional restorations were fabricated and two provisional restorations were cemented onto each tooth. Restorations were fixed with one of three different provisional cements: eugenol-free provisional cement (Cavex), calcium hydroxide (Dycal), and light-cured provisional cement (Tempond Clear). Provisional restorations were removed with either a dental explorer and air-water spray, or a cleaning bur (Opticlean). In the control group, provisional restorations were not used on the surfaces of specimens. IPS Empress 2 ceramic discs were luted with a dual-cured resin cement (Panavia F). Shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey’s HSD and Dunnett tests. Surfaces were examined by scanning electronic microscopy. Results: Significant differences were found between the control group and both the light-cured provisional cement groups and the eugenol-free provisional cement-cleaning bur group (P<.05). Groups that had received light-cured provisional cement showed the lowest bond strength values. Conclusions: Selection of the provisional cement is an important factor in the ultimate bond strength of the final restoration. Calcium hydroxide provisional cement and cleaning with a dental explorer are advisable. PMID:21912495

  7. Evaluation of bonding behavior of silver-tin-zinc-indium alloy to adhesive luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, H; Kawaguchi, T; Takahashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2010-12-01

    The bond strengths of a silver-tin-zinc-indium alloy used with adhesive luting cements were investigated. The metal surfaces were primed with two metal conditioners designed for noble metal alloys or base metal alloys, or prepared using a Rocatec tribochemical coating unit. Two adhesive luting cements (Super-Bond C&B and Panavia F 2.0) were applied. It can be concluded that airborne-particle abrasion with alumina was effective, but the effects on the bond durability of both the metal conditioners and the tribochemical silica coating method were not clear Such bonding behavior seems to be particular to this kind of silver-rich dental casting alloy.

  8. Tensile Bond Strength of Self Adhesive Resin Cement After Various Surface Treatment of Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhri, Sahil; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In self adhesive resin cements adhesion is achieved to dental surface without surface pre-treatment, and requires only single step application. This makes the luting procedure less technique-sensitive and decreases postoperative sensitivity. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of self adhesive resin after surface treatment of enamel for bonding base metal alloy. Materials and Methods On the labial surface of 64 central incisor rectangular base metal block of dimension 6 mm length, 5mm width and 1 mm height was cemented with RelyX U200 and Maxcem Elite self adhesive cements with and without surface treatment of enamel. Surface treatment of enamel was application of etchant, one step bonding agent and both. Tensile bond strength of specimen was measured with universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Results Least tensile bond strength (MPa) was in control group i.e. 1.33 (0.32) & 1.59 (0.299), Highest bond strength observed when enamel treated with both etchant and bonding agent i.e. 2.72 (0.43) & 2.97 (0.19) for Relyx U200 and Elite cement. When alone etchant and bonding agent were applied alone bond strength is 2.19 (0.18) & 2.24 (0.47) for Relyx U200, and 2.38 (0.27) 2.49 (0.16) for Max-cem elite. Mean bond strength was higher in case of Max-cem Elite as compared to RelyX U200 resin cement, although differences were non–significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion Surface treatment of enamel increases the bond strength of self adhesive resin cement. PMID:26894165

  9. The effect of sodium hypochlorite and resin cement systems on push-out bond strength of cemented fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhudhairy, Fahad I; Bin-Shuwaish, Mohammed S

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of different endodontic irrigant solutions and resin cement systems on the bond strength of cemented fiber posts. Sixty human single-rooted anterior teeth were sectioned transversely at 2 mm incisal to the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). The roots were treated endodontically, and teeth were distributed into six groups: group A, includes 5.25%NaOCl irrigant with MultiCore Flow Core Build-Up material; group B, includes 5.25%NaOCl irrigant with RelyX-Unicem Self-Adhesive Universal Resin Cement; group C, includes 2.5% NaOCl irrigant with MultiCore Flow; group D, includes 2.5%NaOCl irrigant with RelyX-Unicem; group E, includes NaCl, irrigant with MultiCore Flow; and group F, includes NaCl irrigant with RelyX-Unicem. Universal tapered fiber posts (No. 3 RelyX Fiber Post) were cemented, and roots were sectioned into cervical and apical segments. Samples were then subjected to a push-out bond strength test and failure modes were examined. The mean push-out bond strength for group D showed the highest mean value (20.07 MPa), while the lowest value was found in group A. There was a significant difference between groups with regard to the irrigants used (p0.05). The total mean push-out bond strength of the cervical segments was found to be significantly higher than the apical segments (pbond strength of the fiber posts regardless of the cement used. Both adhesive resin systems showed similar bonding strength.

  10. Effect of sulfuric acid etching of polyetheretherketone on the shear bond strength to resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproesser, Oliver; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Uhrenbacher, Julia; Roos, Malgorzata; Gernet, Wolfgang; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2014-10-01

    To examine the influence of etching duration on the bond strength of PEEK substrate in combination with different resin composite cements. In total, 448 PEEK specimens were fabricated, etched with sulfuric acid for 5, 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 300 s and then luted with two conventional resin cements (RelyX ARC and Variolink II) and one self-adhesive resin cement (Clearfil SA Cement) (n = 18/subgroup). Non-etched specimens served as the control group. Specimens were stored in distilled water for 28 days at 37°C and shear bond strengths were measured. Data were analyzed nonparametrically using Kruskal-Wallis-H (p cements. The optimal etching duration varied with the type of resin composite: 60 s for RelyX ARC (15.3 ± 7.2 MPa), 90 s for Variolink II (15.2 ± 7.2 MPa), and 120 s for Clearfil SA Cement (6.4 ± 5.9 MPa). Regardless of etching duration, however, the self-etching resin composite cement showed significantly lower shear bond strength values when compared to groups luted with the conventional resin composites. Although sulfuric acid seems to be suitable and effective for PEEK surface pre-treatment, further investigations are required to examine the effect of other adhesive systems and cements.

  11. Influence of Surface Treatments on the Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Monolithic Zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    To assess the influence of surface treatment on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of resin cements to monolithic zirconia materials. Two types of monolithic zirconia (Zenostar T [ZT] and Prettau Anterior [PA]) were evaluated. The specimens were assigned to three groups based on the surface treatment applied: group 1: control, assintered; group 2: sandblasted with 50-μm Al₂O₃; group 3: tribochemically silica sandblasted. Two types of resin cements (Multilink Speed [MS] and Multilink N [MN]) were applied to each group for evaluating the bond strength using the μTBS test. The fractured specimens were observed with a stereomicroscope and SEM. Surface roughness and topography of monolithic zirconia were examined after treatment. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. A Weibull analysis was performed on the bond strength data. The bond strength was significantly affected by the surface treatment and the type of resin cement (p zirconia (p = 0.387). Surface treatment with tribochemical silica sandblasting revealed significantly higher bond strength (p zirconia was changed due to surface treatments. The surface treatment of monolithic zirconia with tribochemical silica sandblasting enhanced the bond strength between zirconia and resin cements. Resins cements containing adhesive phosphate monomer (APM, MS) provided higher bond strength to monolithic zirconia than non-APM (MN).

  12. Effect of cement type, relining procedure, and length of cementation on pull-out bond strength of fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Vanessa Cruz; Faria e Silva, André Luis; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes

    2010-09-01

    As opposed to the cementation metal posts, the cementation of fiber posts has several details that can significantly influence the success of post retention. This study evaluated the effect of the relining procedure, the cement type, and the luted length of the post on fiber posts retention. One hundred eighty bovine incisors were selected to assess post retention; after endodontic treatment, the canals were flared with diamonds burs. Post holes were prepared in lengths of 5, 7.5, and 10 mm; the fiber posts were relined with composite resin and luted with RelyX ARC, RelyX Unicem, or RelyX Luting 2. All cements are manufactured by 3M ESPE (St. Paul, MN). Samples were subjected to a pull-out bond strength test in a universal testing machine; the results (N) were submitted to a three-way analysis of variance and the Tukey post hoc test (alpha = 0.05). The improvement of post retention occurred with the increase of the post length luted into the root canal; the relining procedure improved the pull-out bond strength. RelyX Unicem and RelyX ARC showed similar values of retention, both showing higher values than RelyX Luting 2. Post length, the relining procedure, and the cement type are all important factors for improving the retention of fiber posts. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Impairment of resin cement application on the bond strength of indirect composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovito Adiel SKUPIEN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of immediate and delayed resin cement application on the microtensile bond strength of indirect composite resin restorations and, to evaluate adhesive strategies (for regular resin cement or humidity parameters for self-adhesive resin cement. Forty-five enamel/dentin discs (0.5 mm height and 10 mm of diameter obtained from bovine teeth were divided into nine groups (n = 5. For regular cement, the variation factors were cementation technique at three levels (immediate cementation, 5 or 30 min after adhesive system application; and type of adhesive system at two levels (three- or two-step. For self-adhesive cement, the dentin moisture was the source of variation at three levels (normal, dry, or wet cementation. The specimens were submitted to microtensile bond strength (μTBS testing using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey’s test, and linear regression. Regular cement and three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system showed the highest values of bond strength (25.21 MPa–30 min of delay. Only for this condition, three-step adhesive showed higher bond strength than the two-step adhesive. Nevertheless, the linear regression showed that irrespective of the strategy, the use of the two-step approach when compared with three-step adhesive system decreased μTBS (p < 0.001. The failure analysis showed predominant adhesive failures for all tested groups. All groups had comparable values of bond strength to bovine dentin when the same materials were used, even in suboptimal clinical conditions.

  14. Bond strength of resin cements to noble and base metal alloys with different surface treatments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkhondeh Raeisosadat

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The bond strength of resin cements to metal alloys depends on the type of the metal, conditioning methods and the adhesive resins used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of resin cements to base and noble metal alloys after sand blasting or application of silano-pen.Cylinders of light cured Z 250 composite were cemented to "Degubond 4" (Au Pd and "Verabond" (Ni Cr alloys by either RelyX Unicem or Panavia F2, after sandblasting or treating the alloys with Silano-Pen. The shear bond strengths were evaluated. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and t tests at a significance level of P<0.05.When the alloys were treated by Silano-Pen, RelyX Unicem showed a higher bond strength for Degubond 4 (P=0.021 and Verabond (P< 0.001. No significant difference was observed in the bond strength of Panavia F2 to the alloys after either of surface treatments, Degubond 4 (P=0.291 and Verabond (P=0.899. Panavia F2 showed a higher bond strength to sandblasted Verabond compared to RelyX Unicem (P=0.003. The bond strength of RelyX Unicem was significantly higher to Silano-Pen treated Verabond (P=0.011. The bond strength of the cements to sandblasted Degubond 4 showed no significant difference (P=0.59. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated Degubond 4 (P=0.035.The bond strength of resin cements to Verabond alloy was significantly higher than Degubond 4. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated alloys. Surface treatments of the alloys did not affect the bond strength of Panavia F2.

  15. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to composite submitted to different surface pretreatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Hugo dos Santos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Extensively destroyed teeth are commonly restored with composite resin before cavity preparation for indirect restorations. The longevity of the restoration can be related to the proper bonding of the resin cement to the composite. This study aimed to evaluate the microshear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements to composite resin. Materials and Methods Composite discs were subject to one of six different surface pretreatments: none (control, 35% phosphoric acid etching for 30 seconds (PA, application of silane (silane, PA + silane, PA + adhesive, or PA + silane + adhesive (n = 6. A silicone mold containing a cylindrical orifice (1 mm2 diameter was placed over the composite resin. RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE or BisCem (Bisco Inc. self-adhesive resin cement was inserted into the orifices and light-cured. Self-adhesive cement cylinders were submitted to shear loading. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05. Results Independent of the cement used, the PA + Silane + Adhesive group showed higher microshear bond strength than those of the PA and PA + Silane groups. There was no difference among the other treatments. Unicem presented higher bond strength than BisCem for all experimental conditions. Conclusions Pretreatments of the composite resin surface might have an effect on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to this substrate.

  16. Effect of oxalate desensitizer on the bonding durability of adhesive resin cements to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Memarpour, Mahtab; Doozandeh, Maryam

    2012-07-01

    This study investigated whether the tubular occluding effect of oxalate desensitizer (OX) during adhesive cementation improved bonding of a self-etch and two etch-and-rinse resin cements to dentin after 6 months. A flat dentin surface was prepared on 120 extracted premolars, which were randomly divided into six groups of 20 teeth each according to the adhesive resin cement system used: ED primer II/Panavia F2.0, Excite DSC (Ex DSC)/Variolink II, and One-Step Plus (OS Plus)/Duolink, with or without OX (BisBlock) application. After cementation of an indirect composite rod, two subgroups (n=10) were tested after 24 h and 6 months of water storage plus thermocycling, and shear bond strengths were recorded in MPa. Statistical tests showed that although oxalate had a borderline significant negative effect on initial bonding of ED primer II/Panavia F2.0, it significantly improved bonding durability (p0.05). Combining an oxalate desensitizer with three types of resin cements had different effects on bond strength to dentin after aging, depending on the interaction of oxalate with the adhesive system associated to the resin cement. Copyright © 2011 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanical properties and bond strength of glass-ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Lúcia Coelho; Nunes, Margareth Calvo Pessutti; Dibb, Regina Guenka Palma; Powers, John M; Roulet, Jean-François; Navarro, Maria Fidela de Lima

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties and bond strength of glass-ionomer cements (GICs) and resin-modified GICs (RM-GICs) that are indicated as restorative materials for the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) technique. Fifteen disk specimens for the diametral tensile strength (DTS) test and fifteen cylindrical specimens for the compressive strength (CS) test were made of each GIC: Ketac-Fil, Ketac-Molar (ESPE), Fuji IX and Fuji PLUS (GC). Forty human molars were sectioned and embedded in resin with either buccal or lingual surfaces exposed for the tensile bond strength (TBS) test. The surface was ground until a flattened area of enamel or dentin was obtained. After conditioning, inverted truncated cones of GICs were prepared on the flat tooth surfaces. The powder:liquid ratio of Fuji PLUS was adjusted for restorative purposes. Prior to testing, specimens were stored for 24 h (TBS test) and for 1 h, 24 h, and 7 days (CS and DTS tests) in deionized water at 37 degrees C. They were then loaded at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min for CS and 0.5 mm/min for DTS and TBS tests until failure occurred. The data were submitted to two-way ANOVA at 0.05 level of significance, followed by a Tukey-Kramer test for multiple comparisons. The mean CS values ranged from 90.27 to 170.73 MPa and DTS means from 6.21 to 22.32, with test periods from 1 h to 7 days. The means for TBS ranged from 4.90 to 11.36 MPa and from 2.52 to 5.55 MPa in enamel and dentin, respectively. No differences were found between materials with the CS test except at 1 hour. The resin-modified GIC (RM-GIC) had the highest DTS, with no changes between the test periods, and the highest TBS for both enamel and dentin. Among the GICs tested, RM-GIC showed higher values of DTS and TBS.

  18. Detecting Poor Cement Bonding and Zonal Isolation Problems Using Magnetic Cement Slurries

    KAUST Repository

    Nair, Sriramya D.

    2017-10-02

    There has been growing interest in the use of magnetorheological fluids to improve displacement efficiency of fluids (drilling fluids, spacer fluids, cement slurries) in the eccentric casing annuli. When magnetic particles are mixed with the cement slurry for improved displacement, they provide an excellent opportunity for sensing the presence and quality of cement in the annulus. This work focuses on using sophisticated 3D computational electromagnetics to simulate the use of a magnetic cement slurry for well cement monitoring. The main goal is to develop a new tool, which is capable of locating magnetic cement slurry that is placed behind a stainless steel casing. An electromagnetic coil was used to generate a magnetic field inside the borehole. It was found that when a current was passed through the electric coils, magnetic field lines passed through the stainless steel casing, the cement annulus and the rock formation. Three sensors were placed inside the cased borehole and the magnetic field strength variations were observed at these locations. Various factors that have a significant influence on zonal isolation were considered. These include, effect of debonding between casing and cement annulus, effect of changing annuli thickness, influence of a fracture in the rock formation, effect of changing magnetic permeability of cement and finally influence of annuli eccentricity. Based on the results shown in the paper along with the next generation of supersensitive magnetic sensors that are being developed, the magnetic approach appears to be a viable alternative for evaluating the quality of the cement annulus to ensure good zonal isolation.

  19. Microtensile bond strength of glass fiber posts cemented with self-adhesive and self-etching resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitter, Suellen; Sousa-Neto, Manoel D; Roperto, Renato C; Silva-Sousa, Yara T; El-Mowafy, Omar

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the bond strength of glass fiber posts to intraradicular dentin when cemented with self-etching and self-adhesive resin cements. Forty-eight single-rooted human teeth were decoronated, endodontically treated, post-space prepared and divided into 8 groups (n = 6). The glass fiber posts used were: Exacto (EA) (Angelus) and everStick (ES) (StichTeck), which were cemented with two self-adhesive resin cements: BisCem (BIS) (Bisco) and Rely-X Unicem (UNI) (3M/ESPE), and two self-etching resin cements: Esthetic Cementing System NAC100 (NAC) (Kuraray) and Panavia-F (PAN) (Kuraray). Specimens were thermocycled between 5°C and 55 °C for 1000 cycles and stored in water at 37°C for 1 month. Four 1-mm-thick (in cross section) rods were obtained from the cervical region of the roots. Specimens were then subjected to microtensile testing in a special machine (BISCO; Schaumburg, IL, USA) or a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Microtensile bond strength (μTBS) data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests. Means (and SD) of μTBS (MPa) were: EA/PAN: 10.3 (4.1), EA/NAC: 14 (5.1) EA/BIS: 16.4 (4.8), EA/UNI: 19.8 (5.1), ES/PAN: 25.9 (6.1), ES/NAC: 29.1 (7), ES/BIS: 28.9 (6), ES/UNI: 30.5 (6.6). ANOVA indicated significant differences among the groups (p post were significantly higher than those obtained with EA (p post (p > 0.05). μTBS values obtained with ES post were significantly higher than those obtained with EA post irrespective of the resin cement used. everStick posts resulted in the highest mean μTBS values with all cements. Self-adhesive cements performed well in terms of bond strength.

  20. Effect of Different Silane-Containing Solutions on Glass-Ceramic/ Cement Bonding Interacting with Dual-Cure Resin Cements

    OpenAIRE

    Murillo Gómez DDS, MSc, Fabián; De Góes DDS, MSc, PhD, Mário Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of different silane-containing solutions on ceramic-cement bonding and their interaction with different dual-cure resin cements. Forty five glass- ceramic plaques (IPS e.max CAD®) were sandblasted with aluminum oxide for 5s, etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid gel (HF) for 20s and then divided in three groups of 15 each to be treated with different silane-containing solutions: RelyX Ceramic Primer® (AS), Scotchbond Universal® (SU), Clearfil Ceram...

  1. Effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of zirconia to three resin cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadjoo, Nisa

    Statement of problem: There are no standard guidelines for material selection to obtain acceptable bonding to high-strength zirconium oxide ceramic. Studies suggest resin cements in combination with MDP-containing primer is a reasonable choice, however, the other cements cannot be rejected and need further investigation. Objective: The purpose of this in vitro study was the evaluation of the shear bond strength of three composite resin cements to zirconia ceramic after using different surface conditioning methods. Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty sintered Y-TZP ceramic (IPS e.max ZirCAD) squares (8 x 8 x 4 mm) were embedded in acrylic molds, then divided into three groups (n=40) based on the type of cement used. Within each group, the specimens were divided into four subgroups (n=10) and treated as follows: (1) Air abrasion with 50microm aluminum oxide (Al2O 3) particles (ALO); (2) Air abrasion + Scotchbond Universal adhesive (SBU); (3) Air abrasion + Monobond Plus (MBP); (4) Air abrasion + Z-Prime Plus (ZPP). Composite cylinders were used as carriers to bond to conditioned ceramic using (1) RelyX Ultimate adhesive resin cement (RX); (2) Panavia SA self-adhesive resin cement (PSA); (3) Calibra esthetic cement (CAL). The bonded specimens were submerged in distilled water and subjected to 24-hour incubation period at 37°C. All specimens were stressed in shear at a constant crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA. The bond strength values (MPa), means and standard deviations were calculated and data were analyzed using analysis of variance with Fisher's PLSD multiple comparison test at the 0.05 level of significance. The nature of failure was recorded. Results: The two-way ANOVA showed Panavia SA to have the highest strength at 44.3 +/- 16.9 MPa (pcement showed statistically higher bond strength (p=0.0054). The highest bond strengths for all three cements were observed with Scotchbond Universal surface

  2. Comparison of the microshear bond strength of two resin cements to Cercon and Zirkonzahn ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Nokar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Nowadays, the application of all ceramic restorations are being raised, because of their physical characteristics, such as translucency and good appearance. Numerous researchers investigated the impact of surface treatments on the bond strength of zirconia ceramic with resin cements. The aim of this study was to compare the microshear bond strength of Cercon and Zirkonzahn (two kind of zirconia ceramics, to two types of resin cements after thermocycling.   Materials and Methods: In this study, 24 rectangular specimens were made from each group of Cercon and Zirkonzahn ceramics. After sandblasting, these specimens were connected to 3×1 mm2 composite cylinders by two resin cements (Panavia F2 and Rely X Unicem2. After performing a thermocycling regime for 5000 cycles (5-55 ◦ C, the microshear bond strengths were measured by a universal testing machine. The mode of failures were determined by a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA.   Results: Type of ceramics had no significant impact on the microshear bond strength (P=0.317. The highest bond strengths in both ceramics were obtained with Reply X Unicem (P=0.035. The predominant failure mode was adhesive between the cement and ceramic.   Conclusion: Type of resin cement had a significant effect on their bond strengths to zirconia ceramics.

  3. Effect of temporary cements on the bond strength of ceramic luted to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo-Hamar, Sahar E; Federlin, Marianne; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Friedl, Karl-Heinz; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of either eugenol-containing or eugenol-free temporary cement removal by excavator or sandblasting on the shear bond strength of ceramic luted to dentin. A self-etching primer system, Panavia F 2.0, Kuraray Medical (PF2), and a total-etch bonding system, Excite/Variolink II, Vivadent (EXV), were used. One hundred and forty human molars, ground to expose dentin surfaces, were divided into 14 groups (seven groups for each adhesive system). For each adhesive system, either a eugenol-containing (Temp bond) or a eugenol-free (Temp bond NE) temporary cement was applied to the dentin surface for 7 days, then removed by an excavator or sandblasting (four groups). Three control groups were studied where fresh dentin was either scratched by excavator or sandblasted, or underwent no surface treatment. After application of the adhesives, ceramic cones (Cerafil inserts) were adhesively luted to standardized dentin areas. After 24 h storage in distilled water, the shear bond strengths were determined at a cross-head speed of 0.75 mm/min. For each adhesive system, neither the method of temporary cement removal nor the type of temporary cement affected the bond strength significantly (Pcements, either containing eugenol or not, does not alter the retentive strength of ceramic restorations luted to dentin using the tested adhesive systems, whether the temporary cements are removed by excavator or sandblasting.

  4. Push-out bond strength of a fiber post system with two resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Mosharraf

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Under the conditions of this study, there was no significant difference between the mean push out bond strength of self-etching and the conventional resin cement systems. The coronal region of the root dentin showed a significantly higher bond strength than the apical region.

  5. Comparative Shear-Bond Strength of Six Dental Self-Adhesive Resin Cements to Zirconia

    OpenAIRE

    Si-Eun Lee; Ji-Hyeon Bae; Jae-Won Choi; Yong-Chan Jeon; Chang-Mo Jeong; Mi-Jung Yoon; Jung-Bo Huh

    2015-01-01

    This study compared shear bond strength (SBS) of six self-adhesive resin cements (SARC) and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) to zirconia before and after thermocycling. The cylinder shape (Φ 2.35 mm × 3 mm) of six SARCs (G-CEM LinkAce (GLA), Maxcem Elite (MAX), Clearfil SA Luting (CSL), PermaCem 2.0 (PM2), Rely-X U200 (RXU), Smartcem 2 (SC2)) were bonded to the top surface of the zirconia specimens with light-curing. RMGIC (Fujicem (FJC)) was bonded to the specimens with self-c...

  6. Micro-tensile bond strength of solely self-cured composite cement onto dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Thais Yumi Umeda; Santos, PH; de Munck, Jan; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate bonding effectiveness of a new experimental composite cement to dentin in terms of microtensile bond strength (μTBS) after 1week (‘immediate’) and 6month (‘aged’) artificial aging. Flat ground dentin of 32 human molars was prepared using 600-grit SiC paper. Selfmade composite blocks (Clearfil AP-X,Kuraray Noritake) were bonded to flat dentin surfaces using 4 composite cements: Exp. HPC100 (Kuraray Noritake), Multilink (Ivoclar Vivadent), RelyX Unicem 2 and RelyX Ultimate ...

  7. Impact of various luting cements on the fixed dentures bonding strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krunić Nebojša

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Various luting cements are used to fix dental crowns to prepared teeth, and should provide an adhesive bond to the tooth structure giving reliable retention. The aim of this study was to establish in vitro which type of the tested luting cement provided the strongest adhesive bond of the prepared teeth to the fixed denture. Methods. Testing was carried out on the sample of 100 intact human premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons. The preparation of the teeth was performed by a heavy-duty machine. The surfaces of the prepared teeth were mathematically calculated. Dental crowns from the Nickel-Chromium- Molybenum (Ni-Cr-Mo alloy were made in a standard fashion, and fixed to prepared teeth (two samples of each group with 5 different types of luting cements. The strength of force applyed to separate the cast crowns from the prepared teeth was measured by an electronic dynamometer, after 7 days. Results. The obtained results revealed the connection between the type of luting cement and the values of retention power. The best adhesive bond under the constant convergence angle of the prepared teeth was provided by the resin cement. Conclusion. When choosing a luting cement for fixing dental crowns to prepared teeth, the advantage should be given to the resin cement in case the glassionomers are not available.

  8. Effects of cement-curing mode and light-curing unit on the bond durability of ceramic cemented to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Pestana Passos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different light-curing units and resin cement curing types on the bond durability of a feldspathic ceramic bonded to dentin. The crowns of 40 human molars were sectioned, exposing the dentin. Forty ceramic blocks of VITA VM7 were produced according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The ceramic surface was etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid / 60s and silanized. The dentin was treated with 37% phosphoric acid / 15s, and the adhesive was applied. The ceramic blocks were divided and cemented to dentin according to resin cement / RC curing type (dual- and photo-cured, light-curing unit (halogen light / QTH and LED, and storage conditions (dry and storage / 150 days + 12,000 cycles / thermocycling. All blocks were stored in distilled water (37°C / 24h and sectioned (n = 10: G1 - QTH + RC Photo, G2 - QTH + RC Dual, G3 - LED + RC Photo, G4 - LED + RC Dual. Groups G5, G6, G7, and G8 were obtained exactly as G1 through G4, respectively, and then stored and thermocycled. Microtensile bond strength tests were performed (EMIC, and data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%. The bond strength values (MPa were: G1 - 12.95 (6.40ab; G2 - 12.02 (4.59ab; G3 - 13.09 (5.62ab; G4 - 15.96 (6.32a; G5 - 6.22 (5.90c; G6 - 9.48 (5.99bc; G7 - 12.78 (11.30ab; and G8 - 8.34 (5.98bc. The same superscript letters indicate no significant differences. Different light-curing units affected the bond strength between ceramic cemented to dentin when the photo-cured cement was used, and only after aging (LED > QTH. There was no difference between the effects of dual- and photo-cured resin-luting agents on the microtensile bond strength of the cement used in this study.

  9. Effects of cement-curing mode and light-curing unit on the bond durability of ceramic cemented to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; Souza, Rodrigo Othávio Assunção; Michida, Silvia Masae Araújo; Zamboni, Sandra Costa; Oliveira, Simone Helena Gonçalves de

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different light-curing units and resin cement curing types on the bond durability of a feldspathic ceramic bonded to dentin. The crowns of 40 human molars were sectioned, exposing the dentin. Forty ceramic blocks of VITA VM7 were produced according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The ceramic surface was etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid / 60s and silanized. The dentin was treated with 37% phosphoric acid / 15s, and the adhesive was applied. The ceramic blocks were divided and cemented to dentin according to resin cement / RC curing type (dual- and photo-cured), light-curing unit (halogen light / QTH and LED), and storage conditions (dry and storage / 150 days + 12,000 cycles / thermocycling). All blocks were stored in distilled water (37°C / 24h) and sectioned (n = 10): G1 - QTH + RC Photo, G2 - QTH + RC Dual, G3 - LED + RC Photo, G4 - LED + RC Dual. Groups G5, G6, G7, and G8 were obtained exactly as G1 through G4, respectively, and then stored and thermocycled. Microtensile bond strength tests were performed (EMIC), and data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). The bond strength values (MPa) were: G1 - 12.95 (6.40)ab; G2 - 12.02 (4.59)ab; G3 - 13.09 (5.62)ab; G4 - 15.96 (6.32)a; G5 - 6.22 (5.90)c; G6 - 9.48 (5.99)bc; G7 - 12.78 (11.30)ab; and G8 - 8.34 (5.98)bc. The same superscript letters indicate no significant differences. Different light-curing units affected the bond strength between ceramic cemented to dentin when the photo-cured cement was used, and only after aging (LED > QTH). There was no difference between the effects of dual- and photo-cured resin-luting agents on the microtensile bond strength of the cement used in this study.

  10. Effect of Intracanal Irrigants on Bond Strength of Fiber Posts Cemented With a Self-adhesive Resin Cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, M S; Rosa, R A; Seballos, V G; Machado, E; Valandro, L F; Kaizer, O B; Só, Mvr; Bier, Cas

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of five intracanal irrigants on bond strength of fiber posts cemented with newer self-adhesive resin cement. A total of 60 extracted, single-rooted human premolars, sectioned at 14 mm, were prepared with the ProTaper Universal system with a size F3 instrument and filled with an F3 master cone and AH Plus. The root canal filling was partially removed, leaving 4 mm of apical gutta-percha. Specimens were randomly assigned to five groups (n=12), according to the solution used for dentin surface treatment before fiber post cementation, as follows: EDTA 17% (EDTA); QMix (QM); SmearClear (SC); 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and 0.9% saline solution (SS). Ultrasonic activation was performed (three times, 20 seconds each), and root canals were dried with paper points. Fiber posts were cemented with RelyX U200. In one specimen per group, rhodamine B dye was mixed with RelyX U200 to provide adequate fluorescence for confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) assessment. Specimens were transversally sectioned and three slices were obtained, one for each root third. Next, a push-out test was performed. A stereomicroscope and CLSM were used to analyze the failure modes and to illustrate the pattern of infiltration of RelyX U200 into dentinal tubules, respectively. Bond strength means were calculated, and analysis of variance and Bonferroni tests were used for statistical analysis. SS showed the highest mean bond strength values (11.5±5.3), superior to QM (5.1±3.1) and SC (5.1±3.3). NaOCl presented intermediary bond strength values (9.7±5.0), similar to EDTA (7.7±2.9) and SS. QM and SC showed the lowest mean bond strength (pfiber post cementation with self-adhesive resin cement, whereas chelating solutions, such as EDTA, QM, and SC, cause a decrease in bond strength.

  11. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated posts on bonding of resin cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeld, Anne; Asmussen, Erik

    2004-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of various surface treatments of prefabricated posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White) and zirconia (Cerapost) on the bonding of two resin cements: ParaPost Cement and Panavia F by a diametral tensile strength (DTS) test...... of resin cement to titanium alloy posts was increased by several surface treatments of the post. However, coating with primers as sole treatment had no effect on bonding. With the DTS method applied, none of the surface treatments had an effect on the bonding to glass fiber posts. The bonding of both resin....... The posts received surface treatments in three categories: 1) roughening by sandblasting and hydrofluoric acid etching; 2) application of primer by coating with Alloy Primer, Metalprimer II and Silane and 3) a combination treatment in the form of roughening (sandblasting or etching) supplemented...

  12. The Influence of Abutment Surface Treatment and the Type of Luting Cement on Shear Bond Strength between Titanium/Cement/Zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Śmielak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the shear bond strength of zirconia cylinders on a modified titanium surface using different luting cement types. Material and Methods. Eighty titanium disks were divided into two groups (n=40, which were treated with either grinding or a combination of sandblasting and grinding. Then, each group was subdivided into 4 groups (n=10 and the disks were bonded to disks of sintered zirconia using one of four cement types (permanent: composite cement; temporary: polycarboxylate cement, zinc-oxide-eugenol cement, and resin cement. Shear bond strength (SBS was measured in a universal testing machine. Fracture pattern and site characteristic were recorded. A fractographic analysis was performed with SEM. The chemical analysis of the composition of the fractures was performed using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The results of the experiment were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test. Results. The highest mean values of SBS were achieved when grinding was combined with sandblasting and when composite cement was used (18.18 MPa. In the temporary cement group, the highest mean values of SBS were for polycarboxylate cement after grinding (3.57 MPa. Conclusion. The choice of cement has a crucial influence on the titanium-cement-zirconia interface quality.

  13. Comparative Shear-Bond Strength of Six Dental Self-Adhesive Resin Cements to Zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Si-Eun; Bae, Ji-Hyeon; Choi, Jae-Won; Jeon, Yong-Chan; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Yoon, Mi-Jung; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    This study compared shear bond strength (SBS) of six self-adhesive resin cements (SARC) and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) to zirconia before and after thermocycling. The cylinder shape (Φ 2.35 mm × 3 mm) of six SARCs (G-CEM LinkAce (GLA), Maxcem Elite (MAX), Clearfil SA Luting (CSL), PermaCem 2.0 (PM2), Rely-X U200 (RXU), Smartcem 2 (SC2)) were bonded to the top surface of the zirconia specimens with light-curing. RMGIC (Fujicem (FJC)) was bonded to the specimens with self-curing. The shear bond strength of all cemented specimens was measured with universal testing machine. Half of the specimens were thermocycled 5000 times before shear bonding strength testing. Fractured surfaces were examined with a field-emission SEM (10,000×) and analyzed by energy dispersive x-ray analysis. MAX, PM2, SC2 group without thermocycling and GLA, MAX, PM2 group with thermocycling showed adhesive failure, but GLA, CSL, RXU, FJC group without thermocycling and SLC, RXU, SC2, FJC group with thermocycling indicated cohesive failure. Within the limitation of this study, All of SARCs except MAX demonstrated higher bond strength than that of RMGIC regardless of thermocycling. Also, SARC containing MDP monomers (CSL) retained better bonds than other cements.

  14. Effects of dentin surface treatments on shear bond strength of glass-ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Lombardini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of a conventional glass-ionomer cement (GIC) and a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) to dentin. 80 bovine permanent incisors were used. 40 cylindrical specimens of a GIC (Fuji IX GP Extra) and 40 cylindrical specimens of a RMGIC (Fuji II LC) were attached to the dentin. The teeth were then randomly assigned to 8 groups of equal size (n=10), 4 for every type of glass-ionomer cement, corresponding to type of dentin surface treatments. Group 1: GC Cavity Conditioner; Group 2: 37% phosphoric acid gel; Group 3: Clearfil SE Bond; Group 4: no dentin conditioning (control). The specimens were placed in a universal testing machine (Model 3343, Instron Corp., Canton, Mass., USA) and subsequently tested for shear bond strength (MPa). ANOVA showed the presence of significant differences among the various groups. Post hoc Tukey test showed different values of shear bond strength for Fuji IX GP Extra and for Fuji II LC. The different conditioners variably influence the adhesion of the glass-ionomer cements tested. Conclusions. RMGIC shear bond to dentin was higher than GIC. The use of a Self-etch adhesive system improved the shear bond strength values of RMGIC and lowered the shear bond strength values of GIC significantly.

  15. Comparative Shear-Bond Strength of Six Dental Self-Adhesive Resin Cements to Zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Eun Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compared shear bond strength (SBS of six self-adhesive resin cements (SARC and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC to zirconia before and after thermocycling. The cylinder shape (Φ 2.35 mm × 3 mm of six SARCs (G-CEM LinkAce (GLA, Maxcem Elite (MAX, Clearfil SA Luting (CSL, PermaCem 2.0 (PM2, Rely-X U200 (RXU, Smartcem 2 (SC2 were bonded to the top surface of the zirconia specimens with light-curing. RMGIC (Fujicem (FJC was bonded to the specimens with self-curing. The shear bond strength of all cemented specimens was measured with universal testing machine. Half of the specimens were thermocycled 5000 times before shear bonding strength testing. Fractured surfaces were examined with a field-emission SEM (10,000× and analyzed by energy dispersive x-ray analysis. MAX, PM2, SC2 group without thermocycling and GLA, MAX, PM2 group with thermocycling showed adhesive failure, but GLA, CSL, RXU, FJC group without thermocycling and SLC, RXU, SC2, FJC group with thermocycling indicated cohesive failure. Within the limitation of this study, All of SARCs except MAX demonstrated higher bond strength than that of RMGIC regardless of thermocycling. Also, SARC containing MDP monomers (CSL retained better bonds than other cements.

  16. Different Strategies to Bond Bis-GMA-based Resin Cement to Zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Guilherme Carpena; Spohr, Ana Maria; De Souza, Grace M

    To evaluate the effect of different bonding strategies on short- and long-term bis-GMA-based resin cement bond strengths to zirconia. One hundred twenty samples of fully-sintered zirconia (Prettau Zirconia) were sandblasted and randomly distributed into 5 groups (n = 24): UA: Scotchbond Universal Adhesive; SZP: Signum Zirconia Bond I + II; ZPP: Z-Prime Plus; EXP: MZ experimental primer; CO: no primer application (control). After performing these surface treatments, translucent tubes (0.8 mm diameter and 1.0 mm height) were placed on the zirconia specimens, and bis-GMA-based cement (Duo-Link) was injected into them and light cured. Specimens were tested for microshear bond strength either 24 h or 6 months (m) after water storage (37°C) and surfaces were characterized by SEM and EDX. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (p zirconia surface. In these groups, EDX demonstrated the presence of phosphorus. Group ZPP resulted in a nonhomogeneous layer, exposing the zirconia substrate underneath. EXP application resulted in an undetectable layer. Water storage did not affect resin cement bond strengths to zirconia irrespective of the surface treatment. Bis-GMA-based resin cement bond strengths to zirconia are affected by specific bonding strategies.

  17. Influence of glass particle size of resin cements on bonding to glass ceramic: SEM and bond strength evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Fernanda; Moraes, Rafael R; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Boscato, Noéli

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of the filler particle size (micron or submicron) of experimental resin cements on the microtensile bond strength to a glass-ceramic pretreated with hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching or alumina airborne-particle abrasion (AA). Cements were obtained from a Bis-GMA/TEGDMA mixture filled with 60 mass% micron-sized (1 ± 0.2 µm) or submicron-sized (180 ± 30 µm) Ba-Si-Al glass particles. Ceramic blocks (PM9; VITA) were treated with 10% HFA for 60 s or AA for 15 s. Silane and adhesive were applied. Ceramic blocks were bonded to resin composite blocks (Z250; 3M ESPE) using one of the cements. Bonded specimens were sectioned into beams (n = 20/group) and subjected to microtensile bond strength tests. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' tests (5%). Failure modes were classified under magnification. Morphologies of the treated ceramic surfaces and bonded interfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The HFA-submicron group had lower bond strengths than the other groups. All AA-submicron specimens debonded prematurely. Mixed failures were predominant for HFA groups, whereas interfacial failures predominated for AA groups. SEM revealed a honeycomb-like aspect in the HFA-treated ceramic, whereas the AA-treated groups showed an irregular retentive pattern. Continuity of cement infiltration along the bonded interface was more uniform for HFA-treated compared to AA-treated specimens. Cracks toward the bulk of the ceramic were observed in AA-treated specimens. Particle size significantly influenced the ceramic bond strength, whereas surface treatment had a minor effect. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. In vitro shear bond strength of three self-adhesive resin cements and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement to various prosthodontic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Camila; Patel, Manthan; D'Silva, Eric

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of three self-adhesive resin cements and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) to different prosthodontic substrates. The substrates base metal, noble metal, zirconia, ceramic, and resin composite were used for bonding with different cements (n=12). Specimens were placed in a bonding jig, which was filled with one of four cements (RelyX Unicem, Multilink Automix, Maxcem Elite, and FujiCEM Automix). Both light-polymerizing (LP) and self-polymerizing (SP) setting reactions were tested. Shear bond strength was measured at 15 minutes and 24 hours in a testing device at a test speed of 1 mm/min and expressed in MPa. A Student t-test and a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to evaluate differences between setting reactions, between testing times, and among cements irrespective of other factors. Generalized linear regression model and Tukey tests were used for multifactorial analysis. Significantly higher mean SBS were demonstrated for LP mode relative to SP mode (pcement, substrate, and setting reaction) and all their interactions had a significant effect on the bond strength (padhesive resin cements (padhesive resin cements compared to the RMGICs. Bond strengths also varied depending on the substrate, indicating that selection of luting cement should be partially dictated by the substrate and the setting reaction.

  19. Assessment of non-destructive testing of well casing,, cement and cement bond in high temperature wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knutson, C K; Boardman, C R

    1979-01-01

    Because of the difficulty in bringing geothermal well blowouts under control, any indication of a casing/cement problem should be expeditiously evaluated and solved. There are currently no high temperature cement bond and casing integrity logging systems for geothermal wells with maximum temperatures in excess of 500/sup 0/F. The market is currently insufficient to warrannt the private investment necessary to develop tools and cables capable of withstanding high temperatures. It is concluded that a DOE-funded development program is required to assure that diagnostic tools are available in the interim until geothermal resource development activities are of sufficient magnitude to support developmental work on high temperature casing/cement logging capabilities by industry. This program should be similar to and complement the current DOE program for development of reservoir evaluation logging capabilities for hot wells. The appendices contain annotated bibliographies on the following: high temperature logging in general, cement integrity testing, cosing integrity testing, casing and cement failures, and special and protective treatment techniques. Also included are composite listing of references in alphabetical order by senior author.

  20. Influence of storage times on bond strength of resin cements to root canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Coêlho Bandéca

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The resin cements are responsible to retention of the indirect materials decreasing marginal leakage, increasing failure resistance compared with conventional cementation. The cementation within root canal is very hard due unfavorable conditions regarding the application of adhesive techniques caused by inadequate access. Therefore, considering the possibility to decrease steps of cementation, this study was performed to evaluate the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX TM U100, 3M ESPE and resin cement combined with self-ecthing adhesive system (Panavia® F 2.0, Kuraray light-cured with Quartz Tungsten Halogen (QTH following storage at 37 °C immediately after light-curing, 24 and 48 hours and 7 days. The root canals were prepared to receive the glass fiber post in the depth of 10 mm, irrigated with 17% EDTA and NaOCl, rinsed with distilled water and dried using paper points. The roots were perpendicularly sectioned into approximately 1 mm thick sections, obtaining ninety-six slices (n = 12. The slices were trimmed using a cylindrical diamond bur in the proximal surfaces until it touched the post and attached into a device, which were mounted on a strength tester (Bisco and loaded in tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure occurred at specimens. The analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests showed significant statistical differences (P .05. The resin cements 24 and 48 hours after light-curing were statistically similar among themselves (P > .05. The both resin cement showed similar bond strength into root canal on different storage times. The highest bond strength values of the resin cements were showed 7 days after curing.

  1. Effect of Provisional Cements on Shear Bond Strength of Porcelain Laminate Veneers

    OpenAIRE

    Altintas, Subutay Han; Tak, Onjen; Secilmis, Asli; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of three provisional cements and two cleaning techniques on the final bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers. Methods: The occlusal third of the crowns of forty molar teeth were sectioned and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. Dentin surfaces were polished and specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Provisional restorations were fabricated and two provisional restorations were cemented onto each to...

  2. Effects of Mechanical and Chemical Pretreatments of Zirconia or Fiber Posts on Resin Cement Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Zhou, Hui; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chen; Sun, Ying Chun; Gao, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The bonding strength between resin cement and posts is important for post and core restorations. An important method of improving the bonding strength is the use of various surface pretreatments of the post. In this study, the surfaces of zirconia (fiber) posts were treated by mechanical and/or chemical methods such as sandblasting and silanization. The bonding strength between the zirconia (fiber) post and the resin cement was measured by a push-out method after thermocycling based on the adhesion to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The zirconia and fiber posts exhibited different bonding strengths after sandblasting and/or silanization because of the different strengths and chemical structures. The zirconia post showed a high bonding strength of up to 17.1 MPa after a combined treatment of sandblasting and silanization because of the rough surface and covalent bonds at the interface. This effect was also enhanced by using 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane for the formation of a flexible layer at the interface. In contrast, a high bonding strength of 13.9 MPa was obtained for the fiber post treated by silane agents because the sandblasting treatment resulted in damage to the fiber post, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the improvement in the bonding strength between the post and the resin cement could be controlled by different chemical and/or mechanical treatments. Enhanced bonding strength depended on covalent bonding and the surface roughness. A zirconia post with high bonding strength could potentially be used for the restoration of teeth in the future. PMID:26066349

  3. Effects of Mechanical and Chemical Pretreatments of Zirconia or Fiber Posts on Resin Cement Bonding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Li

    Full Text Available The bonding strength between resin cement and posts is important for post and core restorations. An important method of improving the bonding strength is the use of various surface pretreatments of the post. In this study, the surfaces of zirconia (fiber posts were treated by mechanical and/or chemical methods such as sandblasting and silanization. The bonding strength between the zirconia (fiber post and the resin cement was measured by a push-out method after thermocycling based on the adhesion to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The zirconia and fiber posts exhibited different bonding strengths after sandblasting and/or silanization because of the different strengths and chemical structures. The zirconia post showed a high bonding strength of up to 17.1 MPa after a combined treatment of sandblasting and silanization because of the rough surface and covalent bonds at the interface. This effect was also enhanced by using 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilylethane for the formation of a flexible layer at the interface. In contrast, a high bonding strength of 13.9 MPa was obtained for the fiber post treated by silane agents because the sandblasting treatment resulted in damage to the fiber post, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the improvement in the bonding strength between the post and the resin cement could be controlled by different chemical and/or mechanical treatments. Enhanced bonding strength depended on covalent bonding and the surface roughness. A zirconia post with high bonding strength could potentially be used for the restoration of teeth in the future.

  4. Effects of Mechanical and Chemical Pretreatments of Zirconia or Fiber Posts on Resin Cement Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Zhou, Hui; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chen; Sun, Ying Chun; Gao, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The bonding strength between resin cement and posts is important for post and core restorations. An important method of improving the bonding strength is the use of various surface pretreatments of the post. In this study, the surfaces of zirconia (fiber) posts were treated by mechanical and/or chemical methods such as sandblasting and silanization. The bonding strength between the zirconia (fiber) post and the resin cement was measured by a push-out method after thermocycling based on the adhesion to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The zirconia and fiber posts exhibited different bonding strengths after sandblasting and/or silanization because of the different strengths and chemical structures. The zirconia post showed a high bonding strength of up to 17.1 MPa after a combined treatment of sandblasting and silanization because of the rough surface and covalent bonds at the interface. This effect was also enhanced by using 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane for the formation of a flexible layer at the interface. In contrast, a high bonding strength of 13.9 MPa was obtained for the fiber post treated by silane agents because the sandblasting treatment resulted in damage to the fiber post, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the improvement in the bonding strength between the post and the resin cement could be controlled by different chemical and/or mechanical treatments. Enhanced bonding strength depended on covalent bonding and the surface roughness. A zirconia post with high bonding strength could potentially be used for the restoration of teeth in the future.

  5. Adhesive bonding of resin cements to cast titanium with adhesive primers

    OpenAIRE

    Di Francescantonio,Marina; Oliveira,Marcelo Tavares de; Daroz,Luiz Gustavo Dias; Henriques, Guilherme Elias Pessanha; Giannini,Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of adhesive primer applications on the bond strength of resin cements to cast titanium. Four adhesive primers - Metaltite, Metal Primer II, Alloy Primer and Ceramic Primer - and their respective resin cements - Bistite II DC, Link Max, Panavia F 2.0, RelyX Unicem and RelyX ARC - were tested. Cast plates were prepared from titanium ingots (n=6 specimens/cement) and had their surfaces airborne-particle abraded with Al2O3 (50 μ m). Three...

  6. Effects of Dental Adhesive Cement and Surface Treatment on Bond Strength and Leakage of Zirconium Oxide Ceramics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    TSUKAKOSHI, Makoto; SHINYA, Akikazu; GOMI, Harunori; LASSILA, Lippo V.J; VALLITTU, Pekka K; SHINYA, Akiyoshi

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the interactive influence of adhesive materials and surface treatments on bond strength of zirconium oxide ceramics, six types of adhesive resin cements (RelyX ARC (RA), Super-Bond C & B (SB), Linkmax (LM...

  7. [Bonding properties of four different cements to glass fiber posts after different treatments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojing; Zhao, Sanjun; Shen, Lijuan; Xu, Shuai; Sun, Jiaqi; Chen, Jihua

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the effect of four different cements on the bonding effectiveness of root canal dentine and fiber post before and after different treatments. A total of 216 freshly extracted sound single-root-canal mandibular premolars were randomly divided into four groups. After root canal treatment and post space preparation being conducted on the premolars, Fuji I, Fuji Cem, RelyX Unicem, RelyX ARC were used respectively to bond fiber posts and were marked with group A, B, C, and D. Microleakage, micromorphology of the bonded interfaces, and pull-out bond strength were evaluated in the immediate group, thermocycling group and thermomechanical loading group. In the immediate group, samples in group D showed the highest bond strength [(278 ± 26)N], followed by group C[ (219 ± 12) N], B[ (104 ± 23) N] and A[(73 ± 8) N]. Significant differences were found among all groups (P < 0.05) . A significant increase in bond strength was found in group A and B, whereas a decrease tendency was detected in group C and D after different treatments.Scanning electron microscope indicated that some little gaps were observed in group D after treatment, while a more intense bonding interface was found in group A and B. Microleakage scores in group A and B were lower than those in group C and D after aging treatments. Resin cement can achieve a better immediate bond strength, while resin-modified resin cement may acquire a better long-term retention.

  8. Effect of various surface treatments of tooth – colored posts on bonding strength of resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirzaei M.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Various studies have shown that reliable bond at the root - post - core interfaces are critical for the clinical success of post - retained restorations. Severe stress concentration at post - cement interface increases post debonding from the root. To form a bonded unit that reduces the risk of fracture, it is important to optimize the adhesion. Therefore, some post surface treatments have been proposed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of various surface treatments of tooth - colored posts on the bonding of resin cement. "nMaterials and Methods: In this interventional study, 144 tooth colored posts were used in 18 groups (8 samples in each group. The posts included quartz fiber (Matchpost, glass fiber (Glassix, and zirconia ceramic (Cosmopost and the resin cement was Panavia F 2.0. The posts received the following surface treatments: 1- No surface treatment (control group, 2- Etching with HF and silane, 3- Sandblasting with Cojet sand, 4- Sandblasting with Cojet sand and application of silane, 5- Sandblasting with alumina particles, 6- Sandblasting with alumina particles and application of silane. Then, posts were cemented into acrylic molds with Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The specimens were placed in water for 2 days and debonded in pull - out test. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA followed by Tamhane and Tukey HSD. Failure modes were observed under a stereomicroscope (10 . P<0.05 was considered as the significant level. "nResults: Surface treatments (sandblasting with Cojet and alumina particles ,with or without silane resulted in improved bond strength of resin cement to glass fiber post (Glassix and zirconia ceramic (Cosmopost [p<0/05], but not to the quartz fiber post (Matchpost. In general, higher bond strengths resulted in a to higher percentage of cohesive failures within the cement. "nConclusion: Based on the results of this study, sandblasting with cojet and alumina

  9. Bond strength of selected composite resin-cements to zirconium-oxide ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fons-Font, Antonio; Amigó-Borrás, Vicente; Granell-Ruiz, María; Busquets-Mataix, David; Panadero, Rubén A.; Solá-Ruiz, Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strengths of zirconium-oxide (zirconia) ceramic and a selection of different composite resin cements. Study Design: 130 Lava TM cylinders were fabricated. The cylinders were sandblasted with 80 µm aluminium oxide or silica coated with CoJet Sand. Silane, and bonding agent and/or Clearfil Ceramic Primer were applied. One hundred thirty composite cement cylinders, comprising two dual-polymerizing (Variolink II and Panavia F) and two autopolymerizing (Rely X and Multilink) resins were bonded to the ceramic samples. A shear test was conducted, followed by an optical microscopy study to identify the location and type of failure, an electron microscopy study (SEM and TEM) and statistical analysis using the Kruskal-Wallis test for more than two independent samples and Mann-Whitney for two independent samples. Given the large number of combinations, Bonferroni correction was applied (α=0.001). Results: Dual-polymerizing cements provided better adhesion values (11.7 MPa) than the autopolymerizing (7.47 MPa) (p-value M-WAdhesive failure (separation of cement and ceramic) was produced at a lesser force than cohesive failure (fracture of cement) (p-value M-Wcement and the ceramic. Key words:Shear bond strength, silica coating, surface treatment, zirconia ceramics, phosphate monomer. PMID:22926485

  10. Effect of surface treatment of FRC-Post on bonding strength to resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Hyun Park,

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface treatment of FRC-Post on bonding strength to resin cements. Materials and Methods Pre-surface treated LuxaPost (DMG, Rely-X Fiber Post (3M ESPE and self adhesive resin cement Rely-X Unicem (3M ESPE, conventional resin cement Rely-X ARC (3M ESPE, and Rely-X Ceramic Primer (3M ESPE were used. After completing the surface treatments of the posts, posts and resin cement were placed in clear molds and photo-activation was performed. The specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the FRC-Post into 2 mm-thick segments, and push-out strength were measured. The results of bond strength value were statistically analyzed using independent samples t-test and one-way ANOVA with multiple comparisons using Scheffe's test. Results Silanization of posts affect to the bond strength in LuxaPost, and did not affect in Rely-X Fiber Post. Rely-X ARC showed higher value than Rely-X Unicem. Conclusions Silanization is needed to enhance the bond strength between LuxaPost and resin cements.

  11. Effect of antibacterial/adhesive approaches on bonding durability of fiber posts cemented with self-etch resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Memarpour, Mahtab; Vafamand, Narges; Mohammadi, Mahsa

    2017-09-01

    Longevity of post-retained restoration is highly depended on bonding stability of fiber post (FP) to root dentin. This study evaluated the effect of different antibacterial/adhesive approaches on bonding durability of FPs luted into root canal with a self-etch cement. Seventy-two human maxillary central incisor roots were divided into six groups after endodontic treatment, based on the antibacterial/adhesive treatments as follows: 1)ED primer II (ED, control); 2) Clearfil Protect Bond (PB); 3) 2% chlorhexidine (CH) pretreatment + ED primer II (CH+ED); 4) CH-incorporated into ED primer II (CH in ED); 5) CH pretreatment + Clearfil SE Bond (CH+SE); and 6)CH-incorporated into SE primer (CH in SE). The FPs were then cemented using PanaviaF2.0. After micro-slicing the bonded root dentin, a push-out bond strength (PBS) test was performed immediately or after two years of water storage. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (α=0.05). The effects of antibacterial/adhesive approach, time and interaction between the main factors were significant (p=0.01). There was no significant difference between the immediate groups, except between the CH+ED group (the lowest PBS) and PB and CH in SE groups (the highest PBS) (p≤0.03). After aging, the same difference was observed (p≤0.02); the control group exhibited a significantly lower PBS compared to the other groups (p≤0.01), except for CH+ED. Aging significantly decreased PBS of all the groups (p≤0.01); the control group exhibited the highest reduction. CH incorporated into self-etch primers or in pretreatment step prior to two-step self-etch adhesive and antibacterial adhesive could improve bond stability of self-etch cemented fiber post. However, none of these was capable of inhibiting bond degradation over time. Key words:Push-out bond strength, Fiber post, Chlorhexidine.

