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Sample records for hormones control human

  1. A control system formulation of the mechanism that controls the secretions of serum group hormone in humans during sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, J. C.; Young, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    Plasma growth hormone concentrations during sleep were determined experimentally. An elevated level of plasma growth hormone was observed during the initial phase of sleep and remained elevated for approximately 3 hr before returning to the steady-state level. Moreover, subsequent to a prolonged interruption of sleep, of the order of 2-3 hr, an elevated level of plasma growth hormone was again observed during the initial phase of resumed sleep. A control system formulation of the mechanism that controls the secretions of serum growth hormone in humans was used to account for the growth hormone responses observed.

  2. Growth hormone secretion is diminished and tightly controlled in humans enriched for familial longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Spoel, Evie; Jansen, Steffy W; Akintola, Abimbola A

    2016-01-01

    Reduced growth hormone (GH) signaling has been consistently associated with increased health and lifespan in various mouse models. Here, we assessed GH secretion and its control in relation with human familial longevity. We frequently sampled blood over 24 h in 19 middle-aged offspring of long...... and more tight control. These data imply that the highly conserved GH signaling pathway, which has been linked to longevity in animal models, is also associated with human longevity....

  3. Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH): a new player in human hair-growth control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gáspár, Erzsébet; Hardenbicker, Celine; Bodó, Eniko; Wenzel, Björn; Ramot, Yuval; Funk, Wolfgang; Kromminga, Arno; Paus, Ralf

    2010-02-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) is the most proximal component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis that regulates thyroid hormone synthesis. Since transcripts for members of this axis were detected in cultured normal human skin cells and since human hair follicles (HFs) respond to stimulation with thyrotropin, we now have studied whether human HF functions are also modulated by TRH. Here we report that the epithelium of normal human scalp HFs expresses not only TRH receptors (TRH-R) but also TRH itself at the gene and protein level. Stimulation of microdissected, organ-cultured HFs with TRH promotes hair-shaft elongation, prolongs the hair cycle growth phase (anagen), and antagonizes its termination by TGF-beta2. It also increases proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of hair matrix keratinocytes. These TRH effects may be mediated in part by reducing the ATM/Atr-dependent phosphorylation of p53. By microarray analysis, several differentially up- or down-regulated TRH-target genes were detected (e.g., selected keratins). Thus, human scalp HFs are both a source and a target of TRH, which operates as a potent hair-growth stimulator. Human HFs provide an excellent discovery tool for identifying and dissecting nonclassical functions of TRH and TRH-mediated signaling in situ, which emerge as novel players in human epithelial biology.

  4. Controlled release of human growth hormone fused with a human hybrid Fc fragment through a nanoporous polymer membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eung-Sam; Jang, Do Soo; Yang, Seung Yun; Lee, Mi Nam; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Cha, Hyung Jin; Kim, Jin Kon; Sung, Young Chul; Choi, Kwan Yong

    2013-05-01

    Nanotechnology has been applied to the development of more effective and compatible drug delivery systems for therapeutic proteins. Human growth hormone (hGH) was fused with a hybrid Fc fragment containing partial Fc domains of human IgD and IgG4 to produce a long-acting fusion protein. The fusion protein, hGH-hyFc, resulted in the increase of the hydrodynamic diameter (ca. 11 nm) compared with the diameter (ca. 5 nm) of the recombinant hGH. A diblock copolymer membrane with nanopores (average diameter of 14.3 nm) exhibited a constant release rate of hGH-hyFc. The hGH-hyFc protein released in a controlled manner for one month was found to trigger the phosphorylation of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) in human B lymphocyte and to exhibit an almost identical circular dichroism spectrum to that of the original hGH-hyFc, suggesting that the released fusion protein should maintain the functional and structural integrity of hGH. Thus, the nanoporous release device could be a potential delivery system for the long-term controlled release of therapeutic proteins fused with the hybrid Fc fragment.Nanotechnology has been applied to the development of more effective and compatible drug delivery systems for therapeutic proteins. Human growth hormone (hGH) was fused with a hybrid Fc fragment containing partial Fc domains of human IgD and IgG4 to produce a long-acting fusion protein. The fusion protein, hGH-hyFc, resulted in the increase of the hydrodynamic diameter (ca. 11 nm) compared with the diameter (ca. 5 nm) of the recombinant hGH. A diblock copolymer membrane with nanopores (average diameter of 14.3 nm) exhibited a constant release rate of hGH-hyFc. The hGH-hyFc protein released in a controlled manner for one month was found to trigger the phosphorylation of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) in human B lymphocyte and to exhibit an almost identical circular dichroism spectrum to that of the original hGH-hyFc, suggesting that the released fusion protein should maintain the functional and

  5. Circadian hormone control in a human-on-a-chip: In vitro biology's ignored component?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyr, Kevin J; Avaldi, Omero M; Wikswo, John P

    2017-11-01

    Organs-on-Chips (OoCs) are poised to reshape dramatically the study of biology by replicating in vivo the function of individual and coupled human organs. Such microphysiological systems (MPS) have already recreated complex physiological responses necessary to simulate human organ function not evident in two-dimensional in vitro biological experiments. OoC researchers hope to streamline pharmaceutical development, accelerate toxicology studies, limit animal testing, and provide new insights beyond the capability of current biological models. However, to develop a physiologically accurate Human-on-a-Chip, i.e., an MPS homunculus that functions as an interconnected, whole-body, model organ system, one must couple individual OoCs with proper fluidic and metabolic scaling. This will enable the study of the effects of organ-organ interactions on the metabolism of drugs and toxins. Critical to these efforts will be the recapitulation of the complex physiological signals that regulate the endocrine, metabolic, and digestive systems. To date, with the exception of research focused on reproductive organs on chips, most OoC research ignores homuncular endocrine regulation, in particular the circadian rhythms that modulate the function of all organ systems. We outline the importance of cyclic endocrine regulation and the role that it may play in the development of MPS homunculi for the pharmacology, toxicology, and systems biology communities. Moreover, we discuss the critical end-organ hormone interactions that are most relevant for a typical coupled-OoC system, and the possible research applications of a missing endocrine system MicroFormulator (MES-µF) that could impose biological rhythms on in vitro models. By linking OoCs together through chemical messenger systems, advanced physiological phenomena relevant to pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics studies can be replicated. The concept of a MES-µF could be applied to other standard cell-culture systems such as well

  6. Afferent neuronal control of type-I gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH neurons in the human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik eHrabovszky

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the regulation of the human menstrual cycle represents an important ultimate challenge of reproductive neuroendocrine research. However, direct translation of information from laboratory animal experiments to the human is often complicated by strikingly different and unique reproductive strategies and central regulatory mechanisms that can be present in even closely related animal species. In all mammals studied so far, type-I gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH synthesizing neurons form the final common output way from the hypothalamus in the neuroendocrine control of the adenohypophysis. Under various physiological and pathological conditions, hormonal and metabolic signals either regulate GnRH neurons directly or act on upstream neuronal circuitries to influence the pattern of pulsatile GnRH secretion into the hypophysial portal circulation. Neuronal afferents to GnRH cells convey important metabolic-, stress-, sex steroid-, lactational- and circadian signals to the reproductive axis, among other effects. This article gives an overview of the available neuroanatomical literature that described the afferent regulation of human GnRH neurons by peptidergic, monoaminergic and amino acidergic neuronal systems. Recent studies of human genetics provided evidence that central peptidergic signaling by kisspeptins and neurokinin B play particularly important roles in puberty onset and later, in the sex steroid-dependent feedback regulation of GnRH neurons. This review article places special emphasis on the topographic distribution, sexual dimorphism, aging-dependent neuroanatomical changes and plastic connectivity to GnRH neurons of the critically important human hypothalamic kisspeptin and neurokinin B systems.

  7. Hormonal Control of Lactation

    OpenAIRE

    青野, 敏博; Toshihiro, AONO; 徳島大学; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Tokushima, School of Medicine

    1990-01-01

    We studied the mechanism of normal lactation, especially the roles of prolactin (PRL) and oxytocin (OXT) in the initiation of lactation, the lactation in the women complicated with endocrinological disorders, and medical therapies for stimulation and suppression of lactation. The level of serum PRL increases as pregnancy progresses, and reachs to a peak on the day of delivery. Despite high PRL level, milk secretion does not appear during pregnancy, because the sex steroid hormones suppress bi...

  8. Post-transcriptional control of c-myc proto-oncogene expression by glucocorticoid hormones in human T lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroder, M.; Vacca, A.; Screpanti, I.; Petrangeli, E.; Frati, L. (Univ. La Sapienza, Roma (Italy)); Martinotti, S.; Gulino, A. (Univ. of L' Aquila (Italy))

    1990-03-11

    The authors have studied the regulation of the human c-myc proto-oncogene by glucocorticoid hormones in T lymphoblastic leukemic cells. A significant decrease (50%) of the steady state levels of c-myc mRNA was observed as early as 3 hours after dexamethasone treatment of CEM-1.3 human lymphoma cells, reaching less than 5% values, with respect to untreated cells, 24 hours after hormone administration. Nuclear run-on experiments showed no modifications of the transcriptional rate from the first exon. However, a slight decrease (15%) of the transcript elongation from the first exon/first intron boundary was observed in the dexamethasone-treated cells. Using actinomycin D to block gene transcription, they observed a significant increase in the rate of c-myc RNA specific decay after dexamethasone treatment. The data suggest that dexamethasone is able to inhibit human c-myc gene expression primarily at the post-transcriptional level, through the synthesis of hormone-transcriptional level, through the synthesis of hormone-induced regulatory protein(s) controlling c-myc transcript stability.

  9. Treatment of cryptorchidism with human chorionic gonadotropin or gonadotropin releasing hormone. A double-blind controlled study of 243 boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, P; Müller, J; Buhl, S

    1988-01-01

    We have conducted a modified double-blind study on the effect of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and placebo on bilateral and unilateral maldescended testes. One hundred and fifty-five boys with bilateral and 88 boys with unilateral cryptorchidism fulfilled...... the inclusion criteria and completed the treatment protocol. The boys were between 1 and 13 years of age. hCG was administered as intramuscular injections twice weekly for 3 weeks. GnRH and placebo were given intranasally. hCG was superior to GnRH and placebo in the treatment of bilateral maldescended testes (p...... = 0.0009). Both testes descended in 25% of the boys following treatment with hCG, and improvement in the position of the testes was obtained in a further 25% of the cases. hCG administration resulted in complete testicular descent in 14% of boys with unilateral cryptorchidism compared with 3 and 0...

  10. Human Growth Hormone: The Latest Ergogenic Aid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowart, Virginia S.

    1988-01-01

    Believing that synthetic human growth hormone (hGH) will lead to athletic prowess and fortune, some parents and young athletes wish to use the drug to enhance sports performance. Should hGH become widely available, its abuse could present many problems, from potential health risks to the ethics of drug-enhanced athletic performance. (JL)

  11. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test... system is a device intended to measure the levels of human growth hormone in plasma. Human growth hormone...

  12. Human growth hormone alters carbohydrate storage in blood and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Growth hormone (GH) is a peptide hormone that plays vital roles in cell growth and metabolism. Aim: The study investigates the effect of GH on carbohydrate metabolism using Indian bird, Acridotheres tristis. Methods: Three different doses (0.4, 0.6, and 0.8mg/100g body weight) of human growth hormone ...

  13. Recombinant human growth hormone and rosiglitazone for abdominal fat accumulation in HIV-infected patients with insulin resistance: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, factorial trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall J Glesby

    Full Text Available Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH reduces visceral adipose tissue (VAT volume in HIV-infected patients but can worsen glucose homeostasis and lipoatrophy. We aimed to determine if adding rosiglitazone to rhGH would abrogate the adverse effects of rhGH on insulin sensitivity (SI and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT volume.Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial using a 2×2 factorial design in which HIV-infected subjects with abdominal obesity and insulin resistance were randomized to rhGH 3 mg daily, rosiglitazone 4 mg twice daily, combination rhGH + rosiglitazone, or double placebo (control for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in SI by frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test from entry to week 12. Body composition was assessed by whole body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and dual Xray absorptiometry (DEXA. Seventy-seven subjects were randomized of whom 72 initiated study drugs. Change in SI from entry to week 12 differed across the 4 arms by 1-way ANCOVA (P = 0.02; by pair-wise comparisons, only rhGH (decreasing SI; P = 0.03 differed significantly from control. Changes from entry to week 12 in fasting glucose and glucose area under the curve on 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test differed across arms (1-way ANCOVA P = 0.004, increasing in the rhGH arm relative to control. VAT decreased significantly in the rhGH arms (-17.5% in rhGH/rosiglitazone and -22.7% in rhGH but not in the rosiglitazone alone (-2.5% or control arms (-1.9%. SAT did not change significantly in any arm. DEXA results were consistent with the MRI data. There was no significant rhGH x rosiglitazone interaction for any body composition parameter.The addition of rosiglitazone abrogated the adverse effects of rhGH on insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance while not significantly modifying the lowering effect of rhGH on VAT.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00130286.

  14. Impact of recombinant human growth hormone (rh-GH treatment on psychiatric, neuropsychological and clinical profiles of GH deficient adults: a placebo - controlled trial

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    SOARES CLÁUDIO DE NOVAES

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Untreated GH-deficient adults have a diversity of dysfunctions (e.g. reduced muscle strength, emotional instability during stress, depressive symptoms that may cause deleterious effects on quality of life, and may be positively influenced by recombinant human growth hormone (rh-GH therapy. AIM: To evaluate the impact of a clinical intervention with rh-GH therapy on GH - deficient adults. METHOD: The physical, psychiatric and neuropsychological status of 9 GH-deficient adults was determined before and after the administration of rh-GH (0.250 IU/Kg/week in a double blind placebo-controlled trial for six months. Patients then received rh-GH for a further period of 6 months and their status was re-evaluated. RESULTS: Rh-GH was significant better than placebo at 6th month (p<0.05, producing increased serum Insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-1 levels, reduced body mass index (BMI and body fat, increased lean body mass and water, reduced waist/hip ratio and increased energy expenditure. The rh-GH therapy was also significantly better than placebo on depressive features as measured by the Hamilton Depression Scale (17-items (p= 0.0431 and the Beck Depression Inventory (p= 0.0431. Neuropsychological evaluations showed significant improvements in measures of Attention: Digit Backward (p= 0.035,Verbal Fluency (FAS (p= 0.02 and Cognitive Efficiency (WAIS-R tests: Vocabulary (p= 0.027 , Picture Arrangements (p= 0.017, and Comprehension (p= 0.01 following rh-GH therapy. CONCLUSION: The clinical, psychiatric, and neuropsychological impairments of untreated GH-deficient adults can be decreased by rh-GH therapy.

  15. Possible role of human growth hormone in penile erection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, A J; Uckert, S; Stief, C G; Truss, M C; Machtens, S; Scheller, F; Knapp, W H; Hartmann, U; Jonas, U

    2000-12-01

    Treatment with recombinant human growth hormone in adult patients with growth hormone deficiency increases nitric oxide and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). We examined the functional in vitro effects of recombinant human growth hormone on tissue tension and cyclic nucleotide levels of human corpus cavernosum and detected changes in growth hormone in the cavernous and peripheral blood during different phases of penile erection. Relaxant responses of human corpus cavernosum were investigated using the organ bath technique. Tissue levels of cGMP were determined by a specific radioimmunoassay after dose dependent exposition of isolated human corpus cavernosum strips to recombinant human growth hormone. In 35 healthy potent volunteers blood samples were obtained simultaneously from the corpus cavernosum and cubital vein during different functional conditions of the penis, including flaccidity, tumescence, rigidity and detumescence. Penile erection was induced by audiovisual and tactile stimulation. Serum growth hormone was determined by an immunoradiometric assay. Recombinant human growth hormone elicited dose dependent relaxation of human corpus cavernosum strips in vitro. The relaxing potency of recombinant human growth hormone was paralleled by its ability to elevate intracellular levels of cGMP. In vivo the peripheral growth hormone serum profile of the respective penile conditions did not significantly differ from those of cavernous serum. The main increase in growth hormone to greater than 90% was determined during developing penile tumescence, followed by a transient decrease afterward. These results suggest that penile erection may probably be induced by growth hormone through its cGMP stimulating activity on human corpus cavernosum smooth muscle.

  16. Differences in gene expression of granulosa cells from women undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with either recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone or highly purified human menopausal gonadotropin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøndahl, Marie Louise; Borup, Rehannah; Lee, Young Bae

    2009-01-01

    randomized study. SETTING: University-based facilities for clinical services and research. PATIENT(S): Thirty women undergoing treatment with vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI). INTERVENTION(S): Patients were randomly allocated to receive recombinant FSH or human (hMG) COH......-binding-protein-P (anti-apoptosis protein) were expressed at higher levels in hMG than in recombinant FSH. CONCLUSION(S): The different hormone compositions of the two drugs used for COH had a statistically significant impact on the gene expression profile of preovulatory granulosa cells. Some of these genes may...

  17. Human Growth Hormone (HGH): Does It Slow Aging?

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    Healthy Lifestyle Healthy aging Human growth hormone is described by some as the key to slowing the aging process. Before you sign up, get the ... slowdown has triggered an interest in using synthetic human growth hormone (HGH) as a way to stave ...

  18. Single dose and pulsatile treatment with human growth hormone in growth hormone deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, P J; Pringle, P J; Brook, C G

    1987-01-01

    The growth and growth hormone profiles in four children receiving three different regimens of treatment with human growth hormone (hGH) were compared. There was no significant difference in the rate of growth between the regimens; the rate of growth fell dramatically after treatment. Pulsatile administration of hGH was no better than conventional treatment.

  19. Sex hormone effects on autonomic mechanisms of thermoregulation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkoudian, Nisha; Stachenfeld, Nina

    2016-04-01

    Autonomic mechanisms are fundamental to human physiological thermoregulation, and female reproductive hormones have substantial influences on several aspects of these mechanisms. Of these, the best recognized are the thermoregulatory responses that occur at menopause (hot flushes) and the changes in body temperature within the menstrual cycle which may help couples predict ovulation. Our goal in this brief review is to summarize current knowledge regarding the influences of reproductive hormones on autonomic mechanisms in human thermoregulation. In general, estrogens tend to promote lower body temperatures via augmentation of heat dissipation responses, whereas progesterone tends to promote higher body temperatures. Recent evidence suggests specific influences of estrogens on central autonomic nuclei involved in control of skin blood flow and sweating. Estrogens also augment vasodilation by direct effects on peripheral blood vessels. Influences of progesterone are less well understood, but include both centrally regulated changes in thermoregulatory set-point as well as and peripheral effects, including augmented vasoconstriction in the skin. We conclude with a brief discussion of thermoregulatory adjustments associated with changing hormone levels during menopause, pregnancy and polycystic ovary syndrome. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Nutrient Sensing Overrides Somatostatin and Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone to Control Pulsatile Growth Hormone Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn, F J

    2015-07-01

    Pharmacological studies reveal that interactions between hypothalamic inhibitory somatostatin and stimulatory growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) govern pulsatile GH release. However, in vivo analysis of somatostatin and GHRH release into the pituitary portal vasculature and peripheral GH output demonstrates that the withdrawal of somatostatin or the appearance of GHRH into pituitary portal blood does not reliably dictate GH release. Consequently, additional intermediates acting at the level of the hypothalamus and within the anterior pituitary gland are likely to contribute to the release of GH, entraining GH secretory patterns to meet physiological demand. The identification and validation of the actions of such intermediates is particularly important, given that the pattern of GH release defines several of the physiological actions of GH. This review highlights the actions of neuropeptide Y in regulating GH release. It is acknowledged that pulsatile GH release may not occur selectively in response to hypothalamic control of pituitary function. As such, interactions between somatotroph networks, the median eminence and pituitary microvasculature and blood flow, and the emerging role of tanycytes and pericytes as critical regulators of pulsatility are considered. It is argued that collective interactions between the hypothalamus, the median eminence and pituitary vasculature, and structural components within the pituitary gland dictate somatotroph function and thereby pulsatile GH release. These interactions may override hypothalamic somatostatin and GHRH-mediated GH release, and modify pulsatile GH release relative to the peripheral glucose supply, and thereby physiological demand. © 2015 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  1. Extrapituitary growth hormone synthesis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ibave, Diana Cristina; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Iram Pablo; Garza-Rodríguez, María de Lourdes; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The gene for pituitary growth hormone (GH-N) in man belongs to a multigene locus located at chromosome 17q24.2, which also harbors four additional genes: one for a placental variant of GH-N (named GH-V) and three of chorionic somatommamotropin (CSH) type. Their tandem arrangement from 5' to 3' is: GH-N, CSH-L, CSH-1, GH-V and CSH-2. GH-N is mainly expressed in the pituitary from birth throughout life, while the remaining genes are expressed in the placenta of pregnant women. Pituitary somatotrophs secrete GH into the bloodstream to act at receptor sites in most tissues. GH participates in the regulation of several complex physiological processes, including growth and metabolism. Recently, the presence of GH has been described in several extrapituitary sites, such as neural, ocular, reproductive, immune, cardiovascular, muscular, dermal and skeletal tissues. It has been proposed that GH has an autocrine action in these tissues. While the body of evidence for its presence is constantly growing, research of its possible function and implications lag behind. In this review we highlight the evidence of extrapituitary synthesis of GH in humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Growth hormone-releasing hormone antagonists inhibit growth of human ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadia, A; Schally, A V; Halmos, G; Varga, J L; Seitz, S; Buchholz, S; Rick, F; Zarandi, M; Bellyei, S; Treszl, A; Szalontay, L; Lucci, J A

    2011-10-01

    Epithelial ovarian carcinoma is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women with gynecologic malignancies. Antagonists of the growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) have been shown to inhibit growth of various cancers through endocrine, autocrine, and paracrine mechanisms. In this study, we have investigated the effects of GHRH antagonists (GHRHa) in ES-2 human clear cell ovarian cancer and in UCI-107 human serous ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo. We evaluated the expression of mRNA for GHRH receptor, the binding to GHRH receptors, in specimens of ES-2 ovarian cancer. We evaluated also the in vitro effects of GHRHa on ES-2 cells and the in vivo effect of 2 different GHRHa on ES-2 and UCI-107 tumors. Nude mice bearing xenografts on ES-2 and UCI-107 ovarian cancer were treated with JMR-132 and MZ-J-7-118, respectively. Tumor growth was compared to control. ES-2 cells expressed mRNA for the functional splice variant SV1 of the GHRH receptor. JMR-132 inhibited cell proliferation in vitro by 42% and 18% at 10 and 1 μM concentration, respectively. Specific high affinity receptors for GHRH were detected in ES-2 cancer samples. In vivo daily subcutaneous injections of GHRHa significantly reduced tumor growth compared to a control group in both animal models. Our results indicate that GHRHa such as JMR-132 and MZ-J-7-118 can inhibit the growth of human ovarian cancer. The efficacy of GHRHa in ovarian cancer should be assessed in clinical trials. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. [Human growth hormone and Turner syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Marco, Silvia Beatriz; de Arriba Muñoz, Antonio; Ferrer Lozano, Marta; Labarta Aizpún, José Ignacio; Garagorri Otero, Jesús María

    2017-02-01

    The evaluation of clinical and analytical parameters as predictors of the final growth response in Turner syndrome patients treated with growth hormone. A retrospective study was performed on 25 girls with Turner syndrome (17 treated with growth hormone), followed-up until adult height. Auxological, analytical, genetic and pharmacological parameters were collected. A descriptive and analytical study was conducted to evaluate short (12 months) and long term response to treatment with growth hormone. A favourable treatment response was shown during the first year of treatment in terms of height velocity gain in 66.6% of cases (height-gain velocity >3cm/year). A favourable long-term treatment response was also observed in terms of adult height, which increased by 42.82±21.23cm (1.25±0.76 SDS), with an adult height gain of 9.59±5.39cm (1.68±1.51 SDS). Predictors of good response to growth hormone treatment are: A) initial growth hormone dose, B) time on growth hormone treatment until starting oestrogen therapy, C) increased IGF1 and IGFBP-3 levels in the first year of treatment, and D) height gain velocity in the first year of treatment. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Health-related quality of life of young adults with Turner syndrome following a long-term randomized controlled trial of recombinant human growth hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Vliet Guy

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are limited long-term randomized controlled trials of growth hormone (GH supplementation to adult height and few published reports of the health-related quality of life (HRQOL following treatment. The present follow-up study of young adults from a long-term controlled trial of GH treatment in patients with Turner syndrome (TS yielded data to examine whether GH supplementation resulted in a higher HRQOL (either due to taller stature or from the knowledge that active treatment and not placebo had been received or alternatively a lower HRQOL (due to medicalization from years of injections. Methods The original trial randomized 154 Canadian girls with TS aged 7-13 years from 13 centres to receive either long-term GH injections at the pharmacologic dose of 0.3 mg/kg/week or to receive no injections; estrogen prescription for induction of puberty was standardized. Patients were eligible for the follow-up study if they were at least 16 years old at the time of follow-up. The instrument used to study HRQOL was the SF-36, summarized into physical and mental component scales (PCS and MCS; higher scores indicate better HRQOL. Results Thirty-four of the 48 eligible participants (71% consented to participate; data were missing for one patient. Both groups (GH and no treatment had normal HRQOL at this post-treatment assessment. The GH group had a (mean ± SD PCS score of 56 ± 5; the untreated group 58 ± 4; mean score for 16-24 year old females in the general population 53.5 ± 6.9. The GH group had a mean MCS score of 52 ± 6; the untreated group 49 ± 13; mean score for 16-24 year old females in the general population 49.6 ± 9.8. Secondary analyses showed no relationship between HRQOL and height. Conclusions We found no benefit or adverse effect on HRQOL either from receiving or not receiving growth hormone injections in a long-term randomized controlled trial, confirming larger observational studies. We suggest that it remains

  5. The Hormonal Control of Food Intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, Anthony P.; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; O'Rahilly, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Numerous circulating peptides and steroids produced in the body influence appetite through their actions on the hypothalamus, the brain stem, and the autonomic nervous system. These hormones come from three major sites—fat cells, the gastrointestinal tract, and the pancreas. In this Review we provide a synthesis of recent evidence concerning the actions of these hormones on food intake. PMID:17448988

  6. Modeling hormonal control of cambium proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oles, Vladyslav; Panchenko, Alexander; Smertenko, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    Rise of atmospheric CO2 is one of the main causes of global warming. Catastrophic climate change can be avoided by reducing emissions and increasing sequestration of CO2. Trees are known to sequester CO2 during photosynthesis, and then store it as wood biomass. Thus, breeding of trees with higher wood yield would mitigate global warming as well as augment production of renewable construction materials, energy, and industrial feedstock. Wood is made of cellulose-rich xylem cells produced through proliferation of a specialized stem cell niche called cambium. Importance of cambium in xylem cells production makes it an ideal target for the tree breeding programs; however our knowledge about control of cambium proliferation remains limited. The morphology and regulation of cambium are different from those of stem cell niches that control axial growth. For this reason, translating the knowledge about axial growth to radial growth has limited use. Furthermore, genetic approaches cannot be easily applied because overlaying tissues conceal cambium from direct observation and complicate identification of mutants. To overcome the paucity of experimental tools in cambium biology, we constructed a Boolean network CARENET (CAmbium REgulation gene NETwork) for modelling cambium activity, which includes the key transcription factors WOX4 and HD-ZIP III as well as their potential regulators. Our simulations predict that: (1) auxin, cytokinin, gibberellin, and brassinosteroids act cooperatively in promoting transcription of WOX4 and HD-ZIP III; (2) auxin and cytokinin pathways negatively regulate each other; (3) hormonal pathways act redundantly in sustaining cambium activity; (4) individual cambium cells can have diverse molecular identities. CARENET can be extended to include components of other signalling pathways and be integrated with models of xylem and phloem differentiation. Such extended models would facilitate breeding trees with higher wood yield.

  7. Modeling hormonal control of cambium proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladyslav Oles

    Full Text Available Rise of atmospheric CO2 is one of the main causes of global warming. Catastrophic climate change can be avoided by reducing emissions and increasing sequestration of CO2. Trees are known to sequester CO2 during photosynthesis, and then store it as wood biomass. Thus, breeding of trees with higher wood yield would mitigate global warming as well as augment production of renewable construction materials, energy, and industrial feedstock. Wood is made of cellulose-rich xylem cells produced through proliferation of a specialized stem cell niche called cambium. Importance of cambium in xylem cells production makes it an ideal target for the tree breeding programs; however our knowledge about control of cambium proliferation remains limited. The morphology and regulation of cambium are different from those of stem cell niches that control axial growth. For this reason, translating the knowledge about axial growth to radial growth has limited use. Furthermore, genetic approaches cannot be easily applied because overlaying tissues conceal cambium from direct observation and complicate identification of mutants. To overcome the paucity of experimental tools in cambium biology, we constructed a Boolean network CARENET (CAmbium REgulation gene NETwork for modelling cambium activity, which includes the key transcription factors WOX4 and HD-ZIP III as well as their potential regulators. Our simulations predict that: (1 auxin, cytokinin, gibberellin, and brassinosteroids act cooperatively in promoting transcription of WOX4 and HD-ZIP III; (2 auxin and cytokinin pathways negatively regulate each other; (3 hormonal pathways act redundantly in sustaining cambium activity; (4 individual cambium cells can have diverse molecular identities. CARENET can be extended to include components of other signalling pathways and be integrated with models of xylem and phloem differentiation. Such extended models would facilitate breeding trees with higher wood yield.

  8. Exploiting for Breast Cancer Control a Proposed Unified Mechanism for Reduction of Human Breast Cancer Risk by the Hormones of Pregnancy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jacobson, Herbet; Andersen, Thomas T; Bennett, James A

    2005-01-01

    .... This constitutes a model for studying how parity reduces breast cancer risk for women. Employing the model, investigators have given pregnancy-associated hormones in lieu of pregnancy to carcinogen-treated rats to assess their cancer-inhibiting capability...

  9. THYROID HORMONE: A “PRIME SUSPECT” IN HUMAN IMMUNO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Daniel Owu

    .nips; www.cas.org. THYROID HORMONE: A “PRIME SUSPECT” IN HUMAN IMMUNO. DEFICIENCY VIRUS (HIV/AIDS) PATIENTS? K. AMADI, A. M. SABO, O. O. OGUNKEYE and F. S. OLUWOLE. 1. Department of Human Physiology, College ...

  10. Glycemic Responses, Appetite Ratings and Gastrointestinal Hormone Responses of Most Common Breads Consumed in Spain. A Randomized Control Trial in Healthy Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Anton, Carolina; Rico, Maria C.; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Estefania; Ruiz-Lopez, Maria D.; Gil, Angel; Mesa, Maria D.

    2015-01-01

    The present study was carried out to determine the glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), insulinemic index (InI), appetite ratings and postprandial plasma concentrations of gastrointestinal hormones related to the control of food intake after the ingestion of the five most common breads consumed in Spain with different compositions and manufacturing processes. Twenty-two healthy adults participated in a randomized crossover study. The breads tested were Ordinary, Precooked-Frozen, Candeal-flour, Alfacar whites and Wholemeal. All breads portions were calculated to supply 50 g of available carbohydrates. In addition, 50 g of glucose was used as a reference. A linear mixed-effects model was used to compare data calculated for all breads with glucose load. The GI value varied from 61 for the Wholemeal, to Alfacar 68, Ordinary 76, and 78 and 86 for the Precooked-Frozen and Candeal-flour breads, respectively. Wholemeal and Alfacar had lower GI than glucose. All tested breads had a lower GL (ranged 9 to 18) compared with glucose. Wholemeal GL was similar to Alfacar, but lower than the other white breads. InI were significantly lower for all breads (ranged 68 to 73) compared with glucose, and similar among them. The intake of the Wholemeal bread led to a higher release of gastric inhibitory polypeptide compared with the Ordinary and Precooked breads and to a higher release of pancreatic polypeptide compared with the Precooked-Frozen bread. All breads affected appetite ratings similarly. In conclusion, based on GL, the Wholemeal bread would be expected to exert a favorable glycemic response. PMID:26024293

  11. Glycemic Responses, Appetite Ratings and Gastrointestinal Hormone Responses of Most Common Breads Consumed in Spain. A Randomized Control Trial in Healthy Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Gonzalez-Anton

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to determine the glycemic index (GI, glycemic load (GL, insulinemic index (InI, appetite ratings and postprandial plasma concentrations of gastrointestinal hormones related to the control of food intake after the ingestion of the five most common breads consumed in Spain with different compositions and manufacturing processes. Twenty-two healthy adults participated in a randomized crossover study. The breads tested were Ordinary, Precooked-Frozen, Candeal-flour, Alfacar whites and Wholemeal. All breads portions were calculated to supply 50 g of available carbohydrates. In addition, 50 g of glucose was used as a reference. A linear mixed-effects model was used to compare data calculated for all breads with glucose load. The GI value varied from 61 for the Wholemeal, to Alfacar 68, Ordinary 76, and 78 and 86 for the Precooked-Frozen and Candeal-flour breads, respectively. Wholemeal and Alfacar had lower GI than glucose. All tested breads had a lower GL (ranged 9 to 18 compared with glucose. Wholemeal GL was similar to Alfacar, but lower than the other white breads. InI were significantly lower for all breads (ranged 68 to 73 compared with glucose, and similar among them. The intake of the Wholemeal bread led to a higher release of gastric inhibitory polypeptide compared with the Ordinary and Precooked breads and to a higher release of pancreatic polypeptide compared with the Precooked-Frozen bread. All breads affected appetite ratings similarly. In conclusion, based on GL, the Wholemeal bread would be expected to exert a favorable glycemic response.

  12. Glycemic responses, appetite ratings and gastrointestinal hormone responses of most common breads consumed in Spain. A randomized control trial in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Anton, Carolina; Rico, Maria C; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Estefania; Ruiz-Lopez, Maria D; Gil, Angel; Mesa, Maria D

    2015-05-27

    The present study was carried out to determine the glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), insulinemic index (InI), appetite ratings and postprandial plasma concentrations of gastrointestinal hormones related to the control of food intake after the ingestion of the five most common breads consumed in Spain with different compositions and manufacturing processes. Twenty-two healthy adults participated in a randomized crossover study. The breads tested were Ordinary, Precooked-Frozen, Candeal-flour, Alfacar whites and Wholemeal. All breads portions were calculated to supply 50 g of available carbohydrates. In addition, 50 g of glucose was used as a reference. A linear mixed-effects model was used to compare data calculated for all breads with glucose load. The GI value varied from 61 for the Wholemeal, to Alfacar 68, Ordinary 76, and 78 and 86 for the Precooked-Frozen and Candeal-flour breads, respectively. Wholemeal and Alfacar had lower GI than glucose. All tested breads had a lower GL (ranged 9 to 18) compared with glucose. Wholemeal GL was similar to Alfacar, but lower than the other white breads. InI were significantly lower for all breads (ranged 68 to 73) compared with glucose, and similar among them. The intake of the Wholemeal bread led to a higher release of gastric inhibitory polypeptide compared with the Ordinary and Precooked breads and to a higher release of pancreatic polypeptide compared with the Precooked-Frozen bread. All breads affected appetite ratings similarly. In conclusion, based on GL, the Wholemeal bread would be expected to exert a favorable glycemic response.

  13. Pediatric stress: hormonal mediators and human development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmandari, Evangelia; Kino, Tomoshige; Souvatzoglou, Emmanuil; Chrousos, George P

    2003-01-01

    Stress activates the central and peripheral components of the stress system, i.e., the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the arousal/sympathetic system. The principal effectors of the stress system are corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), arginine vasopressin, the proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and beta-endorphin, the glucocorticoids, and the catecholamines norepinephrine and epinephrine. Appropriate responsiveness of the stress system to stressors is a crucial prerequisite for a sense of well-being, adequate performance of tasks and positive social interactions. By contrast, inappropriate responsiveness of the stress system may impair growth and development, and may account for a number of endocrine, metabolic, autoimmune and psychiatric disorders. The development and severity of these conditions primarily depend on the genetic vulnerability of the individual, the exposure to adverse environmental factors and the timing of the stressful event(s), given that prenatal life, infancy, childhood and adolescence are critical periods characterized by increased vulnerability to stressors. The developing brain undergoes rapid growth and is characterized by high turnover of neuronal connections during the prenatal and early postnatal life. These processes and, hence, brain plasticity, slow down during childhood and puberty, and plateau in young adulthood. Hormonal actions in early life, and to a much lesser extent later, can be organizational, i.e., can have effects that last for long periods of time, often for the entire life of the individual. Hormones of the stress system and sex steroids have such effects, which influence the behavior and certain physiologic functions of individuals for life. Exposure of the developing brain to severe and/or prolonged stress may result in hyperactivity/hyperreactivity of the stress system, with resultant amygdala hyperfunction (fear reaction), decreased activity of the hippocampus

  14. Thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor and thyroid hormone receptors are involved in human endometrial physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghajanova, Lusine; Stavreus-Evers, Anneli; Lindeberg, Maria; Landgren, Britt-Marie; Sparre, Lottie Skjöldebrand; Hovatta, Outi

    2011-01-01

    To study the expression, distribution, and function of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) and thyroid hormone receptors (TR) α1, α2, and β1 in human endometrium. Experimental clinical study. University hospital. 31 fertile women. Endometrial biopsy samples obtained throughout the menstrual cycle. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and Western blot to study the expression of TSHR, TRα1, TRα2, and TRβ1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and proteins in human endometrium. We found TSHR, TRα1, TRα2 and TRβ1 mRNA and proteins expressed in human endometrium. Immunostaining for TSHR in the luminal epithelium and TRα1 and β1 in the glandular and luminal epithelium increased statistically significantly on luteinizing hormone (LH) days 6 to 9, coinciding with appearance of pinopodes. Endometrial stromal and Ishikawa cells expressed mRNA for TSHR, TR, and iodothyronine deiodinases 1-3. After 48 hours, TSH significantly increased leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and LIF receptor (LIFR) messenger RNA (mRNA) in endometrial stromal cells, but decreased their expression in Ishikawa cells. Glucose transporter 1 mRNA was up-regulated by TSH in Ishikawa cells. We found that TSH statistically significantly increased secretion of free triiodothyronine (T3) and total thyroxin (T4) by Ishikawa cells compared with nonstimulated cells. Thyroid hormones are directly involved in endometrial physiology. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A fuzzy logic controller for hormone administration using an implantable pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, L. Stephen; Wells, George H., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the requirements for a Fuzzy Logic Controller for the physiologic administration of hormones by means of a FDA-approved surgically implantable infusion pump. Results of a LabVIEW computer simulation for the administration of insulin for diabetic adult patients as well as human growth hormone for pediatric patients are presented. A VHS video tape of the simulation in action has been prepared and is available for viewing.

  16. SEX DIFFERENCES AND REPRODUCTIVE HORMONE INFLUENCES ON HUMAN ODOR PERCEPTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Richard L.; Cameron, E. Leslie

    2009-01-01

    The question of whether men and women differ in their ability to smell has been the topic of scientific investigation for over a hundred years. Although conflicting findings abound, most studies suggest that, for at least some odorants, women outperform men on tests of odor detection, identification, discrimination, and memory. Most functional imaging and electrophysiological studies similarly imply that, when sex differences are present, they favor women. In this review we examine what is known about sex-related alterations in human smell function, including influences of the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, gonadectomy, and hormone replacement therapy on a range of olfactory measures. We conclude that the relationship between reproductive hormones and human olfactory function is complex and that simple associations between circulating levels of gonadal hormones and measures of olfactory function are rarely present. PMID:19272398

  17. Combined Hormonal Birth Control: Pill, Patch, and Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Gynecologists f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ185 CONTRACEPTION Combined Hormonal Birth Control: Pill, Patch, and Ring • What are ... What are possible side effects of using the contraceptive skin patch? • ... birth control methods? Birth control pills, the birth control patch, and ...

  18. Human growth hormone binding and stimulation of insulin biosynthesis in cloned rat insulinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Nils

    1985-01-01

    Binding of 125I labelled human growth hormone to cloned insulin producing RIN-5AH cells is described. Binding was specific for somatotropic hormones since both human and rat growth hormone could compete for binding sites, whereas much higher concentrations of lactogenic hormones were needed...

  19. Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  20. Sex hormones and the immune response in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, Annechien; Heineman, Maas Jan; Faas, Marijke M.

    2005-01-01

    In addition to their effects on sexual differentiation and reproduction, sex hormones appear to influence the immune system. This results in a sexual dimorphism in the immune response in humans: for instance, females produce more vigorous cellular and more vigorous humoral immune reactions, are more

  1. Exploiting for Breast Cancer Control a Proposed Unified Mechanism for Reduction of Human Breast Cancer Risk by the Hormones of Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Jose M. Reyes, Luis E. Valladares, Thomas T. Andersen, James A. Bennett, Herbert I. Jacobson, Ana M. Pino. Oncology Reports. In review. *6. An...ovarian hormones on the induction of l-methyl-l-nitrosourea-induced mammary cancer. Carcinogenesis, 4, 495–497. 3. Guzman RC, Yang J, Rajkumar L...2;96(5):2520-5. 4. Rajkumar L, Guzman RC, Yang J, Thordarson G, Talamantes F, Nandi S. Prevention of mammary carcinogenesis by short-term

  2. Short-term effect of recombinant human growth hormone in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Becker, U; Grønbaek, M

    1994-01-01

    , and liver function. Twenty consecutive patients with cirrhosis were randomized to recombinant human growth hormone (Norditropin, 4 I.U. twice daily) subcutaneously for 6 weeks (n = 10) or conventional medical treatment (n = 10). The serum concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-I in the recombinant...... human growth hormone group increased after 3 (p group. The change in insulin-like growth factor-I during the treatment period was expressed as area under the curve (AUC). The AUCIGF-I was significantly larger...... in the recombinant human growth hormone group (median AUCIGF-I: 12.1, range: 0.0-54.7 weeks.nmol/l) than in the control group (median AUCIGF-I: 0.2, range: -10.6-9.9 weeks.nmol/l) (p

  3. Ovine prolactin and human growth hormone derivatives. Specific modification of their alpha-amino groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caridad, J J; Nowicki, C; Santomé, J A; Wolfenstein-Todel, C

    1988-06-01

    The alpha-amino group of ovine prolactin (oPRL) and human growth hormone (hGH) was selectively modified by transamination with glyoxylic acid. No difference was found in the binding capacity of transaminated oPRL to rat liver lactogenic receptors with respect to its control, although both samples showed a decrease in its binding capacity with reference to the native hormone. This decrease was due to conformational changes caused by the reaction conditions and not by the transamination itself, as shown by the circular dichroism spectra. Transaminated hGH retained the full binding capacity of the hormone. These results suggest that the alpha-amino group is not relevant for the binding to lactogenic liver receptors in both lactogenic hormones.

  4. [How safe is the recombinant human growth hormone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzada-León, Raúl

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, several aspects related to the safety of the use of biosynthetic human growth hormone are reviewed. For example, its classification as a biosynthetic drug, the phases that need to be performed in Mexico to verify its safety (obtaining, purification, preclinical studies, clinical trials, and finally observational clinical studies), as well as the evidence that exists in relation to the association of intracranial hypertension, muscular events, scoliosis, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, obstructive sleep apnea, pancreatitis, alterations in cortisol, thyroid hormones alterations, cardiovascular disease, metabolic risk, mortality and cancer, adverse events not related to its use, and finally dosing and safety.

  5. Effects of growth hormone on glucose and fat metabolism in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens O L; Møller, Louise; Krag, Morten Brøgger

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on in vivo data from tests performed in normal subjects and in patients who had abnormal growth hormone (GH) status. Experimental data in human subjects demonstrate that GH acutely inhibits glucose disposal in skeletal muscle. At the same time GH stimulates the turnover and o......, but it is recommended that overdosing be avoided and glycemic control be monitored....

  6. Perfluoroalkyl substances exposure and thyroid hormones in humans: epidemiological observations and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Eun Lee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones play crucial roles in normal neurodevelopment of fetus and child. Many chemicals can affect control and homeostasis of thyroid hormones, and eventually lead to various adverse health effects including neurodevelopmental disorders. Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs are among the thyroid disrupting chemicals that can be encountered among general human population. Due to their unique physicochemical characteristics, PFASs have been used as surfactants and surface coating materials in many applications. Therefore, PFASs have been frequently detected in humans and environment worldwide. In cross-sectional studies using nationally representative general human populations of United States, several PFASs have shown significant associations with thyroid hormones. Moreover, among pregnant women and their infants, not only major PFASs such as perfluorooctane sulfonic acid and perfluorooctanoic acid, but also those with shorter or longer carbon chains showed significant associations with thyroid hormones. Often demographic characteristics such as sex, age, and disease status appear to influence the associations between PFASs exposure and thyroid hormones. In general, major PFASs showed hypothyroidism effects among pregnant women and infants. As 8 carbon based PFASs have been phased out, those with shorter or longer carbon chains have been used in growing amount as replacement. However, only limited information is available for their occurrences and toxicity among humans. Further investigations on these substituting PFASs are required. In addition, efforts are warranted to identify sources of and mitigate exposure to these thyroid disrupting chemicals especially during pregnancy and early stages of life.

  7. Sex hormone receptors are present in the human suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijver, Frank P M; Swaab, Dick F

    2002-05-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the clock of the brain that orchestrates circadian and circannual biological rhythms, such as the rhythms of hormones, body temperature, sleep and mood. These rhythms are frequently disturbed in menopause and even more so in dementia and can be restored in postmenopausal women by sex hormone replacement therapy (SHRT). Although it seems clear, both from clinical and experimental studies, that sex hormones influence circadian rhythms, it is not known whether this is by a direct or an indirect effect on the SCN. Therefore, using immunocytochemistry in the present study, we investigated whether the human SCN expresses sex hormone receptors in 5 premenopausal women and 5 young men. SCN neurons appeared to contain estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha), estrogen receptor-beta (ERbeta) and progesterone receptors. Median ratings of ER immunoreactivity per individual and per gender group revealed a statistically significantly stronger nuclear ERalpha expression pattern in female SCN neurons (p sexual dimorphic tendency was observed for nuclear ERbeta (p > 0.1) and progesterone receptors (p > 0.7). These data seem to support previously reported functional and structural SCN differences in relation to sex and sexual orientation and indicate for the first time that estrogen and progesterone may act directly on neurons of the human biological clock. In addition, the present findings provide a potential neuroendocrine mechanism by which SHRT can act to improve or restore SCN-related rhythm disturbances, such as body temperature, sleep and mood. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. Progestin-Only Hormonal Birth Control: Pill and Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ186 CONTRACEPTION Progestin-Only Hormonal Birth Control: Pill and Injection • What is progestin? • How effective are progestin-only pills and the birth control injection in preventing pregnancy? • What are progestin-only ...

  9. Investigations on hormone dependency of human mammary carcinomas transplanted into nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brünner, N; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1981-01-01

    Since human mammary cancer can be transplanted into nude mice, this makes possible the in vivo study of relations between hormone dependency and the steroid hormone receptor content of the tumors. The macroscopic growth curve of the transplanted tumors during endocrine therapy will reflect...... the hormone dependency. The results can be compared with successive steroid hormone receptor determinations in the tumor tissue....

  10. The role of luteinizing hormone activity in controlled ovarian stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelopoulos, N; Goula, A; Tolis, G

    2005-01-01

    The role of LH in the natural menstrual cycle is undisputed. The active participation of LH in both steroidogenesis and ovulation is well established, but its potential effect on oocyte maturation in the issue of assisted reproduction protocols remains a topic of debate. Although several studies have added to our understanding of the specific actions of androgens in human follicular development, some discrepancies persist regarding their role in oocyte atresia. Clinical situations, where LH is either decreased or absent (e.g. in women with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism or LH-receptor gene mutations), provide important data supporting the necessity for a minimal amount of LH to evoke ovulation. Recent use of GnRH antagonists, which results in profound suppression of LH concentration, in combination with the pharmacological production of recombinant gonadotrophins, has attracted the attention of investigators. Identification of sub-fertilized women, in whom LH administration could be beneficial and should be indicated, is arousing ever more interest. Based on the available data in the literature, the aims of this review are to assess the role of both endogenous and exogenous LH activity in stimulated cycles, and to evaluate the effects of recombinant human LH supplementation on the ovarian hormonal milieu and on the main outcomes of controlled stimulated cycles.

  11. 21 CFR 201.316 - Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use; required warning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use... Drug Products § 201.316 Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use; required warning. (a) Drugs with thyroid hormone activity have been promoted for, and continue to be dispensed and prescribed for...

  12. Growth hormone stimulation test - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The growth hormone (GH) is a protein hormone released from the anterior pituitary gland under the control of the hypothalamus. ... performed on infants and children to identify human growth hormone (hGH) deficiency as a cause of growth retardation. ...

  13. Shaped and Balanced by Hormones : cortisol, testosterone and the psychoneuroendocrinology of human socio-emotional behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montoya, E.R.

    2015-01-01

    The steroid hormones testosterone and cortisol can be considered hormones for environmental challenges; they are involved in adaptive neural and behavioral responses towards emotional stimuli. A key challenge of human psychoneuroendocrinology is to unravel the neural mechanisms by which testosterone

  14. Purification and Cultivation of Human Pituitary Growth Hormones Secreting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.; Todd, P.; Grindeland, R.; Lanham, W.; Morrison, D.

    1985-01-01

    The rat and human pituitary gland contains a mixture of hormone producing cell types. The separation of cells which make growth hormone (GH) is attempted for the purpose of understanding how the hormone molecule is made within the pituitary cell; what form(s) it takes within the cell; and what form(s) GH assumes as it leaves the cell. Since GH has a number of biological targets (e.g., muscle, liver, bone), the assessment of the activities of the intracellular/extracellular GH by new and sensitive bioassays. GH cells contained in the mixture was separated by free flow electrophoresis. These experiments show that GH cells have different electrophoretic mobilities. This is relevant to NASA since a lack of GH could be a prime causative factor in muscle atrophy. Further, GH has recently been implicated in the etiology of motion sickness in space. Continous flow electrophoresis experiment on STS-8 showed that GH cells could be partially separated in microgravity. However, definitive cell culture studies could not be done due to insufficient cell recoveries.

  15. Substantial expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor type I in human uveal melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schally, Andrew V.; Block, Norman L; Dezso, Balazs; Olah, Gabor; Rozsa, Bernadett; Fodor, Klara; Buglyo, Armin; Gardi, Janos; Berta, Andras; Halmos, Gabor

    2013-01-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, with a very high mortality rate due to frequent liver metastases. Consequently, the therapy of uveal melanoma remains a major clinical challenge and new treatment approaches are needed. For improving diagnosis and designing a rational and effective therapy, it is essential to elucidate molecular characteristics of this malignancy. The aim of this study therefore was to evaluate as a potential therapeutic target the expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor in human uveal melanoma. The expression of LHRH ligand and LHRH receptor transcript forms was studied in 39 human uveal melanoma specimens by RT-PCR using gene specific primers. The binding charachteristics of receptors for LHRH on 10 samples were determined by ligand competition assays. The presence of LHRH receptor protein was further evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The expression of mRNA for type I LHRH receptor was detected in 18 of 39 (46%) of tissue specimens. mRNA for LHRH-I ligand could be detected in 27 of 39 (69%) of the samples. Seven of 10 samples investigated showed high affinity LHRH-I receptors. The specific presence of full length LHRH receptor protein was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. A high percentage of uveal melanomas express mRNA and protein for type-I LHRH receptors. Our results support the merit of further investigation of LHRH receptors in human ophthalmological tumors. Since diverse analogs of LHRH are in clinical trials or are already used for the treatment of various cancers, these analogs could be considered for the LHRH receptor-based treatment of uveal melanoma. PMID:24077773

  16. Parathyroid hormone-related protein in preterm human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubetzky, Ronit; Weisman, Yosef; Dollberg, Shaul; Herman, Lea; Mandel, Dror

    2010-04-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) has the ability to activate parathyroid hormone receptors and cause hypercalcemia. High concentrations of PTHrP are found in human breastmilk of mothers of term-infants. It is not known whether PTHrP is excreted in preterm human milk. This study tested the hypothesis that PTHrP concentrations in milk obtained from mothers of preterm infants are similar to those found in milk from mothers of term infants. We collected samples of expressed human milk obtained from 27 mothers of preterm infants (27-34 weeks' gestation) and from 16 mothers of full-term infants. Samples were collected within the first 72 hours postpartum (colostrum) and again at 1 and 2 weeks postpartum. PTHrP concentrations in these samples were measured by two-site immunoradiometric assay. PTHrP concentrations were significantly higher in samples obtained after 1 week postpartum than in samples obtained during the first 72 hours of life in breastmilk obtained from mothers of both term and preterm infants (P milk. PTHrP concentrations after 2 weeks of lactation were significantly higher in samples obtained from mothers of term infants (P milk expressed by mothers of preterm infants contains amounts of PTHrP similar to those measured in milk expressed by mothers of term infants.

  17. Advances on human milk hormones and protection against obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, F; Benetti, S; Liguori, S A; Sorrenti, M; Cordero Di Montezemolo, L

    2013-11-03

    Extensive research shows that breast milk could have positive health effects not limited to infancy, but extend into childhood and adulthood. Recently many studies have provided new evidence on the long—term positive effects of breastfeeding, in particular protection against obesity and type 2 diabetes, suggesting that breast milk may have a role in the programming of later metabolic diseases. The mechanism throughout breastfeeding that exerts these effects has been a major focus of interest for researchers and it is still not completely known. There are some hints for biological plausibility of beneficial effects of breastfeeding including macronutrient intake, hormonal and behavioural mechanisms related to breast milk composition. Breast milk biochemical components, such as protein quantity and quality, polyunsaturated fatty acids, oligosaccharides, cytokines and hormones, in particular leptin, adiponectin and resistin together with the breastfeeding practice itself can influence infants feeding behaviour and regulation of growth and appetite control later in life. Further research is needed to confirm the possibility that hormones present in breast milk exert a metabolic and beneficial effects.

  18. Population Pharmacokinetic Modelling of FE 999049, a Recombinant Human Follicle-Stimulating Hormone, in Healthy Women After Single Ascending Doses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Trine Høyer; Röshammar, Daniel; Erichsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this analysis was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for a novel recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) (FE 999049) expressed from a human cell line of foetal retinal origin (PER.C6) developed for controlled ovarian stimulation prior to assisted...

  19. The influence of sex hormones on seizures in dogs and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meervenne, Sofie A E; Volk, Holger A; Matiasek, Kaspar; Van Ham, Luc M L

    2014-07-01

    Epilepsy is the most common chronic neurological disorder in both humans and dogs. The effect of sex hormones on seizures is well documented in human medicine. Catamenial epilepsy is defined as an increase in frequency and severity of seizures during certain periods of the menstrual cycle. Oestradiol increases seizure activity and progesterone is believed to exhibit a protective effect. The role of androgens is controversial and there is a lack of research focusing on androgens and epilepsy. Indeed, little is known about the influence of sex hormones on epilepsy in dogs. Sterilisation is believed to improve seizure control, but no systematic research has been conducted in this field. This review provides an overview of the current literature on the influence of sex hormones on seizures in humans. The literature on idiopathic epilepsy in dogs was assessed to identify potential risk factors related to sex and sterilisation status. In general, there appears to be an over-representation of male dogs with idiopathic epilepsy but no explanation for this difference in prevalence between sexes has been reported. In addition, no reliable conclusions can be drawn on the effect of sterilisation due to the lack of focused research and robust scientific evidence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Epinephrine biosynthesis: hormonal and neural control during stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Dona Lee

    2006-01-01

    1. Stress contributes to the pathophysiology of many diseases, including psychiatric disorders, immune dysfunction, nicotine addiction and cardiovascular illness. Epinephrine and the glucocorticoids, cortisol and corticosterone, are major stress hormones. 2. Release of epinephrine from the adrenal medulla and glucocorticoids from the adrenal cortex initiate the biological responses permitting the organism to cope with adverse psychological, physiological and environmental stressors. Following its massive release during stress, epinephrine must be restored to replenish cellular pools and sustain release to maintain the heightened awareness and sequelae of responses to re-establish homeostasis and ensure survival. 3. Epinephrine is regulated in part through its biosynthesis catalyzed by the final enzyme in the catecholamine pathway, phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (E.C. 2.1.1.28, PNMT). PNMT expression, in turn, is controlled through hormonal and neural stimuli, which exert their effects on gene transcription through protein stability. 4. The pioneering work of Julius Axelrod forged the path to our present understanding of how the stress hormone and neurotransmitter epinephrine, is regulated, in particular via its biosynthesis by PNMT.

  1. Preparation with recombinant humanized thyroid-stimulating hormone before radioiodine ablation after thyroidectomy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, J; Cosby, R; Driedger, A

    2009-09-01

    Standard treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer is thyroidectomy followed in selected cases by radioiodine ablation (RA). Recombinant humanized thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH) is an exogenous source of tsh that can be administered to obviate the need for hormone withdrawal. In this systematic review, we analysed the evidence for the therapeutic use of (rhTSH for RA preparation. A systematic review of the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from 1996 through January 2008 selected articles reporting randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, and retrospective studies published in English that compared ra using rhTSH with standard hormone withdrawal. Stimulation by rhTSH is equivalent to thyroid hormone withdrawal in achieving ablation while avoiding detrimental symptoms of hypothyroidism and significantly lowering the whole-body radiation dose. Furthermore, rhTSH may be the only option for patients who either cannot raise endogenous tsh or who would be at risk from the morbidity of hypothyroidism. Based on the results of validated instruments of physical and mental performance, there is agreement that rhTSH maintains a better quality of life. Studies of cost-effectiveness found that rhTSH-prepared patients lost less time from work and required fewer encounters with health care providers.

  2. Role of maternal thyroid hormones in the developing neocortex and during human evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, Denise; Huttner, Wieland B.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of thyroid hormones during brain development has been appreciated for many decades. In humans, low levels of circulating maternal thyroid hormones, e.g., caused by maternal hypothyroidism or lack of iodine in diet, results in a wide spectrum of severe neurological defects, including neurological cretinism characterized by profound neurologic impairment and mental retardation, underlining the importance of the maternal thyroid hormone contribution. In fact, iodine intake, which is essential for thyroid hormone production in the thyroid gland, has been related to the expansion of the brain, associated with the increased cognitive capacities during human evolution. Because thyroid hormones regulate transcriptional activity of target genes via their nuclear thyroid hormone receptors (THRs), even mild and transient changes in maternal thyroid hormone levels can directly affect and alter the gene expression profile, and thus disturb fetal brain development. Here we summarize how thyroid hormones may have influenced human brain evolution through the adaptation to new habitats, concomitant with changes in diet and, therefore, iodine intake. Further, we review the current picture we gained from experimental studies in rodents on the function of maternal thyroid hormones during developmental neurogenesis. We aim to evaluate the effects of maternal thyroid hormone deficiency as well as lack of THRs and transporters on brain development and function, shedding light on the cellular behavior conducted by thyroid hormones. PMID:23882187

  3. Short-term effects of recombinant human growth hormone and feeding on gluconeogenesis in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    After a short-term fast, lactating women have increased rates of glucose production but not gluconeogenesis (GNG) despite relative hypoinsulinemia. We explored the effects of non-insulin-dependent increase in glucose utilization and recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on glucose production, glyc...

  4. Effect of recombinant human growth hormone and interferon gamma on hepatic collagen synthesis and proliferation of hepatic stellate cells in cirrhotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-Hua; Du, Bing-Qing; Zheng, Zhen-Jiang; Xiang, Guang-Ming; Liu, Xu-Bao; Mai, Gang

    2012-06-01

    Fibrosis plays a key role in the development of liver cirrhosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of growth hormone and interferon gamma on hepatic collagen synthesis and the proliferation of hepatic stellate cells in a cirrhotic rat model. Cirrhosis was induced in rats using carbon tetrachloride. Rats were simultaneously treated with daily subcutaneous injections of recombinant human growth hormone or interferon gamma combined with recombinant human growth hormone. The control group was given saline. The relative content of type I and type IV collagen was assessed by indirect immunofluorescence analysis. Activated hepatic stellate cells were prepared from cirrhotic rats. The 3-(4, 5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2, 5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) method was used to assess the effects of recombinant human growth hormone and interferon gamma on these cells in vitro. Both qualitative and quantitative analysis showed that type I and type IV collagen secretion increased with time after recombinant human growth hormone administration and was significantly higher than control and recombinant human growth hormone combined with interferon gamma administration. In vitro, recombinant human growth hormone significantly stimulated hepatic stellate cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner (10(-3)-10(-1) mg/100 μL), and interferon gamma (10(-2)-10(-1) μg/100 μL) significantly inhibited their growth compared to the control group. Interferon gamma combined with recombinant human growth hormone eliminated this growth-promoting effect to a certain degree in a concentration-dependent manner (10(-1) μg/100 μL, P0.05) and a time-dependent manner (Pgrowth hormone increased collagen secretion in cirrhotic rats in vivo and promoted the proliferation of hepatic stellate cells from cirrhotic rats in vitro. It is possible that concurrent interferon gamma therapy can offset these side-effects of recombinant human growth hormone.

  5. Efficacy and safety of sustained-release recombinant human growth hormone in Korean adults with growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngsook; Hong, Jae Won; Chung, Yoon-Sok; Kim, Sung-Woon; Cho, Yong-Wook; Kim, Jin Hwa; Kim, Byung-Joon; Lee, Eun Jig

    2014-07-01

    The administration of recombinant human growth hormone in adults with growth hormone deficiency has been known to improve metabolic impairment and quality of life. Patients, however, have to tolerate daily injections of growth hormone. The efficacy, safety, and compliance of weekly administered sustained-release recombinant human growth hormone (SR-rhGH, Declage™) supplement in patients with growth hormone deficiency were evaluated. This trial is 12-week prospective, single-arm, open-label trial. Men and women aged ≥20 years with diagnosed growth hormone deficiency (caused by pituitary tumor, trauma and other pituitary diseases) were eligible for this study. Each subject was given 2 mg (6 IU) of SR-rhGH once a week, subcutaneously for 12 weeks. Efficacy and safety at baseline and within 30 days after the 12th injection were assessed and compared. Score of Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults (AGHDA score) for quality of life and serum IGF-1 level. The IGF-1 level of 108.67±74.03 ng/mL was increased to 129.01±68.37 ng/mL (p=0.0111) and the AGHDA QoL score was decreased from 9.80±6.51 to 7.55±5.76 (p<0.0001) at week 12 compared with those at baseline. Adverse events included pain, swelling, erythema, and warmth sensation at the administration site, but many adverse events gradually disappeared during the investigation. Weekly administered SR-rhGH for 12 weeks effectively increased IGF-1 level and improved the quality of life in patients with GH deficiency without serious adverse events.

  6. Identification of putative natriuretic hormones isolated from human urine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert J Kramer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This brief review describes some representative methodological approaches to the isolation of putative endogenous inhibitors of epithelial sodium transport - i. e. as ouabain-like factors (OLF that inhibit the sodium transport enzyme Na-K-ATPase or inhibit the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC. Gel chromatography and reverse-phase (RP-HPLC of lyophilized and reconstituted 24h-urine from salt-loaded healthy humans led to two active fractions, a hydrophilic OLF-1 and a lipophilic OLF-2 whose mass (Ms-spectroscopic data indicate a Mr of 391 (1,2. Further identification was attempted by Ms-, IR-, UV- and 1H-NMR- spectroscopy. OLF-1 and OLF-2 may be closely related if not identical to (diascorbic acid or its salts such as vanadium (V-Vv-diascorbate with Mr 403 (3 and VIV-diascorbate. OLF-1 and Vv-diascorbate are about 10-fold stronger inhibitors of Na-K-ATPase than OLF-2 and VIV-diascorbate, respectively. In conscious rats, i.v. infusion of OLF-1 and OLF-2 resulted in a strong natriuresis. In a similar study Cain et al. (4 isolated a sodium transport inhibitor from the urine of uremic patients by gel chromatography and RP-HPLC. In uremic rats a natriuretic response to the injection of the active material was found. Xanthurenic acid 8-O-ß-D-glucoside (Mr 368 and xanthurenic acid 8-O-sulfate (Mr 284 were identified as endogenous inhibitors of sodium transport acting, e.g. by ENaC blockade. No definite relation to blood pressure, body fluid volume or sodium balance has been reported for any of these above factors and further studies to identify the natriuretic and/or ouabain-like compound(s or hormone(s will be needed.

  7. Antagonists of Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone Inhibit the Growth of U-87MG Human Glioblastoma in Nude Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hippokratis Kiaris

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone(GH-RH inhibit the growth of various cancers by mechanisms that involve the suppression of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF -I and/or IGF-II. In view of the importance of the IGF system in glioma tumorigenesis, the effects of GH-RH antagonists MZ-5-156 and JV-1-36 were investigated in nude mice bearing subcutaneous and orthotopic xenografts of U-87MG human glioblastomas. After 4 weeks of therapy with MZ-5-156 or JV-1-36 at the dose of 20 µmg/day per animal, the final volume of subcutaneous U-87MG tumors was significantly (P < .01 decreased by 84% and 76%, respectively, as compared with controls. Treatment with GHRH antagonists also reduced tumor weight and the levels of mRNA for IGF receptor type I (IGFR-I. A reduction in the mRNA levels for IGF-II was found in tumors of mice treated with MZ-5-156. Treatment with MZ-5-156 or JV-1-36 also extended the survival of nude mice implanted orthotopically with U-87MG glioblastomas by 81% (P < .005 and 18%, respectively, as compared with the controls. Exposure in vitro to GH-RH antagonists MZ-5-156 or JV-1-36 at 1 MM concentration for 24 hours decreased the tumorigenicity of U-87MG cells in nude mice by 10% to 30% and extended the latency period for the development of subcutaneous palpable tumors by 31% to 56%, as compared with the controls. Exposure of U-87MG cells to GH-RH antagonists in vitro also resulted in a time-dependent increase in the mRNA levels of IGFR-II or a decrease in the mRNA levels of IGFR-I. mRNA for GH-RH was detected in U87MG cells and xenografts implying that GH-RH may play a role in the pathogenesis of this tumor. Our results suggest that GH-RH antagonists MZ-5-156 and JV-136 inhibit the growth of U-87MG human glioblastoma by mechanisms that involve the suppression of IGF system. Antagonistic analogs of GH-RH merit further development for the treatment of malignant glioblastoma.

  8. Comparative pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a PEGylated recombinant human growth hormone and daily recombinant human growth hormone in growth hormone-deficient children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou L

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ling Hou,1,* Zhi-hang Chen,2,* Dong Liu,3 Yuan-guo Cheng,2 Xiao-ping Luo1 1Department of Pediatrics, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 2Department of Pharmacy, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing, 3Department of Pharmacy, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this study Objective: Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH replacement therapy in children generally requires daily subcutaneous (sc injections, which may be inconvenient for patients. Jintrolong® is a PEGylated rhGH with the purpose of weekly sc injections. The aim of the current study was to examine the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety, and tolerability of multiple sc doses of Jintrolong® vs daily doses of rhGH. Design and methods: Twelve children with growth hormone deficiency participated in this single-center, open-label, crossover Phase I trial. All subjects received daily sc injections of rhGH at 0.0286 mg/kg/d for 7 days, followed by a 4-week washout period and six weekly doses of Jintrolong® at 0.2 mg/kg/w. Results: In comparison with rhGH, sc injection of Jintrolong® produced a noticeably higher Cmax, significantly longer half-life (t1/2, and slower plasma clearance, signifying a profile suitable for long-term treatment. The ratio of the area under the concentration vs time curve (AUC after the seventh and first injections (AUC(0–∞7th/AUC(0–∞1st of rhGH was 1.02, while the AUC(0–∞6th/AUC(0–∞1st of Jintrolong® was 1.03, indicating no accumulation of circulating growth hormone. There was no significant difference in the change in insulin-like growth factor-1 expression produced by 7 days of sc rhGH and weekly Jintrolong® injections. There were no severe adverse events during the trial. Conclusion: The elimination rate of Jintrolong® was

  9. The use of plasmapheresis for rapid hormonal control in severe hyperthyroidism caused by a partial molar pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adali, Ertan; Yildizhan, Recep; Kolusari, Ali; Kurdoglu, Mertihan; Turan, Nedim

    2009-04-01

    The hormone human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), secreted by molar tissue, is structurally similar to thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Hyperthyroidism in trophoblastic disease is thought to be the result of TSH receptor activation by extremely elevated levels of hCG. Significant elevations in hCG levels are less common in cases of partial moles. We describe a patient with partial molar pregnancy in which the levels of hCG and thyroid hormones were significantly high. It was not possible to decrease the elevated thyroid hormone concentrations to safer levels using medical treatment strategies only. Since the patient's vaginal bleeding increased gradually, plasmapheresis was used to rapidly control the thyroid hormones during the preoperative preparation of the patient for anesthesia and surgery. After the evacuation of the molar tissue, the levels of the thyroid hormones detected after the plasmapheresis started to decrease even further. Plasmapheresis may be used as an alternative to antithyroid medication for the rapid control of thyroid hormones in cases of severe hyperthyroidism caused by molar pregnancy.

  10. Placental hormones and the control of maternal metabolism and fetal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbern, Dorothee; Freemark, Michael

    2011-12-01

    To examine the roles of the placental and pituitary hormones in the control of maternal metabolism and fetal growth. In addition to promoting growth of maternal tissues, placental growth hormone (GH-V) induces maternal insulin resistance and thereby facilitates the mobilization of maternal nutrients for fetal growth. Human placental lactogen (hPL) and prolactin increase maternal food intake by induction of central leptin resistance and promote maternal beta-cell expansion and insulin production to defend against the development of gestational diabetes mellitus. The effects of the lactogens are mediated by diverse signaling pathways and are potentiated by glucose. Pathologic conditions of pregnancy are associated with dysregulation of GH-V and hPL gene expression. The somatogenic and lactogenic hormones of the placenta and maternal pituitary gland integrate the metabolic adaptations of pregnancy with the demands of fetal and neonatal development. Dysregulation of placental growth hormone and/or placental lactogen in pathologic conditions of pregnancy may adversely impact fetal growth and postnatal metabolic function.