  12. Shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to base metal alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattar, Susan; Hatamleh, Muhanad; Khraisat, Ameen; Al-Rabab'ah, Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    Many self-adhesive cements have been introduced in the past few years, with little or no data regarding their clinical performance. This study investigated the shear bond strength of some recently introduced self-adhesive resin cements. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of self-adhesive and conventional resin-based cements to a base metal alloy. Four groups (10-12 each) that comprised 3 self-adhesive cements (SmartCem2; RelyX Unicem; seT SDI) and a conventional resin-based cement (RelyX ARC) were tested. Cylindrical cement specimens (diameter, 3 mm; height, 3 mm) were applied to nickel-free base metal alloy (Sheradent) disks with a diameter of 12 mm, and the surface was treated with airborne-particle abrasion of 50 μm aluminum oxide. The metal disks were fixed in brass molds specifically designed for the shear bond test device. Test specimens were incubated at 37°C for 24 hours and then the shear bond was tested with a Zwick Roll testing machine at a 0.8 mm/min cross-head speed. In addition, bond failures were investigated and categorized as adhesive, cohesive, or mixed. Shear bond strengths were calculated by dividing the maximum debonding force over the cross-sectional area of each specimen. One-way ANOVA and the Tukey (honestly significant difference) post hoc test were used to test statistical significant differences among the groups (α=.05). Statistical analysis showed significant differences among different resin cements (F=14.34, Padhesive in nature, which occurred at the resin-metal interface. The early bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements varied significantly among the tested materials. SmartCem2 showed the highest bond strength, which was 4 times the strength observed for seT SDI. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Orthodontic bracket bonding with a plasma-arc light and resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, H; Komori, A; Kojima, I; Ando, F

    2001-07-01

    Developments in light-curing technology have led to the introduction of a plasma-arc light-curing unit that delivers high-intensity output for faster curing. The purposes of this study were to determine the shear bond strengths of light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement cured with a plasma-arc light-curing unit and to evaluate the durability of the resultant bond strength with thermal cycling. Comparisons were made between light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement and light-cured composite resin. Two light-curing units were used in this study: a plasma-arc light-curing unit and a conventional light-curing unit. The mean shear bond strengths of light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement with the plasma-arc and the conventional light-curing units were 20.3 MPa and 26.0 MPa, respectively. An analysis of variance showed no statistically significant differences between the plasma-arc and the conventional light-curing units. Light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement and light-cured composite resin demonstrated similar bond strengths and exhibited no statistical differences. There was no statistical difference in bond strength between the teeth that were thermal cycled and those that were not. Failure sites for the brackets bonded with light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement appeared to be predominantly at the bracket-adhesive interface. The SDs of light-cured composite resin were high for both light-curing units. Whereas the coefficients of variation for light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement ranged from 20% to 30%, those of light-cured composite resin ranged from 40% to 60%. The bond strength of light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement cured with either a conventional light-curing unit or a plasma-arc light-curing unit surpassed the clinically required threshold. The plasma-arc light-curing unit may be an advantageous alternative to the conventional light-curing unit for orthodontic bracket bonding with both

  14. Influence of adhesive cementation systems on the bond strength of relined fiber posts to root dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Raquel Viana; Sampaio, Camila Sobral; Pacheco, Rafael Rocha; Pascon, Fernanda Miori; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria; Giannini, Marcelo

    2017-10-01

    Glass fiber post cementation procedures have undergone significant development. Relining the post with composite resin is a technique that aims to reduce resin cement thickness and consequently problems inherent to polymerization. Evidence is sparse regarding the efficacy of bonding procedures at increasing depths (from cervical to apical) using different adhesive cementation techniques. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength (PBS) of composite resin relined glass fiber posts cemented to bovine root dentin using different adhesive cementation protocols. Eighteen bovine teeth (n=6) were embedded in polystyrene resin blocks, and the crowns were sectioned leaving a root portion of 20 mm in length. Root canals were prepared using rotary instruments provided by the post manufacturer (Whitepost DC #1), resulting in a uniform root canal preparation. The root canals were lubricated with a water-soluble glycerin gel. Silane (Prosil) was applied and the posts relined with a microhybrid composite resin (Filtek Z100) to conform to the root canal anatomy. Three adhesive cementation protocols were evaluated: a 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi Purpose) in combination with a dual polymerizing resin cement (RelyX ARC); a universal adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal) associated with a dual polymerizing resin cement (RelyX Ultimate); and a self-adhesive dual polymerizing resin cement (RelyX Unicem 2). The roots were sectioned, resulting in four 2-mm segments at 4 different depths (cervical to apical) and evaluated by the PBS test, using a universal testing machine (Instron 4411) at 0.5 mm/min, until failure. Interfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, and failures were classified as cohesive failure in composite resin, cohesive failure in cement, cohesive failure in root dentin, adhesive failure, or mixed. Data were analyzed by 2-way split-plot ANOVA and the Tukey post hoc test (α=.05). No

  15. Desensitizing bioactive agents improves bond strength of indirect resin-cemented restorations: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri Pires-de-Souza

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of indirect composite restorations cemented with a resin-based cement associated with etch-and-rinse and self-etching primer adhesive systems to dentin treated or not with a bioactive material. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Twenty bovine incisor crowns had the buccal enamel removed and the dentin ground flat. The teeth were assigned to 4 groups (n=5: Group I: acid etching + Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply; Group II: application of a bioactive glass (Biosilicato®+ acid etching + Prime & Bond NT; Group III: One-up Bond F (J Morita; Group IV: Biosilicato® + One-up Bond F. Indirect composite resin (Artglass, Kulzer cylinders (6x10mm were fabricated and cemented to the teeth with a dual-cure resin-based cement (Enforce, Dentsply. After cementation, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37ºC for 30 days and thereafter tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine (EMIC with 50 kgf load cell at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Failure modes were assessed under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (95% level of confidence. RESULTS: Groups I, II and III had statistically similar results (p>0.05. Group IV had statistically significant higher bond strength means (p<0.05 than the other groups. The analysis of the debonded surfaces showed a predominance of adhesive failure mode for Group III and mixed failure mode for the other groups. CONCLUSION: The use of desensitizing agent did not affect negatively the bonding of the indirect composite restorations to dentin, independently of the tested adhesive systems.

  16. Aspects of bonding between resin luting cements and glass ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Burrow, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    The bonding interface of glass ceramics and resin luting cements plays an important role in the long-term durability of ceramic restorations. The purpose of this systematic review is to discuss the various factors involved with the bond between glass ceramics and resin luting cements. An electronic Pubmed, Medline and Embase search was conducted to obtain laboratory studies on resin-ceramic bonding published in English and Chinese between 1972 and 2012. Eighty-three articles were included in this review. Various factors that have a possible impact on the bond between glass ceramics and resin cements were discussed, including ceramic type, ceramic crystal structure, resin luting cements, light curing, surface treatments, and laboratory test methodology. Resin-ceramic bonding has been improved substantially in the past few years. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching followed by silanizaiton has become the most widely accepted surface treatment for glass ceramics. However, further studies need to be undertaken to improve surface preparations without HF because of its toxicity. Laboratory test methods are also required to better simulate the actual oral environment for more clinically compatible testing. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Recent Trends in Surface Treatment Methods for Bonding Composite Cement to Zirconia: A Reveiw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aftab Ahmed; Al Kheraif, Abdul Aziz A; Jamaluddin, Syed; Elsharawy, Mohamad; Divakar, Darshan Devang

    To evaluate the in vitro studies conducted in the last six years on new zirconia materials to discover and explore current trends in bonding composite cement to zirconia substrate. An in-depth review of the in vitro studies performed between 2010 and 2016 was conducted, focusing on the current trends in surface conditioning methods for zirconia ceramic. PubMed was used for searching the literature. Resin composite bonding to zirconia, zirconia surface coating, and zirconia surface treatment method were the keywords used. Complete scientific articles were reviewed and evaluated for appropriateness. The literature survey showed a variety of surface treatment techniques comprising grit blasting (laboratory or chairside) with or without silica-coated alumina particles, the use of materials containing phosphate monomers, different silanes and primers, laser irradiation, Si vapor-phase deposition, and selective infiltration etching. The problem of composite cement bonding to zirconia has yet to be definitively solved. Nevertheless, the application of phosphate monomer on tribochemically silica-coated zirconia surfaces is currently the least complicated and most efficaceous means of bonding composite cement to zirconia. Selective infiltration etching seems to be a promising technique for establishing a durable bond between composite cement and zirconia, and should be studied further.

  18. [H(2)O(2) treatment improves the bond strength between glass fiber posts and resin cement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhong, Bo; Tan, Jian guo; Zhou, Jian feng; Chen, Li

    2011-02-18

    To evaluate the effect of etching with H2O2 on the bond strength between epoxy-based glass fiber posts and resin cement. Sixteen epoxy-based glass fiber posts were randomly divided into 4 groups (4 posts in each group) for different surface treatments. Group 1, no surface treatment (Control group); Group 2, treated with silane coupling agent for 60 s; Group 3, immersed in 10% H2O2 for 10 min then treated with silane coupling agent for 60 s; Group 4, immersed in 30% H2O2 for 10 min then treated with silane coupling agent for 60 s. Resin cement was used for the post cementation to form resin slabs which were then sectioned and trimmed into dumbbell shape to obtain microtensile specimens. Microtensile bond strengths were tested and the failure modes were examined with a stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis of microtensile bond strengths was performed with Kruskal-Wallis test. The microtensile bond strengths (standard deviation) were 18.81 (4.04) MPa for Group 1, 26.70 (9.63) MPa for Group 2, 39.07 (6.47) MPa for Group 3, 46.05 (5.97) MPa for Group 4. Etching with H2O2 followed by silanization could significantly improve the bond strength between epoxy-based glass fiber posts and resin cement.

  19. Shear bond strength of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic and nano resin ceramics blocks cemented with three different generations of resin cement

    OpenAIRE

    Zuryati Ab-Ghani; Wahyuni Jaafar; Siew Fon Foo; Zaihan Ariffin; Dasmawati Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the shear bond strength between the dentin substrate and computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic ceramic and nano resin ceramics blocks cemented with resin cement. Materials and Methods: Sixty cuboidal blocks (5 mm × 5 mm × 5 mm) were fabricated in equal numbers from feldspathic ceramic CEREC ® Blocs PC and nano resin ceramic Lava™ Ultimate, and randomly divided into six groups (n = 10). Each block was cemented to the dentin of 60 extracted huma...

  20. Influence of plasma pretreatment on shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to polyetheretherketone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, B; Bähr, N; Beuer, F; Wimmer, T; Eichberger, M; Gernet, W; Jahn, D; Schmidlin, P R

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the adhesion between PEEK and two self-adhesive resin cements after plasma treatment. Eight hundred sixty-four polyetheretherketone (PEEK) disks were cut and polished to silicon carbide (SIC) P4000. One half of the specimens were randomly selected and pretreated with plasma, whereas the remaining 432 specimens remained untreated. Subsequently, specimens were randomly allocated to four groups (n = 108/group): Visio.link (Bredent), Signum PEEK Bond (Heraeus Kulzer), Ambarino P60 (Creamed), and a control group without additional treatment. Half of the specimens of each group (n = 54) were then cemented with either RelyX Unicem Automix 2 (3 M ESPE) or with Clearfil SA (Kuraray). All specimens were stored in water for 24 h (37 °C). Afterwards, specimens were divided into three groups (n = 18) for different aging levels: (1) no aging (baseline measurement), (2) thermal aging for 5,000 cycles (5/55 °C), and (3) thermal aging for 10,000 cycles (5/55 °C). Thereafter, shear bond strengths (SBS) were measured, and failure types (adhesive, mixed, and cohesive) were assessed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, four- and one-way ANOVA followed by a post hoc Scheffé test (p Visio.link or Signum PEEK Bond showed predominantly mixed failure types. Control groups, plasma treated, or treated using Ambarino P60 groups fractured predominantly adhesively. The use of methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based adhesives allows bonding between PEEK and self-adhesive resin cements. Plasma treatment has no impact on bond to resin cements. PEEK reconstructions can be cemented using self-adhesive resin cements combined with pretreatment with MMA-based adhesives.

  1. Bond strength of resin cements to Co-Cr and Ni-Cr metal alloys using adhesive primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francescantonio, Marina; de Oliveira, Marcelo Tavares; Garcia, Rubens Nazareno; Romanini, José Carlos; da Silva, Nelson Renato França Alves; Giannini, Marcelo

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of adhesive primers (APs) applied to Co-Cr and Ni-Cr metal alloys on the bond strength of resin cements to alloys. Eight cementing systems were evaluated, consisting of four resin cements (Bistite II DC, LinkMax, Panavia F 2.0, RelyX Unicem) with or without their respective APs (Metaltite, Metal Primer II, Alloy Primer, Ceramic Primer). The two types of dental alloys (Co-Cr, Ni-Cr) were cast in plate specimens (10 x 5 x 1 mm(3)) from resin patterns. After casting, the plates were sandblasted with aluminum oxide (100 microm) and randomly divided into eight groups (n = 6). Each surface to be bonded was treated with one of eight cementing systems. Three resin cement cylinders (0.5 mm high, 0.75 mm diameter) were built on each bonded metal alloy surface, using a Tygon tubing mold. After water storage for 24 hours, specimens were subjected to micro-shear testing. Data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's studentized range test. The application of Metal Primer II resulted in a significantly higher bond strength for LinkMax resin cement when applied in both metal alloys. In general, the cementing systems had higher bond strengths in Co-Cr alloy than in Ni-Cr. The use of AP between alloy metal surfaces and resin cements did not increase the bond strength for most cementing systems evaluated.

  2. A new adhesive bonding material for the cementation of implantable devices in otologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniglia, A J; Nakabayashi, N; Paparella, M M; Werning, J W

    1997-05-01

    Presently, there are no U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved adhesive bone cements for the surgical fixation of prosthetic materials in the middle ear. A promising new cement, 4-META/MMA-TBB opaque resin, has shown remarkable adhesive properties as a bone cement in vivo. The cement is composed of 4-methacryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META) and methyl methacrylate (MMA) as monomers and tri-n-butyl borane (TBB) as an initiator. An electromagnetic semiimplantable hearing device presently under development was implanted into the middle ear of six cats using 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to cement a titanium-encased magnet to the incus. The animals were subsequently killed (at a mean of 9.6 months) to assess the (temporal bones and specifically the magnet-incus complex in each animal. The titanium-encapsulated magnet was firmly adherent to all incuses without any failure of the cement-bone interface. Histopathologic examination of the implanted temporal bones demonstrated lack of middle ear inflammation. Transmission electron microscopy of the incuses demonstrated a unique "hybrid layer" in the bone-side subsurface of the bone-cement interface that elucidates the mechanism of interfacial adhesion. Our investigation highlights the special biomechanical properties as well as the biocompatibility of 4-META/ MMA-TBB resin that make it an attractive bone-bonding agent for use in otologic surgery, including its potential usefulness during ossicular reconstruction.

  3. Micro push-out bond strength of resin cement in roots exhibiting the butterfly effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Hakan; Uygun, Ahmet Demirhan; Gündüz, Hicran Ateş; Karataş, Ertugrul; Cakici, Fatih; Alsancak, Meltem

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the bond strength of resin cement in root sections with or without butterfly effect. Fifteen single-rooted human maxillary central incisors were decoronated and prepared up to size 40. After post space preparation, the resin cement was placed into the post space and the fiber posts were luted. 1 mm thickness slices were obtained and the presence of the butterfly effect was recorded. A push-out test was then used to measure the bond strength between the resin cement and root dentin. Data were analyzed using independent samples of t and χ(2) tests (p = 0.05). The sections exhibiting butterfly effect showed higher push-out bond strength values than those of without butterfly effect (p Butterfly effect can influence the push-out bond strength. Thus, this phenomena should be taken into account, when push-out bond strength test is performed. Root sections exhibiting butterfly effect resulted in higher push-out bond strength values to root sections without butterfly effect. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Effect of surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of luting cement to ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, PK; Özcan, Mutlu; Vallittu, Pekka K.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of a Bis-GMA based luting cement to six commercial dental ceramics. Methods. Six disc shaped ceramic specimens (glass ceramics, glass infiltrated alumina, glass infiltrated zirconium

  5. Shear bond strengths of three glass ionomer cements to enamel and dentine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, T.S.; van Amerongen, W.E.; de Gee, A.; Bönecker, M.; Sampaio, F.C.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The shear bond strength of three glass ionomer cements (GIC) to enamel and dentine was evaluated. Study Design: Sound permanent human molars (n=12) were grinded perpendicular to their axial axes, exposing smooth, flat enamel and dentine surfaces. The teeth were embedded in resin and

  6. Bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Virgílio Vilas Boas; Rodrigues, José Roberto; da Silva, João Maurício Ferraz; Pagani, Clovis; Souza, Rodrigo Othávio Assunção

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of surface treatments and thermocycling on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of self-adhesive resin cement to human enamel and dentin. Eighty human third molars were selected. The crowns of 40 teeth were transversally sectioned, exposing the mid-coronal dentin. The buccal surfaces of the other 40 teeth were grinded to obtain a 5 mm2 flat enamel area. Eighty resin blocks were produced and cemented to the dental surfaces with RelyX Unicem, then grouped according to the surface treatment (n=10): UnicemC with no conditioning, UnicemP with 37% phosphoric acid/15 s, and UnicemPA with 37% phosphoric acid/15 s plus adhesive bonding (Single Bond 2). There were two control groups, one for enamel and the other for dentin: VR with 37% phosphoric acid/15 s plus adhesive bonding (Single Bond 2) plus Variolink II. The enamel-dentin resin cement blocks were sectioned to produce non-trimmed bar specimens, which were divided into two storage conditions: dry, μTBS immediately after cutting; TC (5,000 x; 5°C/55°C). The samples were submitted to μTBS, and data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test. The results showed statistical differences between UnicemC and the others. UnicemPA and VR showed better bond strength to dentin during the period before and after thermocycling, respectively. For the enamel, UnicemP showed better bond strength for both situations. Only for UnicemPA did the thermocycling significantly decrease the bond strength values. Within the limits of this study, it could be concluded that the bond strength is influenced by the surface treatments, and that thermocycling decreases the bond strength of all groups, but significantly only for UnicemPA.

  7. Interfacial fracture toughness of different resin cements bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, Tabassom; Rostami, Golriz; Behroozibakhsh, Marjan; Fatemi, Mostafa; Keshvad, Alireza; van Noort, Richard

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of HF acid etching and silane treatment on the interfacial fracture toughness of a self-adhesive and two conventional resin-based cements bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Lithium disilicate glass ceramic discs were prepared with two different surface preparations consisting of gritblasted with aluminium oxide, and gritblasted and etched with hydrofluoric acid. Ceramic surfaces with a chevron shaped circular hole were treated by an optimized silane treatment followed by an unfilled resin and then three different resin cements (Variolink II, Panavia F2, and Multilink Sprint). Specimens were kept in distilled water at 37°C for 24h and then subjected to thermocycling. The interfacial fracture toughness was measured and mode of failures was also examined. Data were analysed using analysis of variance followed by T-test analysis. No statistically significant difference in the mean fracture toughness values between the gritblasted and gritblasted and etched surfaces for Variolink II resin cement was found (P>0.05). For the gritblasted ceramic surfaces, no significant difference in the mean fracture toughness values between Panavia F2 and Variolink II was observed (P>0.05). For the gritblasted and etched ceramic surfaces, a significantly higher fracture toughness for Panavia F2 than the other cements was found (Pcements demonstrated a better bonding efficacy to the lithium disilicate glass ceramic compared to the self-adhesive resin cement. The lithium disilicate glass ceramic surfaces should be gritblasted and etched to get the best bond when used with Panavia F2 and Multilink Sprint resin cements, whereas for the Variolink II only gritblasting is required. The best bond overall is achieved with Panavia F2. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Shear bond strength of three self-adhesive resin cements to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokh, Asefzadeh; Mohsen, Merati; Soheil, Salari; Nazanin, Bashardoost

    2012-01-01

    The result of the studies concerning the bonding of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin is controversial. To assess in vitro shear bond strength (SBS) of three self-adhesive dual-cured resin cements to dentin compared to a currently used dual-cured resin cement, using SBS test. The extant study is an experimental in vitro one on extracted human third molars dentin. 40 intact human third molars were selected and randomly divided into 4 groups of 10. Buccal dentin surfaces were exposed perpendicular to the long axis and prepared with SiC papers. A translucent plastic ring, was placed over the dentin surfaces. Group I (Control group): After 15 s of etching and application of Excite DSC Bond (Ex), Variolink II (Var II) resin cement was injected into the plastic ring and was light cured for 40 s. Group II: RelyX Unicem (RX) was injected into the plastic ring and after 30 s, was light cured for 40 s. Group III: Maxcem (Mc) was injected into the plastic ring and after 30 s, was light cured for 40 s. Group IV: Multilink Sprint (MS) was injected into the plastic ring and after 30 s, was light cured for 40 s. After thermal cycling, SBS were measured with a universal testing machine. Statistical computations were conducted according to Student's t-test. The mean SBS and standard deviations (in parentheses) for groups I, II, III, and IV were 12.95 (2.64), 6.73 (0.79), 3.01 (0.90), 4.60 (0.75) MPa, respectively. Statistical analysis, revealed that: (1) the mean SBS of Var II were significantly higher than the other groups (P0.05). Bond strength of three self-adhesive resin cements was significantly lower than the conventional total-etch resin cement. RX significantly performed better SBS than Mc and MS to dentin.

  9. Factors affecting on bond strength of glass fiber post cemented with different resin cements to root canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavijo, V. R. G.; Bandéca, M. C.; Calixto, L. R.; Nadalin, M. R.; Saade, E. G.; Oliveira-Junior, O. B.; Andrade, M. F.

    2009-09-01

    Luting materials provides the retention of endodontic post. However, the failures of endodontic posts predominantly occurred are the losses of retention. Thus, the alternating use to remove the smear layer, open the dentine tubules, and/or etch the inter-tubular dentine can be provided by EDTA. This study was performed to evaluate effect of EDTA on bond strength of glass fiber post cemented with different resin cements to root canal. Fifty bovine incisors were selected and the crowns were removed to obtain a remaining 14-mm-height root. The roots were randomly distributed into five groups: GI: RelyX™ ARC/LED; GII: RelyX™ U100/LED; GIII EDTA/RelyX™ U100/LED; GIV: Multilink™; and GV: EDTA/Multlink™. After endodontic treatment, the post space was prepared with the drills designated for the quartz-coated-carbon-fiber post Aestheti-Post®. Before application of resin cements, root canals were irrigated with 17% EDTA (GIII and GV) during 1 min, rinsed with distilled water and dried using paper points. The light-cured materials were light-activated with UltraLume LED 5 (Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah) with power density of 1315 mW/cm2. Specimens were perpendicularly sectioned into approximately 1 mm thick sections and the stubs were performed on Universal Testing Machine. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s post-hoc tests showed significant statistical different between RelyX™ ARC (GI) and RelyX™ U100 independent of the pre-treatment (GII to GIII) ( P 0.05) to all resin cements between the Cervical to Apical regions (GI to GV). The use of 17% EDTA showed no difference significant between the resin cements evaluated (GII to GIII; GIV to GV). Within the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that the use of EDTA did not provide efficiency on bond strength. The RelyX™ ARC showed higher bond strength values than RelyX™ U100.

  10. Effect of antioxidants on push-out bond strength of hydrogen peroxide treated glass fiber posts bonded with two types of resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Mazaheri, Hamid; Tarighi, Pardis; Samimi, Pouran; Khalighinejad, Navid

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) surface treatment of fiber posts has been reported to increase bond strength of fiber posts to resin cements. However, residual oxygen radicals might jeopardize the bonding procedure. This study examined the effect of three antioxidant agents on the bond strength of fiber posts to conventional and self-adhesive resin cements. Post spaces were prepared in forty human maxillary second premolars. Posts were divided into five groups of 8 each: G1 (control), no pre-treatment; G2, 10% H2O2 pre-treatment; G3, G4 and G5. After H2O2 application, Hesperidin (HES), Sodium Ascorbate (SA) or Rosmarinic acid (RA) was applied on each group respectively. In each group four posts were cemented with Duo-Link conventional resin cement and the others with self-adhesive BisCem cement. Push-out test was performed and data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05). There was a statistically significant interaction between the cement type and post surface treatment on push-out bond strength of fiber posts (p posts' surface treatments significantly affect the push-out bond strength of fiber posts (p = 0.001). H2O2 treated posts (G2) and control posts (G1) cemented with Duo-link showed the highest (15.96 ± 5.07MPa) and lowest bond strengths (6.79 ± 3.94) respectively. It was concluded that H2O2 surface treatment might enhance the bond strength of fiber posts cemented with conventional resin cements. The effect of antioxidants as post's surface treatment agents depends on the characteristics of resin cements used for bonding procedure.

  11. Effect of antioxidants on push-out bond strength of hydrogen peroxide treated glass fiber posts bonded with two types of resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 surface treatment of fiber posts has been reported to increase bond strength of fiber posts to resin cements. However, residual oxygen radicals might jeopardize the bonding procedure. This study examined the effect of three antioxidant agents on the bond strength of fiber posts to conventional and self-adhesive resin cements. Materials and Methods Post spaces were prepared in forty human maxillary second premolars. Posts were divided into five groups of 8 each: G1 (control, no pre-treatment; G2, 10% H2O2 pre-treatment; G3, G4 and G5. After H2O2 application, Hesperidin (HES, Sodium Ascorbate (SA or Rosmarinic acid (RA was applied on each group respectively. In each group four posts were cemented with Duo-Link conventional resin cement and the others with self-adhesive BisCem cement. Push-out test was performed and data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05. Results There was a statistically significant interaction between the cement type and post surface treatment on push-out bond strength of fiber posts (p < 0.001, F = 16. Also it was shown that different posts' surface treatments significantly affect the push-out bond strength of fiber posts (p = 0.001. H2O2 treated posts (G2 and control posts (G1 cemented with Duo-link showed the highest (15.96 ± 5.07MPa and lowest bond strengths (6.79 ± 3.94 respectively. Conclusions It was concluded that H2O2 surface treatment might enhance the bond strength of fiber posts cemented with conventional resin cements. The effect of antioxidants as post's surface treatment agents depends on the characteristics of resin cements used for bonding procedure.

  12. [Comparative study of 4 types of luting cements on shear bond strength of Zirconia ceramics to dentin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Bao-di; Zhang, Xian-fang; Zheng, Hu; Han, Dong-wei

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the adequate luting cements for zirconia ceramics to dentin. Blocks of sintered zirconia ceramics were randomly divided into 4 groups with 8 slices in each. After saliva immersion,airborne-particle abraded ceramic specimens were cleaned with phosphoric acid gel(containing 35% phosphoric acid) and then bonded to dentin with these four kinds of luting cements. After preserved in 37 degrees centigrade distilled water for 24 hours, the shear bonding strength of these specimens was tested and the data was analyzed with SPSS12.0 software package. The Multilink Automix could attain the highest shear bonding strength and the 3M RelyXTM Unicem AplicapTM could attain higher shear bonding strength, which were both significantly higher than in the Tokuso Ionomer and Shofu Polycarboxylate Cement groups(P<0.05). Total etching resin luting cement is an ideal option to the bonding of zirconia ceramics and can provide a strong bonding.

  13. Influence of the Resin Cement Thickness on the Push-Out Bond Strength of Glass Fiber Posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Regina Maria Helen-Cot; Kinder, Gustavo Ross; Alfredo, Edson; Quaranta, Tarcisio; Correr, Gisele Maria; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes da; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of resin cement thickness on the bond strength of prefabricated and customized glass fiber posts after storage in distilled water. Thirty human uniradicular roots were treated endodontically. The roots were divided into 3 groups: THIN (thin cement layer) - post space preparation with #0.5 drill and cementation of #0.5 post; THICK (thick cement layer) - post space preparation with #1 drill and cementation of #0.5 post; and CUSTOM (customized cement layer) - post space preparation with #1 drill and cementation of a customized post (#0.5 glass fiber posts customized with resin composite). All posts were luted with self-adhesive resin cement. The push-out test was carried out after storage for 24 h and 90 days in distilled water at 37 °C. The data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=0.05). Bond strengths were significantly higher for CUSTOM (9.37 MPa), than for THIN (7.85 MPa) and THICK (7.07 MPa), which were statistically similar. Considering the thirds, the bond strength varied in the sequence: apical (7.13 MPa) fiber posts. The customized posts presented higher bond strength. Storage in water for 90 days affected negatively the values of bond strength, especially for thick cement layers in the apical third.

  14. [Curing mode of universal adhesives affects the bond strength of resin cements to dentin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Z R; Tian, F C; Zhang, L; Han, B; Wang, X Y

    2017-02-18

    To determine the effects of curing mode of one-step and two-step universal adhesives on the micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) of different dual-cure resin cements to dentin. One-step universal adhesive Single Bond Universal (SBU), and two-step universal adhesive OptiBond Versa (VSA) were chosen as the subjects, one-step self-etching adhesive OptiBond All in One (AIO) and two-step self-etching adhesive Clearfil SE Bond (SEB) were control groups, and two dual-cure resin cements RelyX Ultimate (RLX) and Nexus 3 Universal (NX3) were used in this study. In this study, 80 extracted human molars were selected and the dentin surface was exposed using diamond saw. The teeth were divided into 16 groups according to the adhesives (AIO, SBU, SEB, VSA), cure modes of adhesives (light cure, non-light cure) and resin cements (RLX, NX3). The adhesives were applied on the dentin surface following the instruction and whether light cured or not, then the resin cements were applied on the adhesives with 1 mm thickness and light cured (650 mW/cm(2) for 20 s. A resin was built up (5 mm) on the cements and light cured layer by layer. After water storage for 24 h, the specimens were cut into resin-cement-dentin strips with a cross sectional area of 1 mm×1 mm and the μTBS was measured. Regarding one-step universal adhesive (SBU) light cured, the μTBS with RLX [(35.45±7.04) MPa] or NX3 [(26.84±10.39) MPa] were higher than SBU non-light cured with RLX [(17.93±8.93) MPa)] or NX3 [(10.07±5.89) MPa, Padhesive (VSA) and control adhesive (SEB), curing mode did not affect the μTBS when used with either RLX or NX3 (25.98-32.24 MPa, P>0.05). Curing mode of one-step universal adhesive may affect the μTBS between dual-cure resin cements and dentin, while for two-step universal adhesive, the curing mode and the type of resin cements did not influence the μTBS.

  15. Effect of saliva contamination and artificial aging on different primer/cement systems bonded to zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitta, João; Branco, Teresa C; Portugal, Jaime

    2017-09-27

    Saliva contamination has been shown to decrease bonding to zirconia. Adopting a less contamination-sensitive cement system may be an alternative to decontamination. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the ability of different primer/cement systems to promote a durable bond to zirconia after saliva contamination. Zirconia blocks (Lava Plus) (N=320) were airborne-particle abraded (50 μm Al2O3) and divided into 32 experimental groups (n=10) according to the variables in the study: saliva contamination; primer/cement system (Panavia SA [PSA]; RelyX Unicem 2 [RU2]; Bifix SE [BSE]; Panavia F2.0 [PF2]; Scotchbond Universal + RelyX Ultimate [SBU+RXU]; Futurabond M+ + Bifix QM [FBM+BQM]; All-Bond Universal + Duo-link [ABU+DL]; Z-Prime Plus + Duo-link [ZPP+DL]; and aging period (72 hours; 30 days with 10 000 thermal cycles at 5°C to 55°C). After half of the blocks had been contaminated with fresh human saliva for 10 minutes, rinsed with water, and air-dried, each primer/cement was applied. Polymerized composite resin disks were then placed over the cement, and the resin cement was light-polymerized for 20 seconds each at 2 opposite margins. After the aging time, the specimens were tested in shear (1 mm/min). The failure mode was classified as adhesive, cohesive, or mixed. Statistical analysis of the shear bond strength (SBS) data was performed with ANOVA followed by Tukey honest significant difference post hoc tests. Chi-square tests were used to analyze the failure mode data (α=.05). The mean SBS ranged between 4.2 and 34.5 MPa. Shear bond strength was influenced (Pcontamination, aging time). SBU+RXU and FBM+BQM showed a higher mean SBS than those of the other experimental groups (Pcontamination (P>.05). Failure was predominantly classified as adhesive. In general, saliva contamination and aging decreased bonding efficacy. Two systems, combining an application of a universal adhesive and a resin cement (SBU+RXU and FBM+BQM) were not affected by

  16. Influence of endodontic sealer cement on fibreglass post bond strength to root dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, M S; Queiroz, E C; Campos, R E; Martins, L R M; Soares, C J

    2008-06-01

    To test the hypothesis that the composition of endodontic sealer cements and the time elapsed between root filling and fibreglass post fixation interferes with adhesion to root canal dentine. Sixty bovine incisor roots were divided into five groups (n = 12): CI, unfilled; SI, filled with a calcium hydroxide-based cement-Sealer 26, and immediate post fixation; S7, Sealer 26 and post fixation after 7 days; EI, filled with a zinc oxide and eugenol-based cement-Endofill and immediate fixation; and E7 Endofill and post fixation after 7 days. The posts were cemented with adhesive system and dual resin cement. Ten roots were cross-sectioned to obtain two 1-mm-thick discs for each cervical (TC), middle (TM) and apical (TA) third of the prepared root portion. The posts were submitted to a micropush-out test. The other two teeth were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy to analyse the bond interface. Data were analysed using anova, Tukey and Dunnett tests (P length and in the TA when post fixation was delayed for 7 days. Bond strength decreased from crown to apex in all groups.

  17. Dentin deproteinization effect on bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Sampaio Lisboa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of deproteinization on the bond strength between self-adhesive resin cements and dentin surfaces that were untreated (control, acid-etched, or acid-etched and subjected to a post-etch deproteinization treatment. Cylinders of RelyX Unicem or BisCem (n = 6 cement were build-up on the dentin surfaces and tested to determine shear strength. The results were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%. While neither dentin pretreatment improved the bond strength for RelyX Unicem, deproteinization treatments resulted in greater bond strength in BisCem specimens while acid etching alone did not improve the performance of the material.

  18. Influence of the Cement Film Thickness on the Push-Out Bond Strength of Glass Fiber Posts Cemented in Human Root Canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Araújo Silva Prado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the influence of the cement film thickness on the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts in the cervical, medium, and apical thirds of root canal spaces. Thirty roots were randomly divided into three groups, according to the fiber post system’s drills: (G1 #2; (G2 #3; (G3 #4. The posts were cemented using a self-adhesive cement, and a small amount of powdered Rhodamine B was used as a stain. Images of both sides of each slice were obtained before and after the push-out test. To determine the cement thickness, a macro routine was developed using the software KS 400. The data were analyzed statistically using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn’s test. G2 (14.62±5.15 MPa showed statistically higher bond strength values than G1 (10.04±5.13 MPa and G3 (7.68±6.14 MPa. All groups presented higher bond strength values in the apical third. The bur diameter significantly influenced the results of the shear bond strength for the push-out test. The slight increase in the cement thickness allowed an increase in the values of shear bond strength when compared to very thin or very thick cement films.

  19. Influence of the Cement Film Thickness on the Push-Out Bond Strength of Glass Fiber Posts Cemented in Human Root Canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Natália Araújo Silva; Ferreira, Reinaldo de Souza; Maurício, Marcos Henrique de Pinho; Paciornik, Sidnei; de Miranda, Mauro Sayão

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the influence of the cement film thickness on the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts in the cervical, medium, and apical thirds of root canal spaces. Thirty roots were randomly divided into three groups, according to the fiber post system's drills: (G1) #2; (G2) #3; (G3) #4. The posts were cemented using a self-adhesive cement, and a small amount of powdered Rhodamine B was used as a stain. Images of both sides of each slice were obtained before and after the push-out test. To determine the cement thickness, a macro routine was developed using the software KS 400. The data were analyzed statistically using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's test. G2 (14.62 ± 5.15 MPa) showed statistically higher bond strength values than G1 (10.04 ± 5.13 MPa) and G3 (7.68 ± 6.14 MPa). All groups presented higher bond strength values in the apical third. The bur diameter significantly influenced the results of the shear bond strength for the push-out test. The slight increase in the cement thickness allowed an increase in the values of shear bond strength when compared to very thin or very thick cement films. PMID:27143971

  20. Influence of the Cement Film Thickness on the Push-Out Bond Strength of Glass Fiber Posts Cemented in Human Root Canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Natália Araújo Silva; Ferreira, Reinaldo de Souza; Maurício, Marcos Henrique de Pinho; Paciornik, Sidnei; de Miranda, Mauro Sayão

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the influence of the cement film thickness on the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts in the cervical, medium, and apical thirds of root canal spaces. Thirty roots were randomly divided into three groups, according to the fiber post system's drills: (G1) #2; (G2) #3; (G3) #4. The posts were cemented using a self-adhesive cement, and a small amount of powdered Rhodamine B was used as a stain. Images of both sides of each slice were obtained before and after the push-out test. To determine the cement thickness, a macro routine was developed using the software KS 400. The data were analyzed statistically using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's test. G2 (14.62 ± 5.15 MPa) showed statistically higher bond strength values than G1 (10.04 ± 5.13 MPa) and G3 (7.68 ± 6.14 MPa). All groups presented higher bond strength values in the apical third. The bur diameter significantly influenced the results of the shear bond strength for the push-out test. The slight increase in the cement thickness allowed an increase in the values of shear bond strength when compared to very thin or very thick cement films.

  1. The influence of different cements on the pull-out bond strength of fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; da Rosa, Ricardo Abreu; do Valle, Accácio Lins; Ghizoni, Janaina Salomon; Só, Marcus Vinicius Reis; Shiratori, Fábio Kenji

    2014-07-01

    Glass fiber posts are commonly used to provide adequate support and retention for the restoration of endodontically treated teeth, but their resistance to dislodgement depends on their adhesion to root dentin. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of cement type on the pull-out bond strength of fiber posts. Seventy maxillary canines were endodontically treated and then divided into 7 groups according to the cement used for fiber post cementation as follows (n = 10): RelyX Unicem, BisCem, RelyX Luting 2, RelyX ARC, Panavia F, Enforce, and Allcem. The specimens were subjected to a pull-out bond strength test in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results, in newtons, were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA and the Tukey post hoc test (α = .05). RelyX Unicem (472.3 ± 8.9 N), BisCem (506.6 ± 9.2 N), RelyX ARC (498.0 ± 8.2 N), Panavia F (502.3 ± 7.0 N), and Allcem (470.0 ± 11.3 N) presented significantly higher bond strength than RelyX Luting 2 (241.8 ± 9.70 N) and Enforce (309.5 ± 6.3 N) cements (mean ± SD; P glass ionomer cement. However, all cements promoted adequate retention to fiber posts to withstand functional loads. Copyright © 2014 The Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of shear bond strength of self-etch and self-adhesive cements bonded to lithium disilicate, enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Jennifer; Ali, Mohsin; Belles, Donald

    2015-11-01

    Comparison of shear bond strength of self-etch and self-adhesive cements bonded to lithium disilicate, enamel and dentin. With several self-adhesive resin cements currently available, there is confusion about which product and technique is optimal for bonding ceramic restorations to teeth. The objective of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of lithium disilicate cemented to enamel and dentin using 5 adhesive cements. 100 lithium disilicate rods were pretreated with 5% hydrofluoric acid, silane, and cemented to 50 enamel and 50 dentin surfaces using five test cements: Variolink II (etch-and-rinse) control group, Clearfil Esthetic (two step self-etch), RelyX Unicem, SpeedCEM, and BifixSE (self-adhesive). All specimens were stored (37 degrees C, 100% humidity) for 24 hours before testing their shear bond strength using a universal testing machine (Instron). Debonded surfaces were observed under a low-power microscope to assess the location and type of failure. The highest bond strength for both enamel and dentin were recorded for Variolink II, 15.1MPa and 20.4MPa respectively, and the lowest were recorded for BifixSE, 0.6MPa and 0.9MPa respectively. Generally, higher bond strengths were found for dentin (7.4MPa) than enamel (5.3MPa). Tukey's post hoc test showed no significant difference between Clearfil Esthetic and SpeedCem (p = 0.059), Unicem and SpeedCem (p = 0.88), and Unicem and BifixSE (p = 0.092). All cements bonded better to lithium disilicate than to enamel or dentin, as all bond failures occurred at the tooth/adhesive interface except for Variolink II. Bond strengths recorded for self-adhesive cements were very low compared to the control "etch and rinse" and self-etch systems. Further improvements are apparently needed in self-adhesive cements for them to replace multistep adhesive systems. The use of conventional etch and rinse cements such as Veriolink II should be preferred for cementing all ceramic restorations over self-adhesive cements

  3. Influence of dentin contamination by temporary cements on the bond strength of adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josimeri Hebling

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin contaminated by temporary cements with or without eugenol. Method: Flat dentin surfaces were obtained from twenty-four human third molars. With exception of the control group (n=8, the surfaces were covered with Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA or Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA and kept in an oven at 37oC for seven days. After removing the cements, the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA or Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan were applied in accordance with the manufacturers’ recommendations, and then the crowns were constructed in of resin composite. The teeth were sectioned into specimens with a cross-sectional bond area of 0.81mm2, which were sub mitted to microtensile testing in a mechanical test machine at an actuator speed of 0.5mm/min. The data were analyzed by t- and ANOVA tests, complemented by Tukey tests (α=0.05. Results: For Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA, bond strength did not differ statistically (p>0.05 for all the experimental conditions. For Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan, only the Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA Group showed significantly lower bond strength (30.1±13.8 MPa in comparison with the other groups; control (38.9±13.5 MPa and Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA (42.1±11.0 MPa, which showed no significant difference between them.Conclusion: It was concluded that the previous covering of dentin with temporary cement containing eugenol had a deleterious effect on the adhesive performance of the self-etching system only.

  4. Influence of Er,Cr: YSGG laser on bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement

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    Matheus Coelho Bandéca

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the bond strength of fiber post previously laser treated root canals. Forty single-rooted bovine teeth were endodontically treated, randomly and equally divided into two main groups according to the type of pretreatment: G1: 2.5% NaOCl (control group; and G2: Er,Cr:YSGG laser. Each group was further subdivided into 2 groups based on the category of adhesive systems/ luting materials used: a: an etch-and-rinse resin cement (Single Bond/RelyX ARC; 3M ESPE, and b: a self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X Unicem; 3M ESPE. Three 1.5 mm thick slabs were obtained per root and the push-out test was performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until post dislodgement occurred. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's test at a pre-set alpha of 0.05. Analysis of variance showed no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05 among the groups G1a (25.44 ± 2.35 and G1b (23.62 ± 3.48, G2a (11.77 ± 2.67 and G2b (9.93 ± 3.37. Fractures were observed at the interface between the dentin and the resin in all groups. The Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation did not influence on the bond strength of the resin cements and the etch-and-rinse resin cement had better results on bond strength than self-adhesive resin cement.

  5. Effect of endodontic sealers on push-out bond strength of cemented fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dwairi, Ziad Nawaf; Aleisa, Khalil; Lynch, Edward

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of eugenol-based and resin-based endodontic sealers on the push-out bond strengths of prefabricated fiber posts luted with different resin cements. Ninety prefabricated fiber posts were luted into extracted singlerooted teeth with one of three resin cements (Variolink II, ParaCore, or Rely X Unicem). Each group was subdivided into three groups with 10 teeth each. The first two groups were obturated with gutta percha and one of two eugenol-based endodontic sealers (Endofil or TubliSeal) each. The third group was obturated with gutta percha and (AH26) resin-based root canal sealer. Push-out tests were performed in a universal testing machine by applying a load speed at 0.5 mm/min by using a 1-mm-diameter metallic plunger which induced a load in an apical to coronal direction. The maximum value for post dislodgement (in Newtons) was recorded. Data were collected and statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison tests (α = .05). The highest mean bond strength values were recorded for the AH26 sealer group (non-eugenol sealer) luted with Rely X Unicem resin cement (mean ± SD = 326.1 ± 66.1 N), while the lowest mean bond strength values were observed with posts luted with Variolink II resin cement into canals obturated with gutta-percha and Endofil (eugenol-based) sealer (90.3 ± 25.2 N). There was no significant difference between the means of push-out strengths for the Endofil and TubliSeal groups (P = .745). Eugenol-based sealers (Endofil and TubliSeal) significantly reduced the push-out bond strength of prefabricated fiber posts luted with resin cement.

  6. Effect of different endodontic sealers and time of cementation on push-out bond strength of fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas-Boas, Danielle Araújo; Grazziotin-Soares, Renata; Ardenghi, Diego Machado; Bauer, José; de Souza, Patrícia Oliveira; de Miranda Candeiro, George Táccio; Maia-Filho, Etevaldo Matos; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes

    2017-10-11

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of different endodontic sealers (epoxy resin, eugenol, and bioceramic/calcium silicate-based) and the time of cementation (immediately or 7 days after canal obturation) on the bond strength of a fiberglass post cemented with RelyX™ ARC. Eighty-four premolars were instrumented and divided into groups (n = 12) according to the sealer and the time of post cementation: Endofill (EN), Endosequence BC Sealer (BC), and AH Plus (AH) had immediately fiber post cementation; EN7, BC7, and AH7 had post cementation after 7 days; and control group (C) had fiber post cementation without endodontic sealer. Each post space of the root was cut into slices and submitted to push-out test. Failure mode was assessed. Two-way ANOVA, Tukey's, and Dunnett's tests were used for statistical analysis (α = 5%). The type of endodontic sealer (p post cementation (p = 0.038), and the interaction sealer time (p = 0.002) had negative influence on bond strength of fiberglass posts cemented with RelyX™ ARC. AH promoted the highest bond strength mean values (21.20 MPa immediately and 15.54 MPa at 7 days). EN (9.75 MPa immediately and 13.15 MPa at 7 days) and BC (10.43 MPa immediately and 5.73 MPa at 7 days) had lower bond strength than AH, regardless the time of cementation. AH was the best sealer to obturate the root canal when fiberglass cementation with resin-based cement is planned. The correct choice of an endodontic sealer and the adequate time of post cementation may avoid post dislocation caused by low bond strength to dentin.

  7. Shear bond strength of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic and nano resin ceramics blocks cemented with three different generations of resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab-Ghani, Zuryati; Jaafar, Wahyuni; Foo, Siew Fon; Ariffin, Zaihan; Mohamad, Dasmawati

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the shear bond strength between the dentin substrate and computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic ceramic and nano resin ceramics blocks cemented with resin cement. Materials and Methods: Sixty cuboidal blocks (5 mm × 5 mm × 5 mm) were fabricated in equal numbers from feldspathic ceramic CEREC® Blocs PC and nano resin ceramic Lava™ Ultimate, and randomly divided into six groups (n = 10). Each block was cemented to the dentin of 60 extracted human premolar using Variolink® II/Syntac Classic (multi-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding), NX3 Nexus® (two-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding) and RelyX™ U200 self-adhesive cement. All specimens were thermocycled, and shear bond strength testing was done using the universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA. Results: Combination of CEREC® Blocs PC and Variolink® II showed the highest mean shear bond strength (8.71 Mpa), while the lowest of 2.06 Mpa were observed in Lava™ Ultimate and RelyX™ U200. There was no significant difference in the mean shear bond strength between different blocks. Conclusion: Variolink® II cement using multi-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding provided a higher shear bond strength than the self-adhesive cement RelyX U200. The shear bond strength was not affected by the type of blocks used. PMID:26430296

  8. Evaluation of Calcium Silicate Cement Bond Strength after Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-24

    Jan 24, 2018 ... Two‑way ANOVA analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey tests were used for analyses (P= 0.05). Results: The highest push‑out bond strength was observed in the Biodentine ..... Effect of blood contamination on the retention characteristics of two endodontic biomaterials in simulated furcation perforations.

  9. Effect of Self-etching Adhesives on the Bond Strength of Glass-Ionomer Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaberi Ansari, Zahra; Panahandeh, Narges; Tabatabaei Shafiei, Zahra Sadat; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza

    2014-11-01

    Adequate bond strength between glass ionomer cements and composite resin is necessary for the success of the sandwich technique. This study assessed the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin to glass-ionomer cements (GIC) using self-etch adhesives with different pH values. One hundred specimens (6×4×2 mm) were made using Fuji II and Fuji II LC GICs and treated with different adhesives as follows: Group 1:Fuji II+ Adper Prompt L-Pop, Group-2: Fuji II+SE bond, Group-3: Fuji II + AdheSE, Group-4:Fuji II+ Protect bond, Group-5: Fuji II + Single bond, Group-6:Fuji II LC+ Adper Prompt LPop, Group-7: Fuji II LC+SE bond, Group-8:Fuji II LC+ AdheSE, Group-9: Fuji II LC+ Protect bond, and Group-10: Fuji II LC+ Single bond. Each group consisted of 10 specimens. A cylinder of Z100 composite resin was placed on each sample and light cured. After 24 hours of water storage (37°C), the specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength tests (0.5 mm/min). Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. The mean micro-shear bond strength of groups 1-10 was 11.66±1.79, 16.50±1.85, 18.47±1.77, 13.95±1.77, 15.27±1.49, 15.14±0.90, 20.03±1.19, 17.48±3.00, 16.24±1.98 and 16.03±1.49 MPa, respectively. There were significant differences between groups 1 and 7 (P0.05). Fuji II LC showed higher bond strength than Fuji II (Padhesive had no significant effect on micro-shear bond strength of glass-ionomer to composite resin. Resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) exhibited higher bond strength than the conventional GIC.

  10. Effect of Self-etching Adhesives on the Bond Strength of Glass-Ionomer Cements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jaberi Ansari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Adequate bond strength between glass ionomer cements and composite resin is necessary for the success of the sandwich technique.This study assessed the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin to glass-ionomer cements (GIC using self-etch adhesives with different pH values.One hundred specimens (6×4×2 mm were made using Fuji II and Fuji II LC GICs and treated with different adhesives as follows: Group 1:Fuji II+ Adper Prompt L-Pop, Group-2: Fuji II+SE bond, Group-3: Fuji II + AdheSE, Group-4:Fuji II+ Protect bond, Group-5: Fuji II + Single bond, Group-6:Fuji II LC+ Adper Prompt LPop, Group-7: Fuji II LC+SE bond, Group-8:Fuji II LC+ AdheSE, Group-9: Fuji II LC+ Protect bond, and Group-10: Fuji II LC+ Single bond. Each group consisted of 10 specimens. A cylinder of Z100 composite resin was placed on each sample and light cured. After 24 hours of water storage (37°C, the specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength tests (0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test.The mean micro-shear bond strength of groups 1-10 was 11.66±1.79, 16.50±1.85, 18.47±1.77, 13.95±1.77, 15.27±1.49, 15.14±0.90, 20.03±1.19, 17.48±3.00, 16.24±1.98 and 16.03±1.49 MPa, respectively. There were significant differences between groups 1 and 7 (P0.05. Fuji II LC showed higher bond strength than Fuji II (P<0.05.Type of self-etch adhesive had no significant effect on micro-shear bond strength of glass-ionomer to composite resin. Resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC exhibited higher bond strength than the conventional GIC.

  11. Bond strength durability of self-etching adhesives and resin cements to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima; de Melo, Renata Marques; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Camargo, Fernanda Pelógia; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Balducci, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply) and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco) self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond) or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar) within a short (24 h) and long period of evaluation (90 days). Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10). The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y), producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm(2) cross-sectional area, which were subjected to microTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The microTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (alpha= 0.05). The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, padhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water.

  12. Shear bond strength of four resin cements used to lute ceramic core material to human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Subutayhan; Eldeniz, Ayçe Unverdi; Usumez, Aslihan

    2008-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of four resin cements on the shear bond strength of a ceramic core material to dentin. One hundred twenty molar teeth were embedded in a self-curing acrylic resin. The occlusal third of the crowns were sectioned under water cooling. All specimens were randomly divided into four groups of 30 teeth each according to the resin cement used. One hundred twenty cylindrical-shaped, 2.7-mm wide, 3-mm high ceramic core materials were heat-pressed. The core cylinders were then luted with one of the four resin systems to dentin (Super-Bond C&B, Chemiace II, Variolink II, and Panavia F). Half of the specimens (n = 15) were tested after 24 hours; the other half (n = 15) were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 day and then thermocycled 1000 times between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C prior to testing. Shear bond strength of each specimen was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The bond strength values were calculated in MPa, and the results were statistically analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. The shear bond strength varied significantly depending on the resin cement used (p strengths after thermocycling were not remarkable as compared with the corresponding prethermal cycling groups (p > 0.05). Significant interactions were present between resin cement and thermocycling (p strength, whereas the specimens luted with Chemiace II (1.6 +/- 0.4 MPa) showed the lowest. After thermocycling, the bond strength values of specimens luted with Chemiace II (1.1 +/- 0.1 MPa) and Super-Bond C&B (1.7 +/- 0.4 MPa) decreased; however, this was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The increase in the shear bond strength values in the Panavia F (4.5 +/- 0.7 MPa) and Variolink II (5.5 +/- 2.1 MPa) groups after thermocycling was also not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Variolink II and Panavia F systems showed higher shear bond strength values than Chemiace II and

  13. [Effect of different surface treatments on the bond strength of fiber posts to resin cement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hu; Guo, Jian-Qing; Zhang, Xian-Fang

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of five different surface treatments on the bond strength between fiber posts and resin cement. Fifty fiber posts were randomly divided into 5 groups for different surface treatments. Group A was treated with silane coupling agent (Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator,Kuraray); Group B was treated with silane coupling agent and then coated with dentin bonding agent (Clearfil SE Bond,Kuraray); Group C was immersed in 30% H(2)O(2); Group D was immersed in 30 % H(2)O(2) and then treated with silane coupling agent; Group E received no surface treatment (control group). After bonding to resin cement, each group was then divided into 2 subgroups equally, while one group was stored in sodium chloride for 24 h at 37 degrees centigrade, and the other group was stored in sodium chloride for 24 h at 37 degrees centigrade and then subjected to thermal cycling for 10000 times. Microtensile bond strengths were tested and the data was statistically analyzed using SPSS17.0 software package. The microtensile bond strength before thermal cycling was (6.7±0.7) MPa for group A,(14.4±1.1) MPa for group B,(10.7±0.9) MPa for group C,(16.0±1.0) MPa for group D and (6.7±1.0) MPa for group E. After thermal cycling, the microtensile bond strength was (6.7±0.7) MPa for group A, (13.1±0.7) MPa for group B, (9.0±0.7) MPa for group C, (15.0±0.9) MPa for group D and (5.6±0.7) MPa for group E. The results showed that surface treatments had significant impact on the bond strength (Pfiber posts to resin cement with these 5 surface treatments. Coupled with 30 % H(2)O(2) solution and silanization, the bonding strength of fiber posts to resin cement can increase significantly.

  14. Bonding of Resin Cement to Zirconia with High Pressure Primer Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-jie; Jiao, Kai; Liu, Yan; Zhou, Wei; Shen, Li-juan; Fang, Ming; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiang; Tay, Franklin R.; Chen, Ji-hua

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of air-drying pressure during ceramic primer coating on zirconia/resin bonding and the surface characteristics of the primed zirconia. Methods Two ceramic primers (Clearfil Ceramic Primer, CCP, Kuraray Medical Inc. and Z-Prime Plus, ZPP, Bisco Inc.) were applied on the surface of air-abraded zirconia (Katana zirconia, Noritake) and dried at 4 different air pressures (0.1–0.4 MPa). The primed zirconia ceramic specimens were bonded with a resin-based luting agent (SA Luting Cement, Kuraray). Micro-shear bond strengths of the bonded specimens were tested after 3 days of water storage or 5,000× thermocycling (n = 12). Failure modes of the fractured specimens were examined with scanning electron miscopy. The effects of air pressure on the thickness of the primer layers and the surface roughness (Sa) of primed zirconia were evaluated using spectroscopic ellipsometry (n = 6), optical profilometry and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) (n = 6), respectively. Results Clearfil Ceramic Primer air-dried at 0.3 and 0.4 MPa, yielding significantly higher µSBS than gentle air-drying subgroups (pzirconia bond strength and durability significantly. Higher air-drying pressure (0.3-0.4 MPa) for CCP and intermediate pressure (0.2 MPa) for ZPP are recommended to produce strong, durable bonds between resin cement and zirconia ceramics. PMID:24992678

  15. Effect of different provisional cement remnant cleaning procedures including Er:YAG laser on shear bond strength of ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Zortuk, Mustafa; Gumus, Hasan Onder; Kilinc, Halil Ibrahim; Tuncdemir, Ali Riza

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of provisional cement removal by different dentin cleaning protocols (dental explorer, pumice, cleaning bur, Er:YAG laser) on the shear bond strength between ceramic and dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS In total, 36 caries-free unrestored human third molars were selected as tooth specimens. Provisional restorations were fabricated and cemented with eugenol-free provisional cement. Then, disc-shaped ceramic specimens were fabricated and...

  16. Effects of etching and adhesive applications on the bond strength between composite resin and glass-ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamir, Tijen; Sen, Bilge Hakan; Evcin, Ozgür

    2012-01-01

    This study determined the effects of various surface treatment modalities on the bond strength of composite resins to glass-ionomer cements. Conventional (Ketac Molar Quick Applicap) or resin-modified (Photac Fil Quick Aplicap) glass-ionomer cements were prepared. Two-step etch-rinse & bond adhesive (Adper Single Bond 2) or single-step self-etching adhesive (Adper Prompt L-Pop) was applied to the set cements. In the etch-rinse & bond group, the sample surfaces were pre-treated as follows: (1) no etching, (2) 15 s of etching with 35% phosphoric acid, (3) 30 s of etching, and (4) 60 s of etching. Following the placement of the composite resin (Filtek Z250), the bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine and the data obtained were analyzed with the two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by the Tukey's HSD post hoc analysis (p=0.05). Then, the fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The bond strength of the composite resin to the conventional glass-ionomer cement was significantly lower than that to the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (padhesives at any etching time (p>0.05). However, a greater bond strength was obtained with 30 s of phosphoric acid application. The resin-modified glass-ionomer cement improved the bond strength of the composite resin to the glass-ionomer cement. Both etch-rinse & bond and self-etching adhesives may be used effectively in the lamination of glass-ionomer cements. However, an etching time of at least 30 s appears to be optimal.

  17. Effects of etching and adhesive applications on the bond strength between composite resin and glass-ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijen Pamir

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study determined the effects of various surface treatment modalities on the bond strength of composite resins to glass-ionomer cements. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Conventional (KetacTM Molar Quick ApplicapTM or resin-modified (PhotacTM Fil Quick AplicapTM glass-ionomer cements were prepared. Two-step etch-rinse & bond adhesive (AdperTM Single Bond 2 or single-step self-etching adhesive (AdperTM PromptTM L-PopTM was applied to the set cements. In the etch-rinse & bond group, the sample surfaces were pre-treated as follows: (1 no etching, (2 15 s of etching with 35% phosphoric acid, (3 30 s of etching, and (4 60 s of etching. Following the placement of the composite resin (FiltekTM Z250, the bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine and the data obtained were analyzed with the two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by the Tukey's HSD post hoc analysis (p=0.05. Then, the fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: The bond strength of the composite resin to the conventional glass-ionomer cement was significantly lower than that to the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (p0.05. However, a greater bond strength was obtained with 30 s of phosphoric acid application. CONCLUSIONS: The resin-modified glass-ionomer cement improved the bond strength of the composite resin to the glass-ionomer cement. Both etch-rinse & bond and self-etching adhesives may be used effectively in the lamination of glass-ionomer cements. However, an etching time of at least 30 s appears to be optimal.

  18. Effect of Coloring–by-Dipping on Microtensile Bond Strength of Zirconia to Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoo Mahshid

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Studies on the effect of coloring procedures on the bond strength of zirconia to resin cement are lacking in the literature. This study evaluated the effect of dipping of zirconia ceramic in different liquid color shades on the microtensile bond strength (MTBS of zirconia ceramic to resin cement.Materials and Methods: This in vitro study was conducted on 100 microbar specimens divided into five groups of B2, C1, D4, A3 and control (not colored. To prepare the microbars, 20 white zirconia ceramic blocks, measuring 5×11×11 mm, were dipped in A3, B2, C1 or D4 liquid color shades for 10 seconds (five blocks for each color shade and five blocks were not colored as controls. All the zirconia blocks were sintered in a sintering furnace. Composite blocks of similar dimensions were fabricated and bonded to zirconia ceramic blocks using Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. Zirconia-cement-composite blocks were sectioned into microbars measuring 1×1×10 mm. The MTBS of microbars was measured by a testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. All tests were carried out at 0.05 level of significance.Results: Statistically significant differences were found among the groups in MTBS (P<0.001. The D4 group had the highest MTBS value (39.16 ± 6.52 MPa.Conclusion: Dipping affected the MTBS of zirconia ceramic to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement; however, a similar pattern of change was not seen due to the different liquid color shades.

  19. Effects of post surface conditioning before silanization on bond strength between fiber post and resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbarian, Parisa

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Post surface conditioning is necessary to expose the glass fibers to enable bonding between fiber post and resin cement. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning on tensile bond strength (TBS) of a glass fiber reinforced post to resin cement. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this in vitro study, 40 extracted single canal central incisors were endodontically treated and post spaces were prepared. The teeth were divided into four groups according to the methods of post surface treatment (n=10): 1) Silanization after etching with 20% H2O2, 2) Silanization after airborne-particle abrasion, 3) Silanization, and 4) No conditioning (Control). Adhesive resin cement (Panavia F 2.0) was used for cementation of the fiber posts to the root canal dentin. Three slices of 3 mm thick were obtained from each root. A universal testing machine was used with a cross-head speed of 1 mm/minute for performing the push-out tests. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests were used for analyzing data (α=0.05). RESULTS It is revealed that different surface treatments and root dentin regions had significant effects on TBS, but the interaction between surface treatments and root canal regions had no significant effect on TBS. There was significant difference among H2O2 + Silane Group and other three groups. CONCLUSION There were significant differences among the mean TBS values of different surface treatments. Application of hydrogen peroxide before silanization increased the bond strength between resin cements and fiber posts. The mean TBS mean values was significantly greater in the coronal region of root canal than the middle and apical thirds. PMID:23755337

  20. Effect of cement type and water storage time on the push-out bond strength of a glass fiber post.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Kátia Rodrigues; Spyrides, George Miguel; Oliveira, Jonas Alves de; Jnoub, Alexandre Abrão; Dias, Kátia Regina Hostilio Cervantes; Bonfantes, Gerson

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the cement type and the water storage time on the push-out bond strength of a glass fiber post. Glass fiber posts (Fibrekor, Jeneric Pentron) were luted to post spaces using a self-cured resin cement (C&B Cement [CB]), a glass ionomer cement (Ketac Cem [KC]) or a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (GC FujiCEM [FC]) according to the manufacturers' instructions. For each luting agent, the specimens were exposed to one of the following water storage times (n=5): 1 day (T1), 7 days (T7), 90 days (T90) and 180 days (T180). Push-out tests were performed after the storage times. Control specimens were not exposed to water storage, but subjected to the push-out test 10 min after post cementation. Data (in MPa) were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn`s test (α=0.05). Cement type and water storage time had a significant effect (pfiber posts luted to post spaces with the self-cured resin cement exhibited the best bonding performance throughout the 180-day water storage period. All cements exhibited a tendency to increase the bond strength after 7 and 90 days of water storage, decreasing thereafter.

  1. Bond strength of resin cement to dentin and to surface-treated posts of titanium alloy, glass fiber, and zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Asmussen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of two resin cements (ParaPost Cement and Panavia F) to posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White), and zirconia (Cerapost), and to dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After embedding, planar surfaces...

  2. Shear bond strength of three dual-cured resin cements to dentin analyzed by finite element analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, L.A.; de Jager, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Pallav, P.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the shear bond strength to bovine dentin of dual-cured resin cements cured in different circumstances, the contraction stress and volumetric shrinkage in both polymerization modes, and to review the failure stress distribution at the cement-tooth interface with finite element

  3. Effect of relining, cement type, and thermocycling on push-out bond strength of fiber reinforced posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roqaia M.A. Al-Assar

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Relining glass fiber posts with composite resin in order to fit wide flared canals instead of using cement for compensating the discrepancy, improves the push out bond strength of glass fiber posts to root canal dentin. Moreover the use of resin cement with high mechanical properties to lute glass fiber post is highly recommended.

  4. The effect of ultrafast fiber laser application on the bond strength of resin cement to titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Sabit Melih; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Caglar, Ipek Satıroglu; Duymus, Zeynep Yeşil; Turgut, Sedanur; Bagis, Elif Arslan

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of ultrafast fiber laser treatment on the bond strength between titanium and resin cement. A total of 60 pure titanium discs (15 mm × 2 mm) were divided into six test groups (n = 10) according to the surface treatment used: group (1) control, machining; group (2) grinding with a diamond bur; group (3) ultrafast fiber laser application; group (4) resorbable blast media (RBM) application; group (5) electro-erosion with copper; and group (6) sandblasting. After surface treatments, resin cements were applied to the treated titanium surfaces. Shear bond strength testing of the samples was performed with a universal testing machine after storing in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc test were used to analyse the data (P titanium.

  5. Evaluation of Surface Treatment Methods on the Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramics Systems, Resin Cements and Tooth Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkuş Emek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the effects of airborne-particle abrasion (APA and tribochemical silica coating (TSC surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramics systems, resin cements and tooth surface

  6. Effect of different laser surface treatment on microshear bond strength between zirconia ceramic and resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan Zanjani, Vagharaldin; Ahmadi, Hadi; Nateghifard, Afshin; Ghasemi, Amir; Torabzadeh, Hassan; Abdoh Tabrizi, Maryam; Alikhani, Farnaz; Razi, Reza; Nateghifard, Ardalan

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of sandblasting, carbon dioxide (CO₂), and erbium,chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) lasers on the microshear bond strength of zirconia to resin cement. Sixty-one sintered yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia blocks (10 × 5 × 2 mm) were prepared and divided into four experimental groups (n = 15); one sample was retained as a control. The samples were treated by aluminium oxide air abrasion, CO₂4W, Er,Cr:YSGG 3W, and Er,Cr:YSGG 2W, respectively. One sample from each group and the control sample were analyzed by scanning electron microscope. Panavia F2.0 resin microcylinders were prepared and placed on treated surfaces, light cured, and incubated for 48 h. Microshear bond strength testing was done by a microtensile tester machine, and the type of bond failures were determined by stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by one-way anova and Tukey's test at a significance level of P laser showed significantly higher bond strength than Er,Cr:YSGG 2W (P laser-treated surfaces, the roughness was much less than the air abrasion-treated surfaces, and the mode of failure was almost pure adhesive. Air abrasion has a greater effect than CO₂and Er,Cr:YSGG lasers in the treatment of zirconia ceramic surfaces to enhance the bonding strength of resin cement to zirconia. CO₂laser at 4W and Er,Cr:YSGG laser at only 3-W output power can be regarded as surface treatment options for roughening the zirconia surface to establish better bond strength with resin cements. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Effects of Hybrid Coat on shear bond strength of five cements: an in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yue; Zhou, Hou-De; Feng, Yun-Zhi

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the sealing performance of Hybrid Coat and its influence on the shear bond strength of five dentin surface cements. MATERIALS AND METHODS Six premolars were pretreated to expose the dentin surface prior to the application of Hybrid Coat. The microscopic characteristics of the dentinal surfaces were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Then, 40 premolars were sectioned longitudinally, and 80 semi-sections were divided into a control group (untreated) and a stud...

  8. Bond Strength of Resin Cement and Glass Ionomer to Nd:YAG Laser-Treated Zirconia Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadzadeh, Nafiseh; Ghorbanian, Foojan; Ahrary, Farzaneh; Rajati Haghi, Hamidreza; Karamad, Reza; Yari, Amir; Javan, Abdollah

    2017-09-05

    To investigate the effect of neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser irradiation on the surface properties and bond strength of zirconia ceramics. Forty-eight zirconia ceramic pieces (4 × 4 × 1 mm3 ) were divided into four groups according to surface treatment as follows: two control groups (no treatment) for resin bonding (CRC) and glass ionomer (GI) bonding (CGC); two laser treatment groups (Nd:YAG irradiation, 3 W, 200 MJ, 10 Hz, 180 μs) for resin bonding (LRC) and GI bonding (LGC). The ceramics in the control groups and the laser groups were distinguished by the application of different cements (resin cement and GI). Following surface treatments, the specimens were cemented to human dentin with resin cement and GI. After bonding, the shear bond strength (SBS) of the ceramic to dentin was measured, and the failure mode of each specimen was analyzed using a stereomicroscope. A one-way ANOVA compared the average bond strength of the four groups. Pairwise comparisons among the groups were performed using the Games-Howell test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. The means (± standard deviation) of SBS values in the CRC, CGC, LRC, and LGC groups were 3.98 ± 1.10, 1.66 ± 0.59, 10.24 ± 2.46, and 2.21 ± 0.38 MPa, respectively. Data showed that the application of the Nd:YAG laser resulted in a significantly greater SBS of the resin cement to the zirconia ceramics (p zirconia ceramic via Nd:YAG laser improves the bond strength of the resin cement to the zirconia ceramic. GI cement does not provide sufficient bond strength of zirconia ceramics to dentin. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  9. Shear bond strength between feldspathic CAD/CAM ceramic and human dentine for two adhesive cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graiff, Lorenzo; Piovan, Caterina; Vigolo, Paolo; Mason, Pier Nicola

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength values between dentin substrate and a feldspathic ceramic material, based on computer-assisted design and manufacture (CAD/CAM) technology, bonded together with two adhesive systems coupled with two dual-polymerized luting agents. In addition, the effect of a silane coupling agent on bond strength was evaluated. Forty cylinders (6 mm in diameter, 5 mm thick) obtained from feldspathic ceramic blocks were cemented to the dentin of 40 recently extracted human teeth stored in saline solution at room temperature until testing. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups of ten teeth each. All specimens were airborne-particle abraded and etched with hydrofluoric acid. In the first two groups (A1, A2) 20 ceramic cylinders were cemented using Excite DSC and Variolink II; in the A2 group the bonding surfaces were also treated with a silane coupling agent. In Groups B1 and B2, 20 ceramic cylinders were cemented using Scotchbond MPP and RelyX ARC; in the B2 group the bonding surfaces were also treated with a silane coupling agent as in Group A2. All cemented specimens were submitted to a shear bond strength test to check the strength of adhesion between the two substrates, dentin and ceramic. The data were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance (p Variolink II without silanization (Group A1); 29 +/- 3 for Excite DSC/Variolink II with silanization (Group A2); 22 +/- 4 for Scotchbond MPP/RelyX ARC without silanization (Group B1); and 26 +/- 5 for Scotchbond MPP/RelyX ARC with silanization (Group B2). Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect of silanization (p 0.1) or the interaction between silanization and bonding agent (p > 0.05). Multinomial logit model did not show any statistical effects on the failure mode by the shear bond strength (p > 0.1). The hypotheses of independence between failure mode (cohesive vs. adhesive) and both the adhesive system (p adhesion strength with both adhesive

  10. Shear bond strength of novel calcium aluminate-based cement (EndoBinder) to root dentine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti; Rossetto, Hebert Luis; Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the shear bond strength of a novel calcium aluminate-based cement, EndoBinder (EB), to dentine in comparison with Grey and White Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA). Materials and Methods: Root canal hemi-sections obtained from 30 extracted molar teeth were embedded in self-polymerized acrylic resin and were grounded wet in order to obtain a flat dentine surface. Next, the roots were randomly assigned into three groups (n = 10), according to the cement used, as follows: EB: EndoBinder; WMTA: White MTA and GMTA: Grey MTA. The shear bond strength test was performed using a Universal Testing Machine (0.5 mm/min) and the data were submitted to statistical analysis (1-way ANOVA and Tukey tests, P 0.05). WMTA presented the lowest mean values, which were significant in comparison with EB (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The novel calcium aluminate-based cement presented higher shear bond strength than WMTA, and should be considered as a promising alternative in endodontic therapy. PMID:25512731

  11. Degree of conversion and bond strength of resin-cements to feldspathic ceramic using different curing modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veridiana Resende NOVAIS

    Full Text Available Abstract Resin cements have led to great advances in dental ceramic restoration techniques because of their ability to bond to both dental structures and restorative materials. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the performance of resin cements when different curing modes are used, by evaluating the degree of conversion and bond strength to a ceramic substrate. Material and Methods Three resin cements were evaluated, two dual-cured (Variolink II and RelyX ARC and one light-cured (Variolink Veneer. The dual-cured resin cements were tested by using the dual activation mode (base and catalyst and light-activation mode (base paste only. For degree of conversion (DC (n=5, a 1.0 mm thick feldspathic ceramic disc was placed over the resin cement specimens and the set was light activated with a QTH unit. After 24 h storage, the DC was measured with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. For microshear bond strength testing, five feldspathic ceramic discs were submitted to surface treatment, and three cylindrical resin cement specimens were bonded to each ceramic surface according to the experimental groups. After 24 h, microshear bond testing was performed at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until the failure. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test (p<0.05. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used for classifying the failure modes. Results Higher DC and bond strength values were shown by the resin cements cured by using the dual activation mode. The Variolink II group presented higher DC and bond strength values when using light-activation only when compared with the Variolink Veneer group. Conclusion The base paste of dual-cured resin cements in light-activation mode can be used for bonding translucent ceramic restorations of up to or less than 1.0 mm thick.

  12. Effect of bioglass and silica coating of zirconia substrate on its bond strength to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moezzizadeh, Maryam; Nojedehian, Hanieh; Valizadeh Haghi, Haleh

    2017-01-31

    This study aimed to assess the effect of bioglass and silica coating of zirconia substrate on its bond strength to resin cement. A total of 120 specimens were used in this in-vitro, experimental study. Zirconia discs measuring 10×7×2 mm were cut from Y-TZP zirconia blocks, sintered, cleaned and received different surface treatments of sandblasting, bioglass powder coating+etching, bioglass powder coating+etching+silanization, bioglass slurry coating+etching, bioglass slurry coating+etching+silanization, silica coating+silanization, silica coating+etching+silanization and no treatment group (control). Then the microshear bond strength testing and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis were done. Data were analyzed using the Mann Whitney U and the Kruskal Wallis tests. Significant differences existed in bond strength of different groups (pbioglass coated groups showed higher and the colloidal silica-coated groups showed lower bond strength compared to the control group.

  13. Evaluation of shear bond strength of silorane resin to conventional, resin-modified glass ionomers and nano-ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babannavar, Roopa; Shenoy, Arvind

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the shear bond strength of silorane composite resin to conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements. Shear bond strengths of Vitrebond (Group I), Ketac N100 (Group II) and Ketac Bond (Group III) glass ionomer cements to the composite Filtek P90 were evaluated. The bond strength was tested using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Comparison between the groups was carried out using an analysis of variance test and pairwise comparison using Tukey's post-hoc test with a significance level of P ≤ 0.05. The measured bond strengths were 17.14 ± 3.39 MPA for Group I (Vitrebond), 15.34 ± 3.39 MPa for Group II (Ketac N100) and 14.12 ± 2.79 MPa for Group III (Ketac Bond). Group I achieved higher bond strength than Groups II and III. Resin-modified glass ionomer cement (i.e. Vitrebond) appears to be preferable to nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement (i.e. Ketac N100) and conventional glass ionomer cement (i.e. Ketac Bond) as a base under low-shrink posterior composite (i.e. Filtek P90). © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Push-out bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin using glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Ricardo PEREIRA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin after cementation with glass ionomer (GICs and resinmodified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty human maxillary canines were transversally sectioned at 15 mm from the apex. Canals were prepared with a step back technique until the application of a #55 K-file and filled. Post spaces were prepared and specimens were divided into five groups according to the cement used for post cementation: Luting & Lining Cement; Fuji II LC Improved; RelyX Luting; Ketac Cem; and Ionoseal. After cementation of the glass fiber posts, all roots were stored at 100% humidity until testing. For push-out test, 1-mm thick slices were produced. The push-out test was performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute and the values (MPa were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Levene's tests and by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: Fiber posts cemented using Luting & Lining Cement, Fuji II LC Improved, and Ketac Cem presented the highest bond strength to root dentin, followed by RelyX Luting. Ionoseal presented the lowest bond strength values (P>0.05. The post level did not influence the bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin (P=0.148. The major cause of failure was cohesive at the cement for all GICs and RMGICs. CONCLUSIONS: Except for Ionoseal, all cements provided satisfactory bond strength values.

  15. Push-out bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin using glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Rosa, Ricardo Abreu da; Só, Marcus Vinícius Reis; Afonso, Daniele; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Honório, Heitor Marques; Valle, Accácio Lins do; Vidotti, Hugo Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin after cementation with glass ionomer (GICs) and resinmodified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs). Fifty human maxillary canines were transversally sectioned at 15 mm from the apex. Canals were prepared with a step back technique until the application of a #55 K-file and filled. Post spaces were prepared and specimens were divided into five groups according to the cement used for post cementation: Luting & Lining Cement; Fuji II LC Improved; RelyX Luting; Ketac Cem; and Ionoseal. After cementation of the glass fiber posts, all roots were stored at 100% humidity until testing. For push-out test, 1-mm thick slices were produced. The push-out test was performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute and the values (MPa) were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Levene's tests and by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 5%. Fiber posts cemented using Luting & Lining Cement, Fuji II LC Improved, and Ketac Cem presented the highest bond strength to root dentin, followed by RelyX Luting. Ionoseal presented the lowest bond strength values (P>0.05). The post level did not influence the bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin (P=0.148). The major cause of failure was cohesive at the cement for all GICs and RMGICs. Except for Ionoseal, all cements provided satisfactory bond strength values.

  16. Effect of Sandblasting and Type of Cement on the Bond Strength of Molar Bands on Stainless Steel Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawazir, Omar A; Elaraby, Alaa; Alshamrani, Hamed; Salama, Fouad S

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) compare the bond strength of molar bands cemented to stainless steel crowns (SSCs) using glass ionomer cement (GIC), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), or polycarboxylate cement (PXC); and (2) assess the influence of sandblasting molar bands on the mean bond strength between the band and the SSC. Sixty SSCs and 60 molar bands were used. The inner surfaces of 30 molar bands were roughened by sandblasting prior to cementation. The bond strength was measured after dislodging the SSC using a push-out test. In the nonsandblasted group, a significant difference was observed between PXC and RMGIC (P >.04). In the sandblasted group, a significant difference was observed between PXC and RMGIC (P >.02), while there was only a marginal difference between GIC and RMGIC (P >.05). The sandblasted group exhibited superior bond strength overall. However, the only significant improvement was observed for GIC (P >.03). PXC showed the highest bond strength of molar bands to SSCs, while RMGIC showed the lowest. Sandblasting the inner surface of bands enhanced the bond strength of different cements.

  17. Bond characteristics of reinforced TMT bars in Self Compacting Concrete and Normal Cement Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nipun Verma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In its simplest form, it can be said that the resistance to separation of mortar and concrete from reinforcing steel (or other materials with which it is in contact is called bond strength. These days different kinds of concrete are manufactured, all with different properties. But bond strength is something which is essentially a well sort after quality for any RCC structure or element. Bond strength can be easily found out by standard pull-out test machine. But in this work, the bond strength was measured using Universal testing machine (UTM with some modified arrangements. The bond between the concrete and steel reinforcement was investigated for two different kinds of concretes. Using reinforcing bars bond strengths were measured using Self Compacting Concrete (SCC specimen and Normal Cement Concrete (NCC specimen. Castings of SCC specimens were carried out without compaction, while the normal concrete specimens were casted with substantial compaction and vibration. The study revealed that SCC specimens generated higher bond to reinforcing bars in comparison with NCC specimens. Secondly, the correlation between bond strength and compressive strength of NCC is more consistent. Thirdly, the results obtained with UTM were compared with the results obtained with standard pull-out test machine and they were found in permissible limits.

  18. Efficacy of a Universal Adhesive in the Bond Strength of Composite Cements to Polymer-infiltrated Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Nadja; Flury, Alba; Fischer, Jens

    2017-11-17

    To investigate the effect of a universal adhesive on the bond strength of composite cements to a polymer- infiltrated ceramic network. Shear bond strength to a polymer-infiltrated ceramic network (Vita Enamic) and to its polymer and ceramic components was assessed on polished surfaces using either a conventional dual-curing resin (RelyX Ultimate) or self-adhesive composite cement (RelyX Unicem 2 Automix). Substrate surfaces were either not pretreated or a silane coupling agent (Vitasil), a universal adhesive (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive), or both were applied. Further, the shear bond strength to polymer-infiltrated ceramic network was evaluated after etching with 5% hydrofluoric acid (Vita Ceramics Etch) of 0, 15, 30, 60 or 120 s without or with application of silane, universal adhesive, or both (n = 10). Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis test (p cement. Application of silane resulted in low mean bond strengths (4 to 5 MPa) to the ceramic. The universal adhesive bonded mainly to the polymer part of the polymer-infiltrated ceramic network. The best bonding performance for both cements was achieved when silane and universal adhesive were applied on the polymer-infiltrated ceramic network. Etching for 30 s or 60 s resulted in the highest mean shear bond strengths for all pretreatment groups (p adhesive dual-curing composite cement RelyX Unicem 2 Automix was found on the HF-etched polymer-infiltrated ceramic network. The conventional dual-curing composite cement RelyX Ultimate with Scotchbond Universal Adhesive may bond chemically to the polymer part of the polymer-infiltrated ceramic network. To achieve the highest bond strengths for both cements, the polymer-infiltrated ceramic network should be etched for 30 to 60 s, followed by the application of silane and universal adhesive.

  19. Effect of resin cement, aging process and root level on the bond strength of the resin-fiber posts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuhim, Khalid Salman

    Background. Little is known about the long-term clinical bonding effectiveness of the Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts cemented with self-etch adhesive systems. Bond stability and longevity of the cemented post are adversely affected by physical and chemical factors over time, such as expansion and contraction stresses caused by thermal changes and occlusal load. This clinical condition can be simulated in vitro by thermocyclic loading; and bonding effectiveness can be evaluated by applying the micropush out test. Therefore, more in vitro studies are needed to evaluate the bond strength of the fiber posts cemented with different resin cement systems after simulating the artificial aging induced by thermocycling. The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two different resin cement systems (total etch, and self-etch resin cement system) used for cementation of fiber reinforced composite posts in three different aging periods using thermocycling. Methods. Following IRB approval, sixty freshly extracted bicuspid single rooted natural teeth were endodontically treated, and the post-spaces were prepared to receive a fiber-post cemented with either a total etch resin cement (Rely-X Ultimate) or with a self-etch resin cement (Rely-X Unicem). No thermocycling, 20,000 and 40,000 cycles was used to age the specimens. Teeth were randomly allocated into six different groups: G1 - Control: Rely-X Ultimate cement with no thermocycling. G2: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 20,000 thermocycling. G3: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 40,000 thermocycling. G4: Rely-X Unicem cement. G5: Rely-X Unicem cement. G6: Rely-X Unicem cement. Microtensile bond strength determined using a micropush out test on a universal testing machine (MTS). Additionally, the failure mode of each specimen was observed under a stereomicroscope (Olympus) at 40x magnification. Finally, one representative sample was randomly selected from each of the five failure modes for scanning

  20. Push-out bond strength of a fiber post system with two resin cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosharraf, Ramin; Haerian, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Debonding is a common cause of failure encountered with fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts, and usually occurs along the post space-dentin adhesive interface. The aim of this in vitro study is to evaluate the regional push-out bond strength of a fiber-reinforced post system, using two resin cements. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study 20 maxillary central incisors were decoronated and the roots were endodontically treated. Following post space preparation, the roots were divided into two groups of 10 specimens each. Fiber-reinforced composite posts were cemented with two resin cement systems: (a) Self-etch system (Panavia F2.0/ED-primer II) and (b) conventional system (Variolink II/Excite DSC). Three slices of each root, with a thickness of 3 mm, were prepared. The push-out test was performed with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute, and bond strength values were calculated. The data were analyzed with a two-way Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe tests (α=.05). Results: There were no significant differences between the mean push-out bond strengths of two experimental groups (Panavia F: 12.59±5.44, Variolink II: 12.49±4.52 MPa) (P=0.920), but there were significant differences between the mean push out bond strengths of the root dentin regions (Pcement systems. The coronal region of the root dentin showed a significantly higher bond strength than the apical region. PMID:23372603

  1. In vitro evaluation of the Long-term bond strength of two resin cements to enamel and dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jaberi Ansari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims : In this in vitro study, the long-term bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement and conventional resin cements to human enamel and dentin was compared .   Materials and Methods: 80 sections of intact human third molars were randomly assigned into eight groups according to the cement type [Rely X Unicem (RXU, Rely X ARC (RXA], bond substrate (enamel, dentin and the duration of water storage (24 h or 1 year. Rods of cements (0.75×1 mm were prepared on the top surface of specimens using Tygon tubes. The micro-shear bond strengths of specimens were measured by a micro-tensile tester. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed ranks and Mann Whitney tests ( α =0.05.   Results: The bond strengths of RXA and RXU cements to enamel after 24h were 18.56±4.08 MPa and 14.99±4.17 MPa, and after 1 year were 19.41±6.24 MPa and 15.51±6.17 MPa, respectively. The bond strengths of RXA and RXU cements to dentin were 13.36±4.02 MPa and 14.16±4.69 MPa after 24h , and 14.63±5.96 MPa and 14.08±6.72 MPa after 1 year, respectively. Tooth substrate had significant effect only on the shear bond strength of RXA cement after 24h (P=0.01, while no other significant differences were found in this study (P>0.05.   Conclusion: According to the results of this study, one-step self-adhesive and multi-step conventional resin cements were similarly effective in bonding to enamel and dentin after 1 year water storage.

  2. The effects of desensitizing resin, resin sealing, and provisional cement on the bond strength of dentin luted with self-adhesive and conventional resincements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Irena; Oendra, Andrea E Hernandez; Stawarczyk, Bogna; Hämmerle, Christoph H F

    2012-04-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements were designed to bond without any pretreatment of dentin. However, pretreatments such as the application of desensitizing resin or the resin sealing of dentin with priming/bonding solutions might influence the bonding quality of these self-adhesive resin cements. Little is known about the effect of dentin pretreatment on the bond quality of self-adhesive resin cements. This study evaluated whether dentin desensitizing or sealing methods influenced the shear bond strength of 1 self-adhesive and 2 conventional resin cements. One-hundred and eighty human molars were assigned to 5 different pretreatment groups: 1) freshly ground dentin, 2) glutaraldehyde/hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) desensitized dentin (Gluma), 3) contamination of desensitized dentin with provisional cement, 4) sealed dentin (dual bonding technique), and 5) contamination of sealed dentin with provisional cement. The shear bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem; RXU) and 2 conventional resin cements (Variolink II; VAR, Panavia 21; PAN) was assessed for each pretreatment group (n=12 per cement types). Two-way ANOVA and 1-way ANOVA together with the post hoc Tukey multiple comparison (α=.05) were performed. On freshly ground dentin, PAN exhibited the highest shear bond strength values (Pdentin (Pdentin increased the bond strength of RXU but had no significant effect on VAR or PAN. RXU exhibited the highest mean bond strength after the contamination of resin-sealed dentin by provisional cement. Glutaraldehyde/HEMA treatment and resin sealing of dentin have a beneficial effect on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement (RXU). Contamination of dentin with provisional cement has no influence on the bond strength of the self-adhesive resin cement (RXU) or VAR but lowered the bond strength of PAN. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bonding All-Ceramic Restorations with Two Resins Cement Techniques: A Clinical Report of Three-Year Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; de Almeida, Erika Oliveira; Junior, Amilcar Chagas Freitas; Martini, Ana Paula

    2011-01-01

    Ceramics have been widely used for esthetic and functional improvements. The resin cement is the material of choice for bonding ceramics to dental substrate and it can also dictate the final esthetic appearance and strength of the restoration. The correct use of the wide spectrum of resin luting agents available depends on the dental tooth substrate. This article presents three-year clinical results of a 41 years old female patient B.H.C complaining about her unattractive smile. Two all-ceramic crowns and two laminates veneers were placed in the maxillary incisors and cemented with a self-adhesive resin luting cement and conventional resin luting cement, respectively. After a three-year follow-up, the restorations and cement/teeth interface were clinically perfect with no chipping, fractures or discoloration. Proper use of different resin luting cements shows clinical appropriate behavior after a three-year follow-up. Self-adhesive resin luting cement may be used for cementing all-ceramic crowns with high predictability of success, mainly if there is a large dentin surface available for bonding and no enamel at the finish line. Otherwise, conventional resin luting agent should be used for achieving an adequate bonding strength to enamel. PMID:21912505

  4. In vitro evaluation of the bonding durability of self-adhesive resin cement to titanium using highly accelerated life test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bonding durability of three self-adhesive resin cements to titanium using the Highly Accelerated Life Test (HALT). The following self-adhesive resin cements were used to bond pairs of titanium blocks together according to manufacturers' instructions: RelyX Unicem, Breeze, and Clearfil SA Luting. After storage in water at 37°C for 24 h, bonded specimens (n=15) immersed in 37°C water were subjected to cyclic shear load testing regimes of 20, 30, or 40 kg using a fatigue testing machine. Cyclic loading continued until failure occurred, and the number of cycles taken to reach failure was recorded. The bonding durability of a self-adhesive resin cement to titanium was largely influenced by the weight of impact load. HALT showed that Clearfil SA Luting, which contained MDP monomer, yielded the highest median bonding lifetime to titanium.

  5. Effect of dentin surface modification on the microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broyles, Allison C; Pavan, Sabrina; Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina

    2013-01-01

    To explore the potential to modify human dentin surface as a means of improving the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of resin cement to dentin. Sound human molars were collected, and their occlusal surfaces were ground flat to expose polished dentin. Indirect composite resin cylinders were cemented to the teeth with RelyX Unicem or G-Cem self-adhesive cements following dentin surface treatments: 6.5% grape-seed extract, 5% glutaraldehyde, or 25% polyacrylic acid and control (no pretreatment). After 24 hours, the teeth were sectioned into beams to produce a cross-sectional area of 1.0 mm(2). Specimens of each group (n = 25) were individually mounted on a jig and placed on a tensile testing machine. A tensile force was applied to failure at a 1 mm/min crosshead speed. The use of polyacrylic acid on dentin prior to cementation with RelyX Unicem resulted in a statistically significant increase in μTBS compared to the control group (p= 0.0282). Polyacrylic acid (p= 0.0016) or glutaraldehyde (p= 0.0043) resulted in a statistically significant increase in μTBS of G-Cem to dentin when compared to the control group. Treatment with grape-seed extract did not result in a statistically significant increase in μTBS for either cement (p > 0.05). Priming dentin surfaces prior to the use of self-adhesive resin cements may be a promising means of improving μTBS. In addition, it was concluded that the results of this study are material dependent as well as being dependent of the type of dentin primer. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  6. Shear bond strength of glass-ionomer cements to air-abraded dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza-Zaroni, Wanessa Christine; Nhani, Vanessa Tessari; Ciccone-Nogueira, Juliane Cristina; Chinelatti, Michelle Alexandra; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of two conventional glass-ionomer cements to bovine dentin when using the air-abrasion technique for cavity preparation. Forty bovine central incisors were selected, embedded in polyester resin, and ground until the dentin surface was exposed. The teeth were randomly assigned to four groups: I and II--rotating instrument with a carbide bur; III and IV--an air-abrasion system. Groups I and III were restored with Fuji IX and groups II and IV with Ketac Molar. A 3-mm-diameter bonding site was delimited and treated with 10% polyacrylic acid for 10 s in the Fuji IX subgroups and with 25% polyacrylic acid for 10 s in the Ketac Molar subgroups. After surface treatment, a glassionomer cylinder was prepared for each specimen, using a split bisected Teflon matrix. The finished specimens were submitted to the shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and Scheffé statistical tests. The dentin bonding areas were analyzed under a stereoscopic optical magnifier (40X) to assess the type of failure. The mean (SD) shear bond strengths in MPa were: group I--3.49 (+/- 3.77), group II--7.17 (+/- 2.93), group III--7.55 (+/- 2.99), group IV--5.67 (+/- 3.90). Ketac Molar showed higher bond strength values in bur-prepared cavities, while on the air-abraded preparations, Fuji IX showed superior results. It can be concluded that the air-abrasion system used for cavity preparations may influence the bonding performance of conventional glass-ionomer cements to dentin.

  7. 24 hours and 3-months bond strength between dual-cured resin cements and simplified adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Thaiane R; Cavalcanti, Andrea N; Fontes, Céres M; Marchi, Giselle M; Muniz, Leonardo; Mathias, Paula

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the bonding compatibility between dual-cured resin cements and simplified adhesive systems (one-step self-etch and two-step etch & rinse), measured after 24 hours and 3 months. The occlusal dentin surfaces of 24 human third molars were exposed and flattened. Teeth were randomly assigned to 3 groups and treated with different combinations of adhesive system and resin cement [G1-Single Bond/Rely X ARC (SB/RX); G2-Excite DSC/Variolink II (EX/VR); G3-Adper Prompt/Rely X ARC (AD/RX)]. Indirect composite restorations were cemented on flattened surfaces, and sectioned to obtain multiple bonded beams for the microtensile bond strength test. The beams from each tooth were tested under tension after 24 hours and 3 months (ANOVA/ Tukey's test, alpha=5%). Failure patterns were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy. After 24h, AD/RX presented the lowest bond strength mean values. AD/RX specimens did not withstand three months storage. SB/RX and EX/VR presented similar bond strengths in both periods tested. The association AD/RX resulted in low bond strength mean values, especially after storage. Cementing indirect restorations using one-step self-etch adhesive systems and dual-cured resin cements would be clinically unreliable.

  8. Bonding of contemporary glass ionomer cements to different tooth substrates; microshear bond strength and scanning electron microscope study

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Wakeel, Aliaa Mohamed; Elkassas, Dina Wafik; Yousry, Mai Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) and ultramorphological characterization of glass ionomer (GI) cements; conventional GI cement (Fuji IX, CGI), resin modified GI (Fuji II LC, RMGI) and nano-ionomer (Ketac N100, NI) to enamel, dentin and cementum substrates. Materials and Methods: Forty-five lower molars were sectioned above the cemento-enamel junction. The occlusal surfaces were ground flat to obtain enamel and dentin substrates, meanwhile the cervical one-third of the root portion were utilized to evaluate the bonding efficacy to cementum substrate. Each substrate received microcylinders from the three tested materials; which were applied according to manufacturer instructions. μSBS was assessed using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post-hoc test. Modes of failure were examined using stereomicroscope at ×25 magnification. Interfacial analysis of the bonded specimens was carried out using environmental field emission scanning electron microscope. Results: Two-way ANOVA revealed that materials, substrates and their interaction had a statistically significant effect on the mean μSBS values at P values; ˂0.0001, 0.0108 and 0.0037 respectively. RMGI showed statistically significant the highest μSBS values to all examined tooth substrates. CGI and RMGI show substrate independent bonding efficiency, meanwhile; NI showed higher μSBS values to dentin and cementum compared to enamel. Conclusion: Despite technological development of GI materials, mainly the nano-particles use, better results have not been achieved for both investigations, when compared to RMGI, independent of tooth substrate. PMID:26038646

  9. Analysis of bond strength by pull out test on fiber glass posts cemented in different lengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Mariana Benedetti Ferreira; Michida, Silvia Masae de Araújo; Marson, Fabiano Carlos; de Oliveira, Giovani Corrêa; Silva, Cleverson de Oliveira E

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, by means of pull-out test, the bond strength of fiberglass posts when cemented with different lengths in endodontically treated teeth. Sixty single-rooted bovine roots were cut in the cementoenamel junction with 21 mm length. They were endodontically treated and randomly divided into three groups (n = 20). Group 1 - Preparation of 2/3 of the remaining roots; Group 2 - Preparation of ½ of the remaining roots and Group 3 - Preparation of ¼ of remaining roots. For all groups it were used posts n = 3 (Exacto, Angelus, Brazil), and cemented with self-etching resin cement (RelyXU200). After cementing posts, the samples were thermocycled (10.000 cycles/5°C and 55°C). The pull-out test was performed on a universal testing machine (EMIC - DL500) and the values obtained were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance (one-factor ANOVA) and multiple comparison test of Tukey, with level of significance of 5%. The mean values ± standard deviation in Newtons (N) were: Group 1 = 120.5 (±42.8) A, Group 2 = 103.1 (±31.2) AB, Group 3 = 41.2 (±22.4) C, P < 0.005. The preparation of ½ of remaining root appears to be a viable alternative when 2/3 of the preparation of the remaining root is not possible, but more results are needed for clinical validation.

  10. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dry and moist dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Bosso Andre

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effects of humidity conditions and evaluation times on the dentin bond strength (DBS of two self-adhesive resin cements (RC. The RC used were: RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE and Clearfil SA Cement (Kuraray Med.. One hundred and twenty coronal portions of bovine incisors (n = 10 were used. Buccal surfaces were abraded in order to expose a flat dentinal surface (180-grit SiC and to standardize the smear layer formation (600-grit SiC. The humidity conditions tested were: dry (air-dried for 10 s, slightly moist (water application with disposable applicator on dried dentin and water excess removed with absorbent paper, and moist (same application without water removal. The RC were used according to the manufacturers' recommendations and were applied to prepolymerized resin discs (2 mm thick; Sinfony, 3M ESPE, which were subsequently bonded to the dentin surfaces. After 24 h, half of the teeth were prepared for the microtensile bond strength test, while the other half were stored in water for 6 months and tested in tension (0.5 mm/min until failure. A 3-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test were performed (preset alpha of 0.05. No RC showed any reduction of DBS after 6 months, and no significant difference was observed between them. The moist dentin increased the bond strength of Clearfil SA Cement for both periods of time. Humidity conditions can change the DBS; however, the study's results were product-dependent.

  11. Effect of storage times and mechanical load cycling on dentin bond strength of conventional and self-adhesive resin luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Thaiane R; André, Carolina B; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Arrais, César A G; Ambrosano, Gláucia M B; Giannini, Marcelo

    2014-05-01

    The lack of long-term bond stability between resin cements and dentin may compromise the success of indirect restorations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term storage in artificial saliva and mechanical load cycling on the microtensile bond strength of conventional and self-adhesive resin cements to dentin. The occlusal dentin surfaces of 128 human molars were exposed and flattened. The teeth were assigned to 16 groups (n=8) according to resin cement and in vitro aging strategy. Two self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem and Clearfil SA Cement) and 2 conventional cementing systems (RelyX ARC and Clearfil Esthetic Cement) were used. Resin cements were applied to prepolymerized indirect resin disks, which were bonded to the dentin surfaces and light polymerized. The control groups were represented by immediate microtensile bond strength (24 hours) and aging methods were performed with mechanical load cycling or storage in artificial saliva (1 year and 2 years). Bonded beams were tested in tension until failure. Data (MPa) were analyzed by Proc Mixed for repeated measures and the Tukey-Kramer test (α=.05). The self-adhesive resin cements exhibited higher microtensile bond strength than conventional cementing systems for all conditions studied. The microtensile bond strength of RelyX ARC and self-adhesive resin cements did not decrease after storage in artificial saliva and mechanical load cycling. The Clearfil Esthetic Cement showed the lowest microtensile bond strength and a significant reduction after 2 years of storage in artificial saliva. The storage times and mechanical load cycling did not affect the microtensile bond strength of self-adhesives and RelyX ARC resin cements. The highest microtensile bond strength was obtained for self-adhesive resin cements, with no significant difference between them. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Luting Cements to Different Core Buildup Materials in Lactic Acid Buffer Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Siddharam M; Kamble, Vikas B; Desai, Raviraj G; Arabbi, Kashinath C; Prakash, Ved

    2015-08-01

    The core buildup material is used to restore badly broken down tooth to provide better retention for fixed restorations. The shear bond strength of a luting agent to core buildup is one of the crucial factors in the success of the cast restoration. The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of luting cements with different core buildup materials in lactic acid buffer solution. Two luting cements {Traditional Glass Ionomer luting cement (GIC) and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer luting cement (RMGIC)} and five core buildup materials {Silver Amalgam, Glass ionomer (GI), Glass Ionomer Silver Reinforced (GI Silver reinforced), Composite Resin and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer(RMGIC)} were selected for this study. Total 100 specimens were prepared with 20 specimens for each core buildup material using a stainless steel split metal die. Out of these 20 specimens, 10 specimens were bonded with each luting cement. All the bonded specimens were stored at 37(0)c in a 0.01M lactic acid buffer solution at a pH of 4 for 7days. Shear bond strength was determined using a Universal Testing Machine at a cross head speed of 0.5mm/min. The peak load at fracture was recorded and shear bond strength was calculated. The data was statistically analysed using Two-way ANOVA followed by HOLM-SIDAK method for pair wise comparison at significance level of pstrength of the luting cements (pcore materials (pstrength values than Traditional GIC luting cement for all the core buildup materials. RMGIC core material showed higher bond strength values followed by Composite resin, GI silver reinforced, GI and silver amalgam core materials for both the luting agents. Shear bond strength of RMGIC luting cement was significantly higher than traditional GIC luting cement for all core buildup materials except, for silver amalgam core buildup material. RMGIC core material showed highest shear bond strength values followed by Composite resin, GI Silver Reinforced, GI and

  13. Push-out bond strength of CAD/CAM-ceramic luted to dentin with self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Simon; Lussi, Adrian; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Zimmerli, Brigitte

    2010-09-01

    This study evaluated the initial and the artificially aged push-out bond strength between ceramic and dentin produced by one of five resin cements. Two-hundred direct ceramic restorations (IPS Empress CAD) were luted to standardized Class I cavities in extracted human molars using one of four self-adhesive cements (SpeedCEM, RelyX Unicem Aplicap, SmartCem2 and iCEM) or a reference etch-and-rinse resin cement (Syntac/Variolink II) (n=40/cement). Push-out bond strength (PBS) was measured (1) after 24h water storage (non-aged group; n=20/cement) or (2) after artificial ageing with 5000 thermal cycles followed by 6 months humid storage (aged group; n=20/cement). Nonparametrical ANOVA and pairwise Wilcoxon rank-sum tests with Bonferroni-Holm adjustment were applied for statistical analysis. The significance level was set at alpha=0.05. In addition, failure mode and fracture pattern were analyzed by stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscopy. Whereas no statistically significant effect of storage condition was found (p=0.441), there was a significant effect of resin cement (pcements. Syntac/Variolink II showed significantly higher PBS than SmartCEM2 (padhesive failure of cements at the dentin interface except for RelyX Unicem which in most cases showed cohesive failure in ceramic. The resin cements showed marked differences in push-out bond strength when used for luting ceramic restorations to dentin. Variolink II with the etch-and-rinse adhesive Syntac did not perform better than three of the four self-adhesive resin cements tested. Copyright 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bond strength and fracture analysis between resin cements and root canal dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Guilherme Carpena; Ballarin, Andressa; Baratieri, Luiz N

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this research is to evaluate bond strength between translucent fibre posts (White Post DC, FGM or FRC Postec Plus, Ivoclar/Vivadent) and intraradicular dentin at three different levels (cervical, middle and apical) using a dual-cure (AllCem, FGM) or self-curing (Multilink, Ivoclar/Vivadent) resin cement. Also, the fracture type after push-out test was analysed under SEM. Thirty-two extracted single-root teeth were selected. After undergoing endodontic therapy, they were randomly divided into four groups according to their post type and resin cement. Root canals were etched using 37% phosphoric acid, and Excite DSC adhesive (Ivoclar/Vivadent) was applied in all groups. The root was sectioned to obtain nine 1-mm-thick slices (three per third: coronal, middle, apical). All slices were subjected to push-out tests. Data were analysed using two-way anova. The mean bond strengths vary from 6.6 (4.6) MPa [apical] to 11.9 (5.9) MPa [cervical]. There were no significant differences between groups. Pearson χ(2)-test revealed significant differences in fracture types for all groups (P < 0.0001). The apical third had the lowest bond strengths and it was also shown to be the most critical region for luting fibre posts. © 2010 The Authors. Australian Endodontic Journal © 2010 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  15. Effect of Silanization on Microtensile Bond Strength of Different Resin Cements to a Lithium Disilicate Glass Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gré, Cristina Parise; de Ré Silveira, Renan C; Shibata, Shizuma; Lago, Carlo Tr; Vieira, Luiz Cc

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the influence of a silane-coupling agent on the bond strength of a self-adhesive cement and a conventional resin cement to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic. A total of eight ceramic blocks were fabricated and divided into four groups (n = 2). In groups 1 and 3, ceramic surfaces were etched with hydrofluoric acid 10% for 20 seconds, rinsed for 30 seconds, and air-dried. One layer of a silane agent was applied onto all ceramic specimens and air-dried for 30 seconds. In groups 2 and 4, ceramic surfaces were etched with hydrofluoric acid, rinsed, and air-dried without application of the silane-coupling agent. The ceramic blocks were bonded to a block of composite with a self-adhesive resin cement or with a conventional resin cement, according to the manufacturer's instructions. After 24 hours in distilled water at 37°C, the specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonding interface area to obtain beams with a bonding area of 0.8 mm(2) and submitted to a microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance and the Games-Howell post hoc test (p = 0.05). Fractured specimens were examined under optical microscopy at 40x magnification. Silanization resulted in higher microtensile bond strength compared to groups without silane. No significant differences were found between the conventional resin cement and the self-adhesive resin cement with silane agent (p = 0.983), and without silane agent (p = 0.877). Silanization appears to be crucial for resin bonding to a lithium disilicate-based ceramic, regardless of the resin cement used. The self-adhesive resin cement performed as well as the conventional resin cement. Applying one layer of a silane-coupling agent after etching the ceramic surface with hydrofluoric acid 10% enhanced the bond strength between resin cements and a glass ceramic.

  16. A new acrylic-based fluoride-releasing cement as a potential orthodontic bonding agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Li; Bai, Yuxing; Li, Song; Al-Naimi, Omar T; McCabe, John F

    2010-07-01

    To develop a fluoride-releasing, acrylic-based 'easy on, easy off' bracket cement as a potential orthodontic bonding agent. Three experimental cements were prepared in powder/liquid forms by mixing different ratios of methylmethacrylate (MMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) to form the liquid (L) and sodium fluoride (NaF) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) to form the powder (P). The resultant materials were tested for setting characteristics, fluoride release, hardness, strength, shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index in comparison with resin composite and glass ionomer, which were used as control materials. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. The experimental groups had satisfactory setting characteristics. Fluoride release of the group containing P (10% NaF, 90% PMMA) and L (60% MMA and 40% HEMA) was similar to that of glass ionomer. When experimental materials were stored in water for 7 days, their hardness was reduced and stabilized at a value lower than those for composite and PMMA. Strength was only slightly affected by water storage. The SBSs of the experimental groups were considered clinically acceptable at both 30 min and 1 month. The group containing P (10% NaF, 90% PMMA) and L (90% MMA and 10% HEMA) had a higher mean SBS than the other two experimental groups. At 1 month, there were significantly less adhesive remnants observed on the surface of enamel after debonding for the experimental groups compared with the composite. The new cement could potentially be useful as an orthodontic bonding agent.

  17. In-vitro evaluation of an experimental method for bonding of orthodontic brackets with self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazanzadeh, Barat Ali; Merati, Mohsen; Shafaee, Hooman; Dogon, Leon; Sohrabi, Keyvan

    2013-01-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements do not require the surface treatment of teeth and are said to release fluoride, which makes them suitable candidates for bonding of orthodontic brackets. The objectives of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of self-adhesive resin cements on etched on non-etched surfaces in vitro and to assess their fluoride release features. Four fluoride-releasing dual-cure self-adhesive resin cements were investigated. For SBS experiment, 135 freshly extracted human maxillary premolars were used and divided into nine groups of 15 teeth. In the control group, brackets were cemented by Transbond XT (3M Unitek, USA), in four groups self-adhesive resin cements were used without acid-etching and in four groups self-adhesive cements were applied on acid-etched surfaces and the brackets were then deboned in shear with a testing machine. Adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were also calculated. For fluoride release investigation, 6 discs were prepared for each self-adhesive cement. Transbond XT and Fuji Ortho LC (GC, Japan) served as negative and positive control groups, respectively. The fluoride release of each disc into 5 ml of deionized water was measured at days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 56 using a fluoride ion-selective electrode connected to an ion analyzer. To prevent cumulative measurements, the storage solutions were changed daily. The SBS of brackets cemented with Transbond XT were significantly higher compared to self-adhesives applied on non-etched surfaces (Padhesive resin cements were used with enamel etching, no significant differences was found in the SBS compared to Transbond XT, except for Breeze. The comparisons of the ARI scores indicated that bracket failure modes were significantly different between the etched and non-etched groups. All self-adhesive cements released clinically sufficient amounts of fluoride for an extended period of time. For the tested cements, the strongest bonds were obtained by enamel acid

  18. Effect of resin cement type on the microtensile bond strength to lithium disilicate ceramic and dentin using different test assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marocho, Susana María; Ozcan, Mutlu; Amaral, Regina; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluated the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of 3 different resin cements to lithium-disilicate ceramic using two assemblies: ceramic-cement-ceramic (CCC) and ceramic-cement-dentin (CCD). The bonding surfaces of lithium disilicate ceramic blocks (5 × 5 × 4 mm) (Nblock = 90) were etched with 4% hydrofluoric acid for 20 s and silanized. Flat dentin surfaces of human third molars were conditioned according to the respective manufacturer's specifications for three types of resin cements (ML: Multilink, Ivoclar-Vivadent; PF: Panavia F, Kuraray; SB: Super Bond C&B, Sun Medical). While one set of ceramic blocks (n = 30) was cemented to another equal set (CCC assembly), another set of ceramic blocks (n = 30) was cemented on flat dentin (CCD assembly). The bonded specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h, and then sectioned along the x- and y-axes to obtain nontrimmed beam specimens. The beam specimens were randomly divided into two conditions: dry condition (DC - immediate testing); and aging condition (AC - thermocycling 12,000 times + water storage for 150 days). The µTBS bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). After debonding, the substrate and adherent surfaces were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope to categorize the failure types. The data were statistically evaluated using 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). While the mean µTBS of CCC assemblies were significantly influenced by the cement type (p 0.05). Without aging (DC), the mean µTBS (MPa) of SB (26.9) and PF (26.9) were significantly higher than ML (18.5) (p 0.05). In both CCC and CCD assemblies, pre-test failures were the least with SB cement. Regardless of the resin cement type employed and storage conditions, adhesive failures ranged between 35.3% and 88.9%, cohesive failures in cement between 2.3% and 35.3%, and cohesive failures in ceramic between 3.3% and 6.8%. SB resin cement demonstrated the highest bond strength to a

  19. Effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on bond durability of fiber posts cemented with etch-and-rinse adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Memarpour, Mahtab; Sarafraz, Zahra

    2016-08-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate whether use of an adhesive penetration enhancer, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), improves bond stability of fiber posts to root dentin using two two-step etch-and-rinse resin cements. Forty human maxillary central incisor roots were randomly divided into 4 groups after endodontic treatment and post space preparation, based on the fiber post/cement used with and without DMSO pretreatment. Acid-etched root dentin was treated with 5% DMSO aqueous solution for 60 seconds or with distilled water (control) prior to the application of Excite DSC/Variolink II or One-Step Plus/Duo-link for post cementation. After micro-slicing the bonded root dentin, push-out bond strength (P-OBS) test was performed immediately or after 1-year of water storage in each group. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Student's t-test (α=.05). A significant effect of time, DMSO treatment, and treatment × time interaction were observed (P.05). DMSO-wet bonding might be a beneficial method in preserving the stability of resin-dentin bond strength over time when fiber post is cemented with the tested etch-and-rinse adhesive cements.

  20. Effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on bond durability of fiber posts cemented with etch-and-rinse adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Sarafraz, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was undertaken to investigate whether use of an adhesive penetration enhancer, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), improves bond stability of fiber posts to root dentin using two two-step etch-and-rinse resin cements. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty human maxillary central incisor roots were randomly divided into 4 groups after endodontic treatment and post space preparation, based on the fiber post/cement used with and without DMSO pretreatment. Acid-etched root dentin was treated with 5% DMSO aqueous solution for 60 seconds or with distilled water (control) prior to the application of Excite DSC/Variolink II or One-Step Plus/Duo-link for post cementation. After micro-slicing the bonded root dentin, push-out bond strength (P-OBS) test was performed immediately or after 1-year of water storage in each group. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Student's t-test (α=.05). RESULTS A significant effect of time, DMSO treatment, and treatment × time interaction were observed (Pcements. Aging significantly reduced P-OBS in control groups (P.05). CONCLUSION DMSO-wet bonding might be a beneficial method in preserving the stability of resin-dentin bond strength over time when fiber post is cemented with the tested etch-and-rinse adhesive cements. PMID:27555893

  1. Role of Chlorhexidine on Long-term Bond Strength of Self-adhesive Composite Cements to Intraradicular Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeloni, Valeria; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Marchesi, Giulio; Cadenaro, Milena; Comba, Allegra; Maravi, Tatjana; Scotti, Nicola; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    To examine the effect of CHX pre-treatment on long-term bond strength of fiber posts luted with self-adhesive resin cements. Seventy-two single-rooted teeth were selected for root canal treatment and post space preparation. The tested self-adhesive cement/post combinations were (N = 36): 1. RelyX Fiber-Posts luted with RelyX Unicem; 2. Rebilda Posts luted with Bifix SE Cement. For both self-adhesive cements, half of the specimens (experimental groups) were luted after the application of a solution of 2% CHX, while no CHX application was performed for the remaining specimens (control groups). Luted specimens were cut and used for push-out bond strength evaluation immediately, and after storage in artificial saliva for 6 months or 1 year. Additional specimens were processed for quantitative interfacial nanoleakage analysis. ANOVA showed that the variable times of storage had a significant influence on the results (p 0.05) was found. Tukey's pairwise post-hoc test showed that the radicular bond strength decreased with time of storage. In particular, a significant difference was found between T0 and T1y, but not between T0 and T6m. In contrast, in terms of pretreatment, no significant reduction in push-out bond strength was observed, irrespective of the aging time. CHX pretreatment did not prevent bond strength degradation of fiber posts luted with self-adhesive cements.