  11. A Hormone-responsive 3D Culture Model of the Human Mammary Gland Epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speroni, Lucia; Sweeney, Michael F; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M

    2016-02-07

    The process of mammary epithelial morphogenesis is influenced by hormones. The study of hormone action on the breast epithelium using 2D cultures is limited to cell proliferation and gene expression endpoints. However, in the organism, mammary morphogenesis occurs in a 3D environment. 3D culture systems help bridge the gap between monolayer cell culture (2D) and the complexity of the organism. Herein, we describe a 3D culture model of the human breast epithelium that is suitable to study hormone action. It uses the commercially available hormone-responsive human breast epithelial cell line, T47D, and rat tail collagen type 1 as a matrix. This 3D culture model responds to the main mammotropic hormones: estradiol, progestins and prolactin. The influence of these hormones on epithelial morphogenesis can be observed after 1- or 2-week treatment according to the endpoint. The 3D cultures can be harvested for analysis of epithelial morphogenesis, cell proliferation and gene expression.

  12. Stress hormones and human memory function across the lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupien, Sonia J; Fiocco, Alexandra; Wan, Nathalie; Maheu, Francoise; Lord, Catherine; Schramek, Tania; Tu, Mai Thanh

    2005-04-01

    In this paper, we summarize the data obtained in our laboratory showing the effects of glucocorticoids on human cognitive function in older adults, young adults and children. We first present data obtained in the aged human population which showed that long-term exposure to high endogenous levels of glucocorticoids is associated with both memory impairments and a 14% smaller volume of the hippocampus. We then report on studies showing that in older adults with moderate levels of glucocorticoids, memory performance can be acutely modulated by pharmacological manipulations of glucocorticoids. In young adults, we present data obtained in our laboratory showing that cognitive processing sustained by the frontal lobes is also sensitive to acute increases of glucocorticoids. We also summarize studies showing that just as in older adults, memory performance in young adults can be acutely modulated by pharmacological manipulations of glucocorticoids. We then present a study in which we showed a differential involvement of adrenergic and glucocorticoid hormones for short- and long-term memory of neutral and emotional information. In the last section of the paper, we present data obtained in a population of young children and teenagers from low and high socioeconomic status (SES), where we showed that children from low SES present significantly higher levels of basal cortisol when compared to children from high SES. We then present new data obtained in this population showing that children and teenagers from low and high SES do not process the plausibility of positive and negative attributes in the same way. Children from low SES tended to process positive and negative attributes on a more negative note than children from high SES, and this type of processing was significantly related to basal cortisol at age 10, 12 and 14. Altogether, the results of these studies show that both bottom-up (effects of glucocorticoids on cognitive function), and top-down (effects of cognitive

  13. Hormones and endocrine disruptors in human seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampl, R; Kubatova, J; Heracek, J; Sobotka, V; Starka, L

    2013-07-01

    Seminal plasma represents a unique environment for maturation, nutrition, and protection of male germ cells from damaging agents. It contains an array of organic as well as inorganic chemicals, encompassing a number of biologically and immunologically active compounds, including hormones. Seminal plasma contains also various pollutants transferred from outer environment known as endocrine disruptors. They interfere with hormones at the receptor level, act as inhibitors of their biosynthesis, and affect hormone regulation.In this minireview, the main groups of hormones detected in seminal plasma are summarized. Seminal gonadal steroids were investigated mostly with aim to use them as biomarkers of impaired spermatogenesis (sperm count, motility, morphology). Concentrations of hormones in the seminal plasma often differ considerably from the blood plasma levels in dependence on their origin. In some instances (dihydrotestosterone, estradiol), their informative value is higher than determination in blood.Out of peptide hormones detected in seminal plasma, peptides of transforming growth factor beta family, especially antimullerian hormone, and oligopeptides related to thyrotropin releasing hormone have the high informative value, while assessment of seminal gonadotropins and prolactin does not bring advantage over determination in blood.Though there is a large body of information about the endocrine disruptors' impact on male reproduction, especially with their potential role in decline of male reproductive functions within the last decades, there are only scarce reports on their presence in seminal plasma. Herein, the main groups of endocrine disruptors found in seminal plasma are reviewed, and the use of their determination for investigation of fertility disorders is discussed.

  14. Dissolving microneedle patch for transdermal delivery of human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Woo; Choi, Seong-O; Felner, Eric I; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2011-02-18

    The clinical impact of biotechnology has been constrained by the limitations of traditional hypodermic injection of biopharmaceuticals. Microneedle patches have been proposed as a minimally invasive alternative. In this study, the translation of a dissolving microneedle patch designed for simple, painless self-administration of biopharmacetucials that generates no sharp biohazardous waste is assessed. To study the pharmacokinetics and safety of this approach, human growth hormone (hGH) was encapsulated in 600 μm-long dissolving microneedles composed of carboxymethylcellulose and trehalose using an aqueous, moderate-temperature process that maintained complete hGH activity after encapsulation and retained most activity after storage for up to 15 months at room temperature and humidity. After manual insertion into the skin of hairless rats, hGH pharmacokinetics were similar to conventional subcutaneous injection. After patch removal, the microneedles had almost completely dissolved, leaving behind only blunt stubs. The dissolving microneedle patch was well tolerated, causing only slight, transient erythema. This study suggests that a dissolving microneedle patch can deliver hGH and other biopharmaceuticals in a manner suitable for self-administration without sharp biohazardous waste. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Digestive physiology of the pig symposium: secretion of gastrointestinal hormones and eating control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, R E; Feinle-Bisset, C; Geary, N; Beglinger, C

    2013-05-01

    Nutrient ingestion triggers numerous changes in gastrointestinal (GI) peptide hormone secretion that affect appetite and eating. Evidence for these effects comes from research in laboratory animals, healthy humans, and, increasingly, obese patients after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery, which has marked effects on GI hormone function and is currently the most effective therapy for morbid obesity. Increases in cholecystokinin (CCK), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY) and decreases in ghrelin secretion after meals are triggered by changes in the nutrient content of the intestine. One apparent physiological function of each is to initiate a reflex-like feedback control of eating. Here we briefly review this function, with an emphasis on the controls of their secretion. Each is secreted from enteroendocrine cells that are directly or indirectly affected by caloric load, macronutrient composition, and other characteristics of ingested food such as fatty acid chain length. In addition, digestive hydrolysis is a critical mechanism that controls their secretion. Although there are relatively few data in agricultural animals, the generally consistent results across widely divergent mammals suggests that most of the processes described are also likely to be relevant to GI hormone functions and eating in agricultural animals.

  16. Polyacrylamide gels with selective recognition of the tetrameric molecular form of human growth hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kublickas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Networks of polyacrylamide were studied for the possibility of imprinting of the oligomeric form of human growth hormone. The tetrameric molecular form of human growth hormone was molecularly imprinted for the first time. The results show that approximately 50–70% (w/w of the templates (depending on polymerization conditions could be extracted from the molecularly imprinted acrylamide polymers. The resulting ‘gel antibodies’ against this form of human growth hormone in the form of granules of polyacrylamide were compared with granules of non-imprinted polymer. The selectivity of the artificial gel antibodies was studied. Investigation of the binding to imprinted polymer of the template hormone, other molecular forms of the hormone and other proteins shows the selectivity of the developed artificial gel antibodies.

  17. Human amniotic fluid contaminants alter thyroid hormone signalling and early brain development in Xenopus embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, Jean-Baptiste; Mughal, Bilal B.; Le Mével, Sébastien; Leemans, Michelle; Lettmann, Mélodie; Spirhanzlova, Petra; Affaticati, Pierre; Jenett, Arnim; Demeneix, Barbara A.

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for normal brain development in vertebrates. In humans, abnormal maternal thyroid hormone levels during early pregnancy are associated with decreased offspring IQ and modified brain structure. As numerous environmental chemicals disrupt thyroid hormone signalling, we questioned whether exposure to ubiquitous chemicals affects thyroid hormone responses during early neurogenesis. We established a mixture of 15 common chemicals at concentrations reported in human amniotic fluid. An in vivo larval reporter (GFP) assay served to determine integrated thyroid hormone transcriptional responses. Dose-dependent effects of short-term (72 h) exposure to single chemicals and the mixture were found. qPCR on dissected brains showed significant changes in thyroid hormone-related genes including receptors, deiodinases and neural differentiation markers. Further, exposure to mixture also modified neural proliferation as well as neuron and oligodendrocyte size. Finally, exposed tadpoles showed behavioural responses with dose-dependent reductions in mobility. In conclusion, exposure to a mixture of ubiquitous chemicals at concentrations found in human amniotic fluid affect thyroid hormone-dependent transcription, gene expression, brain development and behaviour in early embryogenesis. As thyroid hormone signalling is strongly conserved across vertebrates the results suggest that ubiquitous chemical mixtures could be exerting adverse effects on foetal human brain development.

  18. Neural and Hormonal Control of Postecdysial Behaviors in Insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Benjamin H.; Ewer, John

    2016-01-01

    The shedding of the old exoskeleton that occurs in insects at the end of a molt (a process called ecdysis) is typically followed by the expansion and tanning of a new one. At the adult molt, these postecdysial processes include expanding and hardening the wings. Here we describe recent advances in understanding the neural and hormonal control of wing expansion and hardening, focusing on work done in Drosophila where genetic manipulations have permitted a detailed investigation of postecdysial processes and their modulation by sensory input. To place this work in context, we briefly review recent progress in understanding the neuroendocrine regulation of ecdysis, which appears to be largely conserved across insect species. Investigations into the neuroendocrine networks that regulate ecdysial and postecdysial behaviors, will provide insights into how stereotyped, yet environmentally-responsive, sequences are generated, as well as into how they develop and evolve. PMID:24160420

  19. Involvement of human peroxisomes in biosynthesis and signaling of steroid and peptide hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinhofer, Isabelle; Kunze, Markus; Forss-Petter, Sonja; Berger, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Although peroxisomes exert essential biological functions, cell type-specific features of this important organelle are still only superficially characterized. An intriguing new aspect of peroxisomal function was recently uncovered by the observation that the peptide hormones β-lipotropin (β-LPH) and β-endorphin are localized to peroxisomes in various human tissues. This suggests a functional link between peptide hormone metabolism and peroxisomes. In addition, because endocrine manifestations that affect steroid hormones are often found in patients suffering from inherited peroxisomal disorders, the question has been raised whether peroxisomes are also involved in steroidogenesis. With this chapter, we will review several crucial aspects concerning peroxisomes and hormone metabolism.

  20. Sex-dimorphic behaviour development in the human: prenatal hormone administration and postnatal socialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R

    An interdisciplinary integrative approach must be utilized in the study of psychosexual differentiation. The approach must capitalize on data derived from non-human models, from experiments of nature, and from experiments of nurture. Studies from non-human primates strongly suggest the influence of prenatal sex hormone levels on postnatal sexually dimorphic behaviours. Starting from this basis we have studied sixty young adult men whose mothers received, during pregnancy, diethylstilboestrol, diethylstilboestrol and natural progesterone, natural progesterone, or synthetic progesterone. They have been compared with matched controls not exposed in utero to exogenous hormones. Studies of socialization patterns must document the differential developmental experiences, if any, of children with atypical and typical sex-typed behaviours. To this end, we are studying 60 boys whose behaviour before puberty was decidedly feminine, and their parents, and contrasting them with masculine boys and their parents. We are also studying 50 girls whose behaviour before puberty was 'masculine', and contrasting them with 'feminine' girls. Additionally, we are studying the sexually dimorphic behaviour of children of sexually atypical parents. The parents have either undergone sex-change surgery (male-to-female or female-to-male) or are homosexual. Data from the three studies are presented. A call is made to researchers working with non-human primates to test and extend these findings.

  1. Adult height in children with growth hormone deficiency: a randomized, controlled, growth hormone dose-response trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sas, T.C.J.; Ridder, M.A. de; Wit, J.M.; Rotteveel, J.J.; Oostdijk, W.; Reeser, H.M.; Otten, B.J.; Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S.M.P.F. de

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of 2 growth hormone (GH) doses on adult height (AH) in GH deficiency (GHD). METHODS: A multicenter, randomized, controlled dose-response trial compared attained AH minus target height (TH) between children receiving 0.7 mg/m(2)/day biosynthetic GH (approx. 0.025

  2. Adult Height in Children with Growth Hormone Deficiency: A Randomized, Controlled, Growth Hormone Dose-Response Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sas, T.C.J.; de Ridder, M.A.J.; Wit, J.M.; Rotteveel, J.; Oostdijk, W.; Reeser, H.M.; Otten, B.J.; Keizer-Schrama, S.M.P.F.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of 2 growth hormone (GH) doses on adult height (AH) in GH deficiency (GHD). Methods: A multicenter, randomized, controlled dose-response trial compared attained AH minus target height (TH) between children receiving 0.7 mg/m

  3. Impact on human health of hormonal additives used in animal production

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Larrea, Fernando; Chirinos, Mayel

    2007-01-01

    The establishment of the impact of environmental compounds or additives with hormone-like activity on human health still requires further investigation, as well as a reexamination of biologic models...

  4. Position stand on androgen and human growth hormone use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jay R; Kraemer, William J; Bhasin, Shalender; Storer, Thomas; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Haff, G Gregory; Willoughby, Darryn S; Rogol, Alan D

    2009-08-01

    Hoffman, JR, Kraemer, WJ, Bhasin, S, Storer, T, Ratamess, NA, Haff, GG, Willoughby, DS, and Rogol, AD. Position stand on Androgen and human growth hormone use. J Strength Cond Res 23(5): S1-S59, 2009-Perceived yet often misunderstood demands of a sport, overt benefits of anabolic drugs, and the inability to be offered any effective alternatives has fueled anabolic drug abuse despite any consequences. Motivational interactions with many situational demands including the desire for improved body image, sport performance, physical function, and body size influence and fuel such negative decisions. Positive countermeasures to deter the abuse of anabolic drugs are complex and yet unclear. Furthermore, anabolic drugs work and the optimized training and nutritional programs needed to cut into the magnitude of improvement mediated by drug abuse require more work, dedication, and preparation on the part of both athletes and coaches alike. Few shortcuts are available to the athlete who desires to train naturally. Historically, the NSCA has placed an emphasis on education to help athletes, coaches, and strength and conditioning professionals become more knowledgeable, highly skilled, and technically trained in their approach to exercise program design and implementation. Optimizing nutritional strategies are a vital interface to help cope with exercise and sport demands (). In addition, research-based supplements will also have to be acknowledged as a strategic set of tools (e.g., protein supplements before and after resistance exercise workout) that can be used in conjunction with optimized nutrition to allow more effective adaptation and recovery from exercise. Resistance exercise is the most effective anabolic form of exercise, and over the past 20 years, the research base for resistance exercise has just started to develop to a significant volume of work to help in the decision-making process in program design (). The interface with nutritional strategies has been less

  5. FGF21 Is a Sugar-Induced Hormone Associated with Sweet Intake and Preference in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søberg, Susanna; Sandholt, Camilla Helene; Z. Jespersen, Naja

    2017-01-01

    The liking and selective ingestion of palatable foods—including sweets—is biologically controlled, and dysfunction of this regulation may promote unhealthy eating, obesity, and disease. The hepatokine fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) reduces sweet consumption in rodents and primates, whereas k...... elevated in fasted sweet-disliking individuals. These data suggest the liver may secrete hormones that influence eating behavior.......The liking and selective ingestion of palatable foods—including sweets—is biologically controlled, and dysfunction of this regulation may promote unhealthy eating, obesity, and disease. The hepatokine fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) reduces sweet consumption in rodents and primates, whereas...... knockout of Fgf21 increases sugar consumption in mice. To investigate the relevance of these findings in humans, we genotyped variants in the FGF21 locus in participants from the Danish Inter99 cohort (n = 6,514) and examined their relationship with a detailed range of food and ingestive behaviors...

  6. The stress hormone cortisol blocks perceptual learning in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinse, Hubert R; Kattenstroth, J C; Lenz, M; Tegenthoff, M; Wolf, O T

    2017-03-01

    Cortisol, the primary glucocorticoid (GC) in humans, influences neuronal excitability and plasticity by acting on mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors. Cellular studies demonstrated that elevated GC levels affect neuronal plasticity, for example through a reduction of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). At the behavioural level, after treatment with GCs, numerous studies have reported impaired hippocampal function, such as impaired memory retrieval. In contrast, relatively little is known about the impact of GCs on cortical plasticity and perceptual learning in adult humans. Therefore, in this study, we explored the impact of elevated GC levels on human perceptual learning. To this aim, we used a training-independent learning approach, where lasting changes in human perception can be induced by applying passive repetitive sensory stimulation (rss), the timing of which was determined from cellular LTP studies. In our placebo-controlled double-blind study, we used tactile LTP-like stimulation to induce improvements in tactile acuity (spatial two-point discrimination). Our results show that a single administration of hydrocortisone (30mg) completely blocked rss-induced changes in two-point discrimination. In contrast, the placebo group showed the expected rss-induced increase in two-point discrimination of over 14%. Our data demonstrate that high GC levels inhibit rss-induced perceptual learning. We suggest that the suppression of LTP, as previously reported in cellular studies, may explain the perceptual learning impairments observed here. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Parallel Measurement of Circadian Clock Gene Expression and Hormone Secretion in Human Primary Cell Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, Volodymyr; Saini, Camille; Perrin, Laurent; Dibner, Charna

    2016-11-11

    Circadian clocks are functional in all light-sensitive organisms, allowing for an adaptation to the external world by anticipating daily environmental changes. Considerable progress in our understanding of the tight connection between the circadian clock and most aspects of physiology has been made in the field over the last decade. However, unraveling the molecular basis that underlies the function of the circadian oscillator in humans stays of highest technical challenge. Here, we provide a detailed description of an experimental approach for long-term (2-5 days) bioluminescence recording and outflow medium collection in cultured human primary cells. For this purpose, we have transduced primary cells with a lentiviral luciferase reporter that is under control of a core clock gene promoter, which allows for the parallel assessment of hormone secretion and circadian bioluminescence. Furthermore, we describe the conditions for disrupting the circadian clock in primary human cells by transfecting siRNA targeting CLOCK. Our results on the circadian regulation of insulin secretion by human pancreatic islets, and myokine secretion by human skeletal muscle cells, are presented here to illustrate the application of this methodology. These settings can be used to study the molecular makeup of human peripheral clocks and to analyze their functional impact on primary cells under physiological or pathophysiological conditions.

  8. Sex hormone receptors are present in the human suprachiasmatic nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijver, Frank P. M.; Swaab, Dick F.

    2002-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the clock of the brain that orchestrates circadian and circannual biological rhythms, such as the rhythms of hormones, body temperature, sleep and mood. These rhythms are frequently disturbed in menopause and even more so in dementia and can be restored in

  9. Human growth hormone alters carbohydrate storage in blood and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJP

    2015-06-02

    secreting α-cells predominate in the islets of Langerhans of granivorous species, such as the chicken and duck.[1]. Insulin appears to be more dominant in carnivorous avian species.[1] The roles of growth hormone (GH) in regulation ...

  10. Thyroid hormone transporters and deiodinases in the developing human hypothalamus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friesema, E.C.; Visser, T.J.; Borgers, A.J.F.; Kalsbeek, A.; Swaab, D.F.; Fliers, E.; Alkemade, A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Thyroid hormone (TH) signaling in brain cells is dependent on transport of TH across the plasma membrane followed by intracellular deiodination and binding to the nuclear TH receptors. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of the specific TH transporters monocarboxylate

  11. Characterization of human follicle-stimulating hormone binding to human granulosa cells by an immunoenzymological method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotin, F; Royere, D; Roussie, M; Combarnous, Y; Lansac, J; Müh, J P

    1992-04-01

    An original, nonradiometric method has been developed for studying the binding parameters of native follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) to its specific receptors in human ovarian granulosa cells. After binding and washing of the cells, hFSH was desorbed from its receptors and quantitatively measured by a specific enzyme immunoassay (EIA) in which nonspecific binding was estimated in the presence of an excess of equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG/PMSG), which binds to human FSH receptors but does not interfere in the hFSH EIA. This method makes use of native nonmodified hFSH molecules (in contrast to radiometric methods) and permits direct estimation of the binding parameters (Kd and total number of sites). The Kd of hFSH for its human granulosa receptors measured by this technique (4.8 +/- 0.3 x 10(-10) M) is close to that determined by other methods. However, we found a total number of specific FSH receptors per granulosa cell (1 to 6 x 10(4) higher than that reported by others by Scatchard analysis of competition dose-response curves in radioreceptor assays. The method is also sensitive enough to measure the in vivo occupancy of receptors by endogenous hFSH, which was found to be less than 6% in women undergoing hormonal treatment for in vitro fertilization.

  12. Prenatal and postnatal hormone effects on the human brain and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auyeung, Bonnie; Lombardo, Michael V; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2013-05-01

    This review examines the role of hormones in the development of social and nonsocial cognition and the brain. Research findings from human studies designed to elucidate the effects of both prenatal and postnatal exposure to hormones in children and young adults are summarized. Effects are found to be both time and dose dependent, with exposure to abnormal hormone levels having a limited impact outside the "critical window" in development. Particular attention is given to the role of prenatal hormone exposure, which appears to be vital for early organization of the brain. In later life, measurements of circulating hormone levels and the administration of testosterone and oxytocin are found to predict behavior, but the effect is thought to be one of "activation" or "fine-tuning" of the early organization of the brain. Possible directions for valuable future research are discussed.

  13. Human spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    interneurons and exert a direct (willful) muscle control with the aid of a context-dependent integration of somatosensory and visual information at cortical level. However, spinal networks also play an important role. Sensory feedback through spinal circuitries is integrated with central motor commands...... and contributes importantly to the muscle activity underlying voluntary movements. Regulation of spinal interneurons is used to switch between motor states such as locomotion (reciprocal innervation) and stance (coactivation pattern). Cortical regulation of presynaptic inhibition of sensory afferents may focus...... the central motor command by opening or closing sensory feedback pathways. In the future, human studies of spinal motor control, in close collaboration with animal studies on the molecular biology of the spinal cord, will continue to document the neural basis for human behavior. Expected final online...

  14. Receptor dysfunction and hormone resistance in human diseases--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaron, C; Famuyiwa, O

    1978-01-01

    Studies of the hormone-receptor interaction have introduced a new chapter in endocrine and metabolic disorders. Receptor (R) dysfunction in human diseases, due either to an alteration in the number or affinity of the R, or to antibodies against the R, is reviewed and classified in the first part of this paper. Disorders where hormone resistance has been implicated, but where R studies are still unavailable are also presented.

  15. Human hypocretin and melanin-concentrating hormone levels are linked to emotion and social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Ashley M; Fried, Itzhak; Wilson, Charles L; Staba, Richard J; Behnke, Eric J; Lam, Hoa A; Maidment, Nigel T; Karlsson, Karl Æ; Lapierre, Jennifer L; Siegel, Jerome M

    2013-01-01

    The neurochemical changes underlying human emotions and social behaviour are largely unknown. Here we report on the changes in the levels of two hypothalamic neuropeptides, hypocretin-1 and melanin-concentrating hormone, measured in the human amygdala. We show that hypocretin-1 levels are maximal during positive emotion, social interaction and anger, behaviours that induce cataplexy in human narcoleptics. In contrast, melanin-concentrating hormone levels are minimal during social interaction, but are increased after eating. Both peptides are at minimal levels during periods of postoperative pain despite high levels of arousal. Melanin-concentrating hormone levels increase at sleep onset, consistent with a role in sleep induction, whereas hypocretin-1 levels increase at wake onset, consistent with a role in wake induction. Levels of these two peptides in humans are not simply linked to arousal, but rather to specific emotions and state transitions. Other arousal systems may be similarly emotionally specialized.

  16. The relationship of appetitive, reproductive and posterior pituitary hormones to alcoholism and craving in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, George A; Swift, Robert M; Hillemacher, Thomas; Leggio, Lorenzo

    2012-09-01

    A significant challenge for understanding alcoholism lies in discovering why some, but not other individuals, become dependent on alcohol. Genetic, environmental, cultural, developmental, and neurobiological influences are recognized as essential factors underlying a person's risk for becoming alcohol dependent (AD); however, the neurobiological processes that trigger this vulnerability are still poorly understood. Hormones are important in the regulation of many functions and several hormones are strongly associated with alcohol use. While medical consequences are important, the primary focus of this review is on the underlying confluence of appetitive/feeding, reproductive and posterior pituitary hormones associated with distinct phases of alcoholism or assessed by alcohol craving in humans. While these hormones are of diverse origin, the involvement with alcoholism by these hormone systems is unmistakable, and demonstrates the complexity of interactions with alcohol and the difficulty of successfully pursuing effective treatments. Whether alcohol associated changes in the activity of certain hormones are the result of alcohol use or are the result of an underlying predisposition for alcoholism, or a combination of both, is currently of great scientific interest. The evidence we present in this review suggests that appetitive hormones may be markers as they appear involved in alcohol dependence and craving, that reproductive hormones provide an example of the consequences of drinking and are affected by alcohol, and that posterior pituitary hormones have potential for being targets for treatment. A better understanding of the nature of these associations may contribute to diagnosing and more comprehensively treating alcoholism. Pharmacotherapies that take advantage of our new understanding of hormones, their receptors, or their potential relationship to craving may shed light on the treatment of this disorder.

  17. The Relationship of Appetitive, Reproductive and Posterior Pituitary Hormones to Alcoholism and Craving in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, George A.; Swift, Robert M.; Hillemacher, Thomas; Leggio, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    A significant challenge for understanding alcoholism lies in discovering why some, but not other individuals, become dependent on alcohol. Genetic, environmental, cultural, developmental, and neurobiological influences are recognized as essential factors underlying a person's risk for becoming alcohol dependent (AD); however, the neurobiological processes that trigger this vulnerability are still poorly understood. Hormones are important in the regulation of many functions and several hormones are strongly associated with alcohol use. While medical consequences are important, the primary focus of this review is on the underlying confluence of appetitive/feeding, reproductive and posterior pituitary hormones associated with distinct phases of alcoholism or assessed by alcohol craving in humans. While these hormones are of diverse origin, the involvement with alcoholism by these hormone systems is unmistakable, and demonstrates the complexity of interactions with alcohol and the difficulty of successfully pursuing effective treatments. Whether alcohol associated changes in the activity of certain hormones are the result of alcohol use or are the result of an underlying predisposition for alcoholism, or a combination of both, is currently of great scientific interest. The evidence we present in this review suggests that appetitive hormones may be markers as they appear involved in alcohol dependence and craving, that reproductive hormones provide an example of the consequences of drinking and are affected by alcohol, and that posterior pituitary hormones have potential for being targets for treatment. A better understanding of the nature of these associations may contribute to diagnosing and more comprehensively treating alcoholism. Pharmacotherapies that take advantage of our new understanding of hormones, their receptors, or their potential relationship to craving may shed light on the treatment of this disorder. PMID:22772772

  18. Luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone synergy: A review of role in controlled ovarian hyper-stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottumukkala Achyuta Rama Raju

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Luteinizing hormone (LH in synergy with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH stimulates normal follicular growth and ovulation. FSH is frequently used in assisted reproductive technology (ART. Recent studies have facilitated better understanding on the complementary role of the LH to FSH in regulation of the follicle; however, role of LH in stimulation of follicle, optimal dosage of LH in stimulation and its importance in advanced aged patients has been a topic of discussion among medical fraternity. Though the administration of exogenous LH with FSH is obligatory for controlled ovarian stimulation in patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, there is still a paucity of information of its usage in other patient population. In this review we looked in to the multiple roles that LH plays complementary to FSH to better understand the LH requirement in patients undergoing ART.

  19. Functional Development of the Human Gastrointestinal Tract: Hormone- and Growth Factor-Mediated Regulatory Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ménard

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review focuses on the control of gastrointestinal (GI tract development. The first section addresses the differences in general mechanisms of GI development in humans versus rodents, highlighting that morphogenesis of specific digestive organs and the differentiation of digestive epithelia occur not only at different stages of ontogeny but also at different rates. The second section provides an overview of studies from the author's laboratory at the Université de Sherbrooke pertaining to the development of the human fetal small intestine and colon. While both segments share similar morphological and functional characteristics, they are nevertheless modulated by distinct regulatory mechanisms. Using the organ culture approach, the author and colleagues were able to establish that hormones and growth factors, such as glucocorticoids, epidermal growth factor, insulin and keratinocyte growth factor, not only exert differential effects within these two segments, they can also trigger opposite responses in comparison with animal models. In the third section, emphasis is placed on the functional development of human fetal stomach and its various epithelial cell types; in particular, the glandular chief cells responsible for the synthesis and secretion of gastric enzymes such as pepsinogen-5 and gastric lipase. Bearing in mind that limitations of available cell models have, until now, greatly impeded the comprehension of molecular mechanisms regulating human gastric epithelial cell functions, the last section focuses on new human gastric epithelial cell models recently developed in the author's laboratory. These models comprise a novel primary culture system of human fetal gastric epithelium including, for the first time, functional chief cells, and human gastric epithelium cell lines cloned from the parental NCI-N87 strain. These new cells lines could serve important applications in the study of pathogenic action and epithelial

  20. Formaldehyde Crosses the Human Placenta and Affects Human Trophoblast Differentiation and Hormonal Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidoux, Guillaume; Gerbaud, Pascale; Guibourdenche, Jean; Thérond, Patrice; Ferreira, Fatima; Simasotchi, Christelle; Evain-Brion, Danièle; Gil, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    The chorionic villus of the human placenta is the source of specific endocrine functions and nutrient exchanges. These activities are ensured by the syncytiotrophobast (ST), which bathes in maternal blood. The ST arises and regenerates throughout pregnancy by fusion of underlying cytotrophoblasts (CT). Any anomaly of ST formation or regeneration can affect pregnancy outcome and fetal growth. Because of its direct interaction with maternal blood, the ST is sensitive to drugs, pollutants and xenohormones. Ex vivo assays of perfused cotyledon show that formaldehyde, a common pollutant present in furniture, paint and plastics, can accumulate in the human placenta and cross to the fetal compartment. By means of RT-qPCR, immunoblot and immunocytochemistry experiments, we demonstrate in vitro that formaldehyde exerts endocrine toxicity on human trophoblasts, including a decrease in the production of protein hormones of pregnancy. In addition, formaldehyde exposure triggered human trophoblast fusion by upregulating syncitin-1 receptor expression (ASC-type amino-acid transporter 2: ASCT2). Moreover, we show that formaldehyde-exposed trophoblasts present an altered redox status associated with oxidative stress, and an increase in ASCT2 expression intended to compensate for this stress. Finally, we demonstrate that the adverse effects of formaldehyde on trophoblast differentiation and fusion are reversed by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (Nac), an antioxidant. PMID:26186596

  1. (−) Arctigenin and (+) Pinoresinol Are Antagonists of the Human Thyroid Hormone Receptor β

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Lignans are important biologically active dietary polyphenolic compounds. Consumption of foods that are rich in lignans is associated with positive health effects. Using modeling tools to probe the ligand-binding pockets of molecular receptors, we found that lignans have high docking affinity for the human thyroid hormone receptor β. Follow-up experimental results show that lignans (−) arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β. The modeled complexes show key plausible interactions between the two ligands and important amino acid residues of the receptor. PMID:25383984

  2. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence of the human growth hormone structural gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskam, W G; Rougeon, F

    1979-01-01

    An almost complete cDNA copy of human growth hormone has been cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence confirms the known protein sequence and predicts the sequence of a precursor region of 26 amino acids. We have compared the nucleotide sequence to that for the homolgous proteins, rat growth hormone and human chorionic somatomammotropin (Seeburg et al. and Shine et al., Nature 270, 486 (1977)). There appears to be evolutionary conservation of mRNA sequence features not related to protein structure. Images PMID:386281

  3. Human mammospheres secrete hormone-regulated active extracellular vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esperanza Gonzalez

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-associated death worldwide. One of the most important prognostic factors for survival is the early detection of the disease. Recent studies indicate that extracellular vesicles may provide diagnostic information for cancer management. We demonstrate the secretion of extracellular vesicles by primary breast epithelial cells enriched for stem/progenitor cells cultured as mammospheres, in non-adherent conditions. Using a proteomic approach we identified proteins contained in these vesicles whose expression is affected by hormonal changes in the cellular environment. In addition, we showed that these vesicles are capable of promoting changes in expression levels of genes involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition and stem cell markers. Our findings suggest that secreted extracellular vesicles could represent potential diagnostic and/or prognostic markers for breast cancer and support a role for extracellular vesicles in cancer progression.

  4. Physiological role of somatostatin on growth hormone regulation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorner, M O; Vance, M L; Hartman, M L; Holl, R W; Evans, W S; Veldhuis, J D; Van Cauter, E; Copinschi, G; Bowers, C Y

    1990-09-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion in man is pulsatile and this pattern is regulated by both GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin. A large body of experimental evidence in both man and animals supports the model that bursts of GH secretion are mediated by a reduction of tonic hypothalamic somatostatin secretion. Our studies have been performed in normal subjects with frequent blood sampling for GH measurements (from 20-minute to 30-second intervals); the data have been analyzed by computer algorithms to objectively determine pulse characteristics and, in some studies, to estimate both pituitary secretion and clearance rates using deconvolution analysis. The studies include profiles of GH secretion in normal men and women in fed and fasted states; analysis of GH secretion during sleep; and administration of GHRH during different stages of sleep and after sleep deprivation. The variable GH response to exogenous GHRH and the attenuated response after 6 hours of GHRH infusion to GHRH, while not to hypoglycemia, as well as the pulsatile profile of GH secretion in response to continuous GHRH infusions (24 hours to 14 days), all support the thesis that it is hypothalamic somatostatin that determines the timing of bursts of GH secretion. This is further confirmed by the profile of GH secretion in a patient with ectopic GHRH secretion. Recently, we have initiated studies with the novel synthetic GH releasing hexapeptide, HisDTrpAlaTrpDPheLysNH2 (GHRP). Our studies show that it acts synergistically with GHRH. Several lines of evidence suggest that GHRP stimulates GH secretion independently of GHRH receptors and acts at both the hypothalamic and pituitary levels. It may act to functionally antagonize somatostatin.

  5. Novel activity of human angiotensin I converting enzyme: release of the NH2- and COOH-terminal tripeptides from the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone.

    OpenAIRE

    Skidgel, R A; Erdös, E G

    1985-01-01

    Angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE; kininase II; peptidyldipeptide hydrolase, EC 3.4.15.1) cleaves COOH-terminal dipeptides from active peptides containing a free COOH terminus. We investigated the hydrolysis of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) by homogeneous human ACE. Although this decapeptide is blocked at both the NH2 and COOH termini, it was metabolized to several peptides, which were separated by HPLC and identified by amino acid analysis. A major product was the NH2-term...

  6. Controlled ovarian stimulation using a long gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist protocol: a proof of concept and feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Ariel; Ravhon, Amir; Steinfeld, Zohar; Nahum, Hana; Golan, Abraham; Levran, David

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a long protocol of controlled ovarian stimulation prior to in vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo transfer with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist used for pituitary and ovarian suppression. Thirty patients undergoing IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection were randomized into two groups. The control group (n = 16) received a standard flexible GnRH antagonist protocol. Ovarian stimulation consisted of 225 IU/day of recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone for 5 days, followed by 225 IU/day of human menopausal gonadotropin until human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration. The study group (n = 14) received 0.25 mg of GnRH antagonist daily for 7 days, thereafter, upon confirmation of pituitary and ovarian suppression, ovarian stimulation was commenced with the same protocol as used in the control group. Hormone and follicle dynamics, as well as laboratory characteristics and cycle outcome, were compared for both groups. Both groups were comparable in baseline characteristics. Pituitary and ovarian suppression were effectively achieved in 12/14 patients in the study group. The duration of ovarian stimulation and gonadotropin consumption were similar in both groups, as was also the number and size of follicles on hCG day. The results of our study confirm the feasibility of a long GnRH antagonist protocol. This regimen could become another option to optimize GnRH antagonist protocols, and should thus be further explored. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Effect of the human follicle-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-binding inhibitor (FSHBI), purified by our laboratory from human ovarian follicular fluid, has been shown to suppress ovulation and induce follicular atresia/apoptosis in mice as well as impair fertility in marmosets, the new world monkeys. The octapeptide, a peptide corresponding to ...

  8. PSYCHOSOCIAL EFFECTS OF 2 YEARS OF HUMAN GROWTH-HORMONE TREATMENT IN TURNER SYNDROME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SLIJPER, FME; SINNEMA, G; AKKERHUIS, GW; BRUGMANBOEZEMAN, A; FEENSTRA, J; DENHARTOG, L; HEUVEL, F

    1993-01-01

    Thirty-eight girls with Turner syndrome were treated for 2 years with human growth hormone. Both parents and patients carried out assessments of the effects of treatment on various aspects of psychosocial functioning. The children used the Piers-Harris Self-Concept Scale and the Social Anxiety Scale

  9. Thyroid hormone: a “prime suspect” in human immuno deficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is the final and most serious stage of the disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus. The Immune system is the target of AIDS. We investigate presently any possible involvement of thyroid hormone, the deficiency of which gives rise to oedema and susceptibility to ...

  10. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human anti-mullerian hormone type II receptor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Visser (Jenny); A. McLuskey; T. van Beers (T.); D.O. Weghuis (D. Olde); A.H.M. Geurts van Kessel (Ad); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); A.P.N. Themmen (Axel)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractUsing the rat anti-müllerian hormone type II receptor (AMHRII) cDNA as a probe, two overlapping lambda phage clones containing the AMHRII gene were isolated from a human genomic library. Sequence analysis of the exons was performed and the exon/intron boundaries were determined. The

  11. Interspecies hormonal control of host root morphology by parasitic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallek, Thomas; Melnyk, Charles W; Wakatake, Takanori; Zhang, Jing; Sakamoto, Yuki; Kiba, Takatoshi; Yoshida, Satoko; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Shirasu, Ken

    2017-05-16

    Parasitic plants share a common anatomical feature, the haustorium. Haustoria enable both infection and nutrient transfer, which often leads to growth penalties for host plants and yield reduction in crop species. Haustoria also reciprocally transfer substances, such as RNA and proteins, from parasite to host, but the biological relevance for such movement remains unknown. Here, we studied such interspecies transport by using the hemiparasitic plant Phtheirospermum japonicum during infection of Arabidopsis thaliana Tracer experiments revealed a rapid and efficient transfer of carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) from host to parasite upon formation of vascular connections. In addition, Phtheirospermum induced hypertrophy in host roots at the site of infection, a form of enhanced secondary growth that is commonly observed during various parasitic plant-host interactions. The plant hormone cytokinin is important for secondary growth, and we observed increases in cytokinin and its response during infection in both host and parasite. Phtheirospermum-induced host hypertrophy required cytokinin signaling genes (AHK3,4) but not cytokinin biosynthesis genes (IPT1,3,5,7) in the host. Furthermore, expression of a cytokinin-degrading enzyme in Phtheirospermum prevented host hypertrophy. Wild-type hosts with hypertrophy were smaller than ahk3,4 mutant hosts resistant to hypertrophy, suggesting hypertrophy improves the efficiency of parasitism. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the interspecies movement of a parasite-derived hormone modified both host root morphology and fitness. Several microbial and animal plant pathogens use cytokinins during infections, highlighting the central role of this growth hormone during the establishment of plant diseases and revealing a common strategy for parasite infections of plants.

  12. The control of reproductive physiology and behavior by gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone

    OpenAIRE

    Ubuka, Takayoshi; McGuire, Nicolette L.; Calisi, Rebecca M.; Perfito, Nicole; Bentley, George E.

    2008-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) controls the reproductive physiology and behavior of vertebrates by stimulating synthesis and release of gonadotropin from the pituitary gland. In 2000, another hypothalamic neuropeptide, gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), was discovered in quail and found to be an inhibiting factor for gonadotropin release. GnIH homologs are present in the brains of vertebrates, including birds, mammals, amphibians, and fish. These peptides, categorized as RF amide-...

  13. Biosynthesis and metabolism of steroid hormones by human adrenal carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown J.W.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Over a 15-year period, our university-based laboratory obtained 125 adrenal tumors, of which 15 (12% were adrenal cortical carcinomas. Of these, 6 (40% of the carcinomas occurred in patients with clear clinical manifestations of steroid hormone excess. Adrenal cortical carcinoma cells derived from the surgically resected tumors in 4 of these patients were isolated and established in primary culture. Radiotracer steroid interconversion studies were carried out with these cultures and also on mitochondria isolated from homogenized tissues. Large tumors had the lowest steroidogenic activities per weight, whereas small tumors had more moderately depressed enzyme activities relative to cells from normal glands. In incubations with pregnenolone as substrate, 1 mM metyrapone blocked the synthesis of corticosterone and cortisol and also the formation of aldosterone. Metyrapone inhibition was associated with a concomitant increase in the formation of androgens (androstenedione and testosterone from pregnenolone. Administration of metyrapone in vivo before surgery in one patient resulted in a similar increase in plasma androstenedione, though plasma testosterone levels were not significantly affected. In cultures of two of four tumors examined, dibutyryl cAMP stimulated 11ß-hydroxylase activity modestly; ACTH also had a significant stimulatory effect in one of these tumors. Unlike results obtained with normal or adenomatous adrenal cortical tissues, mitochondria from carcinomatous cells showed a lack of support of either cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme complex or steroid 11ß-hydroxylase activity by Krebs cycle intermediates (10 mM isocitrate, succinate or malate. This finding is consistent with the concept that these carcinomas may tend to function predominantly in an anaerobic manner, rather than through the oxidation of Krebs cycle intermediates.

  14. Low-dose growth hormone and human immunodeficiency virus-associated lipodystrophy syndrome: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Haugaard, Steen B; Flyvbjerg, A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment with high doses (2-6 mg day(-1)) of human growth hormone (hGH) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) has been shown to increase concentrations of total insulin-like growth-factor-I (IGF-I) more than twofold greater than.......01). Patients reported improvements of lipodystrophy, which was supported by a decreased waist-to-thigh ratio (P = 0.01), and waist-to-hip ratio (P = 0.06). Ratio of peripheral to trunk soft tissue mass increased (P = 0.01, measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans) and a trend towards reduction......' treatment of lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients with hGH, 0.7 mg day(-1), increased total and free IGF-I twofold and appeared safe and tolerable. The potential of low-dose hGH in the treatment of HIV-lipodystrophy awaits examination by placebo-controlled, randomized trials....

  15. Night work and breast cancer risk defined by human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) and hormone receptor status: A population-based case-control study in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Koudou, Yves; Truong, Thérèse; Arveux, Patrick; Kerbrat, Pierre; Menegaux, Florence; Guénel, Pascal

    Night work has been associated with risk of breast cancer but this association needs to be confirmed. Because breast cancer is an etiologically heterogeneous disease, we explored the association of night work with breast cancer subtypes defined by tumor status (positive of negative) for estrogen-receptor (ER), progesterone-receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor-receptor 2 (HER2). Using the data from a case-control study in France including 975 cases and 1317 controls, we found that the odds ratios for ER+, PR+ or HER2+ breast cancers subtypes were significantly elevated, while no association with night shift work was observed for ER, PR or HER2-negative tumors. After stratification by menopausal status, the associations of night work with receptor-positive breast tumor subtypes were clearly seen in premenopausal women (odds ratios 2.04, 1.98 and 2.80, respectively) but did not appear in postmenopausal women. This study provides evidence that working at night may increase risk of ER, PR and HER2-positive subtypes of breast cancer particularly among premenopausal women.

  16. Regulation of corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1 messenger RNA level in Y-79 retinoblastoma cells: potential implications for human stress response and immune/inflammatory reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Vamvakopoulos

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the regulation of type 1 receptor mRNA in Y-79 human retinoblastoma cells, grown in the absence or presence of pharmacological levels of phorbol esters, forskolin, glucocorticoids and their combinations. To control for inducibility and for assessing the sensitivity of the Y-79 system to glucocorticoids, corticotropin releasing hormone mRNA levels were measured in parallel. All treatments stimulated corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1 gene expression relative to baseline. A weak suppression of corticotropin releasing hormone mRNA level was observed during dexamethasone treatment. The cell line expressed ten-fold excess of receptor to ligand mRNA under basal conditions. The findings predict the presence of functional phorbol ester, cyclic AMP and glucocorticoid response elements in the promoter region of corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1 gene and support a potential role for its product during chronic stress and immune/inflammatory reaction.

  17. Thyroid hormone induced oxygen consumption and glucose-uptake in human mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvetny, J; Matzen, L E

    1989-01-01

    Cellular oxygen consumption and glucose metabolism were examined in human mononuclear blood cells. The cellular oxygen consumption and glucose uptake were dependent on the number of cells, the temperature and the duration of incubation. Stimulation of the cells by T4 and T3 led to a dose dependen...... thyroid hormones and insulin exerted an additive effect on glucose uptake. Our study indicates a direct intracellular effect of T4 independent of its conversion to T3 and a different mechanism for insulin dependent and thyroid hormone glucose uptake....

  18. Fire Control and Human Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Claire

    1978-01-01

    Briefly outlines some aspects of the discovery of fire control by primitive people, such as the preadaptation for speech, the evolution of the human brain, and natural selection for human nakedness or loss of hair. (CS)

  19. Variation of Metabolite and Hormone Contents in Human Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmelmair, Hans; Koletzko, Berthold

    2017-03-01

    Animal studies show that the lactation period contributes to metabolic programming of the offspring and that oral leptin and insulin show bioactivity. Stage of lactation, duration of gestation, maternal body composition, and maternal diet seem to influence the concentrations of small molecules in human milk. Variability of small molecule concentrations seems higher in preterm milk than in term milk. Insulin in human milk shows concentrations similar to plasma. Leptin concentration is lower in milk than in plasma and reflects maternal body mass index. Early in lactation, leptin could contribute to mediating the association between maternal and infant body composition. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ovarian response to recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arce, Joan-Carles; Andersen, Anders Nyboe; Fernández-Sánchez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    ) concentrations. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded, AMH-stratified (low: 5.0-14.9 pmol/L [0.7-infertility centers in four countries. PATIENT(S): Two hundred sixty-five women aged ≤37 years. INTERVENTION(S): Controlled...

  1. Thyroid hormone effect on human mitochondria measured by flow cytometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvetny, Jan; Bomholt, Tobias; Pedersen, Palle

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial function may be impaired in a number of diseases including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and endocrine disorders. Therefore it is important to be able to measure mitochondrial function in human cells. PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate a m...

  2. Identification of hormonal receptors in human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa Pascual, M.; Lage, A.; Diaz, J.W.; Moreno, L.; Marta Diaz, T. (Instituto de Oncologia y Radiobiologia, La Habana (Cuba))

    1981-01-01

    The experience in the implementation of a technique for determining hormono-dependence of human breast cancer is presented. The results found with the use of the technique in 50 patients with malignant breast cancer treated at IOR are examined and discussed.

  3. Pattern of hormone receptors and human epidermal growth factor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women globally. With immunohistochemistry (IHC), breast cancer is classified into four groups based on IHC profile of estrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu) expression, positive (+) and/or ...

  4. A review of human male field studies of hormones and behavioral reproductive effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter B; McHale, Timothy S; Carré, Justin M

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review field studies of human male hormones and reproductive behavior. We first discuss life history theory and related conceptual considerations. As illustrations, distinctive features of human male life histories such as coalitional aggression, long-term partnering and paternal care are noted, along with their relevance to overall reproductive effort and developmental plasticity. We address broad questions about what constitutes a human male field study of hormones and behavior, including the kinds of hormone and behavioral measures employed in existing studies. Turning to several sections of empirical review, we present and discuss evidence for links between prenatal and juvenile androgens and sexual attraction and aggression. This includes the proposal that adrenal androgens-DHEA and androstenedione-may play functional roles during juvenility as part of a life-stage specific system. We next review studies of adult male testosterone responses to competition, with these studies emphasizing men's involvement in individual and team sports. These studies show that men's testosterone responses differ with respect to variables such as playing home/away, winning/losing, and motivation. Field studies of human male hormones and sexual behavior also focus on testosterone, showing some evidence of patterned changes in men's testosterone to sexual activity. Moreover, life stage-specific changes in male androgens may structure age-related differences in sexual behavior, including decreases in sexual behavior with senescence. We overview the considerable body of research on male testosterone, partnerships and paternal care, noting the variation in social context and refinements in research design. A few field studies provide insight into relationships between partnering and paternal behavior and prolactin, oxytocin, and vasopressin. In the third section of the review, we discuss patterns, limitations and directions for future research. This

  5. How does juvenile hormone control insect metamorphosis and reproduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddiford, Lynn M

    2012-12-01

    In insects juvenile hormone (JH) regulates both metamorphosis and reproduction. This lecture focuses on our current understanding of JH action at the molecular level in both of these processes based primarily on studies in the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta, the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, the mosquito Aedes aegypti, and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The roles of the JH receptor complex and the transcription factors that it regulates during larval molting and metamorphosis are summarized. Also highlighted are the intriguing interactions of the JH and insulin signaling pathways in both imaginal disc development and vitellogenesis. Critical actions of JH and its receptor in the timing of maturation of the adult optic lobe and of female receptivity in Drosophila are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The orphan nuclear hormone receptor ERRβ controls rod photoreceptor survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Akishi; Peng, Guang-Hua; Poth, Erin M.; Lee, Daniel A.; Chen, Jichao; Alexis, Uel; de Melo, Jimmy; Chen, Shiming; Blackshaw, Seth

    2010-01-01

    Mutation of rod photoreceptor-enriched transcription factors is a major cause of inherited blindness. We identified the orphan nuclear hormone receptor estrogen-related receptor β (ERRβ) as selectively expressed in rod photoreceptors. Overexpression of ERRβ induces expression of rod-specific genes in retinas of wild-type as well as Nrl−/− mice, which lack rod photoreceptors. Mutation of ERRβ results in dysfunction and degeneration of rods, whereas inverse agonists of ERRβ trigger rapid rod degeneration, which is rescued by constitutively active mutants of ERRβ. ERRβ coordinates expression of multiple genes that are rate-limiting regulators of ATP generation and consumption in photoreceptors. Furthermore, enhancing ERRβ activity rescues photoreceptor defects that result from loss of the photoreceptor-specific transcription factor Crx. Our findings demonstrate that ERRβ is a critical regulator of rod photoreceptor function and survival, and suggest that ERRβ agonists may be useful in the treatment of certain retinal dystrophies. PMID:20534447

  7. Small-molecule pheromones and hormones controlling nematode development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Rebecca A

    2017-05-17

    The existence of small-molecule signals that influence development in Caenorhabditis elegans has been known for several decades, but only in recent years have the chemical structures of several of these signals been established. The identification of these signals has enabled connections to be made between these small molecules and fundamental signaling pathways in C. elegans that influence not only development but also metabolism, fertility, and lifespan. Spurred by these important discoveries and aided by recent advances in comparative metabolomics and NMR spectroscopy, the field of nematode chemistry has the potential to expand dramatically in the coming years. This Perspective will focus on small-molecule pheromones and hormones that influence developmental events in the nematode life cycle (ascarosides, dafachronic acids, and nemamides), will cover more recent work regarding the biosynthesis of these signals, and will explore how the discovery of these signals is transforming our understanding of nematode development and physiology.

  8. Effects of polybrominated diphenyl ethers on thyroid hormone, neurodevelopment and fertility in rodents and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Czerska

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs are used as flame retardants. Due to their widespread use in many consumer products, PBDEs can be found in food as well as in the environment. Their presence has also been found in the human serum, human adipose tissue and human breast milk. Results of experimental studies suggest that the presence of PBDE in the environment is not neutral to our health. In rats and mice exposed to PBDE disturbances in thyroid hormone homeostasis and reproductive system such as changes in reproductive organs weight and disorders in sperm motility and motion were found. In rodents, pre- and postnatal exposure to PBDE can cause neurobehavioral effects. Also in humans disturbances in thyroid hormone system, weight of reproductive organs and concentrations of sex hormones associated with PBDEs serum concentrations were found. Exposure to PBDEs during pregnancy may lead to slower mental and psychomotor development in infants. In this paper the results of previous animal a nd human studies are reviewed.

  9. Deiodinases: the balance of thyroid hormone: type 1 iodothyronine deiodinase in human physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Ana Luiza; Goemann, Iuri Martin; Meyer, Erika L Souza; Wajner, Simone Magagnin

    2011-06-01

    Thyroid hormone is essential for the normal function of virtually all tissues. The iodothyronine deiodinases catalyze the removal of an iodine residue from the pro-hormone thyroxine (T(4)) molecule, thus producing either the active form triiodothyronine (T(3); activation) or inactive metabolites (reverse T(3); inactivation). Type I deiodinase (D1) catalyzes both reactions. Over the last years, several studies have attempted to understand the mechanisms of D1 function, underlying its effects on normal thyroid hormone metabolism and pathological processes. Although peripheral D1-generated T(3) production contributes to a portion of plasma T(3) in euthyroid state, pathologically increased thyroidal D1 activity seems to be the main cause of the elevated T(3) concentrations observed in hyperthyroid patients. On the other hand, D1-deficient mouse models show that, in the absence of D1, inactive and lesser iodothyronines are excreted in feces with the loss of associated iodine, demonstrating the scavenging function for D1 that might be particularly important in an iodine deficiency setting. Polymorphisms in the DIO1 gene have been associated with changes in serum thyroid hormone levels, whereas decreased D1 activity has been reported in the nonthyroid illness syndrome and in several human neoplasias. The current review aims at presenting an updated picture of the recent advances made in the biochemical and molecular properties of D1 as well as its role in human physiology.

  10. Circadian and sleep-dependent regulation of hormone release in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeisler, C. A.; Klerman, E. B.

    1999-01-01

    Daily oscillations characterize the release of nearly every hormone. The circadian pacemaker, located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, generates circadian, approximately 24-hour rhythms in many physiologic functions. However, the observed hormonal oscillations do not simply reflect the output of this internal clock. Instead, daily hormonal profiles are the product of a complex interaction between the output of the circadian pacemaker, periodic changes in behavior, light exposure, neuroendocrine feedback mechanisms, gender, age, and the timing of sleep and wakefulness. The interaction of these factors can affect hormonal secretory pulse frequency and amplitude, with each endocrine system differentially affected by these factors. This chapter examines recent advances in understanding the effects on endocrine rhythms of a number of these factors. Sleep exerts a profound effect on endocrine secretion. Sleep is a dynamic process that is characterized by periodic changes in electrophysiologic activity. These electrophysiologic changes, which are used to mark the state and depth of sleep, are associated with periodic, short-term variations in hormonal levels. The secretion of hormones such as renin and human growth hormone are strongly influenced by sleep or wake state, while melatonin and cortisol levels are relatively unaffected by sleep or wake state. In addition, sleep is associated with changes in posture, behavior, and light exposure, each of which is known to affect endocrine secretion. Furthermore, the tight concordance of habitual sleep and wake times with certain circadian phases has made it difficult to distinguish sleep and circadian effects on these hormones. Specific protocols, designed to extract circadian and sleep information semi-independently, have been developed and have yielded important insights into the effects of these regulatory processes. These results may help to account for changes in endocrine rhythms observed in circadian

  11. Response of the growth plate of uremic rats to human growth hormone and corticosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P.F. Barbosa

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Children with chronic renal failure in general present growth retardation that is aggravated by corticosteroids. We describe here the effects of methylprednisolone (MP and recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH on the growth plate (GP of uremic rats. Uremia was induced by subtotal nephrectomy in 30-day-old rats, followed by 20 IU kg-1 day-1 rhGH (N = 7 or 3 mg kg-1 day-1 MP (N = 7 or 20 IU kg-1 day-1 rhGH + 3 mg kg-1 day-1 MP (N = 7 treatment for 10 days. Control rats with intact renal function were sham-operated and treated with 3 mg kg-1 day-1 MP (N = 7 or vehicle (N = 7. Uremic rats (N = 7 were used as untreated control animals. Structural alterations in the GP and the expression of anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA and anti-insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I by epiphyseal chondrocytes were evaluated. Uremic MP rats displayed a reduction in the proliferative zone height (59.08 ± 4.54 vs 68.07 ± 7.5 µm, P < 0.05 and modifications in the microarchitecture of the GP. MP and uremia had an additive inhibitory effect on the proliferative activity of GP chondrocytes, lowering the expression of PCNA (19.48 ± 11.13 vs 68.64 ± 7.9% in control, P < 0.0005 and IGF-I (58.53 ± 0.96 vs 84.78 ± 2.93% in control, P < 0.0001, that was counteracted by rhGH. These findings suggest that in uremic rats rhGH therapy improves longitudinal growth by increasing IGF-I synthesis in the GP and by stimulating chondrocyte proliferation.

  12. SDR-type human hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases involved in steroid hormone activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoqiu; Lukacik, Petra; Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Oppermann, Udo

    2007-02-01

    Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases catalyze the NAD(P)(H)-dependent oxidoreduction of hydroxyl and oxo-functions at distinct positions of steroid hormones. This reversible reaction constitutes an important pre-receptor control mechanism for nuclear receptor ligands of the androgen, estrogen and glucocorticoid classes, since the conversion "switches" between receptor ligands and their inactive metabolites. The major reversible activities found in mammals acting on steroid hormones comprise 3alpha-, 11beta- and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases, and for each group several distinct isozymes have been described. The enzymes differ in their expression pattern, nucleotide cofactor preference, steroid substrate specificity and subcellular localization, and thus constitute a complex system ensuring cell-specific adaptation and regulation of steroid hormone levels. Several isoforms constitute promising drug targets, of particular importance in cancer, metabolic diseases, neurodegeneration and immunity.

  13. Pseudotumor Cerebri in a Child with Idiopathic Growth Hormone Insufficiency Two Months after Initiation of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Loukianou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To report a rare case of pseudotumor cerebri (PTC in a child two months after receiving treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH and to emphasize the need of close collaboration between ophthalmologists and pediatric endocrinologists in monitoring children receiving rhGH. Methods. A 12-year-old boy with congenital hypothyroidism started treatment with rhGH on a dose of 1,5 mg/daily IM (4.5 IU daily. Eight weeks later, he was complaining of severe headache without any other accompanying symptoms. The child was further investigated with computed tomography scan and lumbar puncture. Results. Computed tomography scan showed normal ventricular size and lumbar puncture revealed an elevated opening pressure of 360 mm H2O. RhGH was discontinued and acetazolamide 250 mg per os twice daily was initiated. Eight weeks later, the papilledema was resolved. Conclusions. There appears to be a causal relationship between the initiation of treatment with rhGH and the development of PTC. All children receiving rhGH should have a complete ophthalmological examination if they report headache or visual disturbances shortly after the treatment. Discontinuation of rhGH and initiation of treatment with acetazolamide may be needed and regular follow-up examinations by an ophthalmologist should be recommended.

  14. Treatment of Turner's syndrome with recombinant human growth hormone (somatrem).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippe, B; Rosenfeld, R G; Hintz, R L; Johanson, A J; Frane, J; Sherman, B

    1988-01-01

    This report extends to 3 years the prospective study of the effects of somatrem alone or in combination with oxandrolone on growth in Turner's syndrome. Sixty-seven patients completed the 1-year study period during which all treatment groups had statistically increased height velocities as compared to the control group. Oral glucose tolerance and insulin responses remained unchanged after 1 year of somatrem treatment. The group receiving oxandrolone experienced an increase in integrated glucose response and the group receiving combined therapy an increase in both integrated glucose and insulin responses. During the second and third years the somatrem group remained on the same dose and treatment schedule and grew at mean velocities of 5.4 +/- 1.1 and 4.6 +/- 1.4 cm/year. The dose of oxandrolone was reduced by 50% during the second and third years for the combination group. The somatrem dose remained unchanged. This group had height velocities of 7.4 +/- 1.4 cm and 6.1 +/- 1.5 cm/year. The control group and the group treated with oxandrolone alone were converted to combined therapy at the lowered oxandrolone dose. Their growth rates during the second year were 8.3 +/- 1.2 and 7.1 +/- 1.6 cm/year, respectively. Using bone age determinations and the methods of Bayley and Pinneau, all groups currently show predicted increases in final adult height.

  15. Hormonal acceleration of song development illuminates motor control mechanism in canaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliende, Jorge A; Méndez, Jorge M; Goller, Franz; Mindlin, Gabriel B

    2010-12-01

    In songbirds, the ontogeny of singing behavior shows strong parallels with human speech learning. As in humans, development of learned vocal behavior requires exposure to an acoustic model of species-typical vocalizations, and, subsequently, a sensorimotor practice period after which the vocalization is produced in a stereotyped manner. This requires mastering motor instructions driving the vocal organ and the respiratory system. Recently, it was shown that, in the case of canaries (Serinus canaria), the diverse syllables, constituting the song, are generated with air sac pressure patterns with characteristic shapes, remarkably, those belonging to a very specific mathematical family. Here, we treated juvenile canaries with testosterone at the onset of the sensorimotor practice period. This hormone exposure accelerated the development of song into stereotyped adultlike song. After 20 days of testosterone treatment, subsyringeal air sac pressure patterns of song resembled those produced by adults, while those of untreated control birds of the same age did not. Detailed temporal structure and modulation patterns emerged rapidly with testosterone treatment, and all previously identified categories of adult song were observed. This research shows that the known effect of testosterone on the neural circuits gives rise to the stereotyped categories of respiratory motor gestures. Extensive practice of these motor patterns during the sensorimotor phase is not required for their expression. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Methionyl human growth hormone and oxandrolone in Turner syndrome: preliminary results of a prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, R G; Hintz, R L; Johanson, A J; Brasel, J A; Burstein, S; Chernausek, S D; Clabots, T; Frane, J; Gotlin, R W; Kuntze, J

    1986-12-01

    Seventy girls with Turner syndrome, 4 to 12 years of age, were randomly assigned to receive either no treatment (control) or methionyl human growth hormone (0.125 mg/kg three times per week), oxandrolone (0.125 mg/kg/day), or combination hGH plus oxandrolone therapy. Baseline growth rates averaged 4.3 cm/yr, and all were within 2 SD of mean growth velocity for age in girls with Turner syndrome. Sixty-seven girls remained in the study for a minimum of 1 year. Growth rates and growth velocity (in standard deviations for age in girls with Turner syndrome) were control 3.8 cm/yr (-0.1 SD), hGH 6.6 cm/yr (+2.3 SD), oxandrolone 7.9 cm/yr (+3.7 SD), and combination therapy 9.8 cm/yr (+5.4 SD). Mean bone ages advanced 1.0 years (hGH), 1.3 years (oxandrolone), and 1.6 years (combination). However, median increments in height age/bone age (delta HA/delta BA) ratios ranged from 1.0 to 1.1 for treatment groups, compared with 0.8 for the controls. Predicted adult height by the method of Bayley-Pinneau increased 2.5 cm for hGH or oxandrolone alone, and 3.2 cm for combination treatment. These data indicate that both hGH and oxandrolone can significantly stimulate short-term skeletal growth in patients with Turner syndrome, and potentially increase final adult height.

  17. Effects of recombinant human growth hormone for 1 year on body composition and muscle strength in children on long-term steroid therapy: randomized controlled, delayed-start study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Dominique; Alberti, Corinne; Alison, Marianne; Le Henaff, Loïc; Chevenne, Didier; Boizeau, Priscilla; Canal, Aurélie; Ollivier, Gwenn; Decostre, Valérie; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Carel, Jean-Claude; Czernichow, Paul; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2013-07-01

    Recombinant human GH (rhGH) improves growth and body composition in glucocorticoid-treated children. Its effects on muscle strength are poorly evaluated. Our objective was to evaluate rhGH effects on muscle strength in children receiving long-term glucocorticoid therapy; effects on height SD score (SDS) and body composition were assessed also. A randomized, controlled, delayed-start study of rhGH for 12 months was started after randomization (baseline) or 6 months later (M6). Patients included 30 children with various diagnoses. rhGH was administered at 0.065 mg/kg/d for 6 months and then in the dosage maintaining serum IGF-I levels below +2 SDS for chronological age. The primary criterion was the between-group difference in composite index of muscle strength (CIMS) change at M6. Secondary criteria included between-group differences in CIMS SDS(height), lean mass (LM), thigh muscle area (MA), and height SDS changes at M6; these parameters were also assessed in the overall population after 1 year of rhGH therapy. At M6, rhGH therapy did not significantly affect changes in CIMS or CIMS SDS(height) (+17.6% vs +7.5% and +0.14 ± 0.38 vs +0.11 ± 0.62, respectively); the rhGH-treated group had significantly larger changes in height SDS (+0.2 [0.3] vs -0.2 [0.3]; P = 0.003), LM (+7.3% [+3.7%; +21.6%] vs 0% [-4.7%; +3.2%]; P = 0.002), and MA (+8.8% [+5%; +15.6%] vs. -0.6% [-6.3%; +7.7%]; P = 0.01) compared with the untreated group. After 1 year of rhGH, height SDS, LM, and MA increased significantly, CIMS increased by 24.7% (+5.8%; +34.2%), and CIMS SDS(height) remained within the normal range. rhGH increased height, LM, and MA. However, muscle strength did not improve significantly.

  18. Efficient eradication of hormone-resistant human prostate cancers by inactivated Sendai virus particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Yoshifumi; Miyamoto, Yasuhide; Inoue, Takehiro; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2009-05-15

    Hormone-refractory prostate cancer is one of the intractable human cancers in the world. Here, we examined the direct tumor-killing activity of inactivated Sendai virus particle [hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E)] through induction of Type I interferon (IFN) in the hormone-resistant human prostate cancer cell lines PC3 and DU145. Preferential binding of HVJ-E to PC3 and DU145 over hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cell and normal prostate epithelium was observed, resulting in a number of fused cells. After HVJ-E treatment, a number of IFN-related genes were up-regulated, resulting in Type I IFN production in PC3 cells. Then, retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) helicase which activates Type I IFN expression after Sendai virus infection was up-regulated in cancer cells after HVJ-E treatment. Produced IFN-alpha and -beta enhanced caspase 8 expression via Janus kinases/Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription pathway, activated caspase 3 and induced apoptosis in cancer cells. When HVJ-E was directly injected into a mass of PC3 tumor cells in SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice, a marked reduction in the bulk of each tumor mass was observed and 85% of the mice became tumor-free. Although co-injection of an anti-asialo GM1 antibody with HVJ-E into each tumor mass slightly attenuated the tumor suppressive activity of HVJ-E, significant suppression of tumor growth was observed even in the presence of anti-asialo GM1 antibody. This suggests that natural killer cell activation made small contribution to tumor regression following HVJ-E treatment in hormone-resistant prostate cancer model in vivo. Thus, HVJ-E effectively targets hormone-resistant prostate cancer by inducing apoptosis in tumor cells, as well as activating anti-tumor immunity. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Free Access to Running Wheels Abolishes Hyperphagia in Human Growth Hormone Transgenic Rats

    OpenAIRE

    KOMATSUDA, Mugiko; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Matsuwaki, Takashi; Nishihara, Masugi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Obesity is a major health problem, and increased food intake and decreased physical activity are considered as two major factors causing obesity. Previous studies show that voluntary exercise in a running wheel decreases not only body weight but also food intake of rats. We previously produced human growth hormone transgenic (TG) rats, which are characterized by severe hyperphagia and obesity. To gain more insight into the effects on physical activity to food consumption and obesity,...

  20. Hypoxia-Related Hormonal Appetite Modulation in Humans during Rest and Exercise: Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadej Debevec

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with numerous chronic ailments and represents one of the major health and economic issues in the modernized societies. Accordingly, there is an obvious need for novel treatment approaches. Recently, based on the reports of reduced appetite and subsequent weight loss following high-altitude sojourns, exposure to hypoxia has been proposed as a viable weight-reduction strategy. While altitude-related appetite modulation is complex and not entirely clear, hypoxia-induced alterations in hormonal appetite modulation might be among the key underlying mechanisms. The present paper summarizes the up-to-date research on hypoxia/altitude-induced changes in the gut and adipose tissue derived peptides related to appetite regulation. Orexigenic hormone ghrelin and anorexigenic peptides leptin, glucagon-like peptide-1, peptide YY, and cholecystokinin have to-date been investigated as potential modulators of hypoxia-driven appetite alterations. Current evidence suggests that hypoxia can, especially acutely, lead to decreased appetite, most probably via reduction of acylated ghrelin concentration. Hypoxia-related short and long-term changes in other hormonal markers are more unclear although hypoxia seems to importantly modulate leptin levels, especially following prolonged hypoxic exposures. Limited evidence also suggests that different activity levels during exposures to hypoxia do not additively affect hormonal appetite markers. Although very few studies have been performed in obese/overweight individuals, the available data indicate that hypoxia/altitude exposures do not seem to differentially affect appetite regulation via hormonal pathways in this cohort. Given the lack of experimental data, future well-controlled acute and prolonged studies are warranted to expand our understanding of hypoxia-induced hormonal appetite modulation and its kinetics in health and disease.

  1. Pancreatic β-Cells Express the Fetal Islet Hormone Gastrin in Rodent and Human Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Tehila; Ziv, Oren; Horwitz, Elad; Zemmour, Hai; Lavi, Judith; Swisa, Avital; Leibowitz, Gil; Ashcroft, Frances M; In't Veld, Peter; Glaser, Benjamin; Dor, Yuval

    2017-02-01

    β-Cell failure in type 2 diabetes (T2D) was recently proposed to involve dedifferentiation of β-cells and ectopic expression of other islet hormones, including somatostatin and glucagon. Here we show that gastrin, a stomach hormone typically expressed in the pancreas only during embryogenesis, is expressed in islets of diabetic rodents and humans with T2D. Although gastrin in mice is expressed in insulin+ cells, gastrin expression in humans with T2D occurs in both insulin+ and somatostatin+ cells. Genetic lineage tracing in mice indicates that gastrin expression is turned on in a subset of differentiated β-cells after exposure to severe hyperglycemia. Gastrin expression in adult β-cells does not involve the endocrine progenitor cell regulator neurogenin3 but requires membrane depolarization, calcium influx, and calcineurin signaling. In vivo and in vitro experiments show that gastrin expression is rapidly eliminated upon exposure of β-cells to normal glucose levels. These results reveal the fetal hormone gastrin as a novel marker for reversible human β-cell reprogramming in diabetes. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  2. Derivation of Diverse Hormone-Releasing Pituitary Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastian Zimmer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs provide an unlimited cell source for regenerative medicine. Hormone-producing cells are particularly suitable for cell therapy, and hypopituitarism, a defect in pituitary gland function, represents a promising therapeutic target. Previous studies have derived pituitary lineages from mouse and human ESCs using 3D organoid cultures that mimic the complex events underlying pituitary gland development in vivo. Instead of relying on unknown cellular signals, we present a simple and efficient strategy to derive human pituitary lineages from hPSCs using monolayer culture conditions suitable for cell manufacturing. We demonstrate that purified placode cells can be directed into pituitary fates using defined signals. hPSC-derived pituitary cells show basal and stimulus-induced hormone release in vitro and engraftment and hormone release in vivo after transplantation into a murine model of hypopituitarism. This work lays the foundation for future cell therapy applications in patients with hypopituitarism.

  3. Evaluation of potential infectivity of Alzheimer and Parkinson disease proteins in recipients of cadaver-derived human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, David J; Abrams, Joseph Y; Schonberger, Lawrence B; Leschek, Ellen Werber; Mills, James L; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2013-04-01

    Growing evidence of cell-to-cell transmission of neurodegenerative disease (ND)-associated proteins (NDAPs) (ie, tau, Aβ, and α-synuclein) suggests possible similarities to the infectious prion protein (PrPsc) in spongiform encephalopathies. There are limited data on the potential human-to-human transmission of NDAPs associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) and other non-PrPsc ND. To examine evidence for human-to-human transmission of AD, Parkinson disease (PD), and related NDAPs in cadaveric human growth hormone (c-hGH) recipients. We conducted a detailed immunohistochemical analysis of pathological NDAPs other than PrPsc in human pituitary glands. We also searched for ND in recipients of pituitary-derived c-hGH by reviewing the National Hormone and Pituitary Program (NHPP) cohort database and medical literature. University-based academic center and agencies of the US Department of Health and Human Services. Thirty-four routine autopsy subjects (10 non-ND controls and 24 patients with ND) and a US cohort of c-hGH recipients in the NHPP. Detectable NDAPs in human pituitary sections and death certificate reports of non-PrPsc ND in the NHPP database. We found mild amounts of pathological tau, Aβ, and α-synuclein deposits in the adeno/neurohypophysis of patients with ND and control patients. No cases of AD or PD were identified, and 3 deaths attributed to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) were found among US NHPP c-hGH recipients, including 2 of the 796 decedents in the originally confirmed NHPP c-hGH cohort database. Despite the likely frequent exposure of c-hGH recipients to NDAPs, and their markedly elevated risk of PrPsc-related disease, this population of NHPP c-hGH recipients does not appear to be at increased risk of AD or PD. We discovered 3 ALS cases of unclear significance among US c-hGH recipients despite the absence of pathological deposits of ALS-associated proteins (TDP-43, FUS, and ubiquilin) in human pituitary glands. In this unique in vivo model

  4. Health-Related Quality of Life of Young Adults Treated with Recombinant Human Growth Hormone during Childhood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grit Sommer

    Full Text Available Since recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH became available in 1985, the spectrum of indications has broadened and the number of treated patients increased. However, long-term health-related quality of life (HRQoL after childhood rhGH treatment has rarely been documented. We assessed HRQoL and its determinants in young adults treated with rhGH during childhood.For this study, we retrospectively identified former rhGH patients in 11 centers of paediatric endocrinology, including university hospitals and private practices. We sent a questionnaire to all patients treated with rhGH for any diagnosis, who were older than 18 years, and who resided in Switzerland at time of the survey. Three hundred participants (58% of 514 eligible returned the questionnaire. Mean age was 23 years; 56% were women; 43% had isolated growth hormone deficiency, or idiopathic short stature; 43% had associated diseases or syndromes, and 14% had growth hormone deficiency after childhood cancer. Swiss siblings of childhood cancer survivors and the German norm population served as comparison groups. HRQoL was assessed using the Short Form-36. We found that the Physical Component Summary of healthy patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency or idiopathic short stature resembled that of the control group (53.8 vs. 54.9. Patients with associated diseases or syndromes scored slightly lower (52.5, and former cancer patients scored lowest (42.6. The Mental Component Summary was similar for all groups. Lower Physical Component Summary was associated with lower educational level (coeff. -1.9. Final height was not associated with HRQoL.In conclusion, HRQoL after treatment with rhGH in childhood depended mainly on the underlying indication for rhGH treatment. Patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency/idiopathic short stature or patients with associated diseases or syndromes had HRQoL comparable to peers. Patients with growth hormone deficiency after childhood cancer were

  5. Recombinant human growth hormone treatment in short children with renal disease: Our first experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasojević-Dimitrijeva Brankica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Growth retardation is a hallmark of chronic illnesses such as chronic kidney disease in children, and it is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The growth hormone (GH resistance observed in uraemia can be overcome by supraphysiological doses of exogenous GH. Objective. We would like to present our first results of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH treatment, mainly in children on haemodialysis. Methods. Sixteen children, aged 4.5-17.1 years (mean age 11.25±3.57 with height below -2.0 standard deviation score (SDS for age or height velocity below -2.0 SDS for age, were selected to receive rhGH therapy at our Nephrology and Haemodialysis Department. Most of them were on haemodialysis (14 children with mean spent time 2.88±2.68 years (0-9 years before the initiation of rhGH therapy. One half of patients were prepubertal (8 children and the second half were in early puberty (testicular volume between 4 and 8 ml for boys and breast development B2 or B3 in girls. All patients received 28-30IU/m² rhGH per week by daily subcutaneous injection. The year before rhGH therapy served as a control period. Results. During the first year of treatment, mean height velocity in haemodialysis patients increased from 2.25 cm/year to 6.59 cm/year (p<0.0001 and in the second year it was 5.25 cm/ year (p=0.004. The mean height SDS in haemodialysis children did not improve significantly during the first year of rhGH treatment (from -3.01 SDS to -2.77 SDS, p=0.063. Neither weight nor the body mass index varied compared with the pretreatment period. Two patients developed worsened secondary hyperparathyroidism and were excluded from the study, but the relationship with rhGH remains uncertain. Conclusion. Mean height velocity significantly improved during rhGH therapy in haemodialysis patients. No significant side-effects were observed in children during three-year treatment with GH.

  6. Understanding the multifactorial control of growth hormone release by somatotropes: lessons from comparative endocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahete, Manuel D; Durán-Prado, Mario; Luque, Raúl M; Martínez-Fuentes, Antonio J; Quintero, Ana; Gutiérrez-Pascual, Ester; Córdoba-Chacón, José; Malagón, María M; Gracia-Navarro, Francisco; Castaño, Justo P

    2009-04-01

    Control of postnatal growth is the main, but not the only, role for growth hormone (GH) as this hormone also contributes to regulating metabolism, reproduction, immunity, development, and osmoregulation in different species. Likely owing to this variety of group-specific functions, GH production is differentially regulated across vertebrates, with an apparent evolutionary trend to simplification, especially in the number of stimulatory factors governing substantially GH release. Thus, teleosts exhibit a multifactorial regulation of GH secretion, with a number of factors, from the newly discovered fish GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) to pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) but also gonadotropin-releasing hormone, dopamine, corticotropin-releasing hormone, and somatostatin(s) directly controlling somatotropes. In amphibians and reptiles, GH secretion is primarily stimulated by the major hypothalamic peptides GHRH and PACAP and inhibited by somatostatin(s), while other factors (ghrelin, thyrotropin-releasing hormone) also influence GH release. Finally, in birds and mammals, primary control of GH secretion is exerted by a dual interplay between GHRH and somatostatin. In addition, somatotrope function is modulated by additional hypothalamic and peripheral factors (e.g., ghrelin, leptin, insulin-like growth factor-I), which together enable a balanced integration of feedback signals related to processes in which GH plays a relevant regulatory role, such as metabolic and energy status, reproductive, and immune function. Interestingly, in contrast to the high number of stimulatory factors impinging upon somatotropes, somatostatin(s) stand(s) as the main primary inhibitory regulator(s) for this cell type.

  7. Associations between brominated flame retardants in human milk and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggesbø, Merete; Thomsen, Cathrine; Jørgensen, Jens V; Becher, Georg; Odland, Jon Øyvind; Longnecker, Matthew P

    2011-08-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have been in widespread use in a vast array of consumer products since the 1970s. The metabolites of some BFRs show a structural similarity to thyroid hormones and experimental animal studies have confirmed that they may interfere with thyroid hormone homeostasis. A major concern has been whether intrauterine exposure to BFRs may disturb thyroid homeostasis since the fetal brain is particularly susceptible to alterations in thyroid hormones. However, few reports on newborns have been published to date. To evaluate the association between BFRs and neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). We studied six polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) measured in milk samples from 239 women who were part of the "Norwegian Human Milk Study" (HUMIS), 2003-2006. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and BDE-209 were measured in a subset of the women (193 and 46 milk samples, respectively). The milk was sampled at a median of 33 days after delivery. TSH was measured in babies three days after delivery as part of the routine national screening program for early detection of congenital hypothyroidism. Additional information was obtained through the Medical Birth Registry and questionnaires to the mothers. The PBDE concentrations in human milk in Norway were comparable to concentrations reported from other European countries and Asia, but not the US and Canada where levels are approximately one order of higher magnitude. We observed no statistically significant associations between BDE-47, 99, 153, 154, 209 and HBCD in human milk and TSH in models adjusted for possible confounders and other environmental toxicants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). We did not observe an association between TSH and exposure to HBCD and PBDEs within the exposure levels observed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Male hormonal contraception: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mommers, E.; Kersemaekers, W.M.; Elliesen, J.; Kepers, M.; Apter, D.; Behre, H.M.; Beynon, J.; Bouloux, P.M.; Costantino, A.; Gerbershagen, H.P.; Gronlund, L.; Heger-Mahn, D.; Huhtaniemi, I.; Koldewijn, E.L.; Lange, C.; Lindenberg, S.; Meriggiola, M.C.; Meuleman, E.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Nieschlag, E.; Perheentupa, A.; Solomon, A.; Vaisala, L.; Wu, F.C.; Zitzmann, M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was performed to assess spermatogenesis suppression and safety of a new combination of an etonogestrel (ENG) implant combined with testosterone undecanoate (TU) injections for male contraception. This is the first large placebo-controlled study for male hormonal contraception.

  9. Human breast milk contamination with phthalates and alterations of endogenous reproductive hormones in infants three months of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Main, Katharina M; Mortensen, Gerda Krog; Kaleva, Marko M

    2006-01-01

    Phthalates adversely affect the male reproductive system in animals. We investigated whether phthalate monoester contamination of human breast milk had any influence on the postnatal surge of reproductive hormones in newborn boys as a sign of testicular dysgenesis....

  10. Menstrual cycle-dependent neural plasticity in the adult human brain is hormone, task, and region specific.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez, G.S.E.; Weis, S.; Stoffel-Wagner, B.; Tendolkar, I.; Reuber, M.; Beyenburg, S.; Klaver, P.; Fell, J.; Greiff, A. de; Ruhlmann, J.; Reul, J.; Elger, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    In rodents, cyclically fluctuating levels of gonadal steroid hormones modulate neural plasticity by altering synaptic transmission and synaptogenesis. Alterations of mood and cognition observed during the menstrual cycle suggest that steroid-related plasticity also occurs in humans. Cycle

  11. Growth hormone used to control intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Xia, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Zheng-Sen; Lu, Xin-Liang

    2015-08-21

    Intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis is rare. We describe a 69-year-old man with intractable hemorrhagic gastritis induced by postoperative radiotherapy for the treatment of esophageal carcinoma. Although anti-secretory therapy with or without octreotide was initiated for hemostasis over three months, melena still occurred off and on, and the patient required blood transfusions to maintain stable hemoglobin. Finally growth hormone was used in the treatment of hemorrhage for two weeks, and hemostasis was successfully achieved. This is the first report that growth hormone has been used to control intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis.

  12. Quantitative Assessment of Female Sexual Motivation in the Rat: Hormonal Control of Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Jennifer A.; Becker, Jill B.

    2011-01-01

    While a good deal of information has been garnered in the last few decades regarding the neural and hormonal control of female sexual behavior, literature elucidating these mechanisms with respect to female sexual motivation has been scarce. We believe that one reason for this is the lack of a standardized paradigm that will quantify female sexual motivation while allowing for sexual interaction to occur. Here we describe a two-chambered apparatus that utilizes operant responding (nose poking) to quantify female sexual motivation. During the test, the female exhibits nose pokes to gain access to a sexually active male, with whom she is allowed to mate. Therefore, this apparatus allows for examination of sexual behavior as well as quantification of sexual motivation by assessing the number of nose pokes the female will exhibit within a fixed interval to gain access to the male. We report that hormone priming significantly increases sexual motivation in the female as indicated by the number of nose pokes she will exhibit to gain access to the male. Additionally, hormone primed females enter the male compartment after a shorter period and spend more time in direct contact with the male compared to when they are not hormone primed. In contrast, when females are not hormone primed they spend more time in view, but out of reach, of the male. This paradigm will help to advance the study of female sexual motivation, providing a method for quantifiable assessment of female sexual motivation while allowing for sexual activity to occur. PMID:22120688

  13. Multiple hormonal control of enzyme synthesis in liver and hepatoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenney, F.T.; Lee, K.L.; Pomato, N.; Nickol, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    Synthesis of hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase is accelerated in vivo by either of the pancreatic hormones, insulin and glucagon as well as by glucocorticoids, and glucagon acts via the intracellular mediator, cyclic AMP. The mechanisms responsive to these hormones have also been retained in cultured hepatoma cells: in H-35 cells the responses appear to be essentially identical to those in liver, especially in that each inducer can act independently of the others. In this paper we describe recent analyses of the cellular mechanisms involved in this multiple hormonal control of synthesis of a single enzyme. These experiments have been done with rat liver in vivo, owing to a need for larger quantities of cellular components that can readily be obtained from cultured cells. As some of these results appear to be at variance in important respects with those of earlier analyses carried out in H-35 cells, we briefly review these earlier experiments as well.

  14. Human breast milk contamination with phthalates and alterations of endogenous reproductive hormones in infants three months of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Main, Katharina M; Mortensen, Gerda Krog; Kaleva, Marko M

    2006-01-01

    Phthalates adversely affect the male reproductive system in animals. We investigated whether phthalate monoester contamination of human breast milk had any influence on the postnatal surge of reproductive hormones in newborn boys as a sign of testicular dysgenesis.......Phthalates adversely affect the male reproductive system in animals. We investigated whether phthalate monoester contamination of human breast milk had any influence on the postnatal surge of reproductive hormones in newborn boys as a sign of testicular dysgenesis....

  15. The effect of hormone replacement therapy on serum homocysteine levels in perimenopausal women : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hak, AE; Bak, AAA; Lindemans, J; Planellas, J; Bennink, HJTC; Hofman, A; Grobbee, DE; Witteman, JCM

    2001-01-01

    Serum homocysteine levels may be lowered by hormone replacement therapy, but randomized controlled trial data are scarce. We performed a single center randomized placebo-controlled trial to assess the 6 months effect of hormone replacement therapy compared with placebo on fasting serum homocysteine

  16. Effect of long term glucocorticoid treatment on human growth hormone secretion in children and adolescents and the safety and effectiveness of recombinant human growth hormone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Li; Dian-Chi, Zhang; Qi-Yong, Wu; Hui-Juan, Zhu; Feng-Yang, Gong; Hui, Pan; Zi-meng, Jin; Jie-ying, Deng; Yi-fan, Shi

    2011-02-01

    Long term glucocorticoid (prednisolone) treatment on human growth hormone (hGH) secretion in children and adolescents and to investigate the effectiveness and safety of the recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) treatment. Twelve patients (age: 10.4∓1.2 years) who were treated in Peking Union Medical College Hospital from September 1999 to November 2009 were enrolled in this study. All of them had taken prednisolone with a dose of 0.5∓2.0 mg/(kg.d) for 6~18 months. Two different hGH stimulating tests was done and their growth and development was evaluated at regular intervals. Seven patients were given rhGH with a dose of 0.1 U/(kg.d) for 6~12 months to improve their growth and development after half a year of prednisolone withdrawal when their disease conditions were improved. The growth speed of these 12 children decreased significantly during prednisolone treatment compared with before prednisolone treatment (1.2∓0.3cm/year vs.3.7∓1.2 cm/year,P12 months than those with a 6~12 months course (P0.05). The growth speed of seven children who received rhGH therapy for half a year were increased from 2.2∓0.1cm/year to 7.8∓0.5cm/year (Pgrowth and development in these children after their primary diseases are improved and glucocorticoids are withdrawn.

  17. Development of a localized surface plasmon resonance-based gold nanobiosensor for the determination of prolactin hormone in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faridli, Zahra; Mahani, Mohamad; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud; Fasihi, Javad

    2016-02-15

    A localized surface plasmon resonance immunoassay has been developed to determine prolactin hormone in human serum samples. Gold nanoparticles were synthesized, and the probe was prepared by electrostatic adsorption of antibody on the surfaces of gold nanoparticles. The pH and the antibody-to-gold nanoparticle ratio, as the factors affecting the probe functions, were optimized. The constructed nanobiosensor was characterized by dynamic light scattering. The sensor was applied for the determination of prolactin antigen concentration based on the amount of localized surface plasmon resonance peak shift. A linear dynamic range of 1-40 ng ml(-1), a detection limit of 0.8 ng ml(-1), and sensitivity of 10 pg ml(-1) were obtained. Finally, the nanobiosensor was applied for the determination of prolactin in human control serum sample. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cephalic phase secretion of insulin and other enteropancreatic hormones in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veedfald, Simon; Plamboeck, Astrid; Deacon, Carolyn F

    2016-01-01

    Enteropancreatic hormone secretion is thought to include a cephalic phase, but the evidence in humans is ambiguous. We studied vagally induced gut hormone responses with and without muscarinic blockade in 10 glucose-clamped healthy men (age: 24.5 ± 0.6 yr, means ± SE; body mass index: 24.0 ± 0.5 kg...... and abolished the MSF response. Neither insulin, C-peptide, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), nor glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels changed in response to MSF or atropine. Glucagon and ghrelin levels were markedly attenuated by atropine prior to and during the clamp: at t = 105 min...... and 3.7 ± 21 pg/ml (means ± SE), P insulin, glucagon, GLP-1, GIP, and ghrelin....

  19. Disorders of sex development expose transcriptional autonomy of genetic sex and androgen-programmed hormonal sex in human blood leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holterhus, Paul-Martin; Bebermeier, Jan-Hendrik; Werner, Ralf; Demeter, Janos; Richter-Unruh, Annette; Cario, Gunnar; Appari, Mahesh; Siebert, Reiner; Riepe, Felix; Brooks, James D; Hiort, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Background Gender appears to be determined by independent programs controlled by the sex-chromosomes and by androgen-dependent programming during embryonic development. To enable experimental dissection of these components in the human, we performed genome-wide profiling of the transcriptomes of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in patients with rare defined "disorders of sex development" (DSD, e.g., 46, XY-females due to defective androgen biosynthesis) compared to normal 46, XY-males and 46, XX-females. Results A discrete set of transcripts was directly correlated with XY or XX genotypes in all individuals independent of male or female phenotype of the external genitalia. However, a significantly larger gene set in the PBMC only reflected the degree of external genital masculinization independent of the sex chromosomes and independent of concurrent post-natal sex steroid hormone levels. Consequently, the architecture of the transcriptional PBMC-"sexes" was either male, female or even "intersex" with a discordant alignment of the DSD individuals' genetic and hormonal sex signatures. Conclusion A significant fraction of gene expression differences between males and females in the human appears to have its roots in early embryogenesis and is not only caused by sex chromosomes but also by long-term sex-specific hormonal programming due to presence or absence of androgen during the time of external genital masculinization. Genetic sex and the androgen milieu during embryonic development might therefore independently modulate functional traits, phenotype and diseases associated with male or female gender as well as with DSD conditions. PMID:19570224

  20. A connection between extracellular matrix and hormonal signals during the development of the human fetal adrenal gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Chamoux

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The human adrenal cortex, involved in adaptive responses to stress, body homeostasis and secondary sexual characters, emerges from a tightly regulated development of a zone-specific secretion pattern during fetal life. Its development during fetal life is critical for the well being of pregnancy, the initiation of delivery, and even for an adequate adaptation to extra-uterine life. As early as from the sixth week of pregnancy, the fetal adrenal gland is characterized by a highly proliferative zone at the periphery, a concentric migration accompanied by cell differentiation (cortisol secretion and apoptosis in the central androgen-secreting fetal zone. After birth, a strong reorganization occurs in the adrenal gland so that it better fulfills the newborn's needs, with aldosterone production in the external zona glomerulosa, cortisol secretion in the zona fasciculata and androgens in the central zona reticularis. In addition to the major hormonal stimuli provided by angiotensin II and adrenocorticotropin, we have tested for some years the hypotheses that such plasticity may be under the control of the extracellular matrix. A growing number of data have been harvested during the last years, in particular about extracellular matrix expression and its putative role in the development of the human adrenal cortex. Laminin, collagen and fibronectin have been shown to play important roles not only in the plasticity of the adrenal cortex, but also in cell responsiveness to hormones, thus clarifying some of the unexplained observations that used to feed controversies.

  1. A connection between extracellular matrix and hormonal signals during the development of the human fetal adrenal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoux, E; Otis, M; Gallo-Payet, N

    2005-10-01

    The human adrenal cortex, involved in adaptive responses to stress, body homeostasis and secondary sexual characters, emerges from a tightly regulated development of a zone-specific secretion pattern during fetal life. Its development during fetal life is critical for the well being of pregnancy, the initiation of delivery, and even for an adequate adaptation to extra-uterine life. As early as from the sixth week of pregnancy, the fetal adrenal gland is characterized by a highly proliferative zone at the periphery, a concentric migration accompanied by cell differentiation (cortisol secretion) and apoptosis in the central androgen-secreting fetal zone. After birth, a strong reorganization occurs in the adrenal gland so that it better fulfills the newborn's needs, with aldosterone production in the external zona glomerulosa, cortisol secretion in the zona fasciculata and androgens in the central zona reticularis. In addition to the major hormonal stimuli provided by angiotensin II and adrenocorticotropin, we have tested for some years the hypotheses that such plasticity may be under the control of the extracellular matrix. A growing number of data have been harvested during the last years, in particular about extracellular matrix expression and its putative role in the development of the human adrenal cortex. Laminin, collagen and fibronectin have been shown to play important roles not only in the plasticity of the adrenal cortex, but also in cell responsiveness to hormones, thus clarifying some of the unexplained observations that used to feed controversies.

  2. Human growth hormone and gonadotropin releasing hormone analog combination therapy increases predicted height in short normal girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniati-Christidi, M; Livadas, S; Voutetakis, A; Tolis, G; Dacou-Voutetakis, C

    2003-01-01

    The "short normal" child constitutes a real challenge for the pediatric endocrinologist. In a subgroup of short normal children, puberty starts at a normal age but with low height, and hence, the final height is expected to be quite compromised. Efforts to improve the outcome in this group have been made in the past with equivocal results. We present the growth data of 8 short girls with normal growth hormone values on provocative testing and low height at puberty initiation. At intervention the height and the stage of puberty were 129.3 +/- 5 cm and II to III, respectively, and the predicted height was 148.8 +/- 2.6 cm. Gonadotropin releasing hormone analog, triptorelin (3.6 +/- 0.5 microg/kg/day) and growth hormone (0.5 IU/kg/week) were used in different sequential order and simultaneously in each child. The mean total treatment period was 47.6 +/- 11.2 months. The mean predicted and the mean final height in the total group were 148.8 +/- 2.6 and 154.5 +/- 3.6 cm, respectively (p:0.028). The final height did not differ from the target height (154.8 +/- 8 cm versus 154.5 +/- 3.6 cm), while in 4 children, the final height was greater than the target height. The height gain (delta Final height - Predicted height) was 5.7 +/- 1.3 cm. If we analyze separately the girls in whom growth hormone was started first and gonadotropin releasing hormone analog followed versus those who started the analog first, the delta Final height - Predicted height was 8 +/- 3 cm in the former and 4.8 +/- 3.1 cm in the latter (p:0.03). It seemed that the difference was accounted for by duration of growth hormone therapy (51.3 +/- 10.6 months versus 28.6 +/- 10.6 months) (p:0.026), rather than by other factors. In conclusion, under the conditions of the present study, the combination of puberty arrest and growth hormone therapy significantly improved predicted height. The most significant determinant of the height gain was the duration of growth hormone therapy.

  3. Effects of human growth hormone on the catabolic state after surgical trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vara-Thorbeck, R; Ruiz-Requena, E; Guerrero-Fernández, J A

    1996-01-01

    The aims of our studies were: (1) to determine if the protein catabolic response after a major or moderate surgical trauma can be restrained by the administration of exogenous human growth hormone (hGH); (2) to determine if the administration of hGH can improve systemic host defenses, thus reducing the risk of infection, and (3) given that the postoperative fatigue syndrome (POF) is mediated by the endocrino-metabolic response to surgery we attempt to determine if the administration of hGH can prevent or reduce POF. Therefore, we performed three placebo-controlled randomized double-blind trials on 216 patients. Major gastrointestinal surgery was treated only with total parenteral nutrition (TPN; n = 20) or TPN plus 4 IU hGH (n = 18). Patients with moderate surgical trauma received either hypocaloric parenteral nutrition (HPN; n = 93) or HPN and 8 IU hGH (n = 87). In this study, we also determined the evolution of the systemic host defenses and thereby the risk of infection. In 48 patients who underwent cholecystectomy treated (n = 26) either with HPN or HPN plus 8 IU hGH, we measured the protein catabolic response, postoperative fatigue and anthropometric modifications. The treatment with hGH together with HPN or TPN (1) overcomes the protein catabolic effects of the trauma response induced by major or moderate surgery by increasing protein synthesis, (2) improves humoral and cellular systemic host defenses, thus reducing the risk of infection, (3) preserves or increases lean body mass and reduces adipose tissue and (4) minimizes POF.

  4. Growth of human prostate carcinomas with and without hormone alpha- dehydrotestosterone in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baisch, H; Otto, U; Fack, H

    1998-12-01

    The dependence of human prostate carcinoma growth on hormone was studied in xenotransplants in nude mice. The objective was to determine differences in cell kinetic parameters and volume growth of tumors growing with alpha-dehydrotestosterone (alphaDHT) and without alphaDHT. These differences could be used as arguments pro and contra the adaptation versus the clonal selection hypothesis. Human prostate carcinomas were xenotransplanted into nude mice. Growth of tumors was observed in castrated male mice without and with implanted osmotic pumps secreting alphaDHT. In a further series of experiments the alphaDHT tubes were removed when the tumors had reached a volume of 0.3 cm3. Tumor volume was measured to determine tumor doubling time with and without alphaDHT. Detailed cell kinetics were analyzed using the bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) method with flow cytometry. Applying the relative movement (RM) and a simulation analysis to parallel single and multiple BrdUrd labelling experimental data we determined transit times through the phases of cell cycle, potential doubling time Tpot, growth fraction (GF) and cell loss. Five human prostate carcinomas were xenotransplanted into nude mice. Tumor take was only achieved when androgen hormone was present. However, when alphaDHT was removed when the tumors had grown to a volume of 0.3 cm3, they continued to grow at nearly the same Td as those tumors with continued alphaDHT application. The BrdUrd experiments, on the other hand, showed considerable increase of Tc and Tpot upon withdrawal of alphaDHT in 4 out of 5 tumors. The GF and labelling index (LI) were maintained at about the same level as alphaDHT consuming tumors. While small transplanted tumor pieces do not grow without alphaDHT, larger tumors grow with the same Td after removal of alphaDHT. The slower proliferation shown by the increased Tc and Tpot is balanced by less cell loss. Since GF and LI were maintained at about the same level, we conclude that in our tumors the

  5. Steroid hormones for contraception in men: systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, David A; Gallo, Maria F; Grigorieva, Vera; Nanda, Kavita; Schulz, Kenneth F

    2005-02-01

    Male hormonal contraception has been an elusive goal. Administration of sex steroids to men can shut off sperm production through effects on the pituitary and hypothalamus. However, this approach also decreases production of testosterone, so an "add-back" therapy is needed. We conducted a systematic review of all randomized controlled trials of male hormonal contraception and azoospermia. Few significant differences emerged from these trials. Levonorgestrel implants combined with injectable testosterone enanthate (100 mg im) were significantly more effective than was levonorgestrel 125 microg po daily combined with testosterone patches [10 mg/d; odds ratio (OR) for azoospermia with the oral levonorgestrel regimen, 0.03; 95% CI, 0.00-0.29]. The addition of levonorgestrel 500 microg po daily improved the effectiveness of testosterone enanthate 100 mg im weekly by itself (OR for azoospermia with the combined regimen, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.00-15.99). Several regimens, including testosterone alone and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists and antagonists, had disappointing results. In conclusion, no male hormonal contraceptive is ready for clinical use. All trials published to date have been small exploratory studies. As a result, their power to detect important differences has been limited and their results have been imprecise. In addition, the definition of oligospermia has been imprecise or inconsistent in many reports. To avoid bias, future trials need to pay more attention on the methodological requirements for randomized controlled trials. Trials with adequate power would also be helpful.

  6. Temporal organization: A novel mechanism of hormonal control of male-typical sexual behavior in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schořálková, Tereza; Kratochvíl, Lukáš; Kubička, Lukáš

    2017-03-01

    In vertebrates, male-typical sexual behavior (MSB) is largely controlled by gonadal androgens, however, the mechanism of this control is believed to vary among species. During immediate activation MSB is tightly correlated with circulating levels of androgens, while the organization of MSB by a hormonal event at a specific developmental period, early in ontogeny or during puberty, has been postulated in other lineages. Here, we put forward an alternative concept of "temporal organization". Under temporal organization longer exposure to circulating androgens is needed for the onset of MSB, which can continue for a long time after the levels of these hormones drop. We tested this concept through long-term monitoring of MSB in females and castrated males of the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius) in response to experimental changes in testosterone levels. Several weeks of elevated testosterone levels were needed for the full expression of MSB in both treatment groups and MSB diminished only slowly and gradually after the supplementation of exogenous testosterone ended. Moreover, despite receiving the same application of the hormone both the progressive onset and the cessation of MSB were significantly slower in experimental females than in castrated males. We suggest that the concept of temporal organization of MSB can parsimoniously explain several earlier discrepancies and debatable conclusions on the apparent variability in the hormonal control of MSB in vertebrates, which were based on behavioral testing at a few subjectively selected time points. We conclude that long-term and continuous behavioral testing after hormonal manipulations is needed to understand the regulation of MSB in vertebrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Human longevity is characterised by high thyroid stimulating hormone secretion without altered energy metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, S W; Akintola, A A; Roelfsema, F

    2015-01-01

    hormone (TH) in an inverse relationship. Greater longevity has been associated with higher TSH and lower TH levels, but mechanisms underlying TSH/TH differences and longevity remain unknown. The HPT axis plays a pivotal role in growth, development and energy metabolism. We report that offspring...... of nonagenarians with at least one nonagenarian sibling have increased TSH secretion but similar bioactivity of TSH and similar TH levels compared to controls. Healthy offspring and spousal controls had similar resting metabolic rate and core body temperature. We propose that pleiotropic effects of the HPT axis...... may favour longevity without altering energy metabolism....

  8. The structure and organization of the human follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gromoll, J; Pekel, E.; Nieschlag, E. [Institute of Reproductive Medicine of the Univ., Muenster (Germany)

    1996-07-15

    The structure and organization of the human follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene were determined by either screening a phage library of human genomic DNA or applying the long PCR technique to amplify different exon pairs with their corresponding introns. The FSHR gene spans a region of 54 kb and consists of 10 exons and 9 introns. Most of the extracellular domain is encoded by 9 exons, ranging in length between 69 and 251 bp; the C-terminal part of the extracellular domain, the transmembrane domain, and the intracellular domain are encoded by the large exon 10 (1234 bp). Overall the gene encodes 695 amino acids. The structure of the human FSHR displays a striking similarity to that of the previously characterized rat FSHR gene, with a high degree of conservation in exon sizes and exon/intron junctions. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. Taltirelin is a superagonist at the human thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirunarayanan, Nanthakumar; Raaka, Bruce M.; Gershengorn, Marvin C.

    2012-01-01

    Taltirelin (TAL) is a thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) analog that is approved for use in humans in Japan. In this study, we characterized TAL binding to and signaling by the human TRH receptor (TRH-R) in a model cell system. We found that TAL exhibited lower binding affinities than TRH and lower signaling potency via the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate/calcium pathway than TRH. However, TAL exhibited higher intrinsic efficacy than TRH in stimulating inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate second messenger generation. This is the first study that elucidates the pharmacology of TAL at TRH-R and shows that TAL is a superagonist at TRH-R. We suggest the superagonism exhibited by TAL may in part explain its higher activity in mediating central nervous system effects in humans compared to TRH. PMID:23087672

  10. Taltirelin is a superagonist at the human thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanthakumar eThirunarayanan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Taltirelin (TAL is a thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH analog that is approved for use in humans in Japan. In this study, we characterized TAL binding to and signaling by the human TRH receptor (TRH-R in a model cell system. We found that TAL exhibited lower binding affinities than TRH and lower signaling potency via the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate/calcium pathway than TRH. However, TAL exhibited higher intrinsic efficacy than TRH in stimulating inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate second messenger generation. This is the first study that elucidates the pharmacology of TAL at TRH-R and shows that TAL is a superagonist at TRH-R. We suggest the superagonism exhibited by TAL may in part explain its higher activity in mediating CNS effects in humans compared to TRH.

  11. Which follicles make the most anti-Mullerian hormone in humans?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, J V; Anderson, R A; Kelsey, T W

    2013-01-01

    Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is exclusively produced by granulosa cells (GC) of the developing pre-antral and antral follicles, and AMH is increasingly used to assess ovarian function. It is unclear which size follicles make the most AMH (total content) and are the main contributors to circulating......-8 mm follicles make the greatest contribution to serum AMH, estimated for the first time in human to be 60% of the circulating concentration. Significant positive associations between gene expression of AMH and FSHR, AR and AMHR2 expression (P

  12. Evolution of the hormonal control of animal performance: insights from the seaward migration of salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, S.D.

    2009-01-01

    The endocrine system is the key mediator of environmental and developmental (internal) information, and is likely to be involved in altering the performance of animals when selection has favored phenotypic plasticity. The endocrine control of performance should be especially pronounced in animals that undergo a developmental shift in niche, such as occurs in migratory species. By way of example, I review the developmental and environmental control of the preparatory changes for seawater entry of juvenile salmon (known as smolting) and its hormonal regulation. There is a size threshold for smolt development in juvenile Atlantic salmon that results in greater sensitivity of the growth hormone and cortisol axes to changes in daylength. These hormones, in turn, have broad effects on survival, ion homeostasis, growth and swimming performance during entry into seawater. Migratory niche shifts and metamorphic events are extreme examples of the role of hormones in animal performance and represent one end of a continuum. A framework for predicting when hormones will be involved in performance of animals is presented. Endocrine involvement in performance will be more substantial when (1) selection differentials on traits underlying performance are high and temporally discontinuous over an animal's lifetime, (2) the energetic and fitness costs of maintaining performance plasticity are less than those of constant performance, (3) cues for altering performance are reliable indicators of critical environmental conditions, require neurosensory input, and minimize effects of lag, and (4) the need for coordination of organs, tissues and cells to achieve increased performance is greater. By examining these impacts of selection, endocrinologists have an opportunity to contribute to the understanding of performance, phenotypic plasticity, and the evolution of life-history traits.

  13. Hyperemesis gravidarum affects maternal sanity, thyroid hormones and fetal health: a prospective case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukkayaci Duman, Nuriye; Ozcan, Oguzhan; Bostanci, M Ömer

    2015-08-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) is a condition of severe nausea or vomiting accompanied by various complications during pregnancy. In the present study, we aimed to demonstrate the effects of HG on mother and fetus health. Control and case group were arranged from 50 healthy pregnant women and 50 pregnant women with HG. Information about the participant women was gathered with data collection form and Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI) and State Anxiety Inventory (SAI) were administered to the women. Following an abortion or delivery, the data about birth complications and neonatal health were collected. All laboratory results (blood count, thyroid hormones, electrolyte values and biochemical parameters) were gathered from the laboratory information system used in the hospital. It was found that in the case group, mean postpartum weight, serum hemoglobin, hematocrit and thyroid stimulant hormone levels were lower than control group (p < 0.01). Conversely, case group women have higher T3 and T4 levels than control group (p < 0.01). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight and abortion but it was observed that women with HG had often delivered prematurely. The mean scores of BDI and SAI in the case group were higher than those of control group. These results suggested that HG may have adverse effects on both mother and baby's health. Pregnant women with HG should be provided with training and consultancy services and be closely monitored in terms of anemia and thyroid hormones.

  14. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of hip fracture: population based case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaëlsson, Karl; Baron, John A; Farahmand, Bahman Y; Johnell, Olof; Magnusson, Cecilia; Persson, Per-Gunnar; Persson, Ingemar; Ljunghall, Sverker

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relative risk of hip fracture associated with postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy including the effect of duration and recency of treatment, the addition of progestins, route of administration, and dose. Design: Population based case-control study. Setting: Six counties in Sweden. Subjects: 1327 women aged 50-81 years with hip fracture and 3262 randomly selected controls. Main outcome measure: Use of hormone replacement therapy. Results: Compared with women who had never used hormone replacement therapy, current users had an odds ratio of 0.35 (95 % confidence interval 0.24 to 0.53) for hip fracture and former users had an odds ratio of 0.76 (0.57 to 1.01). For every year of therapy, the overall risk decreased by 6% (3% to 9%): 4% (1% to 8%) for regimens without progestin and 11% (6% to 16%) for those with progestin. Last use between one and five years previously, with a duration of use more than five years, was associated with an odds ratio of 0.27 (0.08 to 0.94). After five years without hormone replacement therapy the protective effect was substantially diminished (−7% to 48%). With current use, an initiation of therapy nine or more years after the menopause gave equally strong reduction in risk for hip fracture as an earlier start. Oestrogen treatment with skin patches gave similar risk estimates as oral regimens. Conclusions: Recent use of hormone replacement therapy is required for optimum fracture protection, but therapy can be started several years after the menopause. The protective effect increases with duration of use, and an oestrogen-sparing effect is achieved when progestins are included in the regimen. Key messages Hormone replacement therapy should be continued for long periods for optimal protection of hip fracture No overall substantial hip fracture protection remains after five years without hormone replacement therapy Therapy can be initiated several years after menopause without loss of fracture protection

  15. Quantitative Assessment of Female Sexual Motivation in the Rat: Hormonal Control of Motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Cummings, Jennifer A.; Becker, Jill B.

    2011-01-01

    While a good deal of information has been garnered in the last few decades regarding the neural and hormonal control of female sexual behavior, literature elucidating these mechanisms with respect to female sexual motivation has been scarce. We believe that one reason for this is the lack of a standardized paradigm that will quantify female sexual motivation while allowing for sexual interaction to occur. Here we describe a two-chambered apparatus that utilizes operant responding (nose poking...

  16. Differential neural responses to child and sexual stimuli in human fathers and non-fathers and their hormonal correlates

    OpenAIRE

    Mascaro, Jennifer S.; Hackett, Patrick D.; Rilling, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the well-documented importance of paternal caregiving for positive child development, little is known about the neural changes that accompany the transition to fatherhood in humans, or about how changes in hormone levels affect paternal brain function. We compared fathers of children aged 1–2 with non-fathers in terms of hormone levels (oxytocin and testosterone), neural responses to child picture stimuli, and neural responses to visual sexual stimuli. Compared to non-fathers, fathers...

  17. Growth and hormonal responsiveness of human endometrial stromal cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holinka, C F

    1988-06-01

    The present review describes and discusses published results on growth and hormonal responsiveness of human endometrial stromal cells in culture. The proliferative potential of serially subcultured cells, that is, the number of cell doublings before cells enter mitotic senescence and cease to divide, was unusually high in stromal cells from several endometrial specimens, a property that may reflect the unique proliferative capacity of human endometrium when compared to other adult tissues. Fluorescent visualization of microfilaments revealed distinct age-related changes in the distribution of cytoskeletal fibers. Addition of ovarian steroids to the culture medium of stromal cells resulted in significant morphologic changes. From comparative studies using different culture media it became evident that medium components remarkably influenced cell morphology during early culture periods in an irreversible manner. Cultured stromal cells yielded interesting results in experiments designed to define the role of polyamines in growth regulation. Proliferation was greatly inhibited when polyamine levels were reduced by specific inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase, the first and rate limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis which produces putrescine by catalytic conversion from ornithine. The antiproliferative effects were reversed by addition of putrescine to the culture medium. These results clearly establish a causal link between polyamine depletion and growth deficiencies and reveal an essential function of polyamines in stromal cell proliferation. Hormonally regulated parameters in cultured stromal cells include aromatase activity, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A, 51K secreted protein, prolactin and laminin. The hormonally regulated production of prolactin and laminin, both considered markers of decidualization, together with morphologic changes of stromal cells to decidual-like cells, strongly suggest that human endometrial stromal cells, when subjected to

  18. Recombinant human growth hormone improves cognitive capacity in a pain patient exposed to chronic opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodin, A; von Ehren, M; Skottheim, B; Grönbladh, A; Ortiz-Nieto, F; Raininko, R; Gordh, T; Nyberg, F

    2014-07-01

    During recent decades, the increasing use of opioids for chronic non-cancer pain has raised concerns regarding tolerance, addiction, and importantly cognitive dysfunction. Current research suggests that the somatotrophic axis could play an important role in cognitive function. Administration of growth hormone (GH) to GH-deficient humans and experimental animals has been shown to result in significant improvements in cognitive capacity. In this report, a patient with cognitive disabilities resulting from chronic treatment with opioids for neuropathic pain received recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) replacement therapy. A 61-year-old man presented with severe cognitive dysfunction after long-term methadone treatment for intercostal neuralgia and was diagnosed with GH insufficiency by GH releasing hormone-arginine testing. The effect of rhGH replacement therapy on his cognitive capacity and quality of life was investigated. The hippocampal volume was measured using magnetic resonance imaging, and the ratios of the major metabolites were calculated using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Cognitive testing revealed significant improvements in visuospatial cognitive function after rhGH. The hippocampal volume remained unchanged. In the right hippocampus, the N-acetylaspartate/creatine ratio (reflecting nerve cell function) was initially low but increased significantly during rhGH treatment, as did subjective cognitive, physical and emotional functioning. This case report indicates that rhGH replacement therapy could improve cognitive behaviour and well-being, as well as hippocampal metabolism and functioning in opioid-treated patients with chronic pain. The idea that GH could affect brain function and repair disabilities induced by long-term exposure to opioid analgesia is supported. © 2014 The Authors. The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Subarachnoid hemorrhage and hormonal factors in women. A population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longstreth, W T; Nelson, L M; Koepsell, T D; van Belle, G

    1994-08-01

    To determine the degree to which endogenous and exogenous hormonal factors influence the risk for subarachnoid hemorrhage in women. A population-based case-control study. King County, Washington. 103 women with an incident, spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage and 2 age- and sex-matched controls per case-patient who were identified through random-digit dialing. Information on exposures was collected during in-person interviews of case-patients, controls, and their surrogates. Premenopausal women, especially those without a history of smoking or hypertension, were at a reduced risk for subarachnoid hemorrhage compared with age-matched postmenopausal women (odds ratio, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.09 to 0.68). The use of hormone replacement therapy was associated with a reduced risk (odds ratio, 0.47; CI, 0.26 to 0.86); the reduction was significantly greater in women who had smoked than in those that had never smoked. Of the 23 premenopausal case-patients, 74% were either menstruating when hemorrhaging occurred or had had their last menstrual period 21 or more days before hemorrhaging compared with the expected 43% (difference, 31%; CI, 4% to 58%). Premenopausal women are at reduced risk for subarachnoid hemorrhage, especially those without a history of smoking or hypertension. Hormone replacement therapy reduced the risk only in postmenopausal women who had ever smoked. Among women still menstruating, the risk for hemorrhage was greatest in the perimenstrual period.

  20. The effects of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee on sex hormone-binding globulin and endogenous sex hormone levels: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wedick Nicole M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Findings from observational studies suggest that sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG and endogenous sex hormones may be mediators of the putative relation between coffee consumption and lower risk of type 2 diabetes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee on SHBG and sex hormone levels. Findings After a two-week run-in phase with caffeine abstention, we conducted an 8-week parallel-arm randomized controlled trial. Healthy adults (n = 42 were recruited from the Boston community who were regular coffee consumers, nonsmokers, and overweight. Participants were randomized to five 6-ounce cups of caffeinated or decaffeinated instant coffee or water (control group per day consumed with each meal, mid-morning, and mid-afternoon. The main outcome measures were SHBG and sex hormones [i.e., testosterone, estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate]. No significant differences were found between treatment groups for any of the studied outcomes at week 8. At 4 weeks, decaffeinated coffee was associated with a borderline significant increase in SHBG in women, but not in men. At week 4, we also observed several differences in hormone concentrations between the treatment groups. Among men, consumption of caffeinated coffee increased total testosterone and decreased total and free estradiol. Among women, decaffeinated coffee decreased total and free testosterone and caffeinated coffee decreased total testosterone. Conclusions Our data do not indicate a consistent effect of caffeinated coffee consumption on SHBG in men or women, however results should be interpreted with caution given the small sample size. This is the first randomized trial investigating the effects of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee on SHBG and sex hormones and our findings necessitate further examination in a larger intervention trial.

  1. Nuclear receptor DHR4 controls the timing of steroid hormone pulses during Drosophila development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuxiang Ou

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In insects, precisely timed periodic pulses of the molting hormone ecdysone control major developmental transitions such as molts and metamorphosis. The synthesis and release of ecdysone, a steroid hormone, is itself controlled by PTTH (prothoracicotopic hormone. PTTH transcript levels oscillate with an 8 h rhythm, but its significance regarding the timing of ecdysone pulses is unclear. PTTH acts on its target tissue, the prothoracic gland (PG, by activating the Ras/Raf/ERK pathway through its receptor Torso, however direct targets of this pathway have yet to be identified. Here, we demonstrate that Drosophila Hormone Receptor 4 (DHR4, a nuclear receptor, is a key target of the PTTH pathway and establishes temporal boundaries by terminating ecdysone pulses. Specifically, we show that DHR4 oscillates between the nucleus and cytoplasm of PG cells, and that the protein is absent from PG nuclei at developmental times when low titer ecdysone pulses occur. This oscillatory behavior is blocked when PTTH or torso function is abolished, resulting in nuclear accumulation of DHR4, while hyperactivating the PTTH pathway results in cytoplasmic retention of the protein. Increasing DHR4 levels in the PG can delay or arrest development. In contrast, reducing DHR4 function in the PG triggers accelerated development, which is caused by precocious ecdysone signaling due to a failure to repress ecdysone pulses. Finally, we show that DHR4 negatively regulates the expression of a hitherto uncharacterized cytochrome P450 gene, Cyp6t3. Disruption of Cyp6t3 function causes low ecdysteroid titers and results in heterochronic phenotypes and molting defects, indicating a novel role in the ecdysone biosynthesis pathway. We propose a model whereby nuclear DHR4 controls the duration of ecdysone pulses by negatively regulating ecdysone biosynthesis through repression of Cyp6t3, and that this repressive function is temporarily overturned via the PTTH pathway by removing DHR4

  2. Sucrose is an early modulator of the key hormonal mechanisms controlling bud outgrowth in Rosa hybrida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, François; Péron, Thomas; Lecerf, Marion; Perez-Garcia, Maria-Dolores; Barrière, Quentin; Rolčík, Jakub; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Citerne, Sylvie; Lemoine, Remi; Porcheron, Benoît; Roman, Hanaé; Leduc, Nathalie; Le Gourrierec, José; Bertheloot, Jessica; Sakr, Soulaiman

    2015-05-01

    Sugar has only recently been identified as a key player in triggering bud outgrowth, while hormonal control of bud outgrowth is already well established. To get a better understanding of sugar control, the present study investigated how sugar availability modulates the hormonal network during bud outgrowth in Rosa hybrida. Other plant models, for which mutants are available, were used when necessary. Buds were grown in vitro to manipulate available sugars. The temporal patterns of the hormonal regulatory network were assessed in parallel with bud outgrowth dynamics. Sucrose determined bud entrance into sustained growth in a concentration-dependent manner. Sustained growth was accompanied by sustained auxin production in buds, and sustained auxin export in a DR5::GUS-expressing pea line. Several events occurred ahead of sucrose-stimulated bud outgrowth. Sucrose upregulated early auxin synthesis genes (RhTAR1, RhYUC1) and the auxin efflux carrier gene RhPIN1, and promoted PIN1 abundance at the plasma membrane in a pPIN1::PIN1-GFP-expressing tomato line. Sucrose downregulated both RwMAX2, involved in the strigolactone-transduction pathway, and RhBRC1, a repressor of branching, at an early stage. The presence of sucrose also increased stem cytokinin content, but sucrose-promoted bud outgrowth was not related to that pathway. In these processes, several non-metabolizable sucrose analogues induced sustained bud outgrowth in R. hybrida, Pisum sativum, and Arabidopsis thaliana, suggesting that sucrose was involved in a signalling pathway. In conclusion, we identified potential hormonal candidates for bud outgrowth control by sugar. They are central to future investigations aimed at disentangling the processes that underlie regulation of bud outgrowth by sugar. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  3. Subcutaneous absorption kinetics of two highly concentrated preparations of recombinant human growth hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Susgaard, Søren

    1993-01-01

    hours. Samples were taken every 30 minutes for 6 hours and then hourly. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Bioavailability (F) and absorption dynamics of human GH were measured. The relative absorption fractions estimated from the areas under the individual serum concentration curves from 0 to 24 hours......Abstract OBJECTIVE: The relative bioavailability of two highly concentrated (12 IU/ml) formulations of biosynthetic human growth hormone (GH) administered subcutaneously was compared. DESIGN: A randomized, crossover study. Conventional GH therapy was withdrawn 72 hours before each study period...... of signs of endogenous GH secretion. INTERVENTIONS: At the start of each study period, GH 3 IU/m2 was injected subcutaneously. The two formulations, PenFill and PenSet, differ in the buffers used and in the relative content of mannitol and glycine. Serum profiles of GH were monitored frequently for 24...

  4. Low-dose growth hormone and human immunodeficiency virus-associated lipodystrophy syndrome: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O; Haugaard, S B; Flyvbjerg, A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment with high doses (2-6 mg day(-1)) of human growth hormone (hGH) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) has been shown to increase concentrations of total insulin-like growth-factor-I (IGF-I) more than twofold greater than...... the normal upper range and is accompanied by adverse effects such as joint pain and glucose intolerance. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a 16-week open-labelled prospective pilot study in six male HALS patients using a s.c. low-dose hGH, 0.7 mg day(-1), aiming to examine the impact on total and free IGF...

  5. Human sex hormone-binding globulin gene expression- multiple promoters and complex alternative splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosner William

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG regulates free sex steroid concentrations in plasma and modulates rapid, membrane based steroid signaling. SHBG is encoded by an eight exon-long transcript whose expression is regulated by a downstream promoter (PL. The SHBG gene was previously shown to express a second major transcript of unknown function, derived from an upstream promoter (PT, and two minor transcripts. Results We report that transcriptional expression of the human SHBG gene is far more complex than previously described. PL and PT direct the expression of at least six independent transcripts each, resulting from alternative splicing of exons 4, 5, 6, and/or 7. We mapped two transcriptional start sites downstream of PL and PT, and present evidence for a third SHBG gene promoter (PN within the neighboring FXR2 gene; PN regulates the expression of at least seven independent SHBG gene transcripts, each possessing a novel, 164-nt first exon (1N. Transcriptional expression patterns were generated for human prostate, breast, testis, liver, and brain, and the LNCaP, MCF-7, and HepG2 cell lines. Each expresses the SHBG transcript, albeit in varying abundance. Alternative splicing was more pronounced in the cancer cell lines. PL- PT- and PN-derived transcripts were most abundant in liver, testis, and prostate, respectively. Initial findings reveal the existence of a smaller immunoreactive SHBG species in LNCaP, MCF-7, and HepG2 cells. Conclusion These results extend our understanding of human SHBG gene transcription, and raise new and important questions regarding the role of novel alternatively spliced transcripts, their function in hormonally responsive tissues including the breast and prostate, and the role that aberrant SHBG gene expression may play in cancer.

  6. Steroid metabolism in the hormone dependent MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cell line and its two hormone resistant subpopulations MCF-7/LCC1 and MCF-7/LCC2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L; Brünner, N; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1998-01-01

    Androgen and estrogen metabolism was investigated in the hormone-dependent human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and its two hormone-resistant sublines MCF-7/LCC1 and MCF-7/LCC2. Using the product isolation method, the activity of aromatase, 5alpha-reductase, 3alpha/beta-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase...... and 17beta-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase were investigated isolating the following steroids: estriol (E3), estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), 3alpha/beta-androstanediol (A-diol), testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), androsterone (AND), androstenedion (4-AD) and androstanedione (A-dion). For all......, and preincubation with cortisol had no effect on the enzyme activity. With [14C]T as the substrate, the metabolized level of DHT was very similar in the three cell lines, though MCF-7/LCC1 and MCF-7/LCC2 utilized the substrate to a much lesser extent. The amount of DHT and 4-AD produced were comparable in the two...

  7. Hormones and Sex-Specific Transcription Factors Jointly Control Yolk Protein Synthesis in Musca domestica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Siegenthaler

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the housefly Musca domestica, synthesis of yolk proteins (YPs depends on the level of circulating ecdysteroid hormones. In female houseflies, the ecdysterone concentration in the hemolymph oscillates and, at high levels, is followed by expression of YP. In male houseflies, the ecdysterone titre is constantly low and no YP is produced. In some strains, which are mutant in key components of the sex-determining pathway, males express YP even though their ecdysterone titre is not significantly elevated. However, we find that these males express a substantial amount of the female variant of the Musca doublesex homologue, Md-dsx. The dsx gene is known to sex-specifically control transcription of yp genes in the fat body of Drosophila melanogaster. Our data suggest that Md-dsx also contributes to the regulation of YP expression in the housefly by modulating the responsiveness of YP-producing cells to hormonal stimuli.

  8. Control of human trophoblast function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biondi Carla

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The trophoblast, i.e. the peripheral part of the human conceptus, exerts a crucial role in implantation and placentation. Both processes properly occur as a consequence of an intimate dialogue between fetal and maternal tissues, fulfilled by membrane ligands and receptors, as well as by hormone and local factor release. During blastocyst implantation, generation of distinct trophoblast cell types begins, namely the villous and the extravillous trophoblast, the former of which is devoted to fetal-maternal exchanges and the latter binds the placental body to the uterine wall. Physiological placentation is characterized by the invasion of the uterine spiral arteries by extravillous trophoblast cells arising from anchoring villi. Due to this invasion, the arterial structure is replaced by amorphous fibrinoid material and endovascular trophoblastic cells. This transformation establishes a low-resistance, high-capacity perfusion system from the radial arteries to the intervillous space, in which the villous tree is embedded. The physiology of pregnancy depends upon the orderly progress of structural and functional changes of villous and extravillous trophoblast, whereas a derangement of such processes can lead to different types of complications of varying degrees of gravity, including possible pregnancy loss and maternal life-threatening diseases. In this review we describe the mechanisms which regulate trophoblast differentiation, proliferation, migration and invasiveness, and the alterations in these mechanisms which lead to pathological conditions. Furthermore, based on the growing evidence that proper inflammatory changes and oxidative balance are needed for successful gestation, we explain the mechanisms by which agents able to influence such processes may be useful in the prevention and treatment of pregnancy disorders.

  9. A Review of Weight Control Strategies and Their Effects on the Regulation of Hormonal Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil A. Schwarz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The estimated prevalence of obesity in the USA is 72.5 million adults with costs attributed to obesity more than 147 billion dollars per year. Though caloric restriction has been used extensively in weight control studies, short-term success has been difficult to achieve, with long-term success of weight control being even more elusive. Therefore, novel approaches are needed to control the rates of obesity that are occurring globally. The purpose of this paper is to provide a synopsis of how exercise, sleep, psychological stress, and meal frequency and composition affect levels of ghrelin, cortisol, insulin GLP-1, and leptin and weight control. We will provide information regarding how hormones respond to various lifestyle factors which may affect appetite control, hunger, satiety, and weight control.

  10. Bone regeneration in experimental animals using calcium phosphate cement combined with platelet growth factors and human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emilov-Velev, K; Clemente-de-Arriba, C; Alobera-García, M Á; Moreno-Sansalvador, E M; Campo-Loarte, J

    2015-01-01

    Many substances (growth factors and hormones) have osteoinduction properties and when added to some osteoconduction biomaterial they accelerate bone neoformation properties. The materials included 15 New Zealand rabbits, calcium phosphate cement (Calcibon(®)), human growth hormone (GH), and plasma rich in platelets (PRP). Each animal was operated on in both proximal tibias and a critical size bone defect of 6mm of diameter was made. The animals were separated into the following study groups: Control (regeneration only by Calcibon®), PRP (regeneration by Calcibon® and PRP), GH (regeneration by Calcibon® and GH). All the animals were sacrificed at 28 days. An evaluation was made of the appearance of the proximal extreme of rabbit tibiae in all the animals, and to check the filling of the critical size defect. A histological assessment was made of the tissue response, the presence of new bone formation, and the appearance of the biomaterial. Morphometry was performed using the MIP 45 image analyser. ANOVA statistical analysis was performed using the Statgraphics software application. The macroscopic appearance of the critical defect was better in the PRP and the GH group than in the control group. Histologically greater new bone formation was found in the PRP and GH groups. No statistically significant differences were detected in the morphometric study between bone formation observed in the PRP group and the control group. Significant differences in increased bone formation were found in the GH group (p=0.03) compared to the other two groups. GH facilitates bone regeneration in critical defects filled with calcium phosphate cement in the time period studied in New Zealand rabbits. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. A novel pathway regulates thyroid hormone availability in rat and human hypothalamic neurosecretory neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imre Kalló

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic neurosecretory systems are fundamental regulatory circuits influenced by thyroid hormone. Monocarboxylate-transporter-8 (MCT8-mediated uptake of thyroid hormone followed by type 3 deiodinase (D3-catalyzed inactivation represent limiting regulatory factors of neuronal T3 availability. In the present study we addressed the localization and subcellular distribution of D3 and MCT8 in neurosecretory neurons and addressed D3 function in their axons. Intense D3-immunoreactivity was observed in axon varicosities in the external zone of the rat median eminence and the neurohaemal zone of the human infundibulum containing axon terminals of hypophysiotropic parvocellular neurons. Immuno-electronmicroscopy localized D3 to dense-core vesicles in hypophysiotropic axon varicosities. N-STORM-superresolution-microscopy detected the active center containing C-terminus of D3 at the outer surface of these organelles. Double-labeling immunofluorescent confocal microscopy revealed that D3 is present in the majority of GnRH, CRH and GHRH axons but only in a minority of TRH axons, while absent from somatostatin-containing neurons. Bimolecular-Fluorescence-Complementation identified D3 homodimers, a prerequisite for D3 activity, in processes of GT1-7 cells. Furthermore, T3-inducible D3 catalytic activity was detected in the rat median eminence. Triple-labeling immunofluorescence and immuno-electronmicroscopy revealed the presence of MCT8 on the surface of the vast majority of all types of hypophysiotropic terminals. The presence of MCT8 was also demonstrated on the axon terminals in the neurohaemal zone of the human infundibulum. The unexpected role of hypophysiotropic axons in fine-tuned regulation of T3 availability in these cells via MCT8-mediated transport and D3-catalyzed inactivation may represent a novel regulatory core mechanism for metabolism, growth, stress and reproduction in rodents and humans.

  12. Human placental growth hormone in ectopic pregnancy: Detection in maternal blood, immunohistochemistry and potential clinical implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübener, Christoph; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Wu, Zida; Diebold, Joachim; Strasburger, Christian J; Mahner, Sven; Hasbargen, Uwe; Delius, Maria

    2017-12-01

    To investigate human placental growth hormone (hGH-V) in ectopic pregnancy (EP): detection in maternal blood, correlation with immunohistochemistry and possible role as a marker for the course of EP. Women presenting in the outpatient or emergency department of a tertiary care university hospital with a positive pregnancy test and strong suspicion of EP by ultrasound and/or symptoms were eligible for the study (n=70). Tissue specimens from the surgically treated patients (n=50) were examined by histopathology as well as by a hGH-V specific immohistochemistry set-up. A highly sensitive hGH-V specific immunoassay was used to analyse serum samples collected before treatment, day 1 post surgery samples and serial samples for medical treatment. In EP patients' sera hGH-V was shown to be measurable for the first time (n=18). HGH-V however could not be detected in all patients' sera. HCG levels were significantly higher in the hGH-V serum positive group (p 0.001). HGH-V was localized to the syncytiotrophoblast in all specimens of EP examined by immunohistochemistry (n=10) regardless of the detection in the patient's blood. Placental growth hormone (hGH-V) was shown to be present both in ectopic pregnancy patients' sera and tissue. It may serve as a biomarker for monitoring the course and treatment of EP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Structure-activity relations in binding of perfluoroalkyl compounds to human thyroid hormone T3 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Yin-Feng; Guo, Liang-Hong; Qin, Zhan-Fen; Lv, Qi-Yan; Zhang, Lian-Ying

    2015-02-01

    Perfluoroalkyl compounds (PFCs) have been shown to disrupt thyroid functions through thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-mediated pathways, but direct binding of PFCs with TR has not been demonstrated. We investigated the binding interactions of 16 structurally diverse PFCs with human TR, their activities on TR in cells, and the activity of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in vivo. In fluorescence competitive binding assays, most of the 16 PFCs were found to bind to TR with relative binding potency in the range of 0.0003-0.05 compared with triiodothyronine (T3). A structure-binding relationship for PFCs was observed, where fluorinated alkyl chain length longer than ten, and an acid end group were optimal for TR binding. In thyroid hormone (TH)-responsive cell proliferation assays, PFOS, perfluorohexadecanoic acid, and perfluorooctadecanoic acid exhibited agonistic activity by promoting cell growth. Furthermore, similar to T3, PFOS exposure promoted expression of three TH upregulated genes and inhibited three TH downregulated genes in amphibians. Molecular docking analysis revealed that most of the tested PFCs efficiently fit into the T3-binding pocket in TR and formed a hydrogen bond with arginine 228 in a manner similar to T3. The combined in vitro, in vivo, and computational data strongly suggest that some PFCs disrupt the normal activity of TR pathways by directly binding to TR.

  14. Radioimmunoassay of bovine, ovine and porcine luteinizing hormone with a monoclonal antibody and a human tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fosberg, M.; Tagle, R.; Madej, A.; Molina, J.R.; Carlsson, M.-A.

    1993-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay for bovine (bLH), ovine (oLH) and porcine (pLH) luteinizing hormone was developed using a human [sup 125]ILH tracer from a commercial kit and a monoclonal antibody (518B7) specific for LH but with low species specificity. Standard curves demonstrated similar binding kinetics when bLH, oLH and pLH were incubated with tracer and antibody for 2 h at room temperature. A 30-min delay in the addition of the tracer gave sufficient sensitivity when analysing pLH. Separation of antibody-bound LH from free hormone was achieved by using second antibody-coated micro Sepharose beads. The assay was validated and the performance compared with that of an RIA currently in use for determination of bLH (coefficient of correlation: 0.99 and 0.98). Regardless of the standards used, intra-assay coefficients of variation were <10% for LH concentrations exceeding 1 [mu]g/L. The inter-assay coefficients of variation were <15%. The assay was used for clinical evaluation demonstrating the pre-ovulatory LH surge in two cyclic cows, LH pulsatility in an oophorectomized ewe and LH response to GnRH injection in a boar. (au) (7 refs.).

  15. Ten years' clinical experience with biosimilar human growth hormone: a review of efficacy data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Siguero, Juan Pedro; Pfäffle, Roland; Chanson, Philippe; Szalecki, Mieczyslaw; Höbel, Nadja; Zabransky, Markus

    2017-01-01

    In 2006, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) approved Omnitrope(®) as a biosimilar recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH), on the basis of comparable quality, safety, and efficacy to the reference medicine (Genotropin(®), Pfizer). Data continue to be collected on the long-term efficacy of biosimilar rhGH from several on-going postapproval studies. Particular topics of interest include efficacy in indications granted on the basis of extrapolation, and whether efficacy of growth hormone treatment is affected when patients are changed to biosimilar rhGH from other rhGH products. Data from clinical development studies and 10 years of postapproval experience affirm the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of biosimilar rhGH across all approved indications. In addition, the decade of experience with biosimilar rhGH since it was approved in Europe confirms the scientific validity of the biosimilar pathway and the approval process. Concerns about clinical effect in extrapolated indications, and also about the impact of changing from other rhGH preparations, have been alleviated. Biosimilar rhGH is an effective treatment option for children who require therapy with rhGH.

  16. Effective Cellular Uptake and Efflux of Thyroid Hormone by Human Monocarboxylate Transporter 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesema, Edith C. H.; Jansen, Jurgen; Jachtenberg, Jan-willem; Visser, W. Edward; Kester, Monique H. A.; Visser, Theo J.

    2008-01-01

    Cellular entry of thyroid hormone is mediated by plasma membrane transporters, among others a T-type (aromatic) amino acid transporter. Monocarboxylate transporter 10 (MCT10) has been reported to transport aromatic amino acids but not iodothyronines. Within the MCT family, MCT10 is most homologous to MCT8, which is a very important iodothyronine transporter but does not transport amino acids. In view of this paradox, we decided to reinvestigate the possible transport of thyroid hormone by human (h) MCT10 in comparison with hMCT8. Transfection of COS1 cells with hMCT10 cDNA resulted in 1) the production of an approximately 55 kDa protein located to the plasma membrane as shown by immunoblotting and confocal microscopy, 2) a strong increase in the affinity labeling of intracellular type I deiodinase by N-bromoacetyl-[125I]T3, 3) a marked stimulation of cellular T4 and, particularly, T3 uptake, 4) a significant inhibition of T3 uptake by phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan of 12.5%, 22.2%, and 51.4%, respectively, and 5) a marked increase in the intracellular deiodination of T4 and T3 by different deiodinases. Cotransfection studies using the cytosolic thyroid hormone-binding protein μ-crystallin (CRYM) indicated that hMCT10 facilitates both cellular uptake and efflux of T4 and T3. In the absence of CRYM, hMCT10 and hMCT8 increased T3 uptake after 5 min incubation up to 4.0- and 1.9-fold, and in the presence of CRYM up to 6.9- and 5.8-fold, respectively. hMCT10 was less active toward T4 than hMCT8. These findings establish that hMCT10 is at least as active a thyroid hormone transporter as hMCT8, and that both transporters facilitate iodothyronine uptake as well as efflux. PMID:18337592

  17. Growth Hormone Research Society Workshop Summary: Consensus Guidelines for Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Therapy in Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tony, Michèle; Höybye, Charlotte; Allen, David B.; Tauber, Maïthé; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl; Ambler, Geoffrey R.; Battista, Renaldo; Beauloye, Véronique; Berall, Glenn; Biller, Beverly M. K.; Butler, Merlin G.; Cassidy, Suzanne B.; Chihara, Kazuo; Cohen, Pinchas; Craig, Maria; Farholt, Stense; Goetghebeur, Mireille; Goldstone, Anthony P.; Greggi, Tiziana; Grugni, Graziano; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C.; Johannsson, Gudmundur; Johnson, Keegan; Kemper, Alex; Kopchick, John J.; Malozowski, Saul; Miller, Jennifer; Mogul, Harriette R.; Muscatelli, Françoise; Nergårdh, Ricard; Nicholls, Robert D.; Radovick, Sally; Rosenthal, M. Sara; Sipilä, Ilkka; Tarride, Jean-Eric; Vogels, Annick; Waters, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Recombinant human GH (rhGH) therapy in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) has been used by the medical community and advocated by parental support groups since its approval in the United States in 2000 and in Europe in 2001. Its use in PWS represents a unique therapeutic challenge that includes treating individuals with cognitive disability, varied therapeutic goals that are not focused exclusively on increased height, and concerns about potential life-threatening adverse events. Objective: The aim of the study was to formulate recommendations for the use of rhGH in children and adult patients with PWS. Evidence: We performed a systematic review of the clinical evidence in the pediatric population, including randomized controlled trials, comparative observational studies, and long-term studies (>3.5 y). Adult studies included randomized controlled trials of rhGH treatment for ≥ 6 months and uncontrolled trials. Safety data were obtained from case reports, clinical trials, and pharmaceutical registries. Methodology: Forty-three international experts and stakeholders followed clinical practice guideline development recommendations outlined by the AGREE Collaboration (www.agreetrust.org). Evidence was synthesized and graded using a comprehensive multicriteria methodology (EVIDEM) (http://bit.ly.PWGHIN). Conclusions: Following a multidisciplinary evaluation, preferably by experts, rhGH treatment should be considered for patients with genetically confirmed PWS in conjunction with dietary, environmental, and lifestyle interventions. Cognitive impairment should not be a barrier to treatment, and informed consent/assent should include benefit/risk information. Exclusion criteria should include severe obesity, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, untreated severe obstructive sleep apnea, active cancer, or psychosis. Clinical outcome priorities should vary depending upon age and the presence of physical, mental, and social disability, and treatment should be continued for as

  18. Hormonal Add-Back Therapy for Females Treated With Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Agonist for Endometriosis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiVasta, Amy D; Feldman, Henry A; Sadler Gallagher, Jenny; Stokes, Natalie A; Laufer, Marc R; Hornstein, Mark D; Gordon, Catherine M

    2015-09-01

    To assess whether add-back therapy with norethindrone acetate or norethindrone acetate plus conjugated equine estrogens is superior to maintain bone health in adolescents and young women using gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists for endometriosis. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists are associated with deleterious effects on bone. Hormonal add-back may mitigate these effects. Adolescents and young women (n=51) received a random, double-blind assignment to add-back with norethindrone acetate (5 mg/day) plus conjugated equine estrogens (0.625 mg/day) or norethindrone acetate plus placebo for 12 months. Body composition, bone mineral content, and bone mineral density (BMD) were obtained by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry every 6 months. Quality-of-life measures were collected every 3 months. Intention-to-treat comparison of outcomes was conducted by repeated-measures analysis of variance. Thirty-four adolescents and young women completed the trial; dropouts did not differ from those who completed the trial. Bone mineral density was normal at baseline. At 12 months, total body bone mineral content and BMD had increased in the norethindrone acetate plus conjugated equine estrogens group (bone mineral content +37 g, Padd-back successfully preserved bone health and improved quality of life for adolescents and young women with endometriosis during 12 months of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist therapy. Combination norethindrone acetate plus conjugated equine estrogens add-back appears to be more effective for increasing total body bone mineral content, areal BMD, and lean mass than norethindrone acetate monotherapy. ClinicalTrials.gov; www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00474851. I.