  2. Fracture Resistance of Lithium Disilicate Ceramics Bonded to Enamel or Dentin Using Different Resin Cement Types and Film Thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojpaibool, Thitithorn; Leevailoj, Chalermpol

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the influence of cement film thickness, cement type, and substrate (enamel or dentin) on ceramic fracture resistance. One hundred extracted human third molars were polished to obtain 50 enamel and 50 dentin specimens. The specimens were cemented to 1-mm-thick lithium disilicate ceramic plates with different cement film thicknesses (100 and 300 μm) using metal strips as spacers. The cements used were etch-and-rinse (RelyX Ultimate) and self-adhesive (RelyX U200) resin cements. Compressive load was applied on the ceramic plates using a universal testing machine, and fracture loads were recorded in Newtons (N). Statistical analysis was performed by multiple regression (p dentin resulted in lower MFL than with enamel (p dentin resulted in lower fracture loads than bonding to enamel. Reduced resin film thickness could reduce lithium disilicate restoration fracture. Etch-and-rinse resin cements are recommended for cementing on either enamel or dentin, compared with self-adhesive resin cement, for improved fracture resistance. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  3. Bond strength of resin cement to CO2 and Er:YAG laser-treated zirconia ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Kasraei

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives It is difficult to achieve adhesion between resin cement and zirconia ceramics using routine surface preparation methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of CO2 and Er:YAG laser treatment on the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics. Materials and Methods In this in-vitro study 45 zirconia disks (6 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness were assigned to 3 groups (n = 15. In control group (CNT no laser treatment was used. In groups COL and EYL, CO2 and Er:YAG lasers were used for pretreatment of zirconia surface, respectively. Composite resin disks were cemented on zirconia disk using dual-curing resin cement. Shear bond strength tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min after 24 hr distilled water storage. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's HSD tests. Results The means and standard deviations of shear bond strength values in the EYL, COL and CNT groups were 8.65 ± 1.75, 12.12 ± 3.02, and 5.97 ± 1.14 MPa, respectively. Data showed that application of CO2 and Er:YAG lasers resulted in a significant higher shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics (p < 0.0001. The highest bond strength was recorded in the COL group (p < 0.0001. In the CNT group all the failures were adhesive. However, in the laser groups, 80% of the failures were of the adhesive type. Conclusions Pretreatment of zirconia ceramic via CO2 and Er:YAG laser improves the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic, with higher bond strength values in the CO2 laser treated samples.

  4. Push-out bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin using glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cements

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira,Jefferson Ricardo; Ricardo Abreu da ROSA; SÓ, Marcus Vinícius Reis; AFONSO,Daniele; Kuga, Milton Carlos [UNESP; HONÓRIO, Heitor Marques; Valle,Accácio Lins do; Vidotti, Hugo Alberto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin after cementation with glass ionomer (GICs) and resinmodified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty human maxillary canines were transversally sectioned at 15 mm from the apex. Canals were prepared with a step back technique until the application of a #55 K-file and filled. Post spaces were prepared and specimens were divided into five groups according to t...

  5. Can cement film thickness influence bond strength and fracture resistance of fiber reinforced composite posts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penelas, Alice Gonçalves; Piedade, Valery Martins; Borges, Ana Carolina Oliveira da Silva; Poskus, Laiza Tatiana; da Silva, Eduardo Moreira; Guimarães, José Guilherme Antunes

    2016-05-01

    This study compared the influence of cement film thickness (CFT) on bond strength (BS) and fracture resistance (FR) of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts to root canal. One hundred bovine incisors were used for BS and FR analysis (n = 10) and distributed into five experimental groups according to FRC post diameters (WhitePost DC no. 0.5, no. 1, no. 2, no. 3, no. 4), leading to five different CFTs. The canals were prepared using drill no. 4 provided by the post manufacturer and irrigated with 2.5% NaOCl. After conditioning (24% H2O2/5 min) and silanization, posts were cemented with resin cement. BS was evaluated using push-out test and FR using the compression test at 45°. A stereomicroscope was used to measure CFT and to analyze failure pattern. BS data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Scheffé test for contrast (α = 0.05); FR data were subjected to one-way ANOVA. BS was significantly affected by CFT, as the most well-adapted post achieved the highest values (p post well adapted to the root canal results in higher BS values. Different CFTs did not influence the FR of teeth restored with FRC posts. The results indicate that post retention is improved when a well-adapted post is used, although this has not been critical to fracture resistance.

  6. Mechanical, antibacterial and bond strength properties of nano-titanium-enriched glass ionomer cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    GARCIA-CONTRERAS, Rene; SCOUGALL-VILCHIS, Rogelio Jose; CONTRERAS-BULNES, Rosalía; SAKAGAMI, Hiroshi; MORALES-LUCKIE, Raul Alberto; NAKAJIMA, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) has become a significant area of research in Dentistry. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the physical, antibacterial activity and bond strength properties of conventional base, core build and restorative of glass ionomer cement (GIC) compared to GIC supplemented with titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanopowder at 3% and 5% (w/w). Material and Methods Vickers microhardness was estimated with diamond indenter. Compressive and flexural strengths were analyzed in a universal testing machine. Specimens were bonded to enamel and dentine, and tested for shear bond strength in a universal testing machine. Specimens were incubated with S. mutans suspension for evaluating antibacterial activity. Surface analysis of restorative conventional and modified GIC was performed with SEM and EDS. The analyses were carried out with Kolmogorov-Smirnov, ANOVA (post-hoc), Tukey test, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney. Results Conventional GIC and GIC modified with TiO2 nanopowder for the base/liner cement and core build showed no differences for mechanical, antibacterial, and shear bond properties (p>0.05). In contrast, the supplementation of TiO2 NPs to restorative GIC significantly improved Vickers microhardness (p<0.05), flexural and compressive strength (p<0.05), and antibacterial activity (p<0.001), without interfering with adhesion to enamel and dentin. Conclusion GIC supplemented with TiO2 NPs (FX-II) is a promising material for restoration because of its potential antibacterial activity and durable restoration to withstand the mastication force. PMID:26221928

  7. Comparison of two test designs for evaluating the shear bond strength of resin composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, M; Weiger, R; Fischer, J

    2016-02-01

    To compare a shear bond strength test for resin composite cements developed in order to better consider the shrinkage stress (here termed "Swiss shear test") with the shear test design according to ISO 29022. Four restorative materials (VITA Enamic (VE), VITA Suprinity (VS), Vitablocs Mark II (VM) and VITA YZ T (YZ)) served as substrate. VE, VS and VM were polished or etched. YZ was polished, sandblasted or etched. Specimens were either bonded according to the Swiss or the ISO shear test. RelyX Unicem 2 Automix, Maxcem Elite and PermaFlo DC were used as cements. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured. Failure modes (adhesive, cohesive or mixed) were evaluated by means of SEM. Mean SBS values obtained with the Swiss shear test were significantly lower than those obtained with the ISO shear test. VE and VM exhibited similar SBS, values of VS were significantly higher. On etched surfaces VM and VE exhibited primarily cohesive failures, VS primarily adhesive failures. On polished substrates significantly lower bond strength values and exclusively adhesive failures were observed. YZ exhibited solely adhesive failures. Compared to polished YZ, SBS significantly increased after sandblasting and even more after etching. Only for adhesively failed specimens mean SBS values of Swiss and ISO shear test were strongly correlated. Both test designs showed the same ranking of test results. When adhesive failure occurred test results were strongly correlated. When cohesive failure was involved, both test designs did not provide reliable results. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mechanical, antibacterial and bond strength properties of nano-titanium-enriched glass ionomer cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene GARCIA-CONTRERAS

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of nanoparticles (NPs has become a significant area of research in Dentistry. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the physical, antibacterial activity and bond strength properties of conventional base, core build and restorative of glass ionomer cement (GIC compared to GIC supplemented with titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanopowder at 3% and 5% (w/w. Material and Methods Vickers microhardness was estimated with diamond indenter. Compressive and flexural strengths were analyzed in a universal testing machine. Specimens were bonded to enamel and dentine, and tested for shear bond strength in a universal testing machine. Specimens were incubated with S. mutans suspension for evaluating antibacterial activity. Surface analysis of restorative conventional and modified GIC was performed with SEM and EDS. The analyses were carried out with Kolmogorov-Smirnov, ANOVA (post-hoc, Tukey test, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney. Results Conventional GIC and GIC modified with TiO2 nanopowder for the base/liner cement and core build showed no differences for mechanical, antibacterial, and shear bond properties (p>0.05. In contrast, the supplementation of TiO2 NPs to restorative GIC significantly improved Vickers microhardness (p<0.05, flexural and compressive strength (p<0.05, and antibacterial activity (p<0.001, without interfering with adhesion to enamel and dentin. Conclusion GIC supplemented with TiO2 NPs (FX-II is a promising material for restoration because of its potential antibacterial activity and durable restoration to withstand the mastication force.

  9. Effect of different provisional cement remnant cleaning procedures including Er:YAG laser on shear bond strength of ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zortuk, Mustafa; Gumus, Hasan Onder; Kilinc, Halil Ibrahim; Tuncdemir, Ali Riza

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of provisional cement removal by different dentin cleaning protocols (dental explorer, pumice, cleaning bur, Er:YAG laser) on the shear bond strength between ceramic and dentin. In total, 36 caries-free unrestored human third molars were selected as tooth specimens. Provisional restorations were fabricated and cemented with eugenol-free provisional cement. Then, disc-shaped ceramic specimens were fabricated and randomly assigned to four groups of dentin cleaning protocols (n = 9). Group 1 (control): Provisional cements were mechanically removed with a dental explorer. Group 2: The dentin surfaces were treated with a cleaning brush with pumice Group 3: The dentin surfaces were treated with a cleaning bur. Group 4: The provisional cements were removed by an Er:YAG laser. Self-adhesive luting cement was used to bond ceramic discs to dentin surfaces. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.05 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed using a Kolmogorov Smirnov, One-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests to perform multiple comparisons (α=0.05). THE DENTIN CLEANING METHODS DID NOT SIGNIFICANTLY AFFECT THE SBS OF CERAMIC DISCS TO DENTIN AS FOLLOWS: dental explorer, pumice, cleaning bur, and Er:YAG laser. The use of different cleaning protocols did not affect the SBS between dentin and ceramic surfaces.

  10. Effect of different provisional cement remnant cleaning procedures including Er:YAG laser on shear bond strength of ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zortuk, Mustafa; Gumus, Hasan Onder; Kilinc, Halil Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of provisional cement removal by different dentin cleaning protocols (dental explorer, pumice, cleaning bur, Er:YAG laser) on the shear bond strength between ceramic and dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS In total, 36 caries-free unrestored human third molars were selected as tooth specimens. Provisional restorations were fabricated and cemented with eugenol-free provisional cement. Then, disc-shaped ceramic specimens were fabricated and randomly assigned to four groups of dentin cleaning protocols (n = 9). Group 1 (control): Provisional cements were mechanically removed with a dental explorer. Group 2: The dentin surfaces were treated with a cleaning brush with pumice Group 3: The dentin surfaces were treated with a cleaning bur. Group 4: The provisional cements were removed by an Er:YAG laser. Self-adhesive luting cement was used to bond ceramic discs to dentin surfaces. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.05 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed using a Kolmogorov Smirnov, One-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests to perform multiple comparisons (α=0.05). RESULTS The dentin cleaning methods did not significantly affect the SBS of ceramic discs to dentin as follows: dental explorer, pumice, cleaning bur, and Er:YAG laser. CONCLUSION The use of different cleaning protocols did not affect the SBS between dentin and ceramic surfaces. PMID:23236570

  11. The effect of simplified adhesives on the bond strength to dentin of dual-cure resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shade, A M; Wajdowicz, M N; Bailey, C W; Vandewalle, K S

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strengths to dentin of two dual-cure resin cements, one with a unique initiator, NX3 (Kerr Corp), and the other with a traditional redox-initiator system, Calibra (Dentsply), when used in combination with simplified or nonsimplified adhesive agents. The two dual-cure resin cements, in either self- or dual-cure activation modes, were bonded to human dentin with four dental adhesives to create 16 subgroups of 10 specimens each. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37°C, the specimens were tested in shear in a universal testing machine. With both NX3 and Calibra, bond strengths significantly increased when the specimens were dual cured. In addition, with either cement in either mode, the nonsimplified adhesives performed significantly better than did the simplified adhesive bonding agents. When used specifically with simplified adhesives in either cure mode, NX3 did not produce significantly higher bond strengths than did Calibra. In general, lower dentin bond strengths were found with simplified adhesives or self-cure activation with either resin cement.

  12. Bond strength of orthodontic light-cured resin-modified glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsiang Yu; Chen, Chien Hsiu; Li, Chuan Li; Tsai, Hung Huey; Chou, Ta Hsiung; Wang, Wei Nan

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the bond strengths and debonded interfaces achieved with light-cured resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) and conventional light-cured composite resin. In addition, the effects of acid etching and water contamination were examined. One hundred human premolars were randomly divided into five equal groups. The mini Dyna-lock upper premolar bracket was selected for testing. The first four groups were treated with light-cured RMGIC with or without 15 per cent phosphoric acid-etching treatment and with or without water contamination preceding bracket bonding. The control samples were treated with the conventional light-cured Transbond composite resin under acid etching and without water contamination. Subsequently, the brackets were debonded by tensile force using an Instron machine. The modified adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were assigned to the bracket base of the debonded interfaces using a scanning electron microscope. The bond strength and modified ARI scores were determined and analysed statistically by one-way analysis of variance and chi-square test. Under all four conditions, the bond strength of the light-cure RMGIC was equal to or higher than that of the conventional composite resin. The highest bond strength was achieved when using RMGIC with acid etching but without water contamination. The modified ARI scores were 2 for Fuji Ortho LC and 3 for Transbond. No enamel detachment was found in any group. Fifteen per cent phosphoric acid etching without moistening the enamel of Fuji Ortho LC provided the more favourable bond strength. Enamel surfaces, with or without water contamination and with or without acid etching, had the same or a greater bond strength than Transbond.

  13. The bond of different post materials to a resin composite cement and a resin composite core material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewardson, D; Shortall, A; Marquis, P

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the bond of endodontic post materials, with and without grit blasting, to a resin composite cement and a core material using push-out bond strength tests. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts containing carbon (C) or glass (A) fiber and a steel (S) post were cemented into cylinders of polymerized restorative composite without surface treatment (as controls) and after grit blasting for 8, 16, and 32 seconds. Additional steel post samples were sputter-coated with gold before cementation to prevent chemical interaction with the cement. Cylindrical composite cores were bonded to other samples. After sectioning into discs, bond strengths were determined using push-out testing. Profilometry and electron microscopy were used to assess the effect of grit blasting on surface topography. Mean (standard deviation) bond strength values (MPa) for untreated posts to resin cement were 8.41 (2.80) for C, 9.61(1.88) for A, and 19.90 (3.61) for S. Prolonged grit blasting increased bond strength for FRC posts but produced only a minimal increase for S. After 32 seconds, mean values were 20.65 (4.91) for C, 20.41 (2.93) for A, and 22.97 (2.87) for S. Gold-coated steel samples produced the lowest bond strength value, 7.84 (1.40). Mean bond strengths for untreated posts bonded to composite cores were 6.19 (0.95) for C, 13.22 (1.61) for A, and 8.82 (1.18) for S, and after 32 seconds of grit blasting the values were 17.30 (2.02) for C, 26.47 (3.09) for A, and 20.61 (2.67) for S. FRC materials recorded higher roughness values before and after grit blasting than S. With prolonged grit blasting, roughness increased for A and C, but not for S. There was no evidence of significant bonding to untreated FRC posts, but significant bonding occurred between untreated steel posts and the resin cement. Increases in the roughness of FRC samples were material dependent and roughening significantly increased bond strength values (p<0.05). Surface roughening of the tested FRC posts is

  14. [The effect of acid etching on bond strength of different self-adhesive resin cements to dentin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Gui-hong; Wang, Hai-hua

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the effect of acid etching on bond strength (μTBS) of self-adhesive resin cements (Unicem, G-Cem, Clearfil SA Cement, BisCem) to dentin. Thirty-two human third molars without caries were used for the study. One fourth of the crowns were cut off, perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth with (Isomet) a low-speed saw, in order to expose the dentin surfaces of the sectioned sides. The sectioned dentin surfaces of the experimental groups were etched for 15 s. Subsequently, resin blocks were bonded to the dentin surfaces, with one of the four cements (Unicem, G-Cem, Clearfil SA Cement, BisCem). After being stored in water for 24 hours, all specimens were perpendicularly sectioned through the dentin-resin interfaces, prepared into beams about 1 mm×1 mm×8 mm for μTBS tests with micro-tensile tester. The micro-morphologies of the cement-dentin interfaces were assessed using scanning electron microscope. The data was analyzed using SPSS16.0 software package. Without pre-treatment of acid etching, Unicem group (12.9±3.2) MPa, G-Cem group (11.7±2.6) MPa and Clearfil SA Cement group (10.9±2.3) MPa possessed a higher bond strength than BisCem group (6.8±2.4) MPa (Padhesive cements (G-Cem, Clearfil SA CementUnicem, Unicem), but there was no significant difference in bond strength in BisCem group with or without acid etching. With pretreatment of acid etching, the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin decreases in G-Cem, Clearfil SA Cement and Unicem group, while there is no significant effect on the bond strength of BisCem group. Supported by Public Technology Applied Research Project of Science and Technology Bureau of Shaoxing City of Zhejiang Province (2012B70079).

  15. Is the bonding of self-adhesive cement sensitive to root region and curing mode?

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    Thaynara Faelly BOING

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To evaluate the influence of two curing techniques on the degree of conversion (DC of resin cements and on bond strength (BS of fiber posts in different regions of root dentin. Material and Methods Twenty single-rooted premolars were endodontically treated, and the post spaces were prepared. The roots were randomly divided into two groups (n=10, according to the activation mode of the resin cement RelyX™ U200 (3M ESPE Saint Paul, MN, USA: conventional (continuous activation mode and soft-start activation mode (Ramp. The posts (WhitePost DC/FGM were cemented according to the manufacturer’s recommendations and, after one week, the roots were cross-sectioned into six discs each of 1-mm thickness, and the cervical, medium, and apical thirds of the root canals were identified. The DC was evaluated under micro-Raman spectroscopy and the BS was evaluated by the push-out test. The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α=0.05. Results Neither the activation mode nor the root regions affected the DC of the resin cement. Higher BS was achieved in the soft-start group (p=0.036; lower BS was observed in the apical third compared to the other root regions (p<0.001. Irrespective of the activation mode and root region, the mixed failure mode was the most prevalent. Conclusion The BS of fiber posts to root canals can be improved by soft-started polymerization. The DC was not affected by the curing mode.

  16. Effect of conditioner on microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonial, Daniela; Ghiggi, Paula Cristine; Lise, André Amorim; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Oshima, Hugo Mitsuo Silva; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2010-01-01

    Evaluate, in vitro, the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of RelyX ARC conventional resin cement and RelyX Unicem and Maxcem self-adhesive resin cements to dentin, and the influence of polyacrylic acid pretreatment on the µTBS. Flat dentin surfaces were obtained in 15 third molars which were randomly divided into 5 groups: Group 1 - RelyX ARC (control); Group 2 - RelyX Unicem; Group 3 - Maxcem Elite; Group 4 - 22.5% polyacrylic acid and RelyX Unicem; Group 5 - 22.5% polyacrylic acid and Maxcem Elite. A block of composite resin was built over the resin cements. The samples were sectioned to obtain beams, and 20 specimens for each group were submitted to µTBS on a universal testing machine. Failure modes were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. According to ANOVA and Tukey test, the highest µTBS mean (MPa) was obtained with RelyX ARC (21.38), which did not differ statistically from Maxcem Elite with polyacrylic acid pretreatment (19.22) and RelyX Unicem with polyacrylic acid pretreatment (17.75) (p>0.05). The latter two groups did not differ statistically from RelyX Unicem (16.98) (p>0.05). The lowest mean was obtained for Maxcem Elite (6.43), which differed statistically from the other groups (padhesive for Maxcem Elite without polyacrylic acid pretreatment, and mixed failures were predominant in the other groups. RelyX ARC achieved higher µTBS to dentin in comparison to the self-adhesive resin cements. Polyacrylic acid pretreatment was effective in improving the µTBS of Maxcem Elite, but did not influence the µTBS for RelyX Unicem.

  17. Degree of conversion and bond strength of resin-cements to feldspathic ceramic using different curing modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novais, Veridiana Resende; Raposo, Luís Henrique Araújo; Miranda, Rafael Resende de; Lopes, Camila de Carvalho Almança; Simamoto, Paulo Cézar; Soares, Carlos José

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of resin cements when different curing modes are used, by evaluating the degree of conversion and bond strength to a ceramic substrate. Three resin cements were evaluated, two dual-cured (Variolink II and RelyX ARC) and one light-cured (Variolink Veneer). The dual-cured resin cements were tested by using the dual activation mode (base and catalyst) and light-activation mode (base paste only). For degree of conversion (DC) (n=5), a 1.0 mm thick feldspathic ceramic disc was placed over the resin cement specimens and the set was light activated with a QTH unit. After 24 h storage, the DC was measured with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). For microshear bond strength testing, five feldspathic ceramic discs were submitted to surface treatment, and three cylindrical resin cement specimens were bonded to each ceramic surface according to the experimental groups. After 24 h, microshear bond testing was performed at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until the failure. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test (ptranslucent ceramic restorations of up to or less than 1.0 mm thick.

  18. Effect of Endodontic Retreatment on Push-out Bond Strength and Quality of Fiber Postbonding Interface of Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegrine, Rina Andréa; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Kato, Augusto Shoji; Fontana, Carlos Eduardo; Pinheiro, Sérgio Luiz; De Martin, Alexandre Sigrist; Bueno, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of endodontic retreatment on push-out bond strength and dentin interface of two resin cements used for fiber postcementation during endodontic retreatment. The root canals of 40 extracted human canines were prepared, obturated and divided into four groups (n = 10). Gutta-percha was partially removed and fiber posts were immediately cemented in groups 1 and 2 using Panavia F with ED Primer and RelyX™ U200, respectively. In groups 3 and 4, the root canal access was sealed with temporary restorative cement, specimens were stored for 30 days, endodontically retreated, and fiber posts were cemented using the resin cements applied to groups 1 and 2, respectively. Push-out tests and scanning electron microscopy analyses of different areas were performed. Data from push-out bond strengths were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's tests. Higher bond strength values were detected in the apical third for group 1 than group 3 (p 0.05). Comparisons between different thirds in the same group revealed a higher bond strength in the apical third for group 1. Scanning electron microscopy showed formation of hybrid layer and extensive resin tags in group 1. No hybrid layer was observed in groups 2 and 4. Endodontic retreatment had adverse effects on the push-out bond strength and dentinal interface of Panavia F with ED Primer when used for fiber postcementation specifically in the apical third, but not on RelyX™ U200. A significant interaction was detected between endodontic retreatment and resin cement, which indicated that endodontic retreatment might adversely affect the push-out bond strength and dentinal interface of Panavia F with ED Primer when used for fiber postcementation specifically in the apical third.

  19. The Effect of Lithium Disilicate Ceramic Thickness and Translucency on Shear Bond Strength of Light-cured Resin Cement

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    Mohammad Javad Moghaddas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To achieve acceptable clinical performance, a ceramic veneer must be bonded to enamel by well-polymerized resin cement. Among different factors, thickness and translucency of the ceramic may affect the resin cement polymerization. Thus, the current study evaluated the effect of the thickness and translucency of lithium disilicate ceramic on light-cured resin cement bond strength to enamel. Methods: In this laboratory study, 208 sound bovine incisors were equally divided into 16 groups (n = 13. The lithium disilicate ceramic cubes in four thicknesses (0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1 mm with four translucencies (high and medium opaque, high and low translucent were fabricated and bonded to prepared enamel surfaces using a light-cured translucent resin cement according to manufacturer recommendations. After 5000 cycles of thermocycling, the bonded specimens were placed in a universal testing machine and loaded to the point of fracture. To determine the mode of failure, each sample was observed under a stereomicroscope. Data were recorded and analyzed by Shapiro-Wilk test and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: The ceramic thickness and translucency could not significantly affect shear bond strength (SBS of resin cement to enamel (p = 0.17 and p = 0.097, respectively.  The Adhesive and ceramic cohesive failures were reported as the maximum and minimum mode of failure, respectively. Conclusion: The SBS of the light-cured resin cement bonding to enamel and lithium disilicate ceramic was not affected by the translucency of ceramics having a thickness of less than 1 mm.

  20. The effect of luting cement thicknesses on the push-out bond strength of the fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Erhan; Çetin, Ali Rıza; Tunçdemir, Ali Rıza; Ülker, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of luting cement thicknesses on the push-out bond strength of the fiber posts. Sixty human maxillary canine teeth were endodontically treated. Post spaces were prepared and root specimens randomly divided into three groups: Group 1: etch-and-rinse (Variolink II/Exite DSC), Group 2: self-etch (Panavia F2.0/ED primer) and Group 3: self-adhesive (Clearfil SA Cement). Then each group was divided into four sub-groups according to the cement thickness, as follows: Sub-group 1: 0.35 mm, Sub-group 2: 0.25 mm, Sub-group 3: 0.15 mm, and Sub-group 4: 0.05 mm. Three slices of 1 mm thickness were obtained from each root specimen (n = 15). Push-out tests were performed and data was analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests. The etch-and-rinse system (Variolink II) had a significantly higher bond strength compared with the other systems (p cement group (0.35 mm) had a significantly lower bond strength compared with the 0.15 and 0.05 mm groups in the etch-and-rinse and self-adhesive groups (p cement thicknesses did not significantly affect the bond strength (p > 0.05). The etch-and-rinse system offered better bonding to root dentine than the self-adhesive and self-etch systems. The increases in cement thickness significantly reduced the bond strength of fiber posts to root dentine for both the etch-and-rinse and self-adhesive systems.

  1. Long-term bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to intraradicular dentin pretreated with chlorhexidine and ethanol

    OpenAIRE

    SANTOS, Mariah Carvalho Guimarães dos; AMARAL, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; Turssi,Cecília Pedroso; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Self-adhesive resin cements do not require prior preparation of the tooth surface, therefore dentin pretreatments may influence long-term bond strength. Objective To evaluate the influence of 100% ethanol (ET) and 2% chlorhexidine (CL) treatment of intraradicular dentin on the long-term bond strength (BS) of a self-adhesive resin cement (SRC). Material and method 80 bovine roots were restored with fiber posts and SRC (U200 3M/ESPE) and distributed into 4 groups accord...

  2. A study of self-adhesive resin cements for bonding to silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy -- effect of including primer components in cement base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraguchi, Koichi; Minami, Hiroyuki; Minesaki, Yoshito; Suzuki, Shiro; Tanaka, Takuo

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacies of adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA Luting, Maxcem, G-CEM, RelyX Unicem Clicker, Vitremer Paste) for bonding to Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy not surface-pretreated with metal primer. For control, Panavia F 2.0 -developed for use with a proprietary metal primer, Alloy Primer- was tested with and without metal primer application. Pairs of alloy disks (10.0 and 8.0 mm in diameters, 3.0 mm thickness) were air-abraded with alumina and bonded with one of the cements. Shear bond strengths (SBSs) were measured before and after 50,000 times of thermocycling. Among Maxcem, RelyX Unicem Clicker and the control, there were no statistical differences in SBS before and after thermocycling. After thermocycling, Clearfil SA Luting exhibited the highest SBS among all the cements. Results showed that Clearfil SA Luting, Maxcem, and RelyX Unicem Clicker were efficacious for bonding to Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy after air abrasion surface treatment for the latter.

  3. BOND STRENGTH DURABILITY OF SELF-ETCHING ADHESIVES AND RESIN CEMENTS TO DENTIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima; de Melo, Renata Marques; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Camargo, Fernanda Pelógia; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Balducci, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply) and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco) self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond) or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar) within a short (24 h) and long period of evaluation (90 days). Material and Methods: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10). The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y), producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm2 cross-sectional area, which were subjected to μTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The μTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05). Results: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, p<0.001). All eight experimental means (MPa) were compared by the Tukey's test (p<0.05) and the following results were obtained: Tyrian-One Step Plus/C&B/24 h (22.4±7.3); Tyrian-One Step Plus/Variolink II/24 h (39.4±11.6); Xeno III/C&B/24 h (40.3±12.9); Xeno III/Variolink II/24 h (25.8±10.5); Tyrian-One Step Plus/C&B/90 d (22.1±12.8) Tyrian-One Step Plus/VariolinkII/90 d (24.2±14.2); Xeno III/C&B/90 d (27.0±13.5); Xeno III/Variolink II/ 90 d (33.0±8.9). Conclusions: Xeno III/Variolink II was the luting agent/adhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water. PMID:19466243

  4. Bond strength durability of self-etching adhesives and resin cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina de Andrade Lima Chaves

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar within a short (24 h and long period of evaluation (90 days. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10. The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y, producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm² cross-sectional area, which were subjected to µTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The µTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05. RESULTS: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, p<0.001. All eight experimental means (MPa were compared by the Tukey's test (p<0.05 and the following results were obtained: Tyrian-One Step Plus /C&B/24 h (22.4±7.3; Tyrian-One Step Plus /Variolink II/24 h (39.4±11.6; Xeno III/C&B/24 h (40.3±12.9; Xeno III/Variolink II/24 h (25.8±10.5; Tyrian-One Step Plus /C&B/90 d (22.1±12.8 Tyrian-One Step Plus/VariolinkII/90 d (24.2±14.2; Xeno III/C&B/90 d (27.0±13.5; Xeno III/Variolink II/90 d (33.0±8.9. CONCLUSIONS: Xeno III/Variolink II was the luting agent/adhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water.

  5. Effect of various intracanal medicaments on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to root canal dentin

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    Hakan Arslan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It has been shown that the irrigating solutions and medicament used during root canal treatment may affect the bonding strength. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of triple antibiotic paste (TAP, double antibiotic paste (DAP and calcium hydroxide (CH on the bond strength to root dentin of self-adhesive resin cement. Materials and methods: Forty-eight single-rooted human teeth were prepared and randomly divided into one control and three experimental groups (dressing with TAP, DAP or CH. After removal of intracanal dressing, post-spaces were created and fiber posts cemented to the root canal using a self-adhesive resin cement. A push-out test was performed. The data obtained from the push-out test were analyzed using analysis of variance and Bonferroni post hoc tests (p = 0.05. Results: TAP decreased the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement bond strength to root dentin compared to the control group (p = 0.012, while CH and DAP did not influence this (p > 0.05. The majority of specimens exhibited adhesive failures. Conclusions: TAP decreased the bond strength of self-adhesive to the root dentin compared to the control group.

  6. Shear bond strength of calcium enriched mixture cement and mineral trioxide aggregate to composite resin with two different adhesive systems.

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    Siavash Savadi Oskoee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Immediate restoration after vital pulp therapy is essential in order to create and maintain effective coronal seal.The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of recently used pulp capping materials: white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA, and calcium enriched mixture cement (CEM to composite resin with the use of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems and compare them with the bond strength of commonly used resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI cement.Forty specimens from each test material were fabricated, measuring 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in depth. The specimens of each material were divided into 2 groups of 20 specimens according to the adhesive system (Single Bond vs. Clearfil SE Bond used for bonding of resin composite. The shear bond strength values were measured at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min and fractured surfaces were examined. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey's test (P<0.05.Analysis of data showed a significantly higher bond strength for RMGI compared to MTA and CEM (P<0.001; however, no significant differences were observed in the bond strength values of MTA and CEM (P=0.9. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in relation to the type of the adhesive system irrespective of the type of the material used (P=0.95 All the failures were of cohesive type in RMGI, MTA and CEM.Bond strength of RMGI cement to composite resin was higher than that of MTA or CEM cement irrespective of the type of the adhesive system.

  7. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

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    Cafer Türkmen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group: direct composite resin restoration (Alert with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive, Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia luted with a resin cement (Cement-It combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond, Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. RESULTS: The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7 showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05. The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. CONCLUSION: The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces.

  8. Compatibility improvement method of empty fruit bunch fibre as a replacement material in cement bonded boards: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dullah, Hayana; Abidin Akasah, Zainal; Zaini Nik Soh, Nik Mohd; Mangi, Sajjad Ali

    2017-11-01

    The utilization of oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fibre on bio-composite product has been introduced to replace current material mainly wood fibre. OPEFB is widely available as palm oil is one of the major agricultural crops in Malaysia. EFB fibre are lignocellulosic materials that could replace other natural fibre product especially cement bonded board. However, the contains of residual oil and sugar in EFB fibre has been detected to be the reason for incompatibility issue between EFB fibre and cement mixtures. Regarding on the issue, a study has been conducted widely on finding the suitable pre-treatment method for EFB fibre to remove carbohydrate contained in the said fibre that are known to inhibit cement hydration. Aside from that, cement accelerator was introduced to enhance the hydration of cement when it was mixed with natural fibre. Hence, this paper will summaries the previous findings and in-depth study on the use of EFB fibre as a replacement material in cement bonded fibre boards.

  9. Effect of Anatomical Customization of the Fiber Post on the Bond Strength of a Self-Adhesive Resin Cement

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    Adricyla Teixeira Rocha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of the study was to evaluate, by means of the push-out test, the effect of the anatomical customization of the fiber post on the bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement. Methods. Twelve endodontically treated, human, upper central incisors were randomly divided into two groups (n=6: control (glass fiber posts cemented with Relyx® U200 and customized (glass fiber posts anatomically customized with translucent composite resin cemented with Relyx U200. The roots were sectioned into three slices, cervical, middle, and apical, and photographed with a digital camera attached to a stereomicroscopic loupe. The images were analyzed by software, for evaluation of the cement line. The slices were subsequently submitted to the push-out test until the post had completely extruded, and the fracture mode was analyzed with a stereomicroscopic loupe. Results. The results showed significant differences between the groups in the different root thirds in relation to the area occupied by air bubbles (p<0.05. Bond strength, when all the thirds are considered, was 8.77 ± 4.89 MPa for the control group and 16.96 ± 4.85 MPa for the customized group. Conclusion. The customized group showed greater bond resistance than the control group and a more uniform cement layer.

  10. Comparison of Endodontic Medicaments on Bond Strength of Fiber Post to Root Dentin Using Resin Cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare Jahromi, Maryam; Barekatain, Mehrdad; Ravanbod, Shirin; Ranjbarian, Parisa; Kousehlar, Sara

    2017-03-01

    Endodontic irrigants and medicaments may affect the bond strength of intracanal posts to root dentin. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) and 2% chlorhexidine gel (CHX) on bond strength of fiber post cemented with resin cement to root dentin. This in vitro experimental study was conducted on 36 mandibular premolars. Canals were prepared using the step back technique. After root canal irrigation, the teeth were divided into three groups of 12. Ca(OH)2 paste and CHX gel were used as intracanal medicaments in the first and second groups respectively. No intracanal medicament was used in the third group (control group). Access cavities were then sealed and the teeth were incubated for one week. The root canals were then filled using gutta percha and AH26 sealer and the teeth were incubated for 72 hours. Tooth crowns were then cut at the level of the cementoenamel junction and intracanal posts were placed. The teeth were mounted in auto-polymerizing acrylic resin, and incubated for one week .They were then sectioned into 1.5mm thick slices from their coronal surface using a fully automated cutting machine, and subjected to push-out test until failure. The load at debonding was recorded and data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, post-hoc test and t-test. The coronal margin of the root was at the level of the surface of acrylic resin in the mold. The mean bond strength was 4.45 MPa in the Ca(OH)2, 2.45 MPa in the CHX and 2.48 MPa in the control group. The difference in this regard was statistically significant among groups (p= 0.04). The Ca(OH)2 group had significant differences with the CHX and control groups (p= 0.03 and p= 0.02, respectively). The difference between the CHX and control groups was not significant (p= 0.974). Based on the results, Ca(OH)2 increased the bond strength of fiber post to root dentin but 2% CHX had no effect on bond strength.

  11. Effect of light-cured filled sealant on the shear bond strength of metal, ceramic and titanium brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Mahajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a highly filled light-cured sealant (HFLCS on the shear bond strength of metal, ceramic and titanium brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 freshly extracted maxillary premolars were randomly divided into six groups (10 in each group. In all groups, the teeth were etched with 37% phosphoric acid for 20 s and RMGIC (Fuji Ortho LC, GC Europe was used for bracket bonding. Group 1: Titanium brackets were bonded directly to etched enamel surfaces. Group 2: Titanium brackets were bonded to etched enamel surfaces covered with HFLCS (Pro Seal, Reliance Orthodontic Products, Itasca, IL, USA. Group 3: Metal brackets were bonded directly to etched enamel surfaces. Group 4: Metal brackets were bonded to etched enamel surfaces covered with HFLCS. Group 5: Ceramic brackets were bonded directly to etched enamel surfaces. Group 6: Ceramic brackets were bonded to etched enamel surfaces covered with HFLCS. The specimens were tested in shear mode with a universal testing machine. After debonding, the teeth and the brackets were examined under a scanning electron microscope. Univariate analysis of variance (analysis was performed to test the main effects of bracket type and HFLCS. Result and Conclusion: The effect of HFLCS on etched enamel surfaces did not affect the bond strength values and bond failure modes of metal, ceramic and Titanium brackets bonded with RMGIC

  12. Shear Bond Strength of a Resin Cement to Different Alloys Subjected to Various Surface Treatments

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    Fariba Ezoji

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Micromechanical retention of resin cements to alloys is an important factor affecting the longevity of metal base restorations. This study aimed to compare the bond strength and etching pattern of a newly introduced experimental etchant gel namely Nano Met Etch with those of conventional surface treatment techniques for nickel-chrome (Ni-Cr and high noble alloys. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 discs (8×10×15 mm were cast with Ni-Cr (n=20, high noble BegoStar (n=50 and gold coin alloys (n=50. Their Surfaces were ground with abrasive papers. Ni-Cr specimens received sandblasting and etching. High noble alloy specimens (begoStar and gold coin received sandblasting, sandblasting-alloy primer, etching, etch-alloy primer and alloy primer alone. Cylindrical specimens of Panavia were bonded to surfaces using Tygon tubes. Specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength testing after storing at 37°C for 24 hours.Results: In gold coin group, the highest bond strength was achieved after sandblasting (25.82±1.37MPa, P<0.001 and etching+alloy primer (26.60 ± 5.47 MPa, P<0.01. The lowest bond strength belonged to sandblasting+alloy primer (17.79±2.96MPa, P<0.01. In BegoStar group, the highest bond strength was obtained in the sandblasted group (38.40±3.29MPa, P<0.001 while the lowest bond strength was detected in the sandblast+ alloy primer group (15.38±2.92MPa, P<0.001. For the Ni-Cr alloy, bond strength in the etched group (20.79±2.01MPa was higher than that in the sandblasted group (18.25±1.82MPa (P<0.01.Conclusions: For the Ni-Cr alloy, etching was more efficient than sandblasting but for the high noble alloys, higher Au content increased the efficacy of etching.

  13. Adhesion between glass fiber posts and resin cement: evaluation of bond strength after various pre-treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipahi, Cumhur; Piskin, Bulent; Akin, Gulsah E; Bektas, Ozden Ozel; Akin, Hakan

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate surface roughness and bond strength of glass fiber posts to a resin cement after various surface treatments. Sixty individually formed glass fiber posts with a diameter of 1.5 mm and a length of 20 mm were used for this study. They were randomly assigned to six groups of pre-treatment (n = 10/group): Group C, untreated (control); Group SB, sandblasted; Group SC, silica coated; Group HF, hydrofluoric acid-etched; Group N, Nd:YAG laser irradiated; Group E, Er:YAG laser irradiated. Surface roughness of the posts was measured before and after pre-treatment. The posts were then bonded to resin cement and tensile bond strengths were determined in a universal testing machine. For statistical analysis, two-way ANOVA and post-hoc comparison tests (α = 0.05) were performed. The highest bond strength value was observed in group HF, followed by group SC. There was a statistically significant difference in bond strength between group C and groups HF, SC and E (p Posts of group SB and group N showed the highest surface roughness. The findings of the present study reveal that hydrofluoric acid-etching, silica coating and Er:YAG laser irradiation provided a significant increase in bond strength between glass fiber posts and resin cement.

  14. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to glass infiltrated zirconia-reinforced ceramic: The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, R.; Ozcan, M.; Bottino, M.A.; Valandro, L.F.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to a glass-infiltrated zirconia-reinforced alumina-based core ceramic. Methods. Thirty blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm) of In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (In-Ceram Zirconia-INC-ZR,

  15. Bond strength of a resin cement to high-alumina and zirconia-reinforced ceramics: The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valandro, L.F.; Ozcan, M.; Bottino, M.C.; Bottino, M.A.; Scotti, R.; Della Bona, A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to three high-strength core ceramics: high alumina-based (In-Ceram Alumina, Procera AllCeram) and zirconia-reinforced alumina-based (in-Ceram Zirconia)

  16. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to glass infiltrated zirconia-reinforced ceramic : The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, R; Ozcan, M; Bottino, MA; Valandro, LF

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to a glass-infiltrated zirconia-reinforced alumina-based core ceramic. Methods. Thirty blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm) of In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (In-Ceram Zirconia-INC-ZR,

  17. Bond strength of a resin cement to high-alumina and zirconia-reinforced ceramics : The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felipe Valandro, Luiz; Ozcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Cicero; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Scotti, Roberto; Della Bona, Alvaro

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to three high-strength core ceramics: high alumina-based (In-Ceram Alumina, Procera AllCeram) and zirconia-reinforced alumina-based (in-Ceram Zirconia)

  18. Influence of cementation variables on fatigue of simulated two-unit cantilever resin-bonded fixed partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalen, A.; Feilzer, A.J.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the influence of various combinations of surface pretreatment and luting cement on flexural fatigue limits of two-unit CoCr cantilever resin-bonded fixed partial dentures. METHODS: Cyclic fatigue tests were performed at 1 Hz on an ACTA fatigue tester. The staircase test method

  19. The influence of four dual-cure resin cements and surface treatment selection to bond strength of fiber post

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Liu, Hong; Qian, Yue-Tong; Zhu, Song; Zhao, Su-Qian

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluate the influence of post surface pre-treatments on the bond strength of four different cements to glass fiber posts. Eighty extracted human maxillary central incisors and canines were endodontically treated and standardized post spaces were prepared. Four post pre-treatments were tested: (i) no pre-treatment (NS, control), (ii) sandblasting (SA), (iii) silanization (SI) and (iv) sandblasting followed by silanization (SS). Per pre-treatment, four dual-cure resin cements were used for luting posts: DMG LUXACORE Smartmix Dual, Multilink Automix, RelyX Unicem and Panavia F2.0. All the specimens were subjected to micro push-out test. Two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc tests were performed (α=0.05) to analyze the data. Bond strength was significantly affected by the type of resin cement, and bond strengths of RelyX Unicem and Panavia F2.0 to the fiber posts were significantly higher than the other cement groups. Sandblasting significantly increased the bond strength of DMG group to the fiber posts. PMID:24177170

  20. Does the thickness of the resin cement affect the bond strength of a fiber post to the root dentin?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez, Bianca E. M.; Barbosa, Silvia H.; Melo, Renata M.; Zamboni, Sandra C.; Oezcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Bottino, Marco A.

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of cement thickness on the bond strength of a fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) post system to the root dentin. Eighteen single-rooted human teeth were decoronated (length: 16 mm), the canals were prepared, and the specimens were randomly allocated to 2

  1. Arsenic Encapsulation Using Portland Cement With Ferrous Sulfate/Lime And Terra-BondTM Technologies - Microcharacterization And Leaching Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    This work reports the results of an investigation on the treatment and encapsulation of arsenic-containing materials by Portland cement with ferrous sulfate and lime (PFL) and Terra-BondTM, a commercially available patented technology. The arsenic materials treated we...

  2. Standard Test Method for Bond Strength of Ceramic Tile to Portland Cement Paste

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the ability of glazed ceramic wall tile, ceramic mosaic tile, quarry tile, and pavers to be bonded to portland cement paste. This test method includes both face-mounted and back-mounted tile. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  3. Evaluation of the interfacial work of fracture of glass-ionomer cements bonded to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheetham, Joshua J; Palamara, Joseph E A; Tyas, Martin J; Burrow, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interfacial work of fracture of conventional (C-) and resin-modified (RM-) glass-ionomer cements (GICs) bonded to dentin. One hundred and sixty five aries-free human molars were embedded in epoxy resin, sectioned and polished with 300- and 600- grit silicon carbide paper to remove enamel on the occlusal surface. Equilateral triangular-shaped plastic molds (4×4×4×5mm(4)) were clamped to the prepared dentin surfaces by a stainless steel test apparatus. Teflon tape was placed under one internal vertex of the mold to create a 0.1-mm notch at the material-dentin interface. Interfacial work of fracture (γwofint) in tensile fracture mode-I (opening) was determined for six C-GIC, three RM-GIC, and two GIC luting cements at a cross-head speed of 0.1mm/min and a crosshead distance (L) from the interface of 4.3mm. The debonded surfaces were evaluated for the predominant failure mode. SEM analysis of examples showing interfacial and notch areas was performed. ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test demonstrated the highest mean γwofint value (90.16±16.6J/m(2)) of one RM-GIC was significantly different (pglass-ionomer materials. The null hypothesis that there is no difference in the γwofint among different glass-ionomer materials bonded to human dentin was rejected. In the current study, the interfacial work of fracture (γwofint) of glass-ionomer adhesive interfaces has been reported using a simple method that can be used to study the fracture mechanics of an adhesive interface without the need for complicated specimen preparation. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Kekuatan perlekatan geser semen ionomer kaca terhadap dentin dan NiCr alloy (Shear bond strenght of glass ionomer cement in dentin and NiCr alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Leonita

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements were used broadly in restorative dentistry. That’s why researchers always try to invent new form of glass ionomer cement. The newest invention was the paste-paste formulation. Shear bond strenght of powder-liquid glass ionomer cement and paste-paste glass ionomer cement in dentin and NiCr alloy was tested to 4 groups of samples. Each group consisted contain 6 samples that were shaped into cylinder with 4 mm of diameter and 5 mm of height. Group A was dentin with powder-liquid glass ionomer cement, group B was dentin with paste-paste glass ionomer cement, group C was alloy with powder-liquid glass ionomer cement, and group D was alloy with paste-paste glass ionomer cement. Each sample in each group was tested with Autograph. The datas were analyzed statistically using T-test with level of signficance 0.05. The result showed that powder-liquid glass ionomer cement shear bond strenght was 211 N and paste-paste glass ionomer cement was 166.92 N. That showed that powder-liquid glass ionomer cement had a better shear bond strenght.

  5. Evaluation of bond strength of self-adhesive cements to dentin with or without application of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellos, Daphne Câmara; Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Silva, Melissa Aline; Rangel, Patrícia Maria; Torres, Carlos Rocha; Fava, Marcelo

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the bond strength of indirect restorations to dentin using self-adhesive cements with and without the application of adhesive systems. Seventy-two bovine incisors were used, in which the buccal surfaces were ground down to expose an area of dentin measuring a minimum of 4 x 4 mm. The indirect resin composite Resilab was used to make 72 blocks, which were cemented onto the dentin surface of the teeth and divided into 4 groups (n = 18): group 1: self-adhesive resin cement BiFix SE, applied according to manufacturer's recommendations; group 2: self-adhesive resin cement RelyX Unicem, used according to manufacturer's recommendations; group 3: etch-and-rinse Solobond M adhesive system + BiFix SE; group 4: etch-and-rinse Single Bond 2 adhesive system + RelyX Unicem. The specimens were sectioned into sticks and subjected to microtensile testing in a universal testing machine (EMIC DL- 200 MF). Data were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 5%). The mean values (± standard deviation) obtained for the groups were: group 1: 15.28 (± 8.17)a, group 2: 14.60 (± 5.21)a, group 3: 39.20 (± 9.98)c, group 4: 27.59 (± 6.57)b. Different letters indicate significant differences (ANOVA; p = 0.0000). The application of adhesive systems before self-adhesive cements significantly increased the bond strength to dentin. In group 2, RelyX Unicem associated with the adhesive system Single Bond 2 showed significantly lower mean tensile bond strengths than group 3 (BiFix SE associated with the etch-and-rinse Solobond M adhesive system).

  6. Effect of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of two resin cements to aged simulated composite core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Behnaz; Alaghehmand, Homayoon; Shakerian, Mohadese

    2015-01-01

    Roughening of the aged composite resin core (CRC) surface seems essential for durable adhesion. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of various surface treatments and different resin cements on microtensile bond strength (µ TBS) between two aged core build-up composites (CBCs) and feldspathic ceramic. A total of 16 composite blocks made of two CBCs, Core.it and Build-it were randomly assigned to four surface treatment groups after water storage and thermocycling (2 weeks and 500 cycles). Experimental groups included surface roughening with air abrasion (AA), hydrofluoric acid, pumice, and laser and then were bonded to computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic ceramic blocks using two resin cements, Panavia F2 (PF), and Duo-link (DL). The µ TBS was tested, and the fracture mode was assessed. The data were analyzed with multiple analysis of variance to estimate the contribution of different surface treatments, resin cements, and two aged CRCs on µ TBS. Statistical significance level was set at α strength (P strength was in AA group cemented with PF (31.83 MPa). The most common failure mode was cohesive fracture in the cement. Different surface treatments had different effects on µ TBS of aged CRCs to feldspathic ceramics. PF was significantly better than DL.

  7. Influence of Pre-Sintered Zirconia Surface Conditioning on Shear Bond Strength to Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomofumi Sawada

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite on zirconia surface to which a specific conditioner was applied before sintering. After sintering of either conditioner-coated or uncoated specimens, both groups were divided into three subgroups by their respective surface modifications (n = 10 per group: no further treatment; etched with hydrofluoric acid; and sandblasted with 50 µm Al2O3 particles. Surfaces were characterized by measuring different surface roughness parameters (e.g., Ra and Rmax and water contact angles. Half of the specimens underwent thermocycling (10,000 cycles, 5–55 °C after self-adhesive resin cement build-up. The SBSs were measured using a universal testing machine, and the failure modes were analyzed by microscopy. Data were analyzed by nonparametric and parametric tests followed by post-hoc comparisons (α = 0.05. Conditioner-coated specimens increased both surface roughness and hydrophilicity (p < 0.01. In the non-thermocycled condition, sandblasted surfaces showed higher SBSs than other modifications, irrespective of conditioner application (p < 0.05. Adhesive fractures were commonly observed in the specimens. Thermocycling favored debonding and decreased SBSs. However, conditioner-coated specimens upon sandblasting showed the highest SBS (p < 0.05 and mixed fractures were partially observed. The combination of conditioner application before sintering and sandblasting after sintering showed the highest shear bond strength and indicated improvements concerning the failure mode.

  8. Comparison of the resin cement bond strength to an indirect composites treated by Er;YAG laser and sandblast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansure Mirzaee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Indirect composites are designed to overcome the shortcomings of direct composites such as polymerization shrinkage and low degree of conversion. But, good adhesion of resin cements to indirect composites is still difficult. This research was designed to assess the effect of different powers of Er;YAG laser compared with sandblasting. On the micro tensil bond strength of resin cement to indirect composites.   Materials and Methods: Specimens were prepred using dental resin composite (Gradia GC and metallic mold (15×5×5 mm and were cured according to the manufacturer’s instructions. 24 blocks were prepared and randomly divided into 12 groups. G1:no treatment (as control, G 2-6: Er; YAG laser irradiation (2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Watt, G7: sandblast. Two composite blocks were bonded to each other with Panavia F.2. resin cement. The cylindrical sections with dimensions of 1 mm were tested in a microtensile bond strength tester device using 0.5 mm/min speed until fracture points. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and T-test.   Results: Interaction between lasers irradiation and sandblast treatments were significant (P0.05 whether samples were sandblasted or not. Samples which received 300 mJ of laser showed lower bond strength compared with no laser treatment. Other groups showed no significant difference (P>0.05.   Conclusion: It seems that application of sandblast with proper variables, is a good way to improve bond strength.Laser application had no influence in improving the bond strength between the indirect composite and resin cement.

  9. Evaluation of four cementation strategies on the push-out bond strength between fiber post and root dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergoli, Cesar Dalmolin; Amaral, Marina; Druck, Carolina Ceolin; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2011-01-01

    This trial used push-out testing to evaluate four different fiber post cementation strategies. Specimens of bovine mandibular teeth were randomly allocated into four groups according to cementation strategies (n = 10): ScotchBond MultiPurpose and RelyX ARC (Group 1); AdheSE and Multilink Automix (Group 2); phosphoric acid and RelyX U100 (Group 3); and RelyX U100 (Group 4). Four slices from each specimen (2.0 mm thick) were obtained for the push-out test. All slices were analyzed for failure mode after testing. A one-way ANOVA showed differences between the groups (P = 0.002). A Tukey test indicated that Group 1 had the highest bond strength values (13.96 ± 6.41 MPa). Groups 2 (6.58 ± 2.14 MPa), 3 (5.85 ± 2.57 MPa), and 4 (8.19 ± 2.28 MPa) had similar bond strengths, but all of them were lower than Group 1. A three-step total etching adhesive system, associated with a conventional resin cement, might be a good alternative for fiber post cementation.

  10. The effects of non-thermal plasma and conventional treatments on the bond strength of fiber posts to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Prado, Maíra; da Silva, Eduardo Moreira; Marques, Juliana das Neves; Gonzalez, Caroline Brum; Simão, Renata Antoun

    2017-05-01

    This study compared the effect of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and ammonia (NH3) plasmas on the bond strength of resin cement to fiber posts with conventional treatments. Sixty-five fiber posts were divided into 5 groups: Control (no surface treatment); H2O2 (24% hydrogen peroxide for 1 min); Blasting (blasting with aluminum oxide for 30 sec); NH3 (NH3 plasma treatment for 3 min); HMDSO (HMDSO plasma treatment for 15 min). After the treatments, the Ambar adhesive (FGM Dental Products) was applied to the post surface (n = 10). The fiber post was inserted into a silicon matrix that was filled with the conventional resin cement Allcem Core (FGM). Afterwards, the post/cement specimens were cut into discs and subjected to a push-out bond strength (POBS) test. Additionally, 3 posts in each group were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The POBS data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and the Tukey's honest significant difference post hoc test (α = 0.05). The Blasting and NH3 groups showed the highest POBS values. The HMDSO group showed intermediate POBS values, whereas the Control and H2O2 groups showed the lowest POBS values. Blasting and NH3 plasma treatments were associated with stronger bonding of the conventional resin cement Allcem to fiber posts, in a procedure in which the Ambar adhesive was used.

  11. [Effect of a chemical primer on the bond strength of a zirconia ceramic with self-adhesive resin cement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Jing, Ye; Nie, Rongrong; Meng, Xiangfeng

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the bond strength and durability of a self-adhesive resin cement with a zirconia ceramic pretreated by a zirconia primer. Zirconia ceramic (Vita Inceram YZ) plates with a thickness of 2.5 mm were fired, polished, and then cleaned. Half of the polished ceramic plates were sandblasted with 50 μm alumina particles at 0.3 MPa for 20 s. The surface compound weight ratios were measured via X-ray fluorescence microscopy. The polished and sandblasted ceramic plates were directly bonded with self-adhesive resin cement (Biscem) or were pretreated by a zirconia primer (Z Primer Plus) before bonding with Biscem. The specimens of each test group were divided into two subgroups (n=10) and subjected to the shear test after 0 and 10,000 thermal cycles. The data were analyzed via three-way ANOVA. After air abrasion, 8.27% weight ratio of alumina attached to the zirconia surface. Compared with air abrasion, primer treatment more significantly improved the primary resin bond strength of the zirconia ceramic. The primary resin bond strength of the zirconia ceramic with no primer treatment was not affected by thermocycling (P>0.05). However, the primary resin bond strength of the zirconia ceramic with primer treatment was significantly decreased by thermocycling (Pzirconia ceramics. However, the bond interface of the primer is not stable and rapidly degraded during thermocycling.

  12. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength, between IPS-Empress2 ceramics and three dual-cured resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajimiragha H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Cementation is one of the most critical steps of the porcelain restoration technique. However, limited information is available concerning the bond strength of current ceramic bonding systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of three dual-cure resin cements to IPS-Empress2 ceramics. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 30 pairs of IPS-Empress 2 ceramic discs were fabricated with 10 and 8 mm diameters and 2.5 mm thickness. After sandblasting and ultrasonic cleaning, the surfaces of all specimens were etched with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 60 seconds. Then, the three groups of 10 bonded specimens were prepared ceramic bonding resin systems including Panavia F2, Variolink II and Rely X ARC. After storage in 37±1c water for 24 hours and thermocycling in 5c and 55c water for 500 cycles with 1-minute dwell time, the shear bond strengths were determined using Instron machine at speed of 0.5mm/min. Data were analyzed by One Way ANOVA test. For multiple paired comparisons, the Tukey HSD method was used. The mode of failure was evaluated by scanning electro microscope (SEM. P<0.05 was considered as the limit of significance. Result: Significant differences were found between different cement types (P<0.05. Variolink II provided the highest bonding values with IPS-Empress2. A combination of different modes of failure was observed. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, according to the highest mode of cohesive failure, Variolink II seems to have the strongest bond with IPS-Empress2 ceramics.