  19. Environmental and hormonal factors controlling reversible colour change in crab spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llandres, Ana L; Figon, Florent; Christidès, Jean-Philippe; Mandon, Nicole; Casas, Jérôme

    2013-10-15

    Habitat heterogeneity that occurs within an individual's lifetime may favour the evolution of reversible plasticity. Colour reversibility has many different functions in animals, such as thermoregulation, crypsis through background matching and social interactions. However, the mechanisms underlying reversible colour changes are yet to be thoroughly investigated. This study aims to determine the environmental and hormonal factors underlying morphological colour changes in Thomisus onustus crab spiders and the biochemical metabolites produced during these changes. We quantified the dynamics of colour changes over time: spiders were kept in yellow and white containers under natural light conditions and their colour was measured over 15 days using a spectrophotometer. We also characterised the chemical metabolites of spiders changing to a yellow colour using HPLC. Hormonal control of colour change was investigated by injecting 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) into spiders. We found that background colouration was a major environmental factor responsible for colour change in crab spiders: individuals presented with white and yellow backgrounds changed to white and yellow colours, respectively. An ommochrome precursor, 3-OH-kynurenine, was the main pigment responsible for yellow colour. Spiders injected with 20E displayed a similar rate of change towards yellow colouration as spiders kept in yellow containers and exposed to natural sunlight. This study demonstrates novel hormonal manipulations that are capable of inducing reversible colour change.

  20. The polymorphic insertion of the luteinizing hormone receptor “insLQ” show a negative association to LHR gene expression and to the follicular fluid hormonal profile in human small antral follicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgbo, T.; Chrudimska, J.; Macek, M.

    2018-01-01

    The luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR) has a little studied polymorphic 6 bp insertion (rs4539842/insLQ). This study has evaluated the insLQ polymorphism in relation to potential associations with hormonal characteristics of human small antral follicles (hSAFs). In total, 310 hSAFs were collected...

  1. Efficacy of single-hormone and dual-hormone artificial pancreas during continuous and interval exercise in adult patients with type 1 diabetes: randomised controlled crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleb, Nadine; Emami, Ali; Suppere, Corinne; Messier, Virginie; Legault, Laurent; Ladouceur, Martin; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Haidar, Ahmad; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether the dual-hormone (insulin and glucagon) artificial pancreas reduces hypoglycaemia compared with the single-hormone (insulin alone) artificial pancreas during two types of exercise. An open-label randomised crossover study comparing both systems in 17 adults with type 1 diabetes (age, 37.2 ± 13.6 years; HbA1c, 8.0 ± 1.0% [63.9 ± 10.2 mmol/mol]) during two exercise types on an ergocycle and matched for energy expenditure: continuous (60% [Formula: see text] for 60 min) and interval (2 min alternating periods at 85% and 50% [Formula: see text] for 40 min, with two 10 min periods at 45% [Formula: see text] at the start and end of the session). Blocked randomisation (size of four) with a 1:1:1:1 allocation ratio was computer generated. The artificial pancreas was applied from 15:30 hours until 19:30 hours; exercise was started at 18:00 hours and announced 20 min earlier to the systems. The study was conducted at the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal. During single-hormone control compared with dual-hormone control, exercise-induced hypoglycaemia (plasma glucose artificial pancreas outperformed the single-hormone artificial pancreas in regulating glucose levels during announced exercise in adults with type 1 diabetes. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01930110 FUNDING: : Société Francophone du Diabète and Diabète Québec.

  2. Development of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-Secreting Neurons from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Lund

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons regulate human puberty and reproduction. Modeling their development and function in vitro would be of interest for both basic research and clinical translation. Here, we report a three-step protocol to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs into GnRH-secreting neurons. Firstly, hPSCs were differentiated to FOXG1, EMX2, and PAX6 expressing anterior neural progenitor cells (NPCs by dual SMAD inhibition. Secondly, NPCs were treated for 10 days with FGF8, which is a key ligand implicated in GnRH neuron ontogeny, and finally, the cells were matured with Notch inhibitor to bipolar TUJ1-positive neurons that robustly expressed GNRH1 and secreted GnRH decapeptide into the culture medium. The protocol was reproducible both in human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, and thus provides a translational tool for investigating the mechanisms of human puberty and its disorders.

  3. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH promotes wound re-epithelialisation in frog and human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia T Meier

    Full Text Available There remains a critical need for new therapeutics that promote wound healing in patients suffering from chronic skin wounds. This is, in part, due to a shortage of simple, physiologically and clinically relevant test systems for investigating candidate agents. The skin of amphibians possesses a remarkable regenerative capacity, which remains insufficiently explored for clinical purposes. Combining comparative biology with a translational medicine approach, we report the development and application of a simple ex vivo frog (Xenopus tropicalis skin organ culture system that permits exploration of the effects of amphibian skin-derived agents on re-epithelialisation in both frog and human skin. Using this amphibian model, we identify thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH as a novel stimulant of epidermal regeneration. Moving to a complementary human ex vivo wounded skin assay, we demonstrate that the effects of TRH are conserved across the amphibian-mammalian divide: TRH stimulates wound closure and formation of neo-epidermis in organ-cultured human skin, accompanied by increased keratinocyte proliferation and wound healing-associated differentiation (cytokeratin 6 expression. Thus, TRH represents a novel, clinically relevant neuroendocrine wound repair promoter that deserves further exploration. These complementary frog and human skin ex vivo assays encourage a comparative biology approach in future wound healing research so as to facilitate the rapid identification and preclinical testing of novel, evolutionarily conserved, and clinically relevant wound healing promoters.

  4. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) promotes wound re-epithelialisation in frog and human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Natalia T; Haslam, Iain S; Pattwell, David M; Zhang, Guo-You; Emelianov, Vladimir; Paredes, Roberto; Debus, Sebastian; Augustin, Matthias; Funk, Wolfgang; Amaya, Enrique; Kloepper, Jennifer E; Hardman, Matthew J; Paus, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    There remains a critical need for new therapeutics that promote wound healing in patients suffering from chronic skin wounds. This is, in part, due to a shortage of simple, physiologically and clinically relevant test systems for investigating candidate agents. The skin of amphibians possesses a remarkable regenerative capacity, which remains insufficiently explored for clinical purposes. Combining comparative biology with a translational medicine approach, we report the development and application of a simple ex vivo frog (Xenopus tropicalis) skin organ culture system that permits exploration of the effects of amphibian skin-derived agents on re-epithelialisation in both frog and human skin. Using this amphibian model, we identify thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) as a novel stimulant of epidermal regeneration. Moving to a complementary human ex vivo wounded skin assay, we demonstrate that the effects of TRH are conserved across the amphibian-mammalian divide: TRH stimulates wound closure and formation of neo-epidermis in organ-cultured human skin, accompanied by increased keratinocyte proliferation and wound healing-associated differentiation (cytokeratin 6 expression). Thus, TRH represents a novel, clinically relevant neuroendocrine wound repair promoter that deserves further exploration. These complementary frog and human skin ex vivo assays encourage a comparative biology approach in future wound healing research so as to facilitate the rapid identification and preclinical testing of novel, evolutionarily conserved, and clinically relevant wound healing promoters.

  5. Acceptability of a transdermal gel-based male hormonal contraceptive in a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Mara Y; Shih, Grace; Ilani, Niloufar; Wang, Christina; Page, Stephanie T; Bremner, William J; Swerdloff, Ronald S; Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Blithe, Diana L; Amory, John K

    2014-10-01

    Fifty percent of pregnancies in the United States are unintended despite numerous contraceptive methods available to women. The only male contraceptive methods, vasectomy and condoms, are used by 10% and 16% of couples, respectively. Prior studies have shown efficacy of male hormonal contraceptives in development, but few have evaluated patient acceptability and potential use if commercially available. The objective of this study is to determine if a transdermal gel-based male hormonal contraceptive regimen, containing testosterone and Nestorone® gels, would be acceptable to study participants as a primary contraceptive method. As part of a three-arm, 6-month, double-blind, randomized controlled trial of testosterone and nestorone gels at two academic medical centers, subjects completed a questionnaire to assess the acceptability of the regimen. Of the 99 men randomized, 79 provided data for analysis. Overall, 56% (44/79) of men were satisfied or extremely satisfied with this gel-based method of contraception, and 51% (40/79) reported that they would recommend this method to others. One third of subjects (26/79) reported that they would use this as their primary method of contraception if it were commercially available today. However, men with concerns about sexually transmitted disease were significantly less satisfied than men without such concerns (p=0.03). A majority of the men who volunteered to participate in this trial of an experimental male hormonal contraceptive were satisfied with this transdermal male hormonal contraceptive. If commercially available, a combination of topical nesterone and testosterone gels could provide a reversible, effective method of contraception that is appealing to men. A substantial portion of men report they would use this transdermal male contraceptive regimen if commercially available. This method would provide a novel, reversible method of contraception for men, whose current choices are limited to condoms and vasectomy

  6. Effects of Steroid Hormone Levels on the Ultrasound Appearance of the Preovulatory Endometrium in Controlled Ovarian Hyperstimulation Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytul Corbacioglu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study investigated the effects of serum estradiol (E2 and progesterone levels on preovulatory endometrial thickness and echogenicity in controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH cycles for in vitro fertilization (IVF.Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, we evaluated the data of 241 in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer cycles. Cycles were classified into three groups according to endometrial thickness measured on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG administration as: i. ≤8 mm, ii. 8-14 mm, and iii. ≥14 mm. Echogenic patterns were described as trilaminar, isoechogenic, and hyperechogenic. Serum E2 and progesterone levels were evaluated on the day of hCG administration. Data were analyzed using X2 test, Student’s t test and analysis of variance (ANOVA.Results: Serum E2 levels increased in parallel with endometrial thickness, although differences among the three groups were insignificant. There was no correlation between serum progesterone levels and endometrial thickness. There was no significant difference in the steroid hormone concentrations between the echogenic patterns.Conclusion: Serum steroid hormone levels on the day of hCG administration do not affect the ultrasound appearance of the endometrium in COH cycles.

  7. Sex Differences in White Matter Microstructure in the Human Brain Predominantly Reflect Differences in Sex Hormone Exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    van Hemmen, J; Saris, I. M. J.; Cohen-Kettenis, P. T.; Veltman, D.J.; Pouwels, P.J.W.; Bakker, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Sex differences have been described regarding several aspects of human brain morphology; however, the exact biological mechanisms underlying these differences remain unclear in humans. Women with the complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), who lack androgen action in the presence of a 46,XY karyotype, offer the unique opportunity to study isolated effects of sex hormones and sex chromosomes on human neural sexual differentiation. In the present study, we used diffusion tensor imaging...

  8. Human growth hormone stabilizes walking and improves strength in a patient with dominantly inherited calpainopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prahm, Kira Philipsen; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Vissing, John

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to investigate if daily low-dose treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (somatropine) can stabilize or improve muscle strength and walking capability in a patient with dominantly inherited calpainopathy. The patient was treated with daily injections of somatropine, except...... for a 6-month pause, over a period of 4.5 years. Efficacy was assessed by repeated muscle dynamometry tests and 6-minute walk tests (6MWT). Strength improved in most muscle groups on treatment, deteriorated in the 6-month off treatment, and improved again when treatment was resumed. The 6MWT stabilized...... during the initial 18-month treatment period, then deteriorated in the 6 months off treatment and improved to pre-trial levels when treatment was resumed. The findings suggest that supplementation with somatropine, within physiological ranges, may improve muscle strength and stabilize walking capability...

  9. Effects of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone for Osteoporosis: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Hayden F; Moyer, Rebecca F; Yacoub, Daniel; Coughlin, Dexter; Birmingham, Trevor B

    2017-03-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of recombinant human growth hormone (GH) on bone mineral density (BMD) in persons age 50 and older, with normal pituitary function, with or at risk for developing osteoporosis. We systematically reviewed randomized clinical trials (RCTs), searching six databases, and conducted meta-analyses to examine GH effects on BMD of the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Data for fracture incidence, bone metabolism biomarkers, and adverse events were also extracted and analysed. Thirteen RCTs met the eligibility criteria. Pooled effect sizes suggested no significant GH effect on BMD. Pooled effect sizes were largest, but nonsignificant, when compared to placebo. GH had a significant effect on several bone metabolism biomarkers. A significantly higher rate of adverse events was observed in the GH groups. Meta-analysis of RCTs suggests that GH treatment for persons with or at risk for developing osteoporosis results in very small, nonsignificant increases in BMD.

  10. A case-control study of hormonal exposures as etiologic factors for ALS in women: Euro-MOTOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, James P K; Visser, Anne E; D'Ovidio, Fabrizio; Vermeulen, Roel; Beghi, Ettore; Chio, Adriano; Veldink, Jan H; Logroscino, Giancarlo; van den Berg, Leonard H; Hardiman, Orla

    2017-09-19

    To investigate the role of hormonal risk factors for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) among women from 3 European countries. ALS cases and matched controls were recruited over 4 years in Ireland, Italy, and the Netherlands. Hormonal exposures, including reproductive history, breastfeeding, contraceptive use, hormonal replacement therapy, and gynecologic surgical history, were recorded with a validated questionnaire. Logistic regression models adjusted for age, education, study site, smoking, alcohol, and physical activity were used to determine the association between female hormones and ALS risk. We included 653 patients and 1,217 controls. Oral contraceptive use was higher among controls (odds ratio [OR] 0.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.51-0.84), and a dose-response effect was apparent. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) was associated with a reduced risk of ALS only in the Netherlands (OR = 0.57, 95% CI 0.37-0.85). These findings were robust to sensitivity analysis, but there was some heterogeneity across study sites. This large case-control study across 3 different countries has demonstrated an association between exogenous estrogens and progestogens and reduced odds of ALS in women. These results are at variance with previous findings, which may be partly explained by differential regulatory, social, and cultural attitudes toward pregnancy, birth control, and HRT across the countries included. Our results indicate that hormonal factors may be important etiologic factors in ALS; however, a full understanding requires further investigation. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. The effects of kisspeptin-10 on reproductive hormone release show sexual dimorphism in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasena, Channa N; Nijher, Gurjinder M K; Comninos, Alexander N; Abbara, Ali; Januszewki, Adam; Vaal, Meriel L; Sriskandarajah, Labosshy; Murphy, Kevin G; Farzad, Zohreh; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Bloom, Stephen R; Dhillo, Waljit S

    2011-12-01

    Kisspeptin peptides are critical in human reproductive physiology and are potential therapies for infertility. Kisspeptin-10 stimulates gonadotropin release in both male and female rodents. However, few studies have investigated the effects of kisspeptin-10 on gonadotropin release in humans, and none have investigated the effect in women. If kisspeptin is to be useful for treating reproductive disease, its effects in both men and women must be established. To compare the effects of kisspeptin-10 administration on reproductive hormone release in healthy men and women. Intravenous bolus kisspeptin-10 was administered to men and women (n = 4-5 per group). Subcutaneous bolus and i.v. infusion of kisspeptin-10 was also administered to female women (n = 4-5 per group). Circulating reproductive hormones were measured. In healthy men, serum LH and FSH were elevated after i.v. bolus kisspeptin-10, at doses as low as 0.3 and 1.0 nmol/kg, respectively. In healthy women during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle, no alterations in serum gonadotropins were observed after i.v. bolus, s.c. bolus, or i.v. infusion of kisspeptin-10 at maximal doses of 10 nmol/kg, 32 nmol/kg, and 720 pmol/kg/min, respectively. In women during the preovulatory phase, serum LH and FSH were elevated after i.v. bolus kisspeptin-10 (10 nmol/kg). Kisspeptin-10 stimulates gonadotropin release in men as well as women during the preovulatory phase of menstrual cycle but fails to stimulate gonadotropin release in women during the follicular phase. The sexual dimorphism of the responsiveness of healthy men and women to kisspeptin-10 administration has important clinical implications for the potential of kisspeptin-10 to treat disorders of reproduction.

  12. Ultrasensitive determination of human growth hormone (hGH) with a disposable electrochemical magneto-immunosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafín, V; Úbeda, N; Agüí, L; Yáñez-Sedeño, P; Pingarrón, J M

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, an electrochemical magneto-immunosensor for the detection of human growth hormone (hGH) is described for the first time. The immunosensor involves the use of tosyl-activated magnetic microparticles (TsMBs) to covalently immobilize a monoclonal mAbhHG antibody. A sandwich-type immunoassay with a secondary pAbhGH antibody and anti-IgG labelled with alkaline phosphatase (anti-IgG-AP) was employed. TsMBs–mAbhGH–hGH–pAbhGH–anti-IgG-AP conjugates were deposited onto the surface of a screen-printed gold electrode using a small neodymium magnet, and electrochemical detection was performed by square-wave voltammetry upon the addition of 4-aminophenyl phosphate as the AP substrate. All the variables involved in the preparation of immunoconjugates and in the immunoassay protocol were optimized. A calibration curve for hGH was constructed with a linear range between 0.01 and 100 ng/mL (r = 0.998) and a limit of detection of 0.005 ng/mL. This value is nearly three orders of magnitude lower than that obtained using surface plasmon resonance (Treviño et al., Talanta 78:1011-1016, 2009). Furthermore, good repeatability, with RSD = 3% (n = 10) at the 1-ng/mL hGH level, was obtained. Cross-reactivity studies with other hormones demonstrated good selectivity. The magneto-immunosensor was applied to the analysis of human serum spiked with hGH at the 4- and 0.1-ng/mL levels. Mean recoveries of 96 ± 6% and 99 ± 2%, respectively, were obtained.

  13. Endocrine control of canine mammary neoplasms: serum reproductive hormone levels and tissue expression of steroid hormone, prolactin and growth hormone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerri, Michèle; Guscetti, Franco; Hartnack, Sonja; Boos, Alois; Oei, Christine; Balogh, Orsolya; Nowaczyk, Renata M; Michel, Erika; Reichler, Iris M; Kowalewski, Mariusz P

    2015-09-15

    Neoplasms of the mammary gland are among the most common diseases in female domestic dogs (Canis familiaris). It is assumed that reproductive hormones influence tumorigenesis in this species, although the precise role of the endocrine milieu and reproductive state is subject to continuing discussion. In line with this, a recent systematic review of available data on the development of mammary neoplasms revealed weak evidence for risk reduction after neutering and an effect of age at neutering. Investigation of several hormone receptors has revealed decreased expression of estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα, ESR1), progesterone (P4) receptor (PGR), prolactin (PRL) receptor (PRLR) and growth hormone receptor (GHR) associated with neoplastic differentiation of mammary tissues. In other studies, increased levels of estrogens, progesterone and prolactin were found in serum and/or tissue homogenates of dogs with malignant neoplasms. However, the association between these entities within one animal population was never previously examined. Therefore, this study investigated the association between circulating serum concentrations of estradiol-17β, progesterone and prolactin, and gene expression of ERα (ESR1), ERβ (ESR2), PGR, PRLR, PRL and GHR, with respect to reproductive state (spayed vs. intact) and cycle stage (anestrus vs. diestrus). Additionally, the expression of E-cadherin (CDH-1) was evaluated as a possible indicator of metastatic potential. For all receptors, the lowest gene expression was found in malignant tumors compared to normal tissues of affected dogs. Steroid levels were not influenced by their corresponding receptor expression in mammary neoplasms, but increased PRL levels were negatively associated with low PRLR gene expression in malignant tumors. The expression of CDH-1 was influenced by tumor malignancy and cycle stage, i.e., the highest gene expression was found in benign mammary tumors in diestrous dogs compared to normal and malignant mammary

  14. Ten years' clinical experience with biosimilar human growth hormone: a review of efficacy data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Siguero JP

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Juan Pedro López-Siguero,1 Roland Pfäffle,2 Philippe Chanson,3 Mieczyslaw Szalecki,4,5 Nadja Höbel,6 Markus Zabransky6 1Servicio de Endocrinología Pediátrica, Hospital Materno-Infantil, Hospital Regional Universitario de Málaga, Spain; 2University Children’s Hospital Leipzig, Germany; 3Department of Endocrinology and Reproductive Diseases, Hôpital de Bicêtre, Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris-Sud, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris and University Paris-Sud, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France; 4Clinic of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Children’s Memorial Health Institute, Warsaw, Poland; 5Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences UJK, Kielce, Poland; 6Sandoz Biopharmaceuticals, Hexal AG, Holzkirchen, Germany Abstract: In 2006, the European Medicines Agency (EMA approved Omnitrope® as a biosimilar recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH, on the basis of comparable quality, safety, and efficacy to the reference medicine (Genotropin®, Pfizer. Data continue to be collected on the long-term efficacy of biosimilar rhGH from several on-going postapproval studies. Particular topics of interest include efficacy in indications granted on the basis of extrapolation, and whether efficacy of growth hormone treatment is affected when patients are changed to biosimilar rhGH from other rhGH products. Data from clinical development studies and 10 years of postapproval experience affirm the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of biosimilar rhGH across all approved indications. In addition, the decade of experience with biosimilar rhGH since it was approved in Europe confirms the scientific validity of the biosimilar pathway and the approval process. Concerns about clinical effect in extrapolated indications, and also about the impact of changing from other rhGH preparations, have been alleviated. Biosimilar rhGH is an effective treatment option for children who require therapy with rhGH. Keywords: recombinant human growth hormone, Omnitrope®, biosimilar

  15. Product wastage from modern human growth hormone administration devices: a laboratory and computer simulation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollock RF

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Richard F Pollock,1 Yujun Qian,2 Tami Wisniewski,3 Lisa Seitz,4 Anne-Marie Kappelgaard2 1Ossian Health Economics and Communications GmbH, Basel, Switzerland; 2Novo Nordisk AS, Bagsværd, Denmark; 3Novo Nordisk Inc, Princeton, NJ, USA; 4Novo Nordisk Pharma GmbH, Mainz, Germany Background: Treatment of growth hormone disorders typically involves daily injections of human growth hormone (GH over many years, incurring substantial costs. We assessed the extent of undesired GH loss due to leakage in the course of pen preparation prior to injection, and differences between the prescribed dose, based on patient weight, and the actual delivered dose based on pen dosing increments in five GH administration devices. Methods: Norditropin® prefilled FlexPro®, NordiFlex®, NordiLet®, and durable NordiPen®/SimpleXx® 5 mg pens (Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsværd, Denmark and durable Omnitrope® Pen-5 devices (Sandoz, Holzkirchen, Germany were tested (n = 40 for each device type. Product wastage was measured in accordance with validated protocols in an ISO (International Organization for Standardization 11608-1 and Good Manufacturing Practice compliant laboratory. The average mass of wasted GH from each device type was measured in simulations of dripping with the needle attached prior to injection and while setting a dose. Statistical significance (P < 0.05 was confirmed by Student's t-test, and a model was constructed to estimate mean annual GH wastage per patient in cohorts of pediatric patients with GH disorders. Results: Mean GH mass wasted with the needle on prior to injection was 0.0 µg with Norditropin pens, relative to 98 µg with Omnitrope Pen-5. During dose dialing, 0.0–2.3 µg of GH was lost with Norditropin pens versus 0.8 µg with Omnitrope Pen-5. All Norditropin and Omnitrope device comparisons were statistically significant. Modeling GH wastage in a US cohort showed 5.5 mg of annual GH wastage per patient with FlexPro versus 43.6 mg with

  16. Neural control of steroid hormone biosynthesis during development in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Yuko S; Niwa, Ryusuke

    2014-01-01

    The insect steroid hormone ecdysteroid plays pivotal roles in the temporal coordination of development, represented by molting and metamorphosis. During the larval stages, ecdysteroid is biosynthesized from dietary cholesterol by several ecdysteroidogenic enzymes in the specialized endocrine organ called the prothoracic gland (PG). As ecdysteroid biosynthesis in the PG is affected by several environmental cues, such as photoperiod and nutrition, a fundamental question is how the ecdysteroid biosynthesis pathway is controlled in response to environmental cues. In this review, we briefly summarize recent topics on the regulatory mechanisms of ecdysteroid biosynthesis, especially the neuronal regulatory mechanism, in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The implications from studies with other insects are also discussed.

  17. Growth Hormone differentially modulates chemoresistance in human endometrial adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentilin, Erica; Minoia, Mariella; Bondanelli, Marta; Tagliati, Federico; Degli Uberti, Ettore C; Zatelli, Maria Chiara

    2017-06-01

    Growth Hormone may influence neoplastic development of endometrial epithelium towards endometrial adenocarcinoma, which is one of the most occurring tumors in acromegalic patients. Since chemoresistance often develops in advanced endometrial adenocarcinoma, we investigated whether Growth Hormone might influence the development of chemoresistance to drugs routinely employed in endometrial adenocarcinoma treatment, such as Doxorubicin, Cisplatin, and Paclitaxel. Growth Hormone and Growth Hormone receptor expression was assessed by immunofluorescence in two endometrial adenocarcinoma cell lines, AN3 CA and HEC-1-A cells. Growth Hormone effects were assessed investigating cell viability, caspase3/7 activation, ERK1/2, and protein kinase C delta protein expression. AN3 CA and HEC-1-A cells display Growth Hormone and Growth Hormone receptor. Growth Hormone does not influence cell viability in both cells lines, but significantly reduces caspase 3/7 activation in AN3 CA cells, an effect blocked by a Growth Hormone receptor antagonist. Growth Hormone rescues AN3 CA cells from the inhibitory effects of Doxorubicin and Cisplatin on cell viability, while it has no effect on Paclitaxel. Growth Hormone does not influence the pro-apoptotic effects of Doxorubicin, but is capable of rescuing AN3 CA cells from the pro-apoptotic effects of Cisplatin. On the other hand, Growth Hormone did not influence the effects of Doxorubicin and Paclitaxel on HEC-1A cell viability. The protective action of Growth Hormone towards the effects of Doxorubicin may be mediated by ERK1/2 activation, while the pro-apoptotic effects of Cisplatin may be mediated by protein kinase C delta inhibition. All together our results indicate that Growth Hormone may differentially contribute to endometrial adenocarcinoma chemoresistance. This may provide new insights on novel therapies against endometrial adenocarcinoma chemoresistant aggressive tumors.

  18. Associations of in utero exposure to perfluorinated alkyl acids with human semen quality and reproductive hormones in adult men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vested, Anne; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst; Olsen, Sjurdur Frodi; Bonde, Jens Peter; Kristensen, Susanne Lund; Halldorsson, Thorhallur Ingi; Becher, Georg; Haug, Line Småstuen; Ernst, Emil Hagen; Toft, Gunnar

    2013-04-01

    Perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs), persistent chemicals with unique water-, dirt-, and oil-repellent properties, are suspected of having endocrine-disrupting activity. The PFAA compounds perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) are found globally in humans; because they readily cross the placental barrier, in utero exposure may be a cause for concern. We investigated whether in utero exposure to PFOA and PFOS affects semen quality, testicular volume, and reproductive hormone levels. We recruited 169 male offspring (19-21 years of age) from a pregnancy cohort established in Aarhus, Denmark, in 1988-1989, corresponding to 37.6% of the eligible sons. Each man provided a semen sample and a blood sample. Semen samples were analyzed for sperm concentration, total sperm count, motility, and morphology, and blood samples were used to measure reproductive hormones. As a proxy for in utero exposure, PFOA and PFOS were measured in maternal blood samples from pregnancy week 30. Multivariable linear regression analysis suggested that in utero exposure to PFOA was associated with lower adjusted sperm concentration (ptrend = 0.01) and total sperm count (ptrend = 0.001) and with higher adjusted levels of luteinizing hormone (ptrend = 0.03) and follicle-stimulating hormone (ptrend = 0.01). PFOS did not appear to be associated with any of the outcomes assessed, before or after adjustment. The results suggest that in utero exposure to PFOA may affect adult human male semen quality and reproductive hormone levels.

  19. How clocks and hormones act in concert to control the timing of insect development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cara, Francesca; King-Jones, Kirst

    2013-01-01

    During the last century, insect model systems have provided fascinating insights into the endocrinology and developmental biology of all animals. During the insect life cycle, molts and metamorphosis delineate transitions from one developmental stage to the next. In most insects, pulses of the steroid hormone ecdysone drive these developmental transitions by activating signaling cascades in target tissues. In holometabolous insects, ecdysone triggers metamorphosis, the remarkable remodeling of an immature larva into a sexually mature adult. The input from another developmental hormone, juvenile hormone (JH), is required to repress metamorphosis by promoting juvenile fates until the larva has acquired sufficient nutrients to survive metamorphosis. Ecdysone and JH act together as key endocrine timers to precisely control the onset of developmental transitions such as the molts, pupation, or eclosion. In this review, we will focus on the role of the endocrine system and the circadian clock, both individually and together, in temporally regulating insect development. Since this is not a coherent field, we will review recent developments that serve as examples to illuminate this complex topic. First, we will consider studies conducted in Rhodnius that revealed how circadian pathways exert temporal control over the production and release of ecdysone. We will then take a look at molecular and genetic data that revealed the presence of two circadian clocks, located in the brain and the prothoracic gland, that regulate eclosion rhythms in Drosophila. In this context, we will also review recent developments that examined how the ecdysone hierarchy delays the differentiation of the crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) neurons, an event that is critical for the timing of ecdysis and eclosion. Finally, we will discuss some recent findings that transformed our understanding of JH function. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mineral, amino acid, and hormonal composition of chicken eggshell powder and the evaluation of its use in human nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, A; Pakan, [No Value; Hofstede, GJH; Muskiet, FAJ; Van Der Veer, E; De Vries, PJF

    2000-01-01

    Chicken eggshell powder (ESP) might be an attractive source of Ca for human nutrition. To study its nutritional value, we analyzed minerals, amino acids, and hormones in commercially available Slovakian ESP. The mineral composition was compared with three Dutch ESP samples that differed in feed and

  1. SIX1 Oncoprotein as a Biomarker in a Model of Hormonal Carcinogenesis and in Human Endometrial Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The oncofetal protein sine oculis-related homeobox 1 (SIX1) is a developmental transcription factor associated with carcinogenesis in animal models and humans. In a model of hormonal carcinogenesis, mice neonatally exposed to the soy phytoestrogen, genistein (GEN), or the synthet...

  2. Growth hormone replacement delays the progression of chronic heart failure combined with growth hormone deficiency: an extension of a randomized controlled single-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cittadini, Antonio; Marra, Alberto M; Arcopinto, Michele; Bobbio, Emanuele; Salzano, Andrea; Sirico, Domenico; Napoli, Raffaele; Colao, Annamaria; Longobardi, Salvatore; Baliga, Ragavendra R; Bossone, Eduardo; Saccà, Luigi

    2013-08-01

    This study sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of long-term growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy in GH-deficient patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Recent evidence indicates that growth hormone deficiency (GHD) affects as many as 40% of patients with CHF, and short-term GH replacement causes functional benefit. Whether long-term GH replacement also affects CHF progression is unknown. The study is an extension of a previous randomized, controlled single-blind trial that screened 158 consecutive CHF patients (New York Heart Association classes II to IV) and identified 63 who had GHD by the growth hormone releasing hormone plus arginine test. Fifty-six patients were randomized to receive either GH therapy or standard CHF therapy. Patients were evaluated at baseline and after a 4-year follow-up. The primary endpoint was peak oxygen consumption (VO2). Secondary endpoints included left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction and volumes, serum amino terminal fragment of the pro-hormone brain-type natriuretic peptide, quality of life, and safety. Seventeen patients in the GH group and 14 in the control group completed the study. In the GH group, peak VO2 improved over the 4-year follow-up. The treatment effect was 7.1 ± 0.7 ml/kg/min versus -1.8 ± 0.5 ml/kg/min in the GH and control groups, respectively. At 4 years, LV ejection fraction increased by 10 ± 3% in the GH group, whereas it decreased by 2 ± 5% in control patients. The treatment effect on LV end-systolic volume index was -22 ± 6 ml and 8 ± 3 ml/m(2) in the GH and control groups, respectively (all p < 0.001). No major adverse events were reported in the patients who received GH. Although this is a preliminary study, the finding suggests a new therapeutic approach to a large proportion of GHD patients with CHF. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sterol-derived hormone(s controls entry into diapause in Caenorhabditis elegans by consecutive activation of DAF-12 and DAF-16.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitali Matyash

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Upon starvation or overcrowding, Caenorhabditis elegans interrupts its reproductive cycle and forms a specialised larva called dauer (enduring. This process is regulated by TGF-beta and insulin-signalling pathways and is connected with the control of life span through the insulin pathway components DAF-2 and DAF-16. We found that replacing cholesterol with its methylated metabolite lophenol induced worms to form dauer larvae in the presence of food and low population density. Our data indicate that methylated sterols do not actively induce the dauer formation but rather that the reproductive growth requires a cholesterol-derived hormone that cannot be produced from methylated sterols. Using the effect of lophenol on growth, we have partially purified activity, named gamravali, which promotes the reproduction. In addition, the effect of lophenol allowed us to determine the role of sterols during dauer larva formation and longevity. In the absence of gamravali, the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12 is activated and thereby initiates the dauer formation program. Active DAF-12 triggers in neurons the nuclear import of DAF-16, a forkhead domain transcription factor that contributes to dauer differentiation. This hormonal control of DAF-16 activation is, however, independent of insulin signalling and has no influence on life span.

  4. Human metastatic melanoma cell lines express high levels of growth hormone receptor and respond to GH treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sustarsic, Elahu G; Junnila, Riia K; Kopchick, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer Institute's NCI60 panel includes 60 cancer cell lines from nine types of human cancer: breast, CNS, colon, leukemia, melanoma, non-small cell lung, ovarian, prostate and renal. We utilized this panel to quantify expression of GHR, GH, prolactin receptor (PRLR) and prolactin (PRL) mRNA with real......Accumulating evidence implicates the growth hormone receptor (GHR) in carcinogenesis. While multiple studies show evidence for expression of growth hormone (GH) and GHR mRNA in human cancer tissue, there is a lack of quantification and only a few cancer types have been investigated. The National......-time RT qPCR. Both GHR and PRLR show a broad range of expression within and among most cancer types. Strikingly, GHR expression is nearly 50-fold higher in melanoma than in the panel as a whole. Analysis of human metastatic melanoma biopsies confirmed GHR gene expression in melanoma tissue. In these human...

  5. Effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone and human chorionic gonadotropin on cows with ovarian follicular cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, B E; Convey, E M; Oxender, W D

    1976-02-01

    Ovarian follicular cysts of cattle were defined as follicular structures (larger than or equal to 2.5 cm, diameter) which persisted for 10 days or longer in the absence of functional luteal tissue. Thirty dairy cows with ovarian follicular cysts were allotted to 6 groups (5 cows per group) and each was given 0 (saline solution), 25, 50, 100, 150, or 250 mug of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) by intramuscular (IM) injection. Samples of blood were collected before GnRH was injected (0 hour), at 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1, 2, 3, and 4 hours, and at 1, 7, 11, 15, and 20 days after treatment. Five additional cows with follicular cysts were treated IM with 10,000 units of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG), and blood sample collections were made before treatment (0 hour) and on days 1, 7, 11, 15, and 20 after treatment. Serum luteinizing hormone (LH) concentration was not altered in cows given saline solution, but was increased significantly in cows given any of the doses of GnRH (in a dose-related manner). Peak LH responses occurred about 2 hours after GnRH was given, and by 4 hours LH was beginning to decrease. Serum progesterone concentrations increased by more than 2.0 ng/ml by day 11 after treatment in 18 of 20 cows treated with 50, 100, 150, or 250 mug of GnRH. Progesterone responses in these cows were greater (P less than 0.05) than in cows given saline solution or a 25-mug dose of GnRH. Mean progesterone response to the 4 large doses of GnRH was similar in magnitude and duration to serum progesterone changes during the leutal phase of the bovine estrous cycle. After cows were treated with HCG, serum progesterone values were similar to those in cows given GnRH (50 to 250 mug).

  6. Exploring Genitoanal Injury and HIV Risk Among Women: Menstrual Phase, Hormonal Birth Control, and Injury Frequency and Prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brawner, Bridgette M; Sommers, Marilyn S; Moore, Kendra; Aka-James, Rose; Zink, Therese; Brown, Kathleen M; Fargo, Jamison D

    2016-02-01

    Genital, anal, and oral injuries sustained from sexual intercourse may explain HIV transmission among women. We determined the variability in genitoanal injury frequency and prevalence in women after consensual sexual intercourse, exploring the role of menstrual phase and hormonal birth control. We used a longitudinal observational design with a convenience sample of 393 women aged 21 years and older. Participants had a baseline interview with gynecological examination, followed by consensual sexual intercourse with a male partner and a second gynecological examination. We analyzed injury prevalence with logistic regression and injury frequency with negative binomial regression among women who were (1) menstrual, not using hormonal birth control, (2) menstrual, using hormonal birth control, or (3) menopausal. We also compared injury among menstrual women in the follicular, ovulatory, and luteal phases. Women using hormonal birth control had 38% more external genitalia injuries [adjusted rate ratio (ARR) = 1.38, P = 0.030] and more than twice the anal injuries (ARR = 2.67, P = 0.005) as the nonhormonal birth control menstruating group. Menopausal women had more than 3 times the anal injuries (ARR = 3.36, P = 0.020) than those in the nonhormonal menstrual group. Among menstrual women, those in the follicular phase had a greater prevalence and frequency of external genitalia injuries than those in other phases. Increased rates of postcoital genitoanal injuries are noted among women using hormonal birth control and/or in the follicular phase of menstruation. Biological factors that influence women's risk for HIV warrant further investigation.

  7. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human antidiuretic hormone receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibold, A.; Brabet, P.; Rosenthal, W.; Birnbaumer, M. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))

    1992-11-01

    Applying a genomic DNA-expression approach, the authors cloned the gene and cDNA coding for the human antidiuretic hormone receptor, also called vasopressin V2 receptor' (V2R). The nucleotide sequence of both cloned DNAs provided the information to elucidate the structure of the isolated transcriptional unit. The structure of this gene is unusual in that it is the first G protein-coupled receptor gene that contains two very small intervening sequences, the second of which separates the region encoding the seventh transmembrane region from the rest of the open reading frame. The sequence information was used to synthesize appropriate oligonucleotides to be used as primers in the PCR. The V2R gene was localized by PCR using DNA from hybrid cells as template. The gene was found to reside in the q28-qter portion of the human X chromosome, a region identified as the locus for congential nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  8. ELISA for Determination of Human Growth Hormone: Recognition of Helix 4 Epitopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Bonald C.

    2004-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) signal transduction initiates with a receptor dimerization in which one molecule binds to the receptor through sites 1 and 2. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed for quantifying hGH molecules that present helix 4 from binding site 1. For this, horse anti-rhGH antibodies were eluted by an immunoaffinity column constituted by sepharose-rhGH. These antibodies were purified through a second column with synthetic peptide correspondent to hGH helix 4, immobilized to sepharose, and used as capture antibodies. Those that did not recognize synthetic peptide were used as a marker antibody. The working range was of 1.95 to 31.25 ng/mL of hGH. The intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) was between 4.53% and 6.33%, while the interassay CV was between 6.00% and 8.27%. The recovery range was between 96.0% to 103.8%. There was no cross-reactivity with human prolactin. These features show that our assay is an efficient method for the determination of hGH. PMID:15292580

  9. ELISA for Determination of Human Growth Hormone: Recognition of Helix 4 Epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana F. Moura

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Human growth hormone (hGH signal transduction initiates with a receptor dimerization in which one molecule binds to the receptor through sites 1 and 2. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed for quantifying hGH molecules that present helix 4 from binding site 1. For this, horse anti-rhGH antibodies were eluted by an immunoaffinity column constituted by sepharose-rhGH. These antibodies were purified through a second column with synthetic peptide correspondent to hGH helix 4, immobilized to sepharose, and used as capture antibodies. Those that did not recognize synthetic peptide were used as a marker antibody. The working range was of 1.95 to 31.25 ng/mL of hGH. The intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV was between 4.53% and 6.33%, while the interassay CV was between 6.00% and 8.27%. The recovery range was between 96.0% to 103.8%. There was no cross-reactivity with human prolactin. These features show that our assay is an efficient method for the determination of hGH.

  10. Insulin in human milk and the use of hormones in infant formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamir, Raanan; Shehadeh, Naim

    2013-01-01

    Human milk contains a substantial number of hormones and growth factors. Studies in animal models show that some of these peptides (e.g. insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1, IGF-1, epidermal growth factors) have an effect on the small intestine after orogastric administration. Recently, two efforts were made to incorporate growth factors into infant formulas. One of these efforts included the incorporation of IGF-1, and the second is an ongoing effort to evaluate the safety and efficacy of incorporating insulin into infant formulas. The rational and current evidence for adding insulin to infant formulas (presence in human milk, effects of orally administrated insulin on gut maturation, intestinal permeability, systemic effects and preliminary encouraging results of supplementing insulin to a preterm infant formula) is detailed in this review. If the addition of insulin to preterm infant formulas indeed results in better growth and accelerated intestinal maturation, future studies will need to address the supplementation of insulin in term infants and assess the efficacy of such supplementation in enhancing gut maturation and prevention of later noncommunicable diseases such as allergy, autoimmune diseases and obesity. Copyright © 2013 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. The role of gut hormones in controlling the food intake: what is their role in emerging diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prete, Anna; Iadevaia, Maddalena; Loguercio, Carmelina

    2012-03-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) receives peripheral relevant information that are able to regulate individual's energy balance through metabolic, neural, and endocrine signals. Ingested nutrients come into contact with multiple sites in the gastrointestinal tract that have the potential to alter peptide and neural signaling. There is a strong relationship between CNS and those peripheral signals (as gastrointestinal hormones) in the control of food intake. The purpose of this review is to give updated information about the role of gut hormones as mediators of feeding behavior and of different nutrients in modulating gut hormones production. The role of gut hormones in the pathogenesis of emerging diseases as obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is also discussed together with the possible role of these peripheral signals as targets of future therapeutic options. Copyright © 2011 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Plasma hormone levels in human subject during stress loads in microgravity and at readaptation to Earth's gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, L; Koska, J; Ksinantova, L; Vigas, M; Noskov, V B; Grigoriev, A I; Kvetnansky, R

    2001-07-01

    In great part of the investigations of endocrine system functions in astronauts during space flights the plasma levels of hormones and metabolites were determined only in resting conditions, usually from one blood sample collection. Such levels reflected the psychical and physical state and new hormonal homeostasis of organism at the time of blood collection, however, the functional capacity of neuroendocrine system to respond to various stress stimuli during space flight remained unknown. The aim of present investigations was to study dynamic changes of hormone levels during the stress and metabolic loads (insulin induced hypoglycemia, physical exercise and oral glucose tolerance test) at the exposure of human subject to microgravity on the space station MIR. The responses of sympatico-adrenomedullary system to these stress and workloads were presented by Kvetnansky et al.

  13. Central and peripheral effects of thyroid hormone signalling in the control of energy metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkemade, A.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence points towards a role for thyroid hormone signalling in the central nervous system with respect to the development of symptoms of thyroid disease, in addition to the well-known peripheral effects of thyroid hormone. Thyroid hormone affects target tissues directly via thyroid

  14. Phase 1 safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic study of single ascending doses of XM17 (recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone in downregulated healthy women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lammerich A

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Andreas Lammerich, Peter Bias, Beate Gertz Merckle GmbH, Ulm, Germany Background: XM17 is a recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone (follitropin alfa for stimulation of multifollicular development in women undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation during assisted reproductive therapy and for treatment of anovulation. Manufactured using Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with the human follicle-stimulating hormone gene, XM17 has an identical amino acid sequence to that of the human protein as well as to those of the other approved recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone products. Glycosylation patterns may differ slightly between products. The objectives of this first-in-human study were to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and dose-proportionality of single ascending subcutaneous doses of XM17 in healthy young female volunteers.Methods: Endogenous follicle-stimulating hormone was downregulated by implanting a 1-month depot of goserelin acetate 3.6 mg on day 0 in eligible subjects. On day 14 of the experimental period, subjects received one of four ascending doses of XM17. Blood sampling to obtain the pharmacokinetic profile of XM17 was done at frequent intervals until 168 hours post-dose.Results: Following downregulation of endogenous follicle-stimulating hormone to <4 IU/L, 40 subjects (of mean age 29±5.4 years received single subcutaneous doses of 37.5 (n=4, pilot group, 75, 150, or 300 IU (n=12 each of XM17. The mean serum concentration-time profiles of XM17 revealed dose-related increases in maximum concentration (Cmax within 24 hours followed by monoexponential decay for the three higher dose levels. Slopes estimated by linear regression for Cmax and AUC0–168h were ~1.0 (0.9052 IU/L and 1.0964 IU·h/L, respectively. For each IU of XM17 administered, Cmax and AUC0–168h rose by 0.032 IU/L and 2.60 IU·h/L, respectively. Geometric mean elimination half-life ranged from 54 to 90 hours. No antibodies

  15. Comparison of radioiodine biokinetics following the administration of recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone and after thyroid hormone withdrawal in thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luster, Markus; Lassmann, Michael; Haenscheid, Heribert; Reiners, Christoph [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Wuerzburg, Josef-Schneider-Strasse 2, 97080, Wuerzburg (Germany); Sherman, Steven I. [Section of Endocrine Neoplasia and Hormonal Disorders, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Skarulis, Monica C. [Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Reynolds, James R. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren Grant Magnusen Clinical Center, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2003-10-01

    Iodine kinetics were studied in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer while euthyroid under exogenous thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and while hypothyroid to detect differences in radioiodine uptake, distribution and elimination. Nine patients with total or near-total thyroidectomy on thyroid hormone suppressive therapy received two or three daily doses of 0.9 mg recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) followed by administration of a diagnostic activity of 2 mCi (74 MBq) iodine-131. After the biokinetics assessments had been performed, patients stopped taking thyroid hormones to become hypothyroid. A second 2 mCi (74 MBq) diagnostic activity of {sup 131}I was administered, followed by a second set of biokinetics assessments. One week later the patients underwent remnant ablation with a therapeutic activity of {sup 131}I. A comparison of the {sup 131}I kinetics in the patients while euthyroid and while hypothyroid showed major differences in the doses to the remnant as well as in residence times and radiation exposure to the blood. In the first diagnostic assessment the remnant dose was higher in eight of the nine patients and clearance of the activity from the blood was faster in all of them. The data from this study suggest that radioiodine administration is potent and safe when administered to euthyroid patients following rhTSH administration. Enhanced residence time in the remnant and decreased radiation exposure to the blood were noted when patients were euthyroid compared to when they were rendered hypothyroid. However, all patients received diagnostic activities in the same order: first while euthyroid, followed by hypothyroidism. It is quite possible that ''stunning'' from the radioiodine administered in the initial uptake study inhibited the subsequent uptake of radioiodine by the remnant lesions in the second uptake study. (orig.)

  16. Outpatient 60-hour day-and-night glucose control with dual-hormone artificial pancreas, single-hormone artificial pancreas, or sensor-augmented pump therapy in adults with type 1 diabetes: An open-label, randomised, crossover, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidar, Ahmad; Messier, Virginie; Legault, Laurent; Ladouceur, Martin; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi

    2017-05-01

    To assess whether the dual-hormone (insulin and glucagon) artificial pancreas reduces hypoglycaemia compared to the single-hormone (insulin alone) artificial pancreas in outpatient settings during the day and night. In a randomized, three-way, crossover trial we compared the dual-hormone artificial pancreas, the single-hormone artificial pancreas and sensor-augmented pump therapy (control) in 23 adults with type 1 diabetes. Each intervention was applied from 8 AM Day 1 to 8 PM Day 3 (60 hours) in outpatient free-living conditions. The primary outcome was time spent with sensor glucose levels below 4.0 mmol/L. A P value of less than .017 was regarded as significant. The median difference between the dual-hormone system and the single-hormone system was -2.3% (P = .072) for time spent below 4.0 mmol/L, -1.3% (P = .017) for time below 3.5 mmol/L, and -0.7% (P = .031) for time below 3.3 mmol/L. Both systems reduced (P artificial pancreas had the lowest risk of hypoglycaemia, but the differences were not statistically significant. Larger studies are needed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Endocrine Disruption: Computational Perspectives on Human Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin and Phthalate Plasticizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Ishfaq A.; Turki, Rola F.; Abuzenadah, Adel M.; Damanhouri, Ghazi A.; Beg, Mohd A.

    2016-01-01

    Phthalates are a class of high volume production chemicals used as plasticizers for household and industrial use. Several members of this chemical family have endocrine disrupting activity. Owing to ubiquitous environmental distribution and exposure of human population at all stages of life, phthalate contamination is a continuous global public health problem. Clinical and experimental studies have indicated that several phthalates are associated with adverse effects on development and function of human and animal systems especially the reproductive system and exposures during pregnancy and early childhood are by far of utmost concern. Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is a plasma carrier protein that binds androgens and estrogens and represents a potential target for phthalate endocrine disruptor function in the body. In the present study, the binding mechanism of the nine phthalates i.e. DMP, DBP, DIBP, BBP, DNHP, DEHP, DNOP, DINP, DIDP with human SHBG was delineated by molecular docking simulation. Docking complexes of the nine phthalates displayed interactions with 15–31 amino acid residues of SHBG and a commonality of 55–95% interacting residues between natural ligand of SHBG, dihydrotestosterone, and the nine phthalate compounds was observed. The binding affinity values were more negative for long chain phthalates DEHP, DNOP, DINP, and DIDP compared to short chain phthalates such as DMP and DBP. The Dock score and Glide score values were also higher for long chain phthalates compared to short chain phthalates. Hence, overlapping of interacting amino acid residues between phthalate compounds and natural ligand, dihydrotestosterone, suggested potential disrupting activity of phthalates in the endocrine homeostasis function of SHBG, with long chain phthalates expected to be more potent than the short chain phthalates. PMID:26963243

  18. Comparative Analysis of Human Growth Hormone in Serum Using SPRi, Nano-SPRi and ELISA Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Stephen; Zeidan, Effat; Henrich, Vincent C; Sandros, Marinella G

    2016-01-07

    Sensitive and selective methods for the detection of human growth hormone (hGH) over a wide range of concentrations (high levels of 50-100 ng ml(-) (1) and minimum levels of 0.03 ng ml(-) (1)) in circulating blood are essential as variable levels may indicate altered physiology. For example, growth disorders occurring in childhood can be diagnosed by measuring levels of hGH in blood. Also, the misuse of recombinant hGH in sports not only poses an ethical issue it also presents serious health threats to the abuser. One popular strategy for measuring hGH misuse, relies on the detection of the ratio of 22 kDa hGH to total hGH, as non-22 kDa endogenous levels drop after exogenous recombinant hGH (rhGH) administration. Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) is an analytical tool that allows direct (label-free) monitoring and visualization of biomolecular interactions by recording changes of the refractive index adjacent to the sensor surface in real time. In contrast, the most frequently used colorimetric method, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) uses enzyme labeled detection antibodies to indirectly measure analyte concentration after the addition of a substrate that induces a color change. To increase detection sensitivity, amplified SPRi uses a sandwich assay format and near infrared quantum dots (QDs) to increase signal strength. After direct SPRi detection of recombinant rhGH in spiked human serum, the SPRi signal is amplified by the sequential injection of detection antibody coated with near-infrared QDs (Nano-SPRi). In this study, the diagnostic potential of direct and amplified SPRi was assessed for measuring rhGH spiked in human serum and compared directly with the capabilities of a commercially available ELISA kit.

  19. Growth Hormone Safety Workshop Position Paper: a critical appraisal of recombinant human growth hormone therapy in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allen, David B; Backeljauw, Philippe; Bidlingmaier, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant human GH (rhGH) has been in use for 30 years, and over that time its safety and efficacy in children and adults has been subject to considerable scrutiny. In 2001, a statement from the GH Research Society (GRS) concluded that 'for approved indications, GH is safe'; however, the statem......Recombinant human GH (rhGH) has been in use for 30 years, and over that time its safety and efficacy in children and adults has been subject to considerable scrutiny. In 2001, a statement from the GH Research Society (GRS) concluded that 'for approved indications, GH is safe'; however......, the statement highlighted a number of areas for on-going surveillance of long-term safety, including cancer risk, impact on glucose homeostasis, and use of high dose pharmacological rhGH treatment. Over the intervening years, there have been a number of publications addressing the safety of rhGH with regard...

  20. Auxologic parameters and response to 2-year therapy with recombinant human growth hormone in growth hormone deficient children with an ectopic posterior pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalina, Maria; Kalina-Faska, Barbara; Gruszczyńska, Katarzyna; Baron, Jan; Cisowska, Anita; Morawiec, Karolina; Biel-Lewandowska, Paulina; Małecka-Tendera, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Structural defects of the hypothalamic-pituitary area in MRI are suggested as being a more accurate marker of growth hormone deficiency (GHD) than laboratory assays. To compare auxological characteristics in GHD children with normal pituitary (NP) function and with ectopic posterior pituitary (EPP), prior to therapy with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH), extending the follow-up to two years following treatment. Eighty-six (86) GHD patients were divided into two groups depending on the pituitary MRI: the EPP (23 children, 3.2-16.8 years old) and the NP group (63 children, 3.3-14.8 years old). Height deficits in the population (hSD) and parents (hSD-mpSD) and the change of hSD and bone/chronological age ratio were assessed before and after 12 and 24 months of rhGH therapy. Height deficits before treatment were significantly greater in EPP compared to NP [median -4.07 (-7.06, -2.75) vs -3.15 (-4.9, -2.35) for hSD, and -3.65 (-7.06, -1.21) vs -1.83 (-4.31, -0.28) for hSD-mpSD; pgrowth compared to NP [ΔhSD=1.2 (0.42, 2.69) vs 0.74 (0.05, 1.48); pchildren, as well as beneficial effects of rhGH therapy in both groups.

  1. Growth hormone-releasing hormone antagonist inhibits the invasiveness of human endometrial cancer cells by down-regulating twist and N-cadherin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsien-Ming; Huang, Hong-Yuan; Schally, Andrew V; Chao, Angel; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Leung, Peter C K; Wang, Hsin-Shih

    2017-01-17

    More than 25% of patients diagnosed with endometrial carcinoma have invasive primary cancer accompanied by metastases. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) plays an important role in reproduction. Here, we examined the effect of a GHRH antagonist on the motility of endometrial cancer cells and the mechanisms of action of the antagonist in endometrial cancer. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were used to determine the expression of the GHRH receptor protein. The activity of Twist and N-cadherin was determined by Western blotting. Cell motility was assessed by an invasion and migration assay. GHRH receptor siRNA was applied to knockdown the GHRH receptor in endometrial cancer cells. The GHRH antagonist inhibited cell motility in a dose-dependent manner. The GHRH antagonist inhibited cell motility and suppressed the expression of Twist and N-cadherin, and the suppression was abolished by GHRH receptor siRNA pretreatment. Moreover, the inhibition of Twist and N-cadherin with Twist siRNA and N-cadherin siRNA, respectively, suppressed cell motility. Our study indicates that the GHRH antagonist inhibited the cell motility of endometrial cancer cells through the GHRH receptor via the suppression of Twist and N-cadherin. Our findings represent a new concept in the mechanism of GHRH antagonist-suppressed cell motility in endometrial cancer cells and suggest the possibility of exploring GHRH antagonists as potential therapeutics for the treatment of human endometrial cancer.

  2. Hormonal regulation of lipoprotein lipase in adipose tissue (studies in the rat and in humans)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G.A. Baggen (Marinus)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractCurrent data strongly suggest the most important role for insulin in the hormonal regulation of adipose tissue LPL activity. It is not clear from the literature what the role is of glucocorticoids in the regulation of the enzyme. Stress hormones as ACTH and adrenalin for example seem

  3. Unsaturated fatty acids prevent desensitization of the human growth hormone secretagogue receptor by blocking its internalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.D. Delhanty (Patric); A. Kerkwijk (Anke); M. Huisman (Martijn); B. van de Zande (Bedette); M. Verhoef-Post (Miriam); C. Gauna (Carlotta); L.J. Hofland (Leo); A.P.N. Themmen (Axel); A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe composition of the plasma membrane affects the responsiveness of cells to metabolically important hormones such as insulin and vasoactive intestinal peptide. Ghrelin is a metabolically regulated hormone that activates the G protein-coupled receptor GH secretagogue receptor type 1a

  4. Screening of pharmaceuticals and hormones at the regional scale, in surface and groundwaters intended to human consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vulliet, Emmanuelle, E-mail: e.vulliet@sca.cnrs.fr [Institut des Sciences Analytiques - UMR5280, Departement Service Central d' Analyse, Echangeur de Solaize, Chemin du Canal, F-69360 Solaize (France); Cren-Olive, Cecile [Institut des Sciences Analytiques - UMR5280, Departement Service Central d' Analyse, Echangeur de Solaize, Chemin du Canal, F-69360 Solaize (France)

    2011-10-15

    As part of a regional screening to evaluate the risk, for the health of populations, to certain classes of emerging substances, several families of pharmaceuticals and hormones were looked for in waters intended to drinking. Thus, 52 substances were investigated in 71 surface waters and 70 groundwaters. Results indicate that no water was free of pollutants, regardless of its origin (surface or groundwater) and the season of collect. The pharmaceuticals most frequently detected and with the highest concentration levels were salicylic acid, carbamazepine and acetaminophen. Among hormones, testosterone, androstenedione and progesterone were detected in almost all the samples. Globally the groundwaters were less contaminated than surface waters in regards pharmaceuticals frequencies and levels. On the other side, androgens and progestagens were present with comparable frequencies and levels in both compartments. The risk linked to the presence of these substances on human health is discussed. - Highlights: > Traces of 52 substances investigated in 71 surface waters and 70 groundwaters. > No water was free of pollutants, whatever its origin and the season of collect. > Globally groundwaters were less contaminated than surface waters in regards pharmaceuticals. > Hormones were present with comparable frequencies and levels in two compartments. - 52 pharmaceuticals and hormones investigated in 71 surface waters and 70 groundwaters intended to human consumption.

  5. Three-year results of a randomized prospective trial of methionyl human growth hormone and oxandrolone in Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, R G; Hintz, R L; Johanson, A J; Sherman, B; Brasel, J A; Burstein, S; Chernausek, S; Compton, P; Frane, J; Gotlin, R W

    1988-08-01

    Seventy girls with Turner syndrome, 4 to 12 years of age, participated in a prospective, randomized study to determine the effects on growth of methionyl human growth hormone (met-hGH) or oxandrolone. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive either no treatment (control) or met-hGH (0.125 mg/kg three times per week), oxandrolone (0.125 mg/kg/day), or combination met-hGH plus oxandrolone. At the end of an initial period of 12 to 20 months, patients in the original control and oxandrolone groups were given combination met-hGH plus oxandrolone. At that time the dosage of oxandrolone was lowered to 0.0625 mg/kg/day. Sixty-five subjects have now completed the first 3 years of the study. Compared with the control growth rate for year 1 (3.8 cm/yr), significant increases in growth rate were seen in all 3 years of combination therapy (9.8, 7.4, and 6.1 cm/yr, respectively) and in the first 2 years of treatment with met-hGH alone (6.6, 5.4, and 4.6 cm/yr). When growth velocity was expressed as standard deviation for age in girls with Turner syndrome, significant increases relative to the control group for year 1 (-0.1 SD) were seen in all three years of both combination therapy and met-hGH alone (combination, +6.6, +4.3, +3.0 SD; met-hGH, +3.1, +2.0, +1.4 SD). After 3 years of treatment, predicted adult height by the method of Bayley-Pinneau increased 4.5 cm in the met-hGH group and 8.2 cm in the combination group.

  6. Associations between Maternal Body Composition and Appetite Hormones and Macronutrients in Human Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugananthan, Sambavi; Gridneva, Zoya; Lai, Ching T; Hepworth, Anna R; Mark, Peter J; Kakulas, Foteini; Geddes, Donna T

    2017-03-09

    Human milk (HM) appetite hormones and macronutrients may mediate satiety in breastfed infants. This study investigated associations between maternal adiposity and concentrations of HM leptin, adiponectin, protein and lactose, and whether these concentrations and the relationship between body mass index and percentage fat mass (%FM) in a breastfeeding population change over the first year of lactation. Lactating women (n = 59) provided milk samples (n = 283) at the 2nd, 5th, 9th and/or 12th month of lactation. Concentrations of leptin, adiponectin, total protein and lactose were measured. Maternal %FM was measured using bioimpedance spectroscopy. Higher maternal %FM was associated with higher leptin concentrations in both whole (0.006 ± 0.002 ng/mL, p = 0.008) and skim HM (0.005 ± 0.002 ng/mL, p = 0.007), and protein (0.16 ± 0.07 g/L, p = 0.028) concentrations. Adiponectin and lactose concentrations were not associated with %FM (0.01 ± 0.06 ng/mL, p = 0.81; 0.08 ± 0.11 g/L, p = 0.48, respectively). Whole milk concentrations of adiponectin and leptin did not differ significantly over the first year of lactation. These findings suggest that the level of maternal adiposity during lactation may influence the early appetite programming of breastfed infants by modulating concentrations of HM components.

  7. Expression of human placental lactogen and variant growth hormone genes in placentas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Rodriguez, H G; Guerra-Rodriguez, N E; Iturbe-Cantu, M A; Martinez-Torres, A; Barrera-Saldaña, H A

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies comparing the expression levels of human placental lactogen (hPL) genes have shown varying results, due to, perhaps, the fact that in all of them only one placenta was being analyzed. Here, the expression of hPL and growth hormone variant (hGH-V) genes in fifteen term placentas was comparatively analyzed at the RNA level, using reverse transcription coupled to polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The abundance of the combined RNA transcripts derived from these genes varied from one placenta to another. The authors found that hPL-4 transcripts were more abundant than those of hPL-3 in most samples (ratios from 1:1 to 6:1), transcripts from the putative hPL-1 pseudogene were more abundant at the unprocessed stage while those of the hGH-V gene were mostly processed. Again, the authors of this study observed wide variation from placenta to placenta in the abundance of both of these types of transcripts. The same was observed when a group of six placentas from abortuses and nine from pregnancies complicated by preclampsia, diabetes and hypertension was studied. The authors conclude that the disagreeing results reported in the literature which are not in agreement concerning the expression levels of hPL genes could be explained by normal variations of their expression levels among the different placentas analyzed.

  8. Potential therapeutic applications of human anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) analogues in reproductive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Vitaly A; Seifer, David B; Barad, David H; Sen, Aritro; Gleicher, Norbert

    2017-09-01

    Members of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily are key regulators of various physiological processes. Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) which is also commonly known as Müllerian-inhibiting substance (MIS) is a member of the TGF-beta superfamily and an important regulator of reproductive organ differentiation and ovarian follicular development. While AMH has been used for diagnostic purposes as a biomarker for over 15 years, new potential therapeutic applications of recombinant human AMH analogues are now emerging as pharmacologic agents in reproductive medicine. Therapeutic uses of AMH in gonadal tissue may provide a unique opportunity to address a broad range of reproductive themes, like contraception, ovulation induction, onset of menopause, and fertility preservation, as well as specific disease conditions, such as polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) and cancers of the reproductive tract. This review explores the most promising therapeutic applications for a novel class of drugs known as AMH analogues with agonist and antagonist functions.

  9. Expression of functional recombinant human growth hormone in transgenic soybean seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Nicolau B; Murad, André M; Cipriano, Thaís M; Araújo, Ana Cláudia G; Aragão, Francisco J L; Leite, Adilson; Vianna, Giovanni R; McPhee, Timothy R; Souza, Gustavo H M F; Waters, Michael J; Rech, Elíbio L

    2011-08-01

    We produced human growth hormone (hGH), a protein that stimulates growth and cell reproduction, in genetically engineered soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] seeds. Utilising the alpha prime (α') subunit of β-conglycinin tissue-specific promoter from soybean and the α-Coixin signal peptide from Coix lacryma-jobi, we obtained transgenic soybean lines that expressed the mature form of hGH in their seeds. Expression levels of bioactive hGH up to 2.9% of the total soluble seed protein content (corresponding to approximately 9 g kg(-1)) were measured in mature dry soybean seeds. The results of ultrastructural immunocytochemistry assays indicated that the recombinant hGH in seed cotyledonary cells was efficiently directed to protein storage vacuoles. Specific bioassays demonstrated that the hGH expressed in the soybean seeds was fully active. The recombinant hGH protein sequence was confirmed by mass spectrometry characterisation. These results demonstrate that the utilisation of tissue-specific regulatory sequences is an attractive and viable option for achieving high-yield production of recombinant proteins in stable transgenic soybean seeds.

  10. Time course of pharmacokinetic and hormonal effects of inhaled high-dose salvinorin A in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew W; MacLean, Katherine A; Caspers, Michael J; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Griffiths, Roland R

    2016-04-01

    Salvinorin A is a kappa opioid agonist and the principal psychoactive constituent of the Salvia divinorum plant, which has been used for hallucinogenic effects. Previous research on salvinorin A pharmacokinetics likely underestimated plasma levels typically resulting from the doses administered due to inefficient vaporization and not collecting samples during peak drug effects. Six healthy adults inhaled a single high dose of vaporized salvinorin A (n = 4, 21 mcg/kg; n = 2, 18 mcg/kg). Participant- and monitor-rated effects were assessed every 2 min for 60 min post-inhalation. Blood samples were collected at 13 time points up to 90 min post-inhalation. Drug levels peaked at 2 min and then rapidly decreased. Drug levels were significantly, positively correlated with participant and monitor drug effect ratings. Significant elevations in prolactin were observed beginning 5 min post-inhalation and peaking at 15 min post-inhalation. Cortisol showed inconsistent increases across participants. Hormonal responses were not well correlated with drug levels. This is the first study to demonstrate a direct relationship between changes in plasma levels of salvinorin A and drug effects in humans. The results confirm the efficacy of an inhalation technique for salvinorin A. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Free access to running wheels abolishes hyperphagia in human growth hormone transgenic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsuda, Mugiko; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Matsuwaki, Takashi; Nishihara, Masugi

    2014-07-01

    Obesity is a major health problem, and increased food intake and decreased physical activity are considered as two major factors causing obesity. Previous studies show that voluntary exercise in a running wheel decreases not only body weight but also food intake of rats. We previously produced human growth hormone transgenic (TG) rats, which are characterized by severe hyperphagia and obesity. To gain more insight into the effects on physical activity to food consumption and obesity, we examined whether voluntary running wheel exercise causes inhibition of hyperphagia and alteration of body composition in TG rats. Free access to running wheels completely abolished hyperphagia in TG rats, and this effect persisted for many weeks as far as the running wheel is accessible. Unexpectedly, though the running distances of TG rats were significantly less than those of wild type rats, it was sufficient to normalize their food consumption. This raises the possibility that rearing environment, which enables them to access to a running wheel freely, rather than the amounts of physical exercises is more important for the maintenance of proper food intake.

  12. Height Outcome of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Treatment in Achondroplasia Children: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccoli, Mario; Bertelloni, Silvano; Massart, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Although recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) is not approved to treat short stature of achondroplasia (ACH), some studies suggested growth improvement during short-term rhGH treatment. A meta-analysis of rhGH therapy efficacy in ACH children was performed. From 12 English-language studies, 558 (54.0% males) rhGH-treated ACH children were enrolled. Administration of rhGH (median dosage 0.21 mg/kg/ week; range 0.16-0.42 mg/kg/week) improved height (Ht) from baseline [-5.069 standard deviation score (SDS; 95% CI -5.109 to -5.029); p < 0.0001] to 12 [-4.325 SDS (95% CI -4.363 to -4.287); p < 0.0001] and 24 months [-4.073 SDS (95% CI -4.128 to -4.019); p < 0.0001]. Then, Ht remained approximately constant up to 5 years [-3.941 SDS (95% CI -4.671 to -3.212); p < 0.0001]. In ACH children, rhGH treatment increased Ht from -5.0 to -4.0 SDS during 5 years, but insufficient data are available on both the adult Ht and the changes of body proportions. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Associations between Maternal Body Composition and Appetite Hormones and Macronutrients in Human Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambavi Kugananthan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Human milk (HM appetite hormones and macronutrients may mediate satiety in breastfed infants. This study investigated associations between maternal adiposity and concentrations of HM leptin, adiponectin, protein and lactose, and whether these concentrations and the relationship between body mass index and percentage fat mass (%FM in a breastfeeding population change over the first year of lactation. Lactating women (n = 59 provided milk samples (n = 283 at the 2nd, 5th, 9th and/or 12th month of lactation. Concentrations of leptin, adiponectin, total protein and lactose were measured. Maternal %FM was measured using bioimpedance spectroscopy. Higher maternal %FM was associated with higher leptin concentrations in both whole (0.006 ± 0.002 ng/mL, p = 0.008 and skim HM (0.005 ± 0.002 ng/mL, p = 0.007, and protein (0.16 ± 0.07 g/L, p = 0.028 concentrations. Adiponectin and lactose concentrations were not associated with %FM (0.01 ± 0.06 ng/mL, p = 0.81; 0.08 ± 0.11 g/L, p = 0.48, respectively. Whole milk concentrations of adiponectin and leptin did not differ significantly over the first year of lactation. These findings suggest that the level of maternal adiposity during lactation may influence the early appetite programming of breastfed infants by modulating concentrations of HM components.

  14. Body segments and growth hormone.

    OpenAIRE

    Bundak, R; Hindmarsh, P C; Brook, C G

    1988-01-01

    The effects of human growth hormone treatment for five years on sitting height and subischial leg length of 35 prepubertal children with isolated growth hormone deficiency were investigated. Body segments reacted equally to treatment with human growth hormone; this is important when comparing the effect of growth hormone on the growth of children with skeletal dysplasias or after spinal irradiation.

  15. Ovarian Hormones and Transdermal Nicotine Administration Independently and Synergistically Suppress Tobacco Withdrawal Symptoms and Smoking Reinstatement in the Human Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Raina D; Liautaud, Madalyn M; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Huh, Jimi; Monterosso, John; Leventhal, Adam M

    2018-03-01

    Modeling intra-individual fluctuations in estradiol and progesterone may provide unique insight into the effects of ovarian hormones on the etiology and treatment of nicotine dependence. This randomized placebo-controlled laboratory study tested the independent and interactive effects of intra-individual ovarian hormone variation and nicotine on suppression of tobacco withdrawal symptoms and smoking behavior. Female smokers randomized to 21 mg nicotine (TNP; n=37) or placebo (PBO; n=43) transdermal patch following overnight abstinence completed three sessions occurring during hormonally distinct menstrual cycle phases. At each session, participants provided saliva for hormone assays and completed repeated self-report measures (ie, tobacco withdrawal symptoms, smoking urge, and negative affect (NA)) followed by an analog smoking reinstatement task for which participants could earn money to delay smoking and subsequently purchase cigarettes to smoke. Higher (vs lower) progesterone levels were associated with greater reductions in NA. Higher (vs lower) progesterone levels and progesterone to estradiol ratios were associated with reducing smoking urges over time to a greater extent with TNP compared to PBO. There was an interaction between Patch and estradiol on NA. With TNP, higher-than-usual estradiol was associated with greater decreases in NA. However with PBO, lower-than-usual estradiol was associated with greater decreases in NA. These results suggest that the effects of TNP on mood- and smoking-related outcomes may vary depending on the ovarian hormone levels.

  16. Mass spectrometric analysis of innovator, counterfeit, and follow-on recombinant human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haitao; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Karger, Barry L; Hancock, William S

    2009-01-01

    We have performed a detailed characterization of recombinant human growth hormone that included the identification of the entire sequence with disulfide linkages as well as subtle modifications by a sensitive liquid chromatography coupled online with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS) approach using the accurate peptide mass (FTICR MS) and sequence assignment (MS/MS measurement). The extent of oxidation, deamidation, and chain cleavages were measured by the ratio of peak areas of the nonmodified peptide vs. the sum of peak area of the nonmodified and modified peptides in the same LC-MS analysis. The subtle but distinct differences were found in the recombinant human growth from the three manufacturers (the follow-on, counterfeit, and the original innovator products). In relative comparison, the follow-on product had the highest degree of oxidation at methionine residues, followed by the counterfeit product, and the original innovator product had the least amount of oxidation at all three sites with the similar oxidation order. In cases, the oxidation order was Met14 > Met125 > Met170. In contrast, the follow-on had the least amount of deamidation at aspargine (Asn149), and the counterfeit had the highest degree of deamidation at this site. For the chain cleavage, the follow-on product had the highest cleavage occurring at T 10 peptide (between Asn99 and Ser100), the counterfeit had the highest cleavage on T4 peptide, (between Glu30 and Phe31), and the original innovator product with the least amount of cleavages on both sites. These subtle but distinct differences are likely because of nonidentical manufacturing, formulation procedures, and storage conditions.

  17. Hormone therapy in acne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chembolli Lakshmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Underlying hormone imbalances may render acne unresponsive to conventional therapy. Relevant investigations followed by initiation of hormonal therapy in combination with regular anti-acne therapy may be necessary if signs of hyperandrogenism are present. In addition to other factors, androgen-stimulated sebum production plays an important role in the pathophysiology of acne in women. Sebum production is also regulated by other hormones, including estrogens, growth hormone, insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1, glucocorticoids, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and melanocortins. Hormonal therapy may also be beneficial in female acne patients with normal serum androgen levels. An understanding of the sebaceous gland and the hormonal influences in the pathogenesis of acne would be essential for optimizing hormonal therapy. Sebocytes form the sebaceous gland. Human sebocytes express a multitude of receptors, including receptors for peptide hormones, neurotransmitters and the receptors for steroid and thyroid hormones. Various hormones and mediators acting through the sebocyte receptors play a role in the orchestration of pathogenetic lesions of acne. Thus, the goal of hormonal treatment is a reduction in sebum production. This review shall focus on hormonal influences in the elicitation of acne via the sebocyte receptors, pathways of cutaneous androgen metabolism, various clinical scenarios and syndromes associated with acne, and the available therapeutic armamentarium of hormones and drugs having hormone-like actions in the treatment of acne.

  18. Aging changes in hormone production

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004000.htm Aging changes in hormone production To use the sharing ... that produce hormones are controlled by other hormones. Aging also changes this process. For example, an endocrine ...

  19. Adenohypophysial changes in mice transgenic for human growth hormone-releasing factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefaneanu, L; Kovacs, K; Horvath, E

    1989-01-01

    The effect of protracted GH-releasing factor (GRF) stimulation on adenohypophysial morphology was investigated in six mice transgenic for human GRF (hGRF). All animals had significantly higher plasma levels of GH and GRF and greater body weights than controls. Eight-month-old mice were killed...

  20. Characterisation of Population Pharmacokinetics and Endogenous Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) Levels after Multiple Dosing of a Recombinant Human FSH, FE 999049, in Healthy Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Trine Høyer; Röshammer, Daniel; Erichsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to characterise the population pharmacokinetics of FE 999049, a novel recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), after multiple dosing in healthy women, taking into account endogenous FSH levels and the reproductive hormone dynamics. Methods...

  1. Molecular and cellular actions of a structural domain of human growth hormone (AOD9401) on lipid metabolism in Zucker fatty rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, F M; Jiang, W J; Gianello, R; Pitt, S; Roupas, P

    2000-12-01

    A lipolytic domain (AOD9401) of human growth hormone (hGH) which resides in the carboxyl terminus of the molecule and contains the amino acid residues 177-191, has been synthesized using solid-phase peptide synthesis techniques. AOD9401 stimulated hormone-sensitive lipase and inhibited acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (acetyl CoA carboxylase) in isolated rat adipose tissues, in a similar manner to the actions of the intact hGH molecule. The synthetic lipolytic domain mimicked the effect of the intact growth hormone on diacylglycerol release in adipocytes. Chronic treatment of obese Zucker rats with AOD9401 for 20 days reduced the body weight gain of the animals, and the average cell size of the adipocytes of the treated animals decreased from 110 to 80 microm in diameter. Unlike hGH, synthetic AOD9401 did not induce insulin resistance or glucose intolerance in the laboratory animals after chronic treatment. The results suggest that AOD9401 has the potential to be developed into a therapeutic agent for the control of obesity.

  2. Plant hormone cytokinins control cell cycle progression and plastid replication in apicomplexan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrabi, Syed Bilal Ahmad; Tahara, Michiru; Matsubara, Ryuma; Toyama, Tomoko; Aonuma, Hiroka; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Suematsu, Makoto; Tanabe, Kazuyuki; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Nagamune, Kisaburo

    2018-02-01

    Cytokinins are plant hormones that are involved in regulation of cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and cell and plastid development. Here, we show that the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium berghei, an opportunistic human pathogen and a rodent malaria agent, respectively, produce cytokinins via a biosynthetic pathway similar to that in plants. Cytokinins regulate the growth and cell cycle progression of T. gondii by mediating expression of the cyclin gene TgCYC4. A natural form of cytokinin, trans-zeatin (t-zeatin), upregulated expression of this cyclin, while a synthetic cytokinin, thidiazuron, downregulated its expression. Immunofluorescence microscopy and quantitative PCR analysis showed that t-zeatin increased the genome-copy number of apicoplast, which are non-photosynthetic plastid, in the parasite, while thidiazuron led to their disappearance. Thidiazuron inhibited growth of T. gondii and Plasmodium falciparum, a human malaria parasite, suggesting that thidiazuron has therapeutic potential as an inhibitor of apicomplexan parasites. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Suppression of FAT/CD36 mRNA by human growth hormone in pancreatic ß-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Louise Torp; Thams, Peter Grevsen; Gaarn, Louise Winkel

    2011-01-01

    of this study was to examine the effect of human growth hormone (hGH) on mRNAs of fatty acid transport and binding proteins expressed in pancreatic ß-cells, and to examine this in relation to ß-cell survival after exposure to fatty acids. hGH decreased mRNA levels of FAT/CD36, whereas mRNAs of GPR40, FASN, FABP...

  4. Suppression of FAT/CD36 mRNA by human growth hormone in pancreatic β-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Louise Torp; Thams, Peter Grevsen; Gaarn, Louise Winkel

    2011-01-01

    of this study was to examine the effect of human growth hormone (hGH) on mRNAs of fatty acid transport and binding proteins expressed in pancreatic β-cells, and to examine this in relation to β-cell survival after exposure to fatty acids. hGH decreased mRNA levels of FAT/CD36, whereas mRNAs of GPR40, FASN, FABP...

  5. Hormones in pain modulation and their clinical implications for pain control: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueyin; Zhang, Jinyuan; Wang, Xiangrui

    2016-07-01

    Recently, more and more studies have found that pain generation, transmission and modulation are under hormonal regulation. Indeed, hormonal dysregulation is a common component of chronic pain syndromes. Studies have attempted to determine whether the relationship between the pain and its perception and hormones is a causative relationship and how these processes interrelate. This review summarizes and analyzes the current experimental data and provides an overview of the studies addressing these questions. The relationship between pain perception and endocrine effects suggests that hormones can be used as important biomarkers of chronic pain syndromes and/or be developed into therapeutic agents in the fight against pain.

  6. Ozone Exposure Increases Circulating Stress Hormones and Lipid Metabolites in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    RATIONALE: Air pollution has been associated with increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes; however, the mechanisms remain unknown. We have shown that acute ozone exposure in rats induces release of stress hormones, hyperglycemia, leptinemia, and gluoose intolerance that are assoc...

  7. Toward quantifying the usage costs of human immunity: Altered metabolic rates and hormone levels during acute immune activation in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlenbein, Michael P; Hirschtick, Jana L; Bonner, Julia Z; Swartz, Ann M

    2010-01-01

    There is a paucity of data on the energetic demands of human immune functions, despite the fact that both clinical medicine and evolutionary biology would benefit from further clarification of these costs. To better understand the energetic requirements of mounting a mild immune response, as well as some of the major hormonal changes underlying these metabolic changes, we examined changes in resting metabolic rate (RMR) and hormones during and after respiratory tract infection in young adult men. An epidemiologic passive detection design was used to recruit 25 nonfebrile subjects naturally infected with respiratory tract pathogens. Symptomology, percent body fat, RMR, salivary testosterone and cortisol, and other information were collected at a minimum of three time points during and after convalescence. Comparisons of the differences in RMR, testosterone, and cortisol between sampling days within individual cases were made using paired t-tests. Participants experienced 8% higher RMR during illness, and a subset of these men experienced a mean increase greater than 14%. The participants also experienced 10% lower testosterone levels during illness, and a subset of these participants experienced a mean decrease of 30%, although cortisol levels did not change significantly. These results document elevated RMR following natural pathogen exposure in adult humans, demonstrating that even mild immune reactions can elicit significant increases in energy expenditure. Understanding the costs of immunity and the immunomodulatory actions of hormones are central to understanding the role of immunity in human life history evolution.

  8. Steroid hormone control of cell death and cell survival: molecular insights using RNAi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suganthi Chittaranjan

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The insect steroid hormone ecdysone triggers programmed cell death of obsolete larval tissues during metamorphosis and provides a model system for understanding steroid hormone control of cell death and cell survival. Previous genome-wide expression studies of Drosophila larval salivary glands resulted in the identification of many genes associated with ecdysone-induced cell death and cell survival, but functional verification was lacking. In this study, we test functionally 460 of these genes using RNA interference in ecdysone-treated Drosophila l(2mbn cells. Cell viability, cell morphology, cell proliferation, and apoptosis assays confirmed the effects of known genes and additionally resulted in the identification of six new pro-death related genes, including sorting nexin-like gene SH3PX1 and Sox box protein Sox14, and 18 new pro-survival genes. Identified genes were further characterized to determine their ecdysone dependency and potential function in cell death regulation. We found that the pro-survival function of five genes (Ras85D, Cp1, CG13784, CG32016, and CG33087, was dependent on ecdysone signaling. The TUNEL assay revealed an additional two genes (Kap-alpha3 and Smr with an ecdysone-dependent cell survival function that was associated with reduced cell death. In vitro, Sox14 RNAi reduced the percentage of TUNEL-positive l(2mbn cells (p<0.05 following ecdysone treatment, and Sox14 overexpression was sufficient to induce apoptosis. In vivo analyses of Sox14-RNAi animals revealed multiple phenotypes characteristic of aberrant or reduced ecdysone signaling, including defects in larval midgut and salivary gland destruction. These studies identify Sox14 as a positive regulator of ecdysone-mediated cell death and provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the ecdysone signaling network governing cell death and cell survival.

  9. Do Hormonal Contraceptives Alter Mate Choice and Relationship Functioning in Humans?

    OpenAIRE

    Larson, Christina Marie

    2014-01-01

    Most women in the United States use hormonal contraceptives at some point in their lives, yet little is known about their psychological side-effects. A number of scholars have recently argued that hormonal contraceptives might impair women's ability to choose desirable mates and cause problems in their relationship functioning. My dissertation evaluated these claims through a comprehensive review of the literature and two empirical studies. In my review of more than 30 studies examining assoc...

  10. Cues to sex- and stress-hormones in the human male face: functions of glucocorticoids in the immunocompetence handicap hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, F R; Al Dujaili, E A S; Cornwell, R E; Smith, M J Law; Lawson, J F; Sharp, M; Perrett, D I

    2011-08-01

    The stress-linked version of the immunocompetence handicap hypothesis has been proposed to account for inconsistencies in relationships between testosterone and immune response. The model has received some support from studies demonstrating roles of stress hormones in relationships between testosterone, immune function and secondary sexual ornamentation. Such work, however, has relied on artificial elevation of testosterone so may not reflect relationships in natural populations. We created human male facial stimuli on the basis of naturally co-occurring levels of salivary testosterone and the stress hormone cortisol. In Study 1 we tested female preferences for male faces with cues to combinations of the hormones across the menstrual cycle, and in Study 2 we tested perceptions of health and dominance in a novel set of facial stimuli. Females preferred cues to low cortisol, a preference that was strongest during the fertile phase of the menstrual cycle. The effects of cortisol on attractiveness and perceived health and dominance were contingent upon level of testosterone: the effects of the stress hormone were reduced when testosterone was high. We propose explanations for our results, including low cortisol as a cue to a heritable component of health, attractiveness as a predictor of low social-evaluative threat (and, therefore, low baseline cortisol) and testosterone as a proxy of male ability to cope efficiently with stressors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Use of hormonal contraceptives to control menstrual bleeding: attitudes and practice of Brazilian gynecologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makuch MY

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available María Y Makuch,1 Maria José D Osis,1 Karla Simonia de Pádua,1,2 Luis Bahamondes3 1Center for Research in Reproductive Health (CEMICAMP, 2Prof Dr José Aristodemo Pinotti Women's Hospital, University of Campinas, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Campinas, and National Institute of Hormones and Women's Health, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil Background: The purpose of this study was to assess the attitudes and prescribing practices of Brazilian obstetricians and gynecologists regarding use of contraceptive methods to interfere with menstruation and/or induce amenorrhea. Methods: We undertook a nationwide survey of Brazilian obstetricians and gynecologists selected using a computer-generated randomization system. Participants completed a questionnaire on prescription of contraceptives and extended/continuous regimens of combined oral contraceptives (COCs. Results: In total, 79.2% of Brazilian obstetricians and gynecologists reported that 20%–40% of their patients consulted them for menstrual-related complaints and 26%–34% of the gynecologists reported that 21%–40% of their patients consulted them for reduction in the intensity, frequency, and/or duration of menstrual bleeding. Overall, 93% stated that medically induced amenorrhea represents no risk to women's health and 82.5% said that they prescribed contraceptives to control menstruation or induce amenorrhea. The contraceptives most commonly prescribed were extended-cycle 24/4 or 26/2 COC regimens and the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system. Poisson regression analysis showed that Brazilian obstetricians and gynecologists prescribing contraceptives to control menstruation or induce amenorrhea consider extended-use or continuous-use COC regimens to be effective for both indications (prevalence ratio 1.23 [95% confidence interval 1.09–1.40] and prevalence ratio 1.28 [95% confidence interval 1.13–1.46], respectively. They also

  12. Oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1 expression in human breast and prostate cancer cases, and its regulation by sex steroid hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Jorge Maia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1 is an interferon-induced protein characterised by its capacity to catalyse the synthesis of 2ʹ-5ʹ-linked oligomers of adenosine from adenosine triphosphate (2-5A. The 2-5A binds to a latent Ribonuclease L (RNase L, which subsequently dimerises into its active form and may play an important role in the control of cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. Previously, our research group identified OAS1 as a differentially-expressed gene in breast and prostate cancer cell lines when compared to normal cells. This study evaluates: i the expression of OAS1 in human breast and prostate cancer specimens; and ii the effect of sex steroid hormones in regulating the expression of OAS1 in breast (MCF-7 and prostate (LNCaP cancer cell lines. The obtained results showed that OAS1 expression was down-regulated in human infiltrative ductal carcinoma of breast, adenocarcinoma of prostate, and benign prostate hyperplasia, both at mRNA and protein level. In addition, OAS1 expression was negatively correlated with the progression of breast and prostate cancer. With regards to the regulation of OAS1 gene, it was demonstrated that 17β-estradiol (E2 down-regulates OAS1 gene in MCF-7 cell lines, an effect that seems to be dependent on the activation of oestrogen receptor (ER. On the other hand, 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT treatment showed no effect on the expression of OAS1 in LNCaP cell lines. The lower levels of OAS1 in breast and prostate cancer cases indicated that the OAS1/RNaseL apoptotic pathway may be compromised in breast and prostate tumours. Moreover, the present findings suggested that this effect may be enhanced by oestrogen in ER-positive breast cancers.

  13. Biometry of the hypospadic penis after hormone therapy (testosterone and estrogen): A randomized, double-blind controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Kelly Christina de Castro; Bastos, André Netto; Miana, Laura Pimenta; Barros, Eveline de Souza; Ramos, Plínio Santos; Miranda, Lara Meneguelli; Faria, Natália Maia; Avarese de Figueiredo, André; de Bessa, José; Netto, José Murillo B

    2016-08-01

    The use of preoperative hormonal stimulation before hypospadias surgery aims to increase penile size and achieve better surgical results; however, the rules are not clear in the literature. We evaluated the effects of topical testosterone and estrogen in the hypospadic penis regarding biometric measures, side effects, and serum hormonal levels. To our knowledge, this is the first study using estradiol prior to hypospadias surgery. Sixty-nine children with hypospadias were randomly divided into three study groups: a control group (CG) of 17 children given placebo cream; a testosterone group (TG) of 28 children who used 1% testosterone propionate; and an estradiol group (EG) of 24 children using 0.01% estradiol. All subjects applied the topical ointment on the entire penis, twice daily for 30 days before surgical correction. Biometric evaluation of the penis included penile length and diameter, glans diameter, distance from the urethral meatus to the tip, and the width of the urethral plate. These measurements as well as serum hormone level, and side effects were evaluated prior to hormone use, and 30 and 90 days after. After 30 days an increase in penile diameter and length and diameter of the glans were observed in TG (p penis had a tendency to increase also in TG. Estradiol did not change biometric measure of the penis. Few side effects occurred after both hormones, and any that did improved after 90 days follow-up and did not change hormone serum levels. Preoperative use of topical testosterone increases penile size, diameter of the penis and glans. The use of estradiol does not change penile biometry. Side effects occur mainly with the use of testosterone and are transient. No significant and persistent hormonal changes were observed. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of human growth hormone products' cost in pediatric and adult patients. A budgetary impact model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazalo, Gary R; Joshi, Ashish V; Germak, John

    2007-09-01

    We assessed the economic impact to the United States payer of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) utilization, comparing the relative dosage efficiency of marketed pen-based and vial-based products in a pediatric and in an adult population. A budgetary impact model calculated drug costs based on product waste and cost. Waste was the difference between prescribed dose, based on patient weight, and actual delivered dose, based on dosing increments and maximum deliverable dose for pens and a fixed-percent waste as derived from the literature for vials. Annual wholesale acquisition costs were calculated based upon total milligrams delivered, using a daily dose of 0.03 mg/kg for pediatric patients and 0.016 mg/kg for adults. Total annual drug costs were compared for two scenarios: 1) a product mix based on national market share and 2) restricting use to the product with lowest waste. Based on the literature, waste for each vial product was 23 percent. Among individual pens, waste was highest for Humatrope 24 mg (19.5 percent pediatric, 14.3 percent adult) and lowest for Norditropin Nordi-Flex 5 mg (1.1 percent pediatric, 1 percent adult). Restricting use to the brand with least waste (Norditropin), compared to national product share mix, resulted in a 10.2 percent reduction in annual pediatric patient cost from $19,026 to $17,089 and an 8 percent reduction in annual adult patient cost from $24,099 to $22,161. We concluded that pen delivery systems result in less waste than vial and syringe. Considering all approved delivery systems, Norditropin resulted in the least product waste and lower annual patient cost for both pediatric and adult populations.

  15. Thyroid hormone excess stimulates the synthesis of proteoglycan in human skin fibroblasts in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishiba, Yoshimasa; Ozawa, Yasunori; Shimizu, Taeko (Division of Endocrinology and Endocrine Research Laboratory, Toranomon Hospital (Japan)); Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Yokoi, Noriko (Okinaka Memorial Institute for Medical Research, Akasaka, Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that proteoglycan accumulated in the affected skin of circumscribed pretibial myxedema of Graves' disease. As an underlying mechanism responsible for the accumulation, we sought to determine whether excess thyroid hormone was partially responsible for the increase in proteoglycan synthesis. Human skin fibroblasts were cultured in Ham's F-10 medium containing 1% Nutridoma with graded doses of T{sub 3}(0.184 x 10{sup -9} to 46 x 10{sup -9} mol/l) and were labelled with ({sup 35}S)sulphate and ({sup 3}H)glucosamine. Proteoglycans were purified by Sephadex G-50, Q-Sepharose chromatography with NaCl-gradient and Sepharose CL-6B chromatography. {sup 35}S and {sup 3}H incorporated into dermatan sulphate proteoglycan and heparan sulphate proteoglycan and {sup 3}H incorporated into hyaluronan were measured. {sup 35}S and {sup 3}H incorporation into dermatan sulphate proteoglycan was minimum at a T{sub 3} concentration of 0.184 x 10{sup -9} mol/l, and increased with increasing doses of T{sub 3} up to 46 x 10{sup -9} mol/l. {sup 35}S and {sup 3}H incorporation into heparan sulphate proteoglycan also increased with increasing-doses of T{sub 3}. {sup 3}H incorporation into hyaluranan was not influenced at all by T{sub 3}. The increased incorporation of {sup 35}S into proteoglycan in high-T{sub 3} culture reflects the increased synthesis of proteoglycan because 1. the extent of sulphation of disaccharides examined by thin-layer chromatography was not altered by T{sub 3}; 2. the specific activity of ({sup 35}S)sulphate was not influenced by T{sub 3}, and 3. T{sub 3} did not decrease the degradation rate of cell-associated proteoglycan. (author).

  16. Autocrine human growth hormone increases sensitivity of mammary carcinoma cell to arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekri, Ali; Ghaffari, Seyed H; Yousefi, Meysam; Ghanizadeh-Vesali, Samad; Mojarrad, Majid; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2013-09-05

    Human growth hormone (hGH) has been increasingly implicated in a variety of cancers; its up-regulation is observed in breast cancer and correlates with a poor outcome. Autocrine hGH promotes mammary carcinoma cell survival, proliferation, immortalization; it confers an invasive phenotype as a result of an epithelial-mesenchymal transition and contributes to chemoresistance and radioresistance. Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is being successfully used as a first and second line therapy for the treatment of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. It also inhibits tumor cell growth and induces apoptosis in a broad range of solid tumors. In the present study, we investigated the effect of hGH on sensitivity of a mammary adenocarcinoma cell to ATO, using a stable hGH-transfectant MCF-7 cell line, MCF7-hGH. Our results demonstrated for the first time that the overexpression of hGH increased sensitivity of the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 to ATO through apoptotic and anti-proliferative mechanisms. The effect of ATO on the transcriptional level of genes involved in survival (Bcl-2, Bax and Survivin), self-sufficiency in growth signals (c-Myc, ARF, Cdc25A, p53 and Bax), immortalization (hTERT) and invasion and metastasis (MMP-2 and MMP-9, uPA and uPAR and E-cadherin) was more pronounced in MCF7-hGH compared with its parental MCF-7 line. Our study may highlight the potential application of ATO for the treatment of patients with breast cancer, especially in those who have metastatic and chemoresistant tumor phenotype possibly due to the over expression of hGH. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ten years of clinical experience with biosimilar human growth hormone: a review of safety data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrás Pérez, Maria Victoria; Kriström, Berit; Romer, Tomasz; Walczak, Mieczyslaw; Höbel, Nadja; Zabransky, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Safety concerns for recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) treatments include impact on cancer risk, impact on glucose homeostasis, and the formation of antibodies to endogenous/exogenous GH. Omnitrope(®) (biosimilar rhGH) was approved by the European Medicines Agency in 2006, with approval granted on the basis of comparable quality, safety, and efficacy to the reference medicine (Genotropin(®)). Additional concerns that may exist in relation to biosimilar rhGH include safety in indications granted on the basis of extrapolation and the impact of changing to biosimilar rhGH from other rhGH treatments. A substantial data set is available to fully understand the safety profile of biosimilar rhGH, which includes data from its clinical development studies and 10 years of post-approval experience. As of June 2016, 106,941,419 patient days (292,790 patient-years) experience has been gathered for biosimilar rhGH. Based on the available data, there have been no unexpected or unique adverse events related to biosimilar rhGH treatment. There is no increased risk of cancer, adverse glucose homeostasis, or immunogenic response with biosimilar rhGH compared with the reference medicine and other rhGH products. The immunogenicity of biosimilar rhGH is also similar to that of the reference and other rhGH products. Physicians should be reassured that rhGH products have a good safety record when used for approved indications and at recommended doses, and that the safety profile of biosimilar rhGH is in keeping with that of other rhGH products.

  18. Cellular expression of growth hormone and prolactin receptors in human breast disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertani, H C; Garcia-Caballero, T; Lambert, A; Gérard, F; Palayer, C; Boutin, J M; Vonderhaar, B K; Waters, M J; Lobie, P E; Morel, G

    1998-04-17

    Growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) exert their regulatory functions in the mammary gland by acting on specific receptors. Using isotopic in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, we have localized the expression of hGH receptor (hGHR) and hPRL receptor (hPRLR) in a panel of human breast disorders. Surgical specimens from adult females included normal breast, inflammatory lesions (mastitis) benign proliferative breast disease (fibroadenoma, papilloma, adenosis, epitheliosis), intraductal carcinoma or lobular carcinoma in situ, and invasive ductal, lobular or medullary carcinoma. Cases of male breast enlargement (gynecomastia) were also studied. In situ hybridization analysis demonstrated the co-expression of hGHR and hPRLR mRNA in all samples tested. Epithelial cells of both normal and tumor tissues were labelled. Quantitative estimation of receptor mRNA levels was regionally measured in areas corresponding to tumor cells and adipose cells from the same section. It demonstrated large individual variation and no correlation emerged according to the histological type of lesion. Receptor immunoreactivity was detected both in the cytoplasm and nuclei or in the cytoplasm alone. Scattered stromal cells were found positive in some cases, but the labeling intensity was always weaker than for neoplastic epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate the expression of the hGHR and hPRLR genes and their translation in epithelial cells of normal, proliferative and neoplastic lesions of the breast. They also demonstrate that stromal components express GHR and PRLR genes. Thus the putative role of hGH or hPRL in the progression of proliferative mammary disorders is not due to grossly altered levels of receptor expression.

  19. Hormone impostors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colborn, T.; Dumanoski, D.; Myers, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the accumulating evidence that some synthetic chemicals disrupt hormones in one way or another. Some mimic estrogen and others interfere with other parts of the body`s control or endocrine system such as testosterone and thyroid metabolism. Included are PCBs, dioxins, furans, atrazine, DDT. Several short sidebars highlight areas where there are or have been particular problems.

  20. Pregnancy-associated plasma protein A in human ovarian follicles and its association with intrafollicular hormone levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøtkjær, Jane Alrø; Jeppesen, Janni Vikkelsø; Wissing, Marie Louise; Kløverpris, Søren; Oxvig, Claus; Mason, J Ian; Borgbo, Tanni; Andersen, Claus Yding

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate follicular fluid (FF) levels of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) in relation to levels of intrafollicular hormones. Furthermore, immunostaining of human follicles of varying diameters was studied for PAPP-A, antimüllerian hormone (AMH), and aromatase, and the biological activity of PAPP-A in FF was evaluated. Laboratory investigation. University hospital. A total of 43 women with a total of 80 samples were obtained from three different size-groups of antral follicles collected before and after the LH surge. ELISA measurement of steroids, PAPP-A, and AMH, immunohistochemistry of PAPP-A, AMH, and aromatase on follicles of different diameter, and proteolytic activity of PAPP-A toward insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4). Association between FF levels of PAPP-A and measured ovarian hormones, PAPP-A activity in FF, localization of PAPP-A, AMH, and aromatase in antral follicles. A highly significant association between FF levels of PAPP-A and all measured hormones were obtained with positive associations toward E2 and P, whereas AMH, T, and A showed strong negative associations. PAPP-A proteolytic activity toward IGFBP-4 was detected in human FF. PAPP-A immunostaining shifted from being primarily present in theca cells of small antral follicles to being expressed in granulosa cells (GCs) of preovulatory follicles. In contrast, AMH expression became reduced with increasing follicular diameter. Aromatase expression was highly specifically localized to GCs of preovulatory follicles. The results suggest that PAPP-A is specifically involved in the regulation of steroidogenesis in human antral follicles. Local regulation of IGF-II activity may represent a mechanism by which PAPP-A exerts this function and highlights the importance of IGF signaling during follicular development. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pubertal control mechanisms as revealed from human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipman, J J

    1980-05-15

    Human puberty is thought to be regulated by a central nervous system (CNS) program. Strong presumptive evidence for this thesis has been drawn from the augmented gonadotropin secretion that occurs synchronously with sleep in early puberty and serves as a biologic index to CNS puberty. In response to wake/sleep gonadotropin patterns, sex steroids are also secreted in circadian-like patterns during puberty. In disorders such as precocious puberty, anorexia nervosa, and gonadal dysgenesis, the physiological mechanisms that control wake/sleep differences in gonadotropin secretion appear to be intact. Studies in such patients suggest that the primary sex hormones have a quantitative but not qualitative modulating effect on the CNS program. Possible additional control mechanisms include adrenal androgen secretion and body composition.

  2. Influence of hormonal control on LH pulsatility and secretion in women with classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelot, Anne; Chakhtoura, Zeina; Plu-Bureau, Geneviève; Coudert, Mathieu; Coussieu, Christiane; Badachi, Yasmina; Dulon, Jérome; Charbit, Beny; Touraine, Philippe

    2012-10-01

    Women with classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) exhibit reduced fertility due to several factors including anovulation. This has been attributed to a disturbed gonadotropic axis as in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), but there is no precise evaluation. Our aim was to evaluate the gonadotropic axis and LH pulsatility patterns and to determine factor(s) that could account for the potential abnormality of LH pulsatility. Case/control study. Sixteen CAH women (11 with the salt-wasting form and five with the simple virilizing form), aged from 18 to 40 years, and 16 age-matched women, with regular menstrual cycles (28 ± 3 days), were included. LH pulse patterns over 6 h were determined in patients and controls. No differences were observed between patients and controls in terms of mean LH levels, LH pulse amplitude, or LH frequency. In CAH patients, LH pulsatility patterns were heterogeneous, leading us to perform a clustering analysis of LH data, resulting in a two-cluster partition. Patients in cluster 1 had similar LH pulsatility patterns to the controls. Patients in cluster 2 had: lower LH pulse amplitude and frequency and presented menstrual cycle disturbances more frequently; higher 17-OH progesterone, testosterone, progesterone, and androstenedione levels; and lower FSH levels. LH pulsatility may be normal in CAH women well controlled by hormonal treatment. Undertreatment is responsible for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, with low LH pulse levels and frequency, but not PCOS. Suppression of progesterone and androgen concentrations during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle should be a major objective in these patients.

  3. Nuclear hormone receptor NHR-49 controls fat consumption and fatty acid composition in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc R Van Gilst

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs, such as liver X receptor, farnesoid X receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs, precisely control energy metabolism. Consequently, these receptors are important targets for the treatment of metabolic diseases, including diabetes and obesity. A thorough understanding of NHR fat regulatory networks has been limited, however, by a lack of genetically tractable experimental systems. Here we show that deletion of the Caenorhabditis elegans NHR gene nhr-49 yielded worms with elevated fat content and shortened life span. Employing a quantitative RT-PCR screen, we found that nhr-49 influenced the expression of 13 genes involved in energy metabolism. Indeed, nhr-49 served as a key regulator of fat usage, modulating pathways that control the consumption of fat and maintain a normal balance of fatty acid saturation. We found that the two phenotypes of the nhr-49 knockout were linked to distinct pathways and were separable: The high-fat phenotype was due to reduced expression of enzymes in fatty acid beta-oxidation, and the shortened adult life span resulted from impaired expression of a stearoyl-CoA desaturase. Despite its sequence relationship with the mammalian hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 receptor, the biological activities of nhr-49 were most similar to those of the mammalian PPARs, implying an evolutionarily conserved role for NHRs in modulating fat consumption and composition. Our findings in C. elegans provide novel insights into how NHR regulatory networks are coordinated to govern fat metabolism.

  4. Human placental growth hormone: a potential new biomarker in gestational trophoblastic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübener, Christoph; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Wu, Zida; Diebold, Joachim; Delius, Maria; Friese, Klaus; Strasburger, Christian J; Hasbargen, Uwe

    2015-02-01

    Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) involves a spectrum of abnormal proliferations arising from the placental villous trophoblast. Although the incidence is low, a biomarker with short serum half-life would be a major clinical advance to monitor surgical and medical treatment reducing the socioeconomic burden of multiple control visits as well as patient's anxiety. Placental growth hormone (hGH-V) plays an important role in the regulation of normal placental growth and has shown angiogenic effects. We aimed to determine by immunohistochemistry (IHC) whether hGH-V is expressed in GTD and whether it can be detected in the patient's blood for potential monitoring of surgical or medical treatment procedures. Tissue and sera were collected from women undergoing treatment for GTD in a tertiary care university hospital. We evaluated partial and complete hydatidiform moles, invasive moles and choriocarcinoma, n=16. Trophoblast specimens were examined by a newly developed IHC set-up for hGH-V in addition to gross morphologic and histopathological examination. Serum samples were analyzed by a highly sensitive hGH-V specific immunoassay. hGH-V was localized in all entities of GTD to the syncytiotrophoblast by immunohistochemistry. Serum hGH-V was detected for the first time in GTD and was present in a high percentage of all analyzed entities. hGH-V can be detected in all entities of GTD by IHC as well as by serum analysis and may therefore serve as a novel biomarker for the disease. Its clinical utility in diagnosis of GTD and monitoring surgical or medical treatment needs to be determined in further studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of hormone replacement therapy on cardiovascular outcomes: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dicheng Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hormone replacement therapy (HRT is widely used to controlling menopausal symptoms and prevent adverse cardiovascular events. However, the benefit and risk of HRT on cardiovascular outcomes remains controversial. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We systematically searched the PubMed, EmBase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases for obtaining relevant literature. All eligible trials reported on the effects of HRT on cardiovascular outcomes. We did a random effects meta-analysis to obtain summary effect estimates for the clinical outcomes with use of relative risks calculated from the raw data of included trials. Of 1903 identified studies, we included 10 trials reporting data on 38908 postmenopausal women. Overall, we noted that estrogen combined with medroxyprogesterone acetate therapy as compared to placebo had no effect on coronary events (RR, 1.07; 95%CI: 0.91-1.26; P = 0.41, myocardial infarction (RR, 1.09; 95%CI: 0.85-1.41; P = 0.48, stroke (RR, 1.21; 95%CI: 1.00-1.46; P = 0.06, cardiac death (RR, 1.19; 95%CI: 0.91-1.56; P = 0.21, total death (RR, 1.06; 95%CI: 0.81-1.39; P = 0.66, and revascularization (RR, 0.95; 95%CI: 0.83-1.08; P = 0.43. In addition, estrogen therapy alone had no effect on coronary events (RR, 0.93; 95%CI: 0.80-1.08; P = 0.33, myocardial infarction (RR, 0.95; 95%CI: 0.78-1.15; P = 0.57, cardiac death (RR, 0.86; 95%CI: 0.65-1.13; P = 0.27, total mortality (RR, 1.02; 95%CI: 0.89-1.18; P = 0.73, and revascularization (RR, 0.77; 95%CI: 0.45-1.31; P = 0.34, but associated with a 27% increased risk for incident stroke (RR, 1.27; 95%CI: 1.06-1.53; P = 0.01. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Hormone replacement therapy does not effect on the incidence of coronary events, myocardial infarction, cardiac death, total mortality or revascularization. However, it might contributed an important role on the risk of incident stroke.

  6. Human factors challenges for advanced process control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubler, W.F.; O`Hara, J..M.

    1996-08-01

    New human-system interface technologies provide opportunities for improving operator and plant performance. However, if these technologies are not properly implemented, they may introduce new challenges to performance and safety. This paper reports the results from a survey of human factors considerations that arise in the implementation of advanced human-system interface technologies in process control and other complex systems. General trends were identified for several areas based on a review of technical literature and a combination of interviews and site visits with process control organizations. Human factors considerations are discussed for two of these areas, automation and controls.

  7. Pregnancy-associated plasma protein A in human ovarian follicles and its association with intrafollicular hormone levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtkjær, Jane Alrø; Jeppesen, Janni Vikkelsø; Wissing, Marie Louise

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate follicular fluid (FF) levels of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) in relation to levels of intrafollicular hormones. Furthermore, immunostaining of human follicles of varying diameters was studied for PAPP-A, antimüllerian hormone (AMH), and aromatase......, and the biological activity of PAPP-A in FF was evaluated. DESIGN: Laboratory investigation. SETTING: University hospital. PATIENT(S): A total of 43 women with a total of 80 samples were obtained from three different size-groups of antral follicles collected before and after the LH surge. INTERVENTION(S): ELISA...... measurement of steroids, PAPP-A, and AMH, immunohistochemistry of PAPP-A, AMH, and aromatase on follicles of different diameter, and proteolytic activity of PAPP-A toward insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Association between FF levels of PAPP-A and measured...

  8. The CSF and arterial to internal jugular venous hormonal differences during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Ott, Peter; Dela, Flemming

    2004-01-01

    the brain (a-v diff) of hormones that could influence its carbohydrate uptake (n= 9). In addition, neuroendocrine activity and a potential uptake of hormones via the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were assessed by lumbar puncture postexercise and at rest (n= 6). Exercise increased the arterial concentration...... protein (HSP72), insulin, or insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I. The findings indicate that for maximal exercise, the concentration of noradrenaline is increased within the brain, whereas blood borne hormones and cytokines are seemingly unimportant. The results support the notion that the exercise......Strenuous exercise increases the cerebral uptake of carbohydrate out of proportion to that of oxygen, but it is unknown whether such enhanced carbohydrate uptake is influenced by the marked endocrine response to exercise. During exhaustive exercise this study evaluated the a-v differences across...

  9. Hormones and Antibiotics in Nature: A Laboratory Module Designed to Broaden Undergraduate Perspectives on Typically Human-Centered Topics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn F. Weber

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bringing discovery-based research into undergraduate laboratory courses increases student motivation and learning gains over traditional exercises that merely teach technique or demonstrate well-documented phenomena. Laboratory experiences are further enhanced when they are designed to challenge student perspectives on topics relevant to their lives. To this end, a laboratory module on antibiotics and hormones, which are generally discussed in the context of human health, was developed for students to explore the multifaceted roles of antibiotics and hormones in nature (e.g. interspecies communication via reading primary scientific literature and performing discovery-based experiments. The main objective of this module was to increase the general biological literacy of students as determined by their ability to connect the Five Core Concepts of Biological Literacy (American Association for the Advancement of Science, Vision and Change in Undergraduate Education: A Call to Action, 2011 to the topics “hormones” and “antibiotics” in pre- and postmodule surveys. After discussing unpublished research findings, cell biology students performed experiments demonstrating that: 1 fungi may promote fern growth via hormone production, 2 novel bacterial isolates in the genus Streptomyces produce antifungal compounds, and 3 subinhibitory antibiotic concentrations may enhance soil bacterial growth. The third finding provided evidence supporting a hypothesis framed in a scientific article that students read and discussed. Student perspectives on premodule surveys focused on roles of hormones and antibiotics in the human body (e.g. development, fighting infection, but their broadened postmodule perspectives encompassed the roles of these molecules in organismal communication and possibly the evolution of multicellularity.

  10. Corticotropin-releasing hormone neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the human hypothalamus in subjects with normal and abnormal sex hormone status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bao, A.-M.; Swaab, D.F.

    2007-01-01

    In order to determine the role of peripheral sex hormone levels in the expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons, we investigated by means of immunocytochemistry the number of CRH neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in postmortem material of young and old

  11. The CSF and arterial to internal jugular venous hormonal differences during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Ott, Peter; Dela, Flemming

    2004-01-01

    the brain (a-v diff) of hormones that could influence its carbohydrate uptake (n= 9). In addition, neuroendocrine activity and a potential uptake of hormones via the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were assessed by lumbar puncture postexercise and at rest (n= 6). Exercise increased the arterial concentration...... of noradrenaline and adrenaline, but there was no cerebral uptake. However, following exercise CSF noradrenaline was 1.4 (0.73-5.5) nmol l(-1), and higher than at rest, 0.3 (0.19-1.84) nmol l(-1) (P arterial concentration of NH(4...

  12. Influence of neurohypophyseal hormones on human cervical smooth muscle contractility in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryman, I; Norström, A; Lindblom, B

    1990-02-01

    Cervical tissue strips from nonpregnant women and women in early and term pregnancy were used to study spontaneous contractile activity and the effects of oxytocin and vasopressin in vitro. Oxytocin stimulated contractions in strips from all groups of patients except for those from five term pregnant women, in which an inhibitory effect was observed at a high concentration. Vasopressin had a stimulatory effect in all groups of patients. These neurohypophyseal hormones may interact with the effect of other hormones in their regulatory influence on cervical contractility, and this interaction might be important in cervical dilatation during labor as well as in the pathophysiology of dysmenorrhea.

  13. Identification of a Hormone-regulated Dynamic Nuclear Actin Network Associated with Estrogen Receptor α in Human Breast Cancer Cell Nuclei*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosino, Concetta; Tarallo, Roberta; Bamundo, Angela; Cuomo, Danila; Franci, Gianluigi; Nassa, Giovanni; Paris, Ornella; Ravo, Maria; Giovane, Alfonso; Zambrano, Nicola; Lepikhova, Tatiana; Jänne, Olli A.; Baumann, Marc; Nyman, Tuula A.; Cicatiello, Luigi; Weisz, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) is a modular protein of the steroid/nuclear receptor family of transcriptional regulators that upon binding to the hormone undergoes structural changes, resulting in its nuclear translocation and docking to specific chromatin sites. In the nucleus, ERα assembles in multiprotein complexes that act as final effectors of estrogen signaling to the genome through chromatin remodeling and epigenetic modifications, leading to dynamic and coordinated regulation of hormone-responsive genes. Identification of the molecular partners of ERα and understanding their combinatory interactions within functional complexes is a prerequisite to define the molecular basis of estrogen control of cell functions. To this end, affinity purification was applied to map and characterize the ERα interactome in hormone-responsive human breast cancer cell nuclei. MCF-7 cell clones expressing human ERα fused to a tandem affinity purification tag were generated and used to purify native nuclear ER-containing complexes by IgG-Sepharose affinity chromatography and glycerol gradient centrifugation. Purified complexes were analyzed by two-dimensional DIGE and mass spectrometry, leading to the identification of a ligand-dependent multiprotein complex comprising β-actin, myosins, and several proteins involved in actin filament organization and dynamics and/or known to participate in actin-mediated regulation of gene transcription, chromatin dynamics, and ribosome biogenesis. Time course analyses indicated that complexes containing ERα and actin are assembled in the nucleus early after receptor activation by ligands, and gene knockdown experiments showed that gelsolin and the nuclear isoform of myosin 1c are key determinants for assembly and/or stability of these complexes. Based on these results, we propose that the actin network plays a role in nuclear ERα actions in breast cancer cells, including coordinated regulation of target gene activity, spatial and functional

  14. Identification of a hormone-regulated dynamic nuclear actin network associated with estrogen receptor alpha in human breast cancer cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosino, Concetta; Tarallo, Roberta; Bamundo, Angela; Cuomo, Danila; Franci, Gianluigi; Nassa, Giovanni; Paris, Ornella; Ravo, Maria; Giovane, Alfonso; Zambrano, Nicola; Lepikhova, Tatiana; Jänne, Olli A; Baumann, Marc; Nyman, Tuula A; Cicatiello, Luigi; Weisz, Alessandro

    2010-06-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) is a modular protein of the steroid/nuclear receptor family of transcriptional regulators that upon binding to the hormone undergoes structural changes, resulting in its nuclear translocation and docking to specific chromatin sites. In the nucleus, ERalpha assembles in multiprotein complexes that act as final effectors of estrogen signaling to the genome through chromatin remodeling and epigenetic modifications, leading to dynamic and coordinated regulation of hormone-responsive genes. Identification of the molecular partners of ERalpha and understanding their combinatory interactions within functional complexes is a prerequisite to define the molecular basis of estrogen control of cell functions. To this end, affinity purification was applied to map and characterize the ERalpha interactome in hormone-responsive human breast cancer cell nuclei. MCF-7 cell clones expressing human ERalpha fused to a tandem affinity purification tag were generated and used to purify native nuclear ER-containing complexes by IgG-Sepharose affinity chromatography and glycerol gradient centrifugation. Purified complexes were analyzed by two-dimensional DIGE and mass spectrometry, leading to the identification of a ligand-dependent multiprotein complex comprising beta-actin, myosins, and several proteins involved in actin filament organization and dynamics and/or known to participate in actin-mediated regulation of gene transcription, chromatin dynamics, and ribosome biogenesis. Time course analyses indicated that complexes containing ERalpha and actin are assembled in the nucleus early after receptor activation by ligands, and gene knockdown experiments showed that gelsolin and the nuclear isoform of myosin 1c are key determinants for assembly and/or stability of these complexes. Based on these results, we propose that the actin network plays a role in nuclear ERalpha actions in breast cancer cells, including coordinated regulation of target gene

  15. Control system oriented human interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barale, P.; Jacobson, V.; Kilgore, R.; Rondeau, D.

    1976-11-01

    The on-line control system interface for magnet beam steering and focusing in the Bevalac is described. An Aydin model 5205B display generator was chosen. This display generator will allow the computer to completely rewrite a monitor screen in less than 50 ms and is also capable of controlling a color monitor. (PMA)

  16. Hormonal and reproductive risk factors of papillary thyroid cancer: A population-based case-control study in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Leux, Christophe; Neri, Monica; Tcheandjieu, Catherine; Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Schvartz, Claire; Truong, Thérèse; Guénel, Pascal

    2017-06-01

    The three times higher incidence of thyroid cancer in women compared to men points to a role of female sex hormones in its etiology. However the effects of these factors are poorly understood. We analyzed the association between thyroid cancer and hormonal and reproductive factors among women enrolled in CATHY, a population-based case-control study conducted in France. The study included 430 cases of papillary thyroid cancer and 505 controls frequency-matched on age and area of residence. The odds ratios for thyroid cancer increased with age at menarche (p trend 0.05). Postmenopausal women were at increased risk, as compared to premenopausal women, particularly if menopause followed an ovariectomy, and for women with age at menopause association with thyroid cancer by about one third, and breastfeeding by 27%. Overall, these findings provide evidence that the risk of thyroid cancer increases with later age at menarche and after menopause, and decreases with use of oral contraceptives and menopausal hormone therapy. These findings confirm an implication of hormonal factors in papillary thyroid cancer risk, whose mechanisms need to be elucidated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Interplay between reactive oxygen species and hormones in the control of plant development and stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiao-Jian; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Shi, Kai; Zhou, Jie; Foyer, Christine H; Yu, Jing-Quan

    2015-05-01

    As a consequence of a sessile lifestyle, plants are continuously exposed to changing environmental conditions and often life-threatening stresses caused by exposure to excessive light, extremes of temperature, limiting nutrient or water availability, and pathogen/insect attack. The flexible coordination of plant growth and development is necessary to optimize vigour and fitness in a changing environment through rapid and appropriate responses to such stresses. The concept that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are versatile signalling molecules in plants that contribute to stress acclimation is well established. This review provides an overview of our current knowledge of how ROS production and signalling are integrated with the action of auxin, brassinosteroids, gibberellins, abscisic acid, ethylene, strigolactones, salicylic acid, and jasmonic acid in the coordinate regulation of plant growth and stress tolerance. We consider the local and systemic crosstalk between ROS and hormonal signalling pathways and identify multiple points of reciprocal control, as well as providing insights into the integration nodes that involve Ca(2+)-dependent processes and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation cascades. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Menopause: A Review of Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chueh Chang

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Hormone replacement therapy (HRT is frequently prescribed to healthy women to ameliorate menopausal symptoms. HRT is used long term (≥ 1 year to prevent chronic disease in older women. The objective of this study was to review the benefits and risks of HRT and studies of menopause or HRT in Taiwan via a MEDLINE search. Recommendations are provided for future HRT research in Taiwan. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials are considered the gold standard of scientific evidence. A MEDLINE literature search (January 1966-July 2002 identified 23 papers on trials (≥ 1 year that met the inclusion criteria. The results showed that various HRT regimens used for more than 1 year caused more harm than good in healthy menopausal women and that there was no benefit for women with coronary artery disease, Alzheimer's disease, hysterectomy, hysterosalpingooophorectomy, and ischemic stroke. None of this research was conducted in Taiwan. A MEDLINE search using the key words “estrogen replacement therapy and menopause in Taiwan” identified 16 studies. There was only one, short-term, HRT trial. No evidence suggested benefits from long-term HRT in menopausal women in Taiwan.

  19. Regional-specific effects of ovarian hormone loss on synaptic plasticity in adult human APOE targeted replacement mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca C Klein

    Full Text Available The human apolipoprotein ε4 allele (APOE4 has been implicated as one of the strongest genetic risk factors associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD and in influencing normal cognitive functioning. Previous studies have demonstrated that mice expressing human apoE4 display deficits in behavioral and neurophysiological outcomes compared to those with apoE3. Ovarian hormones have also been shown to be important in modulating synaptic processes underlying cognitive function, yet little is known about how their effects are influenced by apoE. In the current study, female adult human APOE targeted replacement (TR mice were utilized to examine the effects of human APOE genotype and long-term ovarian hormone loss on synaptic plasticity in limbic regions by measuring dendritic spine density and electrophysiological function. No significant genotype differences were observed on any outcomes within intact mice. However, there was a significant main effect of genotype on total spine density in apical dendrites in the hippocampus, with post-hoc t-tests revealing a significant reduction in spine density in apoE3 ovariectomized (OVX mice compared to sham operated mice. There was also a significant main effect of OVX on the magnitude of LTP, with post-hoc t-tests revealing a decrease in apoE3 OVX mice relative to sham. In contrast, apoE4 OVX mice showed increased synaptic activity relative to sham. In the lateral amygdala, there was a significant increase in total spine density in apoE4 OVX mice relative to sham. This increase in spine density was consistent with a significant increase in spontaneous excitatory activity in apoE4 OVX mice. These findings suggest that ovarian hormones differentially modulate synaptic integrity in an apoE-dependent manner within brain regions that are susceptible to neurophysiological dysfunction associated with AD.

  20. [Validation of the radioimmunoassays for pituitary gonadotropins II. Human follicle stimulating hormone (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, M D; Santelices, R

    1974-01-01

    The present paper summarizes the experience of the authors in the setting up of the radioimmunoassay (RIA) for human follicle simulating hormone (H-FSH), with the purified antigen for radioiodination, the F-FSH standard and the specific antibodies kindly donated by the National Pituitary Agency of the National Institutes for Arthritis, Metabolic and Digestive Diseases of the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. U.S.A. The conditions for the RIA have modified somewhat and simplified with respect to the suggested instructions accompanying the reagents. Thus, the amount of Chloramine T and the time of exposure of the labeled H-FSH (H-FSH) has been studied. It is always purified on Sephadex G-100 immediately before addition to the RIA and in this manner it may be used for up to 2 month after labeling when kept at --20 degrees C. Curves obtained at different dilutions of the H-FSH Standard, carried out with phosphosaline buffer, pH 7.4-7.8 (PBS) containing 1 % human serum albumin, or with horse plasma, of with PBS containing 0,25 % serum from non-immune rabbits (RIA Buffer) have been compared iwth those abtained by serial dilutions of sera from post-menopausal with these diluents. The most consistent results were obtained with the RIA buffer as diluent. The redisual error was smaller, and serial of dilution curves of the H-FSH standard were parallel to those of plasma and acetone precipitates of urine from post-menopausal women. Parallelism was not god using those serum. Results using PBS contianing human seum albumin were poor. PBS containing bovine serum albumin was avoided as some batches were found to interfere with the binding of the F-FSH to the antibody. The stability of the different dilutions of the H-FSH standard prepared in RIA buffer was tested. It was found that the standard curves could be prepared, pipetted into the RIA tubes and kept ready, frozen at --20 degrees C for one to two months. This shortens the actual setting up of a given RIA and

  1. Growth hormone-releasing peptide ghrelin inhibits homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction in porcine coronary arteries and human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, Nasim; Annambhotla, Suman; Jiang, Jun; Wang, Xinwen; Chai, Hong; Lin, Peter H; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2009-01-01

    Ghrelin, a novel growth hormone-releasing peptide, is implicated to play a protective role in cardiovascular tissues. However, it is not clear whether ghrelin protects vascular tissues from injury secondary to risk factors such as homocysteine (Hcy). This study investigated the effect and potential mechanisms of ghrelin on Hcy-induced endothelial dysfunction. Porcine coronary artery rings were incubated for 24 hours with ghrelin (100 ng/mL), Hcy (50 microM), or ghrelin plus Hcy. Endothelial vasomotor function was evaluated using the myograph tension model. The response to the thromboxane A(2)analog U46619, bradykinin, and sodium nitroprusside was analyzed. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression was determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry staining, and superoxide anion production was documented lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence analysis. Human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) were treated with different concentrations of Hcy, ghrelin, or antighrelin receptor antibody for 24 hours, and eNOS protein levels were determined by Western blot analysis. Maximal contraction with U46619 and endothelium-independent vasorelaxation with sodium nitroprusside were not different among the four groups. However, endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation with bradykinin (10(-6) M) was significantly reduced by 34% with Hcy compared with controls (P ghrelin to Hcy had a protective effect, with 61.6% relaxation, which was similar to controls (64.7%). Homocysteine significantly reduced eNOS expression, whereas ghrelin cotreatment effectively restored eNOS expression to the control levels. Superoxide anion levels, which were increased by 100% with Hcy, returned to control levels with ghrelin cotreatment. Ghrelin also effectively blocked the Hcy-induced decrease of eNOS protein levels in HCAECs in a concentration-dependent manner. Antighrelin receptor antibody effectively inhibited the effect of ghrelin. Ghrelin has a protective

  2. Effect of sodium oxybate on growth hormone secretion in narcolepsy patients and healthy controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donjacour, C.E.; Aziz, N.A.; Roelfsema, F.; Frolich, M.; Overeem, S.; Lammers, G.J.; Pijl, H.

    2011-01-01

    Hypocretin deficiency causes narcolepsy and may affect neuroendocrine systems and body composition. Additionally, growth hormone (GH) alterations my influence weight in narcolepsy. Symptoms can be treated effectively with sodium oxybate (SXB; gamma-hydroxybutyrate) in many patients. This study

  3. A Nested Case-Control Study of Luteinizing Hormone Variants and Risk of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Toniolo, Paolo

    1998-01-01

    An immunological variant of luteinizing hormone (LH) dependent on two point mutations in the gene of the LH beta-subunit has increased in vitro bioactivity and is detectable in serum with immunofluorometric assays (IFMA...

  4. The role of Arg445 and Asp498 in the human thyroid hormone transporter MCT8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Groeneweg (Stefan); E.C.H. Friesema (Edith); S. Kersseboom (Simone); W. Klootwijk (Willem); W.E. Visser (Wil Edward); R.P. Peeters (Robin); T.J. Visser (Theo)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractMonocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) facilitates cellular influx and efflux of the thyroid hormones (THs) T4 and T3. Mutations in MCT8 lead to severe psychomotor retardation. Here, we studied the importance of 2 highly conserved residues (Arg445 in transmembrane domain 8 and Asp498 in

  5. Is Wildlife Fertility Control Always Humane?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan O. Hampton

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of fertility control techniques to reduce reproductive rates in wildlife populations has been the source of much research. Techniques targeting wildlife fertility have been diverse. Most research into fertility control methods has focused upon efficacy, with few studies rigorously assessing animal welfare beyond opportunistic anecdote. However, fertility control techniques represent several very different mechanisms of action (modalities, each with their own different animal welfare risks. We provide a review of the mechanisms of action for fertility control methods, and consider the role of manipulation of reproductive hormones (“endocrine suppression” for the long-term ability of animals to behave normally. We consider the potential welfare costs of animal manipulation techniques that are required to administer fertility treatments, including capture, restraint, surgery and drug delivery, and the requirement for repeated administration within the lifetime of an animal. We challenge the assumption that fertility control modalities generate similar and desirable animal welfare outcomes, and we argue that knowledge of reproductive physiology and behaviour should be more adeptly applied to wild animal management decisions. We encourage wildlife managers to carefully assess long-term behavioural risks, associated animal handling techniques, and the importance of positive welfare states when selecting fertility control methods as a means of population control.

  6. Occurrence of steroid hormones and antibiotics in shallow groundwater impacted by livestock waste control facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon; Snow, Daniel D.; Damon-Powell, Teyona; Miesbach, David

    2011-04-01

    Wastewater impoundments at concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) represent a potential source of veterinary pharmaceuticals and steroid hormone contamination to shallow groundwater. This study investigates the occurrence of seventeen veterinary pharmaceuticals and thirteen steroid hormones and hormone metabolites in lagoons and adjacent groundwater at operating swine and beef cattle facilities. These sites were chosen because subsurface geology and previous monitoring of nitrate, ammonia and chloride levels in shallow ground water strongly indicated direct infiltration, and as such represent worst cases for ground water contamination by waste water. Pharmaceutical compounds detected in samples obtained from cattle facilities include sulfamerazine; sulfamethazine; erythromycin; monensin; tiamulin; and sulfathiazole. Lincomycin; ractopamine; sulfamethazine; sulfathiazole; erythromycin; tiamulin and sulfadimethoxine were detected in wastewater samples obtained from swine facilities. Steroid hormones were detected less frequently than veterinary pharmaceuticals in this study. Estrone, testosterone, 4-androstenedione, and androsterone were detected in wastewater impoundments at concentrations ranging from 30 to 3600 ng/L, while only estrone and testosterone were detected in groundwater samples at concentrations up to 390 ng/L. The co-occurrence of veterinary pharmaceutical and steroid hormone contamination in groundwater at these locations and the correlation between pharmaceutical occurrence in lagoon wastewater and hydraulically downgradient groundwater indicates that groundwater underlying some livestock wastewater impoundments is susceptible to contamination by veterinary pharmaceuticals and steroid hormones originating in wastewater lagoons.

  7. Incorporation of (14)C-cholesterol in human adrenal corticocarcinoma H295R cell line and online-radiodetection of produced (14)C-steroid hormone metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdel-Khalik, Jonas; Björklund, Erland; Nielsen, Frederik Knud

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrates the addition of (14)C-cholesterol to the human cell line H295R will in-situ form radiolabeled steroid hormones allowing for new mechanistic and metabolic insights. The aim of the present study was to in-situ radiolabel steroid hormones from cell line-incorporated (14)C...... of steroid hormones was estimated. Multiple radiolabeled steroid hormones were identified by means of analytical standards and UV (ultraviolet) co-chromatography, though the elucidation of multiple metabolites remains unresolved. Although online radiodetection proved to suffer from suboptimal sensitivity......, the concept of radiolabeling the steroidogenesis in H295R cells with (14)C-cholesterol and detecting the radiolabeled steroid hormones online was proved and may assist in further toxicological studies....

  8. Hormonal and Dietary Characteristics in Obese Human Subjects with and without Food Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardis Pedram

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of food addiction (FA is a potentially important contributing factor to the development of obesity in the general population; however, little is known about the hormonal and dietary differences between obesity with and without FA. Therefore, the aim of our study was to explore potential biomarkers, including various hormones and neuropeptides, which regulate appetite and metabolism, and dietary components that could potentially differentiate obesity with and without FA. Of the 737 adults recruited from the general Newfoundland population, 58 food-addicted and non-food-addicted overweight/obese individuals (FAO, NFO matched for age, sex, BMI and physical activity were selected. A total of 34 neuropeptides, gut hormones, pituitary polypeptide hormones and adipokines were measured in fasting serum. We found that the FAO group had lower levels of TSH, TNF-α and amylin, but higher levels of prolactin, as compared to NFO group. The total calorie intake (per kg body weight, the dietary intake of fat (per g/kg body weight, per BMI and per percentage of trunk fat and the percent calorie intake from fat and carbohydrates (g/kg was higher in the FAO group compared to the NFO group. The FAO subjects consumed more sugar, minerals (including sodium, potassium, calcium and selenium, fat and its components (such as saturated, monounsaturated and trans fat, omega 3 and 6, vitamin D and gamma-tocopherol compared to the NFO group. To our knowledge, this is the first study indicating possible differences in hormonal levels and micro-nutrient intakes between obese individuals classified with and without food addiction. The findings provide insights into the mechanisms by which FA could contribute to obesity.

  9. Hyperactivation of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase promotes escape from hormone dependence in estrogen receptor–positive human breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Todd W.; Hennessy, Bryan T.; González-Angulo, Ana M.; Fox, Emily M.; Mills, Gordon B.; Chen, Heidi; Higham, Catherine; García-Echeverría, Carlos; Shyr, Yu; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2010-01-01

    Many breast cancers exhibit a degree of dependence on estrogen for tumor growth. Although several therapies have been developed to treat individuals with estrogen-dependent breast cancers, some tumors show de novo or acquired resistance, rendering them particularly elusive to current therapeutic strategies. Understanding the mechanisms by which these cancers develop resistance would enable the development of new and effective therapeutics. In order to determine mechanisms of escape from hormone dependence in estrogen receptor–positive (ER-positive) breast cancer, we established 4 human breast cancer cell lines after long-term estrogen deprivation (LTED). LTED cells showed variable changes in ER levels and sensitivity to 17β-estradiol. Proteomic profiling of LTED cells revealed increased phosphorylation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) substrates p70S6 kinase and p85S6 kinase as well as the PI3K substrate AKT. Inhibition of PI3K and mTOR induced LTED cell apoptosis and prevented the emergence of hormone-independent cells. Using reverse-phase protein microarrays, we identified a breast tumor protein signature of PI3K pathway activation that predicted poor outcome after adjuvant endocrine therapy in patients. Our data suggest that upon adaptation to hormone deprivation, breast cancer cells rely heavily on PI3K signaling. Our findings also imply that acquired resistance to endocrine therapy in breast cancer may be abrogated by combination therapies targeting both ER and PI3K pathways. PMID:20530877

  10. Crosstalk between integrin αvβ3 and estrogen receptor-α is involved in thyroid hormone-induced proliferation in human lung carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Meng

    Full Text Available A cell surface receptor for thyroid hormone that activates extracellular regulated kinase (ERK 1/2 has been identified on integrin αvβ3. We have examined the actions of thyroid hormone initiated at the integrin on human NCI-H522 non-small cell lung carcinoma and NCI-H510A small cell lung cancer cells. At a physiologic total hormone concentration (10(-7 M, T(4 significantly increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA abundance in these cell lines, as did 3, 5, 3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (T(3 at a supraphysiologic concentration. Neutralizing antibody to integrin αvβ3 and an integrin-binding Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD peptide blocked thyroid hormone-induced PCNA expression. Tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac lacks thyroid hormone function but inhibits binding of T(4 and T(3 to the integrin receptor; tetrac eliminated thyroid hormone-induced lung cancer cell proliferation and ERK1/2 activation. In these estrogen receptor-α (ERα-positive lung cancer cells, thyroid hormone (T(4>T(3 caused phosphorylation of ERα; the specific ERα antagonist ICI 182,780 blocked T(4-induced, but not T(3-induced ERK1/2 activation, as well as ERα phosphorylation, proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA expression and hormone-dependent thymidine uptake by tumor cells. Thus, in ERα-positive human lung cancer cells, the proliferative action of thyroid hormone initiated at the plasma membrane is at least in part mediated by ERα. In summary, thyroid hormone may be one of several endogenous factors capable of supporting proliferation of lung cancer cells. Activity as an inhibitor of lung cancer cell proliferation induced at the integrin receptor makes tetrac a novel anti-proliferative agent.