  13. Bonding efficacy of new self-etching, self-adhesive dual-curing resin cements to dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Paula; Fernandes, Virgílio Vilas; Torres, Carlos Rocha; Pagani, Clovis

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of the union between two new self-etching self-adhesive resin cements and enamel using the microtensile bond strength test. Buccal enamel of 80 bovine teeth was submitted to finishing and polishing with metallographic paper to a refinement of #600, in order to obtain a 5-mm2 flat area. Blocks (2 x 4 x 4 mm) of laboratory composite resin were cemented to enamel according to different protocols: (1) untreated enamel + RelyX Unicem cement (RX group); (2) untreated enamel + Bifix SE cement (BF group); (3) enamel acid etching and application of resin adhesive Single Bond + RelyX Unicem (RXA group); (4) enamel acid etching and application of resin adhesive Solobond M + Bifix SE (BFA group). After 7 days of storage in distillated water at 37°C, the blocks were sectioned for obtaining microbar specimens with an adhesive area of 1 mm2 (n = 120). Specimens were submitted to the microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results (in MPa) were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test. Enamel pre-treatment with phosphoric acid and resin adhesive (27.9 and 30.3 for RXA and BFA groups) significantly improved (p ≤ 0.05) the adhesion of both cements to enamel compared to the union achieved with as-polished enamel (9.9 and 6.0 for RX and BF). Enamel pre-treatment with acid etching and the application of resin adhesive significantly improved the bond efficacy of both luting agents compared to the union achieved with as-polished enamel.

  14. Evaluation of bond strength between leucite-based and lithium disilicate-based ceramics to dentin after cementation with conventional and self-adhesive resin agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigolin, Fernando J; Miranda, Milton E; Flório, Flávia M; Basting, Roberta T

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two heat-pressed ceramics (leucite-based--IPS Empress Esthetic/Ivoclar Vivadent, and lithium disilicate-based --IPS e.max Press/Ivoclar Vivadent) to dentin with the use of conventional and self-adhesive resin cements. The occlusal surface of 60 intact human molars was removed and the dentin was exposed. Ceramic blocks were cemented randomly with regard to the cementation systems (n = 10): conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II/Ivoclar Vivadent), conventional self-polymerizing resin cement (Multilink/Ivoclar Vivadent), and dual self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100/3M ESPE). The dual cementation systems were photoactivated with a LED light device (Radii Cal, SDI) for 40 seconds. The specimens were sectioned to obtain sticks of approximately 1 mm2 for microtensile tests on a universal testing machine (EMIC). The type of fracture was analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey test (alpha = 0.05) showed that there was no difference between types of ceramic. Average microtensile bond strength was higher for the conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II) and the self-adhesive dual resin cement (RelyX U100), despite greater prevalence of premature loss of the sticks with the latter. Average bond strength was lower when the conventional self-polymerizing resin cement (Multilink) was used. Leucite-based and lithium disilicate-based cements present similar bond strength to the dentin with conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II) and a dual self-adhesive cement (RelyX U100).

  15. Evaluation of shear bond strength of two resin-based composites and glass ionomer cement to pure tricalcium silicate-based cement (Biodentine®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan CANTEK?N

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent phase in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA. It is thus postulated that pure tricalcium silicate can replace the Portland cement component of MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strength of methacrylate-based (MB composites, silorane-based (SB composites, and glass ionomer cement (GIC to Biodentine® and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA. Material and Methods: Acrylic blocks (n=90, 2 mm high, 5 mm diameter central hole were prepared. In 45 of the samples, the holes were fully filled with Biodentine® and in the other 45 samples, the holes were fully filled with MTA. The Biodentine® and the MTA samples were randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 15 specimens each: Group-1: MB composite; Group-2: SB composite; and Group-3: GIC. For the shear bond strength (SBS test, each block was secured in a universal testing machine. Results: The highest (17.7±6.2 MPa and the lowest (5.8±3.2 MPa bond strength values were recorded for the MB composite-Biodentine® and the GIC-MTA, respectively. Although the MB composite showed significantly higher bond strength to Biodentine (17.7±6.2 than it did to MTA (8.9±5.7 (p<0.001, the SB composite (SB and MTA=7.4±3.3; SB and Biodentine®=8.0±3,6 and GIC (GIC and MTA=5.8±3.2; GIC and Biodentine=6.7±2.6 showed similar bond strength performance with MTA compared with Biodentine (p=0.73 and p=0.38, respectively. Conclusions: The new pure tricalcium-based pulp capping, repair, and endodontic material showed higher shear bond scores compared to MTA when used with the MB composite.

  16. Evaluation of shear bond strength of two resin-based composites and glass ionomer cement to pure tricalcium silicate-based cement (Biodentine®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantekin, Kenan; Avci, Serap

    2014-01-01

    Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent phase in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). It is thus postulated that pure tricalcium silicate can replace the Portland cement component of MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strength of methacrylate-based (MB) composites, silorane-based (SB) composites, and glass ionomer cement (GIC) to Biodentine® and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Acrylic blocks (n=90, 2 mm high, 5 mm diameter central hole) were prepared. In 45 of the samples, the holes were fully filled with Biodentine® and in the other 45 samples, the holes were fully filled with MTA. The Biodentine® and the MTA samples were randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 15 specimens each: Group-1: MB composite; Group-2: SB composite; and Group-3: GIC. For the shear bond strength (SBS) test, each block was secured in a universal testing machine. The highest (17.7 ± 6.2 MPa) and the lowest (5.8 ± 3.2 MPa) bond strength values were recorded for the MB composite-Biodentine® and the GIC-MTA, respectively. Although the MB composite showed significantly higher bond strength to Biodentine (17.7 ± 6.2) than it did to MTA (8.9 ± 5.7) (p Biodentine® = 8.0 ± 3,6) and GIC (GIC and MTA = 5.8 ± 3.2; GIC and Biodentine = 6.7 ± 2.6) showed similar bond strength performance with MTA compared with Biodentine (p = 0.73 and p = 0.38, respectively). The new pure tricalcium-based pulp capping, repair, and endodontic material showed higher shear bond scores compared to MTA when used with the MB composite.

  17. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of zirconia restorations cleansed various cleansing protocols bonded with two different resin cements: An In vitro study

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    Sriram Sankar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Yttria partially stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline restorations have gained widespread use because of its enhanced strength and esthetics. During the try-in process, zirconia is likely to be contaminated with saliva. This contamination leads to a clear weakening of the bond between restorative material and cement. For this reason, zirconia surface should be cleaned before cementation. Hence, the purpose of this study is to compare the shear bond strength of zirconia restorations cleansed with various surface cleansing protocols bonded with two different resin cements. Materials and Methods: Eighty samples of zirconia discs were prepared in the dimensions 2.5 mm diameter and 4.5 mm thickness. They were divided into two groups of each forty samples based on luting cement used. Each group was further subdivided into four subgroups of each (n = 10: Group 1: uncontaminated zirconia blocks, Group 2: saliva-contaminated zirconia blocks and cleaned only with distilled water, Group 3: saliva-contaminated zirconia blocks treated with Ivoclean, and Group 4: saliva-contaminated zirconia blocks were air abraded. Eighty human maxillary premolars were then sectioned to expose dentin and were mounted on an acrylic block. A jig was fabricated to bond zirconia with the tooth using two self-adhesive resin cements. The samples were subjected to shear bond strength testing. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's honest significance difference test with a level of significance set at p < 0.05. Results: The mean shear bond strength values of Group 1 and 2 - subgroup B are 10.3 ± 0.4 and 9.80 ± 0.7 (saliva-contaminated zirconia, cleansed with distilled water only, respectively, were lowest among all test subgroups and were significantly less than mean values of subgroup C, Group 1 - 20.45 ± 0.6 and Group 2 - 20.75 ± 0.4 (Ivoclean group and subgroup D, Group 1 - 20.90 ± 0.3 and Group 2 - 20.60 ± 0.5 (air

  18. Durability of microtensile bond to nonetched and etched feldspar ceramic: self-adhesive resin cements vs conventional resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Rodrigo Othávio; Castilho, Anderson A; Fernandes, Virgílio V; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of thermocycling (TC), self-adhesive resin cements and surface conditioning on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) between feldspathic ceramic blocks and resin cements. Fifty-six feldspathic ceramic blocks (10 x 7 x 5 mm) (Vita Mark II) were divided into groups according to the factors "resin cement" (3 cements) and "surface conditioning" (no conditioning or conditioning [10% hydrofluoric acid etching for 5 min + silanization]) (n = 8): group 1: conditioning+Variolink II (control group); group 2: no conditioning+Biscem; group 3: no conditioning+RelyX U100; group 4: no conditioning+Maxcem Elite; group 5: conditioning+ Biscem; group 6: conditioning+RelyX U100; group 7: conditioning+Maxcem Elite. The ceramic-cement blocks were sectioned to produce non-trimmed bar specimens (adhered cross-sectional area: 1 ± 0.1 mm2), which were divided into two storage conditions: dry, μTBS immediately after cutting; TC (12,000x, 5°C/55°C). Statistical significance was determined using two-way ANOVA (7 strategies and 2 storage conditions) and the post-hoc Tukey test (p cement and thermocycling affected the μTBS significantly (p = 0.001). In the dry condition, group 5 (18 ± 6.5 MPa) presented the lowest values of μTBS when compared to the other groups. TC decreased the mean μTBS values significantly (p cements tested (9.7 ± 2.3 to 22.1 ± 6.3 MPa), except for the resin cement RelyX U100 (22.1 ± 6.3 MPa). In groups 3 and 4, it was not possible to measure μTBS, since these groups had 100% pre-test failures during sectioning. Moreover, the same occurred in group 2 after TC, where 100% failure was observed during thermocycling (spontaneous failures). Hydrofluoric acid etching and silanization of the feldspathic ceramic surface are essential for bonding self-adhesive resin cement to a feldspathic ceramic, regardless of the resin cement used. Non-etched ceramic is not recommended.

  19. In vivo evaluation of the bond strength of adhesive 4-META/MMA-TBB bone cement under weight-bearing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, T; Morita, S; Shinomiya, K i; Watanabe, A; Nakabayashi, N; Ishihara, K

    2000-10-01

    In order to minimize the problems associated with implant fixation using acrylic bone cement, we studied a new adhesive bone cement that consists of 4-methacryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydryde (4-META) and methylmethacrylate (MMA) as monomers, tri-n-butylborane (TBB) as an initiator, and PMMA powder (4-META/MMA-TBB cement). It shows remarkable adhesive properties to metal and bone in vitro. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the strength of the bond of the cement to both metal and bone in vivo under weight-bearing conditions. Metal prostheses were implanted in the right femora of 12 rabbits using either adhesive 4-META/MMA-TBB cement or the conventional PMMA cement, as the control, for fixation. After 4 and 12 weeks, both femora were excised and the same operations were performed in the left femora in vitro. Eighteen femora were sectioned for the mechanical assessment of the bone-cement and cement-implant interfaces. 4-META/MMA-TBB cement had a significantly higher interfacial shear strength than the conventional PMMA cement: 201 N and 90 N, on average, for the implant-cement interface (pMMA-TBB cement in providing greater fixation of implants to bone and promise a firmer intramedullary fixation than the control conventional PMMA cement. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. The effects of dentin and intaglio indirect ceramic optimized polymer restoration surface treatment on the shear bond strength of resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitarini, A.; Suprastiwi, E.; Usman, M.

    2017-08-01

    Ceramic optimized polymer (ceromer) bonds to the tooth substrate through resin cements. The bond strength between dentin, resin cement, and ceromer depends on the applied surface treatment. To analyze the effects of dentin and intaglio ceromer surface treatment on the shear bond strength self-adhesive resin cement. Forty-five dentin premolar and ceromer specimens were bonded with resin cement and divided into three groups as follows: in group 1, no treatment was applied; in group 2, dentin surface treatment was carried out with acid etching and a bonding agent; and in group 3, dentin surface treatment was carried out with acid etching, a bonding agent, and intaglio ceromer surface treatment with etching and silane. All specimens were incubated at 37 °C for 24 hours, and the shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. Group 3 showed the highest shear bond strength, followed by group 2. The surface treatment of dentin and intaglio ceromer showed significantly improved shear bond strength in the group comparison. Dentin and intaglio ceromer surface treatment can improved the shear bond strength self-adhesive resin cement.

  1. Comparison of push-out bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite resin posts according to cement thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Seong; Lee, Jeong-Sub; Park, Jeong-Won; Chung, Won-Gyun; Choi, Eun-Hee; Lee, Yoon

    2017-09-01

    Post space size and cement thickness can differ because of variations in root canal morphology, such as an oval shape, and because the entire canal space cannot be included in the post space preparation. As a result, increased cement thickness around the post may affect the bond strength between the post and the dentin. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite resin posts to root dentin with cement layers of varying thickness. Thirty human premolars were endodontically treated and restored with fiber-reinforced composite resin posts. Post space was prepared using a drill with a 1.5-mm diameter and diameters of 1.25 mm (small [S] group), 1.375 mm (medium [M] group), and 1.5 mm (large [L] group) were cemented. The specimens were sectioned horizontally into 1-mm-thick slices, and the push-out bond strengths of the apical and coronal fragments were evaluated. Bond strength was compared using analysis of variance and 2-sample t tests (α=.05). No significant differences were found in the debonding force and push-out bond strength among fiber-reinforced composite posts of different sizes (P>.05). The mean debonding force and standard deviation of the posts were 25.05 ±9.52 N for the S group, 28.17 ±11.38 N for the M group, and 33.78 ±12.47 N for the L group. The corresponding push-out bond strength values were 3.11 ±1.54 MPa, 3.39 ±1.4 MPa, and 4.15 ±1.75 MPa. The differences in debonding force between the apical (26.43 ±10.72 N) and coronal (31.57 ±12.03 N) areas were not significant (P>.05). However, the differences in push-out bond strength between the apical (4.27 ±1.73 MPa) and coronal areas (2.83 ±1.08 MPa) were significant (Ppost spaces and, consequently, the increased cement thickness do not significantly affect the bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite resin posts to root dentin. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc

  2. CHEMICALLY BONDED CEMENTS FROM BOILER ASH AND SLUDGE WASTES. PHASE II REPORT, SEPT.1998-JULY 1999.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.YAGER,K.A.BLANKENHORN,D.(KEYSPAN R AND D INITIATIVE)

    1999-08-01

    Based upon the previous Phase I research program aimed at looking for ways of recycling the KeySpan-generated wastes, such as waste water treatment sludge (WWTS) and bottom ash (BA), into the potentially useful cementitious materials called chemically bonded cement (CBC) materials, the emphasis of this Phase II program done at Brookhaven National Laboratory, in a period of September 1998 through July 1999, was directed towards the two major subjects: One was to assess the technical feasibility of WWTS-based CBC material for use as Pb-exchange adsorbent (PEA) which remediates Pb-contaminated soils in the field; and the other was related to the establishment of the optimum-packaging storage system of dry BA-based CBC components that make it a promising matrix material for the steam-cured concrete products containing sand and coarse aggregate. To achieve the goal of the first subject, a small-scale field demonstration test was carried out. Using the PEA material consisting of 30 wt% WWTS, 13 wt% Type I cement and 57 wt% water, the PES slurry was prepared using a rotary shear concrete mixer, and then poured on the Pb-contaminated soil. The PEA-to-soil ratio by weight was a factor of 2.0. The placed PEA slurry was blended with soil using hand mixing tools such as claws and shovels. The wettability of soils with the PEA was very good, thereby facilitating the soil-PEA mix procedures. A very promising result was obtained from this field test; in fact, the mount of Pb leached out from the 25-day-aged PEA-treated soil specimen was only 0.74 mg/l, meeting the requirement for EPA safe regulation of < 5 mg/l. In contrast, a large amount (26.4 mg/l) of Pb was detected from the untreated soil of the same age. Thus, this finding demonstrated that the WWTS-based CBC has a potential for use as PEA material. Regarding the second subject, the dry-packed storage system consisting of 68.7 wt% BA, 13.0 wt% calcium aluminate cement (CAC), 13.0 wt% Type I portland cement and 5.3 wt

  3. Tensile bond strength of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement to microabraded and silica-coated or tin-plated high noble ceramic alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, J M; Davis, R D; Overton, J D

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of alloy surface microabrasion, silica coating, or microabrasion plus tin plating on the tensile bond strengths between a resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cement and a high-noble alloy. Bond strength between the microabraded alloy specimens and conventional glass-ionomer cement or resin cement were included for comparison. One hundred twenty uniform size, disk-shaped specimens were cast in a noble metal alloy and divided into 6 groups (n = 10 pairs/group). The metal surfaces of the specimens in each group were treated and cemented as follows. Group 1: No surface treatment (as cast, control), cemented with a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Group 2: Microabrasion with 50-microm aluminum oxide particles, resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Group 3: A laboratory microabrasion and silica coating system, resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Group 4: Microabrasion and tin-plating, resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Group 5: Microabrasion only, conventional glass-ionomer cement. Group 6: Microabrasion and tin-plating, conventional resin cement. The uniaxial tensile bond strength for each specimen pair was determined using an Instron Universal Testing Machine (Instron Corp, Canton, MA). Results were analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance (alpha = 0.05) and a Tukey post-hoc analysis. Mean bond strength: Group 1: 3.6 (+/- 1.5) MPa. Group 2: 4.2 (+/-0.5) MPa. Group 3: 6.7 (+/- 0.9) MPa. Group 4: 10.6 (+/- 1.8) MPa. Group 5: 1.1 (+/- 0.4) MPa. Group 6: 14.6 (+/- 2.3) MPa. Group 6 was significantly stronger than Group 4. The bond strength of specimens cemented with the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using microabrasion and tin-plating (Group 4) was significantly stronger than all other groups except the resin cement with microabrasion and tin-plating (Group 6). Microabraded and tin-plated alloy specimens luted with the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement resulted in the greatest mean tensile strengths

  4. Evaluation of the bond strength of resin cements used to lute ceramics on laser-etched dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giray, Figen Eren; Duzdar, Lale; Oksuz, Mustafa; Tanboga, Ilknur

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of two different adhesive resin cements used to lute ceramics on laser-etched dentin. Erbium, chromium: yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser irradiation has been claimed to improve the adhesive properties of dentin, but results to date have been controversial, and its compatibility with existing adhesive resin cements has not been conclusively determined. Two adhesive cements, one "etch-and-rinse" [Variolink II (V)] and one "self-etch" [Clearfil Esthetic Cement (C)] luting cement, were used to lute ceramic blocks (Vita Celay Blanks, Vita) onto dentin surfaces. In total, 80 dentin specimens were distributed randomly into eight experimental groups according to the dentin surface-etching technique used Er,Cr:YSGG laser and Er:YAG laser: (1) 37% orthophosphoric acid+V (control group), (2) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+V, (3) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+acid+V, (4) Er:YAG laser+V, (5) Er:YAG laser+acid+V, (6) C, (7) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+C, and (8) Er:YAG laser+C. Following these applications, the ceramic discs were bonded to prepared surfaces and were shear loaded in a universal testing machine until fracture. SBS was recorded for each group in MPa. Shear test values were evaluated statistically using the Mann-Whitney U test. No statistically significant differences were evident between the control group and the other groups (p>0.05). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser+A+V group demonstrated significantly higher SBS than did the Er,Cr:YSGG laser+V group (p=0.034). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser+C and Er:YAG laser+C groups demonstrated significantly lower SBS than did the C group (padhesive cement used.

  5. Effect of CO2 and Nd:YAG Lasers on Shear Bond Strength of Resin Cement to Zirconia Ceramic

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    Shahin Kasraei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Because of poor bond between resin cement and zirconia ceramics, laser surface treatments have been suggested to improve adhesion. The present study evaluated the effect of CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers on the shear bond strength (SBS of resin cement to zirconia ceramic.Materials and Methods: Ninety zirconia disks (6×2 mm were randomly divided into six groups of 15. In the control group, no surface treatment was used. In the test groups, laser surface treatment was accomplished using CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers, respectively (groups two and three. Composite resin disks (3×2 mm were fabricated and cemented to zirconia disks with self-etch resin cement and stored in distilled water for 24 hours. In the test groups four-six, the samples were prepared as in groups one-three and then thermocycled and stored in distilled water for six months. The SBS tests were performed (strain rate of 0.5 mm/min. The fracture modes were observed via stereomicroscopy. Data were analyzed with one and two-way ANOVA, independent t and Tukey’s tests.Results: The SBS values of Nd:YAG group (18.95±3.46MPa was significantly higher than that of the CO2 group (14.00±1.96MPa, but lower than that of controls (23.35±3.12MPa. After thermocycling and six months of water storage, the SBS of the untreated group (1.80±1.23 MPa was significantly lower than that of the laser groups. In groups stored for 24 hours, 60% of the failures were adhesive; however, after thermocycling and six months of water storage, 100% of failures were adhesive.Conclusion: Bonding durability of resin cement to zirconia improved with CO2 and Nd:YAG laser surface treatment of zirconia ceramic.

  6. Effect of dentin-cleaning techniques on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin luting cement to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M J M C; Bapoo, H; Rizkalla, A S; Santos, G C

    2011-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the influence of different cleansing techniques on the bond strength of self-adhesive cement to dentin. A total of 33 noncarious human molars were sectioned mesiodistally and embedded in chemically cured resin with the buccal or lingual surfaces facing upward. Superficial dentin was exposed and resin disk provisional restorations were cemented to the dentin surfaces with noneugenol provisional cement and were stored in distilled water at 37°C. After seven days, the provisional restorations were removed and 13 specimens were randomly assigned to each of the five groups (n=13), according to the following cleansing treatments: G1-excavator (control); G2-0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate; G3-40% polyacrylic acid; G4-mixture of flour pumice and water; and G5-sandblasting with 50 μm aluminum oxide particles at a pressure of 87 psi. Resin composite disks (Filtek Supreme Plus, 3M ESPE Dental Products, St Paul, MN, USA) 4.7 (±0.1) mm in diameter and 3.0 (±0.5) mm in height were cemented with self-adhesive cement (RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE), photocured, and stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. Shear bond strength testing was conducted using a universal test machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey-B rank order test. Sandblasting with aluminum oxide (11.32 ± 1.70 MPa) produced significantly higher shear bond strength values compared with any other treatment groups (p<0.05). No significant differences were found between G1-control (7.74 ± 1.72 MPa), G2-chlorhexidine (6.37 ± 1.47 MPa), and G4-pumice (7.33 ± 2.85 MPa) (p<0.05).

  7. In vitro Evaluation of Effect of Dental Bleaching on the Shear Bond Strength of Sapphire Orthodontics Brackets Bonded with Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab M Kadhom

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to assess the effect of various types of bleaching agents on the shear bond strength of sapphire brackets bonded to human maxillary premolar teeth using resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC and to determine the site of bond failure. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted maxillary human premolars were selected and assigned into three equal groups, ten teeth in each. The first group was the control (unbleached group; the second group comprised teeth bleached with hydrogen peroxide group (HP 37.5% (in-office bleaching while the third group included teeth bleached with carbamide peroxide group (CP 16% (at-home bleaching. The teeth in the experimental groups were bleached and stored in water one day then bonded with sapphire brackets using RMGIC with the control group and left another day. De-bonding was performed using Instron universal testing machine. To determine the site of bond failure, both the enamel surface and bracket base of each tooth were examined under magnifying lens (20X of a stereomicroscope. Results: Results showed statistically highly significant difference in the shear bond strengths between control group and both of bleaching groups being low in the control group. Score III was the predominant site of bond failure in all groups. Conclusions: RMGIC provides adequate bond strength when bonding the sapphire brackets to bleached enamel; this bonding was strong enough to resist both the mechanical and masticatory forces. Most of the adhesive remained on the brackets, so it reduced the time required for removal of the bonding material’s remnants during enamel finishing and polishing.

  8. Effect of different adhesives combined with two resin composite cements on shear bond strength to polymeric CAD/CAM materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bähr, Nora; Keul, Christine; Edelhoff, Daniel; Eichberger, Marlis; Roos, Malgorzata; Gernet, Wolfgang; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the impact of different adhesives and resin composite cements on shear bond strength (SBS) to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)- and composite-based CAD/CAM materials. SBS specimens were fabricated and divided into five main groups (n=30/group) subject to conditioning: 1. Monobond Plus/Heliobond (MH), 2. Visio.link (VL), 3. Ambarino P60 (AM), 4. exp. VP connect (VP), and 5. no conditioning-control group (CG). All cemented specimens using a. Clearfil SA Cement and b. Variolink II were stored in distilled water for 24 h at 37 °C. Additionally, one half of the specimens were thermocycled for 5,000 cycles (5 °C/55 °C, dwell time 20 s). SBS was measured; data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, four- and one-way ANOVA, unpaired two-sample t-test and Chi(2)-test. CAD/CAM materials without additional adhesives showed no bond to resin composite cements. Highest SBS showed VL with Variolink II on composite-based material, before and after thermocycling.

  9. The role of resin cement on bond strength of glass-fiber posts luted into root canals: a systematic review and meta-analysis of in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkis-Onofre, R; Skupien, J A; Cenci, M S; Moraes, R R; Pereira-Cenci, T

    2014-01-01

    Because there are several ways to cement glass-fiber posts (GFPs) into root canals, there is no consensus on the best strategy to achieve high bond strengths. A systematic review was conducted to determine if there is difference in bond strength to dentin between regular and self-adhesive resin cements and to verify the influence of several variables on the retention of GFPs. This report followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. In vitro studies that investigated the bond strength of GFPs luted with self-adhesive and regular resin cements were selected. Searches were carried out in the PubMed and Scopus databases. No publication year or language limit was used, and the last search was done in October 2012. A global comparison was performed between self-adhesive and regular resin cements. Two subgroup analyses were performed: 1) Self-adhesive × Regular resin cement + Etch-and-rinse adhesive and 2) Self-adhesive × Regular resin cement + Self-etch adhesive. The analyses were carried out using fixed-effect and random-effects models. The results showed heterogeneity in all comparisons, and higher bond strength to dentin was identified for self-adhesive cements. Although the articles included in this meta-analysis showed high heterogeneity and high risk of bias, the in vitro literature seems to suggest that use of self-adhesive resin cement could improve the retention of GFPs into root canals.

  10. Effects of different surface-treatment methods on the bond strengths of resin cements to full-ceramic systems

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    Gülay Kansu

    2011-09-01

    Conclusions: The in vitro findings from this study indicate that surface-treatment procedures applied to the IPS Empress and the IPS Empress 2 full-ceramic systems are important when cement types are considered. In contrast, cement types and surface-treatment methods had no effect on changing the bond strength of the In-Ceram ceramic system.

  11. The effect of curing conditions on the dentin bond strength of two dual-cure resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, Atsuko; Takahashi, Rena; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the curing condition (i.e., the curing mode and restoration thickness) on the tensile bond strength of a dual-cure resin cement applied to dentin. Indirect composite resin disks (1, 2, and 3mm in thickness) were prepared. The irradiance of a halogen light curing unit through each disk was measured by a curing radiometer. A measurement was also taken for the condition with no disk. Following this, two dual-cure resin cements, Panavia F2.0 and Panavia V5, were polymerized in either dual-cure mode or self-cure mode to bond the composite resin disk to the flat dentin surface. The specimens were sectioned and subjected to a microtensile bond strength (μTBS) test after 24h of water storage. The data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed with multiple comparisons by post-hoc Tukey's test (α=0.05). The irradiance values [mW/cm(2)] measured through indirect composite resin disks were 600 (0mm), 200 (1mm), 90 (2mm), and not detected (3mm). Two-way ANOVA indicated that both the curing condition and the type of resin cement affected the μTBS (pPanavia V5 bonded to dentin were significantly higher than those of Panavia F2.0 bonded to dentin (pPanavia V5, showed higher dentin bonding than Panavia F2.0 in both dual- and self-cure modes. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The influence of silane evaporation procedures on microtensile bond strength between a dental ceramic and a resin cement

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    Pereira Carolina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the influence of silane evaporation procedures on bond strength between a dental ceramic and a chemically activated resin cement. Materials and Methods: Eighteen blocks (6 mm Χ 14 mm Χ 14 mm of ceramic IPS Empress 2 were cemented (C and B to composite resin (InTen-S blocks using a chemical adhesive system (Lok. Six groups were analyzed, each with three blocks divided according to ceramic surface treatment: two control groups (no treatment, NT; 10% hydrofluoric acid plus silane Monobond-S dried at room temperature, HFS; the other four groups comprised different evaporation patterns (silane rinsed and dried at room temperature, SRT; silane rinsed in boiling water and dried as before, SBRT; silane rinsed with boiling water and heat dried at 50°C, SBH; silane dried at 50 ± 5°C, rinsed in boiling water and dried at room temperature, SHBRT. The cemented blocks were sectioned to obtain specimens for microtensile test 7 days after cementation and were stored in water for 30 days prior to testing. Fracture patterns were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Statistics and Results: All blocks of NT debonded during sectioning. One way ANOVA tests showed higher bond strengths for HFS than for the other groups. SBRT and SBH were statistically similar, with higher bond strengths than SRT and SHBRT. Failures were 100% adhesive in SRT and SHBRT. Cohesive failures within the "adhesive zone" were detected in HFS (30%, SBRT (24% and SBH (40%. Conclusion: Silane treatment enhanced bond strength in all conditions evaluated, showing best results with HF etching.

  13. Influence of atmospheric pressure low-temperature plasma treatment on the shear bond strength between zirconia and resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuki; Okawa, Takahisa; Fukumoto, Takahiro; Tsurumi, Akiko; Tatsuta, Mitsuhiro; Fujii, Takamasa; Tanaka, Junko; Tanaka, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    Zirconia exhibits excellent strength and high biocompatibility in technological applications and it is has therefore been investigated for clinical applications and research. Before setting prostheses, a crown prosthesis inner surface is sandblasted with alumina to remove contaminants and form small cavities. This alumina sandblasting causes stress-induced phase transition of zirconia. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma has been applied in the dental industry, particularly for adhesives, as a surface treatment to activate the surface energy and remove contaminants. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment on the shear bond strength between zirconia and adhesive resin cement. The surface treatment method was classified into three groups: untreated (Cont group), alumina sandblast treatment (Sb group), and atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment (Ps group). Adhesive resin cement was applied to stainless steel and bonded to zirconia. Shear adhesion tests were performed after complete hardening of the cement. Multiple comparisons were performed using a one-way analysis of variance and the Bonferroni method. X-ray diffractometry was used to examine the change in zirconia crystal structure. Statistically significant differences were noted between the control and Sb groups and between the control and Ps groups. In contrast, no statistically significant differences were noted for the Ps and Sb bond strength. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment did not affect the zirconia crystal structure. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment improves the bonding strength of adhesive resin cement as effectively as alumina sandblasting, and does not alter the zirconia crystal structure. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bonding Effectiveness of Two Adhesive Luting Cements to Glass Fiber Posts: Pull-Out Evaluation of Three Different Post Surface Conditioning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength at the post/resin-cement interface with 3 different surface treatments of glass fiber posts and with 2 different luting resin cements. Sixty glass fiber posts (RelyX Fiber Post) were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 20) and were luted with a dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement (RelyX Unicem) and with a dual-polymerizing resin cement (RelyX ARC). This was carried out in association with a dual-polymerizing adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus) in simulated plexiglass root canals after receiving three different pretreatment procedures. A pull-out test was performed on each sample to measure bond strengths. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Two samples from each group were processed for SEM observations in order to investigate the morphologic aspect of the post/cement interface. Both resin cements demonstrated significant different bond strength values (P post surface after pretreatment with methyl methacrylate. The dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement achieved higher MPa bond strength values. The use of methyl methacrylate as a surface treatment of glass fiber posts provided a significant increase in bond strengths between the posts and both luting materials. PMID:24987418

  15. Evaluation of the Effect of Sodium Hypochlorite Irrigant on Pull-out Bond Strength of FRC Posts Using Different Resin Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Boruziniat

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To evaluate the effects of using sodium hypochlorite irrigant on pull-out bond strength of self-etch and self-adhesive resin cements to dentin. Methods: Sixty intact premolars were decoronated and the root canals were prepared by step-back technique. The teeth were divided into two groups according to the irrigant used during root canal treatment: 5.25% sodium hypochlorite and normal saline. The canals were obturated and after 48 hours storage, 8mm depth post space was prepared with application of normal saline as irrigant. Then, each group was divided into two subgroups depending on the type of the cements used for cementation of fiber reinforced composite (FRC posts (Panavia F2or Embrace. The pull-out bond strength test was evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed by Two-way AONVA. Results: The type of cement had no statistically significant effect on the bond strength; however, the type of irrigant was statistically effective. There was no interaction between two independent variables. The application of sodium hypochlorite significantly decreased the pull-out bond strength in Embrace cement in comparison with the use of normal saline. Conclusion: The type of irrigants used in endodontic treatment may affect on bond strength of FRC posts cemented by self-adhesive cements

  16. Bonding Effectiveness of Two Adhesive Luting Cements to Glass Fiber Posts: Pull-Out Evaluation of Three Different Post Surface Conditioning Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Graiff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength at the post/resin-cement interface with 3 different surface treatments of glass fiber posts and with 2 different luting resin cements. Sixty glass fiber posts (RelyX Fiber Post were randomly divided into 3 groups (n=20 and were luted with a dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement (RelyX Unicem and with a dual-polymerizing resin cement (RelyX ARC. This was carried out in association with a dual-polymerizing adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus in simulated plexiglass root canals after receiving three different pretreatment procedures. A pull-out test was performed on each sample to measure bond strengths. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Two samples from each group were processed for SEM observations in order to investigate the morphologic aspect of the post/cement interface. Both resin cements demonstrated significant different bond strength values (P<0.0001. The surface treatment result was also statistically significant (P=0.0465. SEM examination showed a modification of the post surface after pretreatment with methyl methacrylate. The dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement achieved higher MPa bond strength values. The use of methyl methacrylate as a surface treatment of glass fiber posts provided a significant increase in bond strengths between the posts and both luting materials.

  17. Bonding effectiveness of two adhesive luting cements to glass fiber posts: pull-out evaluation of three different post surface conditioning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graiff, Lorenzo; Rasera, Laura; Calabrese, Marco; Vigolo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength at the post/resin-cement interface with 3 different surface treatments of glass fiber posts and with 2 different luting resin cements. Sixty glass fiber posts (RelyX Fiber Post) were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 20) and were luted with a dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement (RelyX Unicem) and with a dual-polymerizing resin cement (RelyX ARC). This was carried out in association with a dual-polymerizing adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus) in simulated plexiglass root canals after receiving three different pretreatment procedures. A pull-out test was performed on each sample to measure bond strengths. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Two samples from each group were processed for SEM observations in order to investigate the morphologic aspect of the post/cement interface. Both resin cements demonstrated significant different bond strength values (P post surface after pretreatment with methyl methacrylate. The dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement achieved higher MPa bond strength values. The use of methyl methacrylate as a surface treatment of glass fiber posts provided a significant increase in bond strengths between the posts and both luting materials.

  18. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Three Commercially Available Glass Ionomer Cements in Primary Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, S Srinivasa; Murthy, Gargi S

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aims to comparatively evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of three commercially available glass ionomer cements - Miracle Mix (MM) (GC America Inc., Alsip, USA), Ketac Molar (KM) (3M Corp., Minnesota, USA) and amalgomer CR (AM) (Advanced Healthcare Ltd., Kent, England) in primary teeth and later examine the mode of the adhesive failure at the interface. Materials and Methods: Totally, 90 extracted sound primary molars were selected, and dentin on the buccal surface of crowns was exposed. Specimens were randomly assigned into three groups according to the restorative materials being tested. SBS tests were performed, and the obtained values were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (P < 0.05). SBS mean values on were recorded in megapascals (MPa) and the mode of failure was assessed using a scanning electron microscope. Results: SBS (in MPa) was - MM-5.39, KM-4.84, AM-6.38. The predominant failure mode was cohesive. Conclusion: Amalgomer CR exhibited statistically significant higher SBS of 6.38 MPa to primary teeth and has better adhesion to the primary teeth compared to the other test materials and can be considered as a restorative material in pediatric dentistry. However, the results of this study should be corroborated with further investigation to reach a definitive conclusion. PMID:26464550

  19. The shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin and enamel: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Raphaela F; Ramos, Carla M; Francisconi, Paulo A S; Borges, Ana Flávia S

    2015-03-01

    Clinicians continue to search for ways to simplify bonding procedures without compromising clinical efficacy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear strength of self-adhesive cements RelyX U100 and RelyX U200, and conventional resin cement RelyX ARC to enamel and dentin after different surface treatments. The crowns of 120 bovine incisor teeth were separated from the roots and embedded in epoxy resin in polyvinyl chloride tubes. In each tooth, the area to be cemented was delimited with central holed adhesive tape. The teeth were distributed into 12 groups (n=10) according to the substrate; etched or not with 37% phosphoric acid; and cement type of enamel-U100, enamel-phosphoric acid-U100, enamel-U200, enamel-phosphoric acid-U200, enamel-ARC, enamel-phosphoric acid-ARC, dentin-U100, dentin-phosphoric acid-U100, dentin-U200, dentin-phosphoric acid-U200, dentin-ARC, and dentin-phosphoric acid-ARC. After 7 days of storage in artificial saliva, shear strength tests were performed by using a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min). The data were analyzed with 3-way ANOVA and the Tukey test (α=.05). Fracture analysis was performed with a light microscope. Two specimens from each group were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope. In enamel, ARC (9.96 MPa) had higher shear strength (P=.038) than U100 (5.14 MPa); however, after surface etching, U100 (17.81 MPa) and U200 (17.52 MPa) had higher shear strength (Padhesive type. U200 self-adhesive cement had similar bond strength to the ARC in enamel, but the combination with phosphoric acid had the best bond strength. For dentin, self-adhesive resin cements are equally effective alternatives to conventional resin cement. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Correlative analysis of cement-dentin interfaces using an interfacial fracture toughness and micro-tensile bond strength approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Evelise M; De Munck, Jan; Pongprueksa, Pong; Van Ende, Annelies; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2016-12-01

    To determine the interfacial fracture toughness (iFT) and micro-tensile strength (μTBS) of composite cements bonded to dentin. Fifty feldspar ceramic blocks (Vita Mark II, Vita Zahnfabrik) were luted onto dentin using two self-adhesive (G-CEM LinkAce, GC; SpeedCEM, Ivoclar Vivadent), two self-etch (Multilink Primer & Multilink Automix, Ivoclar Vivadent; Scotchbond Universal & RelyX Ultimate, 3 M ESPE), and one etch-and-rinse (Excite F DSC & Variolink II, Ivoclar Vivadent) composite cement (n=10). After 48h in 100% relative humidity at 37°C, one half of each tooth was sectioned in sticks with a chevron notch at the cement-dentin interface and tested in a 4-point bending test setup (iFT). The remaining half of the tooth was sectioned in micro-specimens and stressed in tension until failure (μTBS). The mode of failure was determined with a stereomicroscope at 50× magnification. Data were submitted to Weibull analysis and Pearson's correlation (α=0.05). At 10% probability of failure, no significant differences could be found using iFT, while the etch-and-rinse composite cement Variolink II presented a significantly higher μTBS at this level. At 63.2% probability of failure, the self-adhesive composite cement G-CEM LinkAce revealed a significantly lower μTBS and iFT, and the self-etch cement Multilink Automix also revealed a significantly lower μTBS than all other cements. The correlation found between iFT and μTBS was moderate and not significant (r(2)=0.618, p=0.11). Overall, the etch-and-rinse and 'universal' self-etch composite cements performed best. The micro-tensile bond strength and interfacial fracture toughness tests did not correlate well. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of the application techniques of self-adhesive resin cements on the interfacial integrity and bond strength of fiber posts to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Ribeiro do Vale Pedreira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the influence of an application technique of a glass-fiber post using self-adhesive resin cements on the push-out bond strength and the presence of bubbles in the root thirds. The cements were either applied according to the manufacturer's instruction or using a commercial delivering system (Centrix, at which the cement pastes were collected and applied after manipulation. Material and Methods: Self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX U200/3M ESPE-U200; Maxcem Elite/Kerr-MAX; Clearfil SA Cement/Kuraray-CSA and a conventional cement (RelyX ARC/3M ESPE-ARC were used to cement a post and applied either based on the manufacturer's instructions or using a Centrix syringe to deliver the cements directly onto the post of choice, or directly into canal. The roots were scanned with a micro-computed tomography (μCT and then sectioned into nine 1-mm thick slices for a push-out bond strength test. The μCT images showed the percentage of bubbles in the root thirds (cervical, medium, and apical. Data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA/Tukey (α=0.05. Results: Triple interaction was not significant (p>0.05. The interaction “material” vs “root third” was not significant. A significant interaction was observed between “material” vs “application technique” (p0.05. Significantly higher bond strength was observed when the self-adhesive resin cements were applied using the Centrix delivery system, in comparison with the manufacturer's instructions (pmedium>apical (p<0.05. No correlations were found between the bond strength and voids. Conclusions: Bond strength and voids are negatively influenced by the conventional application technique for luting fiber posts. The delivery system (Centrix seems to produce better results when cementing fiber posts.

  2. Bond strength of a dental leucite-based glass ceramic to a resin cement using different silane coupling agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, Tabassom; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Keshvad, Alireza; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Zamani, Fereshteh

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of different types of novel silane coupling agents with two concentrations on the micro-tensile bond strength of a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystals to a dual-cured resin cement using an optimized method of silane application. Leucite-reinforced feldspathic ceramic blocks were fabricated, wet ground and cleansed. The bonding ceramic surfaces were treated with different organosilane solutions as follows: Control silane: Monobond S; methacryloxypropyltrimethoxy silane and experimental silanes with two concentrations (1.0 and 2.5 vol%): amino, isocyanate, styryl, and acrylate silanes. The silane application method consisted of brush application, hot air drying followed by rinsing with hot water and drying. Then a thin layer of an unfilled resin and a dual-cured resin cement was light-cured on the ceramic surfaces. The resin-ceramic blocks were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h and sectioned to produce beam specimens (n=17) with a 1.0 mm(2) cross-sectional area. Specimens were then subjected to thermocycling and tested in a micro-tensile tester device. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and Tamhane post-hoc test. The mean micro-tensile bond strength value for the styryl silane was significantly higher (P0.05). The micro-tensile bond strength of the leucite-based dental glass ceramic to a resin cement was affected by the type of silane coupling agent and not by the concentration of silane solutions. The best bond strength overall was achieved by methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane and experimental styryl silane solutions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. SEM analysis and push-out bond strength of fiberglass posts luted with different cements of glass-ionomer in humid environment: pilot test

    OpenAIRE

    PEREIRA, Jefferson Ricardo; Vidotti, Hugo Alberto; Valle,Accacio Lins do; Pamato, Saulo; Ghizoni,Janaina Salomon; HONÓRIO,Heitor Marques; Lorenzoni,Fabio Cesar

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength of fiberglass resin reinforced bonded with five ionomer cements. Also, the interface between cement and dentin was inspected by means of SEM. Fifty human canines were chose after rigorous scrutiny process, endodontically treated and divided randomly into five groups (n = 3) according to cement tested: Group I – Ionoseal (VOCO), Group II – Fugi I (GC), Group III – Fugi II Improved (GC), Group IV – Rely X Luting 2 (3M ESPE),...

  4. Effects of surface treatments and cement types on the bond strength of porcelain-to-porcelain repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Fatma Faiez; Finkelman, Matthew; Zandparsa, Roya; Hirayama, Hiroshi; Kugel, Gerard

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of four surface treatments and two resin cements on the repair bond strength of a ceramic primer. Eighty-eight pairs of disks (10 and 5 mm in diameter, 3 mm thickness) were prepared from heat-pressed feldspar ceramics (GC Initial IQ). After being stored in mucin-artificial saliva for 2 weeks, the 10-mm disks were divided into four surface treatment groups (n = 22) and then treated as follows: (1) no treatment (control); (2) 40% phosphoric acid; (3) 5% hydrofluoric acid + acid neutralizer + 40% phosphoric acid; (4) silica coating (CoJet-sand) + 40% phosphoric acid. The 5-mm disks were treated with 5% hydrofluoric acid + 40% phosphoric acid. The two sizes of porcelain disks, excluding the control group, were primed with Clearfil Ceramic Primer. The specimens in each group were further divided into two subgroups of 11 each, and bonded with Clearfil Esthetic Cement (CEC) or Panavia F 2.0 Cement (PFC). The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, thermocycled for 3000 cycles at 5 to 55°C, and stored at 37°C for an additional 7 days. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured with a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until fracture. Statistical analysis of the results was carried out with a two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (α = 0.05). Debonded specimen surfaces were examined under an optical microscope to determine the mode of failure. The statistical analysis showed that the SBS was significantly affected by surface treatment and resin cement (p porcelain. Also, PFC exhibited higher SBS than CEC did. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  5. Effects of sodium hypochlorite and RC-prep on bond strengths of resin cement to endodontic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, M D; Lee, K W; Agee, K A; Bouillaguet, S; Pashley, D H

    2001-12-01

    There is concern that the use of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and RC-Prep may lower the bond strength of resin cements. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of 5% NaOCl and RC-Prep treatment on the bond strength of a resin cement, C&B Metabond. Control roots (group 1) were biomechanically prepared using 0.9% NaCl as an irrigant; group 2, roots with 5% NaOCl; group 3, roots with RC-Prep; group 4, roots with 0.9% NaCl followed by 10% ascorbic acid; group 5, roots with 5% NaOCl followed by 10% ascorbic acid (pH 4); group 6, roots with 5% NaOCl followed by 10% neutral sodium ascorbate; and group 7, roots with RC-Prep followed by 10% ascorbic acid. All roots were then filled with C&B Metabond, incubated in water for 24 h, and then cross-sectioned into six 1-mm thick slabs representing cervical and middle root dentin. The slabs were trimmed and tested for tensile bond strength. The results demonstrated that both 5% NaOCl and RC-Prep produced significantly (p bond strengths, and the reductions could be completely reversed by the application of either 10% ascorbic acid or 10% sodium ascorbate.

  6. Tensile bond strength of a light-cured glass ionomer cement when used for bracket bonding under different conditions: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirovski, I; Madzarova, S

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the tensile bond strength of a new light-cured resin reinforced glass ionomer cement (Fuji Ortho LC), following the bonding of stainless steel brackets to 40 extracted human premolar teeth under four different enamel surface conditions: (1) non-etched, moistened with water; (2) etched, moistened with water; (3) etched, moistened with human saliva; and (4) etched, moistened with human plasma. The etched surface produced a higher bond strength than the non-etched surface when contaminated with distilled water. Contamination with human saliva resulted in a further increase in bond strength whilst plasma contamination produced an even higher strength. However, one-way analysis of variance showed no statistically significant difference between the various groups. After debonding, enamel and bracket base surfaces were examined for residual adhesive. The location of the adhesive also indicated improved bonding to etched enamel. This investigation shows that regardless of enamel surface pretreatment or environment, Fuji Ortho LC provides an adequate strength for bonding of orthodontic brackets.

  7. Evaluation of the resin cement thicknesses and push-out bond strengths of circular and oval fiber posts in oval-shapes canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Özgür; Kılıç, Kerem; Kılınç, Halil İbrahim; Aslan, Tuğrul; Sağsen, Burak

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the push-out bond strength varies between oval and circular fiber posts, and to examine the effect on the resin cement thicknesses around the posts. Eighteen mandibular premolar roots were separated into two groups for oval and circular fiber posts systems. Post spaces were prepared and fiber posts were luted to the post spaces. Roots were cut horizontally to produce 1-mm-thick specimens. Resin cement thicknesses were determined with a metallographic optical microscope and push-out tests were done. No significant differences were observed in terms of push-out bond strength between the oval and circular fiber posts (P>.05) The resin cement thicknesses of the oval posts were greater than those of the circular posts group in the coronal, middle and apical specimens (P<.05). In the light of these results, it can be stated that resin cement thickness does not affect the push-out bond strength.

  8. Effect of Carbamide Peroxide on the Push-out Bond Strength of Different Composition Glass-Ionomer Cement to Root Canal Dentin when used as Cervical Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Suellen Nogueira Linares; Venção, Ana Carolina; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Magro, Miriam Graziele; Guiotti, Aimeé Maria; Segalla, José Claudio Martins; Jordão-Basso, Keren Crisitina Fagundes; Ricci, Weber Adad; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of 37% carbamide peroxide on the bond strength of conventional or resin-modified glass-ionomer cements when used as a cervical barrier in endodontically-treated teeth. After root canal instrumentation and obturation, 40 specimens of the cement-enamel junction were obtained after transversal root canal sectioning from human extracted canines. The root canal specimens were standardized and filled with the following materials (n = 10, each group): G1: zinc phosphate (control), G2: Ketac glass-ionomer, G3: vitrebond glass-ionomer or G4: GC GL glass-ionomer. After 24 hours, the specimens were subjected to an application of 37% carbamide peroxide for 21 days, changed each 7 days and stored in an artificial pulp chamber. The specimens were then submitted to push-out bond strength testing with an electromechanical test machine (EMIC) and the failure mode in each specimen was analyzed with confocal microscopy (LEXT). G3 and G4 showed higher bond strengths values than the other groups (p 0.05). G1 showed the lowest bond strength value (p Glass-ionomer cements showed higher bond strength values than the zinc phosphate cement, and resin-modified glass-ionomer cements presented the highest push-out values to root canal dentin (GC, GL and Vitrebond). Glass ionomer cements are recommended to use as cervical barrier materials before the internal dental bleaching, but its efficiency is questionable.

  9. Effect of time interval between core preparation and post cementation on pushout bond strength of glass fiber-reinforced posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niakan, Mahsa; Mosharraf, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of timing of coronal preparation on the pushout bond strength of fiber postluted with resin cement in the root canal. In this experimental study, 48 mandibular human premolars were selected in a 3-week range. After root canal treatment and postspace preparation, a post #2(Angelus, Brazil) was cemented into the canal by a resin-based cement (Bifix SE, VOCO, Germany). Cylindrical resin composite cores were built on the posts. Then, the specimens were divided into 4 groups of 12 specimens each: one control group without core preparation and 3 experimental groups with core preparation that was done 15 min, 1 h, and 24 h after postcementation. One day after postcementation, each root was sectioned into 3 segments. Each slice was connected to universal testing machine. The load was applied at the speed of 0.5 mm/min till failure happened. The collected data were analyzed (SPSS/PC 20.0; SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey test at P 0.05). Nevertheless, there were significant differences among root regions (P fiber post and bond strength is higher in the cervical segment.

  10. The effect of a diode laser and traditional irrigants on the bond strength of self-adhesive cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncdemir, Ali Riza; Yildirim, Cihan; Ozcan, Erhan; Polat, Serdar

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of a diode laser and traditional irrigants on the bond strength of self-adhesive cement. Fifty-five incisors extracted due to periodontal problems were used. All teeth were instrumented using a set of rotary root canal instruments. The post spaces were enlarged for a No.14 (diameter, 1.4 mm) Snowlight (Abrasive technology, OH, USA) glass fiber reinforced composite post with matching drill. The teeth were randomly divided into 5 experimental groups of 11 teeth each. The post spaces were treated with the followings: Group 1: 5 mL 0.9% physiological saline; Group 2: 5 mL 5.25% sodium hypochlorite; Group 3: 5 mL 17% ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA), Group 4: 37% orthophosphoric acid and Group 5: Photodynamic diode laser irradiation for 1 minute after application of light-active dye solution. Snowlight posts were luted with self-adhesive resin cement. Each root was sectioned perpendicular to its long axis to create 1 mm thick specimens. The push-out bond strength test method was used to measure bond strength. One tooth from each group was processed for scanning electron microscopic analysis. BOND STRENGTH VALUES WERE AS FOLLOW: Group 1 = 4.15 MPa; Group 2 = 3.00 MPa; Group 3 = 4.45 MPa; Group 4 = 6.96 MPa; and Group 5 = 8.93 MPa. These values were analysed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey honestly significant difference test (Pdiode laser and orthophosphoric acid (P.05). Orthophosphoric acid and EDTA were more effective methods for removing the smear layer than the diode laser. However, the diode laser and orthophosphoric acid were more effective at the cement dentin interface than the EDTA, Therefore, modifying the smear layer may be more effective when a self-adhesive system is used.

  11. Bonding durability of using self-etching primer with 4-META/ MMA-TBB resin cement to bond orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kayo; Sirirungrojying, Somsak; Meguro, Daijiro; Hayakawa, Tohru; Kasai, Kazutaka

    2005-03-01

    This study determines the bonding durability when a self-etching primer is used with Superbond C&B (a 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride/methyl methacrylate-tri-n-butyl borane resin) to bond orthodontic brackets to enamel. Thermocycling test was used to assess bonding durability. Metal brackets were bonded to the phosphoric acid-etched or Megabond self-etching primer-treated enamel surface of human premolars using Superbond C&B. The shear bond strengths were measured after immersion in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours or after 2000 or 5000 cycles of thermocycling between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C. Data were analyzed using 2-way analysis of variance and Fisher's protected least significant difference test for multiple comparisons. There was no significant difference in shear bond strength between phosphoric acid and Megabond self-etching primer treatment before the thermocycling test. After 2000 and 5000 thermal cycles, significant decreases in shear bond strength were observed with phosphoric acid etching. On the contrary, no significant differences in shear bond strength were observed after 2000 and 5000 thermal cycles with Megabond self-etching primer. The adhesive remnant indices were not significantly different between phosphoric acid etching and Megabond self-etching primer treatment either before or after thermal cycles. This study suggested that when used with Superbond C&B in bonding orthodontic brackets, Megabond self-etching primer is superior to phosphoric acid as an enamel preparation agent in providing durable bond strength.

  12. Bonding of resin-based luting cements to zirconia with and without the use of ceramic priming agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Nakayama, Daisuke; Komine, Futoshi; Blatz, Markus B; Matsumura, Hideo

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated and compared bonding characteristics of resin-based luting agents and special ceramic primers to zirconia. Disk specimens (n = 242) were fabricated from zirconium dioxide ceramics (Katana) and bonded with four resin-based luting agents without priming. In addition, zirconia was bonded with 7 bondingsystem combinations of three priming agents and three resin-based luting agents. Two of the resin-based luting agents and two ceramic priming agents contain an identical adhesive monomer, 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP), either in the material itself or in the priming agent. Shear bond strength was determined after 20,000 cycles of thermocycling. The Kruskal-Wallis test was performed for both pre- and post-thermocycling groups to evaluate the difference among primer and luting agent variations. On the basis of the Kruskal-Wallis test, Steel-Dwass multiple comparisons were further performed to compare the difference among four luting agents and seven conbinations of three primers and three luting agents for both pre- and post-thermocycling conditions. Within the four unprimed groups, Clearfil SA Cement (5.8 MPa) and Panavia F 2.0 (6.7 MPa) showed statistically higher post-thermocycling bond strength than the other materials (0.1 MPa) (p primed with Monobond Plus (4.0-4.6 MPa) (p priming agents containing the adhesive monomer MDP provide better bond strength to zirconia than do other systems.