  11. The Influence of Physical Training on Blood Levels of Human Growth Hormone, Testosterone and Procollagen in Young Rowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaloupsis Socratis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle strength and skeletal age in trained and untrained pubertal boys and its relationship to the levels of Testosterone (T, Growth Hormone (GH and Procollagen (PICP. Methods: Both the exercise and control groups consisted of 24 (mean 12.91, sd = 0.63 and 17 (mean 12.91, sd = 0.48 year old boys, respectively. The exercise group (EG, in addition to school activities, participated in a rowing training program for six months (rowing technique, strength & aerobic exercises, 60 min/day, three days/week. The control group (CG only participated in the school physical education program, two to three times/week. Hormonal concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay techniques. Venus blood samples were taken at rest from both groups. Results: Testosterone was increased in both groups (p<0.001. Significant differences were found within groups in T before training (p<0.01 There was an increase of PICP in EG after training (p<0.01. Differences on GH were observed before the training period in both groups (p<0.01. Both groups significantly differed in upper and lower limbs strengths. Significant correlation was found between PICP and skeletal age in both (p<0.05 and p<0.02, respectively Conclusions: The gains in muscle strength in both groups may partly be explained by the increase in the concentrations of hormone levels and the changes in body size. Key words: skeletal age, muscle strength, anabolic hormones, rowing

  12. Association between circulating levels of sex steroid hormones and Barrett's esophagus in men: a case-control analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Michael B; Wood, Shannon N; Cash, Brooks D; Young, Patrick; Acosta, Ruben D; Falk, Roni T; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Hu, Nan; Su, Hua; Wang, Lemin; Wang, Chaoyu; Gherman, Barbara; Giffen, Carol; Dykes, Cathy; Turcotte, Veronique; Caron, Patrick; Guillemette, Chantal; Dawsey, Sanford M; Abnet, Christian C; Hyland, Paula L; Taylor, Philip R

    2015-04-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma is believed to result from the progression of gastroesophageal reflux disease to erosive esophagitis and re-epithelialization of the esophagus with a columnar cell population termed Barrett's esophagus (BE). Men develop BE and esophageal adenocarcinoma more frequently than women, yet little is known about the mechanisms of this difference. We assessed whether sex steroid hormones were associated with BE in a male population. We analyzed data from the Barrett's Esophagus Early Detection Case Control Study, based at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Blood samples were collected from 174 men with BE and 213 men without BE (controls, based on endoscopic analysis); 13 sex steroid hormones were measured by mass spectrometry and sex hormone binding globulin was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We also calculated free estradiol, free testosterone, and free dihydrotestosterone (DHT). We used multivariable logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for age, race, smoking status, alcohol consumption, body mass index, heartburn, regurgitation, and gastroesophageal symptom score (excluding heartburn and regurgitation). Levels of free testosterone and free DHT were associated positively with BE risk; patients in the highest quartile for these hormones were most likely to have BE (free testosterone: OR, 5.36; 95% CI, 2.21-13.03; P = .0002; free DHT: OR, 4.25; 95% CI, 1.87-9.66; P = .001). Level of estrone sulfate was associated inversely with BE risk (P for trend = .02). No other hormone was associated with BE risk. Relationships were not modified by age or BMI. In an analysis of men, levels of free testosterone and free DHT were significantly associated with BE. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Association Between Circulating Levels of Sex Steroid Hormones and Barrett's Esophagus in Men: a Case–Control Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Michael B.; Wood, Shannon N.; Cash, Brooks D.; Young, Patrick; Acosta, Ruben D.; Falk, Roni T.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Hu, Nan; Su, Hua; Wang, Lemin; Wang, Chaoyu; Gherman, Barbara; Giffen, Carol; Dykes, Cathy; Turcotte, Veronique; Caron, Patrick; Guillemette, Chantal; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Abnet, Christian C.; Hyland, Paula L.; Taylor, Philip R.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Esophageal adenocarcinoma is believed to result from the progression of gastroesophageal reflux disease to erosive esophagitis and re-epithelialization of the esophagus with a columnar cell population termed Barrett's esophagus (BE). Men develop BE and esophageal adenocarcinoma more frequently than women, and the ratio is increasing; approximately 7 men are diagnosed with malignancy for every woman, yet little is known about the mechanisms of this difference. We assessed whether sex steroid hormones were associated with BE in a male population. Methods We analyzed data from the Barrett's Esophagus Early Detection Case Control Study, based at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Blood samples were collected from 173 men with BE and 213 men without BE (controls, based on endoscopic analysis); 13 sex steroid hormones were measured by mass spectrometry and sex hormone binding globulin was measured by ELISA. We also calculated free estradiol, free testosterone and free dihydrotestosterone (DHT). We used multivariable logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for age, race, smoking status, alcohol consumption, body mass index (BMI; kg/m2), heartburn, regurgitation, and gastroesophageal symptom score (excluding heartburn and regurgitation). Results Levels of free testosterone and free DHT were positively associated with BE risk; patients in the highest quartile for these hormones were most likely to have BE (for free testosterone, OR=5.36; 95% CI, 2.21–13.03; P=0.0002 and for free DHT, OR=4.25, 95% CI, 1.87–9.66; P=.001). Level of estrone sulfate was inversely associated with BE risk (P for trend=.02). No other hormone was associated with BE risk. Relationships were not modified by age or BMI. Conclusions In an analysis of men, levels of free testosterone and free DHT were significantly associated with risk of BE. PMID:25158929

  14. Hormonal response during physical exercise of different intensities in adolescents with type 1 diabetes and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolfsson, Peter; Nilsson, Staffan; Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin; Lindblad, Bengt

    2012-12-01

    Physical activity is a critical component in the care of diabetes. Although it offers health benefits it presents challenges. To investigate differences between adolescent boys and girls with type 1 diabetes and healthy controls in terms of maximal work capacity (VO(2) max) and hormonal response to physical exercise of different intensities. Twelve individuals (six boys and six girls; age 14-19 yr, pubertal stage 4-5) with type 1 diabetes (duration, 6.3 ± 4.4 yr; hemoglobin A1c, 63 ± 10 mmol/mol) were compared with 12 healthy controls matched for age, sex, pubertal stage, body mass index standard deviation score, and amount of regular physical activity. During consecutive days, three different workloads; maximal, endurance, and interval, were performed on an Ergometer cycle. During the tests, levels of lactate, glucose, insulin, and regulatory hormones [glucagon, cortisol, growth hormone (GH), adrenaline, and noradrenaline] were measured in blood. Subcutaneous glucose was measured continuously. VO(2) max did not differ between the groups, diabetes 49.8 ± 9.9 vs. control 50.7 ± 12.0 mL/min/kg. Hormonal responses did not differ between the groups except for mean peak GH level during the interval test, diabetes 63.2 ± 27.0 vs. control 33.8 ± 20.9 mU/L, p exercise of different intensities did not differ between adolescents with diabetes and healthy controls. Thus, adolescents with type 1 diabetes can participate in physical activity on the same terms as healthy peers. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. {sup 18F} FDG Uptake of Human Testis on PET/CT: Correlation with Age, Sex Hormones, and Vasectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Seung Hwan; Eo, Jae Sun; Lee, Jong Jin; Chung, June Key; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Myung Chul [Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate glucose metabolism of normal human testis on {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT and to assess possible correlation among age, the serum levels of sex hormones, and vasectomy. {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT was performed in 66 normal healthy men (50.8{+-}13.6 years, range 22-81), and mean standard uptake values (SUV) of {sup 18F} FDG in testis and adductor muscle were measured. Testis muscle SUV ratios (T/M ratios) were calculated. Serum levels of total testosterone, free testosterone, estradiol, and of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were measured. We searched for correlations between T/M ratios and age and the serum concentrations of sex hormones. {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT was also performed in 32 vasectomized men (55.7{+-}7.8 years, range 38-71) and 52 nonvasectomized men (55.4{+-}11.6 years, range 37-72). Mean SUVs of testis and adductor muscle were measured, and T/M ratios were calculated. A significant age related decline was found in T/M ratio (r=-0.509, p<0.0001). Serum levels of total testosterone and free testosterone were also found to be positively correlated with T/M ratio (r=-0.427, p=0.0003; r=0.435, p=0.0003, respectively). The mean SUV and T/M ratio of vasectomized men were significantly lower than those of nonvasectomized men (p<0.0378 and p=0.0001, respectively). Glucose metabolism in the testis in an adult population was found to be correlated with age, serum sex hormone level, and vasectomy history. These results indicate that testicular {sup 18F} FDG uptake may have attributed to testicular function and testicular histology. Our findings may have important implications for the interpretation of testicular {sup 18F} FDG uptake in the normal adult population.

  16. Sex Differences in White Matter Microstructure in the Human Brain Predominantly Reflect Differences in Sex Hormone Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hemmen, J; Saris, I M J; Cohen-Kettenis, P T; Veltman, D J; Pouwels, P J W; Bakker, J

    2017-05-01

    Sex differences have been described regarding several aspects of human brain morphology; however, the exact biological mechanisms underlying these differences remain unclear in humans. Women with the complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), who lack androgen action in the presence of a 46,XY karyotype, offer the unique opportunity to study isolated effects of sex hormones and sex chromosomes on human neural sexual differentiation. In the present study, we used diffusion tensor imaging to investigate white matter (WM) microstructure in 46,XY women with CAIS (n = 20), 46,XY comparison men (n = 30), and 46,XX comparison women (n = 30). Widespread sex differences in fractional anisotropy (FA), with higher FA in comparison men than in comparison women, were observed. Women with CAIS showed female-typical FA throughout extended WM regions, predominantly due to female-typical radial diffusivity. These findings indicate a predominant role of sex hormones in the sexual differentiation of WM microstructure, although sex chromosome genes and/or masculinizing androgen effects not mediated by the androgen receptor might also play a role. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Human Endometrial Exosomes Contain Hormone-Specific Cargo Modulating Trophoblast Adhesive Capacity: Insights into Endometrial-Embryo Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greening, David W; Nguyen, Hong P T; Elgass, Kirstin; Simpson, Richard J; Salamonsen, Lois A

    2016-02-01

    Embryo implantation into receptive endometrium requires synergistic endometrial-blastocyst interactions within the uterine cavity and is essential for establishing pregnancy. We demonstrate that exosomes (40-150 nm nanovesicles) released from endometrial epithelial cells are an important component of these interactions. We defined the proteome of purified endometrial epithelial-derived exosomes (Exos) influenced by menstrual cycle hormones estrogen (E; proliferative phase) and estrogen plus progesterone (EP; receptive phase) and examined their potential to modify trophoblast function. E-/EP-Exos were uniquely enriched with 254 and 126 proteins, respectively, with 35% newly identified proteins not previously reported in exosome databases. Importantly, EP-Exos protein cargo was related to fundamental changes in implantation: adhesion, migration, invasion, and extracellular matrix remodeling. These findings from hormonally treated ECC1 endometrial cancer cells were validated in human primary uterine epithelial cell-derived exosomes. Functionally, exosomes were internalized by human trophoblast cells and enhanced their adhesive capacity, a response mediated partially through active focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. Thus, exosomes contribute to the endometrial-embryo interactions within the human uterine microenvironment essential for successful implantation. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  18. Effect of metabolic control on parathyroid hormone secretion in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula F.J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic derangement caused by diabetes mellitus may potentially affect bone mineral metabolism. In the present study we evaluated the effect of diabetes metabolic control on parathyroid hormone (PTH secretion during stimulation with EDTA infusion. The study was conducted on 24 individuals, 8 of them normal subjects (group N: glycated hemoglobin - HbA1C = 4.2 ± 0.2%; range = 3.5-5.0%, 8 patients with good and regular metabolic control (group G-R: HbA1C = 7.3 ± 0.4%; range = 6.0-8.5%, and 8 patients with poor metabolic control (group P: HbA1C = 12.5 ± 1.0%; range: 10.0-18.8%. Blood samples were collected at 10-min intervals throughout the study (a basal period of 30 min and a 2-h period of EDTA infusion, 30 mg/kg body weight and used for the determination of ionized calcium, magnesium, glucose and intact PTH. Basal ionized calcium levels were slightly lower in group P (1.19 ± 0.01 mmol/l than in group N (1.21 ± 0.01 mmol/l and group G-R (1.22 ± 0.01 mmol/l. After EDTA infusion, the three groups presented a significant fall in calcium, but with no significant difference among them at any time. Basal magnesium levels and levels determined during EDTA infusion were significantly lower (P<0.01 in group P than in group N. The induction of hypocalcemia caused an elevation in PTH which was similar in groups N and G-R but significantly higher than in group P throughout the infusion period (+110 min, N = 11.9 ± 2.1 vs G-R = 13.7 ± 1.6 vs P = 7.5 ± 0.7 pmol/l; P<0.05 for P vs N and G-R. The present results show that PTH secretion is impaired in patients with poorly controlled diabetes.

  19. Growth hormone-like factor produced by the tapeworm, Spirometra mansonoides, displaces human growth hormone (hGH) from its receptors on cultured human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, D.J.; Phares, C.K.

    1986-03-01

    An analogue of hGH isolated from plerocercoids of the tapeworm Spirometra mansonoides displaces (/sup 125/I)hGH from its receptors in rabbit, rat, and hamster liver membranes. Biologically, plerocercoid growth factor (PGF) is more similar to hGH than to other mammalian GH's but has not been shown to bond human cells. Receptors specific for hGH have been described on cultured human lymphocytes (IM-9). In this study, the authors compared the binding of PGF and hGH in IM-9 cells and in rabbit hepatic membranes. IM-9 lymphocytes (12 x 10/sup 6/ cells/tube) were incubated with (/sup 125/I)hGH and increasing concentrations of hGH (ng/ml) or PGF (serial dilutions) for 90 min at 30/sup 0/ C. Specific binding (B/sub 0/ - NSB) was determined for each dose of hGH or PGF and the binding curves were analyzed by logit-log regression. The results show that PGF displaced (/sup 125/I)hGH from human cells in a dose dependent manner (r = 0.98). Based on the IM-9 assay, 1 ml of the PGF had an activity equivalent to 625 ng of the hGH standard (ngE). However, the binding activity of the PGF in the rabbit liver RRA was 1653 ngE/ml, indicating that the binding potency of PGF in IM-9 cells was only 38% of that in the rabbit liver. These results clearly demonstrate that PGF binds hGH receptors in cells of human origin, suggesting that PGF will be effective in humans.

  20. A pooled analysis of case-control studies of thyroid cancer - III. Oral contraceptives, menopausal replacement therapy and other female hormones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    La Vecchia, C; Ron, E; Franceschi, S; Dal Maso, L; Mark, SD; Chatenoud, L; Braga, C; Preston-Martin, S; McTiernan, A; Kolonel, L; Mabuchi, K; Jin, F; Wingren, G; Galanti, MR; Hallquist, A; Lund, E; Levi, F; Linos, D; Negri, E

    Objective: The relations between oral contraceptives (OC), hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for menopause, and other female hormone use and thyroid cancer risk was analyzed using the original data from 13 studies from North America, Asia and Europe. Methods: Based on 2,132 cases and 3,301 controls,

  1. Ovarian hormones and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeners, Brigitte; Geary, Nori; Tobler, Philippe N; Asarian, Lori

    2017-05-01

    central action of estrogens to increase the satiating potency of the gastrointestinal hormone cholecystokinin. Another mechanism involves a decrease in the preference for sweet foods during the follicular phase. Genetic defects in brain α-melanocycte-stimulating hormone-melanocortin receptor (melanocortin 4 receptor, MC4R) signaling lead to a syndrome of overeating and obesity that is particularly pronounced in women and in female animals. The syndrome appears around puberty in mice with genetic deletions of MC4R, suggesting a role of ovarian hormones. Emerging functional brain-imaging data indicates that fluctuations in ovarian hormones affect eating by influencing striatal dopaminergic processing of flavor hedonics and lateral prefrontal cortex processing of cognitive inhibitory controls of eating. There is a dearth of research on the neuroendocrine control of eating after menopause. There is also comparatively little research on the effects of ovarian hormones on EE, although changes in ovarian hormone levels during the menstrual cycle do affect resting EE. The markedly greater obesity burden in women makes understanding the diverse effects of ovarian hormones on eating, EE and body adiposity urgent research challenges. A variety of research modalities can be used to investigate these effects in women, and most of the mechanisms reviewed are accessible in animal models. Therefore, human and translational research on the roles of ovarian hormones in women's obesity and its causes should be intensified to gain further mechanistic insights that may ultimately be translated into novel anti-obesity therapies and thereby improve women's health.

  2. Interleukin-8 production from human somatotroph adenoma cells is stimulated by interleukin-1β and inhibited by growth hormone releasing hormone and somatostatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vindeløv, Signe Diness; Hartoft-Nielsen, Marie-Louise; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh

    2011-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas cause morbidity and mortality due to their localization and influence on pituitary hormone secretion. Although the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas is unclear, studies have indicated that cytokines are involved. We investigated the role of cytokines, in particular interleukin...

  3. Human/computer control of undersea teleoperators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, T. B.; Verplank, W. L.; Brooks, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    The potential of supervisory controlled teleoperators for accomplishment of manipulation and sensory tasks in deep ocean environments is discussed. Teleoperators and supervisory control are defined, the current problems of human divers are reviewed, and some assertions are made about why supervisory control has potential use to replace and extend human diver capabilities. The relative roles of man and computer and the variables involved in man-computer interaction are next discussed. Finally, a detailed description of a supervisory controlled teleoperator system, SUPERMAN, is presented.

  4. Epigenetic control of vasopressin expression is maintained by steroid hormones in the adult male rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Catherine J.; Coss, Dylan; Auger, Anthony P.; Forbes-Lorman, Robin M.

    2011-01-01

    Although some DNA methylation patterns are altered by steroid hormone exposure in the developing brain, less is known about how changes in steroid hormone levels influence DNA methylation patterns in the adult brain. Steroid hormones act in the adult brain to regulate gene expression. Specifically, the expression of the socially relevant peptide vasopressin (AVP) within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) of adult brain is dependent upon testosterone exposure. Castration dramatically reduces and testosterone replacement restores AVP expression within the BST. As decreases in mRNA expression are associated with increases in DNA promoter methylation, we explored the hypothesis that AVP expression in the adult brain is maintained through sustained epigenetic modifications of the AVP gene promoter. We find that castration of adult male rats resulted in decreased AVP mRNA expression and increased methylation of specific CpG sites within the AVP promoter in the BST. Similarly, castration significantly increased estrogen receptor α (ERα) mRNA expression and decreased ERα promoter methylation within the BST. These changes were prevented by testosterone replacement. This suggests that the DNA promoter methylation status of some steroid responsive genes in the adult brain is actively maintained by the presence of circulating steroid hormones. The maintenance of methylated or demethylated states of some genes in the adult brain by the presence of steroid hormones may play a role in the homeostatic regulation of behaviorally relevant systems. PMID:21368111

  5. Effects of hormone therapy on brain structure: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarci, Kejal; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Lesnick, Timothy G; Zuk, Samantha M; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Gleason, Carey E; Wharton, Whitney; Dowling, N Maritza; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Senjem, Matthew L; Shuster, Lynne T; Bailey, Kent R; Rocca, Walter A; Jack, Clifford R; Asthana, Sanjay; Miller, Virginia M

    2016-08-30

    To investigate the effects of hormone therapy on brain structure in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial in recently postmenopausal women. Participants (aged 42-56 years, within 5-36 months past menopause) in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study were randomized to (1) 0.45 mg/d oral conjugated equine estrogens (CEE), (2) 50 μg/d transdermal 17β-estradiol, or (3) placebo pills and patch for 48 months. Oral progesterone (200 mg/d) was given to active treatment groups for 12 days each month. MRI and cognitive testing were performed in a subset of participants at baseline, and at 18, 36, and 48 months of randomization (n = 95). Changes in whole brain, ventricular, and white matter hyperintensity volumes, and in global cognitive function, were measured. Higher rates of ventricular expansion were observed in both the CEE and the 17β-estradiol groups compared to placebo; however, the difference was significant only in the CEE group (p = 0.01). Rates of ventricular expansion correlated with rates of decrease in brain volume (r = -0.58; p ≤ 0.001) and with rates of increase in white matter hyperintensity volume (r = 0.27; p = 0.01) after adjusting for age. The changes were not different between the CEE and 17β-estradiol groups for any of the MRI measures. The change in global cognitive function was not different across the groups. Ventricular volumes increased to a greater extent in recently menopausal women who received CEE compared to placebo but without changes in cognitive performance. Because the sample size was small and the follow-up limited to 4 years, the findings should be interpreted with caution and need confirmation. This study provides Class I evidence that brain ventricular volume increased to a greater extent in recently menopausal women who received oral CEE compared to placebo. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Impact of Metabolic Hormones Secreted in Human Breast Milk on Nutritional Programming in Childhood Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badillo-Suárez, Pilar Amellali; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Nieves-Morales, Xóchitl

    2017-09-01

    Obesity is the most common metabolic disease whose prevalence is increasing worldwide. This condition is considered a serious public health problem due to associated comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Perinatal morbidity related to obesity does not end with birth; this continues affecting the mother/infant binomial and could negatively impact on metabolism during early infant nutrition. Nutrition in early stages of growth may be essential in the development of obesity in adulthood, supporting the concept of "nutritional programming". For this reason, breastfeeding may play an important role in this programming. Breast milk is the most recommended feeding for the newborn due to the provided benefits such as protection against obesity and diabetes. Health benefits are based on milk components such as bioactive molecules, specifically hormones involved in the regulation of food intake. Identification of these molecules has increased in recent years but its action has not been fully clarified. Hormones such as leptin, insulin, ghrelin, adiponectin, resistin, obestatin and insulin-like growth factor-1 copeptin, apelin, and nesfatin, among others, have been identified in the milk of normal-weight women and may influence the energy balance because they can activate orexigenic or anorexigenic pathways depending on energy requirements and body stores. It is important to emphasize that, although the number of biomolecules identified in milk involved in regulating food intake has increased considerably, there is a lack of studies aimed at elucidating the effect these hormones may have on metabolism and development of the newborn. Therefore, we present a state-of-the-art review regarding bioactive compounds such as hormones secreted in breast milk and their possible impact on nutritional programming in the infant, analyzing their functions in appetite regulation.

  7. Impact of glucocorticoid hormones on adipokine secretion and human adipose tissue metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fain, John N

    2013-08-01

    The glucocorticoid hormones alter the metabolism of the adipose tissue after an approximately 2-h lag period. The effects are mediated through the nuclear receptors that alter the expression of a wide variety of genes through the mechanisms that are similar to those seen in the other cells. There are many direct metabolic effects of the glucocorticoids on the adipose tissue metabolism, and every year, new effects are added to the list of proteins whose expression is influenced by the glucocorticoids. Furthermore, some enzymatic processes are affected by these hormones only in the presence of the other hormones such as growth hormone (GH) or insulin. Most of the effects of the glucocorticoids are on the gene transcription, and the effects on the mRNA are reflected in the altered levels of the target proteins. The glucocorticoids enhance the leptin release, while reducing that of the inflammatory adipokines and stimulating that of the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in the presence of insulin. The activity of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (HSD1) is enhanced by the glucocorticoids along with that of α1 glycoprotein 1 and serum amyloid A release by the adipose tissue. In contrast, the tumor necrosis factor α (TNF)-stimulated lipolysis in the adipose tissue is blocked by the glucocorticoids. It is still unclear which, if any, of these effects account for the insulin resistance due to the glucocorticoids in the adipose tissue. However, recent work suggests that, at least in mice, the reduction in the osteocalcin release by the osteoblasts in the presence of the glucocorticoids accounts for much of the in vivo insulin resistance. In summary, there are multiple direct effects of the glucocorticoids, both anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory, on the adipose tissue.

  8. LC-MS based analysis of endogenous steroid hormones in human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Grass, Juliane; Stalder, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    The quantification of endogenous steroid hormone concentrations in hair is increasingly used as a method for obtaining retrospective information on long-term integrated hormone exposure. Several different analytical procedures have been employed for hair steroid analysis, with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) being recognized as a particularly powerful analytical tool. Several methodological aspects affect the performance of LC-MS systems for hair steroid analysis, including sample preparation and pretreatment, steroid extraction, post-incubation purification, LC methodology, ionization techniques and MS specifications. Here, we critically review the differential value of such protocol variants for hair steroid hormones analysis, focusing on both analytical quality and practical feasibility issues. Our results show that, when methodological challenges are adequately addressed, LC-MS protocols can not only yield excellent sensitivity and specificity but are also characterized by relatively simple sample processing and short run times. This makes LC-MS based hair steroid protocols particularly suitable as a high-quality option for routine application in research contexts requiring the processing of larger numbers of samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Interplay between Light and Plant Hormones in the Control of Arabidopsis Seedling Chlorophyll Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqin Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chlorophyll biosynthesis is one of the most important cellular processes and is essential for plant photosynthesis. After germination under the soil, dark-grown seedlings are etiolated and accumulate the chlorophyll precursor protochlorophyllide (Pchlide in cotyledons. Upon exposure to light, Pchlide is rapidly converted to chlorophyll to initiate photoautotrophic growth. In this light-regulated de-etiolation process, multiple endogenous phytohormones are also involved. Although the co-regulation of seedling greening by light and hormones has long been observed, recent studies greatly advanced our understanding of their interplay by identifying the key components connecting these pathways. The integrators, such as PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTORs, ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5, ETHYLENE INSENSTIVE 3 and DELLA proteins, are key transcription regulators in light or hormone signaling pathways. This review focuses on these integrators and illustrates the regulatory networks of light and hormone interactions in chlorophyll biosynthesis.

  10. Purification and functional characterization of a protein: Bombyx mori human growth hormone like protein in silkworm pupa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianqing; Shu, Tejun; Lv, Zhengbing; Nie, Zuoming; Chen, Jian; Chen, Hao; Yu, Wei; Gai, Qijing; Zhang, Yaozhou

    2014-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) is a peptide hormone secreted by eosinophils of the human anterior pituitary, and a regulatory factor for a variety of metabolic pathways. A 30-kD protein from the pupa stage of silkworm was detected by Western blotting and confirmed by immunoprecipitation based on its ability to bind to anti-hGH antibody. This protein, named BmhGH-like protein, was purified from fresh silkworm pupas through low-temperature homogenization, filtration, and centrifugation to remove large impurity particles. The supernatants were precipitated, resuspended, and passed through a molecular sieve. Further purification by affinity chromatography and two-dimensional electrophoresis resulted in pure protein for analysis by MS MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. An alignment with predicted proteins indicated that BmhGH-like protein consisted of two lipoproteins, which we named hGH-L1 and hGH-L2. These proteins belong to the β-trefoil superfamily, with β domains similar to the spatial structure of hGH. Assays with K562 cells demonstrated that these proteins could promote cell division in vitro. To further validate the growth-promoting effects, hGH-L2 was cloned from pupa cDNA to create recombinant silkworm baculovirus vBmNPV-hGH-L2, which was used to infect silkworm BmN cells at low titer. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that the protein shortened the G0/G1 phase of the cells, and enabled the cells to rapidly traverse the G1/S phase transition point to enter S phase and promote cell division. Discovery of hGH-like protein in silkworm will once again arouse people's interest in the potential medicinal value of silkworm and establish the basis for the development of new hormone drugs.

  11. Purification and functional characterization of a protein: Bombyx mori human growth hormone like protein in silkworm pupa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqing Chen

    Full Text Available Human growth hormone (hGH is a peptide hormone secreted by eosinophils of the human anterior pituitary, and a regulatory factor for a variety of metabolic pathways. A 30-kD protein from the pupa stage of silkworm was detected by Western blotting and confirmed by immunoprecipitation based on its ability to bind to anti-hGH antibody. This protein, named BmhGH-like protein, was purified from fresh silkworm pupas through low-temperature homogenization, filtration, and centrifugation to remove large impurity particles. The supernatants were precipitated, resuspended, and passed through a molecular sieve. Further purification by affinity chromatography and two-dimensional electrophoresis resulted in pure protein for analysis by MS MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. An alignment with predicted proteins indicated that BmhGH-like protein consisted of two lipoproteins, which we named hGH-L1 and hGH-L2. These proteins belong to the β-trefoil superfamily, with β domains similar to the spatial structure of hGH. Assays with K562 cells demonstrated that these proteins could promote cell division in vitro. To further validate the growth-promoting effects, hGH-L2 was cloned from pupa cDNA to create recombinant silkworm baculovirus vBmNPV-hGH-L2, which was used to infect silkworm BmN cells at low titer. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that the protein shortened the G0/G1 phase of the cells, and enabled the cells to rapidly traverse the G1/S phase transition point to enter S phase and promote cell division. Discovery of hGH-like protein in silkworm will once again arouse people's interest in the potential medicinal value of silkworm and establish the basis for the development of new hormone drugs.

  12. Cardiovascular effects of growth hormone in adult hemodialysis patients: results from a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køber, Lars; Rustom, Rana; Wiedmann, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    The high morbidity and mortality rates in hemodialysis (HD) patients are due, at least in part, to their increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). This prospective study evaluated the effect of growth hormone (GH) on a number of CVD risk markers in adult patients on HD.......The high morbidity and mortality rates in hemodialysis (HD) patients are due, at least in part, to their increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). This prospective study evaluated the effect of growth hormone (GH) on a number of CVD risk markers in adult patients on HD....

  13. The corticotropin releasing hormone-1 (CRH1) receptor antagonist pexacerfont in alcohol dependence: a randomized controlled experimental medicine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwako, Laura E; Spagnolo, Primavera A; Schwandt, Melanie L; Thorsell, Annika; George, David T; Momenan, Reza; Rio, Daniel E; Huestis, Marilyn; Anizan, Sebastien; Concheiro, Marta; Sinha, Rajita; Heilig, Markus

    2015-03-13

    Extensive preclinical data implicate corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), acting through its CRH1 receptor, in stress- and dependence-induced alcohol seeking. We evaluated pexacerfont, an orally available, brain penetrant CRH1 antagonist for its ability to suppress stress-induced alcohol craving and brain responses in treatment seeking alcohol-dependent patients in early abstinence. Fifty-four anxious alcohol-dependent participants were admitted to an inpatient unit at the NIH Clinical Center, completed withdrawal treatment, and were enrolled in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study with pexacerfont (300 mg/day for 7 days, followed by 100 mg/day for 23 days). After reaching steady state, participants were assessed for alcohol craving in response to stressful or alcohol-related cues, neuroendocrine responses to these stimuli, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) responses to alcohol-related stimuli or stimuli with positive or negative emotional valence. A separate group of 10 patients received open-label pexacerfont following the same dosing regimen and had cerebrospinal fluid sampled to estimate central nervous system exposure. Pexacerfont treatment had no effect on alcohol craving, emotional responses, or anxiety. There was no effect of pexacerfont on neural responses to alcohol-related or affective stimuli. These results were obtained despite drug levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that predict close to 90% central CRH1 receptor occupancy. CRH1 antagonists have been grouped based on their receptor dissociation kinetics, with pexacerfont falling in a category characterized by fast dissociation. Our results may indicate that antagonists with slow offset are required for therapeutic efficacy. Alternatively, the extensive preclinical data on CRH1 antagonism as a mechanism to suppress alcohol seeking may not translate to humans.

  14. A large set of estrogen receptor β-interacting proteins identified by tandem affinity purification in hormone-responsive human breast cancer cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassa, Giovanni; Tarallo, Roberta; Ambrosino, Concetta; Bamundo, Angela; Ferraro, Lorenzo; Paris, Ornella; Ravo, Maria; Guzzi, Pietro H; Cannataro, Mario; Baumann, Marc; Nyman, Tuula A; Nola, Ernesto; Weisz, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Estrogen receptors α (ER-α) and β (ER-β) play distinct biological roles in onset and progression of hormone-responsive breast cancer, with ER-β exerting a modulatory activity on ER-α-mediated estrogen signaling and stimulation of cell proliferation by mechanisms still not fully understood. We stably expressed human ER-β fused to a tandem affinity purification-tag in estrogen-responsive MCF-7 cells and applied tandem affinity purification and nanoLC-MS/MS to identify the ER-β interactome of this cell type. Functional annotation by bioinformatics analyses of the 303 proteins that co-purify with ER-β from nuclear extracts identify several new molecular partners of this receptor subtype that represents nodal points of a large protein network controlling multiple processes and functions in breast cancer cells. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Anticancer activity of midostaurin in hormone refractory human prostate cancer DU145 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Jun Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We tried a new method of prostate cancer treatment by inducing in vitro differentiation which resulted in reduction of cancer cells growth. A protein kinase inhibitor, midostaurin's ability to trigger the human prostate cancer cell line, DU145 to segregate into nerve cells was studied. Midostaurin (100 nM suppressed the growth of DU145 cells but without change in the number of dead cells. Midostaurin started to extend neurites on DU145 cells after 24 hours and differentiated into nerve cells by 72 hours. The microtubule was stabilized by tau protein and its mRNA expression showed time-dependent increase in midostaurin-treated DU145 cells. At the same time, the amount of acetylcholinesterase was also increased. The midostaurin-treated DU145 cells showed 40% less activity than control in the colony forming assay. The results suggests that midostaurin can induce differentiation of DU145 cells into nerve cells.

  16. Influence of a low calcium and phosphorus diet on the anabolic effect of human parathyroid hormone (1-38) in female rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, P.D.; Forrer, R.; Kneissel, Michaela

    2001-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) or synthetic N-terminal PTH fragments administered intermittently have been established as anabolic agents in animal and human bones. In the present study, the influence of a low calcium diet on the anabolic effect of human PTH(1-38) [hPTH(1-38)] was investigated. Forty...

  17. The effect of physical exercise on postpartum fitness, hormone and lipid levels: a randomized controlled trial in primiparous, lactating women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zourladani, A; Zafrakas, M; Chatzigiannis, B; Papasozomenou, P; Vavilis, D; Matziari, C

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of an exercise training program combining low-impact dance aerobic, resistance and stretching exercise on physical fitness, hormone and lipid levels of postpartum, primiparous, lactating women. Thirty seven primiparous, lactating women were randomly assigned at 4-6 weeks postpartum to either follow an exercise training program of 50-60 min aerobic, strengthening and stretching exercise, 3 days a week, for 12 weeks (interventional group; n = 20) or no training program at all (control group; n = 17). The following parameters were measured at baseline and 12 weeks later: (1) for evaluation of physical fitness: VO2max, muscular endurance, joint mobility and body fat; (2) for evaluation of the lipidemic profile: triglyceride, total cholesterol, HDL and LDL levels, and (3) levels of hormones associated with lactation: prolactin, estradiol, cortisol, TSH, fT3 and fT4. After completion of the exercise training program, comparisons between the interventional and the control group showed statistically significant mean changes in VO2max (p = 0.003), muscular endurance of the upper extremities (p impact exercise training program appears to improve physical fitness of postpartum women, while it does not seem to affect lipid levels and lactation-associated hormone levels. Hence, implementation of an exercise training program combining low-impact dance aerobic, resistance and stretching exercise is feasible in postpartum, primiparous, lactating women.

  18. Comparison of therapeutic efficacy and clinical parameters between recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone and thyroid hormone withdrawal in high-dose radioiodine treatment with differentiated thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Se Hun; Na, Chang Ju; Kim, Jeong Hun; Han, Yeon Hee; KIm, Hee Kwon; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee; Lim, Seok Tae [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    High-dose radioiodine treatment (HD-RIT) after injection of recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rh-TSH) has become widely used. This study compared the therapeutic efficacy of HD-RIT and clinical parameters between rh-TSH supplement and thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW) after total thyroidectomy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. We retrospectively reviewed 266 patients (47 male and 219 female; age, 49.0 ± 10.9 years) with differentiated thyroid cancer detected from September 2011 to September 2012. Patients comprised THW (217, 81.6 %) and rh-TSH (49, 18.4 %). Inclusion criteria were: first HD-RIT; any TN stage; absence of distant metastasis. To evaluate the complete ablation of the remnant thyroid tissue or metastasis, we reviewed stimulated serum thyroglobulin (sTg), I-123 whole-body scan (RxWBS) on T4 off-state, and thyroid ultrasonography (US) or [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) 6–8 months after HD-RIT. We defined a complete ablation state when all three of the follow-up conditions were satisfied; <2.0 ng/ml of the sTg, I-123 RxWBS (−), and thyroid US or F-18 FDG PET/CT (−). If one of the three was positive, ablation was considered incomplete. We also compared various clinical biomarkers (body weight, body mass index, liver and kidney function) between THW and rh-TSH groups. The rates of complete ablation were 73.7 % (160/217) for the THW group and 73.5 % (36/49) for the rh-TSH group. There was no significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.970). The follow-up aspartate transaminase (p = 0.001) and alanine transaminase (p = 0.001) were significantly higher in the THW group. The renal function parameters of blood urea nitrogen (p = 0.001) and creatinine (p = 0.005) tended to increase in the THW group. The change of body weight was + Δ0.96 (±1.9) kg for the THW group and was decreased by -Δ1.39 (±1.5) kg for the rh-TSH group. The change

  19. Human rights and conventionality control in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azul América Aguiar-Aguilar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The protection of human rights in Mexico has, de jure, suffered an important change in the last years, given a new judicial interpretation delivered by the National Supreme Court of Justice that allows the use of conventionality control, which means, that it allows federal and state judges to verify the conformity of domestic laws with those established in the Inter-American Convention of Human Rights. To what extent domestic actors are protecting human rights using this new legal tool called conventionality control? In this article I explore whom and how is conventionality control being used in Mexico. Using N-Vivo Software I reviewed concluded decisions delivered by intermediate level courts (Collegiate Circuit Courts in three Mexican states. The evidence points that conventionality control is a very useful tool especially to defenders, who appear in sentences claiming compliance with the commitments Mexico has acquired when this country ratified the Convention.

  20. Taguchi Experimental Design for Optimization of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Production in CHO Cell Lines and Comparing its Biological Activity with Prokaryotic Growth Hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghili, Zahra Sadat; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Sayyed Hamid

    2018-02-01

    Growth hormone deficiency results in growth retardation in children and the GH deficiency syndrome in adults and they need to receive recombinant-GH in order to rectify the GH deficiency symptoms. Mammalian cells have become the favorite system for production of recombinant proteins for clinical application compared to prokaryotic systems because of their capability for appropriate protein folding, assembly, post-translational modification and proper signal. However, production level in mammalian cells is generally low compared to prokaryotic hosts. Taguchi has established orthogonal arrays to describe a large number of experimental situations mainly to reduce experimental errors and to enhance the efficiency and reproducibility of laboratory experiments.In the present study, rhGH was produced in CHO cells and production of rhGH was assessed using Dot blotting, western blotting and Elisa assay. For optimization of rhGH production in CHO cells using Taguchi method An M16 orthogonal experimental design was used to investigate four different culture components. The biological activity of rhGH was assessed using LHRE-TK-Luciferase reporter gene system in HEK-293 and compared to the biological activity of prokaryotic rhGH.A maximal productivity of rhGH was reached in the conditions of 1%DMSO, 1%glycerol, 25 µM ZnSO 4 and 0 mM NaBu. Our findings indicate that control of culture conditions such as the addition of chemical components helps to develop an efficient large-scale and industrial process for the production of rhGH in CHO cells. Results of bioassay indicated that rhGH produced by CHO cells is able to induce GH-mediated intracellular cell signaling and showed higher bioactivity when compared to prokaryotic GH at the same concentrations. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Hormonal birth control use and relationship jealousy : Evidence for estrogen dosage effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobey, Kelly D.; Pollet, Thomas V.; Roberts, S. Craig; Buunk, Abraham P.

    Women who use hormonal contraceptives have been shown to report higher levels of jealousy than women who are regularly cycling. Here, we extend these findings by examining if self reported levels of jealousy vary with the dose of synthetic estrogen and progestin found in combined oral contraceptives

  2. Cardiovascular effects of growth hormone in adult hemodialysis patients: results from a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køber, Lars; Rustom, Rana; Wiedmann, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    The high morbidity and mortality rates in hemodialysis (HD) patients are due, at least in part, to their increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). This prospective study evaluated the effect of growth hormone (GH) on a number of CVD risk markers in adult patients on HD....

  3. Coordinated control of renal Ca(2+) transport proteins by parathyroid hormone.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abel, M. van; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Kemp, J.W.C.M. van der; Friedlaender, M.M.; Leeuwen, J.P.P.M. van; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The kidney is one of the affected organs involved in the clinical symptoms of parathyroid hormone (PTH)-related disorders, like primary hyperparathyroidism and familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia. The molecular mechanism(s) underlying alterations in renal Ca(2+) handling in these

  4. Accessory gland as a site for prothoracicotropic hormone controlled ecdysone synthesis in adult male insects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentze, Julie Lilith; Møller, Morten Erik; Jørgensen, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Insect steroid hormones (ecdysteroids) are important for female reproduction in many insect species and are required for the initiation and coordination of vital developmental processes. Ecdysteroids are also important for adult male physiology and behavior, but their exact function and site of s...

  5. Human right to water and conventionality control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana N. Martínez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Humanity faces the challenge of achieving the sustainability of water resources supply for the satisfaction of human needs and ofensuring the sustainability of the natural ecosystems for the achievement of sustainable human development and the quality of life of present and future generations. For this reason the recognition of access to water as a Human Right has fundamental significance. We proceed to analyze the international instruments that provide content and legal basis to the human right to water and the obligations of States. In this context, we deal with the constitutional reception of human right to water in Argentina in the constitutional reform of 1994 and the control of conventionality as guarantor of access to water, which has led to different domestic courts to consider cases in which a violation ofthe right to water was proved.

  6. Mechanisms for the bone anabolic effect of parathyroid hormone treatment in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslan, Derya; Dahl Andersen, Mille; Gede, Lene Bjerring

    2012-01-01

    . However, development of the biochemical measurement of PTH in the 1980s led us to understand the regulation of PTH secretion and calcium metabolism which subsequently paved the way for the use of PTH as an anabolic treatment of osteoporosis as, when given intermittently, it has strong anabolic effects......Intermittent low-dose treatment with parathyroid hormone (PTH) analogues has become widely used in the treatment of severe osteoporosis. During normal physiological conditions, PTH stimulates both bone formation and resorption, and in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism, bone loss is frequent...

  7. The influence of hormonal treatment with beta-human chorionic gonadotropin for cryptorchidism on future fertility in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ömer; Akyol, İlker; Özyurt, Mustafa; Ateş, Ferhat; Soydan, Hasan; Malkoç, Ercan

    2015-04-01

    reported histological changes and decreased spermatogenic cell count in contralateral scrotal testes in experimentally induced unilateral cryptorchidism in early period of life in rats. Heiskanen et al. reported that treatment with Beta-HCG leads to decreased total sperm counts in the future due to increased germ cell apoptosis caused by hormonal withdrawal after treatment. Cortes et al. also reported decreased number of germ cells in 1-3 year-old boys who underwent surgery after unsuccessful Beta-HCG treatment. The reasons could be delayed testicular descent or adverse effect of hormone treatment though. Our results concurred with them. Apparently, our model has failed to mimic the pathophysiologic mechanisms of congenital cryptorchidism in humans. Furthermore, we applied hormone treatment in normal rats with normally descended testes. Therefore, the "by-product" information of our study is that, unnecessary use of Beta-HCG during infancy may impair future fertility. Our study suggests that Beta-HCG treatment may decrease sperm counts and decrease the future fertility potential. We could not find any direct correlation of sperm count with either testicular weight or testicular index. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A phase 2 trial of long-acting TransCon growth hormone in adult GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höybye, Charlotte; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Ferone, Diego

    2017-01-01

    was reported. No treatment-emergent anti-growth hormone binding antibodies were detected. TransCon GH demonstrated a linear, dose-dependent increase in growth hormone exposure without substantial accumulation. Growth hormone maximum serum concentration and insulin-like growth factor 1 exposure were similar......TransCon growth hormone is a sustained release human growth hormone prodrug in development in which unmodified growth hormone is transiently linked to a carrier molecule. It is intended as an alternative to daily growth hormone in the treatment of growth hormone deficiency. This was a multi......-center, randomized, open-label, active-controlled trial designed to compare the safety (including tolerability and immunogenicity), pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of three doses of weekly TransCon GH to daily growth hormone (Omnitrope). Thirty-seven adult males or females diagnosed with adult growth hormone...

  9. Enhanced effect of zinc and calcium supplementation on bone status in growth hormone-deficient children treated with growth hormone: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekbote, Veena; Khadilkar, Anuradha; Chiplonkar, Shashi; Mughal, Zulf; Khadilkar, Vaman

    2013-06-01

    Reduced bone mineral content in growth hormone-deficient children (GHD) has been reported. Calcium, zinc, and vitamin D play an important role in bone formation. Hence, the aim of this pilot randomized controlled study was to evaluate the effect of calcium, vitamin D, and zinc supplementation in prepubertal GHD children treated with GH on bone health parameters. After 1 year of treatment with GH (20 mg/m(2)/week), 31 GHD (mean age 8.7 ± 2.8 years, 18 boys) prepubertal children were randomised to receive calcium (500 mg/day) and vitamin D (60,000 IU/3 months) [Group A] or a similar supplement of calcium, vitamin D, and zinc (as per Indian Recommended Allowance) [Group B] along with GH therapy for the next 12 months. The two groups were similar in anthropometric and body composition parameters at baseline (p > 0.1). After 1 year of GH therapy, height-adjusted % gain was similar in both groups, 48 % in bone mineral content (BMC) and 45 % in bone area (BA). Height-adjusted % increase in BMC was significantly (p children has the potential for enhancing bone mass accrual; this effect was further enhanced through the addition of zinc supplement.

  10. Semen quality and reproductive hormones before orchiectomy in men with testicular cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, P M; Skakkebaek, N E; Vistisen, K

    1999-01-01

    cancer (TGCC) investigated before orchiectomy, semen analysis was carried out in 63 patients and hormonal investigations, including measurement of follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, estradiol, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), inhibin B, and human chorionic...... (group 2). Group 3 comprised 141 men employed in a Danish company who served as controls in the comparison of semen parameters. As a control group in hormone investigations, 193 men were selected randomly from the Danish National Personal Register to make up group 4. RESULTS: We found significantly lower...

  11. Somatic embryogenesis of carrot in hormone-free medium: external pH control over morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. L.; Krikorian, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    Cultures of preglobular stage proembryos (PGSPs) were initiated from mechanically wounded mature zygotic embryos of carrot, Daucus carota, on a hormone-free, semisolid medium. These PGSPs have been maintained and multiplied for extended periods without their progression into later embryo stages on the same hormone-free medium containing 1 mM NH4+ as the sole nitrogen source. Sustained maintenance of cultures comprised exclusively of PGSPs was dependent on medium pH throughout the culture period. Best growth and multiplication of PGSP cultures occurred when the pH of unbuffered, hormone-free medium fell from 4.5 to 4 over a 2-week period or when buffered medium was titrated to pH 4. If the hormone-free medium was buffered to sustain a pH at or above 4.5, PGSPs developed into later embryo stages. Maintenance with continuous multiplication of PGSPs occurred equally well on medium containing NH4+ or NH4+ and NO3-, but growth was poor with NO3- alone. Additional observations on the effects of medium components such as various nitrogen sources and levels, sucrose concentration, semisolid supports, type of buffer, borate concentration, activated charcoal, and initial pH that permit optimum maintenance of the PGSPs or foster their continued developmental progression into mature embryos and plantlets are reported. The influence of the pH of the hormone-free medium as a determinant in maintaining cultures as PGSPs or allowing their continued embryonic development are unequivocally demonstrated by gross morphology, scanning electron microscopy, and histological preparations.

  12. Mapping of the gene encoding the melanocortin-1 ([alpha]-melanocyte stimulating hormone) receptor (MC1R) to human chromosome 16q24. 3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gantz, I.; Yamada, Tadataka; Tashiro, Takao; Konda, Yoshitaka; Shimoto, Yoshimasa; Miwa, Hiroto; Trent, J.M. (Univ. of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States))

    1994-01-15

    [alpha]-Melanocyte stimulating hormone ([alpha]-MSH), a hormone originally named for its ability to regulate pigmentation of melanocytes, is a 13-amino-acid post-translational product of the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene. [alpha]-MSH and the other products of POMC processing, which share the core heptapeptide amino acid sequence Met-Glu (Gly)-His-Phe-Arg-Trp-Gly (Asp), the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), [beta]-MSH, and [gamma]-MSH, are collectively referred to as melanocortins. While best known for their effects on the melanocyte (pigmentation) and adrenal cortical cells (steroidogenesis), melanocortins have been postulated to function in diverse activities, including enhancement of learning and memory, control of the cardiovascular system, analgesia, thermoregulation, immunomodulation, parturition, and neurotrophism. To identify the chromosomal band encoding the human melanocortin-1 receptor gene, 1 [mu]g of an EMBL clone coding region of the human MC1R and approximately 15 kb of surrounding DNA was labeled with biotin and hybridized to human metaphase chromosomes as previously described. The results indicate that the human MC1R gene is localized to 16q24.3. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  13. [Ten years experience with the first approved biosimilar recombinant human growth hormone drug in normal clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Siguero, Juan Pedro; Palla García, Margarida; Martínez Busto, Elena; Rebollo, Francisco José; Pombo, Manuel

    2017-06-28

    Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) is the first biosimilar drug approved by the European Medicines Agency in 2006, using the biosimilar registration process. It was authorised for the treatment of growth hormone deficiency, and growth disorders associated with Turner's syndrome, chronic renal failure, Prader-Willi syndrome, and growth disorders in children/adolescents born small for gestational age, and replacement therapy in adults with pronounced growth hormone deficiency. This review is focused on the scientific evidence published about this drug in the last ten years, including the clinical trials on which the approval of the regulatory authority is based, and the most relevant studies evaluating the clinical impact of the drug in clinical practice. The equivalence between biosimilar and original product has been confirmed in the clinical trials published by Romer et al. and López-Siguero et al. Furthermore, studies carried out in real-life conditions confirm its long-term efficacy and safety, as well as the absence of clinical impact by switching treatment from the original to the biosimilar product. The number of patients receiving this medication has continuously increased since its approval. Its equivalence with the original product has been verified. Preliminary data from the post-authorisation PATRO study confirm the efficacy and safety of the biosimilar product in comparison with data from clinical trials. However, final results must be evaluated at the end of the study, which will provide additional information about the long-term efficacy and safety of the biosimilar drug. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  14. The effects of programmed administration of human parathyroid hormone fragment (1-34) on bone histomorphometry and serum chemistry in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobnig, H.; Turner, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    PTH treatment can result in dramatic increases in cancellous bone volume in normal and osteopenic rats. However, this potentially beneficial response is only observed after pulsatile treatment; continuous infusion of PTH leads to hypercalcemia and bone abnormalities. The purpose of these studies was to determine the optimal duration of the PTH pulses. A preliminary study revealed that human PTH-(1-34) (hPTH) is cleared from circulation within 6 h after sc administration of an anabolic dose of the hormone (80 microg/kg). To establish the effects of gradually extending the duration of exposure to hPTH without increasing the daily dose, we programmed implanted Alzet osmotic pumps to deliver the 80 microg/kg x day dose of the hormone during pulses of 1, 2, and 6 h/day, or 40 microg/kg x day continuously. Discontinuous infusion was accomplished by alternate spacing of external tubing with hPTH solution and sesame oil. After 6 days of treatment, we evaluated serum chemistry and bone histomorphometry. As negative and positive controls, groups of rats received pumps that delivered vehicle only and 80 microg/kg x day hPTH by daily sc injection, respectively. Dynamic and static bone histomorphometry revealed that the daily sc injection and 1 h/day infusion dramatically increased osteoblast number and bone formation in the proximal tibial metaphysis, whereas longer infusion resulted in systemic side-effects, including up to a 10% loss in body weight, hypercalcemia, and histological changes in the proximal tibia resembling abnormalities observed in patients with chronic primary hyperparathyroidism, including peritrabecular marrow fibrosis and focal bone resorption. Infusion for as little as 2 h/day resulted in minor weight loss and changes in bone histology that were intermediate between sc and continuous administration. The results demonstrate that the therapeutic interval for hPTH exposure is brief, but that programmed administration of implanted hormone is a feasible

  15. Proprioceptive Control of Human Movement. The Human Movement Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, John

    Various research studies concerned with the feedback from proprioceptors which accompany movement and the way in which this information is relevant to the control of activity are brought together in this volume. It is intended for the use of those who have some basic knowledge of human anatomy and physiology as well as an acquaintance with…

  16. Shared resource control between human and computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendler, James; Wilson, Reid

    1989-01-01

    The advantages of an AI system of actively monitoring human control of a shared resource (such as a telerobotic manipulator) are presented. A system is described in which a simple AI planning program gains efficiency by monitoring human actions and recognizing when the actions cause a change in the system's assumed state of the world. This enables the planner to recognize when an interaction occurs between human actions and system goals, and allows maintenance of an up-to-date knowledge of the state of the world and thus informs the operator when human action would undo a goal achieved by the system, when an action would render a system goal unachievable, and efficiently replans the establishment of goals after human intervention.

  17. A controlled study on serum insulin-like growth factor-I and urinary excretion of growth hormone in fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, S; Main, K; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    1995-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that secretory deficiencies of growth hormone may play a pathophysiological role in fibromyalgia (FM). Our objective was thus to evaluate the secretion of growth hormone in FM.......It has been hypothesized that secretory deficiencies of growth hormone may play a pathophysiological role in fibromyalgia (FM). Our objective was thus to evaluate the secretion of growth hormone in FM....

  18. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of human adrenal vein corticosteroids before and after adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Rege, Juilee; Satoh, Fumitoshi; Morimoto, Ryo; Kennedy, Michael R; Ahlem, Clarence N; Honma, Seijiro; Sasano, Hironobu; Rainey, William E

    2012-06-01

    Although steroid hormones produced by the adrenal gland play critical roles in human physiology, a detailed quantitative analysis of the steroid products has not been reported. The current study uses a single methodology (liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, LC-MS/MS) to quantify ten corticosteroids in adrenal vein (AV) samples pre- and post-adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation. Three men and six women with a diagnosis of an adrenal aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) were included in the study. Serum was collected from the iliac vein (IV) and the AV contralateral to the diseased adrenal. Samples were collected, before and after administration of ACTH. LC-MS/MS was then used to quantify serum concentrations of unconjugated corticosteroids and their precursors. Prior to ACTH stimulation, the four most abundant steroids in AV were cortisol (90%), cortisone (4%), corticosterone (3%) and 11-deoxycortisol (0.8%). Post-ACTH administration, cortisol remained the major adrenal product (79%); however, corticosterone became the second most abundantly produced adrenal steroid (11%) followed by pregnenolone (2.5%) and 17α-hydroxypregnenolone (2%). ACTH significantly increased the absolute adrenal output of all ten corticosteroids measured (P corticosteroids in peripheral and AV serum samples under pre- and post-ACTH stimulation. This study demonstrates the primary adrenal steroid products and their response to ACTH. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Differential neural responses to child and sexual stimuli in human fathers and non-fathers and their hormonal correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascaro, Jennifer S; Hackett, Patrick D; Rilling, James K

    2014-08-01

    Despite the well-documented importance of paternal caregiving for positive child development, little is known about the neural changes that accompany the transition to fatherhood in humans, or about how changes in hormone levels affect paternal brain function. We compared fathers of children aged 1-2 with non-fathers in terms of hormone levels (oxytocin and testosterone), neural responses to child picture stimuli, and neural responses to visual sexual stimuli. Compared to non-fathers, fathers had significantly higher levels of plasma oxytocin and lower levels of plasma testosterone. In response to child picture stimuli, fathers showed stronger activation than non-fathers within regions important for face emotion processing (caudal middle frontal gyrus [MFG]), mentalizing (temporo-parietal junction [TPJ]) and reward processing (medial orbitofrontal cortex [mOFC]). On the other hand, non-fathers had significantly stronger neural responses to sexually provocative images in regions important for reward and approach-related motivation (dorsal caudate and nucleus accumbens). Testosterone levels were negatively correlated with responses to child stimuli in the MFG. Surprisingly, neither testosterone nor oxytocin levels predicted neural responses to sexual stimuli. Our results suggest that the decline in testosterone that accompanies the transition to fatherhood may be important for augmenting empathy toward children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Overexpression of thyroid hormone beta1 nuclear receptor is associated with an increased proliferation of human hepatoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, K.; Lin, Y.; McPhie, P. [Chang-Gung College of Medicine and Technology, Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taoyuan (Taiwan, Province of China); Cheng, S. [National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-12-31

    It is evaluated the expression of thyroid hormone nuclear receptors (TRs) and their possible roles in the carcinogenesis of human hepatocarcinoma. The expression of TR{beta}1 and TR{alpha} genes was evaluated at both the mRNA and protein levels. The expression of TR{beta}1 and TR{alpha}1 mRNAs is similar to those found in normal liver. However, the expression of TR isoform proteins depends on the cell-type. The expression of TRaplha1 protein is low in all cell lines examined. However, TR{Beta}1 protein is overexpressed in Mahlavu, SK-Hep-1, and HA22T, moderately expressed in J5, J7, and J328 and is very low HepG2, Hep3B, and PLC/PRF/5 cells. The proliferation of cells in which TR{beta}1 is overexpressed is stimulated by the thyroid hormone, 3,3`,5- triiodo-L-thyronine. These results suggest that TR{beta}1, not TR{alpha}1, is probably involved in the prolifaration of hepatoma cells.

  1. Property, Control and Separated Human Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Neil

    2017-03-01

    This article examines the relationship between the existence of control rights and property in separated human biomaterials. Much of the theory as to what constitutes property is examined and it is contended that Article 22 of the Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine does not presuppose property in such materials. An analysis is undertaken of the case-law relating to control and property in sperm and embryos from the UK, Australia and the US and the shortcomings of utilising the property paradigm in these disputes are highlighted.

  2. Acceptability of a transdermal gel-based male hormonal contraceptive in a randomized controlled trial☆, ☆☆, ★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Mara Y.; Shih, Grace; Ilani, Niloufar; Wang, Christina; Page, Stephanie T.; Bremner, William J.; Swerdloff, Ronald S.; Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Blithe, Diana L.; Amory, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fifty percent of pregnancies in the United States are unintended despite numerous contraceptive methods available to women. The only male contraceptive methods, vasectomy and condoms, are used by 10% and 16% of couples, respectively. Prior studies have shown efficacy of male hormonal contraceptives in development, but few have evaluated patient acceptability and potential use if commercially available. The objective of this study is to determine if a transdermal gel-based male hormonal contraceptive regimen, containing testosterone and Nestorone® gels, would be acceptable to study participants as a primary contraceptive method. Study Design As part of a three-arm, 6-month, double-blind, randomized controlled trial of testosterone and nestorone gels at two academic medical centers, subjects completed a questionnaire to assess the acceptability of the regimen. Of the 99 men randomized, 79 provided data for analysis. Results Overall, 56% (44/79) of men were satisfied or extremely satisfied with this gel-based method of contraception, and 51% (40/79) reported that they would recommend this method to others. One third of subjects (26/79) reported that they would use this as their primary method of contraception if it were commercially available today. However, men with concerns about sexually transmitted disease were significantly less satisfied than men without such concerns (p=0.03). Conclusions A majority of the men who volunteered to participate in this trial of an experimental male hormonal contraceptive were satisfied with this transdermal male hormonal contraceptive. If commercially available, a combination of topical nesterone and testosterone gels could provide a reversible, effective method of contraception that is appealing to men. Implications A substantial portion of men report they would use this transdermal male contraceptive regimen if commercially available. This method would provide a novel, reversible method of contraception for men, whose

  3. Cytokine and hormonal profile in serum samples of patients undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation: interleukin-1beta predicts ongoing pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, T C S; Salomao, R; Brunialti, M; Braga, D P A F; Borges, E; Silva, I D C G

    2010-08-01

    Changes in the endometrium are not regulated exclusively by ovarian hormones; the immune system has also been implicated in normal endometrial function, similar to processes taking place during inflammatory and reparative path. Many cytokines are crucially important for reproductive processes, and the role of cytokines in the female reproductive system function has been broadly investigated during controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) for IVF attempts. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of serum cytokines and hormones, and the clinical outcomes of women who underwent COS and ICSI procedures. The study prospectively included 96 patients (aged 22-43 years, unexplained or male infertility, n = 61; female infertility factors, n = 35) who underwent ICSI cycles. Serum levels of interleukin (IL-8, IL-6, IL-1beta, IL-10, IL-12), tumour necrosis factor and leukaemia-inhibitory factor (LIF) and the hormones FSH, estradiol, progesterone, anti-Mullerian hormone and Inhibin-B were measured on the day of oocyte retrieval. The ongoing pregnancy rate was 25.3%. The presence of serum IL-1beta positively affected the implantation rate (P = 0.004) and increased the chance of becoming pregnant by 15 fold. Furthermore, the percentage of patients with detectable serum IL-1beta levels who conceived (62.5%) was higher than those who failed to conceive (37.5%; P = 0.019). The LIF was undetectable in all serum samples, and no other factors influenced the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing ICSI cycles. Our findings revealed that detectable serum levels of IL-1beta on the day of oocyte retrieval in patients undergoing COS and ICSI are predictive of successful implantation and ongoing pregnancy.

  4. Association between fetal growth restriction and polymorphisms at sites -1 and +3 of pituitary growth hormone: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidya Rehana

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fetal growth restriction is associated with significantly increased risks of neonatal death and morbidity and with susceptibility to hypertension, cardiovascular disease and NIDDM later in life. Human birth weight has a substantial genetic component, with at least a quarter of the variation attributable to additive genetic effects. Methods One hundred twenty-five subjects (83 control and 42 case were selected using stringent inclusion/exclusion criteria. DNA sequencing was used to identify 26 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the pituitary growth hormone gene (GH1 at which all subjects were genotyped. Association with fetal growth restriction was tested by logistic regression for all sites with minor allele frequencies greater than 5%. Results Logistic regression identified significant association with fetal growth restriction of C alleles at sites -1 and +3 (relative to the start of transcription that are in complete linkage disequilibrium. These alleles are present at higher frequency (6% vs. 0.4% in fetal growth restricted subjects and are associated with an average reduction in birth weight of 152 g in normal birth weight and 97 g in low birth weight subjects. Conclusions There is suggestive association between fetal growth restriction and the presence of C alleles at sites -1 and +3 of the pituitary growth hormone gene.

  5. Thyroid Hormone Deiodinases and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eBianco

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Deiodinases constitute a group of thioredoxin-containing selenoenzymes that play an important function in thyroid hormone homeostasis and control of thyroid hormone action. There are three known deiodinases: D1 and D2 activate the pro-hormone thyroxine (T4 to T3, the most active form of thyroid hormone, while D3 inactivates thyroid hormone and terminates T3 action. A number of studies indicate that deiodinase expression is altered in several types of cancers, suggesting that (i they may represent a useful cancer marker and/or (ii could play a role in modulating cell proliferation - in different settings thyroid hormone modulates cell proliferation. For example, although D2 is minimally expressed in human and rodent skeletal muscle, its expression level in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS-13 cells is 3-4 fold higher. In basal cell carcinoma (BCC cells, sonic hedgehog (Shh-induced cell proliferation is accompanied by induction of D3 and inactivation of D2. Interestingly a 5-fold reduction in the growth of BCC in nude mice was observed if D3 expression was knocked down. A decrease in D1 activity has been described in renal clear cell carcinoma, primary liver cancer, lung cancer, and some pituitary tumors, while in breast cancer cells and tissue there is an increase in D1 activity. Furthermore D1 mRNA and activity were found to be decreased in papillary thyroid cancer while D1 and D2 activities were significantly higher in follicular thyroid cancer tissue, in follicular adenoma and in anaplastic thyroid cancer. It is conceivable that understanding how deiodinase dysregulation in tumor cells affect thyroid hormone signaling and possibly interfere with tumor progression could lead to new antineoplastic approaches.

  6. Adipokinetic hormones control amylase activity in the cockroach (Periplaneta americana) gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodláková, Karolina; Jedlička, Pavel; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the biochemical characteristics of α-amylase and hormonal (adipokinetic hormone: AKH) stimulation of α-amylase activity in the cockroach (Periplaneta americana) midgut. We applied two AKHs in vivo and in vitro, then measured resultant amylase activity and gene expression, as well as the expression of AKH receptor (AKHR). The results revealed that optimal amylase activity is characterized by the following: pH: 5.7, temperature: 38.4 °C, K m (Michaelis-Menten constant): 2.54 mg starch/mL, and V max (maximum reaction velocity): 0.185 μmol maltose/mL/min. In vivo application of AKHs resulted in significant increase of amylase activity: by two-fold in the gastric caeca and 4-7 fold in the rest of the midgut. In vitro experiments supported results seen in vivo: a 24-h incubation with the hormones resulted in the increase of amylase activity by 1.4 times in the caeca and 4-9 times in the midgut. Further, gene expression analyses reveal that AKHR is expressed in both the caeca and the rest of the midgut, although expression levels in the former were 23 times higher than levels in the latter. A similar pattern was found for the amylase (AMY) gene. Hormonal treatment did not affect the expression of either gene. This study is the first to provide evidence indicating direct AKH stimulation of digestive enzyme activity in the insect midgut, supported by specific AKHR gene expression in this organ. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  7. The effect of acupuncture on postmenopausal symptoms and reproductive hormones: a sham controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunay, Didem; Ozdiken, Muruvvet; Arslan, Huseyin; Seven, Ali; Aral, Yalcin

    2011-03-01

    Acupuncture is commonly used to treat menopausal symptoms and other gynaecological conditions. In this study, the authors aimed to investigate whether acupuncture has an effect on menopausal symptoms and to explore whether this effect is related to changes in hormone levels. Materials and methods A total of 53 postmenopausal women were alternately assigned into two treatment groups: acupuncture (n=27) and sham acupuncture (n=26). Menopausal symptoms were assessed using the Menopause Rating Scale (MRS). The serum oestradiol, follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinising hormone (LH) levels were measured at baseline and again after the first and last sessions. The Student t test was used for normally distributed data and the Wilcoxon signed rank test for not normally distributed data. The group differences in MRS scores were assessed using non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test. After treatment, total MRS, and the somatic and psychological subscale scores were significantly lower in the acupuncture group than the sham group (all p=0.001). The severity of hot flushes was found to be significantly decreased after treatment in acupuncture group (p=0.001). In the acupuncture group LH levels were lower and oestradiol levels were significantly higher than sham group (p=0.046 and p=0.045, respectively) after treatment, but there was no difference in FSH levels. Acupuncture was effective in reducing menopausal complaints when compared to sham acupuncture and can be considered as an alternative therapy in the treatment of menopausal symptoms.

  8. Sex Hormones Coordinate Neutrophil Immunity in the Vagina by Controlling Chemokine Gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasarte, Sandra; Samaniego, Rafael; Salinas-Muñoz, Laura; Guia-Gonzalez, Mauriel A; Weiss, Linnea A; Mercader, Enrique; Ceballos-García, Elena; Navarro-González, Teresa; Moreno-Ochoa, Laura; Perez-Millan, Federico; Pion, Marjorie; Sanchez-Mateos, Paloma; Hidalgo, Andres; Muñoz-Fernandez, Maria A; Relloso, Miguel

    2016-02-01

    Estradiol-based contraceptives and hormonal replacement therapy predispose women to Candida albicans infections. Moreover, during the ovulatory phase (high estradiol), neutrophil numbers decrease in the vaginal lumen and increase during the luteal phase (high progesterone). Vaginal secretions contain chemokines that drive neutrophil migration into the lumen. However, their expression during the ovarian cycle or in response to hormonal treatments are controversial and their role in vaginal defense remains unknown.To investigate the transepithelial migration of neutrophils, we used adoptive transfer of Cxcr2(-/-) neutrophils and chemokine immunofluorescence quantitative analysis in response to C. albicans vaginal infection in the presence of hormones.Our data show that the Cxcl1/Cxcr2 axis drives neutrophil transepithelial migration into the vagina. Progesterone promotes the Cxcl1 gradient to favor neutrophil migration. Estradiol disrupts the Cxcl1 gradient and favors neutrophil arrest in the vaginal stroma; as a result, the vagina becomes more vulnerable to pathogens. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Role of incretin hormones in the regulation of insulin secretion in diabetic and nondiabetic humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul; Gromada, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    1 (GLP-1). In patients with type 2 diabetes, however, the incretin effect is lost or greatly impaired. It is hypothesized that this loss explains an important part of the impaired insulin secretion in patients. Further analysis of the incretin effects in patients has revealed that the secretion...... of GIP is near normal, whereas the secretion of GLP-1 is decreased. On the other hand, the insulintropic effect of GLP-1 is preserved, whereas the effect of GIP is greatly reduced, mainly because of a complete loss of the normal GIP-induced potentiation of second-phase insulin secretion. These two......The available evidence suggests that about two-thirds of the insulin response to an oral glucose load is due to the potentiating effect of gut-derived incretin hormones. The strongest candidates for the incretin effect are glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide...

  10. Molecularly imprinted polymer applied to the selective isolation of urinary steroid hormones: an efficient tool in the control of natural steroid hormones abuse in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doué, Mickael; Bichon, Emmanuelle; Dervilly-Pinel, Gaud; Pichon, Valérie; Chapuis-Hugon, Florence; Lesellier, Eric; West, Caroline; Monteau, Fabrice; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2012-12-28

    The use of anabolic substances to promote growth in livestock is prohibited within the European Union as laid down in Directive 96/22/EC. Nowadays, efficient methods such as steroid profiling or isotopic deviation measurements allow to control natural steroid hormones abuse. In both cases, urine is often selected as the most relevant matrix and, due to its relatively high content of potential interferents, its preparation before analysis is considered as a key step. In this context, the use of a selective sorbent such as molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was investigated. A MIP was synthesized based on 17β-estradiol, methacrylic acid and acetonitrile as template, monomer and porogen, respectively. Two approaches were then tested for non-conjugated (aglycons and glucuronides deconjugated) steroid purification: (i) molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) and (ii) semi-preparative supercritical fluid chromatography with a commercial MIP as stationary phase (SFC-MIP). Parameters for both approaches were optimized based on the main bovine metabolites of testosterone, estradiol, nandrolone and boldenone. The MISPE protocol developed for screening purposes allowed satisfactory recoveries (upper 65% for the 12 target steroids) with sufficient purification for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. For confirmatory purposes, the use of isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) requires a higher degree of purity of the target compounds, which can be reached by the SFC-MIP protocol with three steps less compared to the official and current method. Purity, concentration and absence of isotopic fractionation of target steroids extracted from urine of treated cattle (treated with testosterone, estradiol, androstenedione, and boldenone) allowed the measurement of (13)C/(12)C isotopic ratios of corresponding metabolites and endogenous reference compounds (ERC) and proved the relevance of the strategy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  11. Effects of recombinant human growth hormone on the expression of CD47, L-selectin and advanced oxidation protein products in elderly patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun LIU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH on the expression of CD47, L-selective action hormone (L-selectin, and advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs in elderly patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODSE. Methods Sixty-six MODSE patients were randomly and equally divided into two groups (33 each: control group (received conventional treatment only and rhGH treatment group (received conventional and rhGH treatment. Venous blood was taken from all the subjects before treatment and 3rd, 14th and 28th day after treatment. Serum CD47 was detected by flow cytometry, L-selectin and AOPPs concentrations were determined with ELISA and spectrophotometry. The changes in APACHE Ⅲ score in the two groups were also observed. Results Compared with that before treatment, the positive rate of CD47 was increased, meanwhile the AOPPs concentrations, L-selectin levels and APACHE Ⅲ scores declined markedly in both groups after treatment (P<0.05. Compared with that in control group, the positive rate of CD47 increased more significantly, while the AOPPs concentrations, L-selectin levels, APACHE Ⅲ scores and mortalities declined more significantly in rhGH treatment group (P<0.05. In the rhGH treatment group, the positive rate of CD47 increased, the AOPPs concentrations, while L-selectin levels and APACHE Ⅲ scores declined markedly on the 14th day compared with those on the 3rd day, and on the 28th day as compared with that on the 14th day after treatment (P<0.05. Conclusion rhGH may enhance the immune function and reduce oxidative stress, inflammatory reaction, and mortality in elderly patients with MODSE. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.02.10

  12. Effects of itopride hydrochloride on plasma gut-regulatory peptide and stress-related hormone levels in healthy human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, Fumihiko; Shiga, Toru; Inoue, Shin; Sato, Yuhki; Itoh, Hiroki; Takeyama, Masaharu

    2006-01-01

    Itopride hydrochloride (itopride), a gastrokinetic drug, has recently been evaluated for its clinical usefulness in functional dyspepsia. We investigated effects of itopride on human plasma gastrin-, somatostatin-, motilin-, and cholecystokinin (CCK)-like immunoreactive substances (IS); adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-immunoreactive substances (IS), and cortisol under stress conditions in healthy subjects. A single administration of itopride caused significant increases in plasma somatostatin- and motilin-IS levels compared to placebo. Itopride significantly decreased plasma CCK-IS, and suppressed the ACTH-IS level compared to placebo. We hypothesize that itopride may have an accelerating gastric emptying effect, and a modulatory effect on the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and autonomic nervous functions. These effects might be beneficial in stress-related diseases, suggesting that itopride has clinicopharmacological activities.

  13. Does menopausal hormone therapy reduce myocardial infarction risk if initiated early after menopause? A population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasquilla, Germán D; Berglund, Anita; Gigante, Bruna; Landgren, Britt-Marie; de Faire, Ulf; Hallqvist, Johan; Leander, Karin

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to assess whether the timing of menopausal hormone therapy initiation in relation to onset of menopause and hormone therapy duration is associated with myocardial infarction risk. This study was based on the Stockholm Heart Epidemiology Program, a population-based case-control study including 347 postmenopausal women who had experienced a nonfatal myocardial infarction and 499 female control individuals matched for age and residential area. Odds ratios (with 95% CIs) for myocardial infarction were calculated using logistic regression. Early initiation of hormone therapy (within 10 y of onset of menopause or before age 60 y), compared with never use, was associated with an odds ratio of 0.87 (95% CI, 0.58-1.30) after adjustments for lifestyle factors, body mass index, and socioeconomic status. For late initiation of hormone therapy, the corresponding odds ratio was 0.97 (95% CI, 0.53-1.76). For hormone therapy duration of 5 years or more, compared with never use, the adjusted odds ratio was 0.64 (95% CI, 0.35-1.18). For hormone therapy duration of less than 5 years, the odds ratio was 0.97 (95% CI, 0.63-1.48). Neither the timing of hormone therapy initiation nor the duration of therapy is significantly associated with myocardial infarction risk.

  14. ORAL HORMONAL CONTRACEPTION - THE INFLUENCE ON HUMAN GENOME AND LIPID STATUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Loncar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Micronucleus test is the method which is used in discovering the chromosome aberrations in the cells which are exposed to the effects of chemical mutagens. The cell which suffered the DNA damage cytologically fits to extranuclear bodies in cytoplasm, which represent the chromosomal fragments, the whole chromosomes or the groups of chromosomes. These cytoplasmic masses look like small cores, micronucleuses, and their size varies depending on the size of chromosome frag-ments or the number of chromosomes which are in the cytoplasm.The aim of the paper was to examine the influence of monophased, combined, low-dosed contraceptive pills which contain ethinyl- estradiol and gestoden on the micronucleus frequency in human lymphocytes of peripheral blood and their influence on the lipid status of the users.We examined 30 patients older than 18 years. All the patients took part in the research in order to prevent unwanted pregnancy.The existence of cardiovascular, endocrinological, neurological and malignant diseases was excluded by using clinical examinations, biochemical, hematological and additional researches.After the therapy of 20 µg of ethynil- estradiol and 75 µg of gestoden in the period of six consequtive menstrual cycles in order to prevent unwanted pregnancy, there was not statistically significant change of micronucleus frequency in lympho-cytes of peripheral blood in the cases of patients which took part in the research; (p> 0,05.The therapy significantly increases the value of cholesterol, low- density lipo-proteins (LDL and triglycerides in the blood of the patients (p< 0,05.The therapy can be applied along with the regular control of the gynecologist in order to prevent unwanted pregnancy.

  15. Long-term, hormone-responsive organoid cultures of human endometrium in a chemically defined medium

    OpenAIRE

    Turco, Margherita Yayoi; Gardner, L.; Hughes, J.; Cindrova-Davies, Tereza; Gomez, MJ; Farrell, L; Hollinshead, M; Marsh, SGE; Brosens, JJ; Critchley, HO; Simons, Benjamin David; Hemberger, M; Koo, Bonkyoung; Moffett, Ashley; Burton, Graham James

    2017-01-01

    In humans, the endometrium, the uterine mucosal lining, undergoes dynamic changes throughout the menstrual cycle and pregnancy. Despite the importance of the endometrium as the site of implantation and nutritional support for the conceptus, there are no long-term culture systems that recapitulate endometrial function in vitro. We adapted conditions used to establish human adult stem-cell-derived organoid cultures to generate three-dimensional cultures of normal and decidualized human endometr...

  16. Proteolytic processing of anti-Müllerian hormone differs between human fetal testes and adult ovaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mamsen, Linn; Petersen, TS; Jeppesen, JV

    2015-01-01

    and specificity of a panel of five novel high-affinity AMH monoclonal antibodies. Two recognize the mature C-terminal form of AMH, whereas three recognize the active pro-mature form of AMH in human tissue. The antibodies were tested on fetal male testicular and mesonephric tissue aged 8-19 weeks post conception...... (pc), fetal male serum aged 16-26 weeks pc and human immature GCs by immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, ELISA and western blotting. The active pro-mature forms of AMH were expressed in both Sertoli cells from human fetal testis and human immature GCs. In contrast, the mature C-terminal form...

  17. Thyroid and Glucocorticoid Hormones Promote Functional T-tubule Development in Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Shan S; Blackwell, Daniel J; Gomez-Hurtado, Nieves; Frisk, Michael; Wang, Lili; Kim, Kyungsoo; Dahl, Christen P; Fiane, Arnt E; Tønnessen, Theis; Kryshtal, Dmytro O; Louch, William E; Knollmann, Bjorn C

    2017-10-02

    Rationale: Human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM) are increasingly being used for modeling heart disease and are under development for regeneration of the injured heart. However, incomplete structural and functional maturation of hiPSC-CM including lack of t-tubules, immature excitation-contraction (EC) coupling, and inefficient Ca-induced Ca release (CICR) remain major limitations. Objective: Thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones are critical for heart maturation. We hypothesized that their addition to standard protocols would promote t-tubule development and mature EC coupling of hiPSC-CM when cultured on extracellular matrix with physiological stiffness (Matrigel mattress). Methods and Results: HiPSC-CM were generated using a standard chemical differentiation method supplemented with triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) and/or dexamethasone (Dex) during days 16-30 followed by single-cell culture for 5 days on Matrigel mattress. HiPSC-CM treated with T3+Dex, but not with either T3 or Dex alone, developed an extensive t-tubule network. Notably, Matrigel mattress was necessary for t-tubule formation. Compared to adult human ventricular CM, t-tubules in T3+Dex-treated hiPSC-CM were less organized and had more longitudinal elements. Confocal line scans demonstrated spatially and temporally uniform Ca release that is characteristic of EC coupling in the heart ventricle. T3+Dex enhanced elementary Ca release measured by Ca sparks as well as promoted ryanodine receptor (RyR2) structural organization. Simultaneous measurements of L-type Ca current and intracellular Ca release confirmed enhanced functional coupling between L-type Ca channels and RyR2 in T3+Dex cells. Conclusions: Our results suggest a permissive role of combined thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones during the cardiac differentiation process which, when coupled with further maturation on Matrigel mattress, is sufficient for t-tubule development, enhanced CICR, and more ventricular-like EC

  18. Human metastatic melanoma cell lines express high levels of growth hormone receptor and respond to GH treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sustarsic, Elahu G. [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Junnila, Riia K. [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Kopchick, John J., E-mail: kopchick@ohio.edu [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Most cancer types of the NCI60 have sub-sets of cell lines with high GHR expression. •GHR is highly expressed in melanoma cell lines. •GHR is elevated in advanced stage IV metastatic tumors vs. stage III. •GH treatment of metastatic melanoma cell lines alters growth and cell signaling. -- Abstract: Accumulating evidence implicates the growth hormone receptor (GHR) in carcinogenesis. While multiple studies show evidence for expression of growth hormone (GH) and GHR mRNA in human cancer tissue, there is a lack of quantification and only a few cancer types have been investigated. The National Cancer Institute’s NCI60 panel includes 60 cancer cell lines from nine types of human cancer: breast, CNS, colon, leukemia, melanoma, non-small cell lung, ovarian, prostate and renal. We utilized this panel to quantify expression of GHR, GH, prolactin receptor (PRLR) and prolactin (PRL) mRNA with real-time RT qPCR. Both GHR and PRLR show a broad range of expression within and among most cancer types. Strikingly, GHR expression is nearly 50-fold higher in melanoma than in the panel as a whole. Analysis of human metastatic melanoma biopsies confirmed GHR gene expression in melanoma tissue. In these human biopsies, the level of GHR mRNA is elevated in advanced stage IV tumor samples compared to stage III. Due to the novel finding of high GHR in melanoma, we examined the effect of GH treatment on three NCI60 melanoma lines (MDA-MB-435, UACC-62 and SK-MEL-5). GH increased proliferation in two out of three cell lines tested. Further analysis revealed GH-induced activation of STAT5 and mTOR in a cell line dependent manner. In conclusion, we have identified cell lines and cancer types that are ideal to study the role of GH and PRL in cancer, yet have been largely overlooked. Furthermore, we found that human metastatic melanoma tumors express GHR and cell lines possess active GHRs that can modulate multiple signaling pathways and alter cell proliferation. Based on

  19. Follicular and endocrine dose responses according to anti-Müllerian hormone levels in IVF patients treated with a novel human recombinant FSH (FE 999049)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosch, Ernesto; Nyboe Andersen, Anders; Barri, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the association between serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels and follicular development and endocrine responses induced by increasing doses (5·2-12·1 μg/day) of a novel recombinant human FSH (rhFSH, FE 999049) in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF)/intracytop......OBJECTIVE: To study the association between serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels and follicular development and endocrine responses induced by increasing doses (5·2-12·1 μg/day) of a novel recombinant human FSH (rhFSH, FE 999049) in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF...... for these hormones, and no clear dose-related increase was observed for the number of follicles in these patients. CONCLUSIONS: Dose-response relationships between rhFSH and follicular development and endocrine parameters are significantly different for IVF/ICSI patients with lower and higher serum AMH levels...

  20. Human reliability analysis of control room operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Isaac J.A.L.; Carvalho, Paulo Victor R.; Grecco, Claudio H.S. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    Human reliability is the probability that a person correctly performs some system required action in a required time period and performs no extraneous action that can degrade the system Human reliability analysis (HRA) is the analysis, prediction and evaluation of work-oriented human performance using some indices as human error likelihood and probability of task accomplishment. Significant progress has been made in the HRA field during the last years, mainly in nuclear area. Some first-generation HRA methods were developed, as THERP (Technique for human error rate prediction). Now, an array of called second-generation methods are emerging as alternatives, for instance ATHEANA (A Technique for human event analysis). The ergonomics approach has as tool the ergonomic work analysis. It focus on the study of operator's activities in physical and mental form, considering at the same time the observed characteristics of operator and the elements of the work environment as they are presented to and perceived by the operators. The aim of this paper is to propose a methodology to analyze the human reliability of the operators of industrial plant control room, using a framework that includes the approach used by ATHEANA, THERP and the work ergonomics analysis. (author)

  1. Accessory gland as a site for prothoracicotropic hormone controlled ecdysone synthesis in adult male insects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie L Hentze

    Full Text Available Insect steroid hormones (ecdysteroids are important for female reproduction in many insect species and are required for the initiation and coordination of vital developmental processes. Ecdysteroids are also important for adult male physiology and behavior, but their exact function and site of synthesis remains unclear, although previous studies suggest that the reproductive system may be their source. We have examined expression profiles of the ecdysteroidogenic Halloween genes, during development and in adults of the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum. Genes required for the biosynthesis of ecdysone (E, the precursor of the molting hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E, are expressed in the tubular accessory glands (TAGs of adult males. In contrast, expression of the gene encoding the enzyme mediating 20E synthesis was detected in the ovaries of females. Further, Spookiest (Spot, an enzyme presumably required for endowing tissues with competence to produce ecdysteroids, is male specific and predominantly expressed in the TAGs. We also show that prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH, a regulator of E synthesis during larval development, regulates ecdysteroid levels in the adult stage in Drosophila melanogaster and the gene for its receptor Torso seems to be expressed specifically in the accessory glands of males. The composite results suggest strongly that the accessory glands of adult male insects are the main source of E, but not 20E. The finding of a possible male-specific source of E raises the possibility that E and 20E have sex-specific roles analogous to the vertebrate sex steroids, where males produce primarily testosterone, the precursor of estradiol. Furthermore this study provides the first evidence that PTTH regulates ecdysteroid synthesis in the adult stage and could explain the original finding that some adult insects are a rich source of PTTH.

  2. MULTIPLE STABLE PERIODIC SOLUTIONS IN A MODEL FOR THE HORMONAL REGULATION OF THE MENSTRUAL CYCLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACTThe pituitary hormones, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and the ovarian hormones, estradiol (E2), progesterone (P4), and inhibin (Ih), are five hormones important for the regulation and maintenance of the human menstrual cycle. The...

  3. Combined Effects of Growth Hormone and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate on Growth, Differentiation, and Angiogenesis in Human Dental Pulp Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Chang, Seok-Woo; Park, Kyung-Ran; Herr, Lan; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of growth hormone (GH) on mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) with regard to cell adhesion, growth, odontoblastic differentiation, and angiogenesis in human dental pulp cells and the underlying signal pathway mechanisms. Cell adhesion and proliferation were assessed by adhesion analysis and cell counting. Differentiation was examined by alkaline phosphatase activity, alizarin red staining, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for marker genes. Angiogenesis was evaluated by human umbilical vein endothelial cell migration and capillary tube formation assays. Signaling pathways were analyzed by Western blotting and confocal microscopy. Combined treatment with GH and MTA enhanced cell adhesion, growth, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcified nodules, expression of marker mRNAs, migration, and capillary tube formation, compared with treatment with MTA or GH alone. In addition, GH plus MTA increased expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 mRNA, phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, JNK, and p38 MAPK, and increased the levels of the transcription factors Runx2 and Osterix, compared with MTA alone. Collectively, our results demonstrate that a combination of MTA and GH promotes cell adhesion, growth, differentiation, and angiogenesis of MTA in human dental pulp cells via the activation of bone morphogenetic protein and MAPK pathway. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Certain hormonal profiles of postpartum anestrus jersey crossbred cows treated with controlled internal drug release and ovsynch protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayanidhi Jena

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was conducted to determine the serum levels of certain hormones in post-partum anestrus cows following treatment with controlled internal drug release (CIDR and Ovsynch protocol. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 postpartum anestrus cows were divided into three equal groups after thorough gynecoclinical examination. The Group 1 animals received an intravaginal progesterone device on day 0 and 2 ml of prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α on day of CIDR removal (7th day, Group 2 cows were treated with ovsynch protocol (gonadotropinreleasing hormone [GnRH]-PGF2α-GnRH on day 0, 7 and 9, respectively, and Group 3 cows were supplemented with mineral mixture and treated as control. The serum estrogen, progesterone, triiodothyronine, and thyroxine concentration were estimated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit and absorbance was read at 450 nm with Perkin Elmer Wallac 1420 Microplate Reader. Results: There was a significant increase in progesterone level in Group 1 after withdrawal of CIDR as compared to other two groups. However, the estrogen assay revealed a greater concentration in Group 2 against Group 1 on day 7 of sampling. However, there was no significant difference for serum triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxine (T4 irrespective of treatment protocols and days of sampling. Conclusion: Treatment with CIDR based progesterone therapy and drug combinations may affect the reproductive hormonal balance like estrogen and progesterone, which is inevitable for successful return to cyclicity and subsequent fertilization and conception. However, as far as serum T3 and T4 concentration concerned it may not give an astounding result.

  5. The FOXO transcription factor controls insect growth and development by regulating juvenile hormone degradation in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Baosheng; Huang, Yuping; Xu, Jun; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Bai, Hua; Palli, Subba Reddy; Huang, Yongping; Tan, Anjiang

    2017-07-14

    Forkhead box O (FOXO) functions as the terminal transcription factor of the insulin signaling pathway and regulates multiple physiological processes in many organisms, including lifespan in insects. However, how FOXO interacts with hormone signaling to modulate insect growth and development is largely unknown. Here, using the transgene-based CRISPR/Cas9 system, we generated and characterized mutants of the silkworm Bombyx mori FOXO (BmFOXO) to elucidate its physiological functions during development of this lepidopteran insect. The BmFOXO mutant (FOXO-M) exhibited growth delays from the first larval stage and showed precocious metamorphosis, pupating at the end of the fourth instar (trimolter) rather than at the end of the fifth instar as in the wild-type (WT) animals. However, different from previous reports on precocious metamorphosis caused by juvenile hormone (JH) deficiency in silkworm mutants, the total developmental time of the larval period in the FOXO-M was comparable with that of the WT. Exogenous application of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) or of the JH analog rescued the trimolter phenotype. RNA-seq and gene expression analyses indicated that genes involved in JH degradation but not in JH biosynthesis were up-regulated in the FOXO-M compared with the WT animals. Moreover, we identified several FOXO-binding sites in the promoter of genes coding for JH-degradation enzymes. These results suggest that FOXO regulates JH degradation rather than its biosynthesis, which further modulates hormone homeostasis to control growth and development in B. mori In conclusion, we have uncovered a pivotal role for FOXO in regulating JH signaling to control insect development. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Thyroid hormone stimulated glucose uptake in human mononuclear blood cells from normal persons and from patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvetny, J; Matzen, L

    1989-01-01

    of stimulation of cells from control subjects and patients with NIDDM revealed an identical oxygen consumption, whereas the thyroid hormone-induced glucose uptake was significantly increased in cells from patients with NIDDM. T4 (5 mumol/l) stimulation in controls: 1.34 +/- 0.23 mmol.l-1 (mg DNA)-1.h-1, in NIDDM...

  7. Glucose turnover and hormonal changes during insulin-induced hypoglycemia in trained humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Michael; Mikines, K J; Christensen, N J

    1984-01-01

    .9 mmol X l-1. Glucose turnover was determined by primed constant rate infusion of 3-[3H]glucose. Basal C-peptide (0.46 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.73 +/- 0.06 pmol X ml-1) and glucagon (4 +/- 0.4 vs. 10 +/- 2 pmol X l-1) were lower (P less than 0.05) and epinephrine higher (0.30 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.09 +/- 0.03 nmol X l-1......Eight athletes (T), studied the third morning after the last exercise session, and seven sedentary males (C) (maximal O2 consumption 65 +/- 4 vs. 49 +/- 4 (SE) ml X kg-1 X min-1, for T and C men, respectively) had insulin infused until plasma glucose, at an insulin level of 1,600 pmol X l-1, was 1......) in T than in C subjects. During and after insulin infusion production, disappearance and clearance of glucose changed identically in T and C subjects. However, in spite of identical plasma glucose concentrations, epinephrine (7.88 +/- 0.99 vs. 3.97 +/- 0.40 nmol X l-1), growth hormone (97 +/- 17 vs. 64...

  8. Effect of 4 weeks of octreotide treatment on prolactin, thyroid stimulating hormone and thyroid hormones in acromegalic patients. A double blind placebo-controlled cross-over study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M; Hansen, T B; Bollerslev, J

    1995-01-01

    We aimed to test the hypothesis, that octreotide has a suppressive effect on unstimulated and TRH-stimulated PRL levels in both normo- and hyperprolactinaemic acromegalic patients, and besides to evaluate the effect of octreotide on unstimulated TSH and thyroid hormones. The present study is a do...

  9. Hormonal control of hepatic glycogen metabolism in food-deprived, continuously swimming coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, M.M.; Maule, A.G.; Schreck, C.B.; Moon, T.W.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma cortisol concentration and liver cytosolic glucocorticoid receptor activities of continuously swimming, food-deprived coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) did not differ from those of resting, fed fish. Plasma glucose concentration was significantly higher in the exercising, starved fish, but there were no significant differences in either hepatic glycogen concentration or hepatic activities of glycogen phosphorylase, glycogen synthase, pyruvate kinase, or lactate dehydrogenase between the two groups. Total glucose production by hepatocytes did not differ significantly between the two groups; glycogen breakdown accounted for all the glucose produced in the resting, fed fish whereas it explained only 59% of the glucose production in the exercised animals. Epinephrine and glucagon stimulation of glucose production by hepatocytes was decreased in the exercised fish without significantly affecting hepatocyte glycogen breakdown in either group. Insulin prevented glycogen breakdown and enhanced glycogen deposition in exercised fish. The results indicate that food-deprived, continuously swimming coho salmon conserve glycogen by decreasing the responsiveness of hepatocytes to catabolic hormones and by increasing the responsiveness to insulin (anabolic hormone).

  10. Family members CREB and CREM control thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) expression in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappini, Franck; Ramadoss, Preeti; Vella, Kristen R; Cunha, Lucas L; Ye, Felix D; Stuart, Ronald C; Nillni, Eduardo A; Hollenberg, Anthony N

    2013-01-05

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus is regulated by thyroid hormone (TH). cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) has also been postulated to regulate TRH expression but its interaction with TH signaling in vivo is not known. To evaluate the role of CREB in TRH regulation in vivo, we deleted CREB from PVN neurons to generate the CREB1(ΔSIM1) mouse. As previously shown, loss of CREB was compensated for by an up-regulation of CREM in euthyroid CREB1(ΔSIM1) mice but TSH, T₄ and T₃ levels were normal, even though TRH mRNA levels were elevated. Interestingly, TRH mRNA expression was also increased in the PVN of CREB1(ΔSIM1) mice in the hypothyroid state but became normal when made hyperthyroid. Importantly, CREM levels were similar in CREB1(ΔSIM1) mice regardless of thyroid status, demonstrating that the regulation of TRH by T₃ in vivo likely occurs independently of the CREB/CREM family. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Parathyroid Hormone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have any questions about how to inject this medication.Parathyroid hormone injection comes in a cartridge to be mixed in ... and vitamin D while you are taking this medication.Parathyroid hormone injection controls hypoparathyroidism but does not cure it. Continue ...

  12. Vitamin D receptor agonist VS-105 directly modulates parathyroid hormone expression in human parathyroid cells and in 5/6 nephrectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Kaichiro; Wu-Wong, J Ruth; Chen, Yung-Wu; Wessale, Jerry L; Kanai, Genta; Kakuta, Takatoshi; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2017-03-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) agonists (VDRAs) are commonly used to treat secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Current VDRA therapy often causes hypercalcemia, which is a critical risk for vascular calcification. Previously we have shown that a novel VDRA, VS-105, effectively suppresses serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) without affecting serum calcium levels in 5/6 nephrectomized (NX) uremic rats. However, it is not known whether VS-105 directly regulates PTH gene expression. To study the direct effect of VS-105 on modulating PTH, we tested VS-105 and paricalcitol in the spheroid culture of parathyroid cells from human SHPT patients, and examined the time-dependent effect of the compounds on regulating serum PTH in 5/6 NX uremic rats (i.p. 3x/week for 14days). In human parathyroid cells, VS-105 (100nM) down-regulated PTH mRNA expression (to 3.6% of control) and reduced secreted PTH (to 43.9% of control); paricalcitol was less effective. VS-105 effectively up-regulated the expression of VDR (1.9-fold of control) and CaSR (1.8-fold of control) in spheroids; paricalcitol was also less effective. In 5/6 NX rats, one single dose of 0.05-0.2μg/kg of VS-105 or 0.02-0.04μg/kg of paricalcitol effectively reduced serum PTH by >40% on Day 2. Serum PTH remained suppressed during the dosing period, but tended to rebound in the paricalcitol groups. These data indicate that VS-105 exerts a rapid effect on suppressing serum PTH, directly down-regulates the PTH gene, and modulates PTH, VDR and CaSR gene expression more effectively than paricalcitol. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Interplay between endocannabinoids, steroids and cytokines in the control of human reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battista, N; Pasquariello, N; Di Tommaso, M; Maccarrone, M

    2008-05-01

    The use of marijuana, which today is the most used recreational drug, has been demonstrated to affect adversely reproduction. Marijuana smokers, both men and women, show impaired fertility, owing to defective signalling pathways, aberrant hormonal regulation, or wrong timing during embryo implantation. Anandamide (N-arachidonoylethanolamine, AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) mimic Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive principle of Cannabis sativa, by binding to both the brain-type (CB(1)) and the spleen-type (CB(2)) cannabinoid receptors. These 'endocannabinoids' exert several actions either in the central nervous system or in peripheral tissues, and are metabolised by specific enzymes that synthesise or hydrolyse them. In this review, we shall describe the elements that constitute the endocannabinoid system (ECS), in order to put in a better perspective the role of this system in the control of human fertility, both in females and males. In addition, we shall discuss the interplay between ECS, sex hormones and cytokines, which generates an endocannabinoid-hormone-cytokine array critically involved in the control of human reproduction.

  14. (Revised The role of melatonin as a hormone and an antioxidant in the control of fish reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Saumen Kumar Maitra

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Reproduction in most fish is seasonal or periodic and the spawning occurs in an appropriate season to ensure maximum survival of the offspring. The sequence of reproductive events in an annual cycle is largely under the control of a species-specific endogenous timing system, which essentially relies on a well-equipped physiological response mechanism to changing environmental cues. The duration of solar light or photoperiod is one of the most predictable environmental signals used by a large number of animals including fish to coordinate their seasonal breeding. In vertebrates, the pineal gland is the major photo-neuroendocrine part of the brain that rhythmically synthesizes and releases melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine into the circulation in synchronization with the environmental light-dark cycle. Past few decades witnessed an enormous progress in understanding the mechanisms by which melatonin regulates seasonal reproduction in fish and in other vertebrates. Most studies emphasized hormonal actions of melatonin through its high-affinity, pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein (guanine nucleotide binding protein coupled receptors on the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad (HPG axis of fish. However, the discovery that melatonin due to its lipophilic nature can easily cross the plasma membrane of all cells and may act as a potent scavenger of free radicals and stimulant of different antioxidants added a new dimension to the idea explaining mechanisms of melatonin actions in the regulation of ovarian functions. The basic concept on the actions of melatonin as an antioxidant emerged from mammalian studies. Recently, however, some new studies clearly suggested that melatonin, apart from playing the role of a hormone, may also be associated with the reduction in oxidative stress to augment ovarian functions during spawning. This review thus aims to bring together the current knowledge on the role of melatonin as a hormone as well as an antioxidant in

  15. Effects of Growth Hormone Replacement Therapy on Bone Mineral Density in Growth Hormone Deficient Adults: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xue

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Growth hormone deficiency patients exhibited reduced bone mineral density compared with healthy controls, but previous researches demonstrated uncertainty about the effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on bone in growth hormone deficient adults. The aim of this study was to determine whether the growth hormone replacement therapy could elevate bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults. Methods. In this meta-analysis, searches of Medline, Embase, and The Cochrane Library were undertaken to identify studies in humans of the association between growth hormone treatment and bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults. Random effects model was used for this meta-analysis. Results. A total of 20 studies (including one outlier study with 936 subjects were included in our research. We detected significant overall association of growth hormone treatment with increased bone mineral density of spine, femoral neck, and total body, but some results of subgroup analyses were not consistent with the overall analyses. Conclusions. Our meta-analysis suggested that growth hormone replacement therapy could have beneficial influence on bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults, but, in some subject populations, the influence was not evident.

  16. The absorption and uptake of recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone through vaginal subcutaneous injections - a pharmacokinetic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chao-Chin; Kuo, Hsin-Chih; Hsu, Chao-Tien; Gu, Qing

    2009-01-01

    Background Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) has been routinely used for ovulation induction. Because of rapid clearance of the hormone, FSH is commonly administered by daily intramuscular or subcutaneous injections in in-vitro fertilization (IVF). To reduce the number of visits to the clinic, an intermittent vaginal injection of rhFSH every 3 days employing the concepts of mesotherapy and uterine first-pass effect was invented and has successfully been applied in women receiving IVF treatment. This study was designed to monitor the pharmacokinetic pattern of rhFSH administered vaginally. Methods Twelve healthy women with regular ovulatory cycles were recruited. All volunteers received gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist to suppress pituitary function and were assigned to receive single dose recombinant human FSH (rhFSH, Puregon 300) either using conventional abdominal subcutaneous injection or vaginal subcutaneous injection in a randomized cross-over study. Serum samples were collected at pre- scheduled time intervals after injections of rhFSH to determine immunoreactive FSH levels. Pharmacokinetic parameters characterizing rate [maximal plasma concentrations (Cmax) and time of maximal plasma concentrations (tmax)] and extent [area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and clearance] of absorption of rhFSH were compared. Results Vaginal injection of rhFSH was well tolerated and no drug-related adverse reaction was noted. Our analysis revealed that tmax was significantly earlier (mean 6.67 versus 13.33 hours) and Cmax was significantly higher (mean 17.77 versus 13.96 IU/L) in vaginal versus abdominal injections. The AUC0-∞ was 1640 versus 1134 IU·hour/L in vaginal and abdominal injections, respectively. Smaller plasma elimination rate constant (0.011 versus 0.016 hour-1), longer mean residence time (106.58 versus 70.47 hours), and slower total body clearance (292.2 versus 400.1 mL/hour) were also found in vaginal injection. Conclusion The vaginal

  17. The absorption and uptake of recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone through vaginal subcutaneous injections - a pharmacokinetic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Hsin-Chih

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH has been routinely used for ovulation induction. Because of rapid clearance of the hormone, FSH is commonly administered by daily intramuscular or subcutaneous injections in in-vitro fertilization (IVF. To reduce the number of visits to the clinic, an intermittent vaginal injection of rhFSH every 3 days employing the concepts of mesotherapy and uterine first-pass effect was invented and has successfully been applied in women receiving IVF treatment. This study was designed to monitor the pharmacokinetic pattern of rhFSH administered vaginally. Methods Twelve healthy women with regular ovulatory cycles were recruited. All volunteers received gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist to suppress pituitary function and were assigned to receive single dose recombinant human FSH (rhFSH, Puregon 300 either using conventional abdominal subcutaneous injection or vaginal subcutaneous injection in a randomized cross-over study. Serum samples were collected at pre- scheduled time intervals after injections of rhFSH to determine immunoreactive FSH levels. Pharmacokinetic parameters characterizing rate [maximal plasma concentrations (Cmax and time of maximal plasma concentrations (tmax] and extent [area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC and clearance] of absorption of rhFSH were compared. Results Vaginal injection of rhFSH was well tolerated and no drug-related adverse reaction was noted. Our analysis revealed that tmax was significantly earlier (mean 6.67 versus 13.33 hours and Cmax was significantly higher (mean 17.77 versus 13.96 IU/L in vaginal versus abdominal injections. The AUC0-∞ was 1640 versus 1134 IU·hour/L in vaginal and abdominal injections, respectively. Smaller plasma elimination rate constant (0.011 versus 0.016 hour-1, longer mean residence time (106.58 versus 70.47 hours, and slower total body clearance (292.2 versus 400.1 mL/hour were also found in vaginal injection

  18. Hormonal Receptor, Human Epidermal Growth Factor and Its Association with Breast Cancer Tumor Characteristics in Albania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajenga, Edlira; Rexha, Tefta; Çeliku, Silva; Ugrinska, Ana; Bejtja, Gazmend

    2016-09-01

    This retrospective study was designed to analyze expression patterns of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2/neu in Albanian patients with breast carcinoma to identify their relationships with tumor size, histological grade (HG), lymph node metastasis and relapse. Patients with either biopsy or metastatic relapse were identified. Demographics, tumor characteristics, ER, PR, and HER2/neu status were retrospectively obtained from the medical records of patients treated with breast cancer during 2006-2011. Hormonal receptors and HER2/neu were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Association of ER, PR and HER2/neu with clinicopathological and molecular characteristics were studied using Fisher's test. P value ≤0.05 was considered significant. There were 110 patients included in the study. Mean patient age was 51.08±10.75 years. The overall immunoexpression of ER, PR and HER2/neu were found positive in 76 (69%), 73 (67%), and 16 (41%) patients, respectively. ER- was associated with higher histological grade (24% vs. 9.2%) and PR+ with tumor size (T2, 78.3 vs. 64.3) (p=0.02 and 0.05, respectively). ER and PR expression were significantly decreased in HER2/neu positive cases while HER2/neu levels correlated with tumor size (p=0.03) and nodal metastasis (p=0.03). No association was detected between ER, PR, HER2/neu and relapse. A combination of ER, PR and HER2/neu and prognostic factors could be of clinical value by defining subgroups in Albanian breast cancer patients that might benefit from more aggressive treatment.

  19. Bivariate analysis of basal serum anti-Mullerian hormone measurements and human blastocyst development after IVF

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sills, E Scott

    2011-12-02

    Abstract Background To report on relationships among baseline serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) measurements, blastocyst development and other selected embryology parameters observed in non-donor oocyte IVF cycles. Methods Pre-treatment AMH was measured in patients undergoing IVF (n = 79) and retrospectively correlated to in vitro embryo development noted during culture. Results Mean (+\\/- SD) age for study patients in this study group was 36.3 ± 4.0 (range = 28-45) yrs, and mean (+\\/- SD) terminal serum estradiol during IVF was 5929 +\\/- 4056 pmol\\/l. A moderate positive correlation (0.49; 95% CI 0.31 to 0.65) was noted between basal serum AMH and number of MII oocytes retrieved. Similarly, a moderate positive correlation (0.44) was observed between serum AMH and number of early cleavage-stage embryos (95% CI 0.24 to 0.61), suggesting a relationship between serum AMH and embryo development in IVF. Of note, serum AMH levels at baseline were significantly different for patients who did and did not undergo blastocyst transfer (15.6 vs. 10.9 pmol\\/l; p = 0.029). Conclusions While serum AMH has found increasing application as a predictor of ovarian reserve for patients prior to IVF, its roles to estimate in vitro embryo morphology and potential to advance to blastocyst stage have not been extensively investigated. These data suggest that baseline serum AMH determinations can help forecast blastocyst developmental during IVF. Serum AMH measured before treatment may assist patients, clinicians and embryologists as scheduling of embryo transfer is outlined. Additional studies are needed to confirm these correlations and to better define the role of baseline serum AMH level in the prediction of blastocyst formation.

  20. Hyperpolarization of the Membrane Potential Caused by Somatostatin in Dissociated Human Pituitary Adenoma Cells that Secrete Growth Hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Naohide; Shibuya, Naohiko; Ogata, Etsuro

    1986-08-01

    Membrane electrical properties and the response to somatostatin were examined in dissociated human pituitary adenoma cells that secrete growth hormone (GH). Under current clamp condition with a patch electrode, the resting potential was -52.4 ± 8.0 mV, and spontaneous action potentials were observed in 58% of the cells. Under voltage clamp condition an outward K+ current, a tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ current, and a Ca2+ current were observed. Cobalt ions suppressed the Ca2+ current. The threshold of Ca2+ current activation was about -60 mV. Somatostatin elicited a membrane hyperpolarization associated with increased membrane permeability in these cells. The reversal potential of somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization was -78.4 ± 4.3 mV in 6 mM K+ medium and -97.2 ± 6.4 mV in 3 mM K+ medium. These reversal potential values and a shift with the external K+ concentration indicated that membrane hyperpolarization was caused by increased permeability to K+. The hyperpolarized membrane potential induced by somatostatin was -63.6 ± 5.9 mV in the standard medium. This level was subthreshold for Ca2+ and Na+ currents and was sufficient to inhibit spontaneous action potentials. Hormone secretion was significantly suppressed by somatostatin and cobalt ions. Therefore, we suggest that Ca2+ entering the cell through voltage-dependent channels are playing an important role for GH secretion and that somatostatin suppresses GH secretion by blocking Ca2+ currents. Finally, we discuss other possibilities for the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on GH secretion.

  1. Genetic factors associated with small for gestational age birth and the use of human growth hormone in treating the disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saenger Paul

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The term small for gestational age (SGA refers to infants whose birth weights and/or lengths are at least two standard deviation (SD units less than the mean for gestational age. This condition affects approximately 3%–10% of newborns. Causes for SGA birth include environmental factors, placental factors such as abnormal uteroplacental blood flow, and inherited genetic mutations. In the past two decades, an enhanced understanding of genetics has identified several potential causes for SGA. These include mutations that affect the growth hormone (GH/insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 axis, including mutations in the IGF-1 gene and acid-labile subunit (ALS deficiency. In addition, select polymorphisms observed in patients with SGA include those involved in genes associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, ischemic heart disease and deletion of exon 3 growth hormone receptor (d3-GHR polymorphism. Uniparental disomy (UPD and imprinting effects may also underlie some of the phenotypes observed in SGA individuals. The variety of genetic mutations associated with SGA births helps explain the diversity of phenotype characteristics, such as impaired motor or mental development, present in individuals with this disorder. Predicting the effectiveness of recombinant human GH (hGH therapy for each type of mutation remains challenging. Factors affecting response to hGH therapy include the dose and method of hGH administration as well as the age of initiation of hGH therapy. This article reviews the results of these studies and summarizes the success of hGH therapy in treating this difficult and genetically heterogenous disorder.

  2. Human response to an individually controlled environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, G.L.; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2005-01-01

    Forty-eight subjects tested an individually controlled system (ICS) at room air temperatures of 20, 22 and 26 degrees C. Human response to a reference condition without the ICS at a room air temperature of 22 degrees C was also collected. ne ICS incorporated Personalized Ventilation (PV), an under......-desk air terminal device supplying cool air, a chair with convectively heated backrest, an under-desk radiant heating panel and a floor-heating panel. The temperature of the PV air and the under-desk air was kept at 20 degrees C. The subjects were provided with control of the flow rate and direction...

  3. Pancreatic hormones are expressed on the surfaces of human and rat islet cells through exocytotic sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, L I; Hutton, J C; Madsen, O D

    1989-01-01

    responsible for the staining. Human insulin cells were surface-labeled by monoclonal antibodies recognizing the mature secretory products, insulin and C-peptide but not with monoclonal antibodies specific for proinsulin. Thus, routing of unprocessed preproinsulin to the cell surface may not account......Human and rat insulin cells show insulin immunoreactivity, and glucagon cells show glucagon immunoreactivity on their membrane surfaces, respectively. The reaction occurs in the form of small dots on the islet cell surface and colocalizes with the chromogranin family of secretory granule markers...

  4. Translational mixed-effects PKPD modelling of recombinant human growth hormone - from hypophysectomized rat to patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsted, A; Thygesen, P; Agersø, H

    2016-01-01

    and validated through simulations relative to patient data. KEY RESULTS: The final model described rhGH PK as a two compartmental model with parallel linear and non-linear elimination terms, parallel first-order absorption with a total s.c. bioavailability of 87% in rats. Induction of IGF-1 was described...... s.c. administration was over predicted. After correction of the human s.c. absorption model, the induction model for IGF-1 well described the human PKPD data. CONCLUSIONS: A translational mechanistic PKPD model for rhGH was successfully developed from experimental rat data. The model links...

  5. Serum copper, follicular stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, prolactin, spermatic count, viability, progression and seminal zinc correlations in a human (male) infertility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sella, G.E. (Laval Univ., Quebec City, Canada); Cunnane, S.C.; McInnes, R.A.

    1981-06-01

    The role of copper and its correlations to other parameters has been investigated in a male-fertility pilot study at a University infertility clinic in Montreal. Serum and semen Cu concentrations were determined in 100 men (age 25 to 54 years) referred to the clinic for infertility evaluation. The results of the significant correlations between serum Cu concentrations and male fertility parameters such as (1) the serum concentrations of the hormones FSH, LH and prolactin; (2) spermatozoal count, viability and progression and (3) seminal zinc concentrations are reported.

  6. The human gonadotropin releasing hormone type I receptor is a functional intracellular GPCR expressed on the nuclear membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Re

    Full Text Available The mammalian type I gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R is a structurally unique G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR that lacks cytoplasmic tail sequences and displays inefficient plasma membrane expression (PME. Compared to its murine counterparts, the primate type I receptor is inefficiently folded and retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER leading to a further reduction in PME. The decrease in PME and concomitant increase in intracellular localization of the mammalian GnRH-RI led us to characterize the spatial distribution of the human and mouse GnRH receptors in two human cell lines, HEK 293 and HTR-8/SVneo. In both human cell lines we found the receptors were expressed in the cytoplasm and were associated with the ER and nuclear membrane. A molecular analysis of the receptor protein sequence led us to identify a putative monopartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS in the first intracellular loop of GnRH-RI. Surprisingly, however, neither the deletion of the NLS nor the addition of the Xenopus GnRH-R cytoplasmic tail sequences to the human receptor altered its spatial distribution. Finally, we demonstrate that GnRH treatment of nuclei isolated from HEK 293 cells expressing exogenous GnRH-RI triggers a significant increase in the acetylation and phosphorylation of histone H3, thereby revealing that the nuclear-localized receptor is functional. Based on our findings, we conclude that the mammalian GnRH-RI is an intracellular GPCR that is expressed on the nuclear membrane. This major and novel discovery causes us to reassess the signaling potential of this physiologically and clinically important receptor.

  7. Human hypertension is characterized by a lack of activation of the antihypertensive cardiac hormones ANP and BNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macheret, Fima; Heublein, Denise; Costello-Boerrigter, Lisa C; Boerrigter, Guido; McKie, Paul; Bellavia, Diego; Mangiafico, Sarah; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Bailey, Kent; Scott, Christopher G; Sandberg, Sharon; Chen, Horng H; Malatino, Lorenzo; Redfield, Margaret M; Rodeheffer, Richard; Burnett, John; Cataliotti, Alessandro

    2012-10-16

    This study sought to investigate plasma levels of circulating cardiac natriuretic peptides, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type or brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), in the general community, focusing on their relative differences in worsening human hypertension. Although ANP and BNP are well-characterized regulators of blood pressure in humans, little is known at the population level about their relationship with hypertension. The authors hypothesized that hypertension is associated with a lack of activation of these hormones or their molecular precursors. The study cohort (N = 2,082, age >45 years) was derived from a random sample from Rochester, Minnesota, and each subject had a medical history, clinical examination, and assessment of different plasma forms of ANP and BNP. Patients were stratified by blood pressure. Multivariable linear regression was used to assess differences in natriuretic peptide levels in worsening hypertension. Compared to normotensive, BNP(1-32) and N-terminal proBNP(1-76) (NT-proBNP(1-76)) were significantly decreased in pre-hypertension (p ANP(1-28) remained unchanged, while NT-ANP(1-98) was reduced in pre-hypertension (p ANP elevation in advanced hypertension. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Thyroid hormone and adrenergic signaling interact to control pineal expression of the dopamine receptor D4 gene (Drd4)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jong-So; Bailey, Michael J; Weller, Joan L

    2009-01-01

    Dopamine plays diverse and important roles in vertebrate biology, impacting behavior and physiology through actions mediated by specific G-protein-coupled receptors, one of which is the dopamine receptor D4 (Drd4). Here we present studies on the >100-fold daily rhythm in rat pineal Drd4 expression....... Our studies indicate that Drd4 is the dominant dopamine receptor gene expressed in the pineal gland. The gene is expressed in pinealocytes at levels which are approximately 100-fold greater than in other tissues, except the retina, in which transcript levels are similar. Pineal Drd4 expression...... is circadian in nature and under photoneural control. Whereas most rhythmically expressed genes in the pineal are controlled by adrenergic/cAMP signaling, Drd4 expression also requires thyroid hormone. This advance raises the questions of whether Drd4 expression is regulated by this mechanism in other systems...

  9. A controlled study on serum insulin-like growth factor-I and urinary excretion of growth hormone in fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, S; Main, K; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. It has been hypothesized that secretory deficiencies of growth hormone may play a pathophysiological role in fibromyalgia (FM). Our objective was thus to evaluate the secretion of growth hormone in FM. METHODS. The 24-h urinary growth hormone excretion and serum levels of insulin...

  10. Giving birth to a new brain: hormone exposures of pregnancy influence human memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Laura M

    2010-09-01

    Mammalian pregnancy produces alterations in maternal physiology that are necessary for maintaining gestation, fetal development and parturition. These changes also may prepare the maternal brain for the unique demands of motherhood. Parous rodents exhibit long-term changes in neurological structure and function and human work suggests that other landmark events in the reproductive cycle, such as menarche and menopause, influence cognition. However, the influence of pregnancy on the human brain remains to be elucidated. This study indicates that verbal recall memory (but not recognition or working memory) diminishes during human pregnancy and that these decrements persist after parturition. Further, prenatal glucocorticoids and estrogen are associated with these alterations. To meet the challenges of motherhood, the female brain may be remodeled, a process that appears to be initiated prenatally. However, it is not often that adaptation is achieved without an associated cost. For the human, in the case of the new maternal brain, diminished memory performance may reflect such a cost. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Translational mixed-effects PKPD modelling of recombinant human growth hormone - from hypophysectomized rat to patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsted, Anders; Thygesen, Peter; Agersø, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    was developed from experimental PKPD studies of rhGH and effects of long-term treatment as measured by insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and bodyweight gain in rats. Modelled parameter values were scaled to human values using the allometric approach with fixed exponents for PKs and unscaled for PDs...

  12. Human testicular insulin-like factor 3: in relation to development, reproductive hormones and andrological disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, K; Andersson, A-M

    2011-01-01

    is produced in human prenatal and neonatal, and in adult Leydig cells to various extents, and is in a developmental context regulated like testosterone, with production during second trimester, an early postnatal peak and increasing secretion during puberty, resulting in high adult serum levels. INSL3...

  13. N-glycosylation increases the circulatory half-life of human growth hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flintegaard, Thomas V; Thygesen, Peter; Rahbek-Nielsen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic use of recombinant GH typically involves daily sc injections. We examined the possibilities for prolonging the in vivo circulation of GH by introducing N-glycans. Human GH variants with a single potential N-glycosylation site (N-X-S/T) introduced by site-directed mutagenesis were expr...

  14. Effect of the menstrual cycle and hormonal contraceptives on human papillomavirus detection in young, unscreened women.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmeink, C.E.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Lenselink, C.H.; Quint, W.G.V.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Bekkers, R.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the effect of the menstrual cycle and oral contraceptive pill (OCP) use on the prevalence, incidence, and persistence of human papillomavirus (HPV). METHODS: A longitudinal study was conducted among 2,065 women aged 18-29 years. The women returned a self-collected

  15. Effects of Recombinant Human Leptin (Metreleptin) on Nocturnal Luteinizing Hormone Secretion in Lipodystrophy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Brent S; Muniyappa, Ranganath; Stratton, Pamela; Skarulis, Monica C; Gorden, Phillip; Brown, Rebecca J

    2016-01-01

    Leptin replacement in patients with leptin gene mutations improves hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The effects of leptin replacement on luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in patients with lipodystrophy are unknown. We examined nocturnal LH secretory dynamics on and off exogenous leptin therapy using a 2-period, nonrandomized study that included leptin-naïve and leptin-treated subjects with lipodystrophy. In period 1 (5 days) the leptin-treated group (n = 4) continued leptin; leptin was then withdrawn for the next 14 days (period 2). Leptin-naïve subjects (n = 8) were studied without leptin in period 1 and with leptin replacement in period 2. LH secretory dynamics were assessed (23:00-07:00 h, sampling every 10 min, analyzed by multiparameter deconvolution algorithm) at the end of each period. Mean (on vs. off: 5.0 ± 3.1 vs. 3.2 ± 1.3 IU/l, p = 0.04) and integrated LH concentrations (2,403 ± 1,495 vs. 1,534 ± 642 IU × l-1 × min-1, p = 0.04) were higher on leptin therapy. Leptin treatment increased burst mass (9.7± 15.4 vs. 7.0 ± 11.2 IU/l, p = 0.03) and tended to nonsignificantly increase LH burst frequency (0.77 ± 0.26 vs. 0.67 ± 0.24 h-1, p = 0.08). Consequently, leptin therapy increased the pulsatile production rate (64 ± 101 vs. 57 ± 73 IU × l-1 × 8 h-1, p = 0.01). On leptin, testosterone (507 ± 286 vs. 360 ± 174 ng/dl, p = 0.09) and estradiol levels (74 ± 36 vs. 29 ± 24 pg/ml, p = 0.01) were higher in males and females, respectively. Leptin increases spontaneous nocturnal LH secretion in patients with lipodystrophy. This is consistent with rodent and in vitro studies showing a direct stimulatory effect (hypothalamic, pituitary or both) of leptin on LH secretion. These novel findings may explicate some of the salutary effects of leptin therapy on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in lipodystrophy. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Steroid hormone profiling in human breast adipose tissue using semi-automated purification and highly sensitive determination of estrogens by GC-APCI-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Kristin; Antignac, Jean Philippe; Bichon, Emmanuelle; Morvan, Marie-Line; Miran, Isabelle; Delaloge, Suzette; Feunteun, Jean; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2018-01-01

    Body mass index is a known breast cancer risk factor due to, among other mechanisms, adipose-derived hormones. We developed a method for steroid hormone profiling in adipose tissue to evaluate healthy tissue around the tumor and define new biomarkers for cancer development. A semi-automated sample preparation method based on gel permeation chromatography and subsequent derivatization with trimethylsilyl (TMS) is presented. Progestagens and androgens were determined by GC-EI-MS/MS (LOQ 0.5 to 10 ng/g lipids). For estrogen measurement, a highly sensitive GC-APCI-MS/MS method was developed to reach the required lower limits of detection (0.05 to 0.1 ng/g lipids in matrix, 100-200 fg on column for pure standards). The combination of the two methods allows the screening of 27 androgens and progestagens and 4 estrogens from a single sample. Good accuracies and repeatabilities were achieved for each compound class at their respective limit of detection. The method was applied to determine steroid hormone profiles in adipose tissue of 51 patients, collected both at proximity and distant to the tumor. Out of the 31 tested steroid hormones, 14 compounds were detected in human samples. Pregnenolone, 17-hydroxypregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and androstendione accounted together for 80% of the observed steroid hormone profiles, whereas the estrogens accounted for only 1%. These profiles did not differ based on sampling location, except for ß-estradiol; steroid hormone conversions from androgens to estrogens that potentially take place in adipose or tumoral tissue might not be detectable due a factor 100 difference in concentration of for example DHEA and ß-estradiol. Graphical Abstract Schematic overview of the determination of steroid hormones and metabolites in adipose tissue in proximity and distal to the tumor.

  17. Use of human recombinant growth hormone and human recombinant insulin-like growth factor-I in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, S

    1996-01-01

    Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can lead to global alterations in metabolism as well as immunodeficiency. There is dysregulation of endocrine function in adults and children, the extent and magnitude correlating with disease progression. Some of the more prominent abnormalities occur in the thyroid, gonadal, and somatomedin axes. Clinical manifestations of these abnormalities are growth failure in children, which is one of the most sensitive indicators of disease progression, and a wasting syndrome in adults and children. Although there are case reports of growth hormone (GH) deficiency in HIV-infected children, most patients with growth failure have normal serum levels of GH and normal to low levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Antiretrovial therapy can improve the growth rate in children for a period of time if there is a drop in viral titer, but as the viral load increases, the growth rate decreases again. Administration of GH or IGF-I to these patients can improve the growth rate and lean body mass, and in some patients improve immune function. Although studies on resting energy expenditure in HIV-infected patients have shown increases, these are not proportional to disease progression, but may be dependent upon cytokine activation and other abnormalities. Adult patients with wasting have been shown to have relatively normal total energy expenditure, but decreased intake. Appetite stimulants have been shown to have some benefit, but do not increase lean body mass. The most significant clinical benefit has come from administration of GH in short-term trials. GH and IGF-I are both able to inhibit apoptosis and reconstitute the immune system in rodents treated with ablative therapy. In addition, GH can modulate the marrow suppressive effects of zidovudine and may enhance its ability to inhibit viral reverse transcriptase. Current clinical trials are ongoing in both adults and children. GH and IGF-I may have a role in regimens

  18. Investigating the association between polymorphism of follicle-stimulating hormone receptor gene and ovarian response in controlled ovarian hyperstimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hasan Sheikhha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : The aim of the study was to investigate the association between follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR gene polymorphism at Position 680 and the outcomes of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation for in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET in infertile women. Materials and Methods : One hundred and eight patients under 35 years of age who underwent IVF-ET procedures were included in this study. The hormonal profile and treatment of all patients were analyzed and FSHR polymorphism was examined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Women from all groups were classified based on polymorphisms at Position 680, occupied either by asparagines (Asn or serine (Ser as Asn/Asn, Asn/Ser, and Ser/Ser genotype. Result : Our study showed that all patients in the Asn/Asn group were normal responders and in the Asn/Ser group 64.8% were normal responders and 21.1% and 14.1% were poor and hyper responders respectively. In the Ser/Ser group we did not have normal responders and 46.7% of these patients were poor responders and 53.3% were hyper responders. Conclusion : FSH receptor polymorphism is correlated with response to ovarian stimulation.

  19. Methylation at global LINE-1 repeats in human blood are affected by gender but not by age or natural hormone cycles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman El-Maarri

    Full Text Available Previously, we reported on inter-individual and gender specific variations of LINE-1 methylation in healthy individuals. In this study, we investigated whether this variability could be influenced by age or sex hormones in humans. To this end, we studied LINE-1 methylation in vivo in blood-derived DNA from individuals aged 18 to 64 years and from young healthy females at various hormone levels during the menstrual cycle. Our results show that no significant association with age was observed. However, the previously reported increase of LINE-1 methylation in males was reconfirmed. In females, although no correlation between LINE-1 or Alu methylation and hormone levels was observed, a significant stable individual specific level of methylation was noted. In vitro results largely confirmed these findings, as neither estrogen nor dihydrotestosterone affected LINE-1 or Alu methylation in Hek293T, HUVEC, or MDA-kb2 cell lines. In contrast, a decrease in methylation was observed in estrogen-treated T47-Kbluc cell lines strongly expressing estrogen receptor. The very low expression of estrogen receptor in blood cells could explain the observed insensitivity of methylation at LINE-1 to natural hormonal variations in females. In conclusion, neither natural cycle of hormones nor age has a detectable effect on the LINE-1 methylation in peripheral blood cells, while gender remains an important factor.

  20. Studies on luteinizing hormone receptors of human corpora lutea during menstrual cycle and pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumi, Yasushi (Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-10-01

    With the purpose of explicating the lifespan of human corpora lutea, using human corpora lutea of the menstrual cycle and pregnancy, binding of /sup 125/I-LH to the 20,000g cell membrane fraction was examined. 1) Specific bindings of /sup 125/I-LH, /sup 125/I-HCG were demonstrated in the 20,000g cell membrane fraction. Although LH and HCG were parallel in inhibiting /sup 125/I-LH binding, HCG was found to be more effective. FSH did not inhibit binding. 2) Binding of /sup 125/I-LH was dependent on time, temperature, /sup 125/I-LH concentration, amount of the cell membrane fraction protein and pH. The highest binding was seen at pH 6.0 while incubating for 60 min at 37/sup 0/C. 3) The number of LH receptors in human corpora lutea of the menstrual cycle increased towards midluteal phase, especially on 5th day from ovulation, and decreased towards late luteal phase. LH receptor was not found in corpus albicans. The apparent dissociation constant of each corpus luteum did not change throughout the menstrual cycle. 4) Corpora lutea of pregnancy contained a few or no receptors which bound /sup 125/I-LH specifically. These data suggest that LH receptor is an important factor regulating the lifespan of corpus luteum and exogenous HCG has effect on luteal insufficiency, but the effect of HCG on threatened abortion is uncertain.

  1. Hormonal profile and the role of cell expansion in the germination control of Cerrado biome palm seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Daiane Souza; Ribeiro, Leonardo Monteiro; Lopes, Paulo Sérgio Nascimento; Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Garcia, Queila Souza

    2017-09-01

    Little information is currently available concerning the mechanisms controlling palm seed germination. We compared the anatomical and physiological aspects of seeds of two neotropical palm species showing different levels of dormancy. The seeds of Attalea vitrivir and Butia capitata were evaluated for the endogenous contents of hormones (ABA, GAs, CKs, BRs, IAA, JA, SA and the ethylene precursor ACC) in their cotyledonary petiole and operculum (structures involved in germination control), the force necessary to displace the operculum, endo-β-mannanase activities, and embryo cell elongation. The analyses were carried out on with intact dry and imbibed seeds as well as with seeds with the operculum mechanically removed, 2, 5 and 10 days after sowing. The germinabilities of the intact seeds of A. vitrivir and B. capitata were 68% and 3%, respectively; the removal of the operculum increased germination to more than 90% in both species. Reductions of ABA and increases in GAs contents coincided with cell elongation, although there is no evidence that hormonal balance and endo-β-mannanase activity are involved in operculum weakening. The ratio between the embryo length and the force required for operculum displacement (EL/OF) was found to be 1.9 times greater in A. vitrivir than in B. capitata, which means that very small elongations in each cell would be sufficient to promote germination, resulting in a lower level of dormancy in the former species. EL/OF and cell growth control are therefore important for defining dormancy level in palm seeds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Mineral, amino acid, and hormonal composition of chicken eggshell powder and the evaluation of its use in human nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaafsma, A; Pakan, I; Hofstede, G J; Muskiet, F A; Van Der Veer, E; De Vries, P J

    2000-12-01

    Chicken eggshell powder (ESP) might be an attractive source of Ca for human nutrition. To study its nutritional value, we analyzed minerals, amino acids, and hormones in commercially available Slovakian ESP. The mineral composition was compared with three Dutch ESP samples that differed in feed and housing, a Japanese ESP, refined CaCO3, and an oyster shell supplement. Chicken eggshell powder contains high levels of Ca (mean +/- SD/g EPS: 401+/-7.2 mg) and Sr (372+/-161 microg) when compared with recommended or estimated daily intakes for humans 51 to 70 yr of age. Levels of potentially toxic Pb, Al, Cd, and Hg were very low as were levels of V, B, Fe, Zn, P, Mg, N, F, Se, Cu, and Cr. Large differences in the levels of F, Se, Cu, Cr, and Sr in the Dutch and Slovakian ESP indicated a strong influence of feed and environment. The small protein fraction of ESP contains high levels of Gly and Arg. Furthermore, small amounts of transforming growth factor-beta1 (0.75 to 7.28 ng/g ESP), calcitonin (10 to 25 ng/g ESP), and progesterone (0.30 to 0.33 ng/g ESP) were detected. Estradiol-17beta and calcitriol were below the detection limit of the methods used. Compared with ESP, refined CaCO3 was found to contain increased levels of Cd, and the oyster shell supplement showed increased levels of Al and Cd. Therefore, ESP seems to have a beneficial composition with about 39% of elemental Ca, relevant amounts of Sr, and low levels of Al, Pb, Cd and Hg. It may be used as a Ca source in human nutrition.

  3. Identification, characterization and expression of novel Sex Hormone Binding Globulin alternative first exons in the human prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Torres Inés

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG gene, located at 17p13.1, comprises, at least, two different transcription units regulated by two different promoters. The first transcription unit begins with the exon 1 sequence and is responsible for the production of plasma SHBG by the hepatocytes, while the second begins with an alternative exon 1 sequence, which replaces the exon 1 present in liver transcripts. Alternative exon 1 transcription and translation has only been demonstrated in the testis of transgenic mice containing an 11-kb human SHBG transgene and in the human testis. Our goal has been to further characterize the 5' end of the SHBG gene and analyze the presence of the SHBG alternative transcripts in human prostate tissue and derived cell lines. Results Using a combination of in silico and in vitro studies, we have demonstrated that the SHBG gene, along with exon 1 and alternative exon 1 (renamed here exon 1A, contains four additional alternative first exons: the novel exons 1B, 1C, and 1E, and a previously identified exon 1N, which has been further characterized and renamed as exon 1D. We have shown that these four alternative first exons are all spliced to the same 3' splice site of SHBG exon 2, and that exon 1A and the novel exon 1B can be spliced to exon 1. We have also demonstrated the presence of SHBG transcripts beginning with exons 1B, 1C and 1D in prostate tissues and cell lines, as well as in several non-prostatic cell lines. Finally, the alignment of the SHBG mammalian sequences revealed that, while exons 1C, 1D and 1E are very well conserved phylogenetically through non-primate mammal species, exon 1B probably aroused in apes due to a single nucleotide change that generated a new 5' splice site in exon 1B. Conclusion The identification of multiple transcription start sites (TSS upstream of the annotated first exon of human SHBG, and the detection of the alternative transcripts in human prostate

  4. Effect of steroid hormones and retinoids on the formation of capillary-like tubular structures of human microvascular endothelial cells in fibrin matrices is related to urokinase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansink, M; Koolwijk, P; van Hinsbergh, V; Kooistra, T

    1998-08-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new capillary blood vessels, is a feature of a variety of pathological processes. To study the effects of a specific group of hormones (all ligands of the steroid/retinoid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily) on the angiogenic process in humans, we have used a model system in which human microvascular endothelial cells from foreskin (hMVEC) are cultured on top of a human fibrin matrix in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. This model mimics the in vivo situation where fibrin appears to be a common component of the matrix present at sites of chronic inflammation and tumor stroma. Our results show that testosterone and dexamethasone are strong inhibitors and all-trans retinoic acid (at-RA) and 9-cis retinoic acid (9-cis RA) are potent stimulators of the formation of capillary-like tubular structures. These effects are mediated by their respective nuclear hormone receptors as demonstrated by the use of specific synthetic receptor agonists and antagonists. 17beta-estradiol, progesterone, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 did not affect or only weakly affected in vitro angiogenesis, which may be related to the lack of significant nuclear receptor expression. Although hMVEC express both thyroid hormone receptors alpha and beta, no effect of thyroid hormone on tube formation was found. The effects of testosterone, dexamethasone, at-RA, and 9-cis RA on tube formation were accompanied by parallel changes in urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) expression, at both mRNA and antigen levels. Exogenous suppletion of the medium with single chain u-PA enhances tube formation in our in vitro model, whereas quenching of u-PA activity (but not of tissue-type plasminogen activator activity) or of u-PA binding to u-PA receptor by specific antibodies suppressed basal and retinoid-stimulated tube formation. Moreover, addition of scu-PA to testosterone- or dexamethasone-treated hMVEC restored the suppressed

  5. Impact of overweight on effectiveness of treatment with human growth hormone in growth hormone deficient children: analysis of German KIGS data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinehr, T; Bechtold-Dalla Pozza, S; Bettendorf, M; Doerr, H-G; Gohlke, B; Hauffa, B P; Kaspers, S; Land, C; Mehls, O; Schwab, K-O; Stahnke, N; Ranke, M B

    2011-10-01

    We hypothesized that overweight children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) demonstrate a lower response to growth hormone (GH) as a result of a misclassification since obesity is associated with lower GH peaks in stimulation tests. Anthropometric data, response, and responsiveness to GH in the first year of treatment were compared in 1.712 prepubertal children with GHD from the German KIGS database according to BMI (underweight=group A, normal weight=group B, overweight=group C) (median age: group A, B, C: 7.3, 7.28, and 8.4 years). Maximum GH levels to tests (median: group A, B, C: 5.8, 5.8, and 4.0 µg/ml) were significantly lower in group C. IGF-I SDS levels were not different between the groups. Growth velocity in the first year of GH treatment was significantly lower in the underweight cohort (median: group A, B, C: 8.2, 8.8, and 9.0 cm/yr), while the gain in height was not different between groups. The difference between observed and predicted growth velocity expressed as Studentized residuals was not significantly different between groups. Separating the 164 overweight children into obese children (BMI>97th centile; n=71) and moderate overweight children (BMI>90th to 97th centile, n=93) demonstrated no significant difference in any parameter. Overweight prepubertal children with idiopathic GHD demonstrated similar levels of responsiveness to GH treatment compared to normal weight children. Furthermore, the IGF-I levels were low in overweight children. Therefore, a misclassification of GHD in overweight prepubertal children within the KIGS database seems unlikely. The first year growth prediction models can be applied to overweight and obese GHD children. © J. A. Barth Verlag in George Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Optimal control with multiple human papillomavirus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Tufail; Imran, Mudassar; Jayaraman, Raja

    2016-03-21

    A two-sex, deterministic ordinary differential equations model for human papillomavirus (HPV) is constructed and analyzed for optimal control strategies in a vaccination program administering three types of vaccines in the female population: a bivalent vaccine that targets two HPV types and provides longer duration of protection and cross-protection against some non-target types, a quadrivalent vaccine which targets an additional two HPV types, and a nonavalent vaccine which targets nine HPV types (including those covered by the quadrivalent vaccine), but with lesser type-specific efficacy. Considering constant vaccination controls, the disease-free equilibrium and the effective reproduction number Rv for the autonomous model are computed in terms of the model parameters. Local-asymptotic stability of the disease-free equilibrium is established in terms of Rv. Uncertainty and Sensitivity analyses are carried out to study the influence of various important model parameters on the HPV infection prevalence. Assuming the HPV infection prevalence in the population under the constant control, optimal control theory is used to devise optimal vaccination strategies for the associated non-autonomous model when the vaccination rates are functions of time. The impact of these strategies on the number of infected individuals and the accumulated cost is assessed and compared with the constant control case. Switch times from one vaccine combination to a different combination including the nonavalent vaccine are assessed during an optimally designed HPV immunization program. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist trigger of ovulation with aggressive luteal phase support for patients at risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, I-Ting; Huang, Hong-Yuan; Wu, Hsien-Ming; Wang, Hsin-Shih; Yu, Hsing-Tse; Huang, Shang-Yu; Chang, Chia-Lin; Soong, Yung-Kuei

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of luteal phase support using human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in cycles that are triggered with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist in a moderate-to-high risk population undergoing a GnRH antagonist protocol. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of patients undergoing an in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycle with a GnRH antagonist protocol from September 2011 to August 2012. The patients were defined as at high risk for ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) in terms of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) and antral follicle counts (AFCs). The patients were divided into two groups depending on whether ovulation was triggered with hCG or a GnRH agonist. Modified luteal support was provided for the cycles triggered by the GnRH agonist via low dose hCG (1500∼5000 IU). For the cycles that were triggered by hCG, urinary hCG (5000 IU) following two doses of recombinant hCG (250 μg) were administered. The primary outcomes of this study were the clinical pregnancy rate and the OHSS rate of the two groups. The secondary outcomes were the number of oocytes retrieved and the number of good quality embryos obtained. The study group and the control group were similar in terms of the primary and secondary outcome measures. Aggressive luteal support with low dose hCG following a GnRH agonist trigger can result in a comparable pregnancy rate to that with the use of a traditional hCG ovulation trigger. However, OHSS can still occur in patients with risk factors. Therefore, other OHSS prevention strategies should be considered. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone modulates activation of NF-kappa B and AP-1 and secretion of interleukin-8 in human dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, M; Schulte, U; Kalden, H; Luger, T A

    1999-10-20

    Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) has evolved as a mediator of diverse biological activities in an ever-growing number of non-melanocytic cell types. One mechanism by which alpha-MSH exerts its effects is modulation of AP-1 and NF-kappa B. These two transcription factors also play an important role in fibroblasts, in extracellular matrix composition, and in cytokine expression. By use of electric mobility shift assays, we demonstrate that alpha-MSH (10(-6) to 10(-14) M) activates AP-1 in human dermal fibroblasts, whereas coincubation with interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) results in suppression of its activation. alpha-MSH also induces activation of NF-kappa B but does not modulate DNA binding on costimulation with IL-1 beta. Since AP-1 and NF-kappa B are key elements in controlling interleukin-8 (IL-8) transcription, human fibroblasts were treated with alpha-MSH and IL-1 beta for 24 hours, and cytokine levels in the supernatants were measured by ELISA. alpha-MSH alone had little effect, whereas coincubation with IL-1 beta led to marked downregulation of IL-8 secretion (at most 288 +/- 152 ng/mL) when compared to treatment with IL-1 beta alone (919 +/- 157 ng/mL). Our results indicate that alpha-MSH exerts modulatory effects on the activation of NF-kappa B and AP-1, and that it can regulate chemokine secretion in human dermal fibroblasts. These effects of alpha-MSH may have important regulatory functions in extracellular matrix composition, wound healing, or angiogenesis.

  9. Attenuation of skeletal muscle wasting with recombinant human growth hormone secreted from a tissue-engineered bioartificial muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, H.; Del Tatto, M.; Shansky, J.; Goldstein, L.; Russell, K.; Genes, N.; Chromiak, J.; Yamada, S.

    1998-01-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting is a significant problem in elderly and debilitated patients. Growth hormone (GH) is an anabolic growth factor for skeletal muscle but is difficult to deliver in a therapeutic manner by injection owing to its in vivo instability. A novel method is presented for the sustained secretion of recombinant human GH (rhGH) from genetically modified skeletal muscle implants, which reduces host muscle wasting. Proliferating murine C2C12 skeletal myoblasts stably transduced with the rhGH gene were tissue engineered in vitro into bioartificial muscles (C2-BAMs) containing organized postmitotic myofibers secreting 3-5 microg of rhGH/day in vitro. When implanted subcutaneously into syngeneic mice, C2-BAMs delivered a sustained physiologic dose of 2.5 to 11.3 ng of rhGH per milliliter of serum. rhGH synthesized and secreted by the myofibers was in the 22-kDa monomeric form and was biologically active, based on downregulation of a GH-sensitive protein synthesized in the liver. Skeletal muscle disuse atrophy was induced in mice by hindlimb unloading, causing the fast plantaris and slow soleus muscles to atrophy by 21 to 35% ( muscle-wasting disorders.

  10. Intermittent Administration of Parathyroid Hormone 1–34 Enhances Osteogenesis of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Regulating Protein Kinase Cδ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Wen Kuo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs can differentiate into osteoblasts and are regulated by chemical cues. The recombinant N-terminal (1–34 amino acids fragment of the parathyroid hormone (PTH (1–34 is identified to promote osteogenesis. The osteoanabolic effects of intermittent PTH (1–34 treatment are linked to a complex consisting of signaling pathways; additionally, protein kinase C (PKC act as mediators of multifunctional signaling transduction pathways, but the role of PKC δ (PKCδ, a downstream target in regulating osteoblast differentiation during intermittent administration of PTH (1–34 is less studied and still remains elusive. The purpose of this study is to examine the role of PKCδ during intermittent and continuous PTH (1–34 administration using osteoblast-lineage-committed hMSCs. Relative gene expression of osteoblast-specific genes demonstrated significant upregulation of RUNX2, type I Collagen, ALP, and Osterix and increased alkaline phosphatase activity in the presence of PTH (1–34. Intermittent PTH (1–34 administration increased PKC activity at day 7 of osteogenic differentiation, whereas inhibition of PKC activity attenuated these effects. In addition, the specific isoform PKCδ was activated upon treatment. These findings demonstrate that intermittent PTH (1–34 treatment enhances the osteogenesis of hMSCs by upregulating osteoblast-specific genes via PKCδ activation.