  13. Effects of the application techniques of self-adhesive resin cements on the interfacial integrity and bond strength of fiber posts to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedreira, Ana Paula Ribeiro do Vale; D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; Pereira, Patrícia Nóbrega Rodrigues; Chaves, Sasha Braun; Wang, Linda; Hilgert, Leandro; Garcia, Fernanda Cristina Pimentel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the influence of an application technique of a glass-fiber post using self-adhesive resin cements on the push-out bond strength and the presence of bubbles in the root thirds. The cements were either applied according to the manufacturer's instruction or using a commercial delivering system (Centrix), at which the cement pastes were collected and applied after manipulation. Material and Methods: Self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX U200/3M ESPE-U200; Maxcem Elite/Kerr-MAX; Clearfil SA Cement/Kuraray-CSA) and a conventional cement (RelyX ARC/3M ESPE-ARC) were used to cement a post and applied either based on the manufacturer's instructions or using a Centrix syringe to deliver the cements directly onto the post of choice, or directly into canal. The roots were scanned with a micro-computed tomography (μCT) and then sectioned into nine 1-mm thick slices for a push-out bond strength test. The μCT images showed the percentage of bubbles in the root thirds (cervical, medium, and apical). Data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA/Tukey (α=0.05). Results: Triple interaction was not significant (p>0.05). The interaction “material” vs “root third” was not significant. A significant interaction was observed between “material” vs “application technique” (p0.05). Significantly higher bond strength was observed when the self-adhesive resin cements were applied using the Centrix delivery system, in comparison with the manufacturer's instructions (pmedium>apical (pfiber posts. The delivery system (Centrix) seems to produce better results when cementing fiber posts. PMID:27812613

  14. Long-term tensile bond strength of differently cemented nanocomposite CAD/CAM crowns on dentin abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Stich, Nicola; Eichberger, Marlis; Edelhoff, Daniel; Roos, Malgorzata; Gernet, Wolfgang; Keul, Christine

    2014-03-01

    To test the tensile bond strength of luted composite computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) crowns after use of different adhesive systems combined with different resin composite cements on dentin abutments. Human molars (n=200) were embedded in acrylic resin, prepared in a standardized manner and divided into 20 groups (n=10). The crowns were treated as follows: (i) Monobond Plus/Heliobond (MH), (ii) Ambarino P60 (AM), (iii) Visio.link (VL), (iv) VP connect (VP), and (v) non-treated as control groups (CG) and luted with Variolink II (VAR) or Clearfil SA Cement (CSA). Tensile bond strength (TBS) was measured initially (24h water, 37°C) and after aging (5000 thermal cycles, 5/55°C). The failure types were evaluated after debonding. TBS values were analyzed using three-way and one-way ANOVA, followed by post hoc Scheffé-test, and two-sample Student's t-tests. Among VAR and after aging, CG presented significantly higher TBS (p=0.007) than groups treated with MH, AM and VP. Other groups showed no impact of pre-treatment. A decrease of TBS values after thermal aging was observed within CSA: CG (p=0.002), MH (p<0.001), VL (p<0.001), AM (p=0.002), VP (p<0.001) and within VAR: MH (p=0.002) and AM (p=0.014). Groups cemented with VAR showed significantly higher TBS then groups cemented with CSA: non-aged groups: CG (p<0.001), and after thermal aging: CG (p=0.003), MH (p<0.001), VL (p=0.005), VP (p=0.010). According to the study results nano-composite CAD/CAM crowns should be cemented with VAR. Pre-treatment is not necessary if the tested resin composite cements are used. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of airborne-particle abrasion on dentin with experimental niobophosphate bioactive glass on the microtensile bond strength of resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Edilausson Moreno; Lima, Darlon Martins; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Martinelli, José Roberto; Bauer, José

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of two resin cements bonded to dentin pre-treated with experimental niobophosphate bioactive glass (NBG). The experimental bioactive glass was prepared by mixing different amounts of NbO5; (NH4)2HP4; CaO; Na2CO3. The particle size distribution and composition of the bioactive glass powder were determined. Twenty flat dentin surfaces from sound extracted human molars were polished with 600-grit SiC paper and air-abraded using experimental bioactive glass niobium powder. The bonding procedures were accomplished by the application of two resin cements: self-etching Panavia F or self-adhesive RelyX U-100. The resin-bonded specimens were cut and the μTBS test was performed after 24h. The failure mode was determined with a stereomicroscope at 40× magnification. The results were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (α=0.05). The two-way ANOVA did not detect interactions between factors, but only a difference between the self-etching and self-adhesive cement (p=0.001). The self-etching resin cement Panavia F obtained a higher μTBS than the self-adhesive cement Relyx U-100. The predominant failure mode of the cements was adhesive/mixed between the resin cement and dentin. A new bioactive glass containing niobium did not interfere with the immediate bonding performance of self-etching and self-adhesive cements. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of sandblasting, silica coating, and laser treatment on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Nasrin; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Heidari, Solmaz; Khoshro, Kimia

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of laser irradiation as well as other surface treatment methods on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to the two types of resin cements. Zirconia ceramic blocks (ICE Zirkon) were sintered according to the manufacturer's instructions and duplicated in resin composites. The ceramic specimens were divided into four groups according to the following surface treatments: no surface treatment (control), sandblasting with alumina, silica coating plus silanization, and Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The specimens were divided equally and then bonded with Panavia F2.0 (self-etching resin cement) and Clearfil SA Luting (self-adhesive resin cement) to the composite blocks. The bonded ceramic-composite blocks were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 72 h, cut to prepare bar-shaped specimens with a bonding area of approximately 1 mm(2), and thermocycled for 3000 cycles between 5 and 55 °C, and the microtensile bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test. The results showed that the self-adhesive resin cement used in this study did not improve the microtensile bond strength when the zirconia surface was sandblasted by alumina. The use of the Nd:YAG laser did not enhance the bond strength between the zirconia and both types of resin cements. In addition, silica coating of the zirconia surfaces plus silane application significantly improved the bond strength regardless of the type of resin cement utilized.

  17. Effect of thermomechanical aging on bond strength and interface morphology of glass fiber and zirconia posts bonded with a self-etch adhesive and a self-adhesive resin cement to natural teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Batu Can; Ozer, Fusun; Takeichi, Takuro; Karabucak, Bekir; Koray, Fatma; Blatz, Markus B

    2014-09-01

    Information regarding the effect of thermomechanical aging (TMA) on the bond strength of luting cements to root canal dentin and endodontic posts is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of TMA on the bond strength of fiber and zirconia posts bonded to root canal dentin with 2 different resin cements with microtensile and scanning electron microscopic evaluation. Eighty extracted single-rooted human premolars were endodontically treated and restored with either a glass fiber post (FP) or a zirconia post (ZP) with 2 commercially available resin luting cements. The teeth were divided into 2 main groups. In the first group, posts (n=40) were bonded with a self-etch adhesive cement (SEAC). In the second group (n=40), posts were bonded using a self-adhesive cement (SAC). During the first aging phase, all specimens in each group were stored in distilled water for 30 days at 37°C. During the second phase, half of the specimens in each group were subjected to the TMA. The test groups were as follows: FP/SEAC, FP/SEAC+TMA, ZP/SEAC, ZP/SEAC+TMA, FP/SAC, FP/SAC+TMA, ZP/SAC, and ZP/SAC+TMA. The bond strength was measured with a microtensile test. Data were analyzed by 3-way analysis of variance and the Tukey honest significant different test (α=.05). FP/SEAC at 30 days was higher than in the other groups. However, bond strength values were significantly reduced in this group after TMA (Pposts and the resin cements as well as between the resin cements and the root canal dentin. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of surface treatments and storage times on the tensile bond strength of adhesive cements to noble and base metal alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmann, Paulo Afonso; Santos, Jose Fortunato Ferreira; May, Liliana Gressler; Pereira, Joao Eduardo da Silva; Cardoso, Paulo Eduardo Capel

    2008-01-01

    This work evaluated two resin cements and a glass-ionomer cement and their bond strength to gold-palladium (Au-Pd), silver-palladium (Ag-Pd), and nickel-chromium-beryllium (Ni-Cr-Be) alloys, utilizing three surface treatments over a period of six months. Eight hundred ten pieces were cast (in a button shape flat surfaces) in one of three alloys. Each alloy group was assigned to three other groups, based on the surface treatment utilized. Specimens were fabricated by bonding similar buttons in using one of three adhesive cements. The 405 pairs were thermocycled and stored in saline solution (0.9% NaCl) at 37 degrees C. The tensile bond strengths were measured in a universal testing machine after storage times of 2, 90, or 180 days. The highest mean bond strength value was obtained with the base metal alloy (10.9 +/- 8.6 MPa). In terms of surface treatment, oxidation resulted in the highest mean bond strength (13.7 +/- 7.3 MPa), followed by sandblasting (10.3 +/- 5.5 MPa) and polishing (3.0 +/- 6.4 MPa). Panavia Ex (13.2 +/- 9.3 MPa) showed significantly higher bond strengths than the other two cements, although the storage time reduced all bond strengths significantly.

  19. Bonding of Y-TZP to Dentin: Effects of Y-TZP Surface Conditioning, Resin Cement Type, and Aging

    OpenAIRE

    BOTTINO, M.A.; Bergoli, C. [UNESP; Lima, E.G.; Marocho, S. M. S. [UNESP; Souza, R.O.; Valandro, L F

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of two surface treatments, aging, and two resin cements on shear bond strength between dentin and yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal ceramic (Y-TZP).Materials and Methods: Eighty human molars were embedded in acrylic resin and sectioned 3 mm below the occlusal plane. These teeth and 80 cylindrical Y-TZP specimens (height, 4 mm; diameter, 3.4 mm) were divided into eight groups (n=10) using the following factors: Y-TZP surface treatment (Vi: low-...

  20. Effect of three radicular dentine treatments and two luting cements on the regional bond strength of quartz fibre posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Haiyan; Chen, Yaming; Yip, Kevin H-K; Smales, Roger J

    2011-12-01

    The purpose was to investigate by push-out tests and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) the effect, after first acid etching the post space walls, of three radicular dentine treatments on the regional bond strength of quartz fibre posts placed using two heavily filled resin luting cements. The crowns of 39 extracted maxillary central incisors were sectioned transversely 2 mm coronal to the labial cement-enamel junction and the roots endodontically treated. After standardized post space preparations and etching 15 s with 32% phosphoric acid, 36 roots were randomly divided into six equal groups. Quartz fibre posts (D.T. LIGHT-POST) were placed using three radicular dentine treatments (0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl) for 60 s, 10% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) for 60 s, 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) for 60 s followed by 5.25% NaOCl for 60 s) and two resin composite luting cements (ONE-STEP PLUS/DUO-LINK; ONE-STEP PLUS/LuxaCore Dual). Transverse segments (S1-S7), 1.00 mm (SD = 0.05 mm) thick, were sectioned from the coronal 8 mm of each root. Push-out bond strength tests were performed on coronal, middle and apical post space segments (S2, S4, S6) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were recorded and analyzed using a two-way mixed ANOVA design (a = 0.05). Three segments (S1, S5, S7) from roots in each group were examined using SEM/EDS. After post space preparation, acid etching and using each of the three radicular dentine treatments, the three remaining roots were sectioned longitudinally for SEM observation of the post space walls. At all root segment sites, the mean bond strengths from using 0.9% NaCl were significantly lower than for the other two radicular dentine treatments (P ≤ 0.02), and DUO-LINK cement had significantly higher mean bond strengths than LuxaCore Dual cement (P ≤ 0.01). There was a significant linear trend for reduced bond strengths from coronal to apical post space

  1. Comparative Evaluation of the Effect of Laser Etching on the Shear Bond Strength of Crowns Cemented with Two Different Luting Agents: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Ankur; Gandhi, Paresh; Baba, Nadim Z

    The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of crowns cemented on natural teeth after surface treatment of the enamel with an erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser. Crown preparation was done for 40 full-metal crowns, and wax patterns with loops were cast in a cobalt-chromium alloy. The Er:YAG laser was used for surface treatment of some teeth, and teeth without surface treatment acted as the control. Glass-ionomer and self-adhesive resin luting cements were used for cementation. Shear bond strength was tested using a universal testing machine, and statistical analysis was done using paired t test. Scanning electron microscopy analysis was also carried out to study alterations of the enamel and dentin surfaces. Significant increase in shear strength was noted after laser etching the teeth with Er:YAG laser for both types of cement (P crowns.

  2. Effect of chemomechanical caries removal on bonding of resin-modified glass ionomer cement adhesives to caries-affected dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamama, Hhh; Yiu, Cky; Burrow, M F

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the effect of: (1) chemomechanical caries removal (CMCR); (2) dentine surface treatments and (3) dentine substrates on adhesion of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) adhesives. One hundred and twenty permanent molars exhibiting moderate cavitation on the occlusal surface into dentine were used. Seventy-five carious molars were used for bond strength testing; the remaining 45 for micromorphological evaluation of the bonded interface. Caries was excavated with NaOCl-based CMCR (Carisolv), enzyme-based CMCR (Papacarie), or conventional rotary caries removal methods. Dentine surface treatment was performed using 37% phosphoric acid, 25-30% PAA or 20% PAA + 3% AlCl3 . Three-way ANOVA revealed that all three factors 'caries removal methods', 'dentine surface treatments' and 'dentine substrates' did not significantly affect bond strength (p > 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy micrographs showed that the acid-base resistant layer was thicker in caries-affected dentine compared to sound dentine. NaOCl- and enzyme-based CMCR methods have no adverse effect on adhesion of RMGIC adhesives to sound and caries-affected dentine. Dentine surface treatment with 37% phosphoric acid for 5 s has no negative effect on bonding of RMGIC adhesives to dentine compared with using polyacrylic acid for 10 s. RMGIC adhesives bonded well to both sound and caries-affected dentine. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  3. Shear bond strength of Biodentine, ProRoot MTA, glass ionomer cement and composite resin on human dentine ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaup, Markus; Dammann, Christoph Heinrich; Schäfer, Edgar; Dammaschke, Till

    2015-04-19

    The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of Biodentine, ProRoot MTA (MTA), glass ionomer cement (GIC) and composite resin (CR) on dentine. 120 extracted human third molars were embedded in cold-cured-resin and grinned down to the dentine. For each material 30 specimens were produced in standardised height and width and the materials were applied according to manufacturers´ instructions on the dentine samples. Only in the CR group a self-etching dentine-adhesive was used. In all other groups the dentine was not pre-treated. All specimens were stored at 37.5 °C and 100% humidity for 2d, 7d and 14d. With a testing device the shear bond strength was determined (separation of the specimens from the dentine surface). The statistical evaluation was performed using ANOVA and Tukey-test (p Biodentine increased significantly compared to the 2d investigation period (p Biodentine showed a significantly higher shear bond strength than MTA (p Biodentine and GIC was not significant (p > 0.05). After 7d Biodentine showed comparable shear bond values than GIC, whereas the shear bond values for MTA were significantly lower even after 14d. The adhesion of Biodentine to dentine surface seams to be superior compared to that of MTA.

  4. Effect of Resin Cement Pre-heating on the Push-out Bond Strength of Fiber Post to Root Canal Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parnian Alizadeh Oskoee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Various factors influence the interfacial bond between the fiber posts and root canal dentin. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of pre-warming of resin cement on the push-out bond strength of fiber posts to various segments of root canal dentin. Materials and methods. In this in vitro study, 40 single-rooted human premolars were decoronated and underwent root canal treatment along with post space preparation. The samples were randomly divided into two groups: In group 1, Panavia F 2.0 cement was used at room temperature; in group 2, the same cement was warmed to 55‒60°C before mixing. After fiber posts were placed and cemented in the root canals, 3 dentin/post sections (coronal, middle and apical with a thickness of 3 mm were prepared. A universal testing machine was used to measure push-out bond strength in MPa. Data was analyzed using two-factor ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test at α=0.05. Results. The mean value of push-out bond strength was high at room temperature, and the differences in the means of push-out bond strength values between the resin cement temperatures and between different root segments in each temperature were significant (P<0.05. Conclusion. Pre-warming of Panavia F 2.0 resin cement up to 55‒60°C reduced push-out bond strength to root canal dentin. In addition, in each temperature group bond strengths decreased from coronal to apical segments.

  5. Effects of the application techniques of self-adhesive resin cements on the interfacial integrity and bond strength of fiber posts to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedreira, Ana Paula Ribeiro do Vale; D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; Pereira, Patrícia Nóbrega Rodrigues; Chaves, Sasha Braun; Wang, Linda; Hilgert, Leandro; Garcia, Fernanda Cristina Pimentel

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of an application technique of a glass-fiber post using self-adhesive resin cements on the push-out bond strength and the presence of bubbles in the root thirds. The cements were either applied according to the manufacturer's instruction or using a commercial delivering system (Centrix), at which the cement pastes were collected and applied after manipulation. Self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX U200/3M ESPE-U200; Maxcem Elite/Kerr-MAX; Clearfil SA Cement/Kuraray-CSA) and a conventional cement (RelyX ARC/3M ESPE-ARC) were used to cement a post and applied either based on the manufacturer's instructions or using a Centrix syringe to deliver the cements directly onto the post of choice, or directly into canal. The roots were scanned with a micro-computed tomography (μCT) and then sectioned into nine 1-mm thick slices for a push-out bond strength test. The μCT images showed the percentage of bubbles in the root thirds (cervical, medium, and apical). Data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA/Tukey (α=0.05). Triple interaction was not significant (p>0.05). The interaction "material" vs "root third" was not significant. A significant interaction was observed between "material" vs "application technique" (pcements. Equivalent percentages of voids were observed for CSA, irrespective of the application technique (p>0.05). Significantly higher bond strength was observed when the self-adhesive resin cements were applied using the Centrix delivery system, in comparison with the manufacturer's instructions (pmedium>apical (pcementing fiber posts.

  6. Evaluation of the physical properties of the Iranian temporary cement, Tem Band, and the foreign one, Temp Bond, compared to ISO 3107

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soltan Karimy V.

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Iranian temporary cement, Tem Band, has been manufactured by Golchai company, and introduced to market as a suitable material but its properties have not been tested yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the setting time, film thickness, compressive strength, disintegration and arsenic content of Tem Band and Temp bond temporary cements and compare them to ISO 3107. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 12 samples from each cement were obtained and setting time, film thickness, compressive strength, solubility and disintegration were tested according to ISO 3107. In addition, arsenic content was tested based on ASTM 6052. Data were analyzed with t-test and p<0.05 was considered as the limit of significance. Results: The average setting time of Tem Band was 5 minutes and 47 seconds (4.17 minutes for Temp Bond, the average film thickness was 6.67 micrometer for Tem Band and 4.08 micrometer for Temp Bond. There was no difference between two cements regarding setting time and film thickness and for both was at the standard range. Compressive strength of Tem Band was 5.67 MPa and 8.5 MPa for Temp Bond. The difference was statistically significant but for both cements was less than standard (35 MPa. There was no significant difference regarding the solubility and disintegration tests. In both samples, the solubility and disintegration values were in standard ranges. Both cements did not contain arsenic but lead level was at the maximum standard range in Tem Band. Conclusion: Considering these results, both cements are applicable to different clinical situations based on their physical properties. Studies on the biocompatibility of the Iranian cement is recommended.

  7. Evaluation of the resin cement thicknesses and push-out bond strengths of circular and oval fiber posts in oval-shapes canals

    OpenAIRE

    Er, ?zg?r; K?l??, Kerem; K?l?n?, Halil ?brahim; Aslan, Tu?rul; Sa?sen, Burak

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the push-out bond strength varies between oval and circular fiber posts, and to examine the effect on the resin cement thicknesses around the posts. MATERIALS AND METHODS Eighteen mandibular premolar roots were separated into two groups for oval and circular fiber posts systems. Post spaces were prepared and fiber posts were luted to the post spaces. Roots were cut horizontally to produce 1-mm-thick specimens. Resin cement thicknesses were...

  8. Influence of different surface treatments on bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kömürcüoğlu, Meltem Bektaş; Sağırkaya, Elçin; Tulga, Ayça

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of different surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement by four point bending test. The CAD/CAM materials under investigation were e.max CAD, Mark II, Lava Ultimate, and Enamic. A total of 400 bar specimens (4×1.2×12 mm) (n=10) milled from the CAD/CAM blocks underwent various pretreatments (no pretreatment (C), hydrofluoric acid (A), hydrofluoric acid + universal adhesive (Scotchbond) (AS), sandblasting (Sb), and sandblasting + universal adhesive (SbS)). The bars were luted end-to-end on the prepared surfaces with a dual curing adhesive resin cement (Variolink N, Ivoclar Vivadent) on the custom-made stainless steel mold. Ten test specimens for each treatment and material combination were performed with four point bending test method. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. The surface treatment and type of CAD/CAM restorative material showed a significant effect on the four point bending strength (FPBS) ( P CAD/CAM restorative materials was modified after treatments. The surface treatment of sandblasting or HF acid etching in combination with a universal adhesive containing MDP can be suggested for the adhesive cementation of the novel CAD/CAM restorative materials.

  9. Effect of Calcereous Cow Horn and Storage on the Physicochemical Properties of Cement-Bonded Particleboards from Groundnut Hulls

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    Ogunkunle Olaoluwa Ayobami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fine particles of the groundnut hull and cow horn samples were prepared and subjected to hydration experiments with Portland cement with the moisture content maintained around 12%. All the compatibility factor values were very well above 60% making the different combinations appropriate for particleboard production. Metal analyses suggested high concentrations of Ca in both samples with values of  wt% and  wt% for the cow horn and groundnut hull samples, respectively. Potassium was also present in high concentrations but was lower than that of calcium. The cow horn was found to be a good substitute for the synthetic additives. Combinations of with the cow horn gave better compatibility ( between the groundnut hull particles and the Portland cement due to chelation, with the hot-water-treated samples being the best. Bond formation was established through the hydroxyl (–OH, carbonyl (C=O, esters or ethers (C–O, and amide (N–H functional groups on the groundnut hall samples. Storage over a period of time also gave a better compatibility of the groundnut hull sample with cement even in the absence of hot-water pretreatments and chemical additives.

  10. The effect of phosphoric and phosphonic acid primers on bone cement bond strength to total hip stem alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowitz, Eike; Liehn, Louisa; Jahnke, Alexander; Wöstmann, Bernd; Rickert, Markus; Niem, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Aseptic loosening at alloy-cement interfaces constitutes a main failure mechanism of cemented total hip replacements (THR). As a potential solution we investigated the effect of metal primers containing phosphoric and phosphonic acid on shear bond strength (SBS) of bone cement to THR alloys (CoCrMo, TiAlNb) and pure tin (Sn) substrates (20×8×3 mm). Metal surfaces were modified by polishing or Al2O3 blasting and primer application. Substrates without primer treatment served as references. Cylindrical cement pins (Ø 5mm) were polymerised onto substrate surfaces and aging (1, 5, 14 and 150 days) was simulated in aqueous NaCl solution (0.9%) before SBS determination and failure mode evaluation. Regardless of surface roughness and aging time, SBS for THR alloys and Sn was always significantly higher with primer treatment. Compared to untreated reference specimens (≤0.2MPa) SBS values increased even up to 350 fold (TiAlNb, 14 days) or 400 fold (CoCrMo, 5 days). In general, the phosphoric acid containing primer revealed significant higher SBS values on THR alloys compared to the phosphonic acid containing one. Al2O3 blasted specimens showed generally higher SBS values than polished ones with the exception of Sn which showed high SBS values in general. With primer treatment on polished Sn a significant reduction of SBS could not be detected even up to 150 days, whereas THR alloys showed only an SBS improvement in the short term (≤14 days). A NaCl-pitting corrosion probably led to an increasing and durable SBS on polished Sn surfaces over time. Compared to modern THR in clinical practice that shows survival rates of 10, 15, 20 or more years, the receivable bond strength enhancements described in this study appeared to be very short. The improved SBS on THR alloys lasted only a few days before it was lost again. In contrast, the phosphoric acid primer treatment of polished Sn appeared to be very promising and may play a key role in further investigations dealing with

  11. Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Resin-modified Glass-ionomer Cement to Bleached Teeth

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    Behnam Khosravanifard

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Bleaching can considerably reduce shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets bonded with composite adhesives. Application of antioxidants is a method to reverse the negative effect of bleaching on compositeto-enamel bond. However, the efficacy of antioxidants in increasing the SBS of brackets bonded using resin-modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC has not been studied, which was the aim of this study. Materials and methods. Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary first premolars were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Pola Office Bleaching, SDI. Sodium ascorbate 10% was applied to the experimental specimens (n=25. All the specimens were etched with 37% phosphoric acid (Ivoclar/Vivadent and bonded using RMGIC (Fuji Ortho LC, GC. The specimens were subjected to incubation (37°C, 24h and thermocycling (1000 cycles, 5-55°C, dwell time = 1 min. The SBS was measured at 0.5 mm/min debonding crosshead speed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI was scored under ×10 magnification. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test, one- and independent-samples t-test, and Fisher’s exact test (α=0.05. Results. The mean SBS of experimental and control groups were 11.97 ± 4.49 and 7.7 ± 3.19 MPa, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (P=0.000 by t-test. SBS of both control (P=0.014 and experimental (P=0.000 groups were significantly higher than the minimum acceptable SBS of 6 MPa, according to one-sample t-test. Conclusion. Application of ascorbic acid can guarantee a strong bond when RMGIC is to be used. However, RMGIC might tolerate the negative effect of bleaching with minimum SA treatments (or perhaps without treatments, which deserves further studies.

  12. Shear bond strength of self-adhesive resins compared to resin cements with etch and rinse adhesives to enamel and dentin in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lührs, A-K; Guhr, S; Günay, H; Geurtsen, W

    2010-04-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements should ease the placement of dental restorations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate their shear bond strength to enamel and dentin. Sixty molars were randomly assigned to 12 test groups (each n = 10), and the approximal surfaces were ground flat to get an enamel and dentin surface with a diameter of at least 4 mm. Ceramic specimens were bonded to the surfaces with either Variolink/Syntac Classic (VSC), Panavia F2.0 (PAF), RelyX Unicem (RLX), Maxcem Elite (MCE), iCem (IC), or an experimental self-adhesive resin cement (EXP). The shear bond strength (crosshead speed: 1 mm/min) was measured after 24-h storage in NaCl (37 degrees C). The fracture modes were determined with a stereomicroscope (magnification, 8-50-fold). VSC had the highest shear bond strength within the enamel groups (42.9 +/- 9 MPa) and IC the lowest (10.5 +/- 4.2 MPa, p bond strength was determined for VSC (39.2 +/- 8.9 MPa, p bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements was inferior compared to conventional composite resin cements.

  13. BiOBr@SiO2 flower-like nanospheres chemically-bonded on cement-based materials for photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Hou, Pengkun; Yang, Ping; Cheng, Xin

    2018-02-01

    Endowment of photocatalytic property on the surface of concrete structure can contribute to the self-cleaning of the structure and purification of the polluted environment. We developed a nano-structured BiOBr@SiO2 photocatalyst and innovatively used for surface-treatment of cement-based materials with the hope of attaining the photocatalytic property in visible-light region and surface modification/densification performances. The SiO2 layer on the flower-like BiOBr@SiO2 helps to maintain a stable distribution of the photocatalyst, as well as achieving a chemical bonding between the coating and the cement matrix. Results showed that the color fading rate of during the degradation of Rhodamine B dye of the BiOBr-cem sample is 2 times higher compared with the commonly studied C, N-TiO2-cem sample. The photo-degradation rates of samples BiOBr-cem and BiOBr@SiO2-cem are 93 and 81% within 150 min, respectively, while sample BiOBr@SiO2-cem reveals a denser and smoother surface after curing for 28 days and pore-filling effect at size within 0.01-0.2 μm when compared with untreated samples. Moreover, additional C-S-H gel can be formed due to the pozzolanic reaction between BiOBr@SiO2 and the hardened cement matrix. Both advantages of the BiOBr@SiO2 favor its application for surface-treatment of hardened cement-based material to acquire an improved surface quality, as well as durable photocatalytic functionality.

  14. Push-out Bond Strength of Glass Fiber Posts Cemented in Weakened Roots with Different Luting Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silveira-Pedrosa, Daniele M; Martins, Luis Rm; Sinhoreti, Mário Ac; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sousa-Neto, Manoel D; Costa, Edson D; de F Pedrosa-Filho, Celso; de Carvalho, Jacy Ribeiro

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the push-out bond strength (BS) of direct anatomic posts (DAPs) and conventional fiber posts (CFPs) cemented with different luting agents in different thirds of flared root canals. A total of 60 human single-rooted canine teeth were transversally sectioned 16 mm from the radicular apex. After endodontic treatment, canals were flared with diamond burs. Samples were divided into six groups according to post type and luting agent: DAP and RelyX U100 (RXU); DAP and RelyX ARC (RXA); DAP and RelyX Luting 2 (RXL); CFP and RXU; CFP and RXA; CFP and RXL. Roots were sectioned transversely into six 1-mm-thick slices. The push-out test was performed and failure modes were observed. The DAP groups (7.23 ± 2.05) showed highest BS values (p fiber posts with composite and the proper selection of luting resin cement are important for increasing bonding effectiveness in flared root canals.

  15. Influence of Eugenol-based Sealers on Push-out Bond Strength of Fiber Post Luted with Resin Cement: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Aline Segatto Pires; Leitune, Vicente Castelo Branco; Collares, Fabrício Mezzomo

    2015-09-01

    It is unclear in the literature if the presence of eugenol in root dentin impairs the retention of a fiber post luted with resin cements. The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature and perform meta-analysis on the influence of eugenol on the bond strength of posts luted to root canals. A systematic electronic search was performed in PubMed, Scopus, Lilacs, and Web of Science databases. No language or publication date restrictions were applied. Eligible studies were those that assessed the immediate push-out bond strength of posts cemented to root dentin after the removal of eugenol-based sealer and compared it with a eugenol-free group. Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria although 2 were excluded after full-text reading and 1 study was identified by cross-reference. Nine studies were included in the meta-analysis. Global analysis showed a significant influence of eugenol, which lowered the bond strength of fiber posts cemented to root canals (P negative effect of eugenol on bond strength in all subgroups assessed (P posts luted to root canal with resin cement, regardless of the type of adhesive system or resin cement used. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 2: Effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Asuka; Matsumoto, Mariko; Higashi, Mami; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning on resin cement bonding to CAD/CAM resin blocks. One of two resin cements, PANAVIA V5 (PV5) or PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX (PSA), were bonded to one of 24 CAD/CAM blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK). Each cement group was divided into four subgroups: no cleaning (Ctl), ultrasonic cleaning (Uc), acid cleaning (Ac) and Uc+Ac. Micro-tensile bond strengths (µTBSs) were measured immediately and 1, 3, and 6 months after water storage. Block surfaces after each treatment were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (p<0.001, F=40), 'resin cement' (p<0.001, F=696) and 'water aging' (p<0.001, F=71). The PV5 group exhibited higher µTBS values than the PSA group. Although cleaning after sandblasting was effective in removing residual alumina particles, it did not affect the long-term bonding durability with non-contaminated CAD/CAM resin blocks.

  17. Significant shear bond strength improvements of a resin-modified glass ionomer cement with a resin coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, Michael T; Stoeckel, Daniel C; Rawson, Kenneth G; Welch, Dan B

    2017-01-01

    Previous evidence has suggested that resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs) may be sensitive to temperature and moisture changes for the first 24 hours after photopolymerization. To test the hypothesis that a resin coating placed over the surface of an RMGIC restoration would decrease the susceptibility to moisture and temperature conditions, 44 RMGIC samples were prepared in inverted-cone recesses drilled in epoxy resin plates. After abrasion of all samples with 800-grit silicon carbide paper to simulate a diamond bur finish on the surface, a coat of highly filled resin was applied to the experimental group (n = 22) and cured according to the manufacturer's instructions. The plates were thermocycled 500 times between 5°C and 55°C and then maintained at 37°C with 95% humidity. The thermocycled samples were bonded to a second epoxy resin plate filled with RMGIC and subjected to shear bond strength testing. The resin-coated group had a significantly greater mean shear bond strength than the control group (P < 0.05). The resin coating also appeared to affect the mode of failure by significantly increasing the number of mixed failures (P < 0.05). The results suggest that a resin coating protects RMGIC from moisture- and temperature-induced damage and increases shear bond strength.

  18. Comparison of shear bond strength of calcium-enriched mixture cement and mineral trioxide aggregate to composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskoee, Siavash Savadi; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Bahari, Mahmoud; Motahari, Paria; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Asgary, Saeed

    2011-11-01

    Adhesion of composite resin and pulp capping biomaterials remarkably influences treatment outcomes. This in vitro study aimed to compare the shear bond strength of composite resin to calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) with or without acid etching. A total of 90 cylindrical acrylic blocks containing a central hole, measuring 4 mm diameter and 2 mm height were prepared. The blocks were randomly divided into three experimental groups based on being filled with CEM, MTA or RMGI. Samples in each group were then randomly divided into two subgroups, i.e. with or without phosphoric acid etching. Placing composite resin cylinders on the samples, shear bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. Failure modes of the samples were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests. Shear bond strengths in the etched and nonetched samples were not significantly different (p = 0.60). There was a significant difference in shear bond strength values of the three experimental materials (p strength values (p material and surface etching was statistically significant (p shear bond strength of these materials to composite resin. Besides, shear bond strength values of MTA and CEM to composite resin, are favorable due to their cohesive mode of failure. When MTA and CEM biomaterials are used in vital pulp therapy, it is advisable to cover these materials with RMGI. In addition, if it is not possible to use RMGI, the surface etching of MTA and CEM biomaterials is not necessary prior to composite restoration using total-etch adhesive resin.

  19. Effects of aging on the bond strength of self-etching adhesives and resin luting cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Riza Cetin

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: PF luting cement and PLP dentin adhesive were less affected by aging than the other dentin adhesive systems studied. Additional in vivo data should be acquired to complement these findings and clarify the clinical efficacies of the tested adhesives.

  20. Effects of sol-gel processed silica coating on bond strength of resin cements to glass-infiltrated alumina ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Haifeng; Wang, Xiaozu; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Feimin; Chen, Chen; Xia, Yang

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the effects of sol-gel processed silica coating on the bond strength between resin cement and glass-infiltrated aluminum oxide ceramic. Silica coatings were prepared on glass-infiltrated aluminum oxide ceramic surface via the sol-gel process. Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), Fourier Transmission Infrared spectrum (FTIR), and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) were used for coating characterization. Forty-eight blocks of glass-infiltrated aluminum oxide ceramic were fabricated. The ceramic surfaces were polished following sandblasting. Three groups of specimens (16 for each group) with different surface treatment were prepared. Group P: no treatment; group PO: treated with silane solution; group PTO: silica coating via sol-gel process, followed by silane application. Composite cylinders were luted with resin cement to the test specimens. Half of the specimens in each group were stored in distilled water for 24 h and the other half were stored in distilled water for 30 days before shear loading in a universal testing machine until failure. Selected ceramic surfaces were analyzed to identify the failure mode using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Nanostructured silica coatings were prepared on glass-infiltrated aluminum oxide ceramic surfaces by the sol-gel process. The silicon element on the ceramic surface increased significantly after the coating process. The mean shear bond strength values (standard deviation) before artificial aging were: group P: 1.882 +/- 0.156 MPa; group PO: 2.177 +/- 0.226 MPa; group PTO: 3.574 +/- 0.671 MPa. Statistically significant differences existed between group PTO and group P, and group PTO and groups PO. The failure mode for group P and group PO was adhesive, while group PTO was mixed. The mean shear bond strength values (standard deviation) after artificial aging were: group P: 1.594 +/- 0.111 MPa; group PO: 2.120 +/- 0.339 MPa; group PTO: 2.955 +/- 0.113 MPa. Statistically significant

  1. Conventional dual-cure versus self-adhesive resin cements in dentin bond integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Andreza Talaveira da Silva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available During post preparation, the root canal is exposed to the oral cavity, and endodontic treatment may fail because of coronal leakage, bacterial infection and sealing inability of the luting cement. OBJECTIVE: this study quantified the interfacial continuity produced with conventional dual-cure and self-adhesive resin cements in the cervical (C, medium (M and apical (A thirds of the root. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty single-rooted human teeth were restored using Reforpost # 01 conical glass-fiber posts and different materials (N=10 per group: group AC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + AllCem; group ARC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + RelyX ARC; group U100=RelyX U100; and group MXC=Maxcem Elite. After being kept in 100% humidity at 37°C for 72 hours, the samples were sectioned parallel to their longitudinal axis and positive epoxy resin replicas were made. The scanning electron micrographs of each third section of the teeth were combined using Image Analyst software and measured with AutoCAD-2002. We obtained percentage values of the interfacial continuity. RESULTS: Interfacial continuity was similar in the apical, medium and cervical thirds of the roots within the groups (Friedman test, p>0.05. Comparison of the different cements in a same root third showed that interfacial continuity was lower in MXC (C=45.5%; M=48.5%; A=47.3% than in AC (C=85.9%, M=81.8% and A=76.0%, ARC (C=83.8%, M=82.4% and A=75.0% and U100 (C=84.1%, M=82.4% and A=77.3% (Kruskal-Wallis test, p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Allcem, Rely X ARC and U100 provide the best cementation; cementation was similar among root portions; in practical terms, U100 is the best resin because it combines good cementation and easy application and none of the cements provides complete interfacial continuity.

  2. Bond strength of resin cement to yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia ceramic treated with air abrasion, silica coating, and laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyil, Musa Samil; Uzun, Ismail Hakki; Bayindir, Funda

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of a resin cement to yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP) surfaces treated with air abrasion, silica coating, or CO(2), Er:YAG, or Nd:YAG laser irradiation, or irradiated by each laser after air abrasion. Optimized methods are needed to improve the adhesive bonding between resin cement and Y-TZP ceramic. Twelve specimens were irradiated with each laser at different parameters and examined by scanning electron microscopy to determine which parameters to use in this study. One hundred forty-one Y-TZP discs were assigned to nine groups: C, no treatment; AA, air abrasion; CJ, silica coating; ER, Er:YAG laser; ND, Nd:YAG laser; CO, CO(2) laser; AA+ER, air abrasion + Er:YAG laser; AA+ND, air abrasion + Nd:YAG laser; AA+CO, air abrasion + CO(2) laser. The composite cylinders were fabricated. After the surface treatments, the specimens were silanized and composite cylinders were cemented with the resin cement. The shear bond strength test was performed after specimens were stored in water for 24 h and after thermocycling for 500 cycles. The highest bond strength was obtained in the AA group and was similar to that of the CJ group. In C, ER, CO, ND, AA+ND, and AA+CO groups, the shear bond strengths were similar to each other according to the Duncan test results. The lowest bond value was obtained in the AA+ER group. Although air abrasion and silica coating were the most effective surface treatment methods, CO(2) and Er:YAG laser irradiation alone or Nd:YAG laser irradiation after air abrasion may be used as an alternative treatment method to increase the bond strength between resin cement and Y-TZP material.

  3. Effect of post space treatment with adhesives on the push-out bond strength of fiber posts luted with self-adhesive resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufan Can Okay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength of fiber posts used in the restoration of endodontically-treated teeth with extreme material loss, luted with two different self-adhesive resin cements alone or with the combination of an adhesive. Materials and Method: The post spaces of 80 extracted mandibular first premolar roots were prepared and divided into 4 experimental groups according to fiber post (RelyX Fiber Post luting material. Group 1 was luted with RelyX Unicem, Group 2 was luted with RelyX Unicem + Adper Easy One, Group 3 was luted with Clearfil SA Cement, and Group 4 was luted with Clearfil SA Cement + S3 Bond. After 24 h and 1 month, horizontal sections of 1 mm thickness were made from the coronal, middle and apical root parts of the fiber posts, and push-out tests were performed. Groups were compared by using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD post hoc tests and storage periods were compared by using independent samples t-test (α=0.05. Results: For both evaluation time periods, RelyX Unicem + Adper Easy One showed the highest bond strength. Regarding the 24 h period, the lowest bond strength values were found for the apical sections followed by middle and coronal sections. One month results revealed similar bond strength values for the middle and apical sections (p>0.05 which were significantly lower than the values found for the coronal sections (p<0.05. RelyX Unicem + Adper Easy One exhibited greater push-out bonding strength compared to other groups in the middle and apical sections (p<0.05. Conclusion: According to the results of this in vitro study it can be concluded that, using an adhesive system in combination with a self-adhesive resin cement during post cementation may improve the bond strength.

  4. The effect of air abrasion of metal implant abutments on the tensile bond strength of three luting agents used to cement implant superstructures: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugdev, Jasvinder; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Lynch, Edward

    2014-01-01

    To assess the effect of airborne particle abrasion of metal implant abutments on tensile bond strength (TBS) of TempBond, Retrieve, and Premier implant cements. Specimens were designed to replicate a single metal implant crown cemented to both smooth and airborne particle-abraded Osteo-Ti implant abutments with zero degrees of taper. Twenty castings were fabricated and cemented to either a smooth surface abutment (SSA) or to an airborne particle-abraded abutment (AAA). TBS was measured with a 50-kg load and a crosshead speed of 0.5 cm/min in a universal testing machine. Each cement was tested 10 times on both abutment types. The mean TBS values (standard deviations, 95% confidence intervals) of SSAs for TempBond, Retrieve, and Premier cements were 115.89 N (26.44, 96.98-134.81), 134.43 N (36.95, 108.25-160.60), and 132.51 N (55.10, 93.09-171.93), respectively. The corresponding values for AAAs were 129.69 N (30.39, 107.95-151.43), 298.67 N (80.36, 241.19-356.16), and 361.17 N (133.23, 265.86-456.48), respectively. There was no significant difference in TBS among the dental cements when used with an SSA. Air abrasion of abutments did not increase the TBS of TempBond but significantly increased crown retention with Retrieve and Premier. For SSAs, all failures were adhesive on the abutment surface; for AAAs, mostly cohesive cement failures occurred. The retention of copings cemented with Retrieve or Premier to zero-degree-taper abutments was significantly increased after airborne particle abrasion of the abutments. However, this was not significant when TempBond was used. Airborne particle abrasion of abutments and the use of Retrieve or Premier can be recommended for nonretrievable prostheses. Although TempBond functioned similarly to the two other cements in SSAs, it is advisable to limit its use to provisional prostheses; its long-term performance needs to be assessed clinically.

  5. The Effect of Accelerated Aging on the Colour Stability of Composite Resin Luting Cements using Different Bonding Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralur, Satheesh B; Alfaifi, Mohammed; Almuaddi, Abdulmajeed; Al-Yazeedi, Mazen; Al-Ahmari, Abdulmajeed

    2017-04-01

    The main criterion of successful aesthetic restoration is to match the colour of the adjacent teeth. Porcelain laminate veneer is widely practiced indirect restoration in the contemporary aesthetic dentistry. The underlying luting cement colour influences the final outcome of the thin, translucent veneer shade. Hence, colour stability of luting cement is important criteria during their selection. The objective of the study was to assess the colour stability of the different dentin bonding techniques in composite resin luting cements. A total of forty intact, non carious teeth were prepared to receive Porcelain Laminate Veneers (PLV). The lithium disilicate PLV were fabricated, and fitting surface was conditioned with 5% hydrofluoric acid and silane application. According to the bonding technique employed for the cementation of the PLV, the teeth samples were randomly divided into the four groups of ten each. The Group I and Group II samples were conditioned with etch and wash; the polymerization of resin was accomplished with the dual cure for Group I and light cure for Group II. The Group III and Group IV samples were conditioned with self-etch and self-adhesive technique correspondingly. The teeth shade was recorded in similar locations with a spectrophotometer before and after subjecting them to the accelerated ageing process. The ageing process included the thermocycling process in water between 5°C and 55°C for 5000 cycles followed by 100 hours xenon light exposure. The data were analysed with SPSS 19.0 by ANOVA and LSD post-hoc comparison. The higher mean colour change was observed in Group I sample (etch washdual cure) with a ∆E value of 2.491. The ∆E value for Group II (etch wash-light cure) and Group III (selfetch) was 1.110 and 2.357 respectively. The lowest mean colour change was observed in Group IV (self-adhesive) with ∆E at 0.614. Statistical analysis showed significant differences between Group IV and Group I; Group IV and Group III with

  6. The impact of endodontic irrigating solutions on the push-out shear bond strength of glass fiber posts luted with resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Pelegrine, Rina Andrea; Silveira, Cláudia Fernandes de Magalhães; Bueno, Vanessa Castro Pestana da Silveira; Alves, Vanessa de Oliveira; Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches; Pereira, Gisele Damiana da Silveira; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2016-01-01

    Resin-based restorative materials, widely used to cement posts, may be influenced by irrigants used during endodontic chemical-mechanical preparation. This study evaluated the impact of endodontic irrigating solutions and adhesive cement systems on the push-out shear bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin. Ninety-six bovine incisors were divided into 12 groups (4 irrigants × 3 resin cements; n = 8). Prepared canals were irrigated with saline solution, 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 5.25% NaOCl, or 2% chlorhexidine gel, and posts were cemented with RelyX ARC, Panavia F, or RelyX U100. The bond strength was evaluated by means of the push-out test, and results were subjected to analysis of variance. The mean bond strength observed for the combination of 5.25% NaOCl irrigant and RelyX U100 cement was significantly lower (8.82 MPa) than the values found for the other groups (P fiber posts to dentin.

  7. Bond Strength of High-Viscosity Glass Ionomer Cements is Affected by Tubular Density and Location in Dentin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, Tamara K; Calvo, Ana Flávia B; Domingues, Gabrielle G; Mendes, Fausto M; Raggio, Daniela P

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the influence of tubular density of different dentin depths and location on the bond strength of high-viscosity glass ionomer cements (GIC). A total of 20 molars were selected and assigned into six experimental groups, considering two different high-viscosity GICs-Fuji IX (FIX) or Ketac Molar (KM), and dentin location-proximal, occlusal superficial, or occlusal deep dentin (n=10). Teeth were cut and a topographical analysis of four sections per group was performed to obtain data about the tubular density of each different dentin location and depths by laser scanning confocal microscopy (100×). Polyethylene tubes were placed over the pretreated surfaces and filled with one of the GICs. Microshear bond strength (µSBS) test was performed after storage in distilled water (24 h at 37°C). Failure modes were evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×). Multilevel regression analysis was performed to compare the results at a significance level set at 5%. The tubule density was inversely proportional to the bond strength for both GICs (p<0.05). Adhesive/mixed failure prevailed in all experimental groups. Proximal (30036.5±3433.3) and occlusal superficial 29665.3±1434.04 dentin shows lower tubule density, resulting in a better GIC bonding performance (proximal: FIX-3.61±1.05; KM-3.40±1.62; occlusal superficial: FIX-4.70±1.85; KM-4.97±1.25). Thus, we can concluded that the lowest tubule density in proximal and occlusal superficial dentin results in a better GIC bond strength performance.

  8. Restoration of Strip Crown with a Resin-Bonded Composite Cement in Early Childhood Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Mi-ae; Kim, Ah-hyeon; Shim, Youn-soo; An, So-youn

    2013-01-01

    Background. Early childhood caries is a widely prevalent disease throughout the world. It is necessary to treat this condition in early childhood; however, child behavior management may be particularly challenging during treatment. To overcome this challenge, we used Carigel to remove caries and RelyX Unicem resin cement for strip crown restoration. It not only has the desired aesthetic effect but is also more effective for primary teeth, which are used for a shorter period than permanent teeth are. Case Presentation. We report a case of three pediatric patients with early childhood caries, in whom caries was removed by using Carigel to avoid the risk of pulpal exposure associated with high-speed handpieces. Subsequently, aesthetic restoration was performed using strip crown with RelyX Unicem self-adhesive resin cement. Conclusion. RelyX Unicem has the following advantages: (1) not requiring have any special skills for the dentist for performing the procedure, (2) decreased occurrence of bubbles during injection of the cement, and (3) overall short duration of the procedure. Thus, it is appropriate for the treatment of pediatric patients whose behavior is difficult to manage. However, further studies are required in order to establish the use of RelyX Unicem as a stable restorative material in early childhood caries. PMID:24490090

  9. Effects of tree species and wood particle size on the properties of cement-bonded particleboard manufacturing from tree prunings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Ramadan A; Al-Mefarrej, H A; Abdel-Aal, M A; Alshahrani, T S

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the possibility of using the prunings of six locally grown tree species in Saudi Arabia for cement-bonded particleboard (CBP) production. Panels were made using four different wood particle sizes and a constant wood/cement ratio (1/3 by weight) and target density (1200 kg/m3). The mechanical properties and dimensional stability of the produced panels were determined. The interfacial area and distribution of the wood particles in cement matrix were also investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The results revealed that the panels produced from these pruning materials at a target density of 1200 kg m(-3) meet the strength and dimensional stability requirements of the commercial CBP panels. The mean moduli of rupture and elasticity (MOR and MOE) ranged from 9.68 to 11.78 N mm2 and from 3952 to 5667 N mm2, respectively. The mean percent water absorption for twenty four hours (WA24) ranged from 12.93% to 23.39%. Thickness swelling values ranged from 0.62% to 1.53%. For CBP panels with high mechanical properties and good dimensional stability, mixed-size or coarse particles should be used. Using the tree prunings for CBPs production may help to solve the problem of getting rid of these residues by reducing their negative effects on environment, which are caused by poor disposal of such materials through direct combustion process and appearance of black cloud and then the impact on human health or the random accumulation and its indirect effects on the environment.

  10. Effect of two resin cements and two fiber post surface treatments on push-out bond strength between fiber post and root dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druck, Carolina Ceolin; Bergoli, Cesar Dalmolin; Pereira, Gabriel Kalil Rocha; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of fiber post surface treatments on push-out bond strength between fiber post and root dentin. Sixty bovine mandibular teeth (N=60) were sectioned (16 mm), prepared (12 mm), embedded with acrylic resin and then allocated into six groups (n=10): Gr1- Silane coupling agent (Sil)+Conventional resin cement AllC em (Al C); Gr2- Sil+Conventional resin cement RelyX ARC (ARC); Gr3- tribochemical silica coating (TBS)+AlC; Gr4- TBS+ARC; Gr5- No treatment (NT)+AlC; Gr6- NT+ ARC. Specimens were sectioned in four slices (2 mm) and submitted to push-out test. Fracture analyses were executed at x200. The values of the push-out bond strength were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α=0.05). Resincement did not affect the bond strength values (p=0.9674), fiber post surface treatment affected the push-out bond strength (p=0.0353), interaction between factors did not affected the values (p=0.338). Tukey test did not show differences between the groups. Adhesive failure between cement and dentin was predominantly. The fiber post surface treatment appears have no Influence on bond strength between fiber post and root dentin. The tested fiber posts surface treatment appears do not Influence the fiber post bond behavior.

  11. Comparison of push-out bond strength of mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium enriched mixture cement as root end filling materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Adl

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to compare the push-out bond strength of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA and calcium enriched mixture (CEM as root end filling materials. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 root dentin slices (1 ± 0.2 mm were prepared from freshly extracted human maxillary central teeth and their lumens were enlarged to 1.3 mm. The slices were randomly divided into two groups (n = 20. MTA and CEM cement were mixed according to manufacturer′s instruction and introduced into the lumens. The specimens were wrapped in pieces of wet gauze soaked in distilled water and incubated at 37°C for 3 days. The push-out bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. The slices were then examined under a light microscope at ×10 magnification to determine the nature of bond failure. The data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney test (P < 0.001. Results: The mean push-out bond strength for CEM cement and MTA were 1.68 ± 0.9 and 5.94 ± 3.99 respectively. The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001. The bond failure was predominantly of adhesive type in MTA group and cohesive type in CEM group. Conclusion: CEM cement showed significantly lower bond strength to the dentinal wall compared to MTA.

  12. Microleakage of porcelain veneer restorations bonded to enamel and dentin with a new self-adhesive resin-based dental cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Gabriela; Johnson, Glen H; Geurtsen, Werner; Vargas, Marcos A

    2007-02-01

    Cementation technique of bonded ceramic restorations is a time-consuming and technique-sensitive procedure critical to long-term success. Evaluate the performance of a self-adhesive, modified-resin dental cement (Rely-X UniCem, 3M-ESPE) for the cementation of ceramic veneer restorations without previous conditioning of the tooth surface, and in combination with a one-bottle adhesive and a self-etching adhesive. Thirty-six premolars received a veneer preparation that extended into dentin. Leucite-reinforced pressed glass ceramic (Empress 1) veneers were cemented following manufacturers' instructions, according to the following treatment groups (n=9): (1) Variolink-Excite Ivoclar-Vivadent (V+E control), (2) Unicem+Single Bond 3M-ESPE (U+SB), (3) Unicem+Adper Prompt L-Pop 3M-ESPE (U+AP), (4) Unicem 3M-ESPE (U). After 24h storage at 37 degrees C, teeth were thermocycled (2000 cycles) at 5 and 55 degrees C, immersed in ammoniacal silver nitrate for 24h, placed in a developer solution overnight and sectioned using a slow-speed saw. Three 1mm longitudinal sections were obtained from each tooth and evaluated for leakage with a microscope (1x to 4x). Imaging software was used to measure stain penetration along the dentin and enamel surfaces. ANOVA with SNK (alpha=0.05) revealed that on dentin, U had significantly less leakage than U+SB and U+AP, but no different than V+E; on enamel U had leakage values that were significantly greater than the groups with adhesives. The self-adhesive cement U gave low leakage on dentin that was comparable to the cement that employed an adhesive for sealing dentin, whereas this cement benefits from use of an adhesive when cementing to enamel.

  13. Effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyun, Jung-Hoon; Shin, Tae-Bong; Lee, Joo-Hee; Ahn, Kang-Min; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Cha, Hyun-Suk

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement. The specimens were prepared to evaluate the bond strength of epoxy resin-based fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) to dual-curing resin cement (RelyX U200). The specimens were divided into four groups (n=18) according to different surface treatments: group 1, no treatment; group 2, silanization; group 3, silanization after hydrogen peroxide etching; group 4, silanization with warm drying at 80℃ after hydrogen peroxide etching. After storage of the specimens in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours, the shear bond strength (in MPa) between the fiber post and resin cement was measured using a universal testing machine. The fractured surface of the fiber post was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post-hoc analysis with Tukey's HSD test (α=0.05). Silanization of the fiber post (Group 2) significantly increased the bond strength in comparison with the non treated control (Group 1) (Pbond strength (Group 3 and 4) (Phydrogen peroxide etching before applying silane agent (Group 2 and 3) (P>.05). Fiber post silanization and subsequent heat treatment (80℃) with warm air blower can be beneficial in clinical post cementation. However, hydrogen peroxide etching prior to silanization was not effective in this study.

  14. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to feldpathic ceramic after different etching and silanization regimens in dry and aged conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brentel, Aline Scalone; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Alarca, Lilian Guimaraes; Amaral, Regina; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the durability of bond strength between resin cement and a feldspathic ceramic submitted to different etching regimens with and without silane coupling agent application. Methods. Thirty-two blocks (6.4 mm x 6.4 mm x 4.8 mm) were fabricated using a microparticulate

  15. Effect of conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of phosphate monomer-based cement on zirconia ceramic in dry and aged conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, Regina; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Balducci, Ivan; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the durability of bond strength between a resin cement and aluminous ceramic submitted to various surface conditioning methods. Twenty-four blocks (5 X 5 X 4 mm 3) of a glass-in filtrated zirconia-alumina ceramic (inCeram Zirconia Classic) were randomly

  16. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to silica-coated and silanized in-ceram zirconia before and after aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Ozcan, Mutlu; Amaral, Regina; Pereira Leite, Fabiola Pessoa; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared the microtensile bond strength of resin-based cement (Panavia F) to silica-coated, silanized, glass-infiltrated high-alumina zirconia (In-Ceram Zirconia) ceramic in dry conditions and after various aging regimens. Materials and Methods: The specimens were placed in 1 of

  17. [Effects of three different surface treatments on bond strength between composite resin core and glass ionomer cement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Daoyong; Zhong, Tian; Zhu, Hongshui

    2013-02-01

    To compare shear bond strength (SBS) between composite resin core (CRC) disposed with three different surface treatments and glass ionomer cement (GIC), so that to provide theoretical basis for luting of crowns to CRC. According to three different surface treatments, thirty blocks of CRC were randomly and equally divided into three groups: Roughening with diamond grit bur(RDB), RDB plus etching with Gluma Etch 35 Gel (RDBE), RDB plus coating with Adper Single Bond2 adhensive (RDBA). All CRC were cemented with GIC. All specimens were preserved in 37 degrees C water for 24 h, then SBS tests for eight specimens in each group were performed using a universal testing machine at a constant crosshead speed of 0.5 mm x min(-1). The surface topography of one CRC of each group was observed using field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) at 100 amplification. The interface between CRC and GIC was observed using FE-SEM at 500 amplification. Then the nature of failure was also recorded using FE-SEM at 25 amplification and the data were analyzed with a Kruskal-Wallis H test. The surface topography of each group and the interface between CRC and GIC observed using FE-SEM were significantly different, but significant differences on the nature of failure between groups were not found (P > 0.10). SBS of each group was (4.28 +/- 0.18) MPa for RDB, (4.65 +/- 0.17) MPa for RDBE, (2.39 +/- 0.21) MPa for RDBA, respectively (P < 0.01). The SBS between CRC and GIC is affected by the surface treatments of CRC.

  18. Long-term bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to intraradicular dentin pretreated with chlorhexidine and ethanol

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    Mariah Carvalho Guimarães dos SANTOS

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Self-adhesive resin cements do not require prior preparation of the tooth surface, therefore dentin pretreatments may influence long-term bond strength. Objective To evaluate the influence of 100% ethanol (ET and 2% chlorhexidine (CL treatment of intraradicular dentin on the long-term bond strength (BS of a self-adhesive resin cement (SRC. Material and method 80 bovine roots were restored with fiber posts and SRC (U200 3M/ESPE and distributed into 4 groups according to dentin treatment: Group 1 – without treatment; Group 2 – 2% CL for 1 minute; Group 3 – 100% ET for 1 minute; Group 4 – 2% CL, followed by 100% ET. The samples were cross-sectioned to obtain two sections (0.7 mm thick for each root third: coronal, middle and apical. The immediate push-out test was carried out after 48 hours, and the long-term push-out test, after 180 days. Result The three-way ANOVA test for randomized blocks showed no difference between the BS values at 48 hours and 80 days, irrespective of the treatment and the third (p>0.05. The interaction of the treatment/third pairing was significant (p = 0.041 since the treatment with CL promoted lower BS in the coronal third, while treatment with ET promoted better BS in the apical third. Conclusion Treatment with CL and ET, separately or combined, promoted no differences between the BS values of the SRC to root dentin over time.

  19. Measuring the Drying Kinetics and Mass Transfer Coefficients of Hornbeam Wood (Carpinus betulus from Nooshahar Region

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    Mosayeb Dalvand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, drying kinetics and mass transfer coefficients (permeability and diffusion of hornbeam wood (Carpinus betulus from Nooshahar region were investigated. For this purpose, several boards with two nominal thicknesses of 2.5 an 5 cm were prepared from a freshly cut log. The boards were dried inside a laboratory kiln at the dry bulb temperature of 40°C and relative humidity of 50% to the final moisture content of 6%. The pattern of moisture loss, thermal diffusion, final moisture gradient along the board thickness, transverse permeability and diffusion coefficients were then measured. The results showed that by increasing of board thickness, the rate of moisture loss decreased, particularly in the hygroscopic range and the moisture gradient increased, but the thermal diffusion was not affected. The transverse permeability and diffusion coefficient of hornbeam wood was 2.91 × 10 -19 m 2 and 3.29 × 10 -9 m 2s-1, respectively. Overall, it can be concluded that due to low transverse permeability coefficient of hornbeam wood, this species is difficult to be impregnated in common wood preservation process. In contrast, due to low diffusion coefficient, hornbeam wood is recommended for applications where high resistant to water vapor diffusion is required.

  20. Ten-year observation of dentin bonding durability of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin cement--a SEM and TEM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Kanako; Kitasako, Yuichi; Ichinose, Shizuko; Burrow, Michael F; Ariyoshi, Meu; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to assess dentin bond durability of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin cement over ten years, by evaluating the tensile bond strength, and SEM and TEM observations. Tensile bond strength of Super Bond C&B (SB) to bovine dentin was evaluated at 1 day and after 10 years. The mode of failure after debonding was observed by SEM. Interfacial ultrastructure and nanoleakage was observed by TEM at the baseline and after 10 y. The tensile bond strength significantly dropped after 10 y. The failure pattern shifted from cohesive failure in resin towards adhesive failure or cohesive failure in dentin. TEM observation revealed degradation of both resin and collagen networks within the hybrid layer and nanoleakage at the base of the hybrid layer after 10 y. The bond strength of SB to dentin significantly decreased, and the hybrid layer degraded, while the overlying hydrophobic resin layer showed little disintegration over 10 y.

  1. Shear Bond Strength of MDP-Containing Self-Adhesive Resin Cement and Y-TZP Ceramics: Effect of Phosphate Monomer-Containing Primers

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    Jin-Soo Ahn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different phosphate monomer-containing primers on the shear bond strength between yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP ceramics and MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement. Materials and Methods. Y-TZP ceramic surfaces were ground flat with #600-grit SiC paper and divided into six groups (n=10. They were treated as follows: untreated (control, Metal/Zirconia Primer, Z-PRIME Plus, air abrasion, Metal/Zirconia Primer with air abrasion, and Z-PRIME Plus with air abrasion. MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement was applied to the surface-treated Y-TZP specimens. After thermocycling, a shear bond strength test was performed. The surfaces of the Y-TZP specimens were analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. The bond strength values were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and the Student–Newman–Keuls multiple comparison test (P<0.05. Results. The Z-PRIME Plus treatment combined with air abrasion produced the highest bond strength, followed by Z-PRIME Plus application, Metal/Zirconia Primer combined with air abrasion, air abrasion alone, and, lastly, Metal/Zirconia Primer application. The control group yielded the lowest results (P<0.05. Conclusion. The application of MDP-containing primer resulted in increased bond strength between Y-TZP ceramics and MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cements.

  2. Evaluation in vivo of biocompatibility of differents resin-modified cements for bonding orthodontic bands

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    JANAINA A. MESQUITA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The focus of this study was to test the hypothesis that there would be no difference between the biocompatibility of resin-modified glass ionomer cements. Sixty male Wistar rats were selected and divided into four groups: Control Group; Crosslink Group; RMO Group and Transbond Group. The materials were inserted into rat subcutaneous tissue. After time intervals of 7, 15 and 30 days morphological analyses were performed. The histological parameters assessed were: inflammatory infiltrate intensity; reaction of multinucleated giant cells; edema; necrosis; granulation reaction; young fibroblasts and collagenization. The results obtained were statistically analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn test (P<0.05. After 7 days, Groups RMO and Transbond showed intense inflammatory infiltrate (P=0.004, only Group RMO presented greater expression of multinucleated giant cell reaction (P=0.003 compared with the control group. After the time intervals of 15 and 30 days, there was evidence of light/moderate inflammatory infiltrate, lower level of multinucleated giant cell reaction and thicker areas of young fibroblasts in all the groups. The hypothesis was rejected. The Crosslink cement provided good tissue response, since it demonstrated a lower level of inflammatory infiltrate and higher degree of collagenization, while RMO demonstrated the lowest level of biocompatibility.

  3. Push-out bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement used as endodontic sealer

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    Eduardo Diogo Gurgel-Filho

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of the present study was to investigate the bond strength of RelyX Unicem (3M to root canal dentin when used as an endodontic sealer. Materials and Methods Samples of 24 single-rooted teeth were prepared with Gates Glidden drills and K3 files. After that, the roots were randomly assigned to three experimental groups (n = 8 according to the filling material, (1 AH Plus (Dentsply De Trey GmbH/Gutta-Percha cone; (2 Epiphany SE (Pentron/Resilon cone; (3 RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha cone. All roots were filled using a single cone technique associated to vertical condensation. After the filling procedures, each tooth was prepared for a push-out bond strenght test by cutting 1 mm-thick root slices. Loading was performed on a universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey test for multiple comparisons were used to compare the results among the experimental groups. Results Epiphany SE/Resilon showed significantly lower push-out bond strength than both AH Plus/Gutta-Percha and RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha (p 0.05. Conclusions Under the present in vitro conditions, bond strength to root dentin promoted by RelyX Unicem was similar to AH Plus. Epiphany SE/Resilon resulted in lower bond strength values when compared to both materials.

  4. Push-out bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement used as endodontic sealer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgel-Filho, Eduardo Diogo; Lima, Felipe Coelho; Saboia, Vicente de Paula Aragão; Coutinho-Filho, Tauby de Souza; Neves, Aline de Almeida; da Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the bond strength of RelyX Unicem (3M) to root canal dentin when used as an endodontic sealer. Samples of 24 single-rooted teeth were prepared with Gates Glidden drills and K3 files. After that, the roots were randomly assigned to three experimental groups (n = 8) according to the filling material, (1) AH Plus (Dentsply De Trey GmbH)/Gutta-Percha cone; (2) Epiphany SE (Pentron)/Resilon cone; (3) RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha cone. All roots were filled using a single cone technique associated to vertical condensation. After the filling procedures, each tooth was prepared for a push-out bond strenght test by cutting 1 mm-thick root slices. Loading was performed on a universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey test for multiple comparisons were used to compare the results among the experimental groups. Epiphany SE/Resilon showed significantly lower push-out bond strength than both AH Plus/Gutta-Percha and RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha (p 0.05). Under the present in vitro conditions, bond strength to root dentin promoted by RelyX Unicem was similar to AH Plus. Epiphany SE/Resilon resulted in lower bond strength values when compared to both materials.

  5. Assessment of Tensile Bond Strength of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Resin to Enamel Using Two Types of Resin Cements and Three Surface Treatment Methods

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    Tahereh Ghaffari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resin-bonded bridgework with a metal framework is one of the most conservative ways to replace a tooth with intact abutments. Visibility of metal substructure and debonding are the complications of these bridgeworks. Today, with the introduction of fiber-reinforced composite resins, it is possible to overcome these complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite resin materials (FRC to enamel. Methods: Seventy-two labial cross-sections were prepared from intact extracted teeth. Seventy-two rectangular samples of cured Vectris were prepared and their thickness was increased by adding Targis. The samples were divided into 3 groups for three different surface treatments: sandblasting, etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid, and roughening with a round tapered diamond bur. Each group was then divided into two subgroups for bonding to etched enamel by Enforce and Variolink II resin cements. Instron universal testing machine was used to apply a tensile force. The fracture force was recorded and the mode of failure was identified under a reflective microscope. Results: There were no significant differences in bond strength between the three surface treatment groups (P=0.53. The mean bond strength of Variolink II cement was greater than that of Enforce (P=0.04. There was no relationship between the failure modes (cohesive and adhesive and the two cement types. There was some association between surface treatment and failure mode. There were adhesive failures in sandblasted and diamond-roughened groups and the cohesive failure was dominant in the etched group. Conclusion: It is recommended that restorations made of fiber-reinforced composite resin be cemented with VariolinkII and surface-treated by hydrofluoric acid.   Keywords: Tensile bond strength; surface treatment methods; fiber-reinforced composite resin

  6. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 1: Effects of sandblasting and silanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Mami; Matsumoto, Mariko; Kawaguchi, Asuka; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of sandblasting and silanization on resin cement bond strengths to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Twenty four blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK) were divided into two resin cement groups (PANAVIA V5 [PV5] and PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX [PSA]), and further divided into four subgroups representing different surface treatment methods: no treatment (Ctl), silanization (Si), sandblasting (Sb), and Sb+Si. After resin application, microtensile bond strengths (μTBSs) were measured immediately, 1, 3 and 6 months after water storage. In addition, surfaces resulting from each of the treatment methods were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Three-way analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (p<0.001, F=370), 'resin cement' (p<0.001, F=103, PSAbond strength was achieved with Sb+Si treatment. SEM revealed that sandblasting roughened surfaces.

  7. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2002-07-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that was performed to analyze the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  8. Evaluation of pH, ultimate tensile strength, and micro-shear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements

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    Luciana Artioli COSTA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the pH, ultimate tensile strength (UTS, and micro-shear bond strength (µSBS of two self-adhesive resin cements to enamel and dentin. Sound bovine incisors (n = 10 and two self-adhesive resin cements (i.e., RelyX U-100 and seT PP were used. The pH of the resin cements was measured using a pH-indicator paper (n = 3. Specimens for UTS were obtained from an hourglass-shaped mold. For µSBS, cylinders with internal diameter of 0.75 mm and height of 0.5 mm were bonded to the flat enamel and dentin surfaces. Bonded cylinders were tested in the shear mode using a loop wire. The fracture mode was also evaluated. The cement seT PP showed a low pH; U-100 showed significantly higher UTS (49.9 ± 2.0 than seT PP (40.0 ± 2.1 (p < 0.05 and high µSBS to enamel (10.7 ± 3.7. The lowest µSBS was found for seT PP to dentin (0.7 ± 0.6; seT PP to enamel (4.8 ± 1.7, and for U-100 to dentin (7.2 ± 1.9, showing an intermediate µSBS value (p < 0.05. Adhesive failure was the most frequently observed failure mode. The resin cement that presented the lowest pH and UTS also presented the lowest micro-shear bond strength to enamel and dentin.

  9. Effect of different post space irrigation procedures on the bond strength of a fiber post attached with a self-adhesive resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kul, Esra; Yeter, Kübra Yesildal; Aladag, Lütfü Ihsan; Ayrancı, Leyla Benan

    2016-05-01

    The effects of different post space irrigation procedures on the bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to the root canal dentin are still unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of alternative post space irrigation procedures on the cement strengths of posts attached with a self-adhesive resin cement. Forty single-rooted teeth were selected, and after root canal preparation and obturation, post spaces were prepared. The teeth were divided into 4 groups corresponding to the post space irrigation procedure and treated as follows: the distilled water (DW) group (control) received 15 mL of distilled water; the NaOCl+ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) group was treated with 5 mL of 5.25% NaOCl, 5 mL of 17% EDTA, and 5 mL of distilled water; the chlorhexidine (CHX) group was treated with 15 mL of 2% chlorhexidine solution; and the phosphoric acid (PA) group treatment consisted of etching the walls of the prepared post holes with 35% phosphoric acid. Fiber posts were attached with a self-adhesive resin cement, and specimens were cut horizontally for push-out testing. The statistical evaluation consisted of 1-way ANOVA with the post hoc Tukey honest significant differences test (α=.05). The NaOCl+EDTA treatment yielded a significantly higher bond strength than those used in the other 3 groups (P=.003). No statistically significant differences were found among any of the other groups, as different root regions showed similar bond strength values (P>.05). The results showed that EDTA in combination with NaOCl could be advantageous for post space irrigation when fiber posts are bonded with a self-adhesive resin cement. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of post diameter and cement thickness on bond strength of fiber posts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirmohammadi, H.; Gerges, E.; Salameh, Z.; Wesselink, P.R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the effects of different post diameter and oversized post spaces on the push-out bond strength of a fiber post to dentin. Method and Materials: Fifty extracted human maxillary central incisors and canines were divided into five groups and submitted to the push-out

  11. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite to resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using three different resin adhesives vs. glass-ionomer based adhesive

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    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical success of sandwich technique depends on the strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC bonding to both dentin and resin composite. Therefore, the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite bonded to RMGIC utilizing different resin adhesives versus a GIC-based adhesive was compared. Materials and methods: In this in vitro study, 84 holes (5×2 mm were prepared in acrylic blocks, randomly divided into seven groups (n=12 and filled with RMGIC (Light-Cured Universal Restorative, GC. In the Group I; no adhesive was applied on the RMGIC. In the Group II, non-etched and Group III was etched with phosphoric acid. In groups II and III, after rinsing, etch-and-rinse adhesive (OptiBond Solo Plus; in the Group IV; a two-step self-etch adhesive (OptiBond XTR and in Group V; a one-step self-etch (OptiBond All-in-One were applied on the cement surfaces. Group VI; a GIC-based adhesive (Fuji Bond LC was painted over the cement surface and cured. Group VII; the GIC-based adhesive was brushed over RMGIC followed by the placement of resin composite and co-cured. Afterward; resin composite (Point 4 cylinders were placed on the treated cement surfaces. The specimens were placed in 100% humidity at 37 ± 1°C and thermo cycled. The shear bond test was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min and calculated in MPa; the specimens were examined to determine mode of failure. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Results: The maximum (24.62±3.70 MPa and minimum (18.15±3.38 MPa SBS mean values were recorded for OptiBond XTR adhesive and the control group, respectively. The pairwise comparisons showed no significant differences between the groups that bonded with different adhesives. The adhesive failure was the most common failure mode observed. Conclusion: This study suggests that GIC-based adhesive could be applied over RMGIC as co-cure technique for sandwich restorations in lieu of employing the resin

  12. Regional bond strength to lateral walls in class I and II ceramic inlays luted with four resin cements and glass-ionomer luting agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Ana G; González-Lopez, Santiago; Bolaños-Carmona, Victoria; Maurício, Paulo J; Félix, Sergio A; Carvalho, Patricia A

    2011-10-01

    To investigate regional shear bond strength to lateral walls of ceramic inlays in occlusal and occlusoproximal cavities using etch-and-rinse and self-adhesive resin cements and a glass-ionomer luting agent. IPS e.max Press ceramic inlays were made in 50 Class I and 50 Class II standardized cavities in intact extracted human molars and divided into 5 luting agent subgroups (n = 10): Variolink II (VL); Multilink Sprint (MLS); Multilink Automix (MLA); RelyX Unicem (RLX), and Ketac Cem Aplicap (KC). Inlays were pre-etched with IPS Ceramic etching gel for 60s. After 48 h, two disks of ca 1.0 mm thickness, one of superficial and the other of deep dentin, were push-out tested in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The mode of failure was determined under a stereomicroscope at 20X. Data were analyzed with one way ANOVA, and Scheffé's test was used for post-hoc comparisons (α = 0.05). There were no significant differences in shear bond strength between Class I and Class II cavities for the dual-curing system in light-curing mode (VL=MLS=RLX), except that RLX demonstrated greater bond strength to deep dentin in Class II cavities. Bond strength values were significantly higher on deep than on superficial dentin. KC showed the worst result. Failures were mixed (adhesive/cohesive) for the resin luting cements and solely adhesive (cement/ceramic) for the glass-ionomer luting agent. Dual-curing etch-and-rinse or self-etching self-adhesive resin luting cements achieved greater bond strength when light curing was applied, with no differences between Class I and Class II cavities but higher values for deep vs superficial dentin. The weakest adhesion was obtained with glass-ionomer luting agent in both cavity types.

  13. Reactive Silicate Coatings for Protecting and Bonding Reinforcing Steel in Cement-Based Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Research done on the use of porcelain enamel as at interface using smooth mild steel rods has demonstrated that the a glass enamel coating...enamel coating. Vitreous enamel typically has a volume resistivity of 1×1014 ohm·cm, so a perfect enamel surface is an insulator . Defects were...C., and Malone, P., 2006: The Use of Porcelain Enamel Coatings on Reinforcing Steel to Enhance the Bond to Concrete. Proceeding of the

  14. Effect of saliva contamination on the shear bond strength of two types of glass- ionomer cements to dentin in primary teeth

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    Soleymani AA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: Use of glass ionomer cements in pediatric dentistry is increasing and limited information exists with regard to the effect of salivary contamination on the shear bond strength of glass-ionomer to dentin in primary teeth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of salivary contamination on the shear bond strength of two types of glass ionomer cements to dentin in primary teeth."nMaterials and Methods: A total of 36 human extracted primary molars were used in this study. The specimens were divided into two groups for each material and then further subdivided into three groups: group 1: uncontaminated, group 2: contaminated with saliva, group 3: contaminated, washed and air dried. The specimens in groups I, II, III were bonded to glass-ionomer and in groups IV, V, VI to resin modified glass-ionomer. Shear bond strength was measured using an Instron machine at 1 mm/min cross head speed. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey test."nResults: There were significant differences in the mean shear bond strength among groups IV, V (P=0.05. There were no significant difference among groups I & II (P=0.16, I & III (P= 0.93 and IV & VI (P=0.98."nConclusion: Results showed that salivary contamination can decrease the mean shear bond strength of"nlight- cured glass-ionomer to dentin in primary teeth.

  15. Influence of 2% chlorhexidine digluconate on bond strength of a glass-fibre post luted with resin or glass-ionomer based cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Diana Ferreira Gadelha; Chaves, Larissa Pinceli; Bim, Odair; Pimentel Garcia, Fernanda Cristina; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi; Honório, Heitor Marques; Wang, Linda

    2014-06-01

    This study evaluated the influence of 2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) on the bond strength (BS) of a glass-fibre post to the root canal, regarding the cements (dual-cured resin or resin-modified glass-ionomer cement), the root thirds and the time of storage. Eighty bovine roots were selected and endodontically treated, before being randomly assigned to the following groups according to the luting protocol: ARC (RelyX ARC); ARC+CHX; RL (RelyX Luting 2); and RL+CHX. After 24 h of luting, the roots were sliced to obtain 1 mm-thick slices. Half of each group was submitted to either 7-day or 6-month storage in artificial saliva (n=10). The specimens were subjected to push-out tests with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analysed with four-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P≤0.05). The failure modes were analysed with a digital microscope (50× and 200×). ARC yielded a significantly higher BS compared to RL (Peffect; it depends on the interaction with the luting cement and time (PGlass-fibre posts luted with RelyX ARC dual-cure resin cement exhibited higher BS than those luted with RelyX Luting 2 resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Furthermore, CHX was not effective to improve the BS and negatively affected the BS of RelyX ARC after 6 months of storage. The use of chlorhexidine solution seems not to improve the bond strength of fibre posts to root canals, disregarding the composition of the luting cement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Bond strength of resin modified glass ionomer cement to primary dentin after cutting with different bur types and dentin conditioning

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    Rebeca Di Nicoló

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different bur types and acid etching protocols on the shear bond strength (SBS of a resin modified glass ionomer cement (RM-GIC to primary dentin. Forty-eight clinically sound human primary molars were selected and randomly assigned to four groups (n=12. In G1, the lingual surface of the teeth was cut with a carbide bur until a 2.0-mm-diameter dentin area was exposed, followed by the application of RM-GIC (Vitremer - 3M/ESPE prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens of G2, received the same treatment of G1, however the dentin was conditioned with phosphoric acid. In groups G3 and G4 the same procedures of G1 and G2 were conducted respectively, nevertheless dentin cutting was made with a diamond bur. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24h, and then tested in a universal testing machine. SBS. data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA (= 5% and indicated that SBS values of RM-GIC bonded to primary dentin cut with different burs were not statistically different, but the specimens that were conditioned with phosphoric acid presented SBS values significantly higher that those without conditioning. To observe micromorphologic characteristics of the effects of dentin surface cut by diamond or carbide rotary instruments and conditioners treatment, some specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Smear layer was present in all specimens regardless of the type of rotary instrument used for dentin cutting, and specimens etched with phosphoric acid presented more effective removal of smear layer. It was concluded that SBS of a RM-GIC to primary dentin was affected by the acid conditioning but the bur type had no influence.

  17. Bond Strength of Two Resin Cements to Dentin After Disinfection Pretreatment: Effects of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Compared with Chemical Antibacterial Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Fekrazad, Reza; Shafiei, Ehsan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study compared the effects of two disinfection procedures (2% chlorhexidine [CHX] solution versus Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation) on the shear bond strength of ED primer II/Panavia F2.0 (ED/P) and Excite DSC/Variolink N (Ex/V). Background data: Different methods are used for cavity disinfection prior to adhesive cementation, which may influence the bonding ability of resin cements. Methods: Flat dentin surfaces were prepared on 100 extracted premolars and randomly divided into 10 groups. In the eight experimental groups, indirect composite samples were cemented with either ED/P or Ex/V under three disinfecting conditions on the dentin surface as follows: (1) CHX application before ED primer II/ after etching, (2) wet laser irradiation (Er,Cr:YSGG laser, 20 Hz, 0.75 W, 15% water +15% air), (3) dry laser irradiation with no water and air cooling. The control groups had no disinfectant application. After 24 h water storage, bond strength test was performed. The data (MPa) were analyzed using two way ANOVA and Tukey tests. Results: The lowest and highest bond strengths were obtained by dry laser and wet laser (10.18±2.67 and 17.36±2.94 for ED/P, 9.64±2.66 and 20.07±3.36 for Ex/V, respectively). For each cement, two-by-two comparisons of four groups revealed significant differences only for dry laser with others (pcements. PMID:23600378

  18. Pull-out bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to NaOCl-treated root dentin: effect of antioxidizing agents

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    Maryam Khoroushi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study evaluated the effect of three antioxidizing agents on pull-out bond strengths of dentin treated with sodium hypochlorite. Materials and Methods Root canals of 75 single-rooted human teeth were prepared. Fifteen teeth were irrigated with normal saline for a negative control group, and the remaining 60 teeth (groups 2 - 5 with 2.5% NaOCl. The teeth in group 2 served as a positive control. Prior to post cementation, the root canals in groups 3 - 5 were irrigated with three antioxidizing agents including 10% rosmarinic acid (RA, Baridge essence, 10% hesperidin (HPN, Sigma, and 10% sodium ascorbate hydrogel (SA, AppliChem. Seventy-five spreaders (#55, taper .02, Produits Dentaires S.A were coated with silica and silanized with the Rocatec system and ceramic bond. All the prepared spreaders were cemented with a self-adhesive resin cement (Bifix SE, Voco Gmbh in the prepared canals. After storage in distilled water (24 h/37℃, the spreaders were pulled out in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Pull-out strength values were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (α = 0.05. Results There were significant differences between study groups (p = 0.016. The highest pull-out strength was related to the SA group. The lowest strength was obtained in the positive control group. Conclusions Irrigation with NaOCl during canal preparation decreased bond strength of resin cement to root dentin. Amongst the antioxidants tested, SA had superior results in reversing the diminishing effect of NaOCl irrigation on the bond strength to root dentin.

  19. A comparative evaluation of the retention of metallic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement under different enamel preparations: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Padmaja; Valiathan, Ashima; Arora, Ankit; Agarwal, Sachin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: For orthodontists, the ideal bonding material should be less moisture-sensitive and should release fluoride, thereby reducing unfavorable iatrogenic decalcification. Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGICs), due to their ability to bond in the presence of saliva and blood can be a very good bonding agent for orthodontic attachments especially in the areas of mouth, which are difficult to access. Moreover, their fluoride releasing property makes them an ideal bonding agent for patients with poor oral hygiene. However, their immediate bond strength is said to be too low to immediately ligate the initial wire, which could increase the total number of appointments. The effect of sandblasting and the use of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCL) on the immediate bond failure of RMGIC clinically have not been reported in the literature until the date. This investigation intended to assess the effect of sandblasting (of the bracket base and enamel) and NaOCL on the rate of bond failure (with immediate ligation at 30 min) of Fuji Ortho LC and its comparison with that of conventional light cured composite resin over a period of 1 year. Materials and Methods: 400 sample teeth were further divided into 4 groups of 100 each and bonded as follows: (1) Group 1: Normal metallic brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (2) Group 2: Sandblasted bracket base and enamel surface, brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (3) Group 3: Deproteinized enamel surface using sodium hypochlorite and brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (4) Group 4: Normal metallic bracket bonded with Transbond XT after etching enamel with 37% phosphoric acid. This group served as control group. Results and Conclusion: Results showed that sandblasting the bracket base and enamel, can significantly reduce the bond failure rate of RMGIC. PMID:24014999

  20. A comparative evaluation of the retention of metallic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement under different enamel preparations: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmaja Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: For orthodontists, the ideal bonding material should be less moisture-sensitive and should release fluoride, thereby reducing unfavorable iatrogenic decalcification. Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGICs, due to their ability to bond in the presence of saliva and blood can be a very good bonding agent for orthodontic attachments especially in the areas of mouth, which are difficult to access. Moreover, their fluoride releasing property makes them an ideal bonding agent for patients with poor oral hygiene. However, their immediate bond strength is said to be too low to immediately ligate the initial wire, which could increase the total number of appointments. The effect of sandblasting and the use of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCL on the immediate bond failure of RMGIC clinically have not been reported in the literature until the date. This investigation intended to assess the effect of sandblasting (of the bracket base and enamel and NaOCL on the rate of bond failure (with immediate ligation at 30 min of Fuji Ortho LC and its comparison with that of conventional light cured composite resin over a period of 1 year. Materials and Methods: 400 sample teeth were further divided into 4 groups of 100 each and bonded as follows: (1 Group 1: Normal metallic brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (2 Group 2: Sandblasted bracket base and enamel surface, brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (3 Group 3: Deproteinized enamel surface using sodium hypochlorite and brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (4 Group 4: Normal metallic bracket bonded with Transbond XT after etching enamel with 37% phosphoric acid. This group served as control group. Results and Conclusion: Results showed that sandblasting the bracket base and enamel, can significantly reduce the bond failure rate of RMGIC.

  1. Effect of ultrasonic excitation on the microtensile bond strength of glass ionomer cements to dentin after different water storage times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Elcilaine Rizzato; Coldebella, Cármen Regina; Zuanon, Angela Cristina Cilense

    2011-12-01

    The application of ultrasound waves on glass ionomer cement (GIC) surface can accelerate the early setting reaction and improve the mechanical properties of the material, resulting in higher resistance to masticatory forces within a short period of time and thus increasing the clinical longevity of the GIC restoration. In this study, the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of two high-viscosity GICs (Fuji IX GP and Ketac Molar Easymix) and one resin-modified GIC (RMGIC-Vitremer) to dentin was tested after ultrasonic excitation and water storage. GIC blocks were built up on coronal dentin either receiving or not receiving a 30-s ultrasound application during the material initial setting. After storage in water for either 24 h or 30 d, beam-shaped specimens with a cross-sectional area of approximately 1.0 mm(2) were cut perpendicular to GIC/dentin interface and tested to failure. At 24 h, the ultrasonically set Ketac Molar had significantly higher (p Ketac Molar presented significantly higher μTBS after the longer water storage (p Ketac Molar improved its adhesion to dentin, particularly within the first 24 h after setting. Clinically, it seems that ultrasonic excitation can contribute to prevent retention loss of restoration at early stages of GIC setting reaction. Copyright © 2011 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of push-out bond strength of two fiber-reinforced composite posts systems using two luting cements in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Ajay; Pujar, Madhu; Patil, Chetan

    2013-09-01

    The concept of using a "post" for the restoration of teeth has been practiced to restore the endodontically treated tooth. Metallic posts have been commonly used, but their delirious effects have led to the development of fiber-reinforced materials that have overcome the limitations of metallic posts. The use of glass and quartz fibers was proposed as an alternative to the dark color of carbon fiber posts as far as esthetics was concerned. "Debonding" is the most common failure in fiber-reinforced composite type of posts. This study was aimed to compare the push-out bond strength of a self-adhesive dual-cured luting agent (RelyX U100) with a total etch resin luting agent (Variolink II) used to cement two different FRC posts. Eighty human maxillary anterior single-rooted teeth were decoronated, endodontically treated, post space prepared and divided into four groups (n = 20); Group I: D.T. light post (RTD) and Variolink II (Ivoclare vivadent), Group II: D.T. light post (RTD) and RelyX U100 (3M ESPE), Group III: Glassix post (Nordin) and Variolink II (Ivoclare vivadent) and Group IV: Glassix post (Nordin) and RelyX U100 (3M ESPE). Each root was sectioned to get slices of 2 ± 0.05-mm thickness. Push-out tests were performed using a triaxial loading frame. To express bond strength in megapascals (Mpa), load value recorded in Newton (N) was divided by the area of the bonded interface. After testing the push-out strengths, the samples were analyzed under a stereomicroscope. The mean values of the push-out bond strength show that Group I and Group III had significantly higher values than Group II and Group IV. The most common mode of failure observed was adhesive between dentin and luting material and between post and luting material. The mean push-out bond strengths were higher for Groups I and III where Variolink II resin cement was used for luting the fiber post, which is based on the total etch adhesive approach. In most of the samples, failure was observed between

  3. Influence of chemical irrigants on the tensile bond strength of an adhesive system used to cement glass fiber posts to root dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegrine, Rina Andréa; De Martin, Alexandre Sigrist; Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches; Pelegrine, André Antonio; da Silveira Bueno, Carlos Eduardo

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of endodontic irrigants on the tensile bond strength of an adhesive system used to cement glass fiber posts to dentin. Fifty bovine roots were divided into 5 groups according to the solution used during instrumentation: G1, 0.9% NaCl (control); G2, 1.0% NaOCl; G3, 2.5% NaOCl; G4, 5.25% NaOCl; G5, 2% chlorhexidine gel + 0.9% NaCl. The root canals were obturated with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer, and the glass fiber posts were cemented with Clearfil SE Bond/RelyX ARC. The specimens were submitted to tensile strength testing and the results were analyzed by analysis of variance. There were no statistically significant differences regarding the irrigant solution factor (P > .70). It was concluded that the different irrigant solutions did not affect the tensile bond strength of the fixation system used to cement the intraradicular glass fiber posts to dentin. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Optimization of properties of cement-bonded particleboard manufactured from cotton stalk and sawdust containing calcium chloride CaCl2 as an additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    morteza nazerian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was investigation of hydration behavior and mechanical properties of cement-bonded particleboard manufactured from different ratio of cotton stalk to poplar wood particle, sawdust content and CaCl2 as additive at different weight ratios. At the first, curing time of cement paste containing different amount of additive (CaCl2 and wood and cotton fines was determined. Besides, the effect of additive (CaCl2 content, weight ratio of cotton to poplar wood particles and percentage of sawdust on modulus of rupture (MOR, modulus of elasticity (MOE and internal bonding (IB of cement-bonded particleboard was evaluated by response surface methodology (RSM. In order to optimize the properties of panels, a mathematical model equation (second order plan was done by a computer simulation program. According to results, there is a good coincidence between predicted values and actual values (R2 for MOR, MOE and IB was 0.93, 0.90 and 0.95, respectively. This study showed that the response surface methodology (RSM can be effectively used for modeling of panel properties. Results showed that using weight ratio of cotton to poplar particle 43:57 the MOR, MOE and IB of panels can be reached to maximum values (12.5, 2545 and 0.35 MPa, respectively. Simultaneously, application of 4.5% additive and 9% sawdust at had a positive effect on the properties of the panels.

  5. Effects of air abrasion with alumina or glass beads on surface characteristics of CAD/CAM composite materials and the bond strength of resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobuaki, Arao; Keiichi, Yoshida; Takashi, Sawase

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate effects of air abrasion with alumina or glass beads on bond strengths of resin cements to CAD/CAM composite materials. CAD/CAM composite block materials [Cerasmart (CS) and Block HC (BHC)] were pretreated as follows: (a) no treatment (None), (b) application of a ceramic primer (CP), (c) alumina-blasting at 0.2 MPa (AB), (d) AB followed by CP (AB+CP), and (e) glass-beads blasting at 0.4 MPa (GBB) followed by CP (GBB+CP). The composite specimens were bonded to resin composite disks using resin cements [G-CEM Cerasmart (GCCS) and ResiCem (RC)]. The bond strengths after 24 h (TC 0) and after thermal cycling (TC 10,000 at 4-60°C) were measured by shear tests. Three-way ANOVA and the Tukey compromise post hoc tests were used to analyze statistically significant differences between groups (α=0.05). For both CAD/CAM composite materials, the None group exhibited a significant decrease in bond strength after TC 10,000 (p0.05). The AB+CP group showed a significantly higher bond strength after TC 10,000 than did the AB group for RC (pcomposite materials than was using an alumina powder and a CP.

  6. Pyrolysis of hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L.) sawdust: Characterization of bio-oil and bio-char.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moralı, Uğur; Yavuzel, Nazan; Şensöz, Sevgi

    2016-12-01

    Slow pyrolysis of hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L.) sawdust was performed to produce bio-oil and bio-char. The operational variables were as follows: pyrolysis temperature (400-600°C), heating rate (10-50°Cmin(-1)) and nitrogen flow rate (50-150cm(3)min(-1)). Physicochemical and thermogravimetric characterizations of hornbeam sawdust were performed. The characteristics of bio-oil and bio-char were analyzed on the basis of various spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques such as FTIR, GC-MS, 1H NMR, SEM, BET. Higher heating value, density and kinematic viscosity of the bio-oil with maximum yield of 35.28% were 23.22MJkg(-1), 1289kgm(-3) and 0.6mm(2)s(-1), respectively. The bio-oil with relatively high fuel potential can be obtained from the pyrolysis of the hornbeam sawdust and the bio-char with a calorific value of 32.88MJkg(-1) is a promising candidate for solid fuel applications that also contributes to the preservation of the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of surface modifications on the bond strength of zirconia ceramic with resin cement resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, Lubica; Ulmer, Peter; Lehmann, Frank; Wille, Sebastian; Polonskyi, Oleksander; Johannes, Martina; Köbel, Stefan; Trottenberg, Thomas; Bornholdt, Sven; Haase, Fabian; Kersten, Holger; Kern, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of surface modifications on the tensile bond strength between zirconia ceramic and resin. Zirconia ceramic surfaces were treated with 150-μm abrasive alumina particles, 150-μm abrasive zirconia particles, argon-ion bombardment, gas plasma, and piranha solution (H2SO4:H2O2=3:1). In addition, slip casting surfaces were examined. Untreated surfaces were used as the control group. Tensile bond strengths (TBS) were measured after water storage for 3 days or 150 days with additional 37,500 thermal cycling for artificial aging. Statistical analyses were performed with 1-way and 3-way ANOVA, followed by comparison of means with the Tukey HSD test. After storage in distilled water for three days at 37 °C, the highest mean tensile bond strengths (TBS) were observed for zirconia ceramic surfaces abraded with 150-μm abrasive alumina particles (TBS(AAP)=37.3 MPa, TBS(CAAP)=40.4 MPa), and 150-μm abrasive zirconia particles (TBS(AZP)=34.8 MPa, TBS(CAZP)=35.8 MPa). Also a high TBS was observed for specimens treated with argon-ion bombardment (TBS(BAI)=37.8 MPa). After 150 days of storage, specimens abraded with 150-μm abrasive alumina particles and 150-μm abrasive zirconia particles revealed high TBS (TBS(AAP)=37.6 MPa, TBS(CAAP)=33.0 MPa, TBS(AZP)=22.1 MPa and TBS(CAZP)=22.8 MPa). A high TBS was observed also for specimens prepared with slip casting (TBS(SC)=30.0 MPa). A decrease of TBS was observed for control specimens (TBS(UNT)=12.5 MPa, TBS(CUNT)=9.0 MPa), specimens treated with argon-ion bombardment (TBS(BAI)=10.3 MPa) and gas plasma (TBS(GP)=11.0 MPa). A decrease of TBS was observed also for specimens treated with piranha solution (TBS(PS)=3.9 MPa, TBS(CPS)=4.1 MPa). A significant difference in TBS after three days storage was observed for specimens treated with different methods (p0.05), CAAP(p>0.05) and SC(p>0.05). However, the failure patterns of debonded specimens prepared with 150-μm abrasive zirconia

  8. An in situ evaluation of the polymerization shrinkage, degree of conversion, and bond strength of resin cements used for luting fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Camilo Andrés; de Oliveira Franco, Ana Paula Gebert; Gomes, Giovana Mongruel; Bittencourt, Bruna Fortes; Kalinowski, Hypolito José; Gomes, João Carlos; Gomes, Osnara Maria Mongruel

    2016-10-01

    The behavior and magnitude of the deformations that occur during polymerization and the behavior of the luting agents of glass fiber posts inside the root canal require quantification. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the in situ polymerization shrinkage, degree of conversion, and bond strength inside the root canal of resin cements used to lute fiber posts. Thirty maxillary canines were prepared to lute fiber posts. The teeth were randomly divided into 2 groups (n=15) according to the cementation system used, which included ARC, the conventional dual-polymerized resin cement RelyX ARC, and the U200 system, a self-adhesive resin cement, RelyX U200. Two fiber optic sensors with recorded Bragg gratings (FBG) were attached to each post before inserting the resin cement inside the root canal to measure the polymerization shrinkage (PS) of the cements in the cervical and apical root regions (με). Specimens were sectioned (into cervical and apical regions) to evaluate bond strength (BS) with a push-out test and degree of conversion (DC) with micro-Raman spectroscopy. Data were statistically analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey honestly significant difference post hoc test (α=.05). The ARC and U200 system showed similar PS values (-276.4 ±129.2 με and -252.1 ±119.2 με, respectively). DC values from ARC were higher (87.5 ±2.7%) than those of U200 (55.9 ±9.7%). The cervical region showed higher DC values (74.8 ±15.2%) and PS values (-381.6 ±53.0 με) than those of the apical region (68.5 ±20.1% and -146.9 ±43.5 με, respectively) for both of the resin cements. BS was only statistically different between the cervical and apical regions for ARC (P<.05). The ARC system showed the highest PS and DC values compared with U200; and for both of the resin cements, the PS and DC values were higher at the cervical region than at the apical region of the canal root. BS was higher in the cervical region only for ARC. Copyright © 2016

  9. Influence of Immediate Dentin Sealing on the Shear Bond Strength of Pressed Ceramic Luted to Dentin with Self-Etch Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Dalby

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine the effect of immediate dentin sealing (IDS, with dentin bonding agents (DBAs applied to freshly cut dentin, on the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RelyX Unicem (RXU cement. Method. Eighty extracted noncarious third molars were ground flat to expose the occlusal dentin surfaces. The teeth were randomly allocated to five groups (A to E of sixteen teeth each. Groups A to D were allocated a dentin bonding agent (Optibond FL, One Coat Bond, Single Bond, or Go! that was applied to the dentin surface to mimic the clinical procedure of IDS. These specimen groups then had etched glass ceramic discs (Authentic luted to the sealed dentin surface using RXU. Group E (control had etched glass ceramic discs luted to the dentin surface (without a dentin bonding agent using RXU following the manufacturer’s instructions. All specimens were stored for one week in distilled water at room temperature and then shear stressed at a constant cross-head speed of 1 mm per minute until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey HSD method (0.05 in the SBS between the test groups (A–D or the control (group E. Conclusion. IDS using the dentin bonding agents tested does not statistically (>0.05 affect the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RXU when compared to the control.

  10. In vitro shear bond strength of Y-TZP ceramics to different core materials with the use of three primer/resin cement systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Fahad A; Ayad, Neveen M; Khan, Zahid A; Mahrous, Amr A; Morgano, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Durability of the bond between different core materials and zirconia retainers is an important predictor of the success of a dental prosthesis. Nevertheless, because of its polycrystalline structure, zirconia cannot be etched and bonded to a conventional resin cement. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effects of 3 metal primer/resin cement systems on the shear bond strength (SBS) of 3 core materials bonded to yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramic retainers. Zirconia ceramic (Cercon) disks (5×3 mm) were airborne-particle abraded, rinsed, and air-dried. Disk-shaped core specimens (7×7 mm) that were prepared of composite resin, Ni-Cr, and zirconia were bonded to the zirconia ceramic disks by using one of 3 metal primer/cement systems: (Z-Prime Plus/BisCem, Zirconia Primer/Multilink Automix, or Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil SA). SBS was tested in a universal testing machine. Stereomicroscopy was used to evaluate the failure mode of debonded specimens. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and post hoc analysis using the Scheffe procedure (α=.05). Clearfil SA/Clearfil Ceramic Primer system with an Ni-Cr core yielded the highest SBS value (19.03 MPa), whereas the lowest SBS value was obtained when Multilink Automix/Zirconia Primer system was used with the zirconia core group (4.09 MPa). Differences in mean SBS values among the cement/primer groups were statistically significant, except for Clearfil SA and BisCem with both composite resin and zirconia cores. Differences in mean SBS values among the core subgroups were not statistically significant, except for zirconia core with BisCem, Multilink, and Clearfil SA. The predominant failure mode was adhesive, except for Clearfil SA and BisCem luting agents with composite resin cores, which displayed cohesive failure, and Multilink Automix with a composite resin, core as well as Clearfil SA with Ni-Cr cores, where the debonded specimens of each group displayed a mixed

  11. Push-out Bond Strength of Fast-setting Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Pozzolan-based Cements: ENDOCEM MTA and ENDOCEM Zr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; Carvalho, Nancy Kudsi; Guberman, Marta Reis da Costa Labanca; Prado, Marina; Senna, Plinio Mendes; Souza, Erick M; De-Deus, Gustavo

    2017-05-01

    The present study investigated the root canal dentin bond strength of 2 newly developed fast-setting mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and pozzolan-based cements: ENDOCEM MTA (Maruchi, Wonju, Korea) and ENDOCEM Zr (Maruchi). White MTA (Angelus, Londrina, Brazil) was used as the reference material for comparison. Root slices (1 mm ± 0.1 mm) were obtained from the middle third of 15 maxillary incisors previously selected. Three canal-like holes (0.8 diameter) were drilled perpendicularly on the axial surface of each root slice. A standardized irrigation protocol was applied for all samples, and after drying, each hole was filled with 1 of 3 test repair materials. Finally, slices were stored in contact with phosphate-buffered saline solution (pH = 7.2) for 7 days at 37°C before the push-out assay. Data were nonparametrically evaluated at α = 5%. The Friedman test was unable to confirm a significant dissimilarity in push-out ranks among the tested cements (P = .220). The new fast-setting MTA and pozzolan-based cements ENDOCEM MTA and ENDOCEM Zr present suitable bond strength performance, which is comparable with white MTA. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of different surface treatments on push-out bond strengths of fiber-reinforced posts luted with dual-cure resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, H; Ayranci, L B; Kurklu, D; Topcuoglu, H S; Barutcigil, C

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate whether fiber postsurface conditioning with air abrasion or erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser would influence the bond strength of dual-cure resin cement to the fiber-reinforced (FRC) posts. Twenty-one FRC posts were divided into three groups according to surface treatment methods as follows: An untreated control group air abrasion with Al2O3group, and Er:YAG laser treated group with 150 mJ parameter. Fiber posts were then built up to dual-cure resin cement. Eighteen specimens were set and sectioned perpendicularly along the long axis of the post using a saw. Two disks (thickness of 2 mm) were obtained from each specimen (n = 12). Remaining three posts were stored for scanning electron microscopic evaluation. Push out test was performed on the each specimen and the values were recorded as MPa. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey post-hoc tests (P posts were luted to dual-cure resin cement. Additional studies should be designed with different types and parameters of laser devices to understand the effect of these devices on bond strength.

  13. Influence of irrigation protocols on the bond strength of fiber posts cemented with a self-adhesive luting agent 24 hours after endodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Jessica Ferraz Carvalho; Lima, Adriano Fonseca; Humel, Maria Malerba Colombi; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different irrigation protocols on the bond strength, at different root depths, of fiber posts cemented with a self-adhesive cement 24 hours after endodontic treatment. Fifty-six bovine incisor roots were endodontically prepared and separated into 7 groups (n = 8) according to irrigation protocols: group 1, sterile saline (control); group 2, chlorhexidine (CHX) gel 2% and saline; group 3, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) 5.25% and saline; group 4, CHX and saline (final irrigation with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid [EDTA] 17%); group 5, NaOCl and saline (final irrigation with EDTA); group 6, CHX and saline (final irrigation with NaOCl and EDTA); and group 7, NaOCl (final irrigation with CHX and EDTA). No statistically significant difference was found among the groups. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the different irrigation protocols did not influence the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement, which presented similar behaviors at the 3 root depths studied.

  14. Investigation of the fatigue behavior of adhesive bonding of the lithium disilicate glass ceramic with three resin cements using rotating fatigue method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassini, E; Mirzaei, M; Alimi, A; Rahaeifard, M

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the fatigue behavior of bonding interface of lithium disilicate ceramic with three different dual cure resin cements. Forty five bar shaped ceramic-resin-ceramic specimens were prepared and divided into 3 groups (n=15) according to the resin cement used (group1: Panavia F2.0, group 2: RelyX Ultimate, group 3: Duo-Link Universal). Three specimens of each group were tested using three point bending test and the fracture strength of the resin-ceramic bond was measured. Other specimens of each group were placed in the rotating fatigue testing machine at stresses equal to 30%, 40%, 50% and 60% of the fracture strength. The cyclic loading was continued until fracture or a maximum of 10,000 cycles. For the specimens which did not fail until 10,000 cycles, the cyclic loading was stopped and the remained fracture strength of the specimens was measured. None of the specimens with cyclic loads of 30% and 40% of the fracture strength, have failed until 10,000 cycles. After 10,000 load cycles, the fracture strength of these specimens was significantly lower than their initial fracture strength. On the other hand, all specimens with cyclic stresses equal to 50% and 60% of the fracture strength have failed before 10,000 cycles so that the numbers of load cycles of RelyX specimens were significantly higher than those of Panavia ones and the numbers of cycles of Panavia specimens were significantly higher than those of Duo-Link specimens. The fatigue resistance of the ceramic-resin interface is significantly lower than its bond strength. Furthermore, RelyX Ultimate showed the highest fatigue resistance and Duo-Link Universal exhibited the weakest fatigue resistance. Since dental restorations are under cyclic loading caused by mastication forces, the results of this research can be used to select fatigue resistant resin cements for bonding of ceramic restorations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of Cement Kiln Dust, Blast Furnace Slag and Marble Sludge in the Manufacture of Sustainable Artificial Aggregates by Means of Cold Bonding Pelletization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Francesco; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2013-07-25

    In this work, three different samples of solid industrial wastes cement kiln dust (CKD), granulated blast furnace slag and marble sludge were employed in a cold bonding pelletization process for the sustainable production of artificial aggregates. The activating action of CKD components on the hydraulic behavior of the slag was explored by evaluating the neo-formed phases present in several hydrated pastes. Particularly, the influence of free CaO and sulfates amount in the two CKD samples on slag reactivity was evaluated. Cold bonded artificial aggregates were characterized by determining physical and mechanical properties of two selected size fractions of the granules for each studied mixture. Eighteen types of granules were employed in C28/35 concrete manufacture where coarser natural aggregate were substituted with the artificial ones. Finally, lightweight concretes were obtained, proving the suitability of the cold bonding pelletization process in artificial aggregate sustainable production.

  16. Use of Cement Kiln Dust, Blast Furnace Slag and Marble Sludge in the Manufacture of Sustainable Artificial Aggregates by Means of Cold Bonding Pelletization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Cioffi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, three different samples of solid industrial wastes cement kiln dust (CKD, granulated blast furnace slag and marble sludge were employed in a cold bonding pelletization process for the sustainable production of artificial aggregates. The activating action of CKD components on the hydraulic behavior of the slag was explored by evaluating the neo-formed phases present in several hydrated pastes. Particularly, the influence of free CaO and sulfates amount in the two CKD samples on slag reactivity was evaluated. Cold bonded artificial aggregates were characterized by determining physical and mechanical properties of two selected size fractions of the granules for each studied mixture. Eighteen types of granules were employed in C28/35 concrete manufacture where coarser natural aggregate were substituted with the artificial ones. Finally, lightweight concretes were obtained, proving the suitability of the cold bonding pelletization process in artificial aggregate sustainable production.

  17. Assessment of the Shear Bond Strength between Nanofilled Composite Bonded to Glass-ionomer Cement Using Self-etch Adhesive with Different pHs and Total-Etch Adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Choobineh, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-03-01

    In the sandwich technique, the undesirable bond between the composite resin and glass-ionomer cement (GIc) is one of the most important factors which lead to the failure of restoration. Total-etch and self-etch adhesives may improve the bond strength based on their pH. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between the nanofilled composite resin and GIc using different adhesives. In this experimental study, 40 specimens (6×6mm) in 4 groups (n=10) were prepared in acrylic mold. Each specimen contained conventional GI ChemFil Superior with a height of 3mm, bonded to Z350 composite resin with a height measured 3mm. In order to bond the composite to the GI, the following adhesives were used, respectively: A: mild Clearfil SE Bond self-etch (pH=2), B: intermediate OptiBond self-etch (pH=1.4), C: strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (pH=1), and D: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch (pH=7.2). The shear bond strength was measured by using universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test were used to analyze the data (pself-etch) was significantly different from group D (total-etch) (pself-etch) with D (p= 0.024). The results of this study showed that applying the mild self-etch adhesive between the composite and the GIc results in stronger shear bond strength compared to intermediate and strong self-etch adhesives. Moreover, the self-etch adhesive increased the shear bond strength between composite resin and GIc more significantly than total-etch adhesive.

  18. Microtensile bond strength and scanning electron microscopic evaluation of zirconia bonded to dentin using two self-adhesive resin cements; effect of airborne abrasion and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Gamal

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Airborne abrasion-surface treatment of zirconia significantly enhanced the μTBS of both cements adhered to dentin while aging had an adverse effect. MS showed higher insignificant μTBS.

  19. Microtensile Bond Strength of CAD/CAM Resin Blocks to Dual-Cure Adhesive Cement: The Effect of Different Sandblasting Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekçe, Neslihan; Tuncer, Safa; Demirci, Mustafa; Kara, Dilan; Baydemir, Canan

    2018-02-11

    To investigate the effect of sandblasting powder particles on microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of dual-cure adhesive cement to CAD/CAM blocks. CAD/CAM blocks (Cerasmart, VITA, and LAVA) were cut in slabs and divided into groups: group 1, no sandblasting; group 2, sandblasted with 27-μm Al 2 O 3 ; group 3, sandblasted with 30-μm CoJet; group 4, sandblasted with 50-μm Al 2 O 3 . After sandblasting, all specimens were silanized and luted using dual-cure adhesive cement (G-CEM LinkForce). After 24 hours, bonded specimens were cut into 1 ± 0.2 mm 2 sticks, and μTBS values were obtained (N = 30). Additionally, 132 CAD/CAM block sections were prepared for surface roughness testing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluations. Results were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis One-way ANOVA and Dunn's Post Hoc Test (p 0.05). For LAVA, μTBS values of specimens that were sandblasted with 50-μm Al 2 O 3 powder were significantly higher than 30-μm-SiO 2 and 27-μm Al 2 O 3 (p CAD/CAM blocks for Cerasmart and VITA, although the results changed significantly for LAVA. The ideal bond protocol for CAD/CAM blocks is specific to the material used. © 2018 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  20. [The effect of H2O2 surface treatment of posts on the bond strength between glass fiber posts and the resin cement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Jian-hong; Guo, Jing; Zhu, Hong-shui

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of H2O2 on the push-out bond strength between glass fiber posts and the resin cement. Eighteen Tenax glass fiber posts and 18 Macthpost glass fiber posts were randomly assigned to 6 groups according to the surface treatments. Group A, no surface treatment (control group); Group B, treated with silane agent; Group C, treated with 3% H2O2, then with silane agent; Group D, treated with10% H2O2, then with silane agent; Group E, treated with20% H2O2, then with silane agent; Group F, treated with 30% H2O2, then with silane agent. The posts were adhered using the resin cement to form cylindrical resin block. Each resin block was sectioned to 7 sections of 1 mm thick. A push-out test was performed on other sections of each post to measure bond strengths. The date was recorded and analyzed with SPSS13.0 software package. The failure modes were examined with stereomicroscope. The bond strengths of Tenax post from A1 to F1 were (22.35±3.43) MPa, (22.75±1.92) MPa, (27.21±3.60) MPa, (32.32±2.19) MPa, (36.15±2.32) MPa and (40.51±2.37) MPa, respectively. The bond strengths of Macthpost post from A2 to F2 were (17.29±3.23) MPa, (17.01±3.18) MPa, (20.48±2.11) MPa, (23.60±2.60) MPa, (27.65±3.77) MPa and (30.52±2.99) MPa, respectively. No significantly difference (P>0.05) was found between Group A and Group B, except other groups. Treatment with H2O2 followed with silane agent can significantly improve the bond strength between Tenax and Macthpost glass fiber posts and resin cement. The group treated with 30% H2O2 has the highest bond strength, and the treatment procedure is more useful to improve the adhesion of the glass fiber post. Supported by Science and Technology Plan Project of Department of Health of Jiangxi Province (20131084).

  1. Push-out bond strength and SEM analysis of two self-adhesive resin cements: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Baldea

    2013-09-01

    Materials and methods: RelyX Fiber Posts #3 (3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany were luted with RelyX U200 (3M ESPE (n = 10 and Maxcem Elite (Kerr Corporation, Orange, CA, USA (n = 10. Mean values of push-out bond strength for each group and root region (cervical, middle and apical were calculated. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P 60% adhesive failures at the resin cement-dentine interface were observed.

  2. The effect of tooth-preparation cleansing protocol on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to dentin contaminated with a hemostatic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyabutr, Y; Kois, J C

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of tooth-preparation cleansing protocols on the bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to dentin contaminated with two different types of hemostatic agents. The occlusal surface of extracted third molars was flattened to expose the dentin surface and prepared for a full crown. Acrylic temporary crowns were fabricated and placed using temporary cement. The specimens were stored at 100% relative humidity for seven days. Following removal of the temporary crowns, the specimens were surface debrided using aluminum oxide abrasion with a particle size of 27 μm at 40 psi. The specimens were randomly assigned to three groups, according to the hemostatic agents: Group I–an agent containing aluminum chloride was applied to the tooth surface; Group II–an agent containing ferric sulfate was applied to the tooth surface and Group III–uncontaminated (control). The contaminated specimens were then further subdivided into three subgroups (A–C; n=12): Group A–tooth surface cleansing with water spray; Group B–tooth surface cleansing with phosphoric acid etch and Group C–tooth surface cleansing with aluminum oxide abrasion with a particle size of 27 μm at 40 psi. Ceramic blocks were treated with a 9.5% hydrofluoric acid-etch and silanized prior to being cemented with self-adhesive resin luting agent (RelyX Unicem) to the prepared dentin. The shear bond strength was determined at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA, followed by the Duncan multiple range test, to determine any significant differences between the testing groups. The microstructure morphology of the tooth surface was evaluated using SEM analysis. The results revealed that there was a significant difference between the bond strength of the control and the contaminated testing groups (pdentin, while rinsing with water spray resulted in the lowest mean bond strength of the self-adhesive resin cement to dentin (p<0.05).

  3. Bond strength of fiber post adhesion inside the root canal after using different irrigation protocols and adhesive luting cements in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Aschendorff, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to investigate the effects of three different irrigation protocols as a final rinse of the root canal on push-out bond strengths and durability of adhesion of fiber posts. The posts were inserted and luted pursuing two different adhesive strategies. Materials and methods: 120 human maxillary anterior teeth were endodontically treated. The teeth were divided into two groups: 1) self-adhesive resin cement (RX; n = 60) and 2) dual curing luting agent with an etch-and-r...