  11. Protein quantity on the air-solid interface determines degradation rates of human growth hormone in lyophilized samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yemin; Grobelny, Pawel; Von Allmen, Alexander; Knudson, Korben; Pikal, Michael; Carpenter, John F; Randolph, Theodore W

    2014-05-01

    Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) was lyophilized with various glass-forming stabilizers, employing cycles that incorporated various freezing and annealing procedures to manipulate glass formation kinetics, associated relaxation processes, and glass-specific surface areas (SSAs). The secondary structure in the cake was monitored by infrared and in reconstituted samples by circular dichroism. The rhGH concentrations on the surface of lyophilized powders were determined from electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. Glass transition temperature (Tg ), SSAs, and water contents were determined immediately after lyophilization. Lyophilized samples were incubated at 323 K for 16 weeks, and the resulting extents of rhGH aggregation, oxidation, and deamidation were determined after rehydration. Water contents and Tg were independent of lyophilization process parameters. Compared with samples lyophilized after rapid freezing, rhGH in samples that had been annealed in frozen solids prior to drying, or annealed in glassy solids after secondary drying retained more native-like protein secondary structure, had a smaller fraction of the protein on the surface of the cake, and exhibited lower levels of degradation during incubation. A simple kinetic model suggested that the differences in the extent of rhGH degradation during storage in the dried state between different formulations and processing methods could largely be ascribed to the associated levels of rhGH at the solid-air interface after lyophilization. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  12. Long-term effects of recombinant human growth hormone therapy in children with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgram, Peter M; Carrel, Aaron L; Allen, David B

    2013-08-01

    Recombinant human growth hormone (hGH) therapy in children with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) improves linear growth, body composition, physical strength and agility, and other metabolic parameters. These benefits must be weighed against potential adverse effects, including rare occurrences of sudden death. This review summarizes recent evidence important to a benefit-risk analysis of hGH use in children with PWS. Studies consistently show that hGH improves stature, body composition, fat percentage and distribution, and other metabolic markers in children with PWS. Preliminary reports of improved cognitive development during hGH have also emerged. Scoliosis progression is influenced by growth rate, but frequency of occurrence and severity are not increased by hGH exposure. PWS genotype does not appear to affect response to hGH. Concerns about hGH-associated sudden death persist, but recent studies show either absence of change in sleep-disordered breathing or improved sleep cardiovascular function during hGH therapy. Recent studies confirm and expand reported benefits of hGH therapy in children with PWS, including a possible salutary role in cognitive development. These findings support previous assertions that hGH can reduce morbidity and improve function in children with PWS, and suggest that potential risks of such treatment are favorably balanced by its benefits.

  13. Six-year results of a randomized, prospective trial of human growth hormone and oxandrolone in Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, R G; Frane, J; Attie, K M; Brasel, J A; Burstein, S; Cara, J F; Chernausek, S; Gotlin, R W; Kuntze, J; Lippe, B M

    1992-07-01

    Seventy girls with Turner syndrome, verified by karyotype, were randomly assigned to observation or treatment with human growth hormone (hGH), oxandrolone, or a combination of hGH plus oxandrolone for a period of 12 to 24 months, to assess the effect of treatment on growth velocity and adult height. Subsequently, all subjects received either hGH alone or hGH plus oxandrolone. Data are presented for 62 subjects treated for a period of 3 to 6 years. When compared with the anticipated growth rate in untreated patients, the growth rate after treatment with hGH, both alone and in combination with oxandrolone, showed a sustained increase for at least 6 years. Treatment is continuing in over half of the subjects; at present, 14 (82%) of 17 girls receiving hGH alone and 41 (91%) of 45 girls receiving combination therapy exceeded their expected adult heights. Thirty girls have completed treatment; mean height for these 30 patients is 151.9 cm, compared with their mean original projected adult height of 143.8 cm. We conclude that therapy with hGH, alone and in combination with oxandrolone, can result in a sustained increase in growth rate and a significant increase in adult height for most prepubertal girls with Turner syndrome.

  14. Escherichia coli "TatExpress" strains super-secrete human growth hormone into the bacterial periplasm by the Tat pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Douglas F; Richards, Kirsty L; Peswani, Amber R; Roobol, Jo; Busby, Stephen J W; Robinson, Colin

    2017-12-01

    Numerous high-value proteins are secreted into the Escherichia coli periplasm by the General Secretory (Sec) pathway, but Sec-based production chassis cannot handle many potential target proteins. The Tat pathway offers a promising alternative because it transports fully folded proteins; however, yields have been too low for commercial use. To facilitate Tat export, we have engineered the TatExpress series of super-secreting strains by introducing the strong inducible bacterial promoter, ptac, upstream of the chromosomal tatABCD operon, to drive its expression in E. coli strains commonly used by industry (e.g., W3110 and BL21). This modification significantly improves the Tat-dependent secretion of human growth hormone (hGH) into the bacterial periplasm, to the extent that secreted hGH is the dominant periplasmic protein after only 1 hr induction. TatExpress strains accumulate in excess of 30 mg L-1 periplasmic recombinant hGH, even in shake flask cultures. A second target protein, an scFv, is also shown to be exported at much higher rates in TatExpress strains. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Human Growth Hormone Delivery with a Microneedle Transdermal System: Preclinical Formulation, Stability, Delivery and PK of Therapeutically Relevant Doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Ameri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the feasibility of coating formulated recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH on a titanium microneedle transdermal delivery system, Zosano Pharma (ZP-hGH, and assessed preclinical patch delivery performance. Formulation rheology and surface activity were assessed by viscometry and contact angle measurement. rhGH liquid formulation was coated onto titanium microneedles by dip-coating and drying. The stability of coated rhGH was determined by size exclusion chromatography-high performance liquid chromatography (SEC-HPLC. Preclinical delivery and pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in female hairless guinea pigs (HGP using rhGH coated microneedle patches at 0.5 and 1 mg doses and compared to Norditropin® a commercially approved rhGH subcutaneous injection. Studies demonstrated successful rhGH formulation development and coating on microneedle arrays. The ZP-hGH patches remained stable at 40 °C for six months with no significant change in % aggregates. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that the rhGH-coated microneedle patches, delivered with high efficiency and the doses delivered indicated linearity with average Tmax of 30 min. The absolute bioavailability of the microneedle rhGH patches was similar to subcutaneous Norditropin® injections. These results suggest that ZP-transdermal microneedle patch delivery of rhGH is feasible and may offer an effective and patient-friendly alternative to currently marketed rhGH injectables.

  16. Determination of steroid hormones in human plasma by GC-triple quadrupole MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysik, Silke; Schmitz, Gerd

    2015-07-01

    A fast and sensitive GC-MS/MS method is proposed to determine pregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), testosterone and dihydrotestosterone from human plasma. Steroids were extracted by liquid/liquid extraction, and derivatized with N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoracetamide. Electron ionization at 30eV was applied to generate high abundant precursor ions. Specific precursor/product transitions were generated a priori for each compound of interest and these assays were then used to selectively detect and quantify these steroids. Using the selected reaction monitoring mode, detection limits in the pg/ml (subnmol/l) range could be achieved for all four steroid compounds. The method was validated for imprecision, and recovery and applied in a pilot study in patients with hypercholesterolemia. Associations of increased cholesterol biosynthesis and low testosterone and dihydrotestosterone concentrations were found. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Osteoprotegerin and breast cancer risk by hormone receptor subtype: a nested case-control study in the EPIC cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortner, Renée T; Sarink, Danja; Schock, Helena; Johnson, Theron; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Overvad, Kim; Affret, Aurélie; His, Mathilde; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Naska, Androniki; Orfanos, Philippos; Palli, Domenico; Sieri, Sabina; Mattiello, Amalia; Tumino, Rosario; Ricceri, Fulvio; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Peeters, Petra H M; Van Gils, Carla H; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Lund, Eiliv; Quirós, J Ramón; Agudo, Antonio; Sánchez, Maria-José; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Dorronsoro, Miren; Key, Tim; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Rinaldi, Sabina; Dossus, Laure; Gunter, Marc; Merritt, Melissa A; Riboli, Elio; Kaaks, Rudolf

    2017-02-08

    Circulating osteoprotegerin (OPG), a member of the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK) axis, may influence breast cancer risk via its role as the decoy receptor for both the RANK ligand (RANKL) and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Circulating OPG and breast cancer risk has been examined in only one prior study. A case-control study was nested in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. A total of 2008 incident invasive breast cancer cases (estrogen receptor (ER)+, n = 1622; ER-, n = 386), matched 1:1 to controls, were included in the analysis. Women were predominantly postmenopausal at blood collection (77%); postmenopausal women included users and non-users of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT). Serum OPG was quantified with an electrochemiluminescence assay. Relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using conditional logistic regression. The associations between OPG and ER+ and ER- breast cancer differed significantly. Higher concentrations of OPG were associated with increased risk of ER- breast cancer (top vs. bottom tertile RR = 1.93 [95% CI 1.24-3.02]; p trend  = 0.03). We observed a suggestive inverse association for ER+ disease overall and among women premenopausal at blood collection. Results for ER- disease did not differ by menopausal status at blood collection (p het  = 0.97), and we observed no heterogeneity by HT use at blood collection (p het  ≥ 0.43) or age at breast cancer diagnosis (p het  ≥ 0.30). This study provides the first prospective data on OPG and breast cancer risk by hormone receptor subtype. High circulating OPG may represent a novel risk factor for ER- breast cancer.

  18. 60 YEARS OF NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY: TRH, the first hypophysiotropic releasing hormone isolated: control of the pituitary-thyroid axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph-Bravo, Patricia; Jaimes-Hoy, Lorraine; Uribe, Rosa-María; Charli, Jean-Louis

    2015-08-01

    This review presents the findings that led to the discovery of TRH and the understanding of the central mechanisms which control hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis (HPT) activity. The earliest studies on thyroid physiology are now dated a century ago when basal metabolic rate was associated with thyroid status. It took over 50 years to identify the key elements involved in the HPT axis. Thyroid hormones (TH: T4 and T3) were characterized first, followed by the semi-purification of TSH whose later characterization paralleled that of TRH. Studies on the effects of TH became possible with the availability of synthetic hormones. DNA recombinant techniques facilitated the identification of all the elements involved in the HPT axis, including their mode of regulation. Hypophysiotropic TRH neurons, which control the pituitary-thyroid axis, were identified among other hypothalamic neurons which express TRH. Three different deiodinases were recognized in various tissues, as well as their involvement in cell-specific modulation of T3 concentration. The role of tanycytes in setting TRH levels due to the activity of deiodinase type 2 and the TRH-degrading ectoenzyme was unraveled. TH-feedback effects occur at different levels, including TRH and TSH synthesis and release, deiodinase activity, pituitary TRH-receptor and TRH degradation. The activity of TRH neurons is regulated by nutritional status through neurons of the arcuate nucleus, which sense metabolic signals such as circulating leptin levels. Trh expression and the HPT axis are activated by energy demanding situations, such as cold and exercise, whereas it is inhibited by negative energy balance situations such as fasting, inflammation or chronic stress. New approaches are being used to understand the activity of TRHergic neurons within metabolic circuits. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  19. Event-related brain potentials to emotional images and gonadal steroid hormone levels in patients with schizophrenia and paired controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie eChampagne

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Prominent disturbances in the experience, expression, and emotion recognition in patients with schizophrenia have been relatively well documented over the last few years. Furthermore, sex differences in behavior and brain activity, associated with the processing of various emotions, have been reported in the general population and in schizophrenia patients. Others proposed that sex differences should be rather attributed to testosterone, which may play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia. Also, it had been suggested that estradiol may play a protective role in schizophrenia. Surprisingly, few studies investigating this pathology have focused on both brain substrates and gonadal steroid hormone levels, in emotional processing. In the present study, we investigated electrocortical responses related to emotional valence and arousal as well as gonadal steroid hormone levels in patients with schizophrenia. Event-Related Potentials (ERP were recorded during exposition to emotional pictures in 18 patients with schizophrenia and in 24 control participants paired on intelligence, manual dominance and socioeconomic status. Given their previous sensitivity to emotional and attention processes, the P200, N200 and the P300 were selected for analysis. More precisely, emotional valence generally affects early components (N200, which reflect early process of selective attention, whereas emotional arousal and valence both influences the P300 component, which is related to memory context updating, and stimulus categorization. Results showed that, in the control group, the amplitude of the N200 was significantly more lateralized over the right hemisphere, while there was no such lateralization in patients with schizophrenia. In patients with schizophrenia, significantly smaller anterior P300 amplitude was observed to the unpleasant, compared to the pleasant. That anterior P300 reduction was also correlated with negative symptoms.

  20. Brown kelp modulates endocrine hormones in female sprague-dawley rats and in human luteinized granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibola, Christine F; Curry, John D; VandeVoort, Catherine; Conley, Alan; Smith, Martyn T

    2005-02-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that populations consuming typical Asian diets have a lower incidence of hormone-dependent cancers than populations consuming Western diets. These dietary differences have been mainly attributed to higher soy intakes among Asians. However, studies from our laboratory suggest that the anti-estrogenic effects of dietary kelp also may contribute to these reduced cancer rates. As a follow-up to previous findings of endocrine modulation related to kelp ingestion in a pilot study of premenopausal women, we investigated the endocrine modulating effects of kelp (Fucus vesiculosus) in female rats and human luteinized granulosa cells (hLGC). Kelp administration lengthened the rat estrous cycle from 4.3 +/- 0.96 to 5.4 +/- 1.7 d at 175 mg . kg(-1) body wt . d(-1) (P = 0.05) and to 5.9 +/- 1.9 d at 350 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1) (P = 0.002) and also led to a 100% increase in the length of diestrus (P = 0.02). Following 175 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1) treatment for 2 wk, serum 17beta-estradiol levels were reduced from 48.9 +/- 4.5 to 40.2 +/- 3.2 ng/L (P = 0.13). After 4 wk, 17beta-estradiol levels were reduced to 36.7 +/- 2.2 ng/L (P = 0.02). In hLGC, 25, 50, and 75 micromol/L treatment reduced 17beta-estradiol levels from 4732 +/- 591 to 3632 +/- 758, 3313 +/- 373, and 3060 +/- 538 ng/L, respectively. Kelp treatment also led to modest elevations in hLGC culture progesterone levels. Kelp extract inhibited the binding of estradiol to estrogen receptor alpha and beta and that of progesterone to the progesterone receptor, with IC(50) values of 42.4, 31.8, and 40.7 micromol/L, respectively. These data show endocrine modulating effects of kelp at relevant doses and suggest that dietary kelp may contribute to the lower incidence of hormone-dependent cancers among the Japanese.

  1. Exploiting Nanobodies in the Detection and Quantification of Human Growth Hormone via Phage-Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam Murad

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMonitoring blood levels of human growth hormone (hGH in most children with short stature deficiencies is crucial for taking a decision of treatment with extended course of daily and expensive doses of recombinant hGH (rhGH or Somatropin®. Besides, misusing of rhGH by sportsmen is banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency and thus sensitive GH-detecting methods are highly welcome in this field. Nanobodies are the tiniest antigen-binding entity derived from camel heavy chain antibodies. They were successfully generated against numerous antigens including hormones.MethodsA fully nanobody-based sandwich ELISA method was developed in this work for direct measurement of GH in biological samples.ResultsTwo major characteristics of nanobody were exploited for this goal: the robust and stable structure of the nanobody (NbGH04 used to capture hGH from tested samples, and the great ability of tailoring, enabling the display of the anti-GH detector nanobody (NbGH07 on the tip of M13-phage. Such huge, stable, and easy-to-prepare phage-Nb was used in ELISA to provide an amplified signal. Previously, NbGH04 was retrieved on immobilized hGH by phage display from a wide “immune” cDNA library prepared from a hGH-immunized camel. Here, and in order to assure epitope heterogeneity, NbGH07 was isolated from the same library using NbGH04-captured hGH as bait. Interaction of both nanobodies with hGH was characterized and compared with different anti-GH nanobodies and antibodies. The sensitivity (~0.5 ng/ml and stability of the nanobody-base sandwich ELISA were assessed using rhGH before testing in the quantification of hGH in blood sera and cell culture supernatants.ConclusionIn regard to all advantages of nanobodies; stability, solubility, production affordability in Escherichia coli, and gene tailoring, nanobody-based phage sandwich ELISA developed here would provide a valuable method for hGH detection and quantification.

  2. Effect of 30 mCi radioiodine on multinodular goiter previously treated with recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz-Filho, G.J.; Mesa-Junior, C.O.; Boguszewski, C.L.; Carvalho, G.A.; Graf, H. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Hospital de Clinicas. Servico de Endocrinologia e Metabologia; Olandoski, M. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Nucleo de Bioestatistica; Woellner, L.C. [Centro de Medicina Nuclear, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Goedert, C.A. [Centro de Tomografia Computadorizada, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2007-12-15

    Recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH) enhances {sup 131}I uptake, permitting a decrease in radiation for the treatment of multinodular goiter (MNG). Our objective was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a single 0.1-mg dose of rhTSH, followed by 30 mCi {sup 131}I, in patients with MNG. Seventeen patients (15 females, 59.0 {+-} 13.1 years), who had never been submitted to {sup 131}I therapy, received a single 0.1-mg injection of rhTSH followed by 30 mCi {sup 131}I on the next day. Mean basal thyroid volume measured by computed tomography was 106.1 {+-} 64.4 mL. {sup 131}I 24-h uptake, TSH, free-T4, T3, thyroglobulin, anti-thyroid antibodies, and thyroid volume were evaluated at regular intervals of 12 months. Mean {sup 131}I 24-h uptake increased from 18.1 {+-} 9.7 to 49.6 {+-} 13.4% (P < 0.001), a median 2.6-fold increase (1.2 to 9.2). Peak hormonal levels were 10.86 {+-} 5.44 mU/L for TSH (a median 15.5-fold increase), 1.80 {+-} 0.48 ng/dL for free-T4, 204.61 {+-} 58.37 ng/dL for T3, and a median of 557.0 ng/mL for thyroglobulin. The adverse effects observed were hyperthyroidism (17.6%), painful thyroiditis (29.4%) and hypothyroidism (52.9%). Thyroid volume was reduced by 34.3 {+-} 14.3% after 6 months (P < 0.001) and by 46.0 {+-} 14.6% after 1 year (P < 0.001). Treatment of MNG with a single 0.1-mg dose of rhTSH, followed by a fixed amount of radioactivity of {sup 131}I, leads to an efficacious decrease in thyroid volume for the majority of the patients, with a moderate incidence of non-serious and readily treatable adverse effects. (author)

  3. A new pen device for injection of recombinant human growth hormone: a convenience, functionality and usability evaluation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauer M

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available   Maritta Sauer,1 Carole Abbotts2 1Global Strategic Insights, Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany; 2Pharmaceutical Market Research Consultant, London, UK Purpose: Adherence to recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH is critical to growth and other outcomes in patients with growth disorders, but the requirement for daily injections means that ease of use is an important factor. This study assessed the perceived ease of use and functionality of the prototype of a reusable pen injector (pen device for r-hGH that incorporates several advanced features. Participants and methods: Semi-structured 60-minute qualitative interviews were conducted in 5 countries with 57 health care professionals (HCPs and 30 patients with GH deficiency/caregivers administering r-hGH to patients, including children. HCPs had to be responsible for training in the use of r-hGH pen devices and to see ≥4 r-hGH patients/caregivers per month. Patients/caregivers had to have experience with r-hGH administration for at least 6 months.Results: Thirty-seven (65% of HCPs described the pen device as “simple” or “easy” to use. The aluminum body was generally perceived as attractive, high quality and comfortable to hold and operate. The ease of preparation and use made it suitable for both children and adults. The ability to dial back the r-hGH dose, if entered incorrectly, was mentioned as a major benefit, because other devices need several user steps to reset. Patients/caregivers felt the pen device was easy to use and the injection-feedback features reassured them that the full dose had been given. Overall, 40 (70% HCPs and 16 (52% patients/caregivers were likely to recommend or request the pen device. Moreover, patients/caregivers rated the pen device higher than their current reusable pens and almost equal to the leading disposable device for ease of learning, preparation, administration and ease of use.Conclusion: The prototype pen device successfully met its design

  4. Can the usage of human growth hormones affect facial appearance and the accuracy of face recognition systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jake; Martin, Michael; Bourlai, Thirimachos

    2014-06-01

    In law enforcement and security applications, the acquisition of face images is critical in producing key trace evidence for the successful identification of potential threats. The goal of the study is to demonstrate that steroid usage significantly affects human facial appearance and hence, the performance of commercial and academic face recognition (FR) algorithms. In this work, we evaluate the performance of state-of-the-art FR algorithms on two unique face image datasets of subjects before (gallery set) and after (probe set) steroid (or human growth hormone) usage. For the purpose of this study, datasets of 73 subjects were created from multiple sources found on the Internet, containing images of men and women before and after steroid usage. Next, we geometrically pre-processed all images of both face datasets. Then, we applied image restoration techniques on the same face datasets, and finally, we applied FR algorithms in order to match the pre-processed face images of our probe datasets against the face images of the gallery set. Experimental results demonstrate that only a specific set of FR algorithms obtain the most accurate results (in terms of the rank-1 identification rate). This is because there are several factors that influence the efficiency of face matchers including (i) the time lapse between the before and after image pre-processing and restoration face photos, (ii) the usage of different drugs (e.g. Dianabol, Winstrol, and Decabolan), (iii) the usage of different cameras to capture face images, and finally, (iv) the variability of standoff distance, illumination and other noise factors (e.g. motion noise). All of the previously mentioned complicated scenarios make clear that cross-scenario matching is a very challenging problem and, thus, further investigation is required.

  5. Parathyroid hormone-related protein is a hypertrophy factor for human mesangial cells: Implications for diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Arantxa; Romero, Montserrat; Izquierdo, Adriana; Troyano, Nuria; Arce, Yolanda; Ardura, Juan Antonio; Arenas, María Isabel; Bover, Jordi; Esbrit, Pedro; Bosch, Ricardo J

    2012-05-01

    Hypertrophy of human mesangial cells (HMC) is among the earliest characteristics in patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN). Recently, we observed the upregulation of parathyroid hormone (PTH)-related protein (PTHrP) in experimental DN, associated with renal hypertrophy. Herein, we first examined whether PTHrP was overexpressed in human DN, and next assessed the putative role of this protein on high glucose (HG)-induced HMC hypertrophy. As previously found in mice, kidneys from diabetic patients showed an increased tubular and glomerular immunostaining for PTHrP. In HMC, HG medium increased PTHrP protein expression associated with the development of hypertrophy as assessed by cell protein content. This effect was also induced by PTHrP(1-36). HG and PTHrP(1-36)-induced hypertrophy were associated with an increase in cyclin D1 and p27Kip1 protein expression, a decreased cyclin E expression, and the prevention of cyclin E/cdk2 complex activation. Both PTHrP neutralizing antiserum (α-PTHrP) and the PTH/PTHrP receptor antagonist (JB4250) were able to abolish HG induction of hypertrophy, the aforementioned changes in cell cycle proteins, and also TGF-β1 up-regulation. Moreover, the capability of both HG and PTHrP(1-36) to induce HMC hypertrophy was abolished by α-TGFβ1. These data show for the first time that PTHrP is upregulated in the kidney of patients with DN. Our findings also demonstrate that PTHrP acts as an important mediator of HG-induced HMC hypertrophy by modulating cell cycle regulatory proteins and TGF-β1. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Preparative alkaline urea gradient PAGE: application to purification of extraordinarily-stable disulfide-linked homodimer of human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorian, Alexei L; Bustamante, Juan J; Muñoz, Jesus; Aguilar, Roberto M; Martinez, Andrew O; Haro, Luis S

    2007-11-01

    The 40-60 pituitary human growth hormone (hGH) isoforms are so similar in their physico-chemical properties (charge, size, hydrophobicity) that the limited resolutions of chromatographic separation methodologies have not permitted most of them to be isolated. However, application of high-resolution preparative alkaline urea gradient PAGE has facilitated isolation of a disulfide-linked mercaptoethanol-resistant (MER) 45 kDa hGH dimer. Human pituitary extracts were separated by Sephadex G-100 chromatography under alkaline conditions. Pooled fractions containing MER-45 kDa hGH, as determined by SDS-PAGE, were then separated by Sephadex G-100 chromatography under acidic conditions followed by diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) anion-exchange chromatography. Pooled DEAE fractions containing MER-45 kDa hGH and other hGH isoforms were then separated by preparative electrophoresis in an alkaline polyacrylamide gradient (5-20%) slab gel containing 8 M urea into five distinct protein zones. One electroeluted zone contained pure MER-45 kDa hGH. The dimeric hGH isoform was immunoreactive at low concentrations (effective dose to produce 50% response (ED(50)) +/- S.E. = 58 +/- 5.00 pM) in a hGH radioimmunoassay, similar to that of standard monomeric hGH (ED(50) +/- S.E. = 22.93 +/- 3.90 pM), indicating that is was conformationally intact. Alkaline urea gradient PAGE is a valuable tool for preparative separation of structurally similar proteins such as isoforms of the hGH family.

  7. Proteoglycans in Leiomyoma and Normal Myometrium: Abundance, Steroid Hormone Control, and Implications for Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Nichole M; Carrino, David A; Caplan, Arnold I; Hurd, William W; Liu, James H; Tan, Huiqing; Mesiano, Sam

    2016-03-01

    Uterine leiomyoma are a common benign pelvic tumors composed of modified smooth muscle cells and a large amount of extracellular matrix (ECM). The proteoglycan composition of the leiomyoma ECM is thought to affect pathophysiology of the disease. To test this hypothesis, we examined the abundance (by immunoblotting) and expression (by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction) of the proteoglycans biglycan, decorin, and versican in leiomyoma and normal myometrium and determined whether expression is affected by steroid hormones and menstrual phase. Leiomyoma and normal myometrium were collected from women (n = 17) undergoing hysterectomy or myomectomy. In vitro studies were performed on immortalized leiomyoma (UtLM) and normal myometrial (hTERT-HM) cells with and without exposure to estradiol and progesterone. In leiomyoma tissue, abundance of decorin messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein were 2.6-fold and 1.4-fold lower, respectively, compared with normal myometrium. Abundance of versican mRNA was not different between matched samples, whereas versican protein was increased 1.8-fold in leiomyoma compared with myometrium. Decorin mRNA was 2.4-fold lower in secretory phase leiomyoma compared with proliferative phase tissue. In UtLM cells, progesterone decreased the abundance of decorin mRNA by 1.3-fold. Lower decorin expression in leiomyoma compared with myometrium may contribute to disease growth and progression. As decorin inhibits the activity of specific growth factors, its reduced level in the leiomyoma cell microenvironment may promote cell proliferation and ECM deposition. Our data suggest that decorin expression in leiomyoma is inhibited by progesterone, which may be a mechanism by which the ovarian steroids affect leiomyoma growth and disease progression. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Plant Hormone Salicylic Acid Produced by a Malaria Parasite Controls Host Immunity and Cerebral Malaria Outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuma Matsubara

    Full Text Available The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii produces the plant hormone abscisic acid, but it is unclear if phytohormones are produced by the malaria parasite Plasmodium spp., the most important parasite of this phylum. Here, we report detection of salicylic acid, an immune-related phytohormone of land plants, in P. berghei ANKA and T. gondii cell lysates. However, addition of salicylic acid to P. falciparum and T. gondii culture had no effect. We transfected P. falciparum 3D7 with the nahG gene, which encodes a salicylic acid-degrading enzyme isolated from plant-infecting Pseudomonas sp., and established a salicylic acid-deficient mutant. The mutant had a significantly decreased concentration of parasite-synthesized prostaglandin E2, which potentially modulates host immunity as an adaptive evolution of Plasmodium spp. To investigate the function of salicylic acid and prostaglandin E2 on host immunity, we established P. berghei ANKA mutants expressing nahG. C57BL/6 mice infected with nahG transfectants developed enhanced cerebral malaria, as assessed by Evans blue leakage and brain histological observation. The nahG-transfectant also significantly increased the mortality rate of mice. Prostaglandin E2 reduced the brain symptoms by induction of T helper-2 cytokines. As expected, T helper-1 cytokines including interferon-γ and interleukin-2 were significantly elevated by infection with the nahG transfectant. Thus, salicylic acid of Plasmodium spp. may be a new pathogenic factor of this threatening parasite and may modulate immune function via parasite-produced prostaglandin E2.

  9. Social Bots: Human-Like by Means of Human Control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimme, Christian; Preuss, Mike; Adam, Lena; Trautmann, Heike

    2017-12-01

    Social bots are currently regarded an influential but also somewhat mysterious factor in public discourse and opinion making. They are considered to be capable of massively distributing propaganda in social and online media, and their application is even suspected to be partly responsible for recent election results. Astonishingly, the term social bot is not well defined and different scientific disciplines use divergent definitions. This work starts with a balanced definition attempt, before providing an overview of how social bots actually work (taking the example of Twitter) and what their current technical limitations are. Despite recent research progress in Deep Learning and Big Data, there are many activities bots cannot handle well. We then discuss how bot capabilities can be extended and controlled by integrating humans into the process and reason that this is currently the most promising way to realize meaningful interactions with other humans. This finally leads to the conclusion that hybridization is a challenge for current detection mechanisms and has to be handled with more sophisticated approaches to identify political propaganda distributed with social bots.

  10. Gender of pediatric recombinant human growth hormone recipients in the United States and globally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimberg, Adda; Stewart, Elizabeth; Wajnrajch, Michael P

    2008-06-01

    Gender disparities were found in reports of early pediatric recombinant human GH (rhGH) use in the United States. With rhGH entering its third decade, we sought to examine U.S. gender-based treatment patterns and how these patterns compare with that of other countries. All children entered in the Pfizer International Growth Study, a database designed to document long-term outcomes and safety of Genotropin (Pfizer, New York, NY), were categorized by gender, location, date and age of therapy initiation, and diagnosis. Measures of national health status, health care expenditure, general economic indices, and mean adult heights were also compared. Throughout the past 20 yr, the United States had an almost 2:1 male to female ratio overall. The gender ratio depended on the specific indication and age. There was no consistent relation to geographical region, pediatric population size, or density of pediatric endocrinologists. Male predominance was seen in Asia (mostly Japan), the United States, and Europe/Australia/New Zealand (65, 64, and 55%, respectively), but not the rest of the world (47%), where rhGH was prescribed less frequently. In the countries with the greatest rhGH use, the gender ratios depended on the specific indications but did not correlate with mean adult height, national health care measures, or general economic indices. Male predominance among U.S. pediatric rhGH recipients persists, especially for indications without a clear organic etiology. Global differences in gender ratios suggest that factors other than biology are at play. We speculate that social and cultural pressures and the health care systems' permissiveness toward paying for rhGH therapy contribute to these international differences.

  11. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)--a precursor steroid or an active hormone in human physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traish, Abdulmaged M; Kang, H Paco; Saad, Farid; Guay, Andre T

    2011-11-01

    The circulation of large amounts of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfated derivative (DHEA-S) suggests a physiological role in human physiology. In the central nervous system, DHEA is considered a neurosteroid with a wide range of functions. The goal of this review is to discuss metabolism, biochemical, and physiological mechanism of DHEA action and the potential role of DHEA in aging and in ameliorating a host of pathological conditions, associated with aging. We examined preclinical and clinical data reported in various studies from the available literature concerning the effects of DHEA in normal and pathological conditions. Data reported in the literature were analyzed, reviewed, and discussed. DHEA mediates its action via multiple signaling pathways involving specific membrane receptors and via transformation into androgen and estrogen derivatives (e.g., androgens, estrogens, 7α and 7β DHEA, and 7α and 7β epiandrosterone derivatives) acting through their specific receptors. These pathways include: nitric oxide synthase activation, modulation of γ-amino butyric acid receptors, N-methyl D-aspartate, receptors sigma receptors (Sigma-1), differential expression of inflammatory factors, adhesion molecules and reactive oxygen species, among others. Clinical and epidemiological studies suggested that low DHEA levels might be associated with ischemic heart disease, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis, bone loss, inflammatory diseases, and sexual dysfunction. Most importantly, no significant adverse or negative side effects of DHEA were reported in clinical studies of men and women. DHEA modulates endothelial function, reduces inflammation, improves insulin sensitivity, blood flow, cellular immunity, body composition, bone metabolism, sexual function, and physical strength in frailty and provides neuroprotection, improves cognitive function, and memory enhancement. DHEA possesses pleiotropic effects and reduced levels of DHEA and DHEA-S may be

  12. Hormone and growth interactions of scions and size-controlling rootstocks of young apple trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Size-controlling rootstocks are critical to grow small, efficient trees that enable early and high yield in high-density plantings of apple. Improved knowledge of scion and rootstock-related processes associated with size-control can be an important factor in rootstock breeding and cultural practic...

  13. The single dose pharmacokinetic profile of a novel oral human parathyroid hormone formulation in healthy postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämmerle, Sibylle P; Mindeholm, Linda; Launonen, Aino; Kiese, Beate; Loeffler, Rolf; Harfst, Evita; Azria, Moise; Arnold, Michel; John, Markus R

    2012-04-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH), currently the only marketed anabolic treatment for osteoporosis, is available as the full-length hormone, human PTH1-84, or as the human PTH1-34 fragment (teriparatide). Both must be administered as a daily subcutaneous (sc) injection. A new oral formulation of human PTH1-34 (PTH134) is being developed as a more convenient option for patients. In this single-center, partially-blinded, incomplete cross-over study, the safety, tolerability, and exposure of oral PTH134 (teriparatide combined with 2 different quantities of the absorption enhancer 5-CNAC) were assessed in 32 healthy postmenopausal women. 16 subjects were randomized to receive 4 single doses out of 6 different treatments: placebo, teriparatide 20 μg sc, or 1, 2.5, 5 or 10 mg of oral PTH134 formulated with 200 mg 5-CNAC. Subsequently, another 16 subjects were randomized to receive 4 out of 6 different treatments: placebo, teriparatide 20 μg sc, or 2.5 or 5 mg of oral PTH134 formulated with either 100 or 200 mg 5-CNAC. Doses were given ≥6 days apart. All doses of PTH134 were rapidly absorbed, and showed robust blood concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, PTH1-34 disappeared from blood faster after oral than after sc administration. Specifically, 2.5 and 5 mg PTH134 (containing 200 mg 5-CNAC) demonstrated Cmax and AUC0-last values closest to those of sc teriparatide 20 μg (Forsteo®). Mean+/-SD hPTH134 Cmax values were, respectively, 74+/-59, 138+/-101, 717+/-496, and 1624+/-1579 pg/mL for 1, 2.5, 5, and 10 mg doses of this peptide administered with 200 mg 5-CNAC; while mean+/-SD AUC (0-last) values were, respectively, 30+/-40, 62+/-69, 320+/-269, and 627+/-633 h*pg/mL. The corresponding estimates for teriparatide 20 μg sc were 149+/-35 for Cmax and 236+/-58 for AUC (0-last) Ionized calcium remained within normal limits in all treatment groups except for 3 isolated events. Nine subjects withdrew due to treatment-related AEs. Of those, seven were taking PTH

  14. Risk of hormone escape in a human prostate cancer model depends on therapy modalities and can be reduced by tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Guyader

    Full Text Available Almost all prostate cancers respond to androgen deprivation treatment but many recur. We postulated that risk of hormone escape--frequency and delay--are influenced by hormone therapy modalities. More, hormone therapies induce crucial biological changes involving androgen receptors; some might be targets for escape prevention. We investigated the relationship between the androgen deprivation treatment and the risk of recurrence using nude mice bearing the high grade, hormone-dependent human prostate cancer xenograft PAC120. Tumor-bearing mice were treated by Luteinizing-Hormone Releasing Hormone (LHRH antagonist alone, continuous or intermittent regimen, or combined with androgen receptor (AR antagonists (bicalutamide or flutamide. Tumor growth was monitored. Biological changes were studied as for genomic alterations, AR mutations and protein expression in a large series of recurrent tumors according to hormone therapy modalities. Therapies targeting Her-2 or AKT were tested in combination with castration. All statistical tests were two-sided. Tumor growth was inhibited by continuous administration of the LH-RH antagonist degarelix (castration, but 40% of tumors recurred. Intermittent castration or complete blockade induced by degarelix and antiandrogens combination, inhibited tumor growth but increased the risk of recurrence (RR as compared to continuous castration (RR(intermittent: 14.5, RR(complete blockade: 6.5 and 1.35. All recurrent tumors displayed new quantitative genetic alterations and AR mutations, whatever the treatment modalities. AR amplification was found after complete blockade. Increased expression of Her-2/neu with frequent ERK/AKT activation was detected in all variants. Combination of castration with a Her-2/neu inhibitor decreased recurrence risk (0.17 and combination with an mTOR inhibitor prevented it. Anti-hormone treatments influence risk of recurrence although tumor growth inhibition was initially similar. Recurrent

  15. Azithromycin is able to control Toxoplasma gondii infection in human villous explants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Although Toxoplasma gondii infection is normally asymptomatic, severe cases of toxoplasmosis may occur in immunosuppressed patients or congenitally infected newborns. When a fetal infection is established, the recommended treatment is a combination of pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine and folinic acid (PSA). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of azithromycin to control T. gondii infection in human villous explants. Methods Cultures of third trimester human villous explants were infected with T. gondii and simultaneously treated with either PSA or azithromycin. Proliferation of T. gondii, as well as production of cytokines and hormones by chorionic villous explants, was analyzed. Results Treatment with either azithromycin or PSA was able to control T. gondii infection in villous explants. After azithromycin or PSA treatment, TNF-α, IL-17A or TGF-β1 levels secreted by infected villous explants did not present significant differences. However, PSA-treated villous explants had decreased levels of IL-10 and increased IL-12 levels, while treatment with azithromycin increased production of IL-6. Additionally, T. gondii-infected villous explants increased secretion of estradiol, progesterone and HCG + β, while treatments with azithromycin or PSA reduced secretion of these hormones concurrently with decrease of parasite load. Conclusions In conclusion, these results suggest that azithromycin may be defined as an effective alternative drug to control T. gondii infection at the fetal-maternal interface. PMID:24885122

  16. The relationship between boron, stress hormones and bone markers in humans of different ages, life style and health status

    OpenAIRE

    Chummun, Narain Harry

    2000-01-01

    Hormones (sex hormones, thyroxine, cortisol and parathyroid), cytokines (interleukins-1 and 2 and tumour necrosis factor), life style (exercise, smoking and reproductive history), nutrition (calcium, meat, vegetables, vitamin D, caffeine and alcohol) and diseases (diabetes mellitus, malabsorption and thyrotoxicosis) affect bone mass. The loss of calcium, phosphate and magnesium from bone makes it weaker which enhances the incidence of bone diseases such as osteoporosis and osteoarthritis and ...

  17. The dwarf phenotype in GH240B mice, haploinsufficient for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin, is caused by ectopic expression of recombinant human growth hormone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Nuytens

    Full Text Available Two knockout mouse models for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin (Nbea have been generated independently. Although both models have similar phenotypes, one striking difference is the dwarf phenotype observed in the heterozygous configuration of the GH240B model that is generated by the serendipitous insertion of a promoterless human growth hormone (hGH genomic fragment in the Nbea gene. In order to elucidate this discrepancy, the dwarfism present in this Nbea mouse model was investigated in detail. The growth deficiency in Nbea+/- mice coincided with an increased percentage of fat mass and a decrease in bone mineral density. Low but detectable levels of hGH were detected in the pituitary and hypothalamus of Nbea+/- mice but not in liver, hippocampus nor in serum. As a consequence, several members of the mouse growth hormone (mGH signaling cascade showed altered mRNA levels, including a reduction in growth hormone-releasing hormone mRNA in the hypothalamus. Moreover, somatotrope cells were less numerous in the pituitary of Nbea+/- mice and both contained and secreted significantly less mGH resulting in reduced levels of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1. These findings demonstrate that the random integration of the hGH transgene in this mouse model has not only inactivated Nbea but has also resulted in the tissue-specific expression of hGH causing a negative feedback loop, mGH hyposecretion and dwarfism.

  18. The anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) induces forkhead box L2 (FOXL2) expression in primary culture of human granulosa cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchi, Sandro; Marinaro, Federica; Xella, Susanna; Marsella, Tiziana; Tagliasacchi, Daniela; La Marca, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) and forkhead box L2 (FOXL2) are two pivotal genes expressed in human granulosa cells (hGCs) where both genes share similar inhibitory functions on activation and follicular growth in order to preserve the ovarian follicle reserve. Furthermore, AMH and FOXL2 contribute to inhibit steroidogenesis, decreasing or preventing the activation of gonadotrophin-dependent aromatase CYP19A1 cytochrome P450 family 19 subfamily A member 1 (CYP19A1). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the role of AMH in regulating the expression of FOXL2. Primary cultures of hGCs were treated with increasing concentrations of recombinant human AMH (rhAMH; range 10-100 ng/ml) for 3 h. Negative controls were performed using corresponding amounts of AMH vehicle. Total RNA or proteins were purified and quantified by spectrophotometry. FOXL2 and CYP19A1 gene expression, normalized by reference gene ribosomal protein S7 (RpS7), was evaluated by RT-qPCR. Each reaction was repeated in triplicate. Statistical analysis was performed. Extracted proteins were analyzed by immunoblot using anti-FOXL2 and anti-β-actin as primary antibodies. rhAMH treatments tested did not modulate the basal expression of aromatase CYP19A1 gene. rhAMH (50 ng/ml) was able to increase FOXL2 gene expression and its intracellular content. This study demonstrated the existence of an AMH-FOXL2 relationship in hGCs. AMH is capable of increasing both gene and protein expression of FOXL2. Because FOXL2 induces AMH transcription, these ovarian factors could be finely regulated by a positive feedback loop mechanism to preserve the ovarian follicle reserve.

  19. The gene encoding the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 is associated with schizophrenia in a Danish case-control sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demontis, Ditte; Nyegaard, Mette; Christensen, Jane H

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The MCHR1 gene encoding the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 is located on chromosome 22q13.2 and has previously been associated with schizophrenia in a study of cases and controls from the Faroe Islands and Scotland. Herein we report an association between variations in the MCHR...

  20. Effect of pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) single-nucleotide polymorphisms on the level and activity of PAPP-A and the hormone profile in fluid from normal human small antral follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøtkjær, Jane Alrø; Borgbo, Tanni; Kløverpris, Søren; Noer, Pernille Rimmer; Oxvig, Claus; Andersen, Claus Yding

    2016-12-01

    To reveal a possible relationship between two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in PAPP-A-1224 (rs7020782) and 327 (rs12375498)-and the level and activity of PAPP-A in follicular fluid (FF) of human small antral follicles, and to analyze the intrafollicular hormone levels. Laboratory investigation. University hospital. Fifty volunteer women who contributed a total of 210 samples of FF from normal small antral follicles. Genotyping and measurement of antigen levels of steroids, PAPP-A, stanniocalcin-2 (STC2), and antimüllerian hormone (AMH) plus activity of PAPP-A toward insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4). Measurement of PAPP-A levels and hormones with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and PAPP-A activity toward radiolabeled IGFBP-4. Women homozygous for the minor C allele of the 1224 SNP showed a statistically significantly lower level of PAPP-A protein and activity in FF compared with women carrying the major A allele. These women also displayed nonsignificant reduced levels of estradiol and increased levels of AMH and androgen. A statistically significant correlation between FF levels of PAPP-A activity and the molar ratio of PAPP-A/STC2 was obtained. The 327 SNP did not show statistically significant associations. This study presents a statistically significant effect of the 1224 SNP on the level and activity of PAPP-A in human follicles, suggesting that the FF level of bioactive insulin-like growth factor depends on the genotype. We observed STC2 to be an important regulator of PAPP-A in human FF. The 1224 SNP has previously been associated with recurrent pregnancy loss, so further evaluation of an underlying mechanism including aberrant control of insulin-like growth factor activity is warranted. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. High-fructose corn syrup and sucrose have equivalent effects on energy-regulating hormones at normal human consumption levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiping; Lowndes, Joshua; Rippe, James

    2013-12-01

    Intake of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) has been suggested to contribute to the increased prevalence of obesity, whereas a number of studies and organizations have reported metabolic equivalence between HFCS and sucrose. We hypothesized that HFCS and sucrose would have similar effects on energy-regulating hormones and metabolic substrates at normal levels of human consumption and that these values would not change over a 10-week, free-living period at these consumption levels. This was a randomized, prospective, double-blind, parallel group study in which 138 adult men and women consumed 10 weeks of low-fat milk sweetened with either HFCS or sucrose at levels of the 25th, 50th, and 90th percentile population consumption of fructose (the equivalent of 40, 90, or 150 g of sugar per day in a 2000-kcal diet). Before and after the 10-week intervention, 24-hour blood samples were collected. The area under the curve (AUC) for glucose, insulin, leptin, active ghrelin, triglyceride, and uric acid was measured. There were no group differences at baseline or posttesting for all outcomes (interaction, P > .05). The AUC response of glucose, active ghrelin, and uric acid did not change between baseline and posttesting (P > .05), whereas the AUC response of insulin (P < .05), leptin (P < .001), and triglyceride (P < .01) increased over the course of the intervention when the 6 groups were averaged. We conclude that there are no differences in the metabolic effects of HFCS and sucrose when compared at low, medium, and high levels of consumption. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Novel Long-Acting Human Growth Hormone Fusion Protein (VRS-317): Enhanced In Vivo Potency and Half-Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Jeffrey L; Geething, Nathan C; Moore, Jerome A; Rogers, Brian C; Spink, Benjamin J; Wang, Chai-Wei; Alters, Susan E; Stemmer, Willem P C; Schellenberger, Volker

    2012-01-01

    A novel recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) fusion protein (VRS-317) was designed to minimize receptor-mediated clearance through a reduction in receptor binding without mutations to rhGH by genetically fusing with XTEN amino acid sequences to the N-terminus and the C-terminus of the native hGH sequence. Although in vitro potency of VRS-317 was reduced approximately 12-fold compared with rhGH, in vivo potency was increased because of the greatly prolonged exposure to the target tissues and organs. VRS-317 was threefold more potent than daily rhGH in hypophysectomized rats and fivefold more potent than daily rhGH in juvenile monkeys. In juvenile monkeys, a monthly dose of 1.4 mg/kg VRS-317 (equivalent to 0.26 mg/kg rhGH) caused a sustained pharmacodynamic response for 1 month equivalent to 0.05 mg/kg/day rhGH (1.4 mg/kg rhGH total over 28 days). In monkeys, VRS-317, having a terminal elimination half-life of approximately 110 h, was rapidly and near-completely absorbed, and was well tolerated with no observed adverse effects after every alternate week subcutaneous dosing for 14 weeks. VRS-317 also did not cause lipoatrophy in pig and monkey studies. VRS-317 is currently being studied in GH-deficient patients to confirm the observations in these animal studies. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 101:2744–2754, 2012 PMID:22678811

  3. Recombinant human parathyroid hormone related protein 1-34 and 1-84 and their roles in osteoporosis treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wang

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a common disorder characterized by compromised bone strength that predisposes patients to increased fracture risk. Parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP is one of the candidates for clinical osteoporosis treatment. In this study, GST Gene Fusion System was used to express recombinant human PTHrP (hPTHrP 1-34 and 1-84. To determine whether the recombinant hPTHrP1-34 and 1-84 can enhance renal calcium reabsorption and promote bone formation, we examined effects of recombinant hPTHrP1-34 and 1-84 on osteogenic lineage commitment in a primary bone marrow cell culture system and on osteoporosis treatment. Results revealed that both of recombinant hPTHrP1-34 and 1-84 increased colony formation and osteogenic cell differentiation and mineralization in vitro; however, the effect of recombinant hPTHrP1-84 is a little stronger than that of hPTHrP1-34. Next, ovariectomy was used to construct osteoporosis animal model (OVX to test activities of these two recombinants in vivo. HPTHrP1-84 administration elevated serum calcium by up-regulating the expression of renal calcium transporters, which resulted in stimulation of osteoblastic bone formation. These factors contributed to augmented bone mass in hPTHrP1-84 treated OVX mice but did not affect bone resorption. There was no obvious bone mass alteration in hPTHrP1-34 treated OVX mice, which may be, at least partly, associated with shorter half-life of hPTHrP1-34 compared to hPTHrP1-84 in vivo. This study implies that recombinant hPTHrP1-84 is more effective than hPTHrP1-34 to enhance renal calcium reabsorption and to stimulate bone formation in vivo.

  4. Combination Effects of (TriAzole Fungicides on Hormone Production and Xenobiotic Metabolism in a Human Placental Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenja Rieke

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Consumers are exposed to multiple residues of different pesticides via the diet. Therefore, EU legislation for pesticides requires the evaluation of single active substances as well as the consideration of combination effects. Hence the analysis of combined effects of substances in a broad dose range represents a key challenge to current experimental and regulatory toxicology. Here we report evidence for additive effects for (triazole fungicides, a widely used group of antifungal agents, in the human placental cell line Jeg-3. In addition to the triazoles cyproconazole, epoxiconazole, flusilazole and tebuconazole and the azole fungicide prochloraz also pesticides from other chemical classes assumed to act via different modes of action (i.e., the organophosphate chlorpyrifos and the triazinylsulfonylurea herbicide triflusulfuron-methyl were investigated. Endpoints analysed include synthesis of steroid hormone production (progesterone and estradiol and gene expression of steroidogenic and non-steroidogenic cytochrome-P-450 (CYP enzymes. For the triazoles and prochloraz, a dose dependent inhibition of progesterone production was observed and additive effects could be confirmed for several combinations of these substances in vitro. The non-triazoles chlorpyrifos and triflusulfuron-methyl did not affect this endpoint and, in line with this finding, no additivity was observed when these substances were applied in mixtures with prochloraz. While prochloraz slightly increased aromatase expression and estradiol production and triflusulfuron-methyl decreased estradiol production, none of the other substances had effects on the expression levels of steroidogenic CYP-enzymes in Jeg-3 cells. For some triazoles, prochloraz and chlorpyrifos a significant induction of CYP1A1 mRNA expression and potential combination effects for this endpoint were observed. Inhibition of CYP1A1 mRNA induction by the AhR inhibitor CH223191 indicated AhR receptor dependence this

  5. Thiol-Disulfide Exchange in Peptides Derived from Human Growth Hormone during Lyophilization and Storage in the Solid State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Saradha; Topp, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Lyophilization (freeze-drying) is frequently used to stabilize protein therapeutics. However, covalent modifications such as thiol-disulfide exchange and disulfide scrambling can occur even in the solid state. The effects of lyophilization and storage of lyophilized powders on the mechanism and kinetics of thioldisulfide exchange have not been elucidated and are explored here. Reaction kinetics were monitored in peptides corresponding to tryptic fragments of human growth hormone (T20 + T20-T21 or T20 + cT20-T21) during different stages of lyophilization and during storage of the lyophilized powders at 22 °C and ambient RH. The concentrations of reactants and products were determined using RP-HPLC and product identity confirmed using LC-MS. Loss of native disulfide was observed for the reaction of T20 with both linear (T20-T21) and cyclic (cT20-T21) peptides during the primary drying step, however, the native disulfides were regenerated during secondary drying with no further change till the end of lyophilization. Deviations from Arrhenius parameters predicted from solution studies and the absence of buffer effects during lyophilization suggest that factors such as temperature, initial peptide concentration, buffer type and concentration do not influence thiol-disulfide exchange during lyophilization. Results from a ‘cold finger’ method used to study peptide adsorption to ice indicate that there is no preferential adsorption to the ice surface and that its presence may not influence disulfide reactivity during primary drying. Overall, reaction rates and product distribution differ for the reaction of T20 with T20-T21 or cT20-T21 in the solid state and aqueous solution, while the mechanism of thiol-disulfide remains unchanged. Increased reactivity of the cyclic peptide in the solid state suggests that peptide cyclization does not offer protection against lyophilization and that damage induced by a process stress further affects storage stability at 22 °C and

  6. New tools for chloroplast genetic engineering allow the synthesis of human growth hormone in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannathong, Thanyanan; Waterhouse, Janet C; Young, Rosanna E B; Economou, Chloe K; Purton, Saul

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the exploitation of microalgae in industrial biotechnology. Potentially, these phototrophic eukaryotes could be used for the low-cost synthesis of valuable recombinant products such as bioactive metabolites and therapeutic proteins. The algal chloroplast in particular represents an attractive target for such genetic engineering, both because it houses major metabolic pathways and because foreign genes can be targeted to specific loci within the chloroplast genome, resulting in high-level, stable expression. However, routine methods for chloroplast genetic engineering are currently available only for one species-Chlamydomonas reinhardtii-and even here, there are limitations to the existing technology, including the need for an expensive biolistic device for DNA delivery, the lack of robust expression vectors, and the undesirable use of antibiotic resistance markers. Here, we describe a new strain and vectors for targeted insertion of transgenes into a neutral chloroplast locus that (i) allow scar-less fusion of a transgenic coding sequence to the promoter/5'UTR element of the highly expressed endogenous genes psaA or atpA, (ii) employ the endogenous gene psbH as an effective but benign selectable marker, and (iii) ensure the successful integration of the transgene construct in all transformant lines. Transformation is achieved by a simple and cheap method of agitation of a DNA/cell suspension with glass beads, with selection based on the phototrophic rescue of a cell wall-deficient ΔpsbH strain. We demonstrate the utility of these tools in the creation of a transgenic line that produces high levels of functional human growth hormone.

  7. Epidermal growth factor and human growth hormone induce two sodium-dependent arginine transport systems after massive enterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannoli, P; Miller, J H; Sax, H C

    1998-01-01

    A combination of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and human growth hormone (hGH) after massive enterectomy induces a 400% increase in arginine transport in the remnant distal small intestine. The kinetic mechanism(s) responsible for enhanced arginine transport under these conditions is unknown. New Zealand White rabbits underwent 70% midjejunoileal resection. After a 1-week recovery period, animals received hGH (0.2 mg/kg/d IM), EGF (1.5 microg/kg/h SC), hGH + EGF, or vehicle (equal volume) for 7 days. Transport of tritiated arginine into brush border membrane vesicles prepared from distal remnant small intestinal mucosa was quantified in the presence and absence of a sodium gradient over a range of arginine concentrations (25 to 5000 micromol/L). Eadie-Hofstee transformation of the kinetic data demonstrates two sodium-dependent arginine transport systems, comprising a high-capacity, low-affinity system and a low-capacity, high-affinity system. A combination of EGF and hGH significantly upregulates both the high-capacity (685%) and low-capacity (350%) maximum transport velocity (Vmax). Additionally, EGF alone significantly upregulates Vmax by 200% in the low-capacity system. There were no significant changes in transport affinity (Km) in either system. There are two quiescent sodium-dependent arginine transport systems in the distal small intestine. A combination of EGF and hGH after massive enterectomy increase arginine transport by Vmax upregulation in both the high-capacity/low-affinity and low-capacity/high-affinity systems.

  8. Effect of recombinant human growth hormone on intestinal absorption and body composition in children with short bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet, Olivier; Dabbas-Tyan, Myriam; Talbotec, Cécile; Kapel, Nathalie; Rosilio, Myriam; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Corriol, Odile; Ricour, Claude; Colomb, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    This prospective study aimed to establish the effect of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on intestinal function in children with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Eight children with neonatal SBS were included. All were dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN) for >3 years (range, 3.8-11.6 years), with PN providing >50% of recommended dietary allowance for age (range, 50%-65%). The subjects received rhGH (Humatrope) 0.13 mg/kg/d subcutaneously over a 12-week period. The follow-up was continued over a 12-month period after rhGH discontinuation. Clinical and biological assessments were performed at baseline, at the end of the treatment period, and 12 months after the end of treatment. No side effects related to rhGH were observed. PN requirements were decreased in all children during the course of rhGH treatment. Between baseline and the end of treatment, significant increases were observed in concentrations (mean ± standard deviation) of serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (103.1 ± 49.9 µg/L vs 153.5 ± 82.2 µg/L; P children to be maintained on PN or restarted after discontinuation of rhGH treatment, and they remained on PN until the end of the follow-up period. A 12-week high-dose rhGH treatment allowed patients to decrease PN, but only 2 patients could be definitively weaned from PN. Indications and cost-effectiveness of rhGH treatment for SBS pediatric patients need further evaluation.

  9. Rapid and sensitive analysis of phthalate metabolites, bisphenol A, and endogenous steroid hormones in human urine by mixed-mode solid-phase extraction, dansylation, and ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He-xing; Wang, Bin; Zhou, Ying; Jiang, Qing-wu

    2013-05-01

    Steroid hormone levels in human urine are convenient and sensitive indicators for the impact of phthalates and/or bisphenol A (BPA) exposure on the human steroid hormone endocrine system. In this study, a rapid and sensitive method for determination of 14 phthalate metabolites, BPA, and ten endogenous steroid hormones in urine was developed and validated on the basis of ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. The optimized mixed-mode solid phase-extraction separated the weakly acidic or neutral BPA and steroid hormones from acidic phthalate metabolites in urine: the former were determined in positive ion mode with a methanol/water mobile phase containing 10 mM ammonium formate; the latter were determined in negative ion mode with a acetonitrile/water mobile phase containing 0.1 % acetic acid, which significantly alleviated matrix effects for the analysis of BPA and steroid hormones. Dansylation of estrogens and BPA realized simultaneous and sensitive analysis of the endogenous steroid hormones and BPA in a single chromatographic run. The limits of detection were less than 0.84 ng/mL for phthalate metabolites and less than 0.22 ng/mL for endogenous steroid hormones and BPA. This proposed method had satisfactory precision and accuracy, and was successfully applied to the analyses of human urine samples. This method could be valuable when investigating the associations among endocrine-disrupting chemicals, endogenous steroid hormones, and relevant adverse outcomes in epidemiological studies.

  10. Sympathetic control of metabolic and hormonal responses to exercise in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galbo, H; Richter, Erik; Christensen, N J

    1978-01-01

    with 6-hydroxydopamine or shamtreated. Two weeks later the rats had either rabbit-antiglucagon serum or normal rabbit serum injected. Subsequently the rats either rested or swam with a tail weight for 75 min. Immediately afterwards cardiac blood was drawn and liver and muscle tissue collected. In control...... rats in spite of an increase in blood glucose concentrati4ns during exercise plasma insulin concentrations were unchanged, while glucagon concentrations increased. In sympathectomized rats, compared to control rats, glucagon concentrations increased less, and insulin concentrations were higher...

  11. Influence of thyroid hormones on biochemical parameters of liver function: a case-control study in North Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayashree Bhattacharjee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal level of thyroid hormones is important for normal hepatic function and thyroid dysfunction may modulate metabolic function of liver. The purpose of this study is to determine whether liver function is associated with subclinical and overt hypothyroidism. Thyroid and liver function tests were evaluated in 47 patients with overt (TSH ≥10.0 mIU/L and 77 patients with subclinical hypothyroidism (TSH 6.0-9.9mIU/L and compared with 120 age-matched euthyroid controls. Subjects with overt hypothyroidism had significantly raised serum ALT, AST, ALP and total protein levels as compared to controls whereas subclinical hypothyroid patients had significantly increased levels of serum ALT, ALP and total protein. Further, TSH showed significant positive correlation with AST and ALP values whereas fT3 and fT4 had a negative correlation with AST in overt hypothyroidism. Thus, overt hypothyroid state is associated with significant derangement in biochemical parameters of liver function. Hence, liver function should be regularly monitored in hypothyroid patients.

  12. Physiological control of pituitary hormone secretory-burst mass, frequency, and waveform: a statistical formulation and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Daniel M; Roelfsema, Ferdinand; Biermasz, Nienke; Veldhuis, Johannes D

    2003-09-01

    The present study investigates the time-varying control of pituitary hormone secretion over the day and night (D/N). To this end, we implemented an analytical platform designed to reconstruct simultaneously 1) basal (nonpulsatile) secretion, 2) single or dual secretory-burst waveforms, 3) random effects on burst amplitude, 4) stochastic pulse-renewal properties, 5) biexponential elimination kinetics, and 6) experimental uncertainty. The statistical solution is conditioned on a priori pulse-onset times, which are estimated in the first stage. Primary data composed of thyrotropin (TSH) concentrations were monitored over 24 h in 27 healthy adults. According to statistical criteria, 21/27 profiles favored a dual compared with single secretory-burst waveform. An objectively defined waveform change point (D/N boundary) emerged at 2046 (+/-23 min), after which 1) the mass of TSH released per burst increases by 2.1-fold (P process. Further studies will be required to assess the generality of the foregoing distinctive control mechanisms in other hypothalamo-pituitary axes.

  13. Hormonal, functional and genetic biomarkers in controlled ovarian stimulation: tools for matching patients and protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alviggi, Carlo; Humaidan, Peter; Ezcurra, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Variability in the subfertile patient population excludes the possibility of a single approach to controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) covering all the requirements of a patient. Modern technology has led to the development of new drugs, treatment options and quantitative methods that can identif...

  14. Pegylated Long-Acting Human Growth Hormone Possesses a Promising Once-Weekly Treatment Profile, and Multiple Dosing Is Well Tolerated in Adult Patients with Growth Hormone Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Esben; Klose, Marianne; Hansen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    Background: Recombinant human GH (rhGH) replacement therapy in children and adults currently requires daily sc injections for several years or lifelong, which may be both inconvenient and distressing for patients. NNC126-0083 is a pegylated rhGH developed for once-weekly administration. Objectives...

  15. Pegylated Long-Acting Human Growth Hormone Possesses a Promising Once-Weekly Treatment Profile, and Multiple Dosing Is Well Tolerated in Adult Patients with Growth Hormone Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Esben; Klose, Marianne Christina; Hansen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    Background: Recombinant human GH (rhGH) replacement therapy in children and adults currently requires daily sc injections for several years or lifelong, which may be both inconvenient and distressing for patients. NNC126-0083 is a pegylated rhGH developed for once-weekly administration. Objective...

  16. Growth hormone response to growth hormone-releasing peptide-2 in growth hormone-deficient Little mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroni, Cibele N.; Hayashida, Cesar Y.; Nascimento, Nancy; Longuini, Viviane C.; Toledo, Rodrigo A.; Bartolini, Paolo; Bowers, Cyril Y.; Toledo, Sergio P.A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate a possible direct, growth hormone-releasing, hormone-independent action of a growth hormone secretagogue, GHRP-2, in pituitary somatotroph cells in the presence of inactive growth hormone-releasing hormone receptors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The responses of serum growth hormone to acutely injected growth hormone-releasing P-2 in lit/lit mice, which represent a model of GH deficiency arising from mutated growth hormone-releasing hormone-receptors, were compared to those observed in the heterozygous (lit/+) littermates and wild-type (+/+) C57BL/6J mice. RESULTS: After the administration of 10 mcg of growth hormone-releasing P-2 to lit/lit mice, a growth hormone release of 9.3±1.5 ng/ml was observed compared with 1.04±1.15 ng/ml in controls (pgrowth hormone release of 34.5±9.7 ng/ml and a higher growth hormone release of 163±46 ng/ml were induced in the lit/+ mice and wild-type mice, respectively. Thus, GHRP-2 stimulated growth hormone in the lit/lit mice, and the release of growth hormone in vivo may be only partially dependent on growth hormone-releasing hormone. Additionally, the plasma leptin and ghrelin levels were evaluated in the lit/lit mice under basal and stimulated conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Here, we have demonstrated that lit/lit mice, which harbor a germline mutation in the Growth hormone-releasing hormone gene, maintain a limited but statistically significant growth hormone elevation after exogenous stimulation with GHRP-2. The present data probably reflect a direct, growth hormone-independent effect on Growth hormone S (ghrelin) stimulation in the remaining pituitary somatotrophs of little mice that is mediated by growth hormone S-R 1a. PMID:22473409

  17. Vitamin D3 Decreases Parathyroid Hormone in HIV-Infected Youth Being Treated With Tenofovir: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephensen, Charles B.; Hazra, Rohan; Flynn, Patricia M.; Wilson, Craig M.; Rutledge, Brandy; Bethel, James; Pan, Cynthia G.; Woodhouse, Leslie R.; Van Loan, Marta D.; Liu, Nancy; Lujan-Zilbermann, Jorge; Baker, Alyne; Kapogiannis, Bill G.; Mulligan, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Background. The study goal was to determine the effect of vitamin D (VITD) supplementation on tubular reabsorption of phosphate (TRP), parathyroid hormone (PTH), bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), and C-telopeptide (CTX) in youth infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) receiving and not receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) containing tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF). Methods. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial enrolled HIV-infected youth 18–25 years based on stable treatment with cART containing TDF (n = 118) or no TDF (noTDF; n = 85), and randomized within those groups to vitamin D3, 50 000 IU (n = 102) or placebo (n = 101), administered at 0, 4, and 8 weeks. Outcomes included change in TRP, PTH, BAP, and CTX from baseline to week 12 by TDF/noTDF; and VITD/placebo. Results. At baseline, VITD and placebo groups were similar except those on TDF had lower TRP and higher PTH and CTX. At week 12, 95% in the VITD group had sufficient serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-OHD; ≥20 ng/mL), increased from 48% at baseline, without change in placebo (P vitamin D3 supplementation decreased PTH, regardless of baseline 25-OHD concentration. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00490412. PMID:22267714

  18. Successful induction of sclerostin in human-derived fibroblasts by 4 transcription factors and its regulation by parathyroid hormone, hypoxia, and prostaglandin E2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Makoto; Kubota, Takuo; Wang, Wei; Ohata, Yasuhisa; Miura, Kohji; Kitaoka, Taichi; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Namba, Noriyuki; Michigami, Toshimi; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-04-01

    Sclerostin, coded by SOST, is a secretory protein that is specifically expressed in osteocytes and suppresses osteogenesis by inhibiting WNT signaling. The regulatory mechanism underlying SOST expression remains unclear mainly due to the absence of an adequate human cell model. Thus, we herein attempted to establish a cell model of human dermal fibroblasts in order to investigate the functions of sclerostin. We selected 20 candidate transcription factors (TFs) that induce SOST expression by analyzing gene expression patterns in the human sarcoma cell line, SaOS-2, between differentiation and maintenance cultures using microarrays. An effective set of TFs to induce SOST expression was sought by their viral transduction into fibroblasts, and a combination of four TFs: ATF3, KLF4, PAX4, and SP7, was identified as the most effective inducer of SOST expression. Quantitative PCR demonstrated that the expression levels of SOST in fibroblasts treated with the 4 TFs were 199- and 1439-fold higher than those of the control after 1-week and 4-week cultures, respectively. The level of sclerostin in the conditioned medium, as determined by ELISA, was 21.2pmol/l 4weeks after the transduction of the 4 TFs. Interestingly, the production of Dickkopf1 (DKK1), another secreted inhibitor of WNT signaling, was also increased by transduction of these 4 TFs. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) significantly suppressed the induced SOST by 38% and sclerostin by 82% that of the vehicle. Hypoxia increased the induced SOST by 62% that of normoxia. Furthermore, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increased SOST expression levels to 16-fold those of the vehicle. In conclusion, the efficient induction of SOST expression and sclerostin production was achieved in human dermal fibroblasts by the transduction of ATF3, KLF4, PAX4, and SP7, and the induced SOST and sclerostin were regulated by PTH, hypoxia, and PGE2. This model may contribute to elucidating the regulatory mechanisms underlying SOST expression and advancing

  19. Concentrations of prealbumin and some appetite-controlling hormones in pregnancies associated with hyperemesis gravidarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Gulfer; Ozgu-Erdinc, A Seval; Ucar, Fatma; Ginis, Zeynep; Erden, Gonul; Danisman, Nuri

    2017-03-01

    Background Hyperemesis gravidarum, which affects 0.3-2.3% of pregnancies, is defined as excessive vomiting during pregnancy and usually starts in week 4 or 5 of gestation. Symptoms include weight loss, dehydration, ketonaemia, ketonuria, fasting acidosis, alkalosis due to hydrochloric acid loss and hypokalaemia and its exact cause is unknown. The present study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between prealbumin, ghrelin, nesfatin-1 and obestatin concentrations in pregnancies associated with hyperemesis gravidarum. Methods A total of 40 pregnant females with hyperemesis gravidarum and 38 pregnant females without hyperemesis gravidarum as controls were included in this study. Serum concentrations of prealbumin, ghrelin, obestatin and nesfatin-1 were measured. Results There were no significant differences in age, gestational week, gravidity and parity between the two groups. Body mass index was significantly lower in cases than in controls. Serum ghrelin and prealbumin concentrations were significantly lower in cases than in controls ( P  hyperemesis gravidarum. Conclusions Decreased serum concentrations of ghrelin and prealbumin in patients with hyperemesis gravidarum are independent of body mass index. Based on our results, we believe that ghrelin may be considered to play a role in the aetiopathogenesis of hyperemesis gravidarum and that hyperemesis gravidarum may result in disruption of the relationship between nesfatin-1 and ghrelin. In addition, we believe that the measurement of serum prealbumin may be used for assessing nutritional status in pregnancy.

  20. Modeling Canadian Quality Control Test Program for Steroid Hormone Receptors in Breast Cancer: Diagnostic Accuracy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Teresa; Makrestsov, Nikita; Garatt, John; Torlakovic, Emina; Gilks, C Blake; Mallett, Susan

    The Canadian Immunohistochemistry Quality Control program monitors clinical laboratory performance for estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor tests used in breast cancer treatment management in Canada. Current methods assess sensitivity and specificity at each time point, compared with a reference standard. We investigate alternative performance analysis methods to enhance the quality assessment. We used 3 methods of analysis: meta-analysis of sensitivity and specificity of each laboratory across all time points; sensitivity and specificity at each time point for each laboratory; and fitting models for repeated measurements to examine differences between laboratories adjusted by test and time point. Results show 88 laboratories participated in quality control at up to 13 time points using typically 37 to 54 histology samples. In meta-analysis across all time points no laboratories have sensitivity or specificity below 80%. Current methods, presenting sensitivity and specificity separately for each run, r