  4. Chapa aglomerada de cimento-madeira de Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg. Cement-bonded particleboard of Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmeralda Yoshico Arakaki Okino

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Chapas de partículas de cimento-madeira foram confeccionadas com a madeira de quatro clones de Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg. (seringueira: IAN 717, IAN 873, GT 711 e AVROS 1301. Confeccionaram-se as chapas na proporção de 1:4:1 (madeira:cimento:água por peso e nas dimensões de 450 x 450 x 13 mm e densidade nominal de 1,4 g/cm³, com a adição de 4% de cloreto de cálcio di-hidratado (CaCl2.2H2O como acelerador. Foram testadas partículas fervidas e não-fervidas dos quatro clones, totalizando oito tratamentos, sendo em cada um destes, com quatro repetições, avaliadas as propriedades mecânicas e físicas das chapas, segundo a norma ASTM D 1037 - 96a. De forma geral, os melhores resultados de propriedades físicas e mecânicas foram obtidos nas chapas com partículas do clone AVROS 1301. No teste de hidratação do cimento, a madeira de seringueira in natura foi classificada como de "inibição extrema", porém com a adição de CaCl2 o foi como de "baixa inibição". Essa madeira se mostrou tecnicamente viável à produção de chapas de cimento-madeira, independentemente do clone.Cement-bonded particleboards of rubberwood were manufactured with four clones of Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg. (rubberwood: IAN 717, IAN 873, GT 711 and AVROS 1301. Boards of 450 x 450 x 13 mm were manufactured in a ratio of 1:4:1 (wood/cement/water, weight basis, with 1.4 g/cm³ density and 4% calcium chloride dihydrated - CaCl2.2H2O as accelerator. The particles of four clones were tested in treated and untreated conditions, totaling eight treatments. In each treatment with four replicates, the physical and mechanical properties were evaluated according to ASTM D 1037 - 96a standard. Overall, the best mechanical and physical results were obtained with the cement-bonded particleboard made with particles from clone AVROS 1301. Rubberwood has shown to be "highly inhibitory" in the hydration test, however when CaCl2 was added the inhibition index decreased and

  5. A comparison of finite element analysis with in vitro bond strength tests of the bracket-cement-enamel system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Algera, T.J.; Feilzer, A.J.; Prahl-Andersen, B.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro shear bond strength (SBS) and tensile bond strength (TBS) of 45 metal brackets bonded with Transbond XT to bovine enamel. The SBS was determined by loading the short and the long sides of the bracket base. Testing took place after storage of the

  6. Influence of air-abrasion executed with polyacrylic acid-Bioglass 45S5 on the bonding performance of a resin-modified glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauro, Salvatore; Watson, Timothy F; Thompson, Ian; Toledano, Manuel; Nucci, Cesare; Banerjee, Avijit

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to test the microtensile bond strength (μTBS), after 6 months of storage in PBS, of a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) bonded to dentine pretreated with Bioglass 45S5 (BAG) using various etching and air-abrasion techniques. The RMGIC (GC Fuji II LC) was applied onto differently treated dentine surfaces followed by light curing for 30 s. The specimens were cut into matchsticks with cross-sectional areas of 0.9 mm(2). The μTBS of the specimens was measured after 24 h or 6 months of storage in PBS and the results were statistically analysed using two-way anova and the Student-Newman-Keuls test (α = 0.05). Further RMCGIC-bonded dentine specimens were used for interfacial characterization, micropermeability, and nanoleakage analyses by confocal microscopy. The RMGIC-dentine interface layer showed no water absorption after 6 months of storage in PBS except for the interdiffusion layer of the silicon carbide (SiC)-abraded/polyacrylic acid (PAA)-etched bonded dentine. The RMGIC applied onto dentine air-abraded with BAG/H(2)O only or with BAG/PAA-fluid followed by etching procedures (10% PAA gel) showed no statistically significant reduction in μTBS after 6 months of storage in PBS. The abrasion procedures performed using BAG in combination with PAA might be a suitable strategy to enhance the bonding durability and the healing ability of RMGIC bonded to dentine. © 2012 Eur J Oral Sci.

  7. Streptococcus mutans counts in plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement or resin-based composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Machado Mota

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU (colony forming units in the saliva and plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with a glass ionomer cement - GIC (Fuji Ortho or a resin-based composite - RC (Concise. Twenty male and female patients, aged 12 to 20 years, participated in the study. Saliva was collected before and after placement of appliances. Plaque was collected from areas adjacent to brackets and saliva was again collected on the 15th, 30th, and 45th day after placement. On the 30th day, 0.4% stannous fluoride gel was applied for 4 minutes. No significant modification in the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU in saliva was observed after placement of the fixed orthodontic appliances. On the 15th day, the percentage of Streptococcus mutans CFU in plaque was statistically lower in sites adjacent to GIC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.365 than in those adjacent to RC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.935. No evidence was found of a contribution of GIC to the reduction of CFU in plaque after the 15th day. Topical application of stannous fluoride gel on the 30th day reduced the number of CFU in saliva, but not in plaque. This study suggests that the antimicrobial activity of GIC occurs only in the initial phase and is not responsible for a long-term anticariogenic property.

  8. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2002-01-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems: foamed and sodium silicate slurries. Comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, water permeability, and shear bond. Testing was also done to determine the effect that temperature cycling has on the shear bond properties of the cement systems. In addition, analysis was carried out to examine alkali silica reactivity of slurries containing ULHS. Data is also presented from a study investigating the effects of mixing and pump circulation on breakage of ULHS. Information is also presented about the field application of ULHS in cementing a 7-in. intermediate casing in south Texas.

  9. Seasonal changes in the understorey biomass of an oak-hornbeam forest Galio sylvatici-Carpinetum betuli

    OpenAIRE

    Andrzej M. Jagodziński; Pietrusiak, Katarzyna; Rawlik, Mateusz; Janyszek, Sławomir

    2013-01-01

    We studied seasonal changes in the understorey biomass of an oak-hornbeam forest association Galio sylvatici-Carpinetum betuli. Samples were collected weekly during the most dynamic period of herbaceous layer development (April–May 2010), and every two weeks for the remainder of the growing season (June-October). Samples were collected from 10 randomly selected localities of 0.36 m2 within the plant community. The plants harvested were separated by species, then oven-dried and weighe...

  10. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength and microleakage of tricalcium silicate-based restorative material and radioopaque posterior glass ionomer restorative cement in primary and permanent teeth: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vignesh Guptha Raju

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Restoration of carious primary molars is still a major concern while treating the young children that too in deep carious lesion which extends below the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ where pulp protection and achieving adequate marginal seal are very important to prevent secondary caries. The needs were met with the development of new materials. One such of new bioactive material is tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine, recommended for restoring deep lesions. Aim: To evaluate and compare shear bond strength and microleakage of tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine and glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP in primary and permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: Occlusal surface of crowns were ground flat. PVC molds were stabilized over flat dentin surface and filled with tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine/glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP according to group ascertained. Shear bond strength was evaluated using universal testing machine (INSTRON. Standardized Class II cavities were prepared on both primary and permanent teeth, and then restored with tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine/glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP according to group ascertained, over which composite resin material was restored using an open sandwich technique. Microleakage was assessed using dye penetration. Microleakage was examined using a stereomicroscope. Results: Results showed that glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP exhibited better shear bond strength than tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine. Mean microleakage score for glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP in permanent teeth was 1.52 and for primary teeth was 1.56. The mean microleakage for tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine in permanent teeth was 0.76 and for primary teeth was 0.60. Glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP exhibited more microleakage than tricalcium silicate-based restorative

  11. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength and microleakage of tricalcium silicate-based restorative material and radioopaque posterior glass ionomer restorative cement in primary and permanent teeth: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Vignesh Guptha; Venumbaka, Nilaya Reddy; Mungara, Jayanthi; Vijayakumar, Poornima; Rajendran, Sakthivel; Elangovan, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of carious primary molars is still a major concern while treating the young children that too in deep carious lesion which extends below the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) where pulp protection and achieving adequate marginal seal are very important to prevent secondary caries. The needs were met with the development of new materials. One such of new bioactive material is tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine), recommended for restoring deep lesions. To evaluate and compare shear bond strength and microleakage of tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine) and glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) in primary and permanent teeth. Occlusal surface of crowns were ground flat. PVC molds were stabilized over flat dentin surface and filled with tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine)/glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) according to group ascertained. Shear bond strength was evaluated using universal testing machine (INSTRON). Standardized Class II cavities were prepared on both primary and permanent teeth, and then restored with tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine)/glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) according to group ascertained, over which composite resin material was restored using an open sandwich technique. Microleakage was assessed using dye penetration. Microleakage was examined using a stereomicroscope. RESULTS showed that glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) exhibited better shear bond strength than tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine). Mean microleakage score for glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) in permanent teeth was 1.52 and for primary teeth was 1.56. The mean microleakage for tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine) in permanent teeth was 0.76 and for primary teeth was 0.60. Glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) exhibited more microleakage than tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine), which was statistically significant

  12. The Comparison of Kraft Pulp Properties from Stem and Branchwood of Hornbeam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Pouryazdian

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of tree branches as potential resource of fibers, that can be supply raw materials for pulp and paper industries, additionally, increases the productivity of tree. This research was done in order to compare pulp and paper properties from branch wood and stem wood and feasibility utilization that in pulp and paper industries. Stem and branch wood samples of hornbeam with mean diameter about 15 cm were obtained from Shastkolateh educational forest (Gorgan.The measurement of fibers was done with using Franklin method and light microscopic and chemical compositions were determined according to TAPPI test methods. The Kraft pulps from stem and branch wood were prepared under constant condition include sulfudity 20%, Max temp 170˚C and Liquor to wood ratio 5/1 and variable condition include active alkali 14%, 16% and 18%, and cooking time of 90, 120 and 150 min. Ultimately mechanical properties of Handsheet were measured according TAPPI test method The statistical analysis of results indicated that independent effects of wood, active alkali, and time were significant on pulp yield and Kappa number. Comparing the pulp yield and Kappa number means were showing that yield of stem wood pulp is higher than branch wood and its kappa number is less. Analysis mechanical properties on stem and branch wood Hand sheets showed that mechanical properties of Hand sheet from stem wood are higher than branch wood. There is none meaningful difference between the most mechanical properties hand sheets of stem and branch wood, that produced under cooking condition include sulfudity 20%, active alkali 18% and cooking time 150 min. therefore this condition would suggest for simultaneous cooking branch and stem wood

  13. IMPACT OF PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL MUD CONTAMINATION ON WELLBORE CEMENT- FORMATION SHEAR BOND STRENGTH Authors: Arome Oyibo1 and Mileva Radonjic1 * 1. Craft and Hawkins Department of Petroleum Engineering, 2131 Patrick F. Taylor Hall, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, aoyibo1@tigers.lsu.edu, mileva@lsu.edu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyibo, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    Wellbore cement has been used to provide well integrity through zonal isolation in oil & gas wells and geothermal wells. Cementing is also used to provide mechanical support for the casing and protect the casing from corrosive fluids. Failure of cement could be caused by several factors ranging from poor cementing, failure to completely displace the drilling fluids to failure on the path of the casing. A failed cement job could result in creation of cracks and micro annulus through which produced fluids could migrate to the surface which could lead to sustained casing pressure, contamination of fresh water aquifer and blow out in some cases. In addition, cement failures could risk the release of chemicals substances from hydraulic fracturing into fresh water aquifer during the injection process. To achieve proper cementing, the drilling fluid should be completely displaced by the cement slurry. However, this is hard to achieve in practice, some mud is usually left on the wellbore which ends up contaminating the cement afterwards. The purpose of this experimental study is to investigate the impact of both physical and chemical mud contaminations on cement-formation bond strength for different types of formations. Physical contamination occurs when drilling fluids (mud) dries on the surface of the formation forming a mud cake. Chemical contamination on the other hand occurs when the drilling fluids which is still in the liquid form interacts chemically with the cement during a cementing job. We investigated the impact of the contamination on the shear bond strength and the changes in the mineralogy of the cement at the cement-formation interface to ascertain the impact of the contamination on the cement-formation bond strength. Berea sandstone and clay rich shale cores were bonded with cement cores with the cement-formation contaminated either physically or chemically. For the physically contaminated composite cores, we have 3 different sample designs: clean

  14. Efeito de aditivos minerais sobre as propriedades de chapas cimento-madeira Effect of minerals additives on the properties of wood cement-bonded particleboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmar Correia Silva

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito da adição de dois tipos de aditivos minerais (microssílica e metacaulim sobre as propriedades de chapas de cimento-madeira, aplicando-se diferentes teores aditivos (0, 20 e 30%. O aglomerante empregado na produção dos painéis foi o cimento Portland tipo ARI, juntamente com partículas de madeira de Eucalyptus urophylla. Os resultados indicaram que a adição dos aditivos minerais não causou melhorias significativas nas propriedades mecânicas avaliadas. Já, em relação às propriedades físicas, o efeito positivo da adição de 20% de microssílica pôde ser observado no ensaio de absorção em água após a imersão em 2 e 24 horas. O aditivo metacaulim não apresentou tendência clara, porém, de forma geral, a sua adição causou redução na qualidade das chapas.The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of the two minerals additives (microsilica and meta-kaolin on the properties of wood cement-bonded particleboard (WCBP with different amounts (0%, 20% and 30% of additives. Portland cement of high initial resistance was used in the production of panels as binder material. It was mixed with Eucalyptus urophylla wood particles to boards formation. The results indicated that the addition of mineral additives did not cause significant improvements in the evaluated mechanical properties. For physical properties, the positive effect of the addition of 20% microsilica can be observed on the absorption in water properties after 2 and 24 hours. The additive meta-kaolin did not present a clear trend, but, in general, the addition of this additive caused a reduction in the quality of boards.

  15. Susceptibility of hornbeam and Scots pine woods to destruction by the subterranean termite Reticulitermes lucifugus ROSSI, 1792 (Blattodea: Isoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krajewski Adam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of tests of the degree of damage to Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris and hornbeam (Carpinus betulus woods by the termite Reticulitermes lucifugus. Both wood species are classified as “susceptible to destruction by termites” in the EN 350-2:2000 standard. The procedures described in the ASTM D 3345-08 standard (2009 were applied in the experiments. During laboratory coercion tests, wood samples from these two species were damaged to a degree between light attack and moderate attack with penetration. Recent Scots pine sapwood was damaged to a heavy degree. The results can be associated with the much higher density of hornbeam wood as compared to Scots pine sapwood. The mortality rate of the termites in the test containers with both wood species was similar and low, no greater than 10%. In the light of the results, the classification of the susceptibility of native wood species to termite feeding, as stated in the EN 350-2:2000 standard, appears to be oversimplified.

  16. Diagraphies de cimentation : vers une analyse de la qualité du contact ciment-formation Cement Logging: Toward an Analysis of the Quality of Cement-Formation Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isambourg P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Les compagnies pétrolières ont un réel besoin d'évaluer correctement les cimentations de leurs puits : l'étanchéité entre les différentes zones est-elle assurée? Pour ce faire, les outils soniques et ultra-soniques ont été mis au point. Jusqu'à présent, la qualité du contactcasing-ciment était analysée quantitativement et celle du contactciment-formation était analysée qualitativement par les spécialistes (outil VDL. Le progrès le plus important que l'on pouvait apporter dans les logsde cimentation était de détecter les défauts à l'interface ciment-formation. C'est ce que nous avons fait dans le cadre d'un projet financé par l'ARTEP (Association de Recherche sur les Techniques d'Exploitation du Pétrole comprenant Total, Gaz de France GDF, Institut Français du Pétrole (IFP, et Elf Aquitaine Production (EAP. Les expériences laboratoires effectuées au Service Analyse FLuides de Boussens ont été conçues en injectant du ciment entre un casing et une formation-simulée avec présence, ou non, de boue d'épaisseur variable. Des formations rapides ou lentes, ainsi que des ciments, rapides ou lents, ont été utilisés. Les échos ultrasoniques, obtenus à l'aide d'une sonde CET en céramique, ont été enregistrés et analysés. La théorie, comme les expériences, ont montré que les échos ultrasoniques sont modifiés en présence de boue et/ou de gaz. Les relations entre la forme de l'onde ultrasonique et la présence de boue et de gaz entre le ciment et la formation ont été établies. Une procédure de traitement est proposée avec ses limites. Oil companies have a real need to make a correct assessment of cementing jobs in their wells. Is the seal ensured between different zones? To do this, sonic and ultrasonic logging tools have been developed. Up to now, the quality of the casing-cement contacthas been analyzed quantitatively, and that of the cement-formation contacthas been analyzed qualitatively by

  17. Biological control of beech and hornbeam affects species richness via changes in the organic layer, pH and soil moisture characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, A.M.; Cammeraat, E.

    2010-01-01

    1.  Litter quality is an important ecosystem factor, which may affect undergrowth species richness via decomposition and organic layers directly, but also via longer-term changes in soil pH and moisture. The impact of beech trees with low-degradable and hornbeam trees with high-degradable litter on

  18. Effects of litter quality and parent material on organic matter characteristics and N-dynamics in Luxembourg beech and hornbeam forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, A.M.; Martinez-Hernandez, G.B.

    2009-01-01

    To test effects of litter quality and soil conditions on N-dynamics, we selected seven forests in Luxembourg dominated by beech (Fagus sylvatica, L.) and hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L.), and located on acid loam, decalcified marl or limestone, and measured organic matter characteristics, microbial C

  19. A Twofold Comparison between Dual Cure Resin Modified Cement and Glass Ionomer Cement for Orthodontic Band Cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Hanaa El; Elhiny, Omnia; Salem, Ghada; Abdelrahman, Ahmed; Attia, Mazen

    2016-12-15

    To test the solubility of dual cure resin modified resin cement in a food simulating solution and the shear bond strength compared to conventional Glass ionomer cement. The materials tested were self-adhesive dual cure resin modified cement and Glass Ionomer (GIC). Twenty Teflon moulds were divided into two groups of tens. The first group was injected and packed with the modified resin cement, the second group was packed with GIC. To test the solubility, each mould was weighed before and after being placed in an analytical reagent for 30 days. The solubility was measured as the difference between the initial and final drying mass. To measure the Shear bond strength, 20 freshly extracted wisdom teeth were equally divided into two groups and embedded in self-cure acrylic resin. Four mm sections of stainless steel bands were cemented to the exposed buccal surfaces of teeth under a constant load of 500 g. Shear bond strength was measured using a computer controlled materials testing machine and the load required to deband the samples was recorded in Newtons. GIC showed significantly higher mean weight loss and an insignificant lower Shear bond strength, compared to dual cure resin Cement. It was found that dual cure resin modified cement was less soluble than glass ionomer cement and of comparable bond strength rendering it more useful clinically for orthodontic band cementation.

  20. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including...... an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid...

  1. Influence of technique and manipulation on self-adhesive resin cements used to cement intraradicular posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiratori, Fábio Kenji; Valle, Accácio Lins do; Pegoraro, Thiago Amadei; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo

    2013-07-01

    Resin cements are widely used to cement intraradicular posts, but bond strength is significantly influenced by the technique and material used for cementation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of 3 self-adhesive cements used to cement intraradicular glass fiber posts. The cements all required different application and handling techniques. Forty-five human maxillary canines were selected and randomly divided into 3 groups n= 15 by drawing lots: Group BIS - Biscem, Group BRE - Breeze, and Group MAX - Maxcem. Each group was divided into 3 subgroups according to application and handling techniques: Sub-group A - Automix/Point tip applicator, Sub-group L - Handmix/Lentulo, and Sub-group C - Handmix/Centrix. Cementation of the posts was performed according to the manufacturers' instructions. The push-out test was performed with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min, and bond strength was expressed in megapascals. The results were evaluated by 2-way ANOVA and the all pairwise multiple comparison procedures (Tukey test) (α=.05). Breeze cement showed the highest average for the subgroups A, L, and C when compared to the Biscem cement and Maxcem Elite (Pinfluence the bond strength of different self-adhesive cements when used for intraradicular post cementation. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Retention of gold alloy crowns cemented with traditional and resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzón, Lilliam M; Frey, Gary N; Winkler, Mark M; Tate, William H; Burgess, John O; Powers, John M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure in vitro retention of cast gold crowns cemented with traditional and resin cements. Forty-eight human molars were prepared on a lathe to produce complete crown preparations with a consistent taper and split into six groups, eight crowns in each group. Crowns were cast in a high-gold alloy and then cemented. After 24 hours, the retention force (N) was recorded and mean values were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and the Fisher post-hoc least significant difference (PLSD) multiple comparisons test (a = .05). Failure sites were examined under 3100 magnification and recorded. Mean values (SD) for each group in increasing order of retention force were: Harvard Cement: 43 N (27), TempoCem: 59 N (16), PermaCem Dual: 130 N (42), RelyX Luting Cement: 279 N (26), Contax and PermaCem Dual: 286 N (38), and TempoCem with Contax and PermaCem Dual: 340 N (14). The Fisher PLSD interval (P = .05) for comparing cements was 29 N. Zinc-phosphate cement and provisional resin cements had the lowest retention forces. Resin cement with a bonding agent and the hybrid-ionomer cement had similar retention forces. Resin cement with a bonding agent applied after use of a provisional resin cement had a significantly higher retention force than the other cements tested.

  3. Tooth surface treatment strategies for adhesive cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Nadja; Fischer, Jens

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth surface pre-treatment steps on shear bond strength, which is essential for understanding the adhesive cementation process. Shear bond strengths of different cements with various tooth surface treatments (none, etching, priming, or etching and priming) on enamel and dentin of human teeth were measured using the Swiss shear test design. Three adhesives (Permaflo DC, Panavia F 2.0, and Panavia V5) and one self-adhesive cement (Panavia SA plus) were included in this study. The interface of the cement and the tooth surface with the different pre-treatments was analyzed using SEM. pH values of the cements and primers were measured. The highest bond strength values for all cements were achieved with etching and primer on enamel (25.6 ± 5.3 - 32.3 ± 10.4 MPa). On dentin, etching and priming produced the highest bond strength values for all cements (8.6 ± 2.9 - 11.7 ± 3.5 MPa) except for Panavia V5, which achieved significantly higher bond strengths when pre-treated with primer only (15.3 ± 4.1 MPa). Shear bond strength values were correlated with the micro-retentive surface topography of enamel and the tag length on dentin except for Panavia V5, which revealed the highest bond strength with primer application only without etching, resulting in short but sturdy tags. The highest bond strength can be achieved for Panavia F 2.0, Permaflo DC, and Panavia SA plus when the tooth substrate is previously etched and the respective primer is applied. The new cement Panavia V5 displayed low technique-sensitivity and attained significantly higher adhesion of all tested cements to dentin when only primer was applied.

  4. Effect of Rebonding on the Bond Strength of Orthodontic Tubes: A Comparison of Light Cure Adhesive and Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Aleksiejunaite

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of different enamel preparation procedures and compare light cure composite (LCC and resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI on the bond strength of orthodontic metal tubes rebonded to the enamel. Twenty human molars were divided into two groups (n=10. Tubes were bonded using LCC (Transbond XT in group 1 and RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC in group 2. The tubes in each group were bonded following manufacturers’ instructions (experiment I and then debonded using testing machine. Then, the same brackets were sandblasted and rebonded twice. Before the first rebonding, the enamel was cleaned using carbide bur (experiment II and before second rebonding, it was cleaned using carbide bur and soda blasted (experiment III. Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests showed no significant difference between RMGI and LCC bond strengths in case of normal bonding and rebonding, when enamel was cleaned using carbide bur before rebonding. Enamel soda blasting before rebonding significantly increased RMGI tensile bond strength value compared to LLC (p<0.05. LCC and RMGI (especially RMGI provide sufficient bond strengths for rebonding of molar tubes, when residual adhesive from previous bonding is removed and enamel soda blasted.

  5. Basic Chemistry for the Cement Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Mason

    This combined student workbook and instructor's guide contains nine units for inplant classes on basic chemistry for employees in the cement industry. The nine units cover the following topics: chemical basics; measurement; history of cement; atoms; bonding and chemical formulas; solids, liquids, and gases; chemistry of Portland cement…

  6. Low heat cement; Teihatsunetsu cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, K.; Igarashi, H. [Ube Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-09-01

    This paper summarizes the result of studies on low heat (low hydration heat) cement intended to prevent cracking. Good compositional proportions of alite and belite as components of Portland cement are belite at 63% and alite at 37% when hydration heat, strength, and concrete durability are taken into account. Mixing the blast furnace slag into cement fills the voids at low hydration heat, and raises the strength without increasing the hydration heat. However, the voids remain in a long-term material age. The strength of the belite-based cement is improved when the higher the temperature within a range from 20 to 60{degree}C. In the case of a mixed cement of belite-based cement and blast furnace slag, using the blast furnace slag at 60% maintains the strength and reduces the hydration heat. The strength decreases at a curing temperature of 60{degree}C or higher. Hardened mortar with a material age of three days has its voids disappear at 40{degree}C. More void disappearance cannot be recognized even if the material age gets older. Hydration heat decreases largely in the belite-based cement and flyash mixed cement. The strength also decreases, but it increases conversely when the material age gets as old as one year. Flyash causes the temperature to rise more moderately than blast furnace slag. 21 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Tensile bond strength of glass fiber posts luted with different cements Resistência à tração de pinos de fibra de vidro cimentados com diferentes materiais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Bonfante

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Proper selection of the luting agent is fundamental to avoid failure due to lack of retention in post-retained crowns. The objective of this study was to investigate the tensile bond strength and failure mode of glass fiber posts luted with different cements. Glass fiber posts were luted in 40 mandibular premolars, divided into 4 groups (n = 10: Group 1 - resin-modified glass ionomer RelyX Luting; Group 2 - resin-modified glass ionomer Fuji Plus; Group 3 - resin cement RelyX ARC; Group 4 - resin cement Enforce. Specimens were assessed by tensile strength testing and light microscopy analysis for observation of failure mode. The tensile bond strength values of each group were compared by ANOVA and Tukey test. The significance level was set at 5%. The failure modes were described as percentages. The following tensile strength values were obtained: Group 1 - 247.6 N; Group 2 - 256.7 N; Group 3 - 502.1 N; Group 4 - 477.3 N. There was no statistically significant difference between Groups 1 and 2 or between Groups 3 and 4, yet the resin cements presented significantly higher tensile bond strength values than those presented by the glass ionomer cements. Group 1 displayed 70% of cohesive failures, whereas Groups 2, 3 and 4 exhibited 70% to 80% of adhesive failures at the dentin-cement interface. We concluded that resin cements and glass ionomer cements are able to provide clinically sufficient retention of glass fiber posts, and that glass ionomer cements may be especially indicated when the application of adhesive techniques is difficult.A seleção adequada do agente cimentante é essencial para evitar falhas por perda de retenção em coroas retidas por núcleos. O objetivo deste estudo foi investigar a resistência à tração e o tipo de falha de pinos de fibra de vidro cimentados com diferentes materiais. Cimentaram-se pinos de fibra de vidro em 40 pré-molares inferiores, divididos em 4 grupos (n = 10: Grupo 1 - ionômero de vidro modificado

  8. Tooth surface treatment strategies for adhesive cementation

    OpenAIRE

    Rohr, Nadja; Fischer, Jens

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth surface pre-treatment steps on shear bond strength, which is essential for understanding the adhesive cementation process. MATERIALS AND METHODS Shear bond strengths of different cements with various tooth surface treatments (none, etching, priming, or etching and priming) on enamel and dentin of human teeth were measured using the Swiss shear test design. Three adhesives (Permaflo DC, Panavia F 2.0, and Panavia V5) and one sel...

  9. Comparative evaluation of marginal leakage of provisional crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements: In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheen Juneja Arora

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The temporary cements with eugenol showed more microleakage than those without eugenol. SC-10 crowns showed more microleakage compared to Protemp 4 crowns. SC-10 crowns cemented with Kalzinol showed maximum microleakage and Protemp 4 crowns cemented with HY bond showed least microleakage.

  10. INORGANIC CEMENT CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisson Clay Rios Silva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a Geopolymeric Cement Concrete (GCC was developed through adequate portions of geopolymer components. Its characteristics were compared with Portland Cement Concrete (PCC, through of the establishment of some parameters of design, as consumption of binders, water/aggregates ratio and mortar content. The concrete mechanical performance was evaluated with emphasis to the fatigue behavior. Were tested the effects of different tensile strength maximum (increasing and decreasing. The results of fatigue tests had shown that GCC presents a better performance when compared to PCC. Its fatigue strength was 15% higher than that of PCC, when 70% of rupture tension of the concrete in static bending (SR, was applied. Tensions of about 80% SR resulted in 96% of increase, when compared to GCC. The SEM microstructural analysis showed that the GCC has a matrix/aggregate bonding very strong, when compared to PCC, probably due to the massive nature of the geopolymeric matrix.

  11. The impact of forest roads on understory plant diversity in temperate hornbeam-beech forests of Northern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deljouei, Azade; Abdi, Ehsan; Marcantonio, Matteo; Majnounian, Baris; Amici, Valerio; Sohrabi, Hormoz

    2017-08-01

    Forest roads alter the biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems, modifying temperature, humidity, wind speed, and light availability that, in turn, cause changes in plant community composition and diversity. We aim at investigating and comparing the diversity of herbaceous species along main and secondary forest roads in a temperate-managed hornbeam-beech forest, north of Iran. Sixteen transects along main and secondary forest roads were established (eight transects along main roads and eight along secondary roads). To eliminate the effect of forest type, all transects were located in Carpinetum-Fagetum forests, the dominant forest type in the study area. The total length of each transect was 200 m (100 m toward up slope and 100 m toward down slope), and plots were established along it at different distances from road edge. The diversity of herbaceous plant species was calculated in each plot using Shannon-Wiener index, species richness, and Pielou's index. The results showed that diversity index decreased when distance from road edge increases. This decreasing trend continued up to 60 m from forest road margin, and after this threshold, the index slightly increased. Depending on the type of road (main or secondary) as well as cut or fill slopes, the area showing a statistical different plant composition and diversity measured through Shannon-Wiener, species richness, and Pielou's index is up to 10 m. The length depth of the road edge effect found in main and secondary forest roads was small, but it could have cumulative effects on forest microclimate and forest-associated biota at the island scale. Forest managers should account for the effect of road buildings on plant communities.

  12. The influence of temporary cements on dental adhesive systems for luting cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, José C V; Coelho, Paulo G; Janal, Malvin N; Silva, Nelson R F A; Monteiro, André J; Fernandes, Carlos A O

    2011-03-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that bond strength of total- and self-etching adhesive systems to dentine is not affected by the presence of remnants from either eugenol-containing (EC) or eugenol-free (EF) temporary cements after standardized cleaning procedures. Thirty non-carious human third molars were polished flat to expose dentine surfaces. Provisional acrylic plates were fabricated and cemented either with EC, EF or no temporary cements. All specimens were incubated for 7 days in water at 37°C. The restorations were then taken out and the remnants of temporary cements were mechanically removed with a dental instrument. The dentine surfaces were cleaned with pumice and treated with either total-etching (TE) or self-etching (SE) dental adhesive systems. Atomic force microscopy was used to examine the presence of remnants of temporary cements before and after dentine cleaning procedures. Composite resin build-ups were fabricated and cemented to the bonded dentine surfaces with a resin luting cement. The specimens were then sectioned to obtain 0.9mm(2) beams for microtensile bond strength testing. Fractographic analysis was performed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. ANOVA showed lower mean microtensile bond strength in groups of specimens treated with EC temporary cement than in groups treated with either no cement or an EF cement (p<0.05). Mean microtensile bond strength was lower in groups employing the SE rather than the TE adhesive system (p<0.001). SE samples were also more likely to fail during initial processing of the samples. There was no evidence of interaction between cement and adhesive system effects on tensile strength. Fractographic analysis indicated different primary failure modes for SE and TE bonding systems, at the dentine-adhesive interface and at the resin cement-resin composite interface, respectively. The use of eugenol-containing temporary cements prior to indirect bonding restorations reduce, to a statistically similar

  13. Tensile bond strength between different glass ionomer cement and composite resin using three adhesive systems Avaliação da resistência de união interfacial entre diferentes cimentos de ionômero de vidro e resina composta, usando três sistemas adesivos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Dias

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tensile bond strength (TBS among a Composite Resin (Filtek Z250 and six conventional Glass Ionomer Cements, three used for lining (Bioglass F, Vidrion F and Glass Ionomer L.C. and three for restorations (Ketac Fil, Vidrion R and Glass Ionomer type II etched and non etched, using three adhesive systems (Single Bond, Bond 1 and Stae. Thirty-six groups were made, ten samples for each group, totalizing 360 specimens. There were significant differences on TBS among groups. Group 31 (Glass Ionomer Cement type II showed the highest TBS (9.65 MPa in comparison to other tested groups. Group 16 (Glass Ionomer L.C presented the lowest TBS (2.72 MPa in comparison to all the other groups. Therefore, it can be concluded that the acid etching of the Glass Ionomer Cement is not necessary. Foi avaliada, ">in vitro, a resistência de união, por tração, entre uma Resina Composta micro-híbrida (Filtek Z-250 e seis Cimentos de Ionômero de Vidro (CIV convencionais: três utilizados para base/forramento (Bioglass F, Vidrion F e Glass Ionomer Lining Cement e três para restauração (Ketac Fil, Vidrion R e Glass Ionomer Cement type II, sem e com condicionamento ácido ortofosfórico a 37%, usando três sistemas adesivos (Single Bond, Bond 1 e Stae. Foram confeccionados 36 grupos de 10 corpos-de-prova cada, totalizando 360 espécimes. Para análise estatística, foi utilizado o teste de Tukey-Kramer. Dentre os três CIV de base/forramento, os grupos 2 e 5 (Bioglass F apresentaram valores mais altos de adesividade à resina (7,24 e 6,03 MPa respectivamente. Quanto aos três CIV de restauração, todos apresentaram maior resistência de união, superior aos de base/forramento, sendo que o Glass Ionomer Cement type II (Grupo 31 e Vidrion R apresentaram maior força de adesão (9,65 e 7,47 MPa à resina composta. O grupo 16 (Glass Ionomer L.C. mostrou menor adesividade à resina (2,72 MPa. Houve diferenças significantes

  14. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  15. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  16. New polymer additives for mortar cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, S.G.; Podlas, T.J.; Young, T.S.

    1999-07-01

    Mortar cement is a hydraulic cement similar to masonry cement in use and function, introduced to enhance one or more of the latter's properties, such as workability, durability, and water retention. In addition, mortar cement must have lower air content and it has minimum flexural bond strength requirements. In response to fulfilling these needs, a new family of water soluble polymers has been developed. The new polymer additives are designed to optimize air void distribution and rheology of wet mortar, allowing improved workability with low air content. Furthermore, these polymers impart high water retention to the mortar, and allow the production of mortar with enhanced board life and flexural bond strength.

  17. Influence of resin cement polymerization shrinkage on stresses in porcelain crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Liliana G; Kelly, J Robert

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of polymerization shrinkage of the cement layer on stresses within feldspathic ceramic crowns, using experimentally validated FEA models for (1) increasing occlusal cement thickness; and, (2) bonded versus non-bonded ceramic-cement interfaces. 2-D axial symmetric models simulated stylized feldspathic crowns (1.5mm occlusal thickness) cemented with resin-cement layers of 50-500μm on dentin preparations, being loaded (500N) or not. Ceramic-cement interface was either bonded or not. Cement was bonded to the dentin in all models. Maximum axial shrinkage of 0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 4.65% were simulated. The first principal stresses developing in the cementation surface at the center and at the occluso-axial line-angle of the crown were registered. Polymerization shrinkage of the cement increased tensile stresses in the ceramic, especially in loaded non-bonded crowns for thicker cement layers. Stresses in loaded non-bonded crowns increased as much as 87% when cement shrinkage increased from 0% to 4.65% (100-187MPa), for a 500μm-thick cement. Increasing polymerization shrinkage strain raised the tensile stresses, especially at the internal occlusal-axial line-angle, for bonded crowns. Changes in the polymerization shrinkage strain (from 0% to 4.65%) have little effect on the tensile stresses generated at the cementation surface of the ceramic crowns, when the occlusal cement thickness is thin (approx. 50μm for bonded crowns). However, as the cement becomes thicker stresses within the ceramic become significant. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. THE GLASS IONOMER CEMENT IN DENTISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Matos Vieira

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The glass ionomer cement was developed in the past century 70s, after continuous researches about silicate cement. Over the years, glass ionomers have been playing an important role on restorative dentistry. Initially, the material was used for restoration of small cavities, however, its usage has been increased. The main indications at present are: as core buildup restorative, luting cement, liner and base and as a sealant. Recently, glass ionomer cement has been used for ART restorations and in some medicine fields because of the positive biointeraction with bone cells. Although glass ionomer cements exhibit an initial critical solubility and poor aesthetics, great biological properties like fluoride release to oral environment, chemical bonding to tooth tissues and biocompatibility leads this material elective for many purposes. Finally, their inherent antimicrobial properties contributes to the treatment of many situations in dentistry.

  19. Prevention of fibrous layer formation between bone and adhesive bone cement: in vivo evaluation of bone impregnation with 4-META/MMA-TBB cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, T; Morita, S; Shinomiya, K; Watanabe, A; Nakabayashi, N; Ishihara, K

    2000-10-01

    We have studied a new adhesive bone cement, that consists of 4-methacryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META) and methylmethacrylate (MMA) as monomers, tri-n-butyl borane (TBB) as the initiator, and polymethylmethacrylate powder (4-META/MMA-TBB cement). This cement has shown remarkable adhesive properties to bone in vitro. In this study, we assessed the interface in vivo periodically. The femora of rabbits were fenestrated and filled with either the 4-META/MMA-TBB cement or a conventional polymethylmethacrylate cement. The animals were killed after 1, 4, 12, and 24 weeks to analyze the interface by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Optical microscopic examinations showed that the cured 4-META/MMA-TBB adhesive cement bonded to bone directly for 24 weeks, whereas a fibrous tissue layer was observed between the bone and cured conventional cement at 12 weeks after the operation. The transmission electron microscopy views of 4-META/MMA-TBB cement bonded to bone demonstrated a unique "hybridized bone" with the cement in the subsurface of the substrate in every case. The formation of the hybridized bone indicates the bonding mechanism of the adhesive cement to bone, which prevents the fibrosis intervention between bone and cement. These results suggest that the biomechanical and adhesive properties of 4-META/MMA-TBB cement make it a useful bone-bonding agent in orthopedic surgery. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Effect of dentin sealers on postoperative sensitivity of complete cast crowns cemented with glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghrabi, Abdulhamaid A

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to clinically evaluate the effects of pretreatments with copal/ether varnish and dentin bonding system on postoperative sensitivity of complete cast crowns cemented with glass ionomer cement. Three posterior teeth with no pain symptoms were selected from each of 17 patients, totaling 51 teeth, for which a crown was indicated. Rexillium III complete cast crowns were prepared using conventional laboratory techniques. For each patient, the first tooth, which served as the control, received only glass ionomer cement (Ketac-Cem). Copal/ether varnish (Bosworth Copaliner) was applied to the second tooth preparation prior to cementation. Dentin bonding agent (OptiBond Solo Plus) was used on the third tooth before cementation. Sensitivity to different stimuli (cold, heat) was assessed at 7 days, 1 month, and 6 months following restorative procedures by questionnaire. There were no statistically significant differences between the three groups regarding applied stimulus and day of the study (p > 0.05). No statistically significant differences were found between the postoperative sensitivity responses from 7 days to 1 month, and from 1 month to 6 months (p > 0.05). Postoperative sensitivity resulting from glass ionomer cement with complete cast crowns cannot be completely eliminated with the prior use of a cavity varnish or bonding agent. © 2011 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  1. The biotransformation of soil biocenosis by micromycetes under introduction of Fagus sylvatica L. to oak-hornbeam forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhanov, Artur; Bilyera, Nataliya; Sedykh, Olena; Melnychuk, Maksym

    2017-04-01

    Keywords: micromycetes, beech, soil enzymes, illuminance, Penicillium canescens. European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) is a commercially valuable tree species. As the potential distribution area for beech forest is restricted by Europe, planting of artificial stands is adopted in this region. Beech introduction can alter ecosystem considerably, but the mechanism of this transformation is not clear. We aimed to define abiotic and biotic parameters affecting floor development in beech stands introduced to the oak-hornbeam forest ecosystem ca.50 years ago in Eastern Europe (Ukraine). The daylight illuminace level was similar (2.9-6.5 klx) for both stands. However, grass cover in beech stands did not exceed 0.1-0.5 % even on sites with illuminace level 7.5-8.3 klx. It does not comply with the commonly used suggestion that shading is the main factor causes forest floor absence in the beech stands. We indicated predominantly biotic factors influencing forest floor formation. Thus, particular edaphon represented by micromycetes was able to inhibit plants and microorganisms. We isolated Penicillium canescens strains from soil under beech stands. These fungi utilized beech root exudates and phenol compounds of leaf litter, and produced biologically active substances caused cytostatic and mutagenic effects. They also accelerated (in 2-3.2 times) soil β-glucosidase activity, but had no effect on phosphatase. The biomass of fungi varied under cultivation of Penicillium canescens strains on Czapek medium with the addition of aqueous extracts of beech leaf litter. The biomass of micromycetes increased on 10-15 % at plant phenols concentrations up to 1 mg mL-1. On the contrary, increasing the concentration of phenols up to 4 mg mL-1resulted in a biomass decrease to 40%. The relationship between the concentration of plant phenols and rate of fungal biomass formation indicates that there is probably seasonal regulation of micromycetes activity in the forest biocenosis. The highest

  2. Effect of dental cements on peri-implant microbial community: comparison of the microbial communities inhabiting the peri-implant tissue when using different luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsch, Michael; Marten, Silke-Mareike; Dötsch, Andreas; Jáuregui, Ruy; Pieper, Dietmar H; Obst, Ursula

    2016-12-01

    Cementing dental restorations on implants poses the risk of undetected excess cement. Such cement remnants may favor the development of inflammation in the peri-implant tissue. The effect of excess cement on the bacterial community is not yet known. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of two different dental cements on the composition of the microbial peri-implant community. In a cohort of 38 patients, samples of the peri-implant tissue were taken with paper points from one implant per patient. In 15 patients, the suprastructure had been cemented with a zinc oxide-eugenol cement (Temp Bond, TB) and in 23 patients with a methacrylate cement (Premier Implant Cement, PIC). The excess cement found as well as suppuration was documented. Subgingival samples of all patients were analyzed for taxonomic composition by means of 16S amplicon sequencing. None of the TB-cemented implants had excess cement or suppuration. In 14 (61%) of the PIC, excess cement was found. Suppuration was detected in 33% of the PIC implants without excess cement and in 100% of the PIC implants with excess cement. The taxonomic analysis of the microbial samples revealed an accumulation of oral pathogens in the PIC patients independent of the presence of excess cement. Significantly fewer oral pathogens occurred in patients with TB compared to patients with PIC. Compared with TB, PIC favors the development of suppuration and the growth of periodontal pathogens. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Flexural properties of wood cement board fabricated from cropping ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was undertaken to investigate the possibilities of producing cement bonded particle boards from wood wastes generated from 3 urban wood species in University of Ibadan with a view to evaluating the bending properties of cement boards so produced. The materials used for the boards' fabrication were wood ...

  4. Evaluation of the amount of excess cement around the margins of cement-retained dental implant restorations: the effect of the cement application method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Winston W L; Duncan, Jesse; Afshar, Manijeh; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2013-04-01

    Complete removal of excess cement from subgingival margins after cementation of implant-supported restorations has been shown to be unpredictable. Remaining cement has been shown to be associated with periimplant inflammation and bleeding. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the amount of excess cement after cementation with 4 different methods of cement application for cement-retained implant-supported restorations. Ten implant replicas/abutments (3i) were embedded in acrylic resin blocks. Forty complete veneer crowns (CVCs) were fabricated by waxing onto the corresponding plastic waxing sleeves. The wax patterns were cast and the crowns were cemented to the implant replicas with either an interim (Temp Bond) or a definitive luting agent (FujiCEM). Four methods of cement application were used for cementation: Group IM-Cement applied on the internal marginal area of the crown only; Group AH-Cement applied on the apical half of the axial walls of the crown; Group AA-Cement applied to all axial walls of the interior surface of the crown, excluding the occlusal surface; and Group PI-Crown filled with cement then seated on a putty index formed to the internal configuration of the restoration (cementation device) (n=10). Cement on the external surfaces was removed before seating the restoration. Cement layers were applied on each crown, after which the crown was seated under constant load (80 N) for 10 minutes. The excess cement from each specimen was collected and measured. One operator performed all the procedures. Results for the groups were compared, with 1 and 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey multiple range test (α=.05). No significant difference in the amount of excess/used cement was observed between the 2 different types of cements (P=.1). Group PI showed the least amount of excess cement in comparison to other test groups (P=.031). No significant difference was found in the amount of excess cement among groups MI, AH, and AA. Group AA showed the

  5. CONCRETE BASED ON MODIFIED DISPERSE CEMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Rudenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article considers definition of the bond types occurring in a modified cement concrete matrix, and the evaluation of the quality of these links in a non-uniform material to determine the geometrical and physical relationships between the structure and the cement matrix modifiers. Methodology. To achieve this purpose the studies covered the microstructure of dispersed modified concrete cement matrix, the structure formation mechanism of the modified cement concrete system of natural hardening; as well as identification of the methods of sound concrete strength assessment. Findings. The author proposed a model of the spatial structure of the concrete cement matrix, modified by particulate reinforcement crystal hydrates. The initial object of study is a set of volume elements (cells of the cement matrix and the system of the spatial distribution of reinforcing crystallohydrates in these volume elements. It is found that the most dangerous defects such as cracks in the concrete volume during hardening are formed as a result of internal stresses, mainly in the zone of cement matrix-filler contact or in the area bordering with the largest pores of the concrete. Originality. The result of the study is the defined mechanism of the process of formation of the initial strength and stiffness of the modified cement matrix due to the rapid growth of crystallohydrates in the space among the dispersed reinforcing modifier particles. Since the lack of space prevents from the free growth of crystals, the latter cross-penetrate, forming a dense structure, which contributes to the growth of strength. Practical value. Dispersed modifying cement matrix provides a durable concrete for special purposes with the design performance characteristics. The developed technology of dispersed cement system modification, the defined features of its structure formation mechanism and the use of congruence principle for the complex of technological impacts of physical

  6. Design of Fit-for-Purpose Cement to Restore Cement-Caprock Seal Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provost, R.

    2015-12-01

    This project aims to study critical research needs in the area of rock-cement interfaces, with a special focus on crosscutting applications in the Wellbore Integrity Pillar of the SubTER initiative. This study will focus on design and test fit-for-purpose cement formulations. The goals of this project are as follows: 1) perform preliminary study of dispersing nanomaterial admixtures in Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) mixes, 2) characterize the cement-rock interface, and 3) identify potential high-performance cement additives that can improve sorption behavior, chemical durability, bond strength, and interfacial fracture toughness, as appropriate to specific subsurface operational needs. The work presented here focuses on a study of cement-shale interfaces to better understand failure mechanisms, with particular attention to measuring bond strength at the cement-shale interface. Both experimental testing and computational modeling were conducted to determine the mechanical behavior at the interface representing the interaction of cement and shale of a typical wellbore environment. Cohesive zone elements are used in the finite element method to computationally simulate the interface of the cement and rock materials with varying properties. Understanding the bond strength and mechanical performance of the cement-formation interface is critical to wellbore applications such as sequestration, oil and gas production and exploration and nuclear waste disposal. Improved shear bond strength is an indication of the capability of the interface to ensure zonal isolation and prevent zonal communication, two crucial goals in preserving wellbore integrity. Understanding shear bond strength development and interface mechanics will provide an idea as to how the cement-formation interface can be altered under environmental changes (temperature, pressure, chemical degradation, etc.) so that the previously described objectives can be achieved. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi

  7. Intravenous polymethyl methacrylate after cemented hemiarthroplasty of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyrme, A D; Jeer, P J; Berry, J; Lewis, S G; Compson, J P

    2001-06-01

    Current cementing techniques used during hip arthroplasty aim to maximize the bond at the bone-cement interface in an effort to increase the longevity of the prosthesis. To accomplish this, one must generate high intramedullary pressures, which are known to be associated with complications such as cement implantation syndrome. We record a rare complication following cement pressurization of a hip hemiarthroplasty that resulted in intravenous polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). This complication however, is not associated with a significant morbidity or mortality, but it is important to identify and distinguish from a femoral cortical defect, which can be created during surgery.

  8. Ultramorphology of pre-treated adhesive interfaces between self-adhesive resin cement and tooth structures

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira,Carolina Nemesio de Barros; DALEPRANE,Bruno; MIRANDA,Giovani Lana Peixoto de; Magalhães,Cláudia Silami de; Moreira, Allyson Nogueira

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Convencional resin cements can be used in combination with a total-etch system in a conventional mode or as self-adhesive resin cements. The latter are less technique sensitive and able to bond to dental tissues without previous treatment or adhesive layer and requires only a single step to be applied to dental structures. Objective To compare qualitatively the adhesive interfaces of two self-adhesive resin cements and one conventional resin cement after different toot...

  9. Cytotoxicity of four categories of dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid-Schwap, Martina; Franz, Alexander; König, Franz; Bristela, Margit; Lucas, Trevor; Piehslinger, Eva; Watts, David C; Schedle, Andreas

    2009-03-01

    Assessment of dental material biocompatibility is gaining increasing importance for both patients and dentists. Dental cements may be in contact with oral soft tissues for prolonged periods of time and play an important role in prosthetic rehabilitation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate eight dental cements using a standardized L929-fibroblast cell culture test. For each material, fresh specimens (added to the cultures immediately after preparation) and specimens preincubated for 7 days in cell culture medium were prepared according to the manufacturers' recommendations. After exposure to test specimens, cell numbers were compared to glass controls. The main outcome was a two-sided 95% confidence interval for the mean value of the standardized cell number for each substance investigated. Fresh specimens of all tested cements showed significant cytotoxicity, which diminished after 7 days preincubation. Cytotoxicity of fresh adhesive and self-adhesive resin cements was lower when specimens were dual-cured compared to self-cured. A rank order of cytotoxicity was established based on mean values: Nexus 2 (dual-cured) showed least cytotoxicity, followed by Variolink II (dual-cured), Nexus 2 (self-cured), Harvard, RelyxUnicem (dual-cured), Panavia 21, Fujicem, Durelon, Variolink II (self-cured), RelyxUnicem (self-cured), Maxcem (dual-cured) and Maxcem (self-cured). When bondings were added to Nexus 2 or Variolink II specimens, a slight increase in cytotoxicity was observed. Adhesive resin cements showed less cytotoxicity than self-adhesive and chemically setting cements. Bonding only slightly influenced cytotoxicity of the adhesive resin cements. Dual-cured specimens of adhesive and self-adhesive resin cements showed significantly less toxicity than self-cured specimens.

  10. [Influence of time on shear strength using resin cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Wei-min; Zhang, Xiu-yin; Zhang, Fu-qiang

    2007-10-01

    To compare the shear bond strength of different composite resin cement systems at different time intervals. 48 healthy non-carious human molars were selected in the study. The samples were divided into two groups, 24 in each group. (1) RelyX unicem was used on bonding, (2) Variolink 2 was used on bonding. All specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 2 hours, 24 hours and 1 week. 8 specimens in each group were stressed in shear until failure. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS11.0 software package. Debonged surface was examined under light microscope. Shear bond strengths of two resin cements showed a significant increase as time went (Padhesive/dentin interfaces. Time can influence the shear bond strength using different composite resin cement systems. Supported by Shanghai Leading Academic Discipline Project (Grant No.T0202).

  11. Biomineralization in metakaolin modified cement mortar to improve its strength with lowered cement content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengmeng; Zhu, Xuejiao; Mukherjee, Abhijit; Huang, Minsheng; Achal, Varenyam

    2017-05-05

    The role of industrial byproduct as supplementary cementitious material to partially replace cement has greatly contributed to sustainable environment. Metakaolin (MK), one of such byproduct, is widely used to partial replacement of cement; however, during cement replacement at high percentage, it may not be a good choice to improve the strength of concrete. Thus, in the present study, biocement, a product of microbially induced carbonate precipitation is utilized in MK-modified cement mortars to improve its compressive strength. Despite of cement replacement with MK as high as 50%, the presented technology improved compressive strength of mortars by 27%, which was still comparable to those mortars with 100% cement. The results proved that biomineralization could be effectively used in reducing cement content without compromising compressive strength of mortars. Biocementation also reduced the porosity of mortars at all ages. The process was characterized by SEM-EDS to observe bacterially-induced carbonate crystals and FTIR spectroscopy to predict responsible bonding in the formation of calcium carbonate. Further, XRD analysis identified bio/minerals formed in the MK-modified mortars. The study also encourages combining biological role in construction engineering to solve hazardous nature of cement and at same time solve the disposal problem of industrial waste for sustainable environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cements and adhesives for all-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Adriana P; Silva, Nelson R F A; Bonfante, Estevam A; Pegoraro, Thiago A; Dias, Renata A; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2011-04-01

    Dental cements are designed to retain restorations, prefabricated or cast posts and cores, and appliances in a stable, and long-lasting position in the oral environment. Resin-based cements were developed to overcome drawbacks of nonresinous materials, including low strength, high solubility, and opacity. Successful cementation of esthetic restorations depends on appropriate treatment to the tooth substrate and intaglio surface of the restoration, which in turn, depends on the ceramic characteristics. A reliable resin cementation procedure can only be achieved if the operator is aware of the mechanisms involved to perform the cementation and material properties. This article addresses current knowledge of resin cementation concepts, exploring the bonding mechanisms that influence long-term clinical success of all-ceramic systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. To what extent does the longevity of fixed dental prostheses depend on the function of the cement? Working Group 4 materials: cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelhoff, Daniel; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this review was to define the impact of cementation mode on the longevity of different types of single tooth restorations and fixed dental prostheses (FDP). Literature search by PubMed as the major database was used utilizing the terms namely, adhesive techniques, all-ceramic crowns, cast-metal, cement, cementation, ceramic inlays, gold inlays, metal-ceramic, non-bonded fixed-partial-dentures, porcelain veneers, resin-bonded fixed-partial-dentures, porcelain-fused-to-metal, and implant-supported-restorations together with manual search of non-indexed literature. Cementation of root canal posts and cores were excluded. Due to lack of randomized prospective clinical studies in some fields of cementation, recommendations had to be based on lower evidence level (Centre of Evidence Based Medicine, Oxford) for special applications of current cements. One-hundred-and-twenty-five articles were selected for the review. The primary function of the cementation is to establish reliable retention, a durable seal of the space between the tooth and the restoration, and to provide adequate optical properties. The various types of cements used in dentistry could be mainly divided into two groups: Water-based cements and polymerizing cements. Water-based cements exhibited satisfying long-term clinical performance associated with cast metal (inlays, onlays, partial crowns) as well as single unit metal-ceramic FDPs and multiple unit FDPs with macroretentive preparation designs and adequate marginal fit. Early short-term clinical results with high-strength all-ceramic restorations luted with water-based cements are also promising. Current polymerizing cements cover almost all fields of water-based cements and in addition to that they are mainly indicated for non-retentive restorations. They are able to seal the tooth completely creating hybrid layer formation. Furthermore, adhesive capabilities of polymerizing cements allowed for bonded restorations, promoting at the

  14. Resistência de união entre cimentos e liga de níquel-cromo, em função da ciclagem térmica e variações no procedimento de união Tensile bond strength between cements and nickel-chromium alloy related to thermocycling and adhesive variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ruiz MARTUCI

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available A investigação teve a finalidade de avaliar a resistência de união de uma liga de níquel-cromo com diversos agentes cimentantes frente à imersão, sem ou com termociclagem e idade. A liga usada foi a Litecast B. Os sistemas adesivos usados foram Ketac-Cem, Vitremer, Enforce com Flúor em três variações: a com primer apenas (Enforce P; b com primer e adesivo (Enforce P + A; c apenas adesivo (Enforce A. Discos metálicos, obtidos por fundição, foram cimentados entre si, constituindo os corpos de prova, que foram imersos em água destilada e submetidos ou não à ciclagem térmica. Os testes foram feitos 1 e 90 dias após a cimentação. As conclusões foram: o Ketac-Cem apresentou baixa resistência adesiva, sendo superado pelo Vitremer; o Enforce P, embora aumentasse a resistência ao longo do tempo, fez com que ela permanecesse baixa; o Enforce P + A apresentou alta resistência em um dia, que diminuiu ao longo do tempo; o Enforce A apresentou superioridade adesiva, que se manteve ao longo do tempo com ciclagem térmica; a influência da ciclagem térmica foi dependente do sistema adesivo.We evaluated tensile bond strengths between a nickel-chromium alloy and cements at different times (one and 90 days using or not thermocycling. Alloy used was Litecast B, and luting cements were Ketac-Cem, Vitremer, and Fluoride Enforce with three variations: a only primer; b with primer and bond; c only with bond. Metallic discs with 6 mm diameter were cemented together and immersed in distilled water. Half specimens were thermocycled and half one not. Conclusions were: Ketac-Cem presented low bonding strength, being that of Vitremer very higher; the material Enforce when used only with primer increased adhesion with time but yet remained relatively low after 90 days; Enforce used with bond only achieved superior adhesion, still present specially with termocycling after 90 days; influence of thermocycling depends on adhesive system.

  15. Asphalt cement poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... petroleum material that hardens when it cools. Asphalt cement poisoning occurs when someone swallows asphalt. If hot ... found in: Road paving materials Roofing materials Tile cements Asphalt may also be used for other purposes.

  16. Effect of an Indirect Composite Resin Surface Treatment with Two Types of Lasers: Nd: YAG, Er:YAG and Acid Etching on the Microshear Bond Strength of a Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Daneshkazemi

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: The two Er:YAG and Nd: YAG lasers increased the bond strength. Though etching alone had no significant effect, the application of the laser Nd:YAG with etching increased the bond strength